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Sample records for cmos compatible magnetometers

  1. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Justin A.; Naik, Gururaj V.; Petach, Trevor A.; Baum, Brian K.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  2. CMOS-compatible RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakamraju, Narendra V.; Kim, Bruce; Phillips, Stephen M.

    2004-08-01

    Mobile technologies have relied on RF switches for a long time. Though the basic function of the switch has remained the same, the way they have been made has changed in the recent past. In the past few years work has been done to use MEMS technologies in designing and fabricating an RF switch that would in many ways replace the electronic and mechanical switches that have been used for so long. The work that is described here is an attempt to design and fabricate an RF MEMS switch that can handle higher RF power and have CMOS compatible operating voltages.

  3. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  4. Aluminum nitride on titanium for CMOS compatible piezoelectric transducers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C; Petzold, Bryan C; Ninan, Biju; Mullapudi, Ravi; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used for microscale sensors and actuators but can pose material compatibility challenges. This paper reports a post-CMOS compatible fabrication process for piezoelectric sensors and actuators on silicon using only standard CMOS metals. The piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited on titanium (Ti) by reactive sputtering are characterized and microcantilever actuators are demonstrated. The film texture of the polycrystalline Ti and AlN films is improved by removing the native oxide from the silicon substrate in situ and sequentially depositing the films under vacuum to provide a uniform growth surface. The piezoelectric properties for several AlN film thicknesses are measured using laser doppler vibrometry on unpatterned wafers and released cantilever beams. The film structure and properties are shown to vary with thickness, with values of d33f, d31 and d33 of up to 2.9, −1.9 and 6.5 pm V−1, respectively. These values are comparable with AlN deposited on a Pt metal electrode, but with the benefit of a fabrication process that uses only standard CMOS metals. PMID:20333316

  5. Aluminum nitride on titanium for CMOS compatible piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Joseph C.; Petzold, Bryan C.; Ninan, Biju; Mullapudi, Ravi; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-02-01

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used for microscale sensors and actuators but can pose material compatibility challenges. This paper reports a post-CMOS compatible fabrication process for piezoelectric sensors and actuators on silicon using only standard CMOS metals. The piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited on titanium (Ti) by reactive sputtering are characterized and microcantilever actuators are demonstrated. The film texture of the polycrystalline Ti and AlN films is improved by removing the native oxide from the silicon substrate in situ and sequentially depositing the films under vacuum to provide a uniform growth surface. The piezoelectric properties for several AlN film thicknesses are measured using laser doppler vibrometry on unpatterned wafers and released cantilever beams. The film structure and properties are shown to vary with thickness, with values of d33f, d31 and d33 of up to 2.9, -1.9 and 6.5 pm V-1, respectively. These values are comparable with AlN deposited on a Pt metal electrode, but with the benefit of a fabrication process that uses only standard CMOS metals.

  6. CMOS-compatible graphene photodetector covering all optical communication bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Humer, Markus; Furchi, Marco M.; Bachmann, Dominic; Guider, Romain; Fromherz, Thomas; Mueller, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Optical interconnects are becoming attractive alternatives to electrical wiring in intra- and interchip communication links. Particularly, the integration with silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology has received considerable interest because of the ability of cost-effective integration of electronics and optics on a single chip. Although silicon enables the realization of optical waveguides and passive components, the integration of another, optically absorbing, material is required for photodetection. Traditionally, germanium or compound semiconductors are used for this purpose; however, their integration with silicon technology faces major challenges. Recently, graphene emerged as a viable alternative for optoelectronic applications, including photodetection. Here, we demonstrate an ultra-wideband CMOS-compatible photodetector based on graphene. We achieved a multigigahertz operation over all fibre-optic telecommunication bands beyond the wavelength range of strained germanium photodetectors, the responsivity of which is limited by their bandgap. Our work complements the recent demonstration of a CMOS-integrated graphene electro-optical modulator, and paves the way for carbon-based optical interconnects.

  7. Label-free immunodetection with CMOS-compatible semiconducting nanowires.

    PubMed

    Stern, Eric; Klemic, James F; Routenberg, David A; Wyrembak, Pauline N; Turner-Evans, Daniel B; Hamilton, Andrew D; LaVan, David A; Fahmy, Tarek M; Reed, Mark A

    2007-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires have the potential to function as highly sensitive and selective sensors for the label-free detection of low concentrations of pathogenic microorganisms. Successful solution-phase nanowire sensing has been demonstrated for ions, small molecules, proteins, DNA and viruses; however, 'bottom-up' nanowires (or similarly configured carbon nanotubes) used for these demonstrations require hybrid fabrication schemes, which result in severe integration issues that have hindered widespread application. Alternative 'top-down' fabrication methods of nanowire-like devices produce disappointing performance because of process-induced material and device degradation. Here we report an approach that uses complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor compatible technology and hence demonstrate the specific label-free detection of below 100 femtomolar concentrations of antibodies as well as real-time monitoring of the cellular immune response. This approach eliminates the need for hybrid methods and enables system-scale integration of these sensors with signal processing and information systems. Additionally, the ability to monitor antibody binding and sense the cellular immune response in real time with readily available technology should facilitate widespread diagnostic applications. PMID:17268465

  8. MAGNETOMETER

    DOEpatents

    Leavitt, M.A.

    1958-11-18

    A magnetometer ls described, partlcularly to a device which accurately indicates the polarity and intensity of a magnetlc field. The main feature of the invention is a unique probe construction in combinatlon wlth a magnetic fleld detector system. The probe comprises two coils connected in series opposition for energization with an a-c voltage. The voltage lnduced in a third coll on the probe, a pick-up coil, is distorted by the presence of an external field to produce even harmonic voltages. A controlled d-c current is passed through the energized coils to counter the dlstortlon and reduce tbe even harmonic content to a null. When the null point is reached, the d-c current is a measure of the external magnetic field strength, and the phase of the pickup coil voltage indicates tbe field polarlty.

  9. Steps toward fabricating cryogenic CMOS compatible single electron devices for future qubits.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Childs, Kenton David; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Tracy, Lisa A.; Eng, Kevin; Stevens, Jeffrey; Nordberg, Eric; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Lilly, Michael Patrick

    2008-08-01

    We describe the development of a novel silicon quantum bit (qubit) device architecture that involves using materials that are compatible with a Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 0.35 mum complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process intended to operate at 100 mK. We describe how the qubit structure can be integrated with CMOS electronics, which is believed to have advantages for critical functions like fast single electron electrometry for readout compared to current approaches using radio frequency techniques. Critical materials properties are reviewed and preliminary characterization of the SNL CMOS devices at 4.2 K is presented.

  10. Top-down fabrication of fully CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire arrays and their integration into CMOS Inverters on plastic.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeongwon; Jeon, Youngin; Moon, Taeho; Kim, Sangsig

    2011-04-26

    A route to the top-down fabrication of highly ordered and aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays with degenerately doped source/drain regions from a bulk Si wafer is presented. In this approach, freestanding n- and p-SiNWs with an inverted triangular cross section are obtained using conventional photolithography, crystal orientation dependent wet etching, size reduction oxidation, and ion implantation doping. Based on these n- and p-SiNWs transferred onto a plastic substrate, simple SiNW-based complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) inverters are constructed for the possible applications of these SiNW arrays in integrated circuits on plastic. The static voltage transfer characteristic of the SiNW-based CMOS inverter exhibits a voltage gain of ∼9 V/V and a transition of 0.32 V at an operating voltage of 1.5 V with a full output voltage swing between 0 V and V(DD), and its mechnical bendability indicates good fatigue properties for potential applications of flexible electronics. This novel top-down approach is fully compatible with the current state-of-the-art Si-based CMOS technologies and, therefore, offers greater flexibility in device design for both high-performance and low-power functionality. PMID:21355599

  11. A CMOS-compatible, surface-micromachined pressure sensor for aqueous ultrasonic application

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    A surface micromachined pressure sensor array is under development at the Integrated Micromechanics, Microsensors, and CMOS Technologies organization at Sandia National Laboratories. This array is designed to sense absolute pressures from ambient pressure to 650 psia with frequency responses from DC to 2 MHz. The sensor is based upon a sealed, deformable, circular LPCVD silicon nitride diaphragm. Absolute pressure is determined from diaphragm deflection, which is sensed with low-stress, micromechanical, LPCVD polysilicon piezoresistors. All materials and processes used for sensor fabrication are CMOS compatible, and are part of Sandia`s ongoing effort of CMOS integration with Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Test results of individual sensors are presented along with process issues involving the release etch and metal step coverage.

  12. CMOS compatible IR sensors by cytochrome c protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chien-Jen; Su, Guo-Dung

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, due to the progression of the semiconductor industrial, the uncooled Infrared sensor - microbolometer has opened the opportunity for achieving low cost infrared imaging systems for both military and commercial applications. Therefore, various fabrication processes and different materials based microbolometer have been developed sequentially. The cytochrome c (protein) thin film has be reported high temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), which is related to the performance of microbolometer directly. Hence the superior TCR value will increase the performance of microbolometer. In this paper, we introduced a novel fabrication process using aluminum which is compatible with the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company (TSMC) D35 2P4M process as the main structure material, which benefits the device to integrate with readout integrated circuit (ROIC).The aluminum split structure is suspended by sacrificial layer utilizing the standard photolithography technology and chemical etching. The height and thickness of the structure are already considered. Besides, cytochrome c solutions were ink-jetted onto the aluminum structure by using the inkjet printer, applying precise control of the Infrared absorbing layer. In measurement, incident Infrared radiation can be detected and later the heat can be transmitted to adjacent pads to readout the signal. This approach applies an inexpensive and simple fabrication process and makes the device suitable for integration. In addition, the performance can be further improved with low noise readout circuits.

  13. A CMOS compatible Microbulk Micromegas-like detector using silicon oxide as spacer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco Carballo, V. M.; Fransen, M.; van der Graaf, H.; Lu, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2011-02-01

    We present a new Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) fabricated with nonpolymeric materials. The device structure is similar to a Microbulk Micromegas design, consisting of a punctured metal grid supported by a continuous perforated insulating structure. In this detector, the supporting structure is made out of silicon oxide. Devices were tested in He/ iC 4H 10 (80/20) and Ar/ iC 4H 10 (80/20) gas mixtures under 55Fe irradiation. Gas gain of 20,000 and energy resolution below 13% FWHM were achieved. The CMOS compatibility of the fabrication process has been studied in Timepix chips as well as individual 0.13-μm technology CMOS transistors. Complete detectors have been fabricated on top of Timepix chips. In an Ar/ iC 4H 10 (80/20) gas mixture 55Fe decay events were recorded operating the Timepix chip in 2D readout mode.

  14. Electroabsorption modulators for CMOS compatible optical interconnects in III-V and group IV materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Jonathan Edgar

    device is compatible with both the voltage swing of modern CMOS circuits, and long-distance telecommunications technologies including low-loss optical fiber and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers.

  15. A new laterally conductive bridge random access memory by fully CMOS logic compatible process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Min-Che; Chin, Yung-Wen; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Chih, Yu-Der; Tsai, Kan-Hsueh; Tsai, Ming-Jinn; King, Ya-Chin; Lin, Chrong Jung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel laterally conductive bridge random access memory (L-CBRAM) module using a fully CMOS logic compatible process. A contact buffer layer between the poly-Si and contact plug enables the lateral Ti-based atomic layer to provide on/off resistance ratio via bipolar operations. The proposed device reached more than 100 pulse cycles with an on/off ratio over 10 and very stable data retention under high temperature operations. These results make this Ti-based L-CBRAM cell a promising solution for advanced embedded multi-time programmable (MTP) memory applications.

  16. CMOS-compatible metal-stabilized nanostructured Si as anodes for lithium-ion microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gibaek; Schweizer, Stefan L.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of fully complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible metal-coated nanostructured silicon anodes for Li-ion microbatteries have been studied. The one-dimensional nanowires on black silicon (nb-Si) were prepared by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching and the metal (Au and Cu) coatings by successive magnetron sputtering technique. The Cu-coated nb-Si show the most promising electrochemical performance enhancements for the initial specific capacity as well as their cyclability compared to pristine nb-Si. The electrochemical and microstructural properties before and after cycling of the metal-coated nb-Si compared to their pristine counterparts are discussed in detail.

  17. CMOS compatible on-chip decoupling capacitor based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, A. M.; Göransson, G.; Desmaris, V.; Enoksson, P.

    2015-05-01

    On-chip decoupling capacitor of specific capacitance 55 pF/μm2 (footprint area) which is 10 times higher than the commercially available discrete and on-chip (65 nm technology node) decoupling capacitors is presented. The electrodes of the capacitor are based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) capable of being integrated directly on CMOS chips. The carbon nanofibers employed in this study were grown on CMOS chips using direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC-PECVD) technique at CMOS compatible temperature. The carbon nanofibers were grown at temperature from 390 °C to 550 °C. The capacitance of the carbon nanofibers was measured by cyclic voltammetry and thus compared. Futhermore the capacitance of decoupling capacitor was measured using different voltage scan rate to show their high charge storage capability and finally the cyclic voltammetry is run for 1000 cycles to assess their suitability as electrode material for decoupling capacitor. Our results show the high specific capacitance and long-term reliability of performance of the on-chip decoupling capacitors. Moreover, the specific capacitance shown is larger for carbon nanofibers grown at higher temperature.

  18. CMOS-Compatible Room-Temperature Rectifier Toward Terahertz Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamava, Volha; De Amicis, Giovanni; Del Monte, Andrea; Perticaroli, Stefano; Rao, Rosario; Palma, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new rectifying device, compatible with the technology of CMOS image sensors, suitable for implementing a direct-conversion detector operating at room temperature for operation at up to terahertz frequencies. The rectifying device can be obtained by introducing some simple modifications of the charge-storage well in conventional CMOS integrated circuits, making the proposed solution easy to integrate with the existing imaging systems. The rectifying device is combined with the different elements of the detector, composed of a 3D high-performance antenna and a charge-storage well. In particular, its position just below the edge of the 3D antenna takes maximum advantage of the high electric field concentrated by the antenna itself. In addition, the proposed structure ensures the integrity of the charge-storage well of the detector. In the structure, it is not necessary to use very scaled and costly technological nodes, since the CMOS transistor only provides the necessary integrated readout electronics. On-wafer measurements of RF characteristics of the designed junction are reported and discussed. The overall performances of the entire detector in terms of noise equivalent power (NEP) are evaluated by combining low-frequency measurements of the rectifier with numerical simulations of the 3D antenna and the semiconductor structure at 1 THz, allowing prediction of the achievable NEP.

  19. CMOS-Compatible Room-Temperature Rectifier Toward Terahertz Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamava, Volha; De Amicis, Giovanni; Del Monte, Andrea; Perticaroli, Stefano; Rao, Rosario; Palma, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new rectifying device, compatible with the technology of CMOS image sensors, suitable for implementing a direct-conversion detector operating at room temperature for operation at up to terahertz frequencies. The rectifying device can be obtained by introducing some simple modifications of the charge-storage well in conventional CMOS integrated circuits, making the proposed solution easy to integrate with the existing imaging systems. The rectifying device is combined with the different elements of the detector, composed of a 3D high-performance antenna and a charge-storage well. In particular, its position just below the edge of the 3D antenna takes maximum advantage of the high electric field concentrated by the antenna itself. In addition, the proposed structure ensures the integrity of the charge-storage well of the detector. In the structure, it is not necessary to use very scaled and costly technological nodes, since the CMOS transistor only provides the necessary integrated readout electronics. On-wafer measurements of RF characteristics of the designed junction are reported and discussed. The overall performances of the entire detector in terms of noise equivalent power (NEP) are evaluated by combining low-frequency measurements of the rectifier with numerical simulations of the 3D antenna and the semiconductor structure at 1 THz, allowing prediction of the achievable NEP.

  20. CMOS compatible electrode materials selection in oxide-based memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, V. Y.-Q.; Li, M.; Guo, Y.; Wang, W.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Robertson, J.

    2016-07-01

    Electrode materials selection guidelines for oxide-based memory devices are constructed from the combined knowledge of observed device operation characteristics, ab-initio calculations, and nano-material characterization. It is demonstrated that changing the top electrode material from Ge to Cr to Ta in the Ta2O5-based memory devices resulted in a reduction of the operation voltages and current. Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) Spectrometer analysis clearly shows that the different top electrode materials scavenge oxygen ions from the Ta2O5 memory layer at various degrees, leading to different oxygen vacancy concentrations within the Ta2O5, thus the observed trends in the device performance. Replacing the Pt bottom electrode material with CMOS compatible materials (Ru and Ir) further reduces the power consumption and can be attributed to the modification of the Schottky barrier height and oxygen vacancy concentration at the electrode/oxide interface. Both trends in the device performance and EDX results are corroborated by the ab-initio calculations which reveal that the electrode material tunes the oxygen vacancy concentration via the oxygen chemical potential and defect formation energy. This experimental-theoretical approach strongly suggests that the proper selection of CMOS compatible electrode materials will create the critical oxygen vacancy concentration to attain low power memory performance.

  1. Room temperature lasing in GeSn alloys: A path to CMOS-compatible infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zairui; Zhao, Yun; Gallagher, James; Menéndez, José; Kouvetakis, John; Agha, Imad; Mathews, Jay

    The semiconductor industry has been pushing silicon photonics development for many years, resulting in the realization of many CMOS-compatible optoelectronic devices. However, one challenge that has not been overcome is the development of Si-based lasers. Recently, GeSn alloys grown on Si have shown much promise in the field of infrared optoelectronics. These alloy films are compatible with CMOS processing, have band gaps in the infrared, and the band structure of GeSn can be tuned via Sn concentration to induce direct band gap emission. In this work, we report on room temperature lasing in optically-pumped waveguides fabricated from GeSn films grown epitaxially on Si(100) substrates. The waveguides were defined using standard UV photolithography and dry-etched in a Cl plasma. The end facets were mirror polished, and Al was deposited on one facet to enhance cavity quality. The waveguides were optically-pumped using a 976nm wavelength solid-state laser, and the corresponding emission was measured. The dependence of the emission power on the pump power shows a clear transition between spontaneous and stimulated emission, thereby demonstrating room temperature lasing.

  2. Resistive switching phenomena of tungsten nitride thin films with excellent CMOS compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seok Man; Kim, Hee-Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The resistive switching characteristics of WN{sub x} thin films. • Excellent CMOS compatibility WN{sub x} films as a resistive switching material. • Resistive switching mechanism revealed trap-controlled space charge limited conduction. • Good endurance and retention properties over 10{sup 5} cycles, and 10{sup 5} s, respectively - Abstract: We report the resistive switching (RS) characteristics of tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films with excellent complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility. A Ti/WN{sub x}/Pt memory cell clearly shows bipolar RS behaviors at a low voltage of approximately ±2.2 V. The dominant conduction mechanisms at low and high resistance states were verified by Ohmic behavior and trap-controlled space-charge-limited conduction, respectively. A conducting filament model by a redox reaction explains the RS behavior in WN{sub x} films. We also demonstrate the memory characteristics during pulse operation, including a high endurance over >10{sup 5} cycles and a long retention time of >10{sup 5} s.

  3. Ultra-sensitive detection of adipocytokines with CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pui, Tze-Sian; Agarwal, Ajay; Ye, Feng; Tou, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Yinxi; Chen, Peng

    2009-09-01

    Perfectly aligned arrays of single-crystalline silicon nanowires were fabricated using top-down CMOS-compatible techniques. We demonstrate that these nanowire devices are able to detect adipocytokines secreted by adipose cells with femtomolar sensitivity, high specificity, wide detection range, and ability for parallel monitoring. The nanowire sensors also provide a novel tool to reveal the poorly understood signaling mechanisms of these newly recognized signaling molecules, as well as their relevance in common diseases such as obesity and diabetes.Perfectly aligned arrays of single-crystalline silicon nanowires were fabricated using top-down CMOS-compatible techniques. We demonstrate that these nanowire devices are able to detect adipocytokines secreted by adipose cells with femtomolar sensitivity, high specificity, wide detection range, and ability for parallel monitoring. The nanowire sensors also provide a novel tool to reveal the poorly understood signaling mechanisms of these newly recognized signaling molecules, as well as their relevance in common diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Process diagram of nanowire fabrication; specificity of nanowire detection; induced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. See DOI: 10.1039/b9nr00092e

  4. CMOS-Compatible Silicon-Nanowire-Based Coulter Counter for Cell Enumeration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Jinhong; Muhammad, Hamidullah; Kang, Yuejun; Ary, Sunil K

    2016-02-01

    A silicon-nanowire-based Coulter counter has been designed and fabricated for particle/cell enumeration. The silicon nanowire was fabricated in a fully complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible process and used as a field effect transistor (FET) device. The Coulter counter device worked on the principle of potential change detection introduced by the passing of microparticles/cells through a sensing channel. Device uniformity was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Current-voltage measurement showed the high sensitivity of the nanowire FET device to the surface potential change. The results revealed that the silicon-nanowire-based Coulter counter can differentiate polystyrene beads with diameters of 8 and 15 μm. Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells have been successfully counted to validate the device. A fully CMOS-compatible fabrication process can help the device integration and facilitate the development of sensor arrays for high throughput application. With appropriate sample preparation steps, it is also possible to expand the work to applications such as rare-cells detection. PMID:26799578

  5. Optical modulation techniques for analog signal processing and CMOS compatible electro-optic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Douglas M.; Rasras, Mahmoud; Tu, Kun-Yii; Chen, Young-Kai; White, Alice E.; Patel, Sanjay S.; Carothers, Daniel; Pomerene, Andrew; Kamocsai, Robert; Beattie, James; Kopa, Anthony; Apsel, Alyssa; Beals, Mark; Mitchel, Jurgen; Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2008-02-01

    Integrating electronic and photonic functions onto a single silicon-based chip using techniques compatible with mass-production CMOS electronics will enable new design paradigms for existing system architectures and open new opportunities for electro-optic applications with the potential to dramatically change the management, cost, footprint, weight, and power consumption of today's communication systems. While broadband analog system applications represent a smaller volume market than that for digital data transmission, there are significant deployments of analog electro-optic systems for commercial and military applications. Broadband linear modulation is a critical building block in optical analog signal processing and also could have significant applications in digital communication systems. Recently, broadband electro-optic modulators on a silicon platform have been demonstrated based on the plasma dispersion effect. The use of the plasma dispersion effect within a CMOS compatible waveguide creates new challenges and opportunities for analog signal processing since the index and propagation loss change within the waveguide during modulation. We will review the current status of silicon-based electrooptic modulators and also linearization techniques for optical modulation.

  6. Post-CMOS compatible high-throughput fabrication of AlN-based piezoelectric microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Campos, A.; Iriarte, G. F.; Hernando-Garcia, J.; Calle, F.

    2015-02-01

    A post-complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible microfabrication process of piezoelectric cantilevers has been developed. The fabrication process is suitable for standard silicon technology and provides low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. This work reports design, fabrication and characterization of piezoelectric cantilevers based on aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films synthesized at room temperature. The proposed microcantilever system is a sandwich structure composed of chromium (Cr) electrodes and a sputtered AlN film. The key issue for cantilever fabrication is the growth at room temperature of the AlN layer by reactive sputtering, making possible the innovative compatibility of piezoelectric MEMS devices with CMOS circuits already processed. AlN and Cr have been etched by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) dry etching using a BCl3-Cl2-Ar plasma chemistry. As part of the novelty of the post-CMOS micromachining process presented here, a silicon Si (1 0 0) wafer has been used as substrate as well as the sacrificial layer used to release the microcantilevers. In order to achieve this, the Si surface underneath the structure has been wet etched using an HNA (hydrofluoric acid + nitric acid + acetic acid) based solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization indicated the high crystalline quality of the AlN film. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to determine the Cr electrode surface roughness. The morphology of the fabricated devices has been studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The cantilevers have been piezoelectrically actuated and their out-of-plane vibration modes were detected by vibrometry.

  7. Optical characterization of CMOS compatible micro optics fabricated by mask-based and mask-less hybrid lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sunglin; Summitt, Chris; Johnson, Lee; Zaverton, Melissa; Milster, Tom; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2014-09-01

    We report a CMOS compatible fabrication and optical characterization of the micrometer scale optical coupler, a 45° mirror-based optical coupler for inter-layer optical coupling. A newly proposed mask-based and mask-less hybrid lithography process enables accurate surface profile of the micrometer sized 45° mirror by using a CMOS compatible buffer coat material. Surface profile inspected by an optical interferometry agrees well with SEM based inspection results. Experimental and theoretical results for routing and coupling of laser beam in 90° will be discussed.

  8. CMOS Compatible 3-Axis Magnetic Field Sensor using Hall Effect Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Joshua R.

    The purpose of this study is to design, fabricate and test a CMOS compatible 3-axis Hall effect sensor capable of detecting the earth's magnetic field, with strength's of ˜50 muT. Preliminary testing of N-well Van Der Pauw structures using strong neodymium magnets showed proof of concept for hall voltage sensing, however, poor geometry of the structures led to a high offset voltage. A 1-axis Hall effect sensor was designed, fabricated and tested with a sensitivity of 1.12x10-3 mV/Gauss using the RIT metal gate PMOS process. Poor geometry and insufficient design produced an offset voltage of 0.1238 volts in the 1-axis design; prevented sensing of the earth's magnetic field. The new design features improved geometry for sensing application, improved sensitivity and use the RIT sub-CMOS process. The completed 2-axis device showed an average sensitivity to large magnetic fields of 0.0258 muV/Gauss at 10 mA supply current.

  9. Nonlinear optical signal processing in high figure of merit CMOS compatible platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D. J.; Morandotti, R.

    2015-05-01

    Photonic integrated circuits that exploit nonlinear optics in order to generate and process signals all-optically have achieved performance far superior to that possible electronically - particularly with respect to speed. Although silicon-on-insulator has been the leading platform for nonlinear optics for some time, its high two-photon absorption at telecommunications wavelengths poses a fundamental limitation. We review the recent achievements based in new CMOS-compatible platforms that are better suited than SOI for nonlinear optics, focusing on amorphous silicon and Hydex glass. We highlight their potential as well as the challenges to achieving practical solutions for many key applications. These material systems have opened up many new capabilities such as on-chip optical frequency comb generation and ultrafast optical pulse generation and measurement.

  10. Ge microdisk with lithographically-tunable strain using CMOS-compatible process.

    PubMed

    Sukhdeo, David S; Petykiewicz, Jan; Gupta, Shashank; Kim, Daeik; Woo, Sungdae; Kim, Youngmin; Vučković, Jelena; Saraswat, Krishna C; Nam, Donguk

    2015-12-28

    We present germanium microdisk optical resonators under a large biaxial tensile strain using a CMOS-compatible fabrication process. Biaxial tensile strain of ~0.7% is achieved by means of a stress concentration technique that allows the strain level to be customized by carefully selecting certain lithographic dimensions. The partial strain relaxation at the edges of a patterned germanium microdisk is compensated by depositing compressively stressed silicon nitride layer. Two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy measurements along with finite-element method simulations confirm a relatively homogeneous strain distribution within the final microdisk structure. Photoluminescence results show clear optical resonances due to whispering gallery modes which are in good agreement with finite-difference time-domain optical simulations. Our bandgap-customizable microdisks present a new route towards an efficient germanium light source for on-chip optical interconnects. PMID:26831991

  11. CMOS-compatible metal-stabilized nanostructured Si as anodes for lithium-ion microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gibaek; Schweizer, Stefan L; Wehrspohn, Ralf B

    2014-01-01

    The properties of fully complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible metal-coated nanostructured silicon anodes for Li-ion microbatteries have been studied. The one-dimensional nanowires on black silicon (nb-Si) were prepared by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching and the metal (Au and Cu) coatings by successive magnetron sputtering technique. The Cu-coated nb-Si show the most promising electrochemical performance enhancements for the initial specific capacity as well as their cyclability compared to pristine nb-Si. The electrochemical and microstructural properties before and after cycling of the metal-coated nb-Si compared to their pristine counterparts are discussed in detail. PMID:25411568

  12. CMOS-compatible temperature-independent tunable silicon optical lattice filters.

    PubMed

    Lu, Liangjun; Zhou, Linjie; Sun, Xiaomeng; Xie, Jingya; Zou, Zhi; Zhu, Haike; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jianping

    2013-04-22

    We present a CMOS-compatible athermal tunable silicon optical lattice filter composed of 10 cascaded 2 × 2 asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers. Active tuning experiments show that the filter central wavelength can be red-/blue-shifted by 13.1/21.3 nm with power consumption of 77/96 mW on top/bottom arms. Temperature shift measurements show that the thermal-sensitivity of the filter central wavelength before active tuning is as low as -1.465 pm/°C. The thermal-sensitivity is varied within 26.5 pm/°C to -27.1 pm/°C when the filter central wavelength is tuned in the wavelength range of 1534 nm to 1551 nm. We use the transfer matrix method to theoretically model the lattice filter and its thermal-sensitivity before and after tuning is analyzed and discussed. PMID:23609656

  13. Low back-reflection CMOS-compatible grating coupler for perfectly vertical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabos, G.; Pleros, N.; Tsiokos, D.

    2015-02-01

    In view of high volume manufacturing of silicon based photonic-integrated-circuits (Si-PICs), CMOS compatible low-cost fabrication processes as well as simplified packaging methods are imperatively needed. Silicon-onInsulator (SOI) based grating couplers (GCs) have attracted attention as the key components for providing optical interfaces to Si-PICs due their fabrication simplicity compared to the edge coupling alternatives. GCs based on perfectly vertical coupling scheme become essential by introducing substantial savings in the packaging cost as no angular configurations are required but at the expense of high coupling efficiency values due to the second order diffraction. In this context, research efforts concentrated on designing GCs with minimized back reflection into the waveguide yet employing more than one etching steps or rather complex fabrication processes. Herein, we propose a fully etched CMOS compatible non-uniform one-dimensional (1D) GC for perfectly vertical coupling with low back reflected optical power by means of numerical simulations. A particle-swarm-optimization (PSO) algorithm was deployed in conjunction with a commercially available 2D finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method to maximize the coupling efficiency to a SMF fiber for TM polarization. The design parameters were restricted to the period length and the filling factor while the minimum feature size was 80 nm. A peak coupling loss of 4.4 dB at 1553 nm was achieved with a 1-dB bandwidth of 47 nm and a back reflection of -20 dB. The coupling tolerance to fabrication errors was also investigated.

  14. a Uhv Compatible SQUID Magnetometer System for Investigations in Surface, Interface, and Thin Film Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagna, Stefano

    The magnetic properties of Co thin films on silicon and magnetite single crystal substrates grown by electron beam evaporation were studied in situ in UHV using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (UHVSQM). In this system, freshly deposited thin film samples from a separate molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) facility, were transported into the UHVSQM for magnetic characterization without breaking vacuum. The combination of the extremely high sensitivity of the SQUID for magnetic measurements with UHV surface analysis techniques offers the unique capability for films to be prepared, processed, and characterized repeatedly without substantial contamination. Magnetization isotherms as function of oxygen exposure on polycrystalline thin ferromagnetic (FM) Co layers indicate that the magnetic properties of these materials are profoundly altered as a result of oxidation and atmospheric contamination. In addition, field-cooled hysteresis loops performed at low temperatures indicate that the antiferromagnetic (AF) Co-oxide layer that result from the oxidation process is responsible for an induced exchange anisotropy in the FM Co films. The data indicates that interfacial roughness and non-uniform coupling across the interface may cause the AF to break up into a domain structure analogous to the one found in bulk FM materials. The resulting AF magnetic structure is apparently dependent on the competition between destabilizing forces at the interface when the FM layer moment's direction is reversed and stabilizing coercive forces within the AF domains. During the course of this research, we also investigated the effect of clean and oxidized Co layers on the magnetic properties of oriented single crystal rm Fe_3O_4 films. These experiments were aimed in gaining an understanding of the underlying mechanism responsible for the large increase in coercivity rm (H_{c}), and induced uniaxial anisotropy exhibited by this system as a result of the Co coverage. A

  15. Tunable, Room Temperature CMOS-Compatible THz Emitters Based on Nonlinear Mixing in Microdisk Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Raju; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Ahmadivand, Arash; Al-Amin, Chowdhury; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Shur, Michael; Pala, Nezih

    2016-03-01

    We propose and investigate in detail a novel tunable, compact, room temperature terahertz (THz) emitter using individual microdisk resonators for both optical and THz waves with the capability of radiating THz field in 0.5-10 THz range with tuning frequency resolution of 0.05 THz. Enhanced THz generation is achieved by employing a nonlinear optical disk resonator with a high value of second-order nonlinearity ( χ (2)) in order to facilitate the difference-frequency generation (DFG) via nonlinear mixing with the choice of two appropriate input infrared optical waves. Efficient coupling of infrared waves from bus to the nonlinear disk is ensured by satisfying critical coupling condition. Phase matching condition for efficient DFG process is also met by employing modal phase matching technique. Our simulations show that THz output power can be reached up to milliwatt (mW) level with high optical to THz conversion efficiency. The proposed source is Silicon on Insulator (SoI) technology compatible enabling the monolithic integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics including plasmonic THz detectors.

  16. CMOS compatible fabrication of 3D photonic crystals by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibelhuber, M.; Uhrmann, T.; Glinsner, T.

    2015-03-01

    Nanoimprinting techniques are an attractive solution for next generation lithography methods for several areas including photonic devices. A variety of potential applications have been demonstrated using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) (e.g. SAW devices, vias and contact layers with dual damascene imprinting process, Bragg structures, patterned media) [1,2]. Nanoimprint lithography is considered for bridging the gap from R and D to high volume manufacturing. In addition, it is capable to adapt to the needs of the fragmented and less standardized photonic market easily. In this work UV-NIL has been selected for the fabrication process of 3D-photonic crystals. It has been shown that UVNIL using a multiple layer approach is well suited to fabricate a 3D woodpile photonic crystal. The necessary alignment accuracies below 100nm were achieved using a simple optical method. In order to obtain sufficient alignment of the stacks to each other, a two stage alignment process is performed: at first proximity alignment is done followed by the Moiré alignment in soft contact with the substrate. Multiple steps of imprinting, etching, Si deposition and chemical mechanical polishing were implemented to create high quality 3D photonic crystals with up to 5 layers. This work has proven the applicability of nanoimprint lithography in a CMOS compatible process on 3D photonic crystals with alignment accuracy down to 100nm. Optimizing the processes will allow scaling up these structures on full wafers while still meeting the requirements of the designated devices.

  17. CMOS-compatible polarization rotator design based on asymmetrical periodic loaded waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology has been a promising platform for photonic applications. However, the high index-contrast between silicon and the top cladding (SiO2 or air) of the SOI waveguides makes the modal birefringence hard to control. Consequently, SOI based photonics integrated circuits (PICs) are in general highly polarization-sensitive, making polarization management important. In this paper, a polarization rotator (PR) design on the 220 nm SOI platform is demonstrated through numerical simulations and experiments. The demonstrated PR design is based on asymmetrical periodic loaded waveguide structures. The demonstrated design features compact device footprint and can be fabricated by CMOS compatible process. In addition, no special cladding is required to break the vertical symmetry of the waveguide. The design has shown promising performance over the C-band wavelengths (1530 nm-1565 nm) by simulations. However, the fabrication requirements are stringent for the design, thus the performance of the fabricated devices are limited by the current fabrication technology.

  18. Ultrasensitive Detection of Dual Cancer Biomarkers with Integrated CMOS-Compatible Nanowire Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na; Gao, Anran; Dai, Pengfei; Mao, Hongju; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-11-17

    A direct, rapid, highly sensitive and specific biosensor for detection of cancer biomarkers is desirable in early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. However, the existing methods of detecting cancer biomarkers suffer from poor sensitivity as well as the requirement of enzymatic labeling or nanoparticle conjugations. Here, we proposed a two-channel PDMS microfluidic integrated CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire (SiNW) field-effect transistor arrays with potentially single use for label-free and ultrasensitive electrical detection of cancer biomarkers. The integrated nanowire arrays showed not only ultrahigh sensitivity of cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) with detection to at least 1 fg/mL in buffer solution but also highly selectivity of discrimination from other similar cancer biomarkers. In addition, this method was used to detect both CYFRA21-1 and PSA real samples as low as 10 fg/mL in undiluted human serums. With its excellent properties and miniaturization, the integrated SiNW-FET device opens up great opportunities for a point-of-care test (POCT) for quick screening and early diagnosis of cancer and other complex diseases. PMID:26473941

  19. Growth and optical properties of CMOS-compatible silicon nanowires for photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Alex Richard

    Silicon (Si) is the dominant semiconductor material in both the microelectronic and photovoltaic industries. Despite its poor optical properties, Si is simply too abundant and useful to be completely abandoned in either industry. Since the initial discovery of efficient room temperature photoluminescence (PL) from porous Si and the following discoveries of PL and time-resolved optical gain from Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) in SiO2, many groups have studied the feasibility of making Si-based, CMOS-compatible electroluminescent devices and electrically pumped lasers. These studies have shown that for Si-ne sizes below about 10 nm, PL can be attributed to radiative recombination of confined excitons and quantum efficiencies can reach 90%. PL peak energies are blue-shifted from the bulk Si band edge of 1.1 eV due to the quantum confinement effect and PL decay lifetimes are on mus timescales. However, many unanswered questions still exist about both the ease of carrier injection and various non-radiative and loss mechanisms that are present. A potential alternative material system to porous Si and Si-nc is Si nanowires (SiNWs). In this thesis, I examine the optical properties of SiNWs with diameters in the range of 3-30 nm fabricated by a number of compound metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication techniques including Chemical Vapor Deposition on metal nanoparticle coated substrates, catalytic wet etching of bulk Si and top-down electron-beam lithographic patterning. Using thermal oxidation and etching, we can increase the degree of confinement in the SiNWs. I demonstrate PL peaked in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges that is tunable by controlling the crystalline SiNW core diameter, which is measured with dark field and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. PL decay lifetimes of the SiNWs are on the order of 50 mus after proper surface passivation, which suggest that the PL is indeed from confined carriers in the SiNW cores

  20. CMOS-Compatible Top-Down Fabrication of Periodic SiO2 Nanostructures using a Single Mask.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingkuan; Gao, Jianfeng; He, Xiaobin; Li, Junjie; Wei, Yayi; Yan, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    We propose a CMOS-compatible top-down fabrication technique of highly-ordered and periodic SiO2 nanostructures using a single amorphous silicon (α-Si) mask layer. The α-Si mask pattern is precisely transferred into the underlying SiO2 substrate material with a high fidelity by a novel top-down fabrication. It is the first time for α-Si film used as an etch mask to fabricate SiO2 nanostructures including nanoline, nanotrench, and nanohole arrays. It is observed that the α-Si mask can significantly reduce the pattern edge roughness and achieve highly uniform and smooth sidewalls. This behavior may be attributed to the presence of high concentration of dangling bonds in α-Si mask surface. By controlling the process condition, it is possible to achieve a desired vertical etched profile with a controlled size. Our results demonstrate that SiO2 pattern as small as sub-20 nm may be achievable. The obtained SiO2 pattern can be further used as a nanotemplate to produce periodic or more complex silicon nanostructures. Moreover, this novel top-down approach is a potentially universal method that is fully compatible with the currently existing Si-based CMOS technologies. It offers a greater flexibility for the fabrication of various nanoscale devices in a simple and efficient way. PMID:26306538

  1. Design and fabrication of a CMOS-compatible MHP gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jun Wu, Hao; Tang, Zhenan

    2014-03-15

    A novel micro-hotplate (MHP) gas sensor is designed and fabricated with a standard CMOS technology followed by post-CMOS processes. The tungsten plugging between the first and the second metal layer in the CMOS processes is designed as zigzag resistor heaters embedded in the membrane. In the post-CMOS processes, the membrane is released by front-side bulk silicon etching, and excellent adiabatic performance of the sensor is obtained. Pt/Ti electrode films are prepared on the MHP before the coating of the SnO{sub 2} film, which are promising to present better contact stability compared with Al electrodes. Measurements show that at room temperature in atmosphere, the device has a low power consumption of ∼19 mW and a rapid thermal response of 8 ms for heating up to 300 °C. The tungsten heater exhibits good high temperature stability with a slight fluctuation (<0.3%) in the resistance at an operation temperature of 300 °C under constant heating mode for 336 h, and a satisfactory temperature coefficient of resistance of about 1.9‰/°C.

  2. A CMOS-Compatible, Low-Noise ISFET Based on High Efficiency Ion-Modulated Lateral-Bipolar Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sheng-Ren; Chen, Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Ion-sensitive, field-effect transistors (ISFET) have been useful biosensors in many applications. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ISFET is limited by its intrinsic, low-frequency noise. This paper presents an ISFET capable of utilizing lateral-bipolar conduction to reduce low-frequency noise. With a particular layout design, the conduction efficiency is further enhanced. Moreover, the ISFET is compatible with the standard CMOS technology. All materials above the gate-oxide are removed by simple, die-level post-CMOS process, allowing ions to modulate the lateral-bipolar current directly. By varying the gate-to-bulk voltage, the operation mode of the ISFET is controlled effectively, so is the noise performance measured and compared. Finally, the biasing conditions preferable for different low-noise applications are identified. Under the identified biasing condition, the signal-to-noise ratio of the ISFET as a pH sensor is proved to be improved by more than five times. PMID:22408508

  3. A CMOS-compatible electronic synapse device based on Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenhao; Fang, Runchen; Balaban, Mehmet B.; Yu, Weijie; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh J.; Kozicki, Michael N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the resistance plasticity of Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cell devices is experimentally explored for the emulation of biological synapses. PMC devices were fabricated with foundry friendly materials using standard processes. The resistance can be continuously increased or decreased with both dc and voltage pulse programming. Impedance spectroscopy results indicate that the gradual change of resistance is attributable to the expansion or contraction of a Cu-rich layer within the device. Pulse programming experiments further show that the pulse amplitude plays a more important role in resistance change than pulse width, which is consistent with the proposed ‘dual-layer’ device model. The dense resistance-state distribution, 1 V operating voltage and inherent CMOS-compatibility suggests its potential application as electronic synapse in neuromorphic computing.

  4. A CMOS-compatible electronic synapse device based on Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Fang, Runchen; Balaban, Mehmet B; Yu, Weijie; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh J; Kozicki, Michael N

    2016-06-24

    In this work, the resistance plasticity of Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cell devices is experimentally explored for the emulation of biological synapses. PMC devices were fabricated with foundry friendly materials using standard processes. The resistance can be continuously increased or decreased with both dc and voltage pulse programming. Impedance spectroscopy results indicate that the gradual change of resistance is attributable to the expansion or contraction of a Cu-rich layer within the device. Pulse programming experiments further show that the pulse amplitude plays a more important role in resistance change than pulse width, which is consistent with the proposed 'dual-layer' device model. The dense resistance-state distribution, 1 V operating voltage and inherent CMOS-compatibility suggests its potential application as electronic synapse in neuromorphic computing. PMID:27171505

  5. Ultra-sensitive nucleic acids detection with electrical nanosensors based on CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Na; Gao, Anran; Dai, Pengfei; Li, Tie; Wang, Yi; Gao, Xiuli; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Yuelin

    2013-10-01

    Silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) have recently emerged as a type of powerful nanoelectronic biosensors due to their ultrahigh sensitivity, selectivity, label-free and real-time detection capabilities. Here, we present a protocol as well as guidelines for detecting DNA with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible SiNW-FET sensors. SiNWs with high surface-to-volume ratio and controllable sizes were fabricated with an anisotropic self-stop etching technique. Probe DNA molecules specific for the target DNA were covalently modified onto the surface of the SiNWs. The SiNW-FET nanosensors exhibited an ultrahigh sensitivity for detecting the target DNA as low as 1 fM and good selectivity for discrimination from one-base mismatched DNA. PMID:23886908

  6. Atomic layer deposited second-order nonlinear optical metamaterial for back-end integration with CMOS-compatible nanophotonic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Hermans, Artur; Solano, Eduardo; Dendooven, Jolien; Koskinen, Kalle; Kauranen, Martti; Brainis, Edouard; Detavernier, Christophe; Baets, Roel

    2015-11-15

    We report the fabrication of artificial unidimensional crystals exhibiting an effective bulk second-order nonlinearity. The crystals are created by cycling atomic layer deposition of three dielectric materials such that the resulting metamaterial is noncentrosymmetric in the direction of the deposition. Characterization of the structures by second-harmonic generation Maker-fringe measurements shows that the main component of their nonlinear susceptibility tensor is about 5 pm/V, which is comparable to well-established materials and more than an order of magnitude greater than reported for a similar crystal [Appl. Phys. Lett.107, 121903 (2015)APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.4931492]. Our demonstration opens new possibilities for second-order nonlinear effects on CMOS-compatible nanophotonic platforms. PMID:26565877

  7. CMOS compatible fabrication process of MEMS resonator for timing reference and sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Duc H.; Nguyen, Phuong D.; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Skafidas, Stan; Evans, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Frequency reference and timing control devices are ubiquitous in electronic applications. There is at least one resonator required for each of this device. Currently electromechanical resonators such as crystal resonator, ceramic resonator are the ultimate choices. This tendency will probably keep going for many more years. However, current market demands for small size, low power consumption, cheap and reliable products, has divulged many limitations of this type of resonators. They cannot be integrated into standard CMOS (Complement metaloxide- semiconductor) IC (Integrated Circuit) due to material and fabrication process incompatibility. Currently, these devices are off-chip and they require external circuitries to interface with the ICs. This configuration significantly increases the overall size and cost of the entire electronic system. In addition, extra external connection, especially at high frequency, will potentially create negative impacts on the performance of the entire system due to signal degradation and parasitic effects. Furthermore, due to off-chip packaging nature, these devices are quite expensive, particularly for high frequency and high quality factor devices. To address these issues, researchers have been intensively studying on an alternative for type of resonator by utilizing the new emerging MEMS (Micro-electro-mechanical systems) technology. Recent progress in this field has demonstrated a MEMS resonator with resonant frequency of 2.97 GHz and quality factor (measured in vacuum) of 42900. Despite this great achievement, this prototype is still far from being fully integrated into CMOS system due to incompatibility in fabrication process and its high series motional impedance. On the other hand, fully integrated MEMS resonator had been demonstrated but at lower frequency and quality factor. We propose a design and fabrication process for a low cost, high frequency and a high quality MEMS resonator, which can be integrated into a standard

  8. Silicon nitride CMOS-compatible platform for integrated photonics applications at visible wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Romero-García, Sebastian; Merget, Florian; Zhong, Frank; Finkelstein, Hod; Witzens, Jeremy

    2013-06-17

    Silicon nitride is demonstrated as a high performance and cost-effective solution for dense integrated photonic circuits in the visible spectrum. Experimental results for nanophotonic waveguides fabricated in a standard CMOS pilot line with losses below 0.71dB/cm in an aqueous environment and 0.51dB/cm with silicon dioxide cladding are reported. Design and characterization of waveguide bends, grating couplers and multimode interference couplers (MMI) at a wavelength of 660 nm are presented. The index contrast of this technology enables high integration densities with insertion losses below 0.05 dB per 90° bend for radii as small as 35 µm. By a proper design of the buried oxide layer thickness, grating couplers with efficiencies above 38% for the TE polarization have been obtained. PMID:23787593

  9. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  10. CMOS-compatible InP/InGaAs digital photoreceiver

    DOEpatents

    Lovejoy, M.L.; Rose, B.H.; Craft, D.C.; Enquist, P.M.; Slater, D.B. Jr.

    1997-11-04

    A digital photoreceiver is formed monolithically on an InP semiconductor substrate and comprises a p-i-n photodetector formed from a plurality of InP/InGaAs layers deposited by an epitaxial growth process and an adjacent heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifier formed from the same InP/InGaAs layers. The photoreceiver amplifier operates in a large-signal mode to convert a detected photocurrent signal into an amplified output capable of directly driving integrated circuits such as CMOS. In combination with an optical transmitter, the photoreceiver may be used to establish a short-range channel of digital optical communications between integrated circuits with applications to multi-chip modules (MCMs). The photoreceiver may also be used with fiber optic coupling for establishing longer-range digital communications (i.e. optical interconnects) between distributed computers or the like. Arrays of digital photoreceivers may be formed on a common substrate for establishing a plurality of channels of digital optical communication, with each photoreceiver being spaced by less than about 1 mm and consuming less than about 20 mW of power, and preferably less than about 10 mW. Such photoreceiver arrays are useful for transferring huge amounts of digital data between integrated circuits at bit rates of up to about 1,000 Mb/s or more. 4 figs.

  11. CMOS-compatible InP/InGaAs digital photoreceiver

    DOEpatents

    Lovejoy, Michael L.; Rose, Benny H.; Craft, David C.; Enquist, Paul M.; Slater, Jr., David B.

    1997-01-01

    A digital photoreceiver is formed monolithically on an InP semiconductor substrate and comprises a p-i-n photodetector formed from a plurality of InP/InGaAs layers deposited by an epitaxial growth process and an adjacent heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifier formed from the same InP/InGaAs layers. The photoreceiver amplifier operates in a large-signal mode to convert a detected photocurrent signal into an amplified output capable of directly driving integrated circuits such as CMOS. In combination with an optical transmitter, the photoreceiver may be used to establish a short-range channel of digital optical communications between integrated circuits with applications to multi-chip modules (MCMs). The photoreceiver may also be used with fiber optic coupling for establishing longer-range digital communications (i.e. optical interconnects) between distributed computers or the like. Arrays of digital photoreceivers may be formed on a common substrate for establishing a plurality of channels of digital optical communication, with each photoreceiver being spaced by less than about 1 mm and consuming less than about 20 mW of power, and preferably less than about 10 mW. Such photoreceiver arrays are useful for transferring huge amounts of digital data between integrated circuits at bit rates of up to about 1000 Mb/s or more.

  12. Which Photodiode to Use: A Comparison of CMOS-Compatible Structures

    PubMed Central

    Murari, Kartikeya; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2010-01-01

    While great advances have been made in optimizing fabrication process technologies for solid state image sensors, the need remains to be able to fabricate high quality photosensors in standard CMOS processes. The quality metrics depend on both the pixel architecture and the photosensitive structure. This paper presents a comparison of three photodiode structures in terms of spectral sensitivity, noise and dark current. The three structures are n+/p-sub, n-well/p-sub and p+/n-well/p-sub. All structures were fabricated in a 0.5 μm 3-metal, 2-poly, n-well process and shared the same pixel and readout architectures. Two pixel structures were fabricated—the standard three transistor active pixel sensor, where the output depends on the photodiode capacitance, and one incorporating an in-pixel capacitive transimpedance amplifier where the output is dependent only on a designed feedback capacitor. The n-well/p-sub diode performed best in terms of sensitivity (an improvement of 3.5 × and 1.6 × over the n+/p-sub and p+/n-well/p-sub diodes, respectively) and signal-to-noise ratio (1.5 × and 1.2 × improvement over the n+/p-sub and p+/n-well/p-sub diodes, respectively) while the p+/n-well/p-sub diode had the minimum (33% compared to other two structures) dark current for a given sensitivity. PMID:20454596

  13. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  14. CMOS-compatible catalytic growth of graphene on a silicon dioxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Sung; Lim, Jae-Young; Jung, Su-Ho; Kang, Seog-Gyun; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Choi, Jae-Young; Hwang, Sung-Woo; Whang, Dongmok

    2016-08-01

    We report the direct growth of graphene on a dielectric SiO2 surface by utilizing complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible germane as a gas-phase catalyst. Results of Raman spectroscopy and XPS confirmed that the synthesized graphene consist of a sp2 hybridized carbon network. We were able to fabricate graphene field effect transistors without the wet etching process, and the calculated mobility was ˜160 cm2/V.s at high carrier concentration (n = 3 × 1012 cm-2). Furthermore, the crystallinity and morphology of graphene is easily controlled from single-layer graphene to graphene nanowall structures by adjusting the reaction conditions. The results of this study verify the promising catalytic graphene growth method on a non-catalytic insulating surface without metal contaminations.

  15. Droplet-Confined Alternate Pulsed Epitaxy of GaAs Nanowires on Si Substrates down to CMOS-Compatible Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Balaghi, Leila; Tauchnitz, Tina; Hübner, René; Bischoff, Lothar; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Dimakis, Emmanouil

    2016-07-13

    We introduce droplet-confined alternate pulsed epitaxy for the self-catalyzed growth of GaAs nanowires on Si(111) substrates in the temperature range from 550 °C down to 450 °C. This unconventional growth mode is a modification of the migration-enhanced epitaxy, where alternating pulses of Ga and As4 are employed instead of a continuous supply. The enhancement of the diffusion length of Ga adatoms on the {11̅0} nanowire sidewalls allows for their targeted delivery to the Ga droplets at the top of the nanowires and, thus, for a highly directional growth along the nanowire axis even at temperatures as low as 450 °C. We demonstrate that the axial growth can be simply and abruptly interrupted at any time without the formation of any defects, whereas the growth rate can be controlled with high accuracy down to the monolayer scale, being limited only by the stochastic nature of nucleation. Taking advantage of these unique possibilities, we were able to probe and describe quantitatively the population dynamics of As inside the Ga droplets in specially designed experiments. After all, our growth method combines all necessary elements for precise growth control, in-depth investigation of the growth mechanisms and compatibility with fully processed Si-CMOS substrates. PMID:27351336

  16. CMOS-compatible, label-free silicon-nanowire biosensors to detect cardiac troponin I for acute myocardial infarction diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Tao; Su, Ruigong; Zhang, Beibei; Zhang, Qi; Cheng, Guosheng

    2012-04-15

    A label-free biosensor for electrical detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), a highly sensitive and selective biomarker of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is demonstrated using silicon nanowire (SiNW) based field-effect transistors (FETs). The FET devices were fabricated by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible top-down approach to define the SiNW followed by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) wet etching. Electrical characterizations of the SiNW FET revealed an ambipolar conduction characteristic with an on/off ratio of 10(5)-10(6). CTnI monoclonal antibodies were then covalently immobilized on the SiNW surfaces. By integrating with a homemade biosensor measurement system, the biosensor exhibited rapid and sensitive response to cTnI proteins. The current response showed a nature of logarithm relationship against the cTnI concentration from 46 ng/mL down to 0.092 ng/mL. Moreover, an anti-interference capability of the fabricated biosensor was also assessed. By utilizing the top-down fabrication method, this work provides an efficient way for the cTnI proteins detection with an enormous potential of mass-production, which definitely facilitate the practical applications. PMID:22386490

  17. Board-level optical clock signal distribution using Si CMOS-compatible polyimide-based 1- to 48-fanout H-tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linghui; Bihari, Bipin; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Ray T.; Tang, Suning

    1998-08-01

    Si-CMOS compatible polymer-based waveguides for optoelectronic interconnects and packaging have been fabricated and characterized. A 1-to-48 fanout optoelectronic interconnection layer (OIL) structure based on Ultradel 9120/9020 for the high-speed massive clock signal distribution for a Cray T-90 supercomputer board has been constructed. The OIL employs multimode polymeric channel waveguides in conjunction with surface-normal waveguide output coupler and 1-to-2 splitter. A total insertion loss of 7.98 dB at 850 nm was measured experimentally.

  18. Direct ultrasensitive electrical detection of prostate cancer biomarkers with CMOS-compatible n- and p-type silicon nanowire sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Anran; Lu, Na; Dai, Pengfei; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2014-10-01

    Sensitive and quantitative analysis of proteins is central to disease diagnosis, drug screening, and proteomic studies. Here, a label-free, real-time, simultaneous and ultrasensitive prostate-specific antigen (PSA) sensor was developed using CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire field effect transistors (SiNW FET). Highly responsive n- and p-type SiNW arrays were fabricated and integrated on a single chip with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique which eliminated the need for a hybrid method. The incorporated n- and p-type nanowires revealed complementary electrical response upon PSA binding, providing a unique means of internal control for sensing signal verification. The highly selective, simultaneous and multiplexed detection of PSA marker at attomolar concentrations, a level useful for clinical diagnosis of prostate cancer, was demonstrated. The detection ability was corroborated to be effective by comparing the detection results at different pH values. Furthermore, the real-time measurement was also carried out in a clinically relevant sample of blood serum, indicating the practicable development of rapid, robust, high-performance, and low-cost diagnostic systems.Sensitive and quantitative analysis of proteins is central to disease diagnosis, drug screening, and proteomic studies. Here, a label-free, real-time, simultaneous and ultrasensitive prostate-specific antigen (PSA) sensor was developed using CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire field effect transistors (SiNW FET). Highly responsive n- and p-type SiNW arrays were fabricated and integrated on a single chip with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique which eliminated the need for a hybrid method. The incorporated n- and p-type nanowires revealed complementary electrical response upon PSA binding, providing a unique means of internal control for sensing signal verification. The highly

  19. Ge quantum dot arrays grown by ultrahigh vacuum molecular-beam epitaxy on the Si(001) surface: nucleation, morphology, and CMOS compatibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Issues of morphology, nucleation, and growth of Ge cluster arrays deposited by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy on the Si(001) surface are considered. Difference in nucleation of quantum dots during Ge deposition at low (≲600°C) and high (≳600°C) temperatures is studied by high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy. The atomic models of growth of both species of Ge huts--pyramids and wedges-- are proposed. The growth cycle of Ge QD arrays at low temperatures is explored. A problem of lowering of the array formation temperature is discussed with the focus on CMOS compatibility of the entire process; a special attention is paid upon approaches to reduction of treatment temperature during the Si(001) surface pre-growth cleaning, which is at once a key and the highest-temperature phase of the Ge/Si(001) quantum dot dense array formation process. The temperature of the Si clean surface preparation, the final high-temperature step of which is, as a rule, carried out directly in the MBE chamber just before the structure deposition, determines the compatibility of formation process of Ge-QD-array based devices with the CMOS manufacturing cycle. Silicon surface hydrogenation at the final stage of its wet chemical etching during the preliminary cleaning is proposed as a possible way of efficient reduction of the Si wafer pre-growth annealing temperature. PMID:21892938

  20. Small Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhnke, Falko; Musmann, Gunter; Glassmeier, K. H.; Tsurutani, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Small, lightweight, low-power magnetometer measures three-dimensional magnetic field. Includes three toroidal cores - one for each dimension. Exhibits high sensitivity, low zero-point drift, and low noise. Magnetometer circuit includes driver circuit and three analog signal-processing circuits. Output of analog signal-processing circuit proportional to one of components of external magnetic field.

  1. MAVEN Magnetometer

    NASA Video Gallery

    MAVEN’s dual magnetometers will allow scientists to study the interactionbetween the solar wind and the Martian atmosphere, giving us a betterunderstanding of how Mars has evolved from a warm, ...

  2. Rebecca's Magnetometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossfield, Casper H.

    I describe a McWilliams torsion-balance magnetometer I helped Arkansas high school senior Rebecca Ragat build as a science fair project. Rebecca won awards at the regional fair which qualified her to enter her magnetometer in the Arkansas State Science Fair, where she won awards from the United States Geological Survey and the United States Navy. For those interested in building a McWilliams torsion-balance magnetometer similar to Rebecca's, I have created a kit that is available through the AAVSO Solar Division. I also describe my experience as a judge at the orange County Regional Science Fair in Florida, and encourage other scientists to participate in programs that help students learn about science through hands-on experience. Offering to be a judge at your local science fair is a good way to do this.

  3. Design and Analysis of CMOS-Compatible III-V Compound Electron-Hole Bilayer Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor for Ultra-Low-Power Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Yoon; Seo, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Ho-Young; Lee, Seong Min; Cho, Seongjae; Kang, In Man

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we design and analyze complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible III-V compound electron-hole bilayer (EHB) tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs) by using two-dimensional (2D) technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations. A recently proposed EHB TFET exploits a bias-induced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) across the electron-hole bilayer by an electric field from the top and bottom gates. This is in contrast to conventional planar p(+)-p(-)-n TFETs, which utilize BTBT across the source-to-channel junction. We applied III-V compound semiconductor materials to the EHB TFETs in order to enhance the current drivability and switching performance. Devices based on various compound semiconductor materials have been designed and analyzed in terms of their primary DC characteristics. In addition, the operational principles were validated by close examination of the electron concentrations and energy-band diagrams under various operation conditions. The simulation results of the optimally designed In0.533Ga0.47As EHB TFET show outstanding performance, with an on-state current (Ion) of 249.5 μA/μm, subthreshold swing (S) of 11.4 mV/dec, and threshold voltage (Vth) of 50 mV at VDS = 0.5 V. Based on the DC-optimized InGaAs EHB TFET, the CMOS inverter circuit was simulated in views of static and dynamic behaviors of the p-channel device with exchanges between top and bottom gates or between source and drain electrodes maintaining the device structure. PMID:26726356

  4. Design of a 0.18 μm CMOS multi-band compatible low power GNSS receiver RF frontend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Li; Yiqi, Zhuang; Qiang, Long; Zhao, Jin; Zhenrong, Li; Gang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a fully integrated multi-band RF receiver frontend for GNSS applications on L-band. A single RF signal channel with a low-IF architecture is adopted for multi-band operation on the RF section, which mainly consists of a low noise amplifier (LNA), a down-converter, polyphase filters and summing circuits. An improved cascode source degenerated LNA with a multi-band shared off-chip matching network and band switches is implemented in the first amplifying stage. Also, a re-designed wideband double balance mixer is implemented in the down conversion stage, which provides better gain, noise figure and linearity performances. Using a TSMC 0.18 μm 1P4M RF CMOS process, a compact 1.27 GHz/1.575 GHz dual-band GNSS frontend is realized in the proposed low-IF topology. The measurements exhibit the gains of 45 dB and 43 dB, and noise figures are controlled at 3.35 dB and 3.9 dB of the two frequency bands, respectively. The frontend model consumes about 11.8-13.5 mA current on a 1.8 V power supply. The core occupies 1.91 × 0.53 mm2 while the total die area with ESD is 2.45 × 2.36 mm2.

  5. A novel CMOS-compatible, monolithically integrated line-scan hyperspectral imager covering the VIS-NIR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Pilar; Tack, Klaas; Geelen, Bert; Masschelein, Bart; Charle, Wouter; Vereecke, Bart; Lambrechts, Andy

    2016-05-01

    Imec has developed a process for the monolithic integration of optical filters on top of CMOS image sensors, leading to compact, cost-efficient and faster hyperspectral cameras. Different prototype sensors are available, most notably a 600- 1000 nm line-scan imager, and two mosaic sensors: a 4x4 VIS (470-620 nm range) and a 5x5 VNIR (600-1000 nm). In response to the users' demand for a single sensor able to cover both the VIS and NIR ranges, further developments have been made to enable more demanding applications. As a result, this paper presents the latest addition to imec's family of monolithically-integrated hyperspectral sensors: a line scan sensor covering the range 470-900 nm. This new prototype sensor can acquire hyperspectral image cubes of 2048 pixels over 192 bands (128 bands for the 600- 900 nm range, and 64 bands for the 470-620 nm range) at 340 cubes per second for normal machine vision illumination levels.

  6. Silicon-nanowire-based CMOS-compatible field-effect transistor nanosensors for ultrasensitive electrical detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Anran; Lu, Na; Dai, Pengfei; Li, Tie; Pei, Hao; Gao, Xiuli; Gong, Yibin; Wang, Yuelin; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-09-14

    We herein report the design of a novel semiconducting silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) biosensor array for ultrasensitive label-free and real-time detection of nucleic acids. Highly responsive SiNWs with narrow sizes and high surface-to-volume-ratios were "top-down" fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique. When SiNWs were covalently modified with DNA probes, the nanosensor showed highly sensitive concentration-dependent conductance change in response to specific target DNA sequences. This SiNW-FET nanosensor revealed ultrahigh sensitivity for rapid and reliable detection of 1 fM of target DNA and high specificity single-nucleotide polymorphism discrimination. As a proof-of-concept for multiplex detection with this small-size and mass producible sensor array, we demonstrated simultaneous selective detection of two pathogenic strain virus DNA sequences (H1N1 and H5N1) of avian influenza. PMID:21848308

  7. Atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  8. Electron-Tunneling Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-tunneling magnetometer is conceptual solid-state device operating at room temperature, yet offers sensitivity comparable to state-of-art magnetometers such as flux gates, search coils, and optically pumped magnetometers, with greatly reduced volume, power consumption, electronics requirements, and manufacturing cost. Micromachined from silicon wafer, and uses tunneling displacement transducer to detect magnetic forces on cantilever-supported current loop.

  9. The MASCOT Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herčík, David; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Blum, Jürgen; Fornaçon, Karl-Heinz; Fujimoto, Masaki; Gebauer, Kathrin; Güttler, Carsten; Hillenmaier, Olaf; Hördt, Andreas; Liebert, Evelyn; Matsuoka, Ayako; Nomura, Reiko; Richter, Ingo; Stoll, Bernd; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    The Mobile Asteroid Scout (MASCOT) is a small lander on board the Hayabusa2 mission of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency to the asteroid 162173 Ryugu. Among the instruments on MASCOT is a fluxgate magnetometer, the MASCOT Magnetometer (MasMag). The magnetometer is a lightweight ( ˜280 g) and low power ( ˜0.5 W) triaxial fluxgate magnetometer. Magnetic field measurements during the landing period and during the surface operational phase shall provide information about any intrinsic magnetic field of the asteroid and its remanent magnetization. This could provide important constraints on planet formation and the thermal and aqueous evolution of primitive asteroids.

  10. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (magnetometer that utilizes a novel optical (interferometric) detection technique. Further miniaturization and low-power operation are key advantages of this magnetometer, when compared to systems using SQUIDs which require liquid Helium temperatures and associated overhead to achieve similar sensitivity levels.

  11. Cold Atom Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Yujiro; Sadrove, Mark; Hirano, Takuya

    Detection of weak magnetic fields with high spatial resolution is an important technology for various applications such as biological imaging, detection of MRI signals and fundamental physics. Cold atom magnetometry enables 10-11 T/ Hz sqrt{text{Hz}} sensitivities at the micron scale, that is, at the scale of a typical biological cell size. This magnetometry takes advantage of unique properties of atomic gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates with internal spin degrees of freedom. In this chapter, we first overview various state-of-the-art magnetometers, addressing their sensitivities and spatial resolutions. Then we describe properties of spinor condensates, ultracold atom magnetometers, and the latest research developments achieved in the FIRST project, especially for the detection of alternate current magnetic fields using a spin-echo-based magnetometer. We also discuss future prospects of the magnetometers.

  12. Magnetometer uses bismuth-selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollman, J. A.; Spain, I. L.; Beale, H.

    1972-01-01

    Characteristics of bismuth-selenide magnetometer are described. Advantages of bismuth-selenide magnetometer over standard magnetometers are stressed. Thermal stability of bismuth-selenide magnetometer is analyzed. Linearity of output versus magnetic field over wide range of temperatures is reported.

  13. Hall effect magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Beale, H. A.; Spain, I. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A magnetometer which uses a single crystal of bismuth selenide is described. The rhombohedral crystal structure of the sensing element is analyzed. The method of construction of the magnetometer is discussed. It is stated that the sensing crystal has a positive or negative Hall coefficient and a carrier concentration of about 10 to the 18th power to 10 to the 20th power per cubic centimeter.

  14. Ultra-high amplified strain on 200 mm optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates: towards CMOS compatible Ge lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboud, V.; Gassenq, A.; Guilloy, K.; Osvaldo Dias, G.; Escalante, J. M.; Tardif, S.; Pauc, N.; Hartmann, J. M.; Widiez, J.; Gomez, E.; Bellet Amalric, E.; Fowler, D.; Rouchon, D.; Duchemin, I.; Niquet, Y. M.; Rieutord, F.; Faist, J.; Geiger, R.; Zabel, T.; Marin, E.; Sigg, H.; Chelnokov, A.; Calvo, V.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, one of the main challenges in the field of silicon photonics is the fabrication of efficient laser sources compatible with the microelectronic fabrication technology. An alternative to the complexity of integration of group III-V laser compounds is advancing from high tensile strains applied to germanium leading to improved emission properties by transforming the material from an indirect to a direct bandgap semiconductor. Theory predicts this transformation occurs at around 4.7% uniaxial tensile strain or 2.0% bi-axial tensile strain. Here, we report on ultrahigh strains obtained by amplifying the residual strain from novel optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates fabricated by Smart CutTM technology and patterned with micro-bridges and micro-crosses. The high crystalline quality of the GeOI layers dramatically declined the mechanical failure limits when liberating the Ge microbridges. Record level Raman shift of 8.1 cm-1 for biaxial (micro-crosses) and 8.7 cm-1 for uniaxial stress (micro-bridges) were reached by carefully designing the geometry of the micro-structures. The photoluminescence (PL) evolution is compared to theoretical calculations based on the tight-binding model revealing a detailed understanding of the influence of strain on the germanium optical properties.

  15. The UOSAT magnetometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetometer aboard the University of Surrey satellite (UOSAT) and its associated electronics are described. The basic fluxgate magnetometer employed has a dynamic range of plus or minus 8000 nT with outputs digitized by a 12-bit successive approximation A-D converter having a resolution of plus or minus 2 nT. Noise in the 3-13 Hz bandwidth is less than 1 nT. A bias field generator extends the dynamic range to plus or minus 64,000 nT with quantization steps of 8000 nT. The magnetometer experiment is expected to provide information on the secular variation of the geomagnetic field, and the decay rate of the dipole term. Special emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of real time and memory data over the poles which can be correlated with that from Magsat.

  16. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  17. THOR Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Eastwood, Jonathan; Magnes, Werner; Valavanoglou, Aris; Carr, Christopher M.; O'Brien, Helen L.; Narita, Yasuhito; Delva, Magda; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Soucek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The goal of the Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG) is to measure the DC to low frequency ambient magnetic field. The design of the magnetometer consists of two tri-axial sensors and the related magnetometer electronics; the electronics are hosted on printed circuit boards in the common electronics box of the fields and wave processor (FWP). A fully redundant two sensor system mounted on a common boom and the new miniaturized low noise design based on MMS and Solar Orbiter instruments enable accurate measurement throughout the region of interest for THOR science. The usage of the common electronics hosted by FWP guarantees to fulfill the required timing accuracy with other fields measurements. These improvements are important to obtain precise measurements of magnetic field, which is essential to estimate basic plasma parameters and correctly identify the spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence. Furthermore, THOR MAG provides high quality data with sufficient overlap with the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in frequency space to obtain full coverage of the wave forms over all the frequencies necessary to obtain the full solar wind turbulence spectrum from MHD to kinetic range with sufficient accuracy.

  18. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Dearborn, D.; Fischer, D.; Le, G.; Leinweber, H. K.; Leneman, D.; Magnes, W.; Means, J. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nakamura, R.; Pierce, D.; Plaschke, F.; Rowe, K. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R.; Hagen, C.; Jernej, I.; Valavanoglou, A.; Richter, I.

    2016-03-01

    The success of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission depends on the accurate measurement of the magnetic field on all four spacecraft. To ensure this success, two independently designed and built fluxgate magnetometers were developed, avoiding single-point failures. The magnetometers were dubbed the digital fluxgate (DFG), which uses an ASIC implementation and was supplied by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the analogue magnetometer (AFG) with a more traditional circuit board design supplied by the University of California, Los Angeles. A stringent magnetic cleanliness program was executed under the supervision of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory. To achieve mission objectives, the calibration determined on the ground will be refined in space to ensure all eight magnetometers are precisely inter-calibrated. Near real-time data plays a key role in the transmission of high-resolution observations stored on board so rapid processing of the low-resolution data is required. This article describes these instruments, the magnetic cleanliness program, and the instrument pre-launch calibrations, the planned in-flight calibration program, and the information flow that provides the data on the rapid time scale needed for mission success.

  19. The Voyager magnetometer boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft magnetometer experiment utilizes two sensors on a deployable boom. The boom is an Astromast. The implementation of the Astromast into the Voyager design is described along with the hardware used to hold, latch, and deploy the mast and the tests to demonstrate damping, deployment, and alignments. Several problems encountered are discussed and their solutions are given. Flight deployment and preliminary alignment results are presented. Finally, the design is evaluated in retrospect.

  20. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  1. The IRM fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, H.; Kloecker, N.; Oelschlaegel, W.; Haeusler, B.; Acuna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the three-axis fluxgate magnetometer instrument on board the AMPTE IRM spacecraft. Important features of the instrument are its wide dynamic range (0.1-60,000 nT), a high resolution (16-bit analog to digital conversion) and the capability to operate automatically or via telecommand in two gain states. In addition, the wave activity is monitored in all three components up to 50 Hz. Inflight checkout proved the nominal functioning of the instrument in all modes.

  2. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  3. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  4. Precessing Ferromagnetic Needle Magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Jackson Kimball, Derek F; Sushkov, Alexander O; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-13

    A ferromagnetic needle is predicted to precess about the magnetic field axis at a Larmor frequency Ω under conditions where its intrinsic spin dominates over its rotational angular momentum, Nℏ≫IΩ (I is the moment of inertia of the needle about the precession axis and N is the number of polarized spins in the needle). In this regime the needle behaves as a gyroscope with spin Nℏ maintained along the easy axis of the needle by the crystalline and shape anisotropy. A precessing ferromagnetic needle is a correlated system of N spins which can be used to measure magnetic fields for long times. In principle, by taking advantage of rapid averaging of quantum uncertainty, the sensitivity of a precessing needle magnetometer can far surpass that of magnetometers based on spin precession of atoms in the gas phase. Under conditions where noise from coupling to the environment is subdominant, the scaling with measurement time t of the quantum- and detection-limited magnetometric sensitivity is t^{-3/2}. The phenomenon of ferromagnetic needle precession may be of particular interest for precision measurements testing fundamental physics. PMID:27232012

  5. Precessing Ferromagnetic Needle Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek F.; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-05-01

    A ferromagnetic needle is predicted to precess about the magnetic field axis at a Larmor frequency Ω under conditions where its intrinsic spin dominates over its rotational angular momentum, N ℏ≫I Ω (I is the moment of inertia of the needle about the precession axis and N is the number of polarized spins in the needle). In this regime the needle behaves as a gyroscope with spin N ℏ maintained along the easy axis of the needle by the crystalline and shape anisotropy. A precessing ferromagnetic needle is a correlated system of N spins which can be used to measure magnetic fields for long times. In principle, by taking advantage of rapid averaging of quantum uncertainty, the sensitivity of a precessing needle magnetometer can far surpass that of magnetometers based on spin precession of atoms in the gas phase. Under conditions where noise from coupling to the environment is subdominant, the scaling with measurement time t of the quantum- and detection-limited magnetometric sensitivity is t-3 /2. The phenomenon of ferromagnetic needle precession may be of particular interest for precision measurements testing fundamental physics.

  6. Kinetic inductance magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luomahaara, Juho; Vesterinen, Visa; Grönberg, Leif; Hassel, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Sensing ultra-low magnetic fields has various applications in the fields of science, medicine and industry. There is a growing need for a sensor that can be operated in ambient environments where magnetic shielding is limited or magnetic field manipulation is involved. To this end, here we demonstrate a new magnetometer with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The device is based on the current nonlinearity of superconducting material stemming from kinetic inductance. A further benefit of our approach is of extreme simplicity: the device is fabricated from a single layer of niobium nitride. Moreover, radio frequency multiplexing techniques can be applied, enabling the simultaneous readout of multiple sensors, for example, in biomagnetic measurements requiring data from large sensor arrays.

  7. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  8. Miniature Laser Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert; Brown, Andy

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a miniature laser magnetometer (MLM) that will measure the scalar magnitude and vector components of near-Earth magnetic fields. The MLM incorporates a number of technical innovations to achieve high-accuracy and high-resolution performance while significantly reducing the size of the laser-pumped helium magnetometer for use on small satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). and electronics sections that has the capability of measuring both the scalar magnetic field magnitude and the vector magnetic field components. Further more, the high-accuracy scalar measurements are used to calibrate and correct the vector component measurements in order to achieve superior vector accuracy and stability. The correction algorithm applied to the vector components for calibration and the same cell for vector and scalar measurements are major innovations. The separate sensor and electronics section of the MLM instrument allow the sensor to be installed on a boom or otherwise located away from electronics and other noisy magnetic components. The MLM s miniaturization will be accomplished through the use of advanced miniaturized components and packaging methods for the MLM sensor and electronics. The MLM conceptual design includes three key innovations. The first is a new non-magnetic laser package that will allow the placement of the laser pump source near the helium cell sensing elements. The second innovation is the design of compact, nested, triaxial Braunbek coils used in the vector measurements that reduce the coil size by a factor of two compared to existing Helmholtz coils with similar field-generation performance. The third innovation is a compact sensor design that reduces the sensor volume by a factor of eight compared to MLM s predecessor.

  9. The Magsat precision vector magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the Magsat precision vector magnetometer which is designed to measure projections of the ambient field in three orthogonal directions. The system contains a highly stable and linear triaxial fluxgate magnetometer with a dynamic range of + or - 2000 nT (1 nT = 10 to the -9 weber per sq m). The magnetometer electronics, analog-to-digital converter, and digitally controlled current sources are implemented with redundant designs to avoid a loss of data in case of failures. Measurements are carried out with an accuracy of + or - 1 part in 64,000 in magnitude and 5 arcsec in orientation (1 arcsec = 0.00028 deg).

  10. Magnetometers for Geoscience (Christiaan Huygens Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the Earth's magnetic field is one of the first metrological actions of humankind, traceable till about 5000 years BC. It is remarkable that the interest in magnetic fields measurements still is growing and the scope of their applications is getting wider and wider. The progress in the recent 20-30 years in the development of magnetometers of different kinds is highly impressive. Currently practically all scales of the magnetic field values can be measured - from the huge magnetic fields of astronomical objects down to atto-Tesla levels. A modern flux-gate magnetometer (FGM) may cover an amazing dynamic range of the magnetic field, ranging from 10-4 down to 10-12 T, and even lower. The second most important parameter, the zero line drift, may reach below 10-5 of the full measurement scale per year. Development of state of the art FGMs requires profound research activity in various science disciplines: mathematics, metrology, electronics and material science to name a few. This talk reviews the principles of various types of existing magnetometers and their main performance aspects are compared. It is shown that the most suitable type of instrument for measurements of the magnetic fields in the range applicable for geosciences is the FGM. A few highlights of recent developments of FGMs, with record parameters concerning noise level and power consumption, are given. Techniques to lower the noise to a cutting edge level are described and a new physical phenomenon discovered during this development work is reported and explained. Advancement in flux-gate magnetometry is discussed and a few specific examples are presented: a) a one-second INTERMAGNET-compatible FGM, b) a super-low power FGM, c) the lowest available noise FGM and d) the smallest but sensitive FGM for nano-satellites. Finally some applications for FGM use in geosciences are given and envisaged progress in the future development in the field of magnetic observations is discussed.

  11. Lunar surface magnetometer design review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Design and fabrication parameters of a lunar surface magnetometer are discussed. Drawings and requirements for mechanical design, electronic packaging design, thermal design, quality assurance and systems testing are included.

  12. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  13. A 128 x 128 CMOS Active Pixel Image Sensor for Highly Integrated Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, Sunetra K.; Kemeny, Sabrina E.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A new CMOS-based image sensor that is intrinsically compatible with on-chip CMOS circuitry is reported. The new CMOS active pixel image sensor achieves low noise, high sensitivity, X-Y addressability, and has simple timing requirements. The image sensor was fabricated using a 2 micrometer p-well CMOS process, and consists of a 128 x 128 array of 40 micrometer x 40 micrometer pixels. The CMOS image sensor technology enables highly integrated smart image sensors, and makes the design, incorporation and fabrication of such sensors widely accessible to the integrated circuit community.

  14. Microfabricated Spin Polarized Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Martinez, Ricardo

    Spin polarized atomic magnetometers involve the preparation of atomic spins and their detection for monitoring magnetic fields. Due to the fact that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our world, spin polarized atomic magnetometers are used in a wide range of applications from the detection of magnetic fields generated by the human heart and brain to the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance. In this thesis we developed microfabricated spin polarized atomic magnetometers. These sensors are based on optical pumping and spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms and noble gases contained in microfabricated millimeter-scale vapor cells. In the first part of the thesis, we improved different features of current microfabricated optical magnetometers. Specifically, we improved the bandwidth of these devices, without degrading their magnetic field sensitivity, by broadening their magnetic resonance through spin-exchange collisions between alkali atoms. We also implemented all-optical excitation techniques to avoid problems, such as the magnetic perturbation of the environment, induced by the radio-frequency fields used in some of these sensors. In the second part of the thesis we demonstrated a microfluidic chip for the optical production and detection of hyperpolarized Xe gas through spin-exchange collisions with optically pumped Rb atoms. These devices are critical for the widespread use of spin polarized atomic magnetometers in applications requiring simple, compact, low-cost, and portable instrumentation.

  15. Cryogenic High-Sensitivity Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter; Chui, Talso; Goodstein, David

    2005-01-01

    A proposed magnetometer for use in a cryogenic environment would be sensitive enough to measure a magnetic-flux density as small as a picogauss (10(exp -16) Tesla). In contrast, a typical conventional flux-gate magnetometer cannot measure a magnetic-flux density smaller that about 1 microgauss (10(exp -10) Tesla). One version of this device, for operation near the low end of the cryogenic temperature range, would include a piece of a paramagnetic material on a platform, the temperature of which would be controlled with a periodic variation. The variation in temperature would be measured by use of a conventional germanium resistance thermometer. A superconducting coil would be wound around the paramagnetic material and coupled to a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer.

  16. Digital fluxgate magnetometer: design notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyayev, Serhiy; Ivchenko, Nickolay

    2015-12-01

    We presented an approach to understanding the performance of a fully digital fluxgate magnetometer. All elements of the design are important for the performance of the instrument, and the presence of the digital feed-back loop introduces certain peculiarities affecting the noise and dynamic performance of the instrument. Ultimately, the quantisation noise of the digital to analogue converter is found to dominate the noise of the current design, although noise shaping alleviates its effect to some extent. An example of magnetometer measurements on board a sounding rocket is presented, and ways to further improve the performance of the instrument are discussed.

  17. Ultralow-Loss CMOS Copper Plasmonic Waveguides.

    PubMed

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu; Yakubovsky, Dmitry I; Kirtaev, Roman V; Volkov, Valentyn S

    2016-01-13

    Surface plasmon polaritons can give a unique opportunity to manipulate light at a scale well below the diffraction limit reducing the size of optical components down to that of nanoelectronic circuits. At the same time, plasmonics is mostly based on noble metals, which are not compatible with microelectronics manufacturing technologies. This prevents plasmonic components from integration with both silicon photonics and silicon microelectronics. Here, we demonstrate ultralow-loss copper plasmonic waveguides fabricated in a simple complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible process, which can outperform gold plasmonic waveguides simultaneously providing long (>40 μm) propagation length and deep subwavelength (∼λ(2)/50, where λ is the free-space wavelength) mode confinement in the telecommunication spectral range. These results create the backbone for the development of a CMOS plasmonic platform and its integration in future electronic chips. PMID:26654281

  18. Noiseless Coding Of Magnetometer Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Robert F.; Lee, Jun-Ji

    1989-01-01

    Report discusses application of noiseless data-compression coding to digitized readings of spaceborne magnetometers for transmission back to Earth. Objective of such coding to increase efficiency by decreasing rate of transmission without sacrificing integrity of data. Adaptive coding compresses data by factors ranging from 2 to 6.

  19. A subfemtotesla multichannel atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, I. K.; Kornack, T. W.; Allred, J. C.; Romalis, M. V.

    2003-04-01

    The magnetic field is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous physical observables, carrying information about all electromagnetic phenomena. For the past 30 years, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4K have been unchallenged as ultrahigh-sensitivity magnetic field detectors, with a sensitivity reaching down to 1fTHz-1/2 (1fT = 10-15T). They have enabled, for example, mapping of the magnetic fields produced by the brain, and localization of the underlying electrical activity (magnetoencephalography). Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have approached similar levels of sensitivity using large measurement volumes, but have much lower sensitivity in the more compact designs required for magnetic imaging applications. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with non-cryogenic operation of atomic magnetometers would enable new applications, including the possibility of mapping non-invasively the cortical modules in the brain. Here we describe a new spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer, and demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54fTHz-1/2 with a measurement volume of only 0.3cm3. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device are below 0.01fTHz-1/2. We also demonstrate simple multichannel operation of the magnetometer, and localization of magnetic field sources with a resolution of 2mm.

  20. A subfemtotesla multichannel atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kominis, I K; Kornack, T W; Allred, J C; Romalis, M V

    2003-04-10

    The magnetic field is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous physical observables, carrying information about all electromagnetic phenomena. For the past 30 years, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4 K have been unchallenged as ultrahigh-sensitivity magnetic field detectors, with a sensitivity reaching down to 1 fT Hz(-1/2) (1 fT = 10(-15) T). They have enabled, for example, mapping of the magnetic fields produced by the brain, and localization of the underlying electrical activity (magnetoencephalography). Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have approached similar levels of sensitivity using large measurement volumes, but have much lower sensitivity in the more compact designs required for magnetic imaging applications. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with non-cryogenic operation of atomic magnetometers would enable new applications, including the possibility of mapping non-invasively the cortical modules in the brain. Here we describe a new spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer, and demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54 fT Hz(-1/2) with a measurement volume of only 0.3 cm3. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device are below 0.01 fT Hz(-1/2). We also demonstrate simple multichannel operation of the magnetometer, and localization of magnetic field sources with a resolution of 2 mm. PMID:12686995

  1. CMOS-compatible spot-size converter for optical fiber to sub-μm silicon waveguide coupling with low-loss low-wavelength dependence and high tolerance to misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Marie-Josée.; Latrasse, Christine; Larouche, Carl; Painchaud, Yves; Poulin, Michel; Pelletier, François; Guy, Martin

    2016-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges of silicon photonics is the efficient coupling of light between the sub-micron SiP waveguides and a standard optical fiber (SMF-28). We recently proposed a novel approach based on a spot-size converter (SSC) that fulfills this need. The SSC integrates a tapered silicon waveguide and a superimposed structure made of a plurality of rods of high index material, disposed in an array-like configuration and embedded in a cladding of lower index material. This superimposed structure defines a waveguide designed to provide an efficient adiabatic transfer, through evanescent coupling, to a 220 nm thick Si waveguide tapered down to a narrow tip on one side, while providing a large mode overlap to the optical fiber on the other side. An initial demonstration was made using a SSC fabricated with post-processing steps. Great coupling to a SMF-28 fiber with a loss of 0.6 dB was obtained for TEpolarized light at 1550 nm with minimum wavelength dependence. In this paper, SSCs designed for operation at 1310 and 1550 nm for TE/TM polarizations and entirely fabricated in a CMOS fab are presented.

  2. CAOS-CMOS camera.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; La Torre, Juan Pablo; Amin, M Junaid

    2016-06-13

    Proposed and experimentally demonstrated is the CAOS-CMOS camera design that combines the coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager platform with the CMOS multi-pixel optical sensor. The unique CAOS-CMOS camera engages the classic CMOS sensor light staring mode with the time-frequency-space agile pixel CAOS imager mode within one programmable optical unit to realize a high dynamic range imager for extreme light contrast conditions. The experimentally demonstrated CAOS-CMOS camera is built using a digital micromirror device, a silicon point-photo-detector with a variable gain amplifier, and a silicon CMOS sensor with a maximum rated 51.3 dB dynamic range. White light imaging of three different brightness simultaneously viewed targets, that is not possible by the CMOS sensor, is achieved by the CAOS-CMOS camera demonstrating an 82.06 dB dynamic range. Applications for the camera include industrial machine vision, welding, laser analysis, automotive, night vision, surveillance and multispectral military systems. PMID:27410361

  3. Observational magnetometer calibration with the Hubble Space Telescope's new magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broude, Sidney M.

    1995-01-01

    The two magnetometers recently replaced on the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-61 Servicing Mission are now being used successfully for Coarse Attitude Determination during spacecraft vehicle safemode recovery operation. The magnetometer alignments relative to the spacecraft's vehicle's reference frame and the magnetic coupling of the sensors to the four magnetic torquer bars were determined. Coarse Attitude determination errors are now reduced to an average of 0.6 deg. Magnetometer Sensing System calibration and Coarse Attitude determination testing with the new calibration parameters is a geometrical problem. Telemetered earth magnetic field data was collected at twenty-six different vehicle attitudes. The spacecraft attitudes selected were distributed as widely apart as possible throughout the Geocentric Inertial Coordinate reference frame. It is also desirable to sample the Earth's magnetic field over as many different locations of the spacecraft's passage over the Earth as possible, within the limitation of the +/- 28.5 deg orbital inclination. A full range of magnetic moment outputs from the torquer bars needs to be sampled, +/- 3600 ampmeters squared, as well as data when the torquer bars have zero current. Graphic utilities were also developed to visually aid in optimizing the data collection process. Finally, a brief discussion of a method for collecting data for future calibrations is suggested.

  4. Radiation source for helium magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A radiation source (12) for optical magnetometers (10) which use helium isotopes as the resonance element (30) includes an electronically pumped semiconductor laser (12) which produces a single narrow line of radiation which is frequency stabilized to the center frequency of the helium resonance line to be optically pumped. The frequency stabilization is accomplished using electronic feedback (34, 40, 42, 44) to control a current sources (20) thus eliminating the need for mechanical frequency tuning.

  5. Biosensing with integrated CMOS nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ashfaque; Yemenicioglu, Sukru; Chen, Chin-Hsuan; Corgliano, Ellie; Milaninia, Kaveh; Xia, Fan; Plaxco, Kevin; Theogarajan, Luke

    2012-10-01

    This paper outlines our recent efforts in using solid-state nanopores as a biosensing platform. Traditionally biosensors concentrate mainly on the detection platform and not on signal processing. This decoupling can lead to inferior sensors and is exacerbated in nanoscale devices, where device noise is large and large dynamic range is required. This paper outlines a novel platform that integrates the nano, micro and macroscales in a closely coupled manner that mitigates many of these problems. We discuss our initial results of DNA translocation through the nanopore. We also briefly discuss the use of molecular recognition properties of aptamers with the versatility of the nanopore detector to design a new class of biosensors in a CMOS compatible platform.

  6. Atomic magnetometer for human magnetoencephalograpy.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwindt, Peter; Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (<5 fTesla/{radical}Hz), fiber-optically coupled magnetometer to detect magnetic fields produced by the human brain. This is the first demonstration of a noncryogenic sensor that could replace cryogenic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and is an important advance in realizing cost-effective MEG. Within the sensor, a rubidium vapor is optically pumped with 795 laser light while field-induced optical rotations are measured with 780 nm laser light. Both beams share a single optical axis to maximize simplicity and compactness. In collaboration with neuroscientists at The Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM, the evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer and a commercial SQUID-based MEG system with signals comparing favorably. Multi-sensor operation has been demonstrated with two AMs placed on opposite sides of the head. Straightforward miniaturization would enable high-density sensor arrays for whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  7. THEMIS Ground-based Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D.; Means, J. D.; Dearborn, D.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Mende, S.; Craig, N.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a fluxgate suitable for full earth's field ground measurements and to be used for the ground-based segment of the THEMIS project.. The operation of the electronics is based on a 2nd order sigma-delta technique that yields a 24 bit/axis vector value with 4ppm measurement resolution at 2Hz without the use of analog to digital converters. This digital design produces superior noise performance over more conventional techniques while dramatically increasing the resolution of the magnetic field measurement. The magnetometer system is equipped with a DAC offsetting system which by program control can offset the Earth's field in any sensor orientation. Time and position data are maintained to an accuracy of 100usec and 40 meters with a dedicated Trimble Acutime2000 GPS receiver. The magnetometer may be powered from any un-regulated DC source capable of delivering 300ma. @ +10-24VDC. All data are output via USB or RS-232 interface to LabView host software which has been developed to support either Windows or Linux operating systems.Interrogation and control of the magnetometer is available via TCP protocol through a host internet connection.

  8. HTS magnetometers for fetal magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wakai, R T; Paulson, D N; Schwartz, B

    2004-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) SQUID sensors have adequate magnetic field sensitivity for adult magnetocardiography (MCG) measurements, but it remains to be seen how well they perform for fetal MCG (fMCG), where the heart signals are typically ten times smaller than the adult signals. In this study, we assess the performance of a prototype HTS SQUID system; namely, a three-SQUID gradiometer formed from three vertically-aligned HTS dc-SQUID magnetometers integrated into a fiberglass liquid nitrogen dewar of diameter 12.5 cm and height 30 cm. Axial gradiometers with short or long baseline, as well as a second order gradiometer, can be formed out of these magnetometers via electronic subtraction. The calibrated magnetometer sensitivities at 1 kHz are 109 fT/square root of Hz, 155 fT/square root of Hz and 51 fT/square root of Hz. Direct comparison is made between the HTS SQUID system and a LTS SQUID system by making recordings with both systems during the same session on adult and fetal subjects. Although the fMCG could be resolved with the HTS SQUID system in most near-term subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio was relatively low and the system could not be operated outside of a shielded room. PMID:16012655

  9. IR CMOS: infrared enhanced silicon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, M. U.; Carey, J. E.; Haddad, Homayoon; Vineis, C.; Sickler, J.; Li, X.; Jiang, J.; Sahebi, F.; Palsule, C.; McKee, J.

    2013-06-01

    SiOnyx has developed visible and infrared CMOS image sensors leveraging a proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor process technology. This technology demonstrates 10 fold improvements in infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Furthermore, these sensitivity enhancements are achieved on a focal plane with state of the art noise performance of 2 electrons/pixel. By capturing light in the visible regime as well as infrared light from the night glow, this sensor technology provides imaging in daytime through twilight and into nighttime conditions. The measured 10x quantum efficiency at the critical 1064 nm laser node enables see spot imaging capabilities in a variety of ambient conditions. The spectral sensitivity is from 400 to 1200 nm.

  10. A Complete Cubesat Magnetometer System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zesta, Eftyhia

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to provide the center with a fully tested, flexible, low cost, miniaturized science magnetometer system applicable to small satellite programs, like Cubesats, and to rides of opportunity that do not lend themselves to the high integration costs a science magnetometer on a boom necessitates.

  11. Construction of an alternating gradient magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Michael M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetometer is described which was constructed to facilitate the study and characterization of the magnetic properties of high transition temperature superconductors. This instrument was used to measure the dc magnetic susceptibility of several superconducting compounds as a function of temperature. The construction of the magnetometer and the operating parameters are discussed in detail.

  12. High Sensitivity Optically Pumped Quantum Magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Tiporlini, Valentina; Alameh, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Quantum magnetometers based on optical pumping can achieve sensitivity as high as what SQUID-based devices can attain. In this paper, we discuss the principle of operation and the optimal design of an optically pumped quantum magnetometer. The ultimate intrinsic sensitivity is calculated showing that optimal performance of the magnetometer is attained with an optical pump power of 20 μW and an operation temperature of 48°C. Results show that the ultimate intrinsic sensitivity of the quantum magnetometer that can be achieved is 327 fT/Hz1/2 over a bandwidth of 26 Hz and that this sensitivity drops to 130 pT/Hz1/2 in the presence of environmental noise. The quantum magnetometer is shown to be capable of detecting a sinusoidal magnetic field of amplitude as low as 15 pT oscillating at 25 Hz. PMID:23766716

  13. Optical magnetometer array for fetal magnetocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Robert; Kauer, Matthew; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an array of spin-exchange-relaxation-free optical magnetometers designed for detection of fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). The individual magnetometers are configured with a small volume with intense optical pumping, surrounded by a large pump-free region. Spin-polarized atoms that diffuse out of the optical pumping region precess in the ambient magnetic field and are detected by a probe laser. Four such magnetometers, at the corners of a 7 cm square, are configured for gradiometry by feeding back the output of one magnetometer to a field coil to null uniform magnetic field noise at frequencies up to 200 Hz. We present the first measurements of fMCG signals using an atomic magnetometer. PMID:22739870

  14. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  15. Micromachined magnetoflexoelastic resonator based magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoglu, Gokhan; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of a magnetoflexoelastic magnetometer consisting of a micromachined ultra-thin (7.5 μm) quartz bulk acoustic resonator on which 500 nm thick magnetostrictive Metglas® (Fe85B5Si10) film is deposited. The resonance frequency of the unimorph resonator structure is sensitively affected by the magnetostrictively induced flexoelastic effect in quartz and is exploited to detect low frequency (<100 Hz) and nanoTesla magnetic fields. The resonance frequency shift is measured by tracking the at-resonance admittance of the resonator as a function of the applied magnetic field. The frequency shifts are linearly correlated to the magnetic field strength. A minimum detectable magnetic flux density of ˜79 nT has been measured for 10 Hz modulated magnetic field input signals which corresponds to a frequency sensitivity of 0.883 Hz/μT.

  16. Compatible solutes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Recently we reported a role for compatible solute uptake in mediating bile tolerance and increased gastrointestinal persistence in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.1 Herein, we review the evolution in our understanding of how these low molecular weight molecules contribute to growth and survival of the pathogen both inside and outside the body, and how this stress survival mechanism may ultimately be used to target and kill the pathogen. PMID:21326913

  17. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  18. Fetal MCG with Atomic Magnetometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deland, Zack; Bulatowicz, Michael D.; Sulai, Ibrahim A.; Wahl, Colin P.; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2016-05-01

    We present results on the development of 87Rb atomic magnetometers for the detection of a fetal magnetocardiogram (fMCG). Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime, the magnetometers' sensitivities are reported at the 1 fT /√{ Hz } level. Environmental common-mode noise, including the field from the maternal heart, can be suppressed by operating the magnetometers in a gradiometric configuration. We report on schemes from implementing such gradiometers along with recent fMCG measurements. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  19. Fiber-integrated diamond-based magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodi; Cui, Jinming; Sun, Fangwen; Song, Xuerui; Feng, Fupan; Wang, Junfeng; Zhu, Wei; Lou, Liren; Wang, Guanzhong

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated a fiber-integrated diamond-based magnetometer in this paper. In the system, the fluorescence of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds deposited on a tapered fiber was coupled to the tapered fiber effectively and detected at the output end of the fiber. By using this scheme, optically detected electron spin resonance spectra were recorded for single NV centers. The results confirmed that such a tapered fiber-nanodiamond system can act as a magnetometer. Featured with excellent portability, convenient fabrication, and potential for further integration, the constructed system has been demonstrated to be a practical magnetometer prototype.

  20. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  1. Multi-sensor magnetoencephalography with atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cort N; Schwindt, P D D; Weisend, M

    2014-01-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with two independent, simultaneously operating rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometers. Evoked responses from auditory stimulation were recorded from multiple subjects with two multi-channel magnetometers located on opposite sides of the head. Signal processing techniques enabled by multi-channel measurements were used to improve signal quality. This is the first demonstration of multi-sensor atomic magnetometer magnetoencephalography and provides a framework for developing a non-cryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography array for source localization. PMID:23939051

  2. ATS-6 - UCLA fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Snare, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the design of the University of California at Los Angeles' fluxgate magnetometer is presented. Instrument noise in the bandwidth 0.001 to 1.0 Hz is of order 85 m gamma. The DC field of the spacecraft transverse to the earth-pointing axis is 1.0 + or - 21 gamma in the X direction and -2.4 + or - 1.3 gamma in the Y direction. The spacecraft field parallel to this axis is less than 5 gamma. The small spacecraft field has made possible studies of the macroscopic field not previously possible at synchronous orbit. At the 96 W longitude of Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6), the earth's field is typically inclined 30 deg to the dipole axis at local noon. Most perturbations of the field are due to substorms. These consist of a rotation in the meridian to a more radial field followed by a subsequent rotation back. The rotation back is normally accompanied by transient variations in the azimuthal field. The exact timing of these perturbations is a function of satellite location and the details of substorm development.

  3. Sensitivity of double-resonance alignment magnetometers

    SciTech Connect

    Di Domenico, Gianni; Saudan, Herve; Bison, Georg; Knowles, Paul; Weis, Antoine

    2007-08-15

    We present an experimental study of the intrinsic magnetometric sensitivity of an optical or rf-frequency double-resonance magnetometer in which linearly polarized laser light is used in the optical pumping and detection processes. We show that a semiempirical model of the magnetometer can be used to describe the magnetic resonance spectra. Then, we present an efficient method to predict the optimum operating point of the magnetometer, i.e., the light power and rf Rabi frequency providing maximum magnetometric sensitivity. Finally, we apply the method to investigate the evolution of the optimum operating point with temperature. The method is very efficient to determine relaxation rates and thus allowed us to determine the three collisional disalignment cross sections for the components of the alignment tensor. Both first and second harmonic signals from the magnetometer are considered and compared.

  4. The Pioneer XI high field fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The high field fluxgate magnetometer experiment flown aboard the Pioneer XI spacecraft is described. This extremely simple instrument was used to extend the spacecraft's upper-limit measurement capability by approximately an order of magnitude (from 0.14 mT to 1.00 mT) with minimum power and volume requirements. This magnetometer was designed to complement the low-field measurements provided by a helium vector magnetometer and utilizes magnetic ring core sensors with biaxial orthogonal sense coils. The instrument is a single-range, triaxial-fluxgate magnetometer capable of measuring fields of up to 1 mT along each orthogonal axis, with a maximum resolution of 1 microT.

  5. Advanced helium magnetometer for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The goal of this effort was demonstration of the concepts for an advanced helium magnetometer which meets the demands of future NASA earth orbiting, interplanetary, solar, and interstellar missions. The technical effort focused on optical pumping of helium with tunable solid state lasers. We were able to demonstrate the concept of a laser pumped helium magnetometer with improved accuracy, low power, and sensitivity of the order of 1 pT. A number of technical approaches were investigated for building a solid state laser tunable to the helium absorption line at 1083 nm. The laser selected was an Nd-doped LNA crystal pumped by a diode laser. Two laboratory versions of the lanthanum neodymium hexa-aluminate (LNA) laser were fabricated and used to conduct optical pumping experiments in helium and demonstrate laser pumped magnetometer concepts for both the low field vector mode and the scalar mode of operation. A digital resonance spectrometer was designed and built in order to evaluate the helium resonance signals and observe scalar magnetometer operation. The results indicate that the laser pumped sensor in the VHM mode is 45 times more sensitive than a lamp pumped sensor for identical system noise levels. A study was made of typical laser pumped resonance signals in the conventional magnetic resonance mode. The laser pumped sensor was operated as a scalar magnetometer, and it is concluded that magnetometers with 1 pT sensitivity can be achieved with the use of laser pumping and stable laser pump sources.

  6. The Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijn, Alfred; Bethge, Christian; McIntosh, Scott; Tomczyk, Steven; Burkepile, Joan

    2013-04-01

    The Chromosphere and Prominence Magnetometer (ChroMag) is a synoptic instrument with the goal of quantifying the intertwined dynamics and magnetism of the solar chromosphere and in prominences through imaging spectro-polarimetry of the full solar disk in a synoptic fashion. The picture of chromospheric magnetism and dynamics is rapidly developing, and a pressing need exists for breakthrough observations of chromospheric vector magnetic field measurements at the true lower boundary of the heliospheric system. ChroMag will provide measurements that will enable scientists to study and better understand the energetics of the solar atmosphere, how prominences are formed, how energy is stored in the magnetic field structure of the atmosphere and how it is released during space weather events like flares and coronal mass ejections. An essential part of the ChroMag program is a commitment to develop and provide community access to the `inversion' tools necessary to interpret the measurements and derive the magneto-hydrodynamic parameters of the plasma. Measurements of an instrument like ChroMag provide critical physical context for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) as well as ground-based observatories such as the future Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). A prototype is currently under construction at the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, CO, USA. The heart of the ChroMag instrument is an electro-optically tunable wide-fielded narrow-band birefringent six-stage Lyot filter with a built-in polarimeter. We will present a progress update on the ChroMag design, and present results from the prototype instrument.

  7. CCD and CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Nick

    The charge-coupled device (CCD) has been developed primarily as a compact image sensor for consumer and industrial markets, but is now also the preeminent visible and ultraviolet wavelength image sensor in many fields of scientific research including space-science and both Earth and planetary remote sensing. Today"s scientific or science-grade CCD will strive to maximise pixel count, focal plane coverage, photon detection efficiency over the broadest spectral range and signal dynamic range whilst maintaining the lowest possible readout noise. The relatively recent emergence of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor technology is arguably the most important development in solid-state imaging since the invention of the CCD. CMOS technology enables the integration on a single silicon chip of a large array of photodiode pixels alongside all of the ancillary electronics needed to address the array and digitise the resulting analogue video signal. Compared to the CCD, CMOS promises a more compact, lower mass, lower power and potentially more radiation tolerant camera.

  8. High-performance monolithic CMOS detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Vignon, Bruno; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean A.; Corbiere, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2001-12-01

    During the last 10 years, research about CMOS image sensors (also called APS - Active Pixel Sensors) has been intensively carried out, in order to offer an alternative to CCDs as image sensors. This is particularly the case for space applications as CMOS image sensors feature characteristics which are obviously of interest for flight hardware: parallel or semi-parallel architecture, on chip control and processing electronics, low power dissipation, high level of radiation tolerance... Many image sensor companies, institutes and laboratories have demonstrated the compatibility of CMOS image sensors with consumer applications: micro-cameras, video-conferencing, digital- still cameras. And recent designs have shown that APS is getting closer to the CCD in terms of performance level. However, he large majority of the existing products do not offer the specific features which are required for many space applications. ASTRIUM and SUPAERO/CIMI have decided to work together in view of developing CMOS image sensors dedicated to space business. After a brief presentation of the team organization for space image sensor design and production, the latest results of a high performances 512 X 512 pixels CMOS device characterization are presented with emphasis on the achieved electro-optical performance. Finally, the on going and short-term coming activities of the team are discussed.

  9. A phaseonium magnetometer: A new optical magnetometer based on index enhanced media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Marlan O.; Fleischauer, Michael; Graf, Martin

    1993-01-01

    An optical magnetometer based on quantum coherence and interference effects in atoms is proposed. The sensitivity of this device is potentially superior to the present state-of-the-art devices. Optimum operating conditions are derived, and a comparison to standard optical pumping magnetometers is made.

  10. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  11. Large-area low-temperature ultrananocrystaline diamond (UNCD) films and integration with CMOS devices for monolithically integrated diamond MEMD/NEMS-CMOS systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A.V.; Auciello, O.; Yuan, H.-C; Ma, Z.; Carpick, R. W.; Mancini, D. C.; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-05-01

    Because of exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties, diamond has a great potential to be used as a material for the development of high-performance MEMS and NEMS such as resonators and switches compatible with harsh environments, which involve mechanical motion and intermittent contact. Integration of such MEMS/NEMS devices with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) microelectronics will provide a unique platform for CMOS-driven commercial MEMS/NEMS. The main hurdle to achieve diamond-CMOS integration is the relatively high substrate temperatures (600-800 C) required for depositing conventional diamond thin films, which are well above the CMOS operating thermal budget (400 C). Additionally, a materials integration strategy has to be developed to enable diamond-CMOS integration. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), a novel material developed in thin film form at Argonne, is currently the only microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) grown diamond film that can be grown at 400 C, and still retain exceptional mechanical, chemical, and tribological properties comparable to that of single crystal diamond. We have developed a process based on MPCVD to synthesize UNCD films on up to 200 mm in diameter CMOS wafers, which will open new avenues for the fabrication of monolithically integrated CMOS-driven MEMS/NEMS based on UNCD. UNCD films were grown successfully on individual Si-based CMOS chips and on 200 mm CMOS wafers at 400 C in a MPCVD system, using Ar-rich/CH4 gas mixture. The CMOS devices on the wafers were characterized before and after UNCD deposition. All devices were performing to specifications with very small degradation after UNCD deposition and processing. A threshold voltage degradation in the range of 0.08-0.44V and transconductance degradation in the range of 1.5-9% were observed.

  12. The Magnetometer Instrument on MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Acuña, Mario H.; Lohr, David A.; Scheifele, John; Raval, Asseem; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James A.

    2007-08-01

    The Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is a low-noise, tri-axial, fluxgate instrument with its sensor mounted on a 3.6-m-long boom. The boom was deployed on March 8, 2005. The primary MAG science objectives are to determine the structure of Mercury’s intrinsic magnetic field and infer its origin. Mariner 10 observations indicate a planetary moment in the range 170 to 350 nT R {M/3} (where R M is Mercury’s mean radius). The uncertainties in the dipole moment are associated with the Mariner 10 trajectory and variability of the measured field. By orbiting Mercury, MESSENGER will significantly improve the determination of dipole and higher-order moments. The latter are essential to understanding the thermal history of the planet. MAG has a coarse range, ±51,300 nT full scale (1.6-nT resolution), for pre-flight testing, and a fine range, ±1,530 nT full scale (0.047-nT resolution), for Mercury operation. A magnetic cleanliness program was followed to minimize variable and static spacecraft-generated fields at the sensor. Observations during and after boom deployment indicate that the fixed residual field is less than a few nT at the location of the sensor, and initial observations indicate that the variable field is below 0.05 nT at least above about 3 Hz. Analog signals from the three axes are low-pass filtered (10-Hz cutoff) and sampled simultaneously by three 20-bit analog-to-digital converters every 50 ms. To accommodate variable telemetry rates, MAG provides 11 output rates from 0.01 s-1 to 20 s-1. Continuous measurement of fluctuations is provided with a digital 1-10 Hz bandpass filter. This fluctuation level is used to trigger high-time-resolution sampling in eight-minute segments to record events of interest when continuous high-rate sampling is not possible. The MAG instrument will provide accurate characterization of the intrinsic planetary field, magnetospheric structure, and

  13. Automatic magnetometer calibration with small space coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahdan, Ahmed

    The use of a standalone Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has proved to be insufficient when navigating indoors or in urban canyons due to multipath or obstruction. Recent technological advances in low cost micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) -- based sensors (like accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers) enabled the development of sensor-based navigation systems. Although MEMS sensors are low-cost, lightweight, small size, and have low-power consumption, they have complex error characteristics. Accurate computation of the heading angle (azimuth) is one of the most important aspects of any navigation system. It can be computed either by gyroscopes or magnetometers. Gyroscopes are inertial sensors that can provide the angular rate from which the heading can be calculated, however, their outputs drift with time. Moreover, the accumulated errors due to mathematical integration, performed to obtain the heading angle, lead to large heading errors. On the other hand, magnetometers do not suffer from drift and the calculation of heading does not suffer from error accumulation. They can provide an absolute heading from the magnetic north by sensing the earth's magnetic field. However, magnetometer readings are usually affected by magnetic fields, other than the earth magnetic field, and by other error sources; therefore magnetometer calibration is required to use magnetometer as a reliable source of heading in navigation applications. In this thesis, a framework for fast magnetometer calibration is proposed. This framework requires little space coverage with no user involvement in the calibration process, and does not need specific movements to be performed. The proposed techniques are capable of performing both 2-dimensional (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) calibration for magnetometers. They are developed to consider different scenarios suitable for different applications, and can benefit from natural device movements. Some applications involve tethering the

  14. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometer metrological performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, J.; Fratter, I.; Bertrand, F.; Jager, T.; Morales, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) has been developed for the ESA Earth Observation Swarm mission, planned for launch in November 2012. As its Overhauser magnetometers forerunners flown on Oersted and Champ satellites, it will deliver high resolution scalar measurements for the in-flight calibration of the Vector Field Magnetometer manufactured by the Danish Technical University. Latest results of the ground tests carried out to fully characterize all parameters that may affect its accuracy, both at instrument and satellite level, will be presented. In addition to its baseline function, the ASM can be operated either at a much higher sampling rate (burst mode at 250 Hz) or in a dual mode where it also delivers vector field measurements as a by-product. The calibration procedure and the relevant vector performances will be discussed.

  15. MAGDAS I and II Magnetometers in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choque, Ed.; Ishitsuka, J.; Yumoto, K.; Veliz, O.; Rosales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Car negie Institution of Washington founded in 1919 the Huancayo Observatory, in Peru (Lat. -12.060, Long - 75.210) and installed a classical magnetometer which has provided a long standing flow of data since March 1st, 1922. Today, there are 10 magnetometers in operation in Peru. On October 13th, 2006, Space Environment Research Center - SERC of Kyushu University installed a new Magnetic Dat a Acquisition System MAGDAS I (PI; Prof. K. Yumoto) at Ancon Observatory (Geographic Latitude: -11.790, Longitude: - 77.160 and Geomagnetic Latitude (2000): 3.100 and Longitude (2000): 354.660). On July 13th, 2011, SERC installed a MAGDAS II at Ica Solar Station (Geographic Latitude: - 140 04' Longitude: -750 44'). Details of the magnetometer that we are hosting will be explained in this presentation.

  16. Vector magnetometer as an attitude determining instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietila, R.; Dunn, W. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The solid state vector magnetometer sensor system is presented for the accuracy and reliability of existing systems, and for providing independent measures of attitude. Since a large number of aircraft heading reference systems depend on measurement of the earth's magnetic field, it can be shown that by substituting a 3-axis magnetometer for the remote sensing unit, both heading and attitude measurement functions can be derived using common elements. Sample calculations are made using the earth's magnetic field data acquired during actual flight conditions.

  17. Design and simulation of MEMS capacitive magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti, Aditi, Tripathi, C. C.; Gopal, Ram

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of a MEMS Capacitive Magnetometer using FEM (Finite Element Method) tool COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b and results from this simulation are closely matched with analytically calculated results. A comb drive structure is used for actuation purpose which operates at resonant frequency of device is 11.791 kHz to achieve maximum displacement. A magnetic field in z-axis can be detected by this comb drive structure. Quality factor of MEMS capacitive magnetometer obtained is 18 and it has good linear response in the magnetic field range of 100 µT.

  18. Cassini magnetometer measurements in the Jovian environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, M. K.

    2001-05-01

    M. K. Dougherty, and the Cassini magnetometer team The recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter had the spacecraft flying along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere, a region which has only been visited very briefly before during the Ulysses outbound pass. The unique Cassini flyby resulted in the spacecraft making numerous entries into the magnetosheath region as well as into the magnetosphere itself. Initial results from the magnetometer instrument will be described including information concerning the solar wind IMF, the large amount of mirror mode activity measured within the magnetosheath and incursions into the magnetosphere proper.

  19. Magnetometer deployment mechanism for Pioneer Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    A three segment, 15-foot boom mechanism was developed to deploy magnetometers from the Pioneer Venus orbiter spinning shelf. The stowage mechanism is designed to contain the magnetometers during launch and to deploy these instruments by centrifugal force upon pyrotechnic release. Unique graphite-epoxy boom segments are used for a lightweight design with sufficient strength to withstand a 7.5 g orbit insertion force while extended. The detailed design is described along with the test methods developed for qualification in a one-g field.

  20. Magnetometer deployment mechanism for Pioneer Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    A three segment, 15-foot boom mechanism was developed to deploy magnetometers from the Pioneer Venus orbiter spinning shelf. The stowage mechanism is designed to contain the magnetometers during launch and to deploy these instruments by centrifugal force upon pyrotechnic release. Unique graphite-epoxy boom segments are used for a lightweight design with sufficient strength to withstand a 7.5 g orbit insertion force while extended. The detailed design is described, along with the test methods developed for qualification in a one-g field.

  1. Digital flux-gate magnetometer structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Berkman, Rikhard

    1999-08-01

    Analogue and digital structures of the flux-gate magnetometer are compared. The main disturbing factors in digital circuit were singled out and the additional errors associated with the digital structure are estimated. The reader's attention is drawn to some specific problems associated with digital circuits - the special influence of the unbalanced voltage amplitude at the flux-gate-sensor output and ADC-DAC switching-time instabilities. The given analytical results could be useful for the designer when it is necessary to make a choice of the structural type of magnetometer.

  2. Parametric modulation of an atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimin; Wakai, Ronald T.; Walker, Thad G.

    2012-01-01

    The authors report on a rubidium atomic magnetometer designed for use in a shielded environment. Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime, the magnetometer utilizes parametric modulation of the z-magnetic field to suppress noise associated with airflow through the oven and to simultaneously detect x- and y-field components, using a single probe beam, with minimal loss of sensitivity and bandwidth. A white noise level of 60 fT/(Hz)1/2 was achieved. PMID:22942436

  3. A surface-towed vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. S.; Cande, S. C.

    2002-07-01

    We have tested the feasibility of using a commercial motion sensor as a vector magnetometer that can be towed at normal survey speeds behind a research vessel. In contrast to previous studies using a shipboard mounted vector magnetometer, the towed system is essentially unaffected by the magnetization of the towing vessel. Results from a test deployment compare favorably with an earlier vector aeromagnetic survey, indicating that the towed instrument can resolve horizontal and vertical anomalies with amplitudes >30-50 nT. This instrument should be particularly useful in equatorial regions, where the vector anomalies are substantially greater than the corresponding total field anomalies.

  4. Aircraft attitude measurement using a vector magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peitila, R.; Dunn, W. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a vector magnetometer system was investigated by developing a technique to determine attitude given magnetic field components. Sample calculations are then made using the earth's magnetic field data acquired during actual flight conditions. Results of these calculations are compared graphically with measured attitude data acquired simultaneously with the magnetic data. The role and possible implementation of various reference angles are discussed along with other pertinent considerations. Finally, it is concluded that the earth's magnetic field as measured by modern vector magnetometers can play a significant role in attitude control systems.

  5. Parametric modulation of an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Wakai, Ronald T; Walker, Thad G

    2006-01-01

    The authors report on a rubidium atomic magnetometer designed for use in a shielded environment. Operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime, the magnetometer utilizes parametric modulation of the z-magnetic field to suppress noise associated with airflow through the oven and to simultaneously detect x- and y-field components, using a single probe beam, with minimal loss of sensitivity and bandwidth. A white noise level of 60 fT/(Hz)(1/2) was achieved. PMID:22942436

  6. A novel multi-actuation CMOS RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiung-I.; Ko, Chih-Hsiang; Huang, Tsun-Che

    2008-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a capacitive shunt type RF MEMS switch, which is actuated by electro-thermal actuator and electrostatic actuator at the same time, and than latching the switching status by electrostatic force only. Since thermal actuators need relative low voltage compare to electrostatic actuators, and electrostatic force needs almost no power to maintain the switching status, the benefits of the mechanism are very low actuation voltage and low power consumption. Moreover, the RF MEMS switch has considered issues for integrated circuit compatible in design phase. So the switch is fabricated by a standard 0.35um 2P4M CMOS process and uses wet etching and dry etching technologies for postprocess. This compatible ability is important because the RF characteristics are not only related to the device itself. If a packaged RF switch and a packaged IC wired together, the parasitic capacitance will cause the problem for optimization. The structure of the switch consists of a set of CPW transmission lines and a suspended membrane. The CPW lines and the membrane are in metal layers of CMOS process. Besides, the electro-thermal actuators are designed by polysilicon layer of the CMOS process. So the RF switch is only CMOS process layers needed for both electro-thermal and electrostatic actuations in switch. The thermal actuator is composed of a three-dimensional membrane and two heaters. The membrane is a stacked step structure including two metal layers in CMOS process, and heat is generated by poly silicon resistors near the anchors of membrane. Measured results show that the actuation voltage of the switch is under 7V for electro-thermal added electrostatic actuation.

  7. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, J.D.

    1998-06-02

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a series combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electrically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided. 14 figs.

  8. Regenerative switching CMOS system

    DOEpatents

    Welch, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Schottky barrier Field Effect Transistor systems, which are a seriesed combination of N and P-Channel MOSFETS, in which Source Schottky barrier junctions of the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS are electically interconnected, (rather than the Drains as in conventional diffused junction CMOS), which Schottky barrier MOSFET system demonstrates Regenerative Inverting Switching Characteristics in use are disclosed. Both the N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFET devices are unique in that they provide operational Drain Current vs. Drain to Source voltage as a function of Gate voltage only where the polarities of the Drain voltage and Gate voltage are opposite, referenced to the Source as a common terminal, and where the polarity of the voltage applied to the Gate is appropriate to cause Channel inversion. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate and verify the operation of N and P-Channel Schottky barrier MOSFETS actually fabricated on P and N-type Silicon respectively, by a common procedure using vacuum deposited Chromium as a Schottky barrier forming metal, are also provided.

  9. A novel colour-sensitive CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-10-01

    A novel colour-sensitive semiconductor detector is proposed. The device (named Transverse Field Detector (TFD)) can be used to measure the colour of the incident light without any colour filter. The device is completely compatible with standard CMOS processes and is suitable to be integrated in a pixel array for imaging purposes. The working principle is based on the capability of this device to collect at different superficial junctions the carriers, generated at different depths, by means of suitable transverse electric fields. The transverse components of the electric field are generated inside the depleted region by a suitable bias of the superficial junctions. Thanks to the differences in the light absorption coefficients at different wavelengths, the device performs colour separation. Among the advantages of this approach are the capability of an active tuning of the pixel colour response, which can be obtained just by changing the biasing values of collecting junctions, and foreseen higher colour fidelity, thanks to the easy extension to four colour pixels. First test structures of three colours TFD pixels were designed and built in a standard CMOS 90 nm technology. Operative principles of the device and first experimental results are presented.

  10. The DE magnetometer preprocessor users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salter, L. M.; Byrnes, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A users guide for the Dynamics Explorer magnetometer preprocessor computer program is provided. This program is written in Xerox Extended FORTRAN IV and is used to process telemetry data in order to provide data files for use in analysis programs. This preprocessor is designed to operate on the Sigma 9 and the IBM 4341.

  11. Magnetometer networks during the International Magnetosphere Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Regan, R. D.; Sugiura, M.; Williams, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes the geographical layout of the planned North American IMS magnetometer network and outlines some plans regarding instrumentation and data transmission services. The network consists of three meridional high-latitude chains, an east-west chain along the auroral zone, and a network of stations at mid-latitudes. In addition, the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories will have their own network with an east-west chain along geomagnetic latitude 54 N and some other mid-latitude stations. The preliminary magnetometer specifications require that the three-component flux gate magnetometer be accurate to within 0.25 gamma and that each axis be sampled every 10 sec. A block diagram is presented showing the proposed magnetometer station, of which the most complex piece of equipment will be the interface controller. The SMS-GOES satellite telemetry relay capability will be used for transmission of data from a selected network of magnetic stations to the Space Environment Laboratory in Boulder.

  12. Diffusive suppression of AC-Stark shifts in atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, I. A.; Wyllie, R.; Kauer, M.; Smetana, G. S.; Wakai, R. T.; Walker, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In atomic magnetometers, the vector AC-Stark shift associated with circularly polarized light generates spatially varying effective magnetic fields, which limit the magnetometer response and serve as sources of noise. We describe a scheme whereby optically pumping a small subvolume of the magnetometer cell and relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms allows a magnetometer to be operated with minimal sensitivity to the AC-Stark field. © 2013 Optical Society of America PMID:23503278

  13. Method of performing MRI with an atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry; Zotev, Vadim Sergeyevich

    2012-11-06

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing an in-situ magnetic resonance imaging of an object. The method includes the steps of providing an atomic magnetometer, coupling a magnetic field generated by magnetically resonating samples of the object through a flux transformer to the atomic magnetometer and measuring a magnetic resonance of the atomic magnetometer.

  14. Method of performing MRI with an atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Espy, Michelle A; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry; Zotev, Vadim Sergeyevich

    2013-08-27

    A method and apparatus are provided for performing an in-situ magnetic resonance imaging of an object. The method includes the steps of providing an atomic magnetometer, coupling a magnetic field generated by magnetically resonating samples of the object through a flux transformer to the atomic magnetometer and measuring a magnetic resonance of the atomic magnetometer.

  15. Super-light Magnetometers For Nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkman, R.; Korepanov, V.; Marussenkov, A.; Sukhynyuk, A.

    The modern tendency to decrease the weight and dimensions of the space vehicles, especially for scientific research, imply corresponding requirements to the scientific payload too. A correlation between metrological parameters (particularly sensitivity and own noise level) and mass, dimensions and power consumption of search-coil (SC) and flux gate (FG) magnetometers was studied. In this abstract both these prob- lems are considered. In order to decrease the SC weight it appeared to be necessary to derive the common equations, which describe minimum mass criterion for search- coil sensors in different frequency bands. The corresponding algorithm, based upon "generalized" SC parameters was introduced and a set of stable combinations, rela- tively independent on dimensions, number of turns and intended frequency band was developed. It was also revealed that the preamplifier connected to SC has to be charac- terized by extended set of 8 known noise parameters. As a result, the new approach of calculation and design of minimum-weight of SC magnetometers was proposed. All that allowed to manufacture first model of space qualified SC magnetometers with the following parameters: weight - 75 g, noise level density - 2 fT/sqrt(Hz) at 50 kHz. The most important problem for super-light FG magnetometers creation with low power consumption is to reduce the FG sensor (FGS) excitation power. Based on earlier de- veloped ferroresonance excitation mode a new study in this direction was made. The relations allowing to estimate the minimally possible FGS excitation power were de- rived, which allow for the given FGS dimensions and given mumetal saturation level to determine the required power. It was obtained that if we diminish the FGS volume in n^3 times, the possible power drop is only n times. Using new methodology a set of super-light FG magnetometers was manufactured with the sensor about 12 x 5 x 5 mm, consumed power about 2 mW and noise level density about 100 pT/sqrt(Hz) at

  16. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  17. A Web Server for MACCS Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG5-3719 was provided to Augsburg College to support the development of a web server for the Magnetometer Array for Cusp and Cleft Studies (MACCS), a two-dimensional array of fluxgate magnetometers located at cusp latitudes in Arctic Canada. MACCS was developed as part of the National Science Foundation's GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) Program, which was designed in part to complement NASA's Global Geospace Science programs during the decade of the 1990s. This report describes the successful use of these grant funds to support a working web page that provides both daily plots and file access to any user accessing the worldwide web. The MACCS home page can be accessed at http://space.augsburg.edu/space/MaccsHome.html.

  18. A back-illuminated megapixel CMOS image sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jones, Todd; Wrigley, Chris; Hancock, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the test and characterization results for a back-illuminated megapixel CMOS imager. The imager pixel consists of a standard junction photodiode coupled to a three transistor-per-pixel switched source-follower readout [1]. The imager also consists of integrated timing and control and bias generation circuits, and provides analog output. The analog column-scan circuits were implemented in such a way that the imager could be configured to run in off-chip correlated double-sampling (CDS) mode. The imager was originally designed for normal front-illuminated operation, and was fabricated in a commercially available 0.5 pn triple-metal CMOS-imager compatible process. For backside illumination, the imager was thinned by etching away the substrate was etched away in a post-fabrication processing step.

  19. Science Highlights from the Cassini magnetometer instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, Michele

    2014-05-01

    The Cassini dual technique magnetometer instrument has been taking data in the Saturn system for the last 10 years. Science highlights encompass topics including the magnetosphere and its aurora, the internal dynamo magnetic field of Saturn, the icy satellites and Enceladus in particular, as well as the large moon Titan. The science discoveries will be described as well as important science observations yet to be made in the remaining 4 years of the mission.

  20. High temperature superconductive flux gate magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gershenson, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper proposes a different type of HTS superconducting magnetometer based on the non-linear magnetic behavior of bulk HTS materials. The device design is based on the generation of second harmonics which arise as a result of non-linear magnetization observed in Type-II superconductors. Even harmonics are generated from the non-linear interaction of an ac excitation signal with an external DC magnetic field which acts as a bias signal.

  1. Superconducting Nanobridge SQUID Magnetometers for Spin Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antler, Natania

    As the cutting edge of science and technology pushes towards smaller length scales, sensing technologies with nanoscale precision become increasingly important. In this thesis I will discuss the optimization and application of a 3D nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for studying solid state spin systems, in particular for sensing impurity spins in diamond. Solid state spins have proposed applications in memory and computation for both classical and quantum computing. Isolated spins typically have longer coherence times, making them attractive qubit candidates, but necessitating the development of very sensitive detectors for readout. This 3D nanobridge SQUID combines the exquisite spatial sensitivity of a traditional nanoSQUID with a large non-linearity on par with a tunnel junction SQUID. This allows us to build a highly sensitive magnetometer which can act as both an efficient flux transducer as well as a nearly quantum limited lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier. We show that the device has a minimum flux noise of 17 +/- 0.9 nphi0/Hz1/2 with only a factor of ˜2.5 increase in flux noise up to 61 mT. A second generation device with a smaller capacitor achieves field tolerance up to 75 mT. The maximal bandwidth values range from 25-40 MHz in the parametric amplification regime to 70 MHz in the linear regime. This combination of large bandwidth, low flux noise, large flux coupling and field tolerance make this sensor a promising candidate for near-single-spin dynamics measurements. In the last part of this thesis we begin to demonstrate the utility of a nanobridge SQUID magnetometer for characterizing spin systems in the solid state. We use the magnetometer to measure the decay characteristics of P1 centers in diamond. We find that the spin-lattice relaxation time varies with temperature, with an order of magnitude decrease in the decay time between 25 mK and 370 mK.

  2. Fluxgate magnetometers for outer planets exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The exploration of the interplanetary medium and the magnetospheres of the outer planets requires the implementation of magnetic field measuring instrumentation with wide dynamic range, high stability, and reliability. The fluxgate magnetometers developed for the Pioneer 11 and Mariner-Jupiter-Saturn missions are presented. These instruments cover the range of .01 nT to 2 million nT with optimum performance characteristics and low power consumption.

  3. The MAGSAT vector magnetometer: A precision fluxgate magnetometer for the measurement of the geomagnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Scearce, C. S.; Seek, J.; Scheifele, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the precision triaxial fluxgate magnetometer to be flown aboard the MAGSAT spacecraft is presented. The instrument covers the range of + or - 64,000 nT with a resolution of + or - 0.5 nT, an intrinsic accuracy of + or - 0.001% of full scale and an angular alignment stability of the order of 2 seconds of arc. It was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and represents the state-of-the-art in precision vector magnetometers developed for spaceflight use.

  4. Large area CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, R.; Guerrini, N.; Sedgwick, I.

    2011-01-01

    CMOS image sensors, also known as CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) or Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS), are today the dominant imaging devices. They are omnipresent in our daily life, as image sensors in cellular phones, web cams, digital cameras, ... In these applications, the pixels can be very small, in the micron range, and the sensors themselves tend to be limited in size. However, many scientific applications, like particle or X-ray detection, require large format, often with large pixels, as well as other specific performance, like low noise, radiation hardness or very fast readout. The sensors are also required to be sensitive to a broad spectrum of radiation: photons from the silicon cut-off in the IR down to UV and X- and gamma-rays through the visible spectrum as well as charged particles. This requirement calls for modifications to the substrate to be introduced to provide optimized sensitivity. This paper will review existing CMOS image sensors, whose size can be as large as a single CMOS wafer, and analyse the technical requirements and specific challenges of large format CMOS image sensors.

  5. Ground magnetometer survey in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trible, M. C.

    1972-01-01

    A reconnaissance magnetometer survey was conducted with both total- and vertical-field magnetometers. The large, sharp, narrow total magnetic anomalies observed over a zone of relict fumaroles in Broken Mountain Valley showed spectacular agreement with the surficial geology. Such a correlation is a strong indication that accumulations of magnetic minerals have been preserved along these fissure vents at shallow depths. Since large magnetic anomalies were measured near fumarolic markings along all of the traverses, it is proposed that the retention of sublimates along fumarolic vents is common throughout the Valley. The generally concentric contours of the vertical magnetic anomaly at the head of the Valley suggest that the dome of Novarupta is merely the surficial expression of a very massive conical-shaped intrusive centered just northeast of the dome. The magnetometer survey indicates that the pyroclastics in the Valley may be over 150 meters thick. Such an estimate is compatible with the volume of eruptive material needed to compensate for the subsidence surrounding Novarupta as well as a sizable amount of other regional subsidence.

  6. Optimization of buffer gas pressure for Rb atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chang; Liu, Xiaohu; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong

    2015-08-01

    The optimization of buffer gas pressure is very important to improve the performance of the rubidium (Rb) atomic magnetometer. In this paper we briefly introduce the basic principle and the experimental method of the rubidium magnetometer based on Faraday rotation effect, and describe the factors affecting the magnetometer sensitivity, then analyze and summarize the mechanism of the influence of spin-exchange, spin-destruction collisions, radiation trapping and the spin diffusion on spin relaxation of Rb atoms. Based on this, the relationship between the rubidium magnetometer sensitivity, the spin relaxation rate and the gas chamber conditions (buffer gas pressure, the bubble radius, measuring temperature) is established. Doing calculations by the simulation software, how the magnetometer sensitivity and the relaxation rate vary with the gas chamber conditions can be seen; finally, the optimal values of the buffer gas pressure under certain gas chamber conditions are obtained. The work is significant for the engineering development of rubidium magnetometer.

  7. The atomic magnetometer: A new era in biomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-11-01

    The high cost and impracticality of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometers has limited the expansion of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG), especially in countries where the cost of liquid helium is high. A recent breakthrough, however, has the potential to radically change this situation. In 2003, a group at Princeton University demonstrated an atomic magnetometer, known as the SERF (spin-exchange free relaxation) magnetometer, with unprecedented sensitivity. Since then, several research groups have utilized SERF magnetometers to record MEG, MCG, and fetal MCG signals. Despite some modest drawbacks, it now seems almost certain that SERF magnetometers can replace SQUIDs for many applications. With a price tag that is likely to be far less than that of SQUIDs, SERF magnetometers can propel the next wave of growth in biomagnetism.

  8. The atomic magnetometer: A new era in biomagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Wakai, Ronald T.

    2014-11-07

    The high cost and impracticality of SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) magnetometers has limited the expansion of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG), especially in countries where the cost of liquid helium is high. A recent breakthrough, however, has the potential to radically change this situation. In 2003, a group at Princeton University demonstrated an atomic magnetometer, known as the SERF (spin-exchange free relaxation) magnetometer, with unprecedented sensitivity. Since then, several research groups have utilized SERF magnetometers to record MEG, MCG, and fetal MCG signals. Despite some modest drawbacks, it now seems almost certain that SERF magnetometers can replace SQUIDs for many applications. With a price tag that is likely to be far less than that of SQUIDs, SERF magnetometers can propel the next wave of growth in biomagnetism.

  9. A CCD/CMOS process for integrated image acquisition and early vision signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keast, Craig L.; Sodini, Charles G.

    The development of technology which integrates a four phase, buried-channel CCD in an existing 1.75 micron CMOS process is described. The four phase clock is employed in the integrated early vision system to minimize process complexity. Signal corruption is minimized and lateral fringing fields are enhanced by burying the channel. The CMOS process for CCD enhancement is described, which highlights a new double-poly process and the buried channel, and the integration is outlined. The functionality and transfer efficiency of the process enhancement were appraised by measuring CCD shift registers at 100 kHz. CMOS measurement results are presented, which include threshold voltages, poly-to-poly capacitor voltage and temperature coefficients, and dark current. A CCD/CMOS processor is described which combines smoothing and segmentation operations. The integration of the CCD and the CMOS processes is found to function due to the enhancement-compatible design of the CMOS process and the thorough employment of CCD module baseline process steps.

  10. International solar polar mission: The vector helium magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The functional requirements for the vector helium magnetometer (VHM) on the Solar Polar spacecraft are presented. The VHM is one of the two magnetometers on board that will measure the vector magnetic field along the Earth to Jupiter transfer trajectory, as well as in the vicinity of Jupiter and along the solar polar orbit following the Jupiter encounter. The interconnection between these two magnetometers and their shared data processing unit is illustrated.

  11. Pulsed 3-Axis Vector SERF Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedges, Morgan; Romalis, Michael

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a 3-axis atomic vector magnetometer operating in the SERF regime, using a single beam path, and capable of operating in Earth's field using field feedback. It has similar sensitivity along all 3 axes that is fundamentally limited by photon and atom shot noise. The scheme uses a high intensity pump pulse to polarize Rb atoms in ~ 1 μs and a sequence of magnetic field pulses applied while the atoms are monitored during free precession. The sequence used provides minimal sensitivity to pulse errors, while also allowing unambiguous discrimination between external magnetic fields and misalignment between laser and magnetic coil axes.

  12. Magnetometer Based on Optoelectronic Microwave Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    proposed instrument, intended mainly for use as a magnetometer, would include an optoelectronic oscillator (OEO) stabilized by an atomic cell that could play the role of a magnetically tunable microwave filter. The microwave frequency would vary with the magnetic field in the cell, thereby providing an indication of the magnetic field. The proposed magnetometer would offer a combination of high accuracy and high sensitivity, characterized by flux densities of less than a picotesla. In comparison with prior magnetometers, the proposed magnetometer could, in principle, be constructed as a compact, lightweight instrument: It could fit into a package of about 10 by 10 by 10 cm and would have a mass <0.5 kg. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, an OEO is a hybrid of photonic and electronic components that generates highly spectrally pure microwave radiation, and optical radiation modulated by the microwave radiation, through direct conversion between laser light and microwave radiation in an optoelectronic feedback loop. As used here, "atomic cell" signifies a cell containing a vapor, the constituent atoms of which can be made to undergo transitions between quantum states, denoted hyperfine levels, when excited by light in a suitable wavelength range. The laser light must be in this range. The energy difference between the hyperfine levels defines the microwave frequency. In the proposed instrument (see figure), light from a laser would be introduced into an electro-optical modulator (EOM). Amplitude-modulated light from the exit port of the EOM would pass through a fiber-optic splitter having two output branches. The light in one branch would be sent through an atomic cell to a photodiode. The light in the other branch would constitute the microwave-modulated optical output. Part of the light leaving the atomic cell could also be used to stabilize the laser at a frequency in the vicinity of the desired hyperfine or other quantum transition. The

  13. Postflight evaluation of the solar maximum spacecraft magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was launched February 14, 1980 from Cape Kennedy. Attached to one side of the spacecraft was the Modular Attitude Control System (MACS). Two Schonstedt magnetometers were located within the MACS module. Although primarily used as a backup attitude determination system during the Solar Maximum Repair Mission, the magnetometers were instrumental in stabilizing the spacecraft. In October of 1984 the Solar Maximum magnetometers were returned to Schonstedt Instrument Company for postflight analysis, where they were subjected to the same electrical performance tests performed prior to use. In both instances the magnetometer performance was exceptional. Postflight test data nearly duplicated preflight test data.

  14. Autonomous navigation system based on GPS and magnetometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julie, Thienel K. (Inventor); Richard, Harman R. (Inventor); Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention is drawn to an autonomous navigation system using Global Positioning System (GPS) and magnetometers for low Earth orbit satellites. As a magnetometer is reliable and always provides information on spacecraft attitude, rate, and orbit, the magnetometer-GPS configuration solves GPS initialization problem, decreasing the convergence time for navigation estimate and improving the overall accuracy. Eventually the magnetometer-GPS configuration enables the system to avoid costly and inherently less reliable gyro for rate estimation. Being autonomous, this invention would provide for black-box spacecraft navigation, producing attitude, orbit, and rate estimates without any ground input with high accuracy and reliability.

  15. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal K.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2×2×5 cm3 and is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/√Hz, which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM. PMID:24200837

  16. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  17. Verilog-A Device Models for Cryogenic Temperature Operation of Bulk Silicon CMOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturk, Akin; Potbhare, Siddharth; Goldsman, Neil; Holloway, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Verilog-A based cryogenic bulk CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compact models are built for state-of-the-art silicon CMOS processes. These models accurately predict device operation at cryogenic temperatures down to 4 K. The models are compatible with commercial circuit simulators. The models extend the standard BSIM4 [Berkeley Short-channel IGFET (insulated-gate field-effect transistor ) Model] type compact models by re-parameterizing existing equations, as well as adding new equations that capture the physics of device operation at cryogenic temperatures. These models will allow circuit designers to create optimized, reliable, and robust circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures.

  18. Vectorial atomic magnetometer using electronic and nuclear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Binquan; Chen, Linlin; Lei, Guanqun; Meng, Xiaofeng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-05-01

    We present an experimental study of a vectorial atomic magnetometer, which can measure three-dimensional magnetic field simultaneously. The experimental setup for magnetometer has been described in the literature. Where an external magnetic field is added parallel to the pumping light, that the goal is to switch the nuclear spin state form an undesired state to the desired state creating a gas whose atoms are completely aligned. A probe light is added perpendicular to the pumping light. When there is transverse alternating magnetic field, the probe light will be modulated by the spin procession. We obtain the two transverse magnetic fields signal through the in-phase and out-of-phase of a lock-in amplifier, At the same time, the external magnetic field held constant relative to the external frequency reference, two nuclear signals can be used to measure z vertical magnetic field by comparing the measured two nuclear signal to a second stable reference signal generated by the same external frequency. Once the output signal is feedbacked to the coil, the external three-dimensional magnetic field is measured in real-time. The dynamic range can be adjusted through the external magnetic field,so this method can be used both in the magnetic surveys and in the prospecting field range. This work was supported in part by the NSF of China (61227902,61374210,61121003).

  19. Juno Magnetometer Observations in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Espley, J. R.; MacDowall, R. J.; Schnurr, R.; Sheppard, D.; Odom, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Joergensen, J. L.; Joergensen, P. S.; Merayo, J. M.; Denver, T.; Bloxham, J.; Smith, E. J.; Murphy, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft enjoyed a close encounter with Earth on October 9, 2013, en route to Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) on July 5, 2016. The Earth Flyby (EFB) provided a unique opportunity for the Juno particles and fields instruments to sample mission relevant environments and exercise operations anticipated for orbital operations at Jupiter, particularly the period of intense activity around perijove. The magnetic field investigation onboard Juno is equipped with two magnetometer sensor suites, located at 10 and 12 m from the spacecraft body at the end of one of the three solar panel wings. Each contains a vector fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) sensor and a pair of co-located non-magnetic star tracker camera heads which provide accurate attitude determination for the FGM sensors. This very capable magnetic observatory sampled the Earth's magnetic field at 64 vector samples/second throughout passage through the Earth's magnetosphere. We present observations of the Earth's magnetic field and magnetosphere obtained throughout the encounter and compare these observations with those of other Earth-orbiting assets, as available, and with particles and fields observations acquired by other Juno instruments operated during EFB.

  20. Magnetoresistive magnetometer for space science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Beek, T.; Carr, C.; O'Brien, H.; Cupido, E.; Oddy, T.; Horbury, T. S.

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of the in situ dc magnetic field on space science missions is most commonly achieved using instruments based on fluxgate sensors. Fluxgates are robust, reliable and have considerable space heritage; however, their mass and volume are not optimized for deployment on nano or picosats. We describe a new magnetometer design demonstrating science measurement capability featuring significantly lower mass, volume and to a lesser extent power than a typical fluxgate. The instrument employs a sensor based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) achieving a noise floor of less than 50 pT Hz-1/2 above 1 Hz on a 5 V bridge bias. The instrument range is scalable up to ±50 000 nT and the three-axis sensor mass and volume are less than 10 g and 10 cm3, respectively. The ability to switch the polarization of the sensor's easy axis and apply magnetic feedback is used to build a driven first harmonic closed loop system featuring improved linearity, gain stability and compensation of the sensor offset. A number of potential geospace applications based on the initial instrument results are discussed including attitude control systems and scientific measurement of waves and structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. A flight version of the AMR magnetometer will fly on the TRIO-CINEMA mission due to be launched in 2012.

  1. Automated system for the calibration of magnetometers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrucha, Vojtech; Kaspar, Petr; Ripka, Pavel; Merayo, Jose M. G.

    2009-04-01

    A completely nonmagnetic calibration platform has been developed and constructed at DTU Space (Technical University of Denmark). It is intended for on-site scalar calibration of high-precise fluxgate magnetometers. An enhanced version of the same platform is being built at the Czech Technical University. There are three axes of rotation in this design (compared to two axes in the previous version). The addition of the third axis allows us to calibrate more complex devices. An electronic compass based on a vector fluxgate magnetometer and micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer is one example. The new platform can also be used to evaluate the parameters of the compass in all possible variations in azimuth, pitch, and roll. The system is based on piezoelectric motors, which are placed on a platform made of aluminum, brass, plastic, and glass. Position sensing is accomplished through custom-made optical incremental sensors. The system is controlled by a microcontroller, which executes commands from a computer. The properties of the system as well as calibration and measurement results will be presented.

  2. CMOS VLSI Active-Pixel Sensor for Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Sun, Chao; Yang, Guang; Heynssens, Julie

    2004-01-01

    An architecture for a proposed active-pixel sensor (APS) and a design to implement the architecture in a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit provide for some advanced features that are expected to be especially desirable for tracking pointlike features of stars. The architecture would also make this APS suitable for robotic- vision and general pointing and tracking applications. CMOS imagers in general are well suited for pointing and tracking because they can be configured for random access to selected pixels and to provide readout from windows of interest within their fields of view. However, until now, the architectures of CMOS imagers have not supported multiwindow operation or low-noise data collection. Moreover, smearing and motion artifacts in collected images have made prior CMOS imagers unsuitable for tracking applications. The proposed CMOS imager (see figure) would include an array of 1,024 by 1,024 pixels containing high-performance photodiode-based APS circuitry. The pixel pitch would be 9 m. The operations of the pixel circuits would be sequenced and otherwise controlled by an on-chip timing and control block, which would enable the collection of image data, during a single frame period, from either the full frame (that is, all 1,024 1,024 pixels) or from within as many as 8 different arbitrarily placed windows as large as 8 by 8 pixels each. A typical prior CMOS APS operates in a row-at-a-time ( grolling-shutter h) readout mode, which gives rise to exposure skew. In contrast, the proposed APS would operate in a sample-first/readlater mode, suppressing rolling-shutter effects. In this mode, the analog readout signals from the pixels corresponding to the windows of the interest (which windows, in the star-tracking application, would presumably contain guide stars) would be sampled rapidly by routing them through a programmable diagonal switch array to an on-chip parallel analog memory array. The

  3. Internet Access to ISEE-1 and 2 Magnetometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is reported that the entire ISEE-1 and -2 magnetometer data are placed on-line, using an 8 Gbyte disk drive. The data are stored at 4-s and 60-s resolution. Also, an interactive world wide web page, which allows to plot, on request, any interval for which magnetometer data are available, is developed.

  4. Magnetometers. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning magnetometer devices and equipment used in detection, control, and survey systems. The design, fabrication, and application of magnetometers using thin film, optical, nuclear, and electron beam technologies are discussed. Applications include navigation systems, vehicle direction control, and natural resource exploration. (Contains a minimum of 204 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Magnetic field satellite /MAGSAT/ spacecraft vector magnetometer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkal, S. W.

    1980-01-01

    The low-flying MAGSAT spacecraft, launched October 30, 1979, included a Vector Magnetometer to accurately map the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field of the earth. Calibration of the magnetometer included arc-second precision determination of the relative orientations of the three sensor axes in a coordinate system defined by optical references. This determination began with laboratory measurements of the relative alignments of optical components mounted with the magnetometer. The actual calibration procedure then consisted basically of accurate and repeatable positioning of the Vector Magnetometer within a unique magnetic test facility which nulls the earth's magnetic field, then generates magnetic fields of various orientations and strengths. Analysis of the magnetometer sensor outputs together with the position and alignment data then gave the axes orientations. We used precision theodolites and methods related to surveying techniques to achieve the accurate positioning and optical component alignment measurements. The final calibration accuracy exceeded results previously achieved in the facility.

  6. Detection of brain magnetic fields with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hui; Hoffman, Dan; Baranga, Andrei; Romalis, Michael

    2006-05-01

    We report detection of magnetic fields generated by evoked brain activity with an atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed with a high-density potassium magnetometer operating in a spin-exchange relaxation free regime. Compared to SQUID magnetometers which so far have been the only detectors capable of measuring the magnetic fields from the brain, atomic magnetometers have the advantages of higher sensitivity and spatial resolution, simple multi-channel recording, and no need for cryogenics. Using a multi-channel photodetector array we recorded magnetic fields from the brain correlated with an audio tone administered with a non-magnetic earphone. The spatial map of the magnetic field gives information about the location of the brain region responding to the auditory stimulation. Our results demonstrate the atomic magnetometer as an alternative and low cost technique for brain imaging applications, without using cryogenic apparatus.

  7. Prototyping of an HV-CMOS demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, E.; Benoit, M.; Casanova, R.; Casse, G.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Peric, I.; Vossebeld, J.

    2016-01-01

    HV-CMOS sensors can offer important advantages in terms of material budget, granularity and cost for large area tracking systems in high energy physics experiments. This article presents the design and simulated results of an HV-CMOS pixel demonstrator for the High Luminosity-LHC. The pixel demonstrator has been designed in the 0.35 μm HV-CMOS process from ams AG and submitted for fabrication through an engineering run. To improve the response of the sensor, different wafers with moderate to high substrate resistivities are used to fabricate the design. The prototype consists of four large analog and standalone matrices with several pixel flavours, which are all compatible for readout with the FE-I4 ASIC. Details about the matrices and the pixel flavours are provided in this article.

  8. On Software Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ershov, Andrei P.

    The problem of compatibility of software hampers the development of computer application. One solution lies in standardization of languages, terms, peripherais, operating systems and computer characteristics. (AB)

  9. Magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Papoyan, Aram; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Alen; Khanbekyan, Karen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A concept for an optical magnetometer used for the measurement of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field (B-field) in two orthogonal directions is developed based on double scanning of a B-field to compensate the measured field to zero value, which is monitored by a resonant magneto-optical process in an unshielded atomic vapor cell. Implementation of the technique using the nonlinear Hanle effect on the D2 line of rubidium demonstrates viability and efficiency of the proposed concept. The ways to enhance characteristics of the suggested technique and optimize its performance, as well as the possible extension to three-axis magnetometry, are discussed. PMID:26836097

  10. Free-Flying Magnetometer Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, B.; Javadi, H.; Spencer, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) is an autonomous "sensorcraft" developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy sounding rocket mission. This mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University and JPL. The science goal of the mission was the study of current filamentation phenomena in the northern auroral region through multipoint measurements of magnetic field. The technical objective of the mission was the proof of concept of the JPL FFM design and the demonstration of an in-situ multipoint measurement technique employing many free-flying spacecraft. Four FFMs were successfully deployed from a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. These hockey-puck-sized (80 mm diameter, 38 mm. height, 250 gram mass) free flyers each carry a miniature 3-axis flux-gate magnetometer that output +/- 2 V signals corresponding to a +/- 60,000 nT measurement range for each axis. The FFM uses a synchronized four-channel Sigma(Delta) Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) having a dynamic range of +/- 2.5V and converting at a rate of 279 samples/second/channel. Three channels are used to digitize the magnetometer signals to 17-bit (1.144 nT/bit) resolution. The fourth ADC channel is multiplexed for system monitoring of four temperature sensors and two battery voltages. The FFM also contains two sun sensors, a laser diode which emits a fan-shaped beam, a miniature S-band transmitter for direct communication to the ground station antennas, an ultra-stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, an integrated data subsystem implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), a 4 Mbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) for data storage and Lithium Thionyl Chloride batteries for power. Communicating commands to the FFM prior to deployment is achieved with an infrared (IR) link. The FFM IR receiver responds to 9-bit pulse coded signals that are generated by an IR Light Emitting

  11. Fetal Magnetocardiography with an Atomic Magnetometer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Deland, Zack; Wahl, Colin; Wakai, Ronald; Walker, Thad

    2014-05-01

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) is a powerful technique for analyzing the heartbeat patterns of inutero fetuses. We present results from our array of four Spin-Exchange Relaxation-Free (SERF) rubidium-87 atomic magnetometers which has been used to detect and create these magnetocardiograms. We have demonstrated a magnetic noise sensitivity of < 10 fT /√{ Hz} , limited by the Johnson noise of the magnetically-shielded room. We discuss new design features and experimental practices that have increased our sensitivity and allowed us to successfully measure an fMCG at a gestational age of only 21 weeks. We hope to eventually apply these techniques to the detection and diagnosis of heartbeat arrhythmias, which, if detected early enough, can be treated inutero . This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health.

  12. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm CMOS foundry process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, A.; Yemenicioglu, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Corigliano, E.; Milaninia, K.; Theogarajan, L.

    2013-04-01

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA-base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor’s 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the n+ polysilicon/SiO2/n+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3, which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3.

  13. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm CMOS foundry process.

    PubMed

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-04-19

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA-base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor's 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the n+ polysilicon/SiO2/n+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3, which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  14. Integration of solid-state nanopores in a 0.5 μm cmos foundry process

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, A; Yemenicioglu, S; Chen, C-H; Corigliano, E; Milaninia, K; Theogarajan, L

    2013-01-01

    High-bandwidth and low-noise nanopore sensor and detection electronics are crucial in achieving single-DNA base resolution. A potential way to accomplish this goal is to integrate solid-state nanopores within a CMOS platform, in close proximity to the biasing electrodes and custom-designed amplifier electronics. Here we report the integration of solid-state nanopore devices in a commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) potentiostat chip implemented in On-Semiconductor’s 0.5 μm technology. Nanopore membranes incorporating electrodes are fabricated by post-CMOS micromachining utilizing the N+ polysilicon/SiO2/N+ polysilicon capacitor structure available in the aforementioned process. Nanopores are created in the CMOS process by drilling in a transmission electron microscope and shrinking by atomic layer deposition. We also describe a batch fabrication method to process a large of number of electrode-embedded nanopores with sub-10 nm diameter across CMOS-compatible wafers by electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition. The CMOS-compatibility of our fabrication process is verified by testing the electrical functionality of on-chip circuitry. We observe high current leakage with the CMOS nanopore devices due to the ionic diffusion through the SiO2 membrane. To prevent this leakage, we coat the membrane with Al2O3 which acts as an efficient diffusion barrier against alkali ions. The resulting nanopore devices also exhibit higher robustness and lower 1/f noise as compared to SiO2 and SiNx. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model for our low-capacitance CMOS nanopore devices, showing good agreement with the experimental value. In addition, experiments and theoretical models of translocation studies are presented using 48.5 kbp λ-DNA in order to prove the functionality of on-chip pores coated with Al2O3. PMID:23519330

  15. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  16. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented.

  17. Fabrication of cantilever based mass sensors integrated with CMOS using direct write laser lithography on resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsén, E.; Nilsson, S. G.; Carlberg, P.; Abadal, G.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; Figueras, E.; Campabadal, F.; Verd, J.; Montelius, L.; Barniol, N.; Boisen, A.

    2004-10-01

    A CMOS compatible direct write laser lithography technique has been developed for cantilever fabrication on pre-fabricated standard CMOS. We have developed cantilever based sensors for mass measurements in vacuum and air. The cantilever is actuated into lateral vibration by electrostatic excitation and the resonant frequency is detected by capacitive readout. The device is integrated on standard CMOS circuitry. In the work a new direct write laser lithography (DWL) technique is introduced. This laser lithography technique is based on direct laser writing on substrates coated with a resist bi-layer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on lift-off resist (LOR). Laser writing evaporates the PMMA, exposing the LOR. A resist solvent is used to transfer the pattern down to the substrate. Metal lift-off followed by reactive ion etching is used for patterning the structural poly-Si layer in the CMOS. The developed laser lithography technique is compatible with resist exposure techniques such as electron beam lithography. We demonstrate the fabrication of sub-micrometre wide suspended cantilevers as well as metal lift-off with feature line widths down to approximately 500 nm.

  18. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  19. Fabrication of CMOS image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovich, Yacov; Koltin, Ephie; Choen, David; Shkuri, Moshe; Ben-Simon, Meir

    1999-04-01

    In order to provide its customers with sub-micron CMOS fabrication solutions for imaging applications, Tower Semiconductor initiated a project to characterize the optical parameters of Tower's 0.5-micron process. A special characterization test chip was processed using the TS50 process. The results confirmed a high quality process for optical applications. Perhaps the most important result is the process' very low dark current, of 30-50 pA/cm2, using the entire window of process. This very low dark current characteristic was confirmed for a variety of pixel architectures. Additionally, we have succeeded to reduce and virtually eliminate the white spots on large sensor arrays. As a foundry Tower needs to support fabrication of many different imaging products. Therefore we have developed a fabrication methodology that is adjusted to the special needs of optical applications. In order to establish in-line process monitoring of the optical parameters, Tower places a scribe line optical test chip that enables wafer level measurements of the most important parameters, ensuring the optical quality and repeatability of the process. We have developed complementary capabilities like in house deposition of color filter and fabrication of very large are dice using sub-micron CMOS technologies. Shellcase and Tower are currently developing a new CMOS image sensor optical package.

  20. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dantsker, E

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO{sub 3}-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  1. Integration of nanostructured planar diffractive lenses dedicated to near infrared detection for CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Thomas; Massenot, Sébastien; Estribeau, Magali; Magnan, Pierre; Pardo, Fabrice; Pelouard, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-18

    This paper deals with the integration of metallic and dielectric nanostructured planar lenses into a pixel from a silicon based CMOS image sensor, for a monochromatic application at 1.064 μm. The first is a Plasmonic Lens, based on the phase delay through nanoslits, which has been found to be hardly compatible with current CMOS technology and exhibits a notable metallic absorption. The second is a dielectric Phase-Fresnel Lens integrated at the top of a pixel, it exhibits an Optical Efficiency (OE) improved by a few percent and an angle of view of 50°. The third one is a metallic diffractive lens integrated inside a pixel, which shows a better OE and an angle of view of 24°. The last two lenses exhibit a compatibility with a spectral band close to 1.064 μm. PMID:27137315

  2. A photovoltaic-driven and energy-autonomous CMOS implantable sensor.

    PubMed

    Ayazian, Sahar; Akhavan, Vahid A; Soenen, Eric; Hassibi, Arjang

    2012-08-01

    An energy-autonomous, photovoltaic (PV)-driven and MRI-compatible CMOS implantable sensor is presented. On-chip P+/N-well diode arrays are used as CMOS-compatible PV cells to harvest μW's of power from the light that penetrates into the tissue. In this 2.5 mm × 2.5 mm sub-μW integrated system, the in-vivo physiological signals are first measured by using a subthreshold ring oscillator-based sensor, the acquired data is then modulated into a frequency-shift keying (FSK) signal, and finally transmitted neuromorphically to the skin surface by using a pair of polarized electrodes. PMID:23853178

  3. Search Coil vs. Fluxgate Magnetometer Measurements at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.B., III

    2012-01-01

    We present magnetic field observations at interplanetary shocks comparing two different sample rates showing significantly different results. Fluxgate magnetometer measurements show relatively laminar supercritical shock transitions at roughly 11 samples/s. Search coil magnetometer measurements at 1875 samples/s, however, show large amplitude (dB/B as large as 2) fluctuations that are not resolved by the fluxgate magnetometer. We show that these fluctuations, identified as whistler mode waves, would produce a significant perturbation to the shock transition region changing the interpretation from laminar to turbulent. Thus, previous observations of supercritical interplanetary shocks classified as laminar may have been under sampled.

  4. Analysing harmonic motions with an iPhone’s magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Kağan Temiz, Burak

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an experiment for analysing harmonic motion using an iPhone’s (or iPad’s) magnetometer. This experiment consists of the detection of magnetic field variations obtained from an iPhone’s magnetometer sensor. A graph of harmonic motion is directly displayed on the iPhone’s screen using the Sensor Kinetics application. Data from this application was analysed with Eureqa software to establish the equation of the harmonic motion. Analyses show that the use of an iPhone’s magnetometer to analyse harmonic motion is a practical and effective method for small oscillations and frequencies less than 15–20 Hz.

  5. High-sensitivity low-noise miniature fluxgate magnetometers using a flip chip conceptual design.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current "flip chip" concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or "responsivity" for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz(1/2) at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market. PMID:25196107

  6. High-Sensitivity Low-Noise Miniature Fluxgate Magnetometers Using a Flip Chip Conceptual Design

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff; Chiu, Po-Kai; Chiu, Shih-Liang; Jeng, Jen-Tzong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel class of miniature fluxgate magnetometers fabricated on a print circuit board (PCB) substrate and electrically connected to each other similar to the current “flip chip” concept in semiconductor package. This sensor is soldered together by reversely flipping a 5 cm × 3 cm PCB substrate to the other identical one which includes dual magnetic cores, planar pick-up coils, and 3-D excitation coils constructed by planar Cu interconnections patterned on PCB substrates. Principles and analysis of the fluxgate sensor are introduced first, and followed by FEA electromagnetic modeling and simulation for the proposed sensor. Comprehensive characteristic experiments of the miniature fluxgate device exhibit favorable results in terms of sensitivity (or “responsivity” for magnetometers) and field noise spectrum. The sensor is driven and characterized by employing the improved second-harmonic detection technique that enables linear V-B correlation and responsivity verification. In addition, the double magnitude of responsivity measured under very low frequency (1 Hz) magnetic fields is experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the maximum responsivity of 593 V/T occurs at 50 kHz of excitation frequency with the second harmonic wave of excitation; however, the minimum magnetic field noise is found to be 0.05 nT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz under the same excitation. In comparison with other miniature planar fluxgates published to date, the fluxgate magnetic sensor with flip chip configuration offers advances in both device functionality and fabrication simplicity. More importantly, the novel design can be further extended to a silicon-based micro-fluxgate chip manufactured by emerging CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus enriching its potential range of applications in modern engineering and the consumer electronics market. PMID:25196107

  7. A 3-Axis Miniature Magnetic Sensor Based on a Planar Fluxgate Magnetometer with an Orthogonal Fluxguide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    A new class of tri-axial miniature magnetometer consisting of a planar fluxgate structure with an orthogonal ferromagnetic fluxguide centrally situated over the magnetic cores is presented. The magnetic sensor possesses a cruciform ferromagnetic core placed diagonally upon the square excitation coil under which two pairs of pick-up coils for in-plane field detection are allocated. Effective principles and analysis of the magnetometer for 3-D field vectors are described and verified by numerically electromagnetic simulation for the excitation and magnetization of the ferromagnetic cores. The sensor is operated by applying the second-harmonic detection technique that can verify V-B relationship and device responsivity. Experimental characterization of the miniature fluxgate device demonstrates satisfactory spatial magnetic field detection results in terms of responsivity and noise spectrum. As a result, at an excitation frequency of 50 kHz, a maximum in-plane responsivity of 122.4 V/T appears and a maximum out-of-plane responsivity of 11.6 V/T is obtained as well. The minimum field noise spectra are found to be 0.11 nT/√Hz and 6.29 nT/√Hz, respectively, in X- and Z-axis at 1 Hz under the same excitation frequency. Compared with the previous tri-axis fluxgate devices, this planar magnetic sensor with an orthogonal fluxguide provides beneficial enhancement in both sensory functionality and manufacturing simplicity. More importantly, this novel device concept is considered highly suitable for the extension to a silicon sensor made by the current CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus emphasizing its emerging applications of field detection in portable industrial electronics. PMID:26102496

  8. A 3-Axis Miniature Magnetic Sensor Based on a Planar Fluxgate Magnetometer with an Orthogonal Fluxguide.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    A new class of tri-axial miniature magnetometer consisting of a planar fluxgate structure with an orthogonal ferromagnetic fluxguide centrally situated over the magnetic cores is presented. The magnetic sensor possesses a cruciform ferromagnetic core placed diagonally upon the square excitation coil under which two pairs of pick-up coils for in-plane field detection are allocated. Effective principles and analysis of the magnetometer for 3-D field vectors are described and verified by numerically electromagnetic simulation for the excitation and magnetization of the ferromagnetic cores. The sensor is operated by applying the second-harmonic detection technique that can verify V-B relationship and device responsivity. Experimental characterization of the miniature fluxgate device demonstrates satisfactory spatial magnetic field detection results in terms of responsivity and noise spectrum. As a result, at an excitation frequency of 50 kHz, a maximum in-plane responsivity of 122.4 V/T appears and a maximum out-of-plane responsivity of 11.6 V/T is obtained as well. The minimum field noise spectra are found to be 0.11 nT/√Hz and 6.29 nT/√Hz, respectively, in X- and Z-axis at 1 Hz under the same excitation frequency. Compared with the previous tri-axis fluxgate devices, this planar magnetic sensor with an orthogonal fluxguide provides beneficial enhancement in both sensory functionality and manufacturing simplicity. More importantly, this novel device concept is considered highly suitable for the extension to a silicon sensor made by the current CMOS-MEMS technologies, thus emphasizing its emerging applications of field detection in portable industrial electronics. PMID:26102496

  9. CMOS downsizing toward sub-10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Recently, CMOS downsizing has been accelerated very aggressively in both production and research level, and even transistor operation of a 6 nm gate length p-channel MOSFET was reported in a conference. However, many serious problems are expected for implementing such small-geometry MOSFETs into large scale integrated circuits, and it is still questionable whether we can successfully introduce sub-10 nm CMOS LSIs into the market or not. In this paper, limitation and its possible causes for the downscaling of CMOS towards sub-10 nm are discussed with consideration of past CMOS predictions for the limitation.

  10. Ultrasensitive Magnetometer using a Single Atom.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, I; Cai, J-M; Retzker, A; Plenio, M B; Wunderlich, Ch

    2016-06-17

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers, often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry, scales as 1/sqrt[T_{2}] with the phase coherence time T_{2} of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending T_{2} by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of 4.6  pT/sqrt[Hz] for an alternating-current magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tunability from direct current to the gigahertz range could be used for magnetic imaging in as of yet inaccessible parameter regimes. PMID:27367376

  11. Magnetoencephalography with Optically Pumped Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter; Colombo, Anthony; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Carter, Tony; Berry, Christopher; Young, Amber; McKay, Jim; Weisend, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We are working to develop a 36-channel array of optically pumped atomic magnetometers (AMs) to perform magnetoencephalography (MEG) with the goal of localizing magnetic sources within the human brain. The 36-channel array will consist of nine 4-channel sensor modules where the channels within each sensor will be spaced by 18 mm and each sensor will cover a 40 mm by 40 mm area of the head. In a previous 4-channel AM prototype, we demonstrated the measurement of evoked responses in both the auditory and somatosensory cortexes. This prototype had a 5 fT/Hz1/2 sensitivity. In the current version of the AM under development we are maintaining the previous sensitivity while implementing several improvements, including increasing the bandwidth from 20 Hz to more than 100 Hz, reducing the separation of the active volume of the AM from exterior of the sensor from 25 mm to 10 mm or less, and reducing the active sensor volume by a factor >10 to ~15 mm3. We will present results on the performance of our most recent AM prototype and progress toward developing a complete MEG system including a person-sized magnetic shield to provide a low-noise magnetic environment for MEG measurements.

  12. High- Tc thin-film magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Miklich, A.H.; Wellstood, F.C.; Kingston, J.J.; Clarke, J. ); Colclough, M.S. ); Cardona, A.H.; Bourne, L.C.; Olson, W.L.; Eddy, M.M. )

    1990-09-01

    We have constructed and tested high-{Tc} magnetometers by coupling a high-{Tc} thin-film Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) to two different high-{Tc} thin-film flux transformers. The SQUID was made from Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8+y} films grown on MgO, with junctions consisting of native grain boundaries. The flux transformers were made from YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and each had 10-turn input coils and a single-turn pickup loop. The first transformer, which was patterned with a combination of shadow masks and photolithography, yielded a magnetic field gain of about {minus}7.5, functioned up to 79 K, and gave a magnetic field sensitivity B{sub N} (10 Hz) {approx} 3.1 pT Hz{sup {minus}1/2}at 38 K. The second transformer, which was patterned entirely by photolithography, yielded a gain of about {minus}8.7, functioned up to 25 K, and had a sensitivity B{sub N} (10 Hz) {approx} 3.5 pT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 4.2 K. In both cases, the limiting noise arose in the SQUID. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Global maps of ground magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, C. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Dupont, M.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    A statistical-based method combined with basis function expansion techniques is described in order to provide extensive maps of the ground level perturbation magnetic field from 40∘ magnetic latitude to the north magnetic pole for all longitudes. The method combines historical data from the SuperMAG data base, Principal Component Analysis, and a spherical cap harmonic basis function expansion in order to fill in magnetic perturbation data where there are no magnetometers and produce the poloidal current potential. The maps have a regular grid with a 2∘ latitude and 1 h longitude spacing. The statistical process uses SuperMAG data derived magnetic indices plus the solar zenith angle which orders the resulting spatial maps by geomagnetic activity indicators to enhance model agreement with the data. For quiet through to moderate magnetic activity intervals, the root-mean-square error between the input and the fitted data are 18 nT and 10 nT for the north-south and east-west components, respectively, which are of similar magnitude to the statistical uncertainty in the SuperMAG data set.

  14. Plasmonic fiber-optic vector magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaochuan; Guo, Tuan; Zhang, Xuejun; Xu, Jian; Xie, Wenping; Nie, Ming; Wu, Qiang; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    A compact fiber-optic vector magnetometer based on directional scattering between polarized plasmon waves and ferro-magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. The sensor configuration reported in this work uses a short section of tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with a nanometer scale gold film and packaged with a magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) inside a capillary. The transmission spectrum of the sensor provides a fine comb of narrowband resonances that overlap with a broader absorption of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The wavelength of the SPR attenuation in transmission shows high sensitivity to slight perturbations by magnetic fields, due to the strong directional scattering between the SPR attenuated cladding modes and the magnetic fluid near the fiber surface. Both the orientation (2 nm/deg) and the intensity (1.8 nm/mT) of magnetic fields can be determined unambiguously from the TFBG spectrum. Temperature cross sensitivity can be referenced out by monitoring the wavelength of the core mode resonance simultaneously.

  15. Calibrating the Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lewis; Casini, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag) is a dual-channel, dual-beam, slit-scanning, full Stokes spectro-polarimeter designed by the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) for the study of the magnetism of solar prominences and filaments. It was deployed in August 2009 at the 40 cm coronagraph of the Evans Solar Facility (ESF) of the National Solar Observatory on Sacramento Peak (NSO/SP). In its standard mode of operation it acquires spectro-polarimetric maps of solar targets simultaneously in the two chromospheric lines of He I at 587.6 nm and 1083.0 nm. Since August 2011 ProMag has operated in “patrol mode” with a dedicated observer. We aim to routinely measure the vector magnetic field in prominences. The electro-optic modulator and polarization analyzer are integrated into a single mechanical unit located at the coude feed of the telescope. This location was necessary for proper co-alignment of the dual beams, but complicates the precise polarimeter calibration necessary to achieve the sensitivity required for prominence measurements (< 10^-3). At this sensitivity, small variations in optical alignment can become significant. We present a calibration method for ProMag, using a polarizer and retarder at coronagraph prime focus. Calibrations are recorded before and after observations. We discuss the success of this method and its limitations.

  16. The Search-Coil Magnetometer for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Leroy, P.; Roux, A.; Coillot, C.; Alison, D.; Bouabdellah, A.; Mirioni, L.; Meslier, L.; Galic, A.; Vassal, M. C.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, J.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Ergun, R. E.; Westfall, J.; Summers, D.; Wallace, J.; Magnes, W.; Valavanoglou, A.; Olsson, G.; Chutter, M.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Turco, S.; Nolin, J.; Bodet, D.; Rowe, K.; Tanguy, M.; de la Porte, B.

    2016-03-01

    The tri-axial search-coil magnetometer (SCM) belongs to the FIELDS instrumentation suite on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission (Torbert et al. in Space Sci. Rev. (2014), this issue). It provides the three magnetic components of the waves from 1 Hz to 6 kHz in particular in the key regions of the Earth's magnetosphere namely the subsolar region and the magnetotail. Magnetospheric plasmas being collisionless, such a measurement is crucial as the electromagnetic waves are thought to provide a way to ensure the conversion from magnetic to thermal and kinetic energies allowing local or global reconfigurations of the Earth's magnetic field. The analog waveforms provided by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the digital signal processor (DSP), within the Central Electronics Box (CEB), together with the electric field data provided by the spin-plane double probe (SDP) and the axial double probe (ADP). On-board calibration signal provided by DSP allows the verification of the SCM transfer function once per orbit. Magnetic waveforms and on-board spectra computed by DSP are available at different time resolution depending on the selected mode. The SCM design is described in details as well as the different steps of the ground and in-flight calibrations.

  17. Ultrasensitive Magnetometer using a Single Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, I.; Cai, J.-M.; Retzker, A.; Plenio, M. B.; Wunderlich, Ch.

    2016-06-01

    Precision sensing, and in particular high precision magnetometry, is a central goal of research into quantum technologies. For magnetometers, often trade-offs exist between sensitivity, spatial resolution, and frequency range. The precision, and thus the sensitivity of magnetometry, scales as 1 /√{T2 } with the phase coherence time T2 of the sensing system playing the role of a key determinant. Adapting a dynamical decoupling scheme that allows for extending T2 by orders of magnitude and merging it with a magnetic sensing protocol, we achieve a measurement sensitivity even for high frequency fields close to the standard quantum limit. Using a single atomic ion as a sensor, we experimentally attain a sensitivity of 4.6 pT /√{Hz } for an alternating-current magnetic field near 14 MHz. Based on the principle demonstrated here, this unprecedented sensitivity combined with spatial resolution in the nanometer range and tunability from direct current to the gigahertz range could be used for magnetic imaging in as of yet inaccessible parameter regimes.

  18. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Freesland, Douglas C.; Tadikonda, Sivakumara K.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields or stray fields are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed with zero offset calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can be a good idea, but this gradiometer solution is even more susceptible to noise than a single magnetometer. Unless the stray fields are larger than the magnetometer noise, simply averaging the two measurements is a more accurate approach. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to explicitly estimate and remove stray fields. Models and estimation algorithms are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  19. Magnetometer with miniature transducer and automatic transducer scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. A.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Fales, C. L.; Pohm, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetometer is simple to operate and has fast response. Transducer is rugged and flat and can measure magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from any relatively flat surface. Magnetometer has active region of approximately 0.64 by 0.76 mm and is capable of good spatial resolution of magnetic fields as low as 0.02 Oe (1.6 A/m).

  20. Microfabricated Optically-Pumped Magnetometers for Biomagnetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, Svenja; Alem, Orang; Sheng, Dong; Kitching, John

    2016-06-01

    We report on the progress in developing microfabricated optically-pumped magnetometer arrays for imaging applications. We have improved our sensitivities by several orders of magnitude in the last ten years. Now, our zero-field magnetometers reach noise values below 15 fT/Hz1/2. Recently, we have also developed gradiometers to reject ambient magnetic field noise. We have built several imaging arrays and validated them for biomedical measurements of brain and heart activity.

  1. Detection of J-coupling using atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Ledbetter, Micah P.; Crawford, Charles W.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-09-22

    An embodiment of a method of detecting a J-coupling includes providing a polarized analyte adjacent to a vapor cell of an atomic magnetometer; and measuring one or more J-coupling parameters using the atomic magnetometer. According to an embodiment, measuring the one or more J-coupling parameters includes detecting a magnetic field created by the polarized analyte as the magnetic field evolves under a J-coupling interaction.

  2. Ultra-sensitive Magnetic Microscopy with an Atomic Magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Jin

    2015-08-19

    The PowerPoint presentation focused on research goals, specific information about the atomic magnetometer, response and resolution factors of the SERF magnetometer, FC+AM systems, tests of field transfer and resolution on FC, gradient cancellation, testing of AM performance, ideas for a multi-channel AM, including preliminary sensitivity testing, and a description of a 6 channel DAQ system. A few ideas for future work ended the presentation.

  3. Multichannel optical atomic magnetometer operating in unshielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Biancalana, Valerio; Chessa, Piero; Dancheva, Yordanka

    2016-04-01

    A multichannel atomic magnetometer operating in an unshielded environment is described and characterised. The magnetometer is based on D_1 optical pumping and D_2 polarimetry of Cs vapour contained in gas-buffered cells. Several technical implementations are described and discussed in detail. The demonstrated sensitivity of the set-up is 100 fT/√{Hz} when operating in the difference mode.

  4. Nanosecond monolithic CMOS readout cell

    DOEpatents

    Souchkov, Vitali V.

    2004-08-24

    A pulse shaper is implemented in monolithic CMOS with a delay unit formed of a unity gain buffer. The shaper is formed of a difference amplifier having one input connected directly to an input signal and a second input connected to a delayed input signal through the buffer. An elementary cell is based on the pulse shaper and a timing circuit which gates the output of an integrator connected to the pulse shaper output. A detector readout system is formed of a plurality of elementary cells, each connected to a pixel of a pixel array, or to a microstrip of a plurality of microstrips, or to a detector segment.

  5. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  6. Design and Fabrication of High-Efficiency CMOS/CCD Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    An architecture for back-illuminated complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled-device (CCD) ultraviolet/visible/near infrared- light image sensors, and a method of fabrication to implement the architecture, are undergoing development. The architecture and method are expected to enable realization of the full potential of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers to perform with high efficiency, high sensitivity, excellent angular response, and in-pixel signal processing. The architecture and method are compatible with next-generation CMOS dielectric-forming and metallization techniques, and the process flow of the method is compatible with process flows typical of the manufacture of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The architecture and method overcome all obstacles that have hitherto prevented high-yield, low-cost fabrication of back-illuminated CMOS/CCD imagers by use of standard VLSI fabrication tools and techniques. It is not possible to discuss the obstacles in detail within the space available for this article. Briefly, the obstacles are posed by the problems of generating light-absorbing layers having desired uniform and accurate thicknesses, passivation of surfaces, forming structures for efficient collection of charge carriers, and wafer-scale thinning (in contradistinction to diescale thinning). A basic element of the present architecture and method - the element that, more than any other, makes it possible to overcome the obstacles - is the use of an alternative starting material: Instead of starting with a conventional bulk-CMOS wafer that consists of a p-doped epitaxial silicon layer grown on a heavily-p-doped silicon substrate, one starts with a special silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer that consists of a thermal oxide buried between a lightly p- or n-doped, thick silicon layer and a device silicon layer of appropriate thickness and doping. The thick silicon layer is used as a handle: that is, as a mechanical support for the

  7. SOI CMOS Imager with Suppression of Cross-Talk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Zheng, Xingyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Seshadri, Suresh; Sun, Chao

    2009-01-01

    A monolithic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type, now undergoing development, is designed to operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths and to offer a combination of high quantum efficiency and low diffusion and capacitive cross-talk among pixels. The imager is designed to be especially suitable for astronomical and astrophysical applications. The imager design could also readily be adapted to general scientific, biological, medical, and spectroscopic applications. One of the conditions needed to ensure both high quantum efficiency and low diffusion cross-talk is a relatively high reverse bias potential (between about 20 and about 50 V) on the photodiode in each pixel. Heretofore, a major obstacle to realization of this condition in a monolithic integrated circuit has been posed by the fact that the required high reverse bias on the photodiode is incompatible with metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) in the CMOS pixel readout circuitry. In the imager now being developed, the SOI structure is utilized to overcome this obstacle: The handle wafer is retained and the photodiode is formed in the handle wafer. The MOSFETs are formed on the SOI layer, which is separated from the handle wafer by a buried oxide layer. The electrical isolation provided by the buried oxide layer makes it possible to bias the MOSFETs at CMOS-compatible potentials (between 0 and 3 V), while biasing the photodiode at the required higher potential, and enables independent optimization of the sensory and readout portions of the imager.

  8. Further developments on a novel color sensitive CMOS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Longoni, A.; Zaraga, F.

    2009-05-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD) is a recently proposed Silicon pixel device designed to perform color imaging without the use of color filters. The color detection principle is based on the dependence of the Silicon absorption coefficient from the wavelength and relies on the generation of a suitable transverse electric field configuration, within the semiconductor active layer, to drive photocarriers generated at different depths towards different collecting electrodes. Each electrode has in this way a different spectral response with respect to the incoming wavelength. Pixels with three or four different spectral responses can be implemented within ~ 6 μm of pixel dimension. Thanks to the compatibility with standard triple well CMOS processes, the TFD can be used in an Active Pixel Sensor exploiting a dedicated readout topology, based on a single transistor charge amplifier. The overall APS electronics includes five transistors (5T) and a feedback capacitance, with a resulting overall fill factor around 50%. In this work the three colors and four colors TFD pixel simulations and implementations in a 90 nm standard CMOS triple well technology are described. Details on the design of a TFD APS mini matrix are provided and preliminary experimental results on four colors pixels are presented.

  9. Electronic-photonic integrated circuits on the CMOS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimerling, L. C.; Ahn, D.; Apsel, A. B.; Beals, M.; Carothers, D.; Chen, Y.-K.; Conway, T.; Gill, D. M.; Grove, M.; Hong, C.-Y.; Lipson, M.; Liu, J.; Michel, J.; Pan, D.; Patel, S. S.; Pomerene, A. T.; Rasras, M.; Sparacin, D. K.; Tu, K.-Y.; White, A. E.; Wong, C. W.

    2006-02-01

    The optical components industry stands at the threshold of a major expansion that will restructure its business processes and sustain its profitability for the next three decades. This growth will establish a cost effective platform for the partitioning of electronic and photonic functionality to extend the processing power of integrated circuits. BAE Systems, Lucent Technologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Applied Wave Research are participating in a high payoff research and development program for the Microsystems Technology Office (MTO) of DARPA. The goal of the program is the development of technologies and design tools necessary to fabricate an application-specific, electronicphotonic integrated circuit (AS-EPIC). As part of the development of this demonstration platform we are exploring selected functions normally associated with the front end of mixed signal receivers such as modulation, detection, and filtering. The chip will be fabricated in the BAE Systems CMOS foundry and at MIT's Microphotonics Center. We will present the latest results on the performance of multi-layer deposited High Index Contrast Waveguides, CMOS compatible modulators and detectors, and optical filter slices. These advances will be discussed in the context of the Communications Technology Roadmap that was recently released by the MIT Microphotonics Center Industry Consortium.

  10. IR CMOS: near infrared enhanced digital imaging (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Carey, James E.; Joy, Thomas; Vineis, Chris J.; Palsule, Chintamani

    2015-08-01

    SiOnyx has demonstrated imaging at light levels below 1 mLux (moonless starlight) at video frame rates with a 720P CMOS image sensor in a compact, low latency camera. Low light imaging is enabled by the combination of enhanced quantum efficiency in the near infrared together with state of the art low noise image sensor design. The quantum efficiency enhancements are achieved by applying Black Silicon, SiOnyx's proprietary ultrafast laser semiconductor processing technology. In the near infrared, silicon's native indirect bandgap results in low absorption coefficients and long absorption lengths. The Black Silicon nanostructured layer fundamentally disrupts this paradigm by enhancing the absorption of light within a thin pixel layer making 5 microns of silicon equivalent to over 300 microns of standard silicon. This results in a demonstrate 10 fold improvements in near infrared sensitivity over incumbent imaging technology while maintaining complete compatibility with standard CMOS image sensor process flows. Applications include surveillance, nightvision, and 1064nm laser see spot. Imaging performance metrics will be discussed. Demonstrated performance characteristics: Pixel size : 5.6 and 10 um Array size: 720P/1.3Mpix Frame rate: 60 Hz Read noise: 2 ele/pixel Spectral sensitivity: 400 to 1200 nm (with 10x QE at 1064nm) Daytime imaging: color (Bayer pattern) Nighttime imaging: moonless starlight conditions 1064nm laser imaging: daytime imaging out to 2Km

  11. 1500 Gate standard cell compatible radiation hard gate array

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, B.D.; Shafer, B.D.; Melancon, E.P.

    1984-11-01

    The G1500 gate array combines Sandia Labs' 4/3..mu.. CMOS silicon gate radiation hard process with a novel gate isolated standard cell compatible design for quick turnaround time, low cost, and radiation hardness. This device is hard to 5 x 10/sup 5/ rads, utilizes a configuration that provides high packing density, and is supported on both the Daisy and Mentor workstations. This paper describes Sandia Labs' radiation hard 4/3..mu.. process, the G1500's unique design, and the complete design capabilities offered by the workstations.

  12. Towed and Shipboard Vector Magnetometers in Marine Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of vector magnetometer components in geomagnetics has many advantages compared to the use of total field magnetometers. However, in marine geophysics the robust and easy-to-use Proton Precession magnetometers are still the standard instruments. Most of the few vector magnetometers in use work on multi instrument deep submersible platforms. Here we present some new instrumental and methodological aspects of surface towed fluxgate vector magnetometers which we use in a combination with Overhauser sensors. Processed fluxgate total field data are practically identical to the Overhauser reference and even provide a reliable gradient when combined with one Overhauser.The vertical component derived from the vector data constrains 2-D modelling much better than the total field alone. Although towed vector magnetometers typically provide no independent estimate of yaw, we illustrate that a numerical yaw (bandpass filtered magnetic heading) can provide reasonable estimates of the horizontal field components. These component data open additional analysis tools: the strike direction of magnetic lineations can be estimated from single profiles by either magnetic boundary strike ellipses in the space domain or by coherences between vertical and horizontal components in the wavenumber domain. Auto power spectra of the total field provide an approximate depth to the anomaly source or, if in obvious contradiction to the bathymetric depth, allow the detection of distortions, for example, by external temporal geomagnetic variations. A more common application is the use of vector magnetometers as shipboard instruments where the sensor's orientation can easily be resolved with data from the ship's positioning systems. We present some comparisons of shipboard and towed vector data. The quality of the magnetic data recorded onboard the ship can be surprisingly good after a thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field.

  13. A radiation hardened SONOS/CMOS EEPROM family

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, V.F.; Wood, G.M.; Buller, J.F. . Semiconductor Sector); Murray, J.R.; Rodriquez, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    There has long been a need for fast read nonvolatile, rad hard memories for military and space applications. Recent advances in EEPROM technology now allow this need to be met for many applications. Harris/Sandia have developed a 16k and a 256k rad hard EEPROM. The EEPROMs utilize a Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) memory transistor integrated into a 2 {mu}m, rad hard two level metal CMOS process. Both the 16k and the 256k parts have been designed to interface with the Intel 8085 or 80C51 and National 32000 series microprocessors and feature page and block clear modes. Both parts are functionally identical, and are produced by the same fabrication process. They are also pin for pin compatible with each other, except for the extra address and ground pins on the 256k. This paper describes the characteristics of this EEPROM family. 1 ref.

  14. A radiation hardened SONOS/CMOS EEPROM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, V. F.; Wood, G. M.; Buller, J. F.; Murray, J. R.; Rodriquez, J. L.

    1990-07-01

    There has long been a need for fast read nonvolatile, rad hard memories for military and space applications. Recent advances in Electrically Erasably Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) technology now allow this need to be met for many applications. Harris/Sandia have developed a 16k and a 256k rad hard EEPROM. The EEPROMs utilize a Silicon Oxide Nitride Oxide Silicon (SONOS) memory transistor integrated into a 2 microns rad hard two level metal CMOS process. Both the 16k and the 256k parts were designed to interface with the Intel 8085 or 80C51 and National 32000 series microprocessors and feature page and block clear modes. Both parts are functionally identical, and are produced by the same fabrication process. They are also pin for pin compatible with each other, except for the extra address and ground pins on the 256k. The characteristics of this EEPROM family are described.

  15. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Accelerated life tests were performed on CMOS microcircuits to predict their long term reliability. The consistency of the CMOS microcircuit activation energy between the range of 125 C to 200 C and the range 200 C to 250 C was determined. Results indicate CMOS complexity and the amount of moisture detected inside the devices after testing influences time to failure of tested CMOS devices.

  16. An improved proton magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chengyu; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    As a precision instrument to measure the earth magnetic field, proton magnetometer is widely used in different fields such as geological survey, buried objects detection and earth field variations. Due to poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the system, proton magnetometer suffers from low sensitivity which directly affects the performance. In order to increase the sensitivity, we present an improved proton magnetometer. First, the effect of matching resistance on Q value is discussed to enhance SNR, and high matching resistance has been chosen to improve the Q value of the resonant circuit. Second, noise induced by pre-amplifier is investigated in order to obtain low noise signal, and we adopt the JFET with noise figure less than 0.5dB as the pre-amplifier. Third, by using band-pass filter, low-noise output signal is obtained. Fourth, the method of period measurement based on CPLD is employed to measure frequency of the square wave shaped from the output sinusoidal signal. High precision temperature compensate crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been used to improve the frequency measurement accuracy. Last, experimental data is obtained through field measurements. By calculating the standard deviation, the sensitivity of the improved proton magnetometer is 0.15nT for Earth's magnetic field observation. Experimental results show that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  17. THEMIS Ground Based Magnetometers and the Involvement of GEONS Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L.; Shutkin, A.; Dearborn, D.; Pierce, D.; Odenwald, S.; Orr, L.; Gehman, W.; Dewolf, C.; Walker, A.

    2005-05-01

    The THEMIS Education and Public Outreach team selected ten ground-based magnetometer stations each located in the proximity of a rural school in traditionally under-served, under-represented communities from Alaska to Vermont. These `ground based magnetometer' observatories will assist the THEMIS Mission's five identical satellites, called probes, when they are launched in the fall of 2006. The five probes, placed in strategic locations in Earth's magnetosphere, will help to determine the onset of auroral substorms. A teacher at each of these schools is responsible for their magnetometer data and system as well as using the data with their students through lesson plans developed collaboratively with the E/PO team. The network of teachers, students, and magnetometers together with other students who participate in monitoring the geomagnetic disturbances using the web is called the Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS). We will report specific contributions to the project from the Oregon, South Dakota and Michigan GEONS teachers. We have installed five magnetometers during the Fall of 2004, and will be installing the remaining five in the Spring of 2005, and have started to display the data from the first five schools on the web. We will describe the pedagogical challenges of bringing understanding of the physics behind the THEMIS science which requires some understanding of magnetic fields, charged particles, forces, motions, and energy to middle school and high school classrooms. We will also include the formative evaluation results to date.

  18. Recent Advances in Magnetoseismology Using Network Observations by Ground Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, P. J.; Russell, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    The rise of modern, synchronized networks of ground magnetometers in recent years has inspired and advanced research and development in magnetoseismology. Like the practice in other geophysical disciplines, magnetoseismology can infer the structure of the magnetosphere from the observations of normal-mode frequencies of the magnetic field. It can also time and locate impulsive events by measuring the signal arrival time at multiple ground stations. We highlight recent advances in using network observations by ground magnetometers for both types of magnetoseismic research. In the area of normal-mode magnetoseismology the increase in ground magnetometers has enabled ever more station pairs suitable for the gradient analysis. We demonstrate progress in automatic detection of field line resonance frequencies and the results that reveal longitudinal structure of the plasmasphere. As a relatively young research topic, travel-time magnetoseismology has shown its capability to time and locate sudden impulses and substorm onsets by using ground-based magnetometer observations. These initial successes in turn motivated detailed examination of MHD wave propagation in the magnetosphere. In the end we discuss how these magnetoseismic studies shed light on the regions in the world where future establishment of ground magnetometers is desirable.

  19. An improved RF circuit for Overhauser magnetometer excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Di; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-08-01

    Overhauser magnetometer is a high-precision device for magnetostatic field measurement, which can be used in a wide variety of purposes: UXO detection, pipeline mapping and other engineering and environmental applications. Traditional proton magnetometer adopts DC polarization, suffering from low polarization efficiency, high power consumption and low signal noise ratio (SNR). Compared with the traditional proton magnetometer, nitroxide free radicals are used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). RF excitation is very important for electron resonance in nitrogen oxygen free radical solution, and it is primarily significant for the obtention of high SNR signal and high sensitive field observation. Therefore, RF excitation source plays a crucial role in the development of Overhauser magnetometer. In this paper, an improved design of a RF circuit is discussed. The new RF excitation circuit consists of two parts: Quartz crystal oscillator circuit and RF power amplifier circuit. Simulation and optimization designs for power amplifier circuit based on software ADS are presented. Finally we achieve a continuous and stable sine wave of 60MHz with 1-2.5 W output power, and the second harmonic suppression is close to -20dBc. The improved RF circuit has many merits such as small size, low-power consumption and high efficiency, and it can be applied to Overhauser magnetometer to obtain high sensitive field observation.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Integration with a CMOS Process

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Maximiliano S.; Lerner, Betiana; Resasco, Daniel E.; Pareja Obregon, Pablo D.; Julian, Pedro M.; Mandolesi, Pablo S.; Buffa, Fabian A.; Boselli, Alfredo; Lamagna, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    This work shows the integration of a sensor based on carbon nanotubes using CMOS technology. A chip sensor (CS) was designed and manufactured using a 0.30 μm CMOS process, leaving a free window on the passivation layer that allowed the deposition of SWCNTs over the electrodes. We successfully investigated with the CS the effect of humidity and temperature on the electrical transport properties of SWCNTs. The possibility of a large scale integration of SWCNTs with CMOS process opens a new route in the design of more efficient, low cost sensors with high reproducibility in their manufacture. PMID:22319330

  1. Performances of compact integrated superconducting magnetometers for biomagnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granata, C.; Vettoliere, A.; Rombetto, S.; Nappi, C.; Russo, M.

    2008-10-01

    In the present paper, performances of compact fully integrated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers, recently developed, have been investigated in view of their employment in large multichannel systems for biomagnetic imaging. The analysis has been focused on SQUID sensors having a pickup loop side length of 3 and 4 mm based on a design aimed to maximize the magnetic flux transferred from the detection coil to the SQUID in comparison with a magnetometer with 9 mm side length having a suitable sensitivity for biomagnetic applications. The performance study has been consisted in the computation of the magnetic responses to a current dipole which is the most fundamental approach used in biomagnetism. The results have shown that the dipole current sensitivity of 4 mm long side compact magnetometers is suitable for application in multichannel systems for magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography.

  2. Rotating sample magnetometer for cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisterer, M.; Hengstberger, F.; Voutsinas, C. S.; Hörhager, N.; Sorta, S.; Hecher, J.; Weber, H. W.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a rotating sample magnetometer (RSM) operating in the variable temperature insert (VTI) of a cryostat equipped with a high-field magnet. The limited space and the cryogenic temperatures impose the most critical design parameters: the small bore size of the magnet requires a very compact pick-up coil system and the low temperatures demand a very careful design of the bearings. Despite these difficulties the RSM achieves excellent resolution at high magnetic field sweep rates, exceeding that of a typical vibrating sample magnetometer by about a factor of ten. In addition the gas-flow cryostat and the high-field superconducting magnet provide a temperature and magnetic field range unprecedented for this type of magnetometer.

  3. Spin-Damping in an RF atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alem, Orang; Romalis, Michael V.; Sauer, Karen L.

    2009-05-01

    Optically pumped atomic magnetometers have demonstrated an improved sensitivity over standard tuned coils for frequencies less than 50 MHz, making these radio-frequency (RF) magnetometers attractive for low-field NMR (for example, Budker and Romalis, Nature Physics 3, April 2007). Such magnetometers are often plagued by transient effects resulting in decreased sensitivity. The decay time of these transients, or ringing, can last for milliseconds, which is particularly detrimental for rapidly decaying NMR signals. We have found that actively damping the ringing of the atomic spins can significantly reduce such dead time. This spin-damping of the atomic transients is achieved through a negative feedback mechanism in which part of the optical signal during ringing is used to apply an RF field forcing the realignment of the atomic spins with the static magnetic field. We have successfully implemented spin-damping in 100 μs and recovered our femto-Tesla signal previously obscured by the ringing.

  4. Participation in the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium for the Cluster Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, Margaret

    1997-01-01

    Prof. M. G. Kivelson (UCLA) and Dr. R. C. Elphic (LANL) are Co-investigators on the Cluster Magnetometer Consortium (CMC) that provided the fluxgate magnetometers and associated mission support for the Cluster Mission. The CMC designated UCLA as the site with primary responsibility for the inter-calibration of data from the four spacecraft and the production of fully corrected data critical to achieving the mission objectives. UCLA was also charged with distributing magnetometer data to the U.S. Co-investigators. UCLA also supported the Technical Management Team, which was responsible for the detailed design of the instrument and its interface. In this final progress report we detail the progress made by the UCLA team in achieving the mission objectives.

  5. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. Both behave as expected, and their accuracy predictions agree within 30%. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the GOES-R magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  6. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10-8 Am2 was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  7. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  8. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dahai; Wu, Lingqi; Yan, Meizhi; Cui, Mingyang; You, Zheng; Hu, Muzhi

    2009-01-01

    A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor's vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment. PMID:22399981

  9. Assessing and ensuring GOES-R magnetometer accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Delano; Todirita, Monica; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer subsystem accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma error per axis. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma error per axis. Error comes both from outside the magnetometers, e.g. spacecraft fields and misalignments, as well as inside, e.g. zero offset and scale factor errors. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it will be necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance before launch, we have used Monte Carlo simulations and covariance analysis. With the proposed calibration regimen, both suggest that the magnetometer subsystem will meet its accuracy requirements.

  10. Magnetometer with a miniature transducer and automatic scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, W. J. J.; Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Pohm, A. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The magnetometer is based on the time variation of the magnetic permeability in the magnetic material of its transducer; however, its operation is substantially different from the ordinary flux-gate magnetometer. The transducer uses 0.05 mm diameter plated magnetic wire and is made flat enabling it to make measurements of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from the surface, and it has very good spatial resolution because of its small active region of approximately 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. The magnetometer uses an inexpensive clip-on millimeter for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. It also utilizes an automatic scanning technique which is made possible by a specially designed transducer holding mechanism that replaces the ink pen on an X-Y recorder.