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1

Admission criteria and diversity in medical school Lotte O'Neill, Maria C Vonsild, Birgitta Wallstedt & Tim Dornan  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Admission criteria and diversity in medical school Lotte O'Neill, Maria C Vonsild­2007 to the University of Southern Denmark medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 social diversity in medical schools. Attracting a sufficiently diverse applicant pool may represent

2

The tau effect put to the test of time Birgitta Dresp-Langley and Benoit Schwaller  

E-print Network

1 The tau effect put to the test of time Birgitta Dresp-Langley and Benoit Schwaller ICube UMR 7357 by a longer temporal interval. This perceptual illusion is known as the tactile variant of the tau effect temporal intervals, show that the tau effect occurs in the first trial blocks, and then vanishes over time

3

Facilitating Co-Authoring: Reflections of Content and Language Lecturers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During a content and language project at a University of Technology (UoT) in Cape Town, South Africa, pairs of language and content lecturers, whose broad definition of integration was "the provision of linguistic access to content knowledge", co-authored ten integrated textbooks. Their intention was to assist first year learners with their…

Wright, J.

2010-01-01

4

A new method to construct co-author networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose a new method to evaluate the importance of nodes in a given network. The proposed method is based on the PageRank algorithm. However, we have made necessary improvements to combine the importance of the node itself and that of its community status. First, we propose an improved method to better evaluate the real impact of a paper. The proposed method calibrates the real influence of a paper over time. Then we propose a scheme of evaluating the contribution of each author in a paper. We later develop a new method to combine the information of the author itself and the structure of the co-author network. We use the number of co-authorship to calculate the effective distance between two authors, and evaluate the strength of their influence to each other with the law of gravity. The strength of influence is used to build a new network of authors, which is a comprehensive topological representation of both the quality of the node and its role in network. Finally, we apply our method to the Erdos co-author community and AMiner Citation Network to identify the most influential authors.

Liu, Jie; Li, Yunpeng; Ruan, Zichan; Fu, Guangyuan; Chen, Xiaowu; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

2015-02-01

5

Prague, Tourism and the Post-industrial City Co-authors  

E-print Network

). This present article takes a broader more contextual view of the role of tourism in the development of tourism in the transition. Third, where tourism is discussed, it is usually, as an urban developmentPrague, Tourism and the Post-industrial City Co-authors: Lily M. Hoffman and Jiri Musil Great

Illinois at Chicago, University of

6

This volume contains seven articles authored or co-authored by participants in the meeting Mathematical Innovative Methods and Models Of BIOsciences (MIMMO-  

E-print Network

This volume contains seven articles authored or co-authored by participants, biometrics, ecology and environment, mathematical biology, and population dynamics two articles dealing with the stability of steady- states for models

Milner, Fabio Augusto

7

A generalized view of self-citation: direct, co-author, collaborative, and coercive induced self-citation.  

PubMed

The phenomenon of self-citation can present in many different forms, including direct, co-author, collaborative, and coercive induced self-citation. It can also pertain to the citation of single scientists, groups of scientists, journals, and institutions. This article presents some case studies of extreme self-citation practices. It also discusses the implications of different types of self-citation. Self-citation is not necessarily inappropriate by default. In fact, usually it is fully appropriate but often it is even necessary. Conversely, inappropriate self-citation practices may be highly misleading and may distort the scientific literature. Coercive induced self-citation is the most difficult to discover. Coercive Induced self-citation may happen directly from reviewers of articles, but also indirectly from reviewers of grants, scientific advisors who steer a research agenda, and leaders of funding agencies who may espouse spending disproportionately large funds in research domains that perpetuate their own self-legacy. Inappropriate self-citation can be only a surrogate marker of what might be much greater distortions of the scientific corpus towards conformity to specific opinions and biases. Inappropriate self-citations eventually affect also impact metrics. Different impact metrics vary in the extent to which they can be gamed through self-citation practices. Citation indices that are more gaming-proof are available and should be more widely used. We need more empirical studies to dissect the impact of different types of inappropriate self-citation and to examine the effectiveness of interventions to limit them. PMID:25466321

Ioannidis, John P A

2015-01-01

8

Improved Velocity Projection for the Material Point Method P. C. Wallstedt1  

E-print Network

simulations in one and two dimensions. keywords: Material Point Method, MPM, PIC, GIMP, meshless methods. 1 physical systems. Meshless and quasi-meshless methods often provide acceptable solutions for problems where Method (MPM) [Sulsky, Chen and Schreyer (1994); Sulsky, Zhou and Schreyer (1995)] is one such quasi-meshless

Utah, University of

9

YU, Lu ( ) Write authors including co-authors, title  

E-print Network

. Hirasawa and T. Ueno, " Anal ysis of Energy Cons umpt ion of Elevator Group Super visory Control System, J. Zhou, L. Yu, J. Hu and S. Markon, "A Double-deck Elevator Group Supervis ory Control System usi-Deck Elevator Syst ems usi ng Geneti c Networ k Progra mmi ng wit h Reinforcement Learni ng", J our nal

Fernandez, Thomas

10

Becoming Co-Authors: Toward Sharing Authority in Religious Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article offers an alternative model, the model of shared authority, to the traditional, authoritarian model for authority and obedience for Religious Education. This model moves away from the authoritarian model of a teacher as the authority and the students as obedient listeners in the direction of a shared authority model in which teachers…

Kim, Hyun-Sook

2009-01-01

11

*denotes co-authored with graduate student(s) **denotes co-authored with undergraduate student(s)  

E-print Network

in Proceedings = 95 Aggarwal*, G. and I. Smid, "Powder Injection Molding and Sintering of Pure Niobium," Proc. 16.J. Park and I. Smid, "Development of Niobium Powder Injection Molding" Proc. Int. Symposium on Tantalum. Tricarico, "Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Metal Injection Molded Products," Journal of Materials

Demirel, Melik C.

12

Engineering Science and Mechanics Publications 2006 Total Published = 201 articles (1 co-authored with undergraduate students and 86 co-authored with graduate students)  

E-print Network

. Urquidi- Macdonald, C. Romanucci, and A. Zanesco, "Wavelet- based Filtering of EIS Corrosion Data.-O. Ruault, T. Sauvage, and S. Ashok, "Structural and Nuclear Characterizations of Defects created by Noble, S. Perini, and M. Lanagan, "Microwave Dielectric Loss Characterization of Silicon Carbide Wafers

Demirel, Melik C.

13

To Co-Author or Not to Co-Author: How to Write, Publish, and Negotiate Issues of Authorship with Undergraduate Research Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Beyond simply extolling the virtues of undergraduate research, we examine how such deep learning experiences for students can translate into unique opportunities for the faculty to demonstrate devotion to both teaching and scholarship. Along with highlighting the reasons faculty should consider publishing with undergraduates, we identify the particular challenges that accompany this suggestion and discuss strategies for overcoming them. Our resource includes two decision trees for helping faculty determine whether publishing with undergraduates represents a reasonable and attainable goal and whether an undergraduate has earned authorship. Based on our experience at primarily undergraduate institutions, we provide a list of strategies that may facilitate writing with undergraduates and lead to certain milestones in the careers of both students and faculty.

Romi Burks (Southwestern University; )

2009-10-27

14

To Co-Author or Not to Co-Author: How to Write, Publish, and Negotiate Issues of Authorship with Undergraduate Research Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Teaching Resource emphasizes the value of publishing with undergraduates and may be particularly helpful to incoming faculty who are new to the process of working with students. Beyond simply extolling the virtues of undergraduate research, we examine how such deep learning experiences for students can translate into unique opportunities for the faculty to demonstrate devotion to both teaching and scholarship. Along with highlighting the reasons faculty should consider publishing with undergraduates, we identify the particular challenges that accompany this suggestion and discuss strategies for overcoming them. Our resource includes two decision trees for helping faculty determine whether publishing with undergraduates represents a reasonable and attainable goal and whether an undergraduate has earned authorship. Based on our experience at primarily undergraduate institutions, we provide a list of strategies that may facilitate writing with undergraduates and lead to certain milestones in the careers of both students and faculty.

Romi L. Burks (Southwestern University; Associate Professor of Biology REV)

2009-10-27

15

Engineering Science and Mechanics Publications 2011 Total Published = 159 Articles (1 co-authored with undergraduate students and 86 co-authored with graduate students)  

E-print Network

Stage Sintering of Binderless Tungsten Carbide Powder under Microwave Radiation," Ceramic International. and C. J. Lissenden, "Monitoring Fatigue Cracks in Aluminum Joints with Ultrasonic Guided Waves," Review

Demirel, Melik C.

16

Engineering Science and Mechanics Publications 2010 Total Published= 187 Articles (3 co-authored with undergraduate students and 104 co-authored with graduate students)  

E-print Network

, "Ultraviolet Radiation Effects on Paramagnetic Defects in Low Kappa Dielectrics for Ultra Large Scale*, P. M. Lenahan and S. King, "Defects in Low -k Dielectrics and Etch Stop Layers for use as Interlayer Defects in Low-k Dielectrics for use as Interlayer Dielectrics," 48th Annual IEEE International

Demirel, Melik C.

17

Engineering Science and Mechanics Publications 2008 Total Published = 158 Articles (3 co-authored with undergraduate students and 132 co-authored with graduate students)  

E-print Network

of pipelines," 17th World Conference on Nondestructive Testing, 25- 28 Oct 2008, Shanghai, China. Campbell, J, M. Guers*, and B. R. Tittmann, "Structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation of double wall structures. Presented at SPIE Smart Structures and Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation

Demirel, Melik C.

18

SEMINARIEPROGRAM FoKult vt 2013 Fre 25 jan kl 10-12 Textseminarium Elisabeth Niklasson (leds av Birgitta  

E-print Network

SEMINARIEPROGRAM FoKult vt 2013 Fre 25 jan kl 10-12 Textseminarium Elisabeth Niklasson (leds av-12 Textseminarium Elin Engström (leds av Inga Sanner) Fre 19 april, kl 10-12 Textseminarium Niklas Haga (leds av-15 Textseminarier Robin W Böckerman & Frederik Wallerstein (leds av Mats Hallenberg) Fre 17 maj, kl 10

19

SEMINARIEPROGRAM FoKult vt 2013 Fre 25 jan kl 10-12 Textseminarium Elisabeth Niklasson (leds av Birgitta  

E-print Network

SEMINARIEPROGRAM FoKult vt 2013 Fre 25 jan kl 10-12 Textseminarium Elisabeth Niklasson (leds av-12 Textseminarium Elin Engström (leds av Inga Sanner) Fre 19 april, kl 10-12 Textseminarium Niklas Haga (leds av-15 Textseminarier Robert Nilsson & Frederik Wallerstein (leds av Mats Hallenberg) Fre 17 maj, kl 10

20

Using Co-Authoring and Cross-Referencing Information for MEDLINE Indexing  

E-print Network

referencing and au- thoring links can be used for this purpose. Using a JAMA-based subset of MEDLINE, we from the Journal of the American Medical Associ- ation (JAMA, http://jama.ama-assn.org/), downloading

Zweigenbaum, Pierre

21

Max Baumhefner & Ed Pike, Co-Authors Andreas Klugescheid, Contributing Author  

E-print Network

building efficiency PEV buyers are strong candidates for energy efficiency programs Offset load is to create large-scale environmental benefits for our clients by implementing market-based solutions ownership in California PEV driver population #12;Five Potential Pathways 6 On-site energy efficiency

California at Davis, University of

22

OSU Authors and Editors (published in 2011) Book Title Authors, Co-Authors & Editors Department College  

E-print Network

. Morzillo Forest Ecosystems and Society Forestry Size-and Age-Related Changes in Tree Structure and Function Barbara Lachenbruch Forest Ecosystems and Society Forestry Strategic Marketing in the Global Forest Michael Polanyi and his generation : origins of the social construction of science Mary Jo Nye History

Escher, Christine

23

Multiple narratives: How underserved urban girls engage in co-authoring life stories and scientific stories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contemporary critics of science education have noted that girls often fail to engage in learning because they cannot "see themselves" in science. Yet theory on identity, engagement, and the appropriation of scientific discourse remains underdeveloped. Using identity as a lens, I constructed 2-two week lunchtime science sessions for 17 ethnic-minority high school girls who were failing their science classes. The units of instruction were informed by a pilot study and based on principles from literature on engagement in identity work and engagement in productive disciplinary discourse. Primary data sources included 19 hours of videotaped lunchtime sessions, 88 hours of audio-taped individual student interviews (over the course of 3--4 years), and 10 hours of audio-taped small group interviews. Secondary data sources included student journals, 48 hours of observations of science classes, teacher surveys about student participation, and academic school records. I used a case-study approach with narrative and discourse analysis. Not only were the girls individually involved in negotiating ideas about their narratives about themselves and their future selves, but collectively some of the girls productively negotiated multiple identities, appropriated scientific and epistemological discourse and learned science content. This was accomplished through the use of a hybrid discourse that blended identity talk with science talk. The use of this talk supported these girls in taking ownership for or becoming advocates for certain scientific ideas.

Thompson, Jessica Jane

24

Co-Authoring Gender-Queer Youth Identities: Discursive "Tellings" and "Retellings"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For youth who challenge the culturally fixed gender dichotomy through nonconventional gender expression, societal reaction can be harsh. Uncovering these youth voices as they pioneer new gender frontiers through pathways of language and social dialogue provides the focus for this manuscript. Drawing from discursive, narrative practices, we sat in…

Saltzburg, Susan; Davis, Tamara S.

2010-01-01

25

Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt  

SciTech Connect

Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

2012-03-01

26

The Role of Postgraduate Students in Co-Authoring Open Educational Resources to Promote Social Inclusion: A Case Study at the University of Cape Town  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Like many universities worldwide, the University of Cape Town (UCT) in South Africa has joined the open educational resources (OER) movement, making a selection of teaching and learning materials available through its OER directory, UCT OpenContent. However, persuading and then supporting busy academics to share their teaching materials as OER…

Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl; Paskevicius, Michael

2012-01-01

27

Illustration: Bibliometric network visualization of organizations affiliated to KTH Royal Institute of Technology and University of Tokyo co-authored items in ISI Web of Science.  

E-print Network

Institute of Technology, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department 3.95% ISIJ INTERNATIONAL 3 3.95% PHYSICAL REVIEW C 3 3.95% ADVANCES IN MATHEMATICS 2 2..............................................................................................................2 Large-scale international collaborations

Haviland, David

28

INTRO TO HARTVIGSEN/BOSCH PIECE: The following opinion piece, co-authored by Gregg Hartvigsen and Isidro Bosch, was recently published in the  

E-print Network

scientific evidence linking greenhouse gases with climate change. Our understanding of how human activities gases through human activities causes climate change, but the evidence is very convincing. The time has on Climate Change. We would like to clarify Mr. Williams' suggestion that we should avoid putting stock

Hartvigsen, Gregg

29

25/03/2011 22:31139 Co-authors Can't Be Wrong--And That's The Problem : Evolution for Everyone Page 1 of 10http://scienceblogs.com/evolution/2011/03/139_co-authors_cant_be_wrong--.php  

E-print Network

Blogs: Maximum meltdown Last 24 Hrs Life Science Physical Science Environment Humanities Education Politics Medicine Brain & Behavior Technology Information Science Jobs Latest Posts Archives About RSS Contact

Gardner, Andy

30

Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include reports, theses,…

International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

31

Neurolinguistic Papers: Proceedings of the Finnish Conference of Neurolinguistics (2nd, Joensuu, Finland, May 31-June 1, 1985). AFinLA Series No. 40.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collection of papers on neurolinguistics includes: "Communication Strategies in Aphasia" (Elisabeth Ahlsen); "Speech Planning in the Light of Stuttering" (Ann-Marie Alme); "L. S. Tsvetkova's Aphasia Rehabilitation Method and Its Applications" (Ritva Hanninen); "Semantic Aphasia and Luria's Neurolinguistic Model" (Birgitta Johnsen); "Aphasic…

Niemi, Jussi, Ed.; Koivuselka-Sallinen, Paivi, Ed.

32

Current Zoology 57 (3): 253-259, 2011 Received Agu. 10, 2010; accepted Dec. 18, 2010.  

E-print Network

Current Zoology 57 (3): 253-259, 2011 Received Agu. 10, 2010; accepted Dec. 18, 2010. Corresponding author. E-mail: temrin@zoologi.su.se © 2011 Current Zoology Is the higher rate of parental child RYING2 , Birgitta S. TULLBERG1 1 Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm

Tullberg, Birgitta

33

Induced abortion ratio in modern Sweden falls with age, but rises again before menopause  

E-print Network

Induced abortion ratio in modern Sweden falls with age, but rises again before menopause Birgitta S, as is often found in abortion statistics, could depend on older women on average having larger families rather than on age per se. We used data on abortions and births in Sweden during 1994 to investigate how

Tullberg, Birgitta

34

Seasonal polyphenism and leaf mimicry in the comma butterfly  

E-print Network

Seasonal polyphenism and leaf mimicry in the comma butterfly CHRISTER WIKLUND & BIRGITTA S 2003; final acceptance 21 December 2003; MS. number: 7774) The comma butterfly, Polygonia c as a result of high predation pressure. Although butterflies in temperate areas that start reproduction soon

Tullberg, Birgitta

35

PHYSICAL REVIEW A 89, 023408 (2014) High-spectral-resolution attosecond absorption spectroscopy of autoionization in xenon  

E-print Network

of autoionization in xenon Birgitta Bernhardt,1,2,* Annelise R. Beck,1,2 Xuan Li,1 Erika R. Warrick,1,2 M. Justine; published 10 February 2014) The decay of highly excited states of xenon after absorption of extreme

Neumark, Daniel M.

36

Annual Merit Evaluation Report College of Engineering  

E-print Network

Annual Merit Evaluation Report College of Engineering University of North Texas Name Date, or rejected). Please indicate with a star * student co-authors, and in italics faculty co-authors from any UNT

Mohanty, Saraju P.

37

OTKA nyilvntartsi szm: T 034280 RSZJELENTS 1. sz. mellklet  

E-print Network

2001), Hammamet, Tunisia, (2001) Co-authors: T. Marosits, S. Molnár Telek Miklós 1. Analysis of partial-source queueing systems XXV Hungarian Conference of Operations Research, Debrecen, Hungary (2001) Co-authors: M of Operations Research, Debrecen, Hungary (2001) Co-authors: B. Almási, M.Kósa 9. Modeling a Communication

Sztrik, János

38

16 FEBRUARY2004,GSATODAY Post-Seattle  

E-print Network

out two publications with co-authors. I outlined a proposal with col- leagues and students from two met with longtime and new geo-friends and watched proudly as my student co-author, Lila Gerald this on the plane ride home (Maya is finally tak- ing a nap), I am tired. Very tired. Maya didn't understand

Greer, Lisa

39

Fossils and human origins, Mark StonekingSite: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Interviewee: Mark Stoneking DNAi Location:Applications>Human origins>migrations Geneticist Mark Stoneking, co-author of an early mitochondrial DNA paper, talks about the competing theories of human origins.

2008-10-06

40

Swallowing Pills? Children Can Learn How  

MedlinePLUS

... Bradford said, though some studies noted in this paper showed even higher percentages. Study co-author Dr. ... head positions seems most plausible," she said. "The paper was not specific about what the behavioral interventions ...

41

Many U.S. Households Include Someone with Failing Memory  

MedlinePLUS

... first warning signs of [thinking] decline," said Lynda Anderson, a co-author of the first study and ... activities of daily living and language capabilities," said Anderson. She added that these problems can "negatively affect ...

42

Three essays on sovereign debt and financial markets  

E-print Network

This dissertation analyzes different aspects of the actions of borrowing and repaying debts by governments in both domestic and international financial markets. In Chapter 1, which is co-authored with Guido Sandleris and ...

Alessandro, Mauro

2011-01-01

43

Depression Research - The STAR*D Study - Relief in Hours?  

MedlinePLUS

... of this page please turn Javascript on. The STAR*D Study New research reveals that, by working ... Southwestern Medical Center and co-authors of the STAR*D study. Photo courtesy of University of Texas ...

44

Advertiser retains sole responsibility for content ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE  

E-print Network

and co-authors caused a stir when they used this ap- proach to study the number of living species, conservation, business and industry." "As statisticians we find the stories in the data, and then convey

Cai, Long

45

Privatarkiv nr 303 Fredspedagogikk (Peace Education)  

E-print Network

include: Education in Developments (1996) ­ (forthcoming edition in Spanish entitled Reflexiones acerca de, (co-authored with Mario Borrelli, 1993), Disarming: Discourse on Violence and Peace, (editor, 1993

Malinnikova, Eugenia

46

Curriculum Vitae Jeffrey Reiman August 2010 William Fraser McDowell Professor of Philosophy  

E-print Network

, 1997) The Death Penalty: For and Against (co-authored with Louis Pojman), (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998) Abortion and the Ways We Value Human Life (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999) The Rich

Carlini, David

47

Dr. Thomas D. Frank From the west...  

E-print Network

Mojave Desert Mojave National PreserveMojave National Preserve Death Valley National ParkConsequences of land concentrations at Death Valley National Park in the Mojave desert of southern California. Co-author Dr. Larry Di

Frank, Thomas D.

48

VOLCANIC PROCESSES, PRODUCTS & SUCCESSIONS SHORTCOURSE  

E-print Network

with a need to understand physical volcanic processes, deposit characteristics, the identification of rock, komatiite NiS and kimberlite systems. Ray is co-author (with JV Wright) of the internationally acclaimed

Albrecht, David

49

Some with Kidney Stones Might Have Calcium Buildup in Blood Vessels  

MedlinePLUS

... co-author Dr. Robert Unwin, of University College London. Unwin is currently chief scientist with the AstraZeneca ... osteoporosis. SOURCES: Robert Unwin, M.D., University College London, chief scientist, AstraZeneca cardiovascular metabolic diseases innovative medicines ...

50

MEDIA RELEASE 18 April 2013  

E-print Network

enterprise, Climate Smart, which trains organizations to measure, manage and reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG-medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that have worked with Climate Smart. Report co-author, and Climate Smart

Pedersen, Tom

51

2011 Newsletter 39 Lorena Moscardelli Finds  

E-print Network

By Joshua Zaffos In the search for water on Mars, planetary ge- ologists have combed over countless images contested. The anal- ogy presented by Moscardelli and co-author Lesli Wood, a colleague at the Bureau

Texas at Austin, University of

52

Exceptional service in the national interest www.sandia.gov  

E-print Network

development, sparse iterative methods and applied graph theory. There he co- authored Chaco, a graph partitioning and sequencing toolkit widely used to optimize parallel computations. In 1995, Dr. Leland served

53

Contagion by shared financial intermediary in the pre-1914 London sovereign debt market  

E-print Network

This thesis consists of one empirical essay on contagion (co-authored with Joao Manoel Pinho de Melloą and Marcelo de Paiva Abreu˛). We document a novel type of international financial contagion whose driving force is ...

Sodre, Antonio Carlos de Azevedo

2011-01-01

54

Regulation of Genetic Tests  

MedlinePLUS

... Edward Kennedy (D-MA) partnered with Senator Gordon Smith (R-OR) to co-author the Laboratory Test ... introduced by Senator Edward Kennedy and Senator Gordon Smith. August 2006 : Genomics and Personalized Medicine Act of ...

55

ISS Update: Nutrition Manager Talks About Children's Book '??Space Nutrition' - Duration: 12:10.  

NASA Video Gallery

NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Scott Smith, Manager of Nutritional Biochemistry at Johnson Space Center, about the children'??s book he co-authored called "Space Nutrition."?ť T...

56

Ecology, 00(0), 0000, pp. 000000 0000 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-print Network

ecology; simulation modeling; sustain- ability. Why are starfish like an atomic bomb? The answer, according to the co-authors of Complexity in landscape ecology, is that like the chain reaction of atomic

Turner, Monica G.

57

'-> print _ profile VIRTUAL DA VINCI  

E-print Network

University, and has co-authored four papers on immersive environments website: His academic page has links? Are the caves just about fancier videogames, or better cyber-porn? Well sure. As with most technological

Laidlaw, David

58

This is the preliminary version of the JASIST submission Topicbased PageRank on Author Co  

E-print Network

but are linked via various relationships, including cited/citing, co-author, co- occur, friend-of, know, vote Ranking authors is vital for identifying a researcher's impact and his standing within a scientific field

Menczer, Filippo

59

Ms. Nancy Slach Department of  

E-print Network

Early Childhood." Dr. Rebecca Slayton Department of Pediatric Dentistry Co-author of Early Childhood Research Nutrition Group's 2009 Best Student Abstract Award. Dr. Joel Khoo Prosthodontics, 2011 First place

60

Essays in empirical law and economics/  

E-print Network

This dissertation, which is a collection of three essays, uses empirical methods to study questions at the intersection of law and economics. The first chapter, co-authored with Joshua Fischman, explores how supervision ...

Lem, Jacklin Chou

2010-01-01

61

The relationship between microbial DNA concentrations and swimming associated health effects at a tropical environment bathing beach  

EPA Science Inventory

The relationship between microbial DNA concentrations and swimming associated health effects at a tropical environment bathing beach. Timothy 1. Wade, presenter. Co-authors: Alfred P. Dufour, Kristen Brenner, Rich Haugland, Larry Wymer, Elizabeth Sams Fecal indicator bacteria (F...

62

Science Highlight May 2010 Figure1: Structure of the nest-shaped [S6Cu4MoS4] cluster in  

E-print Network

in the treatment of Wilson disease, a disease caused by an overload of copper, and certain metastatic cancers, and graduate student Yi Xue, both co-authors of the paper, solved the three-dimensional crystal structure using

Wechsler, Risa H.

63

A Little Fat, Sugar OK for Kids If Diet Is Healthy  

MedlinePLUS

... schools, said Dr. Robert Murray, a professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University and co-author of ... Dairy Association. SOURCES: Robert Murray, M.D., professor, human nutrition, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; Wesley Delbridge, R. ...

64

Essays in credit markets and development economics  

E-print Network

Chapter 1 (co-authored with Ali Choudhary) exploits exogenous variation in the amount of public information available to banks about a firm to empirically evaluate the importance of adverse selection in the credit market. ...

Jain, Anil Kumar

2014-01-01

65

Essays in cooperation and repeated games  

E-print Network

This dissertation explores cooperation when formal contracts and legal institutions are imperfect. The first chapter (co-authored with Isaiah Andrews) considers how a principal allocates business among a group of agents ...

Barron, Daniel (Daniel Vincent)

2013-01-01

66

Biographical Summary Tianfu Xu is a Career Staff Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-print Network

applications. Tianfu has authored and co-authored about 40 peer-reviewed journal papers. His papers have been cited by other researchers more than 360 times (SCI citation). Research Interests · Developing new

Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

67

A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of citations) and

Matthew L. Wallace; Vincent Larivičre; Yves Gingras

2011-01-01

68

Erdos Number Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered about the mathematics behind the idea of "six degrees of separation?" The Erd's Number Project offers several fairly comprehensive lists of co-author relationships to elaborate (with a bit of humor) studies of the dynamics involved in "the collaboration graph," which the website says is "a 'real-life' fairly large graph for combinatorialists to study." The co-author relationship list begins with the Hungarian mathematician Paul Erd's and branches outward, so that anyone who co-authored with Erd's is assigned Erd's number 1 and anyone who co-authored with an Erd's number 1 is assigned the Erd's number 2, and so on. The website offers some suggestions for how the lists might be used, including finding your own Erd's number, testing algorithms, or just getting a sense of the different areas of mathematics represented by Erd's' co-authors. Visitors can also learn more about Erd's, read articles about collaboration in mathematics, or browse through the websites which are linked from the co-author data lists.

69

Retraction. "Immunohistochemical prognostic markers in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: validation of tissue microarray as a prerequisite for broad clinical applications (a study from the Lunenburg Lymphoma Biomarker Consortium)" (J Clin Pathol 2009;62:128–38;doi:10.1136/jcp.2008.057257).  

PubMed

The Journal of Clinical Pathology wishes to inform its readers of the authors' retraction of the following article for redundancy. The original article by D de Jong, W Xie, Rosenwald, M Chhanabhai, P Gaulard,W Klapper, A Lee, B Sander, C Thorns,E Campo, T Molina, A Hagenbeek,S Horning, A Lister, J Raemaekers, G Salles, R D Gascoyne and E Weller entitled "Immunohistochemical prognostic markersi n diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: validation of tissue microarray as a prerequisite for broad clinical applications (a study from the Lunenburg Lymphoma Biomarker Consortium)" (J Clin Pathol 2009;62:128–38;doi:10.1136/jcp.2008.057257) published online on 15 September 2008, contained substantial overlap in text, data, and conclusions compared with a previous article with the same title published in Journal of Clinical Oncology on 1 March 2007 by Daphne de Jong, Andreas Rosenwald, Mukesh Chhanabhai, Philippe Gaulard,Wolfram Klapper, Abigail Lee, Birgitta Sander, Christoph Thorns, Elias Campo, Thierry Molina, Andrew Norton, Anton Hagenbeek, Sandra Horning, Andrew Lister, John Raemaekers, Randy D Gascoyne, Gilles Salles and Edie Weller (doi:10.1200/JCO.2006.09.4490). In addition, the authors did not cite the Journal of Clinical Oncology article in the paper published in Journal of Clinical Pathology. PMID:22930798

2012-09-01

70

Assessing the true role of coauthors in the h-index measure of an author scientific impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method based on the classical principal component analysis leads to demonstrate that the role of co-authors should give a h-index measure to a group leader higher than usually accepted. The method rather easily gives what is usually searched for, i.e. an estimate of the role (or "weight") of co-authors, as the additional value to an author papers' popularity. The construction of the co-authorship popularity H-matrix is exemplified and the role of eigenvalues and the main eigenvector component are discussed. Examples illustrate the points and serve as the basis for suggesting a generally practical application of the concept.

Ausloos, M.

2015-03-01

71

Assessing the true role of coauthors in the h-index measure of an author scientific impact  

E-print Network

A method based on the classical principal component analysis leads to demonstrate that the role of co-authors should give a h-index measure to a group leader higher than usually accepted. The method rather easily gives what is usually searched for, i.e. an estimate of the role (or "weight") of co-authors, as the additional value to an author papers' popularity. The construction of the co-authorship popularity H-matrix is exemplified and the role of eigenvalues and the main eigenvector component are discussed. An example illustrates the points and serves as the basis for suggesting a generally practical application of the concept.

Ausloos, Marcel

2015-01-01

72

Teaching Engineering Concepts through a Middle School Transmedia Book  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the background and experiences of three graduate students who co-authored a print-based transmedia book during the summer of 2013. The article provides information about why the transmedia engineering book was designed and provides an overview of the book's creation process. The project was funded through a National…

Stansell, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brenda; Zimmerman, Ellen; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

2015-01-01

73

Radboud University Nijmegen 2010 Research Report  

E-print Network

bno, Nijmegen Print Van Eck & Oosterink Photography Anke Albers Photography (p. 105) Bert Beelen (p in this scientific discovery (a third of the papers have a co-author from Nijmegen). Professor Katsnelson to these achievements, the University has risen in the major international rankings. Good scientific research helps

van Suijlekom, Walter

74

Who Writes History? Developing a Social Imagination with Third Graders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over her 23 years of teaching elementary school, Vera, a third grade teacher (and co-author of this article), had often fallen into the familiar rhythm of the fall social studies curriculum, with its predictable narrative of discovery, bravery, heroism, and thanksgiving. Her journey to becoming a more reflective, thoughtful, and equitable teacher…

Zaleski, Joan; Zinnel, Vera

2013-01-01

75

Caffeinated Seas Found off U.S. Pacific Northwest Human waste in coffee country has unknown effect on marine life..  

E-print Network

and humans alike, experts say. Scientists sampled both "potentially polluted" sites--near sewage-site waste disposal systems like septic systems," said study co-author Elise Granek. The difference may is not specifically monitored. By contrast, for on-site waste-disposal systems, "there is frequently not much

South Bohemia, University of

76

T h e Q u e e n s C o l l e g e W o m e n ' s s T u d i e s P r o g r a m Monday, March 19, 2012 9 aM2:30 PM  

E-print Network

for Pregnant Women. She has worked at leading reproductive rights organizations, including the ACLU and reproductive justice activism. She is co-author of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice presents The Virginia Frese Palmer ConFerenCe Women's hisTory monTh 2012 faiTh Penni

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

77

MICHELE A. JOHNSON Trinity University, Department of Biology  

E-print Network

, Herpetological Review, March 2010. Johnson, M. A., M. Leal, L. R. Schettino, A. C. Lara, L. J. Revell, and J. B lizards. Animal Behaviour 75: 555-563. Sanger, T. J., P. M. Hime, M. A. Johnson, J. Diani, and J. B. Losos. Juli Wade PUBLICATIONS * indicates undergraduate co-author a. Peer-reviewed articles Kircher, B.K., C.D

Johnson, Michele A.

78

The early Web was hailed for giving individuals the same publish-ing power as large content providers. But over time, large content  

E-print Network

by projects, conferences, or co-authors. · A history high-school teacher wants to showcase 57 important). Distribution of these papers is limited to classroom use, and personal use by others. WWW 2007, May 8­12, 2007 MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory The Stata Center, Building 32, 32 Vassar

79

Inspection Judgements on Urban Schools: A Case for the Defence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is co-authored by two urban school Heads in the north of England with the support of an academic partner. The article begins with the phenomenon of official judgements of urban schools, made by the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills, a semi-privatised and supposedly independent arm of government.…

Gorton, Julian; Williams, Melanie; Wrigley, Terry

2014-01-01

80

Better Pictures from Better Measurements of Image Quality Jon Hardeberg  

E-print Network

Télécommunications in Paris, France in 1999 with a dissertation on color image acquisition and reproduction, using both colorimetric and multispectral approaches. He has more than 10 years experience with industrial and academic color imaging research and development, and has co-authored over 100 research papers within

Zanibbi, Richard

81

N.Y.C. Study Finds Gains for Charters: Research Shows Schools Closing City-Suburb Gap  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New York City's charter schools are making strides in closing achievement gaps between disadvantaged inner-city students and their better-off suburban counterparts, a new study concludes. The study, conducted by Stanford University researcher Caroline M. Hoxby and her co-authors Sonali Mararka and Jenny Kang, is based on eight years of data for…

Viadero, Debra

2009-01-01

82

London home for Crick archive.  

PubMed

Unprecedented access to the archives of Francis Crick, just before the 50th anniversary next year of his famous paper co-authored with James Watson on the proposed double helix structure of DNA, looks set to go ahead. Nigel Williams reports. PMID:11790311

Williams, Nigel

2002-01-01

83

Learning to Teach Inclusively: Student Teachers' Classroom Inquiries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book--co-authored by a teacher educator, a diverse group of five pre-service student teachers, and their student teaching supervisor--takes a unique, illuminating look at the experience of student teaching from the perspective of student teachers. It is premised on learning to teach as an inquiry process enriched by collaborative…

Oyler, Celia

2006-01-01

84

Talk presented at Joint AINC and Dev Psy Seminar 21st Feb 2011 and collaborators  

E-print Network

's two last books NB: Each has several additional co-authors. Piaget, Jean, et al., Possibility Feider from French in 1987, (Original 1981) Piaget, Jean, et al., Possibility and Necessity Vol 2 It is not widely known that shortly before he died Jean Piaget and his collaborators produced a pair of books

Sloman, Aaron

85

DartMail: Digital Information Transfer through Physical Surrogates  

E-print Network

information between collaborators. People swap business cards and vacation photos, and co- authors exchange. Associating the RFID dart with digital data. The person passes the dart over the RFID reader to raise an on. Information retrieval. The receiver passes the dart over another RFID reader, automatically opening up

British Columbia, University of

86

Culturally Sensitive Computer Support for Creative Co-authorship of a Sex Education Game  

E-print Network

Culturally Sensitive Computer Support for Creative Co-authorship of a Sex Education Game Junia C, Canada, ssfels@ece.ubc.ca Abstract. We describe a computer-supported game authoring system for educators to co-author a game to help teaching sensitive content, specifically sex education. Our approach

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Armin Philipp Moczek Department of Biology Program Affiliation: EEB  

E-print Network

horn dimorphism in the scarab beetle Onthophagus taurus: do alternative reproductive tactics favor (*undergraduate co-author): (1) Moczek AP (1998). Horn polyphenism in the beetle Onthophagus taurus: diet quality: 636-641. (2) Moczek AP (1999). Facultative paternal investment in the polyphenic beetle Onthophagus

Moczek, Armin P.

88

The Contradictions of Contemporary Culture: A Tribute to Norman Jay Levitt (1943-2009)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Norman Jay Levitt was the author's good friend, collaborator, and co-author. He was--above, before, and after politics--an honest inquirer. His socio-cultural views evolved continuously. Levitt, truth-seeker and liberal, was impatient with, and a devastating critic of, the political correctness and--even worse--the philosophic triviality that…

Gross, Paul R.

2012-01-01

89

The Freakonomics of Tenure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ever-simmering question of whether the tenure system should be reformed lit up the blogosphere, ignited by an online essay from the (tenured) professor Steven D. Levitt, co-author of the publishing phenomenon "Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything" and the popular blog Freakonomics. When Levitt posted "Let's…

Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

2007-01-01

90

NATURE PHOTONICS | VOL 6 | OCTOBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 639 news & views  

E-print Network

thermal expansion near 124 K. Building on a knowledge of conventional systems, Kessler and co- workers1 process. For instance, Kessler et al.1 report using X-ray diffraction to determine the crystalline axes frequency combs based on erbium-doped fibre lasers. Kessler and co-authors1 have compared their new silicon

91

CORRESPONDENCE Reply to: African dust and asthma in the Caribbean--medical  

E-print Network

CORRESPONDENCE Reply to: African dust and asthma in the Caribbean--medical and statistical perspectives by M A Monteil and R Antoine Joseph M. Prospero & Edmund Blades & Raana Naidu & Marc C. Lavoie. One of the co- authors of our paper, Dr. R. Naidu, was at that time a member of the medical school

Prospero, Joseph M.

92

A World of Ideas: International Survey Gives a Voice to Teachers Everywhere  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Kristen Weatherby is a senior policy analyst at OECD in the education directorate. She runs the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and is author or co-author of publications and blog posts on TALIS and teachers. She started her career as a classroom teacher in the United States before working in education in the private sector in…

Crow, Tracy

2013-01-01

93

Alexander A. Puretzky Research Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering  

E-print Network

) and molecules (IR multiphoton dissociation). Laser isotope separation. Publications Author of more than 160 thin film deposition, laser plasma dynamics and diagnostics, laser spectroscopy, and laser isotope separation; Co-author of two books (Chemistry of Plasma: Selective Photoionization of Atoms by Laser

Geohegan, David B.

94

NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Anthony Adornato  

E-print Network

in disability and civil rights law. He is one of the co-authors of a leading casebook on disability law and his Rights Scholars from the United States, Israel, and Japan SYRACUSE, NEW YORK ­ The Burton Blatt on the rights of persons with disabilities in the US, Israel, and Japan." Thursday, Feb. 17 ­ 2:30 p

McConnell, Terry

95

August 2010 Features | News | Media | Events Business, Science, and Technology Simi Kedia wins "Best  

E-print Network

August 2010 Features | News | Media | Events Business, Science, and Technology Simi Kedia wins School, along with co-author Thomas Philippon from NYU, won the 2010 prize for the "Best Paper" published with Ernst & Young's Inclusive Excellence Award RBS Professor and PhD student receive 'Best Paper in Ethics

Lin, Xiaodong

96

But that wasn't the case for the paper on elements 116 and 118,  

E-print Network

, willholdagrievancehearingonNinov'sfiring. Science has already published a brief note retracting eight of Schön's papers7 on ethics and the responsibilities of co-authors, intended to prevent a repeat of the situation in which to require all NIH grant holders to receive ethics training. The proposal has languished in the face

Cai, Long

97

Identity Matters in a Short-Term, International Service-Learning Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the role that identity and the identity development process play in a short-term, international service-learning experience. Employing narrative inquiry, two of the co-authors, student participants in a 2-week service-learning program in Honduras, describe and interpret their service-learning experience in the context of life…

Mather, Peter C.; Karbley, Megan; Yamamoto, Makiko

2012-01-01

98

COEO's Landmark Research Summary: "Reconnecting Children through Outdoor Education"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past year, Andrea Foster reviewed a wide array of current and international research into the multiple, powerful and lasting outcomes produced through utilizing outdoor and experiential education (OEE) as a key learning methodology. As co-authors, Foster and Linney produced an 80-page document that reports the findings according to the…

Linney, Grant

2007-01-01

99

Toward Next Generation Mobile Networks Abbas Jamalipour, PhD; Fellow IEEE, Fellow IEAust  

E-print Network

a consensus regarding the priority of one radio system over another. In this tutorial, the state-of-the art University, Japan. He is the author of the first book on wireless IP and two other books, and has co-authored five books and over 175 technical papers, all in the field of wireless networks. He is a Fellow Member

100

The Quagmire Called Lebanon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dr. David Kimche is the president of the Israel Council on Foreign Relations and served as the director general of the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 1980-1987. He is the author and co-author of a number of books on Israel and international affairs, including The Last Option: After Nasser, Arafat & Saddam Hussein. Of all the countries in the

David Kimche

101

Linda H. Peterson Home Address: Department of English 53 Edgehill Road  

E-print Network

, Harriet Martineau, and the `Little Book,'" Nineteenth Century Literature, 60 (2006), 409-50. "Personal, 1989. Co-authored with Stuart Moulthrop et al. Editions and Edited Collections: Editor. Harriet Martineau's Autobiography. Peterborough, Canada: Broadview Press, 2007. Editor. The Life of Charlotte Brontë

102

USGS Oceanographer Named to IPCC Report  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Asbury (Abby) H. Sallenger has been named one of the authors of a chapter in the next IPCC report, due to be published in 2014. Sallenger has been assigned to co-author Chapter 5 of the Fifth Assessment Report, entitled Coastal Systems and Low-Lying Areas. This chapter will contain an international ...

103

Three Essays on Estimating Causal Treatment Effects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation is composed of three distinct chapters, each of which addresses issues of estimating treatment effects. The first chapter empirically tests the Value-Added (VA) model using school lotteries. The second chapter, co-authored with Michael Wood, considers properties of inverse probability weighting (IPW) in simple treatment effect…

Deutsch, Jonah

2013-01-01

104

Divide and Conquer: Detecting Patterns that Explain the Big Picture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Alecia Ford, co-author of this article, had a problem that teachers everywhere face more and more frequently with the predominance of standardized testing--too much world history to teach in too little time. Her problem relates to how she can help her sixth-grade students develop an in-depth understanding of the Enlightenment, a period in history…

Secules, Teresa; Ford, Alecia

2006-01-01

105

Seeing Organizational Learning: A 'Cultural' View  

Microsoft Academic Search

What sight does a 'cultural' approach to organizational learn- ing enable? In an earlier essay my co-author and I argued that such an approach made it possible to bypass certain conceptual problems inher- ent in treating organizational learning as an attribute of individuals. In this essay I reflect on the metaphoric process that enabled that argument, which was implicitly as

Dvora Yanow

106

Return of the Google Game: More Fun Ideas to Transform Students into Skilled Researchers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teens are impatient and unsophisticated online researchers who are often limited by their poor reading skills. Because they are attracted to clean and simple Web interfaces, they often turn to Google--and now Wikipedia--to help meet their research needs. The Google Game, co-authored by this author, teaches kids that there is a well-thought-out…

Watkins, Katrine

2008-01-01

107

WORLD-WIDE DIRECT USES OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

The worldwide application of geothermal energy for direct utilization is reviewed. This paper attempts to update the previous survey carried out in 1995 by one of the co-authors (Freeston) and presented at the World Geothermal Congress in Florence, Italy. For each of these updates since 1975, the recording of data has been similar, but not exactly the same. As in

John W. Lund; Derek H. Freeston

2000-01-01

108

2011 Department at a Glance Points of Pride  

E-print Network

: · National Institutes of Health · Medical Foundation-Smith Family · Parkinson's Foundation · American Lung Association · American Heart Association Education I Molly Fitzgerald-Hayes co-authored a textbook, DNA of major journals. I Alejandro Heuck was selected by the American Lung Association as a 2009 Diseases

Schweik, Charles M.

109

The Roles of a Visual Literacy Component in Middle School Language Arts Curricula: A Case Study with At-Risk Students and Their Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a co-author of the GEAR-UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant proposal to the Department of Education in 1999, the primary author (Kohl) of this paper is in her third year of working at Franklin Middle School, which largely serves at-risk minority students through the University of South Florida (USF),…

Kohl, Virginia; Dressler, Becky; Hoback, John

110

ABSORBING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS FOR GENERAL NONLINEAR SCHRODINGER  

E-print Network

is given through the Dirichlet-to-Neumann (DtN) operator (see [1] for a complete review). This DtN map can and his co-authors [11]. However, in most situations, it is impos- sible to obtain the exact DtN map robust and accurate approximations of the DtN maps for nonlinear one- and two-dimensional Schr

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

BIOGRAPHIES Randolph Hall: Networks, Emergency Response,  

E-print Network

and risk analysis with particular interest in the application of these fields to environmental, technology California Planning Model, which they apply to the study of economic impacts at detailed spatial and sectoral, "Urban Police Patrol Analysis." He also served as the society's president. He is co-author (with

Southern California, University of

112

Searching for proofs (and uncovering capacities of the mathematical mind)1  

E-print Network

enriches our perspective on his 1This essay is dedicated to Grigori Mints on the occasion of his 70th step for propositional logic; see the co-authored paper (Shanin, et al. 1965), but also (Mints 1969) and the description of further work in (Maslov, Mints, and Orevkov 1983). #12;190 Wilfried Sieg metamathematical work

Spirtes, Peter

113

Reflection on the Role of Artists: A Case Study on the Hidden Visual Curriculum of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2005, Maria Acaso, professor in Art Education at the Universidad Complutense Madrid in Spain and a co-author of this article, conducted a comparative research project on visual configurations at different art schools in Europe and the United States. The study of hidden visual curriculum examines how knowledge and cultural/political/social…

Baker, Marissa H.; Ng-He, Carol; Lopez-Bosch, Maria Acaso

2008-01-01

114

Latino National Survey Executive Summary  

E-print Network

of the APSA Standing Committee on Civic Engagement and Education that co-authored Democracy at Risk: How also published in the Journal of Politics, Urban Affairs Quarterly, Western Political Quarterly, West European Politics, the Journal of State Government, as well as many edited volumes. He is co

Kaminsky, Werner

115

N E W S R E L E A S E Joe Mathews  

E-print Network

Schwarzenegger and the Rise of Blockbuster Democracy and co-author (with Mark Paul) of the just, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the New Republic, The American Prospect, Politico, the Scientific as sweeping as the proposals in California Crackup." -- Troy Senik, Wall Street Journal "A terrific book

Akhmedov, Azer

116

Opening Windows  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Beth Kanter is working hard to get the word out about how best to get the word out. Kanter is CEO of Zoetica, which provides word-of-mouth communication services to nonprofits and socially conscious companies; a decade-long blogger on the topic of social media and nonprofits; and a popular conference speaker and trainer. She is also co-author of…

Bennett, Gayle

2011-01-01

117

an Evening with Dr. Michael Graham  

E-print Network

behind The Essential Naturalist, and dive into some of the most fascinating and intriguing writingspresents THE ESSENTIAL NATURALIST an Evening with Dr. Michael Graham Please join us Tuesday new co-authored book, Dr. Michael Graham offers an eclectic collection of natural history writings

McPhee-Shaw, Erika

118

Intercom, 77. Explorations in the Emergent Present.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of Intercom promotes an awareness of the world as a system that poses new possibilities and obligations for educators as well as policy makers. The first part includes interviews with and excerpts from the works of Denis Meadows, joint author of Limits to Growth; Mihajlo Mesarovic, co-author of Mankind at the Turning Point; Robert…

Hanvey, Robert

119

Collaboration and Article Quality in the Literature of Academic Librarianship  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studies suggest that co-authorship results in a higher quality article. This study looks for evidence of this in the literature of academic librarianship. Using citation counts to articles from two important journals over a ten-year period, no evidence is found to support the superiority of co-authored articles.

Hart, Richard L.

2007-01-01

120

The University of Dayton Sigma Xi Chapter with the Bioengineering Program, Biology  

E-print Network

, and Pre-Medicine Program Present: What can we learn about breast cancer by combining mathematics multiple data types and build predictive models that help us to understand how breast cancer cells hormones and growth factors affect breast cancer. Dr. Clarke has authored/co-authored over 225 publications

Yengulalp, Lynne

121

Shakespeare in Japan: A Multimedia Teaching Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a CD ROM created by three co-authors which presents a multimedia exposition and comparison of three parallel productions of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by a single director staged sequentially at the Tokyo Globe in 1994. Provides specific suggestions as to how secondary English teachers could use this material. (NH)

Gillies, John

1999-01-01

122

Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* J. Hansen, M. Sato  

E-print Network

Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* J. Hansen, M. Sato NASA Goddard;Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* Jim Hansen March 11, 2009 Climate. Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture co-authors or colleagues providing data

Hansen, James E.

123

The Future of the American Faculty: An Interview with Martin J. Finkelstein and Jack H. Schuster  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Martin J. Finkelstein and Jack H. Schuster have teamed up to continue tracing the changes taking place in faculty work with their Project on the American Faculty. They have published The New Academic Generation: A Profession in Transformation (1998), co-authored with Robert Seal, and are preparing a new manuscript to appear in 2004 with a working…

Rice, R. Eugene

2004-01-01

124

Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Intergenerational Reflections--An Interview with Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a September 2013 interview, Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu--whose passion for public service is manifested in differing ways and from two dramatically different generational standpoints--discussed insights from their co-authored book, "Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Two Generations Reflect on Public Service (2013)." Septuagenarian Tom…

McTighe Musil, Caryn

2014-01-01

125

More than Tolerance for Engineering Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described herein is a science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) secondary lesson created by graduate engineering student Safa Herfat, with modifications by her co-authors. The lessons learned from this case study are explored through an explanation of tolerance, a description of the lesson, the results obtained, and participant…

Burrows, Andrea; Herfat, Safa; Truesdell, Pam; Miller, Richard

2013-01-01

126

Storytelling as Scholarship: A Writerly Approach to Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What does it mean to take a writerly approach to research? Sondra Perl and her co-authors have pondered this question over the past five years as they have each worked with her to design and draft dissertations that combine their work as literacy researchers with their love of writing. Each of them has moved toward storytelling as a compelling and…

Perl, Sondra; Counihan, Beth; McCormack, Tim; Schnee, Emily

2007-01-01

127

Restoring Bonds of Respect  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

Brokenleg, Martin

2014-01-01

128

Perspectives on thermoelectrics: from fundamentals to device applications  

E-print Network

This review is an update of a previous review (A. J. Minnich, et al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2009, 2, 466) published two years ago by some of the co-authors, focusing on progress made in thermoelectrics over the past two ...

Zebarjadi, M.

2012-01-01

129

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Emily Kumlien August 18, 2014 (608) 265-8199  

E-print Network

of Sports Medicine. "However, there was nothing in our study to show that any specific brand of helmet has suggested." The study, published online in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, involved 2 and competition level," said Tim McGuine, UW sports medicine researcher and co-author of the study. "These results

Schulte, Mike

130

Publications - Implementation Science  

Cancer.gov

The following selected publications have been authored or co-authored by members of the Implementation Science team. They are organized chronologically by year of publication. Most are available as Portable Document Format (PDF) files, which you can view using a free copy of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

131

Special Education in High School Redesign  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography, co-authored by the National High School Center and the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center, identifies articles that address high school redesign as it relates to students with disabilities and special education's role in such initiatives. The articles are organized around the National High School…

National High School Center, 2011

2011-01-01

132

Cyber Security and Research Education Institute The University of Texas at Dallas  

E-print Network

on Artificial Intelligence Tools 22(5) (2013) The Continued War on Terrorism ­ How to Maintain Long-range Deterrence Against Terrorism, To appear in Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism, 2014. (co-author: Jan Kallberg). Jan Kallberg, Bhavani M. Thuraisingham: State Actors' Offensive Cyberoperations

O'Toole, Alice J.

133

Studying Research Collaboration Patterns via Co-authorship Analysis in the Field of TeL: The Case of "Educational Technology & Society" Journal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research collaboration is studied in different research areas, so as to provide useful insights on how researchers combine existing distributed scientific knowledge and transform it into new knowledge. Commonly used metrics for measuring research collaborative activity include, among others, the co-authored publications (concerned with who works…

Zervas, Panagiotis; Tsitmidelli, Asimenia; Sampson, Demetrios G.; Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk

2014-01-01

134

Exercise Physiology and the Academy: Contributions to Physiological Concepts and Biological Systems during the Commemorative Years  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine the contributions made by Academy Fellows during the past 75 years to concepts within the body of knowledge associated with exercise physiology, a literature search was undertaken. Of the charter Fellows, Hetherington and eight others (34%) were identified. Schneider in 1933 was the first of 18 Fellows who became authors, co-authors,…

Tipton, Charles M.

2006-01-01

135

The Spiritual Sequelae of Combat as Reflected by Vietnam Veterans Suffering from PTSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combat veterans experience severe physical, psychological and social consequences as a result of their involvement in life-threatening and other horrific phenomena. They also endure a great deal of trauma to their spiritual selves as well. This article reports on a group led by the co-authors of this paper that was designed to focus on the spiritual dimension of the experience

Gail M. Barton; Lawrence L. Lapierre

1999-01-01

136

JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

Hendrickson, S.

2002-01-01

137

ESPRIT BR Project RAND-REC ( EC-US Exploratory Collaborative Activity {  

E-print Network

of Computing, 1995. 9. Bloemer, J., Kalfane, M., Karp, R., Karpinski, M., Luby, M., Zuckerman, D., An XOR, co-authors T. Hagerup, and R. Raman, Sorting in linear time? In proc. 27th ACM Symposium on Theory, Berkeley, 1995. 10. Dagum, P., Karp, R., Luby, M., Ross, Sheldon, An Optimal Algorithm for Monte Carlo

Eckmiller, Rolf

138

Positioning New Patterns of Privilege in Learning: A Response to Ware  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This special series represents collective courage because what is willing to be risked may be profound. At center is a willingness to reach out and cultivate new conversations on disability. Indeed, the artists who contribute to Ware's article are key co-authors; their art ushers us into a new disability literacy that extends and challenges…

Paxton-Buursma, Debra J.; Mariage, Troy V.

2011-01-01

139

Unleashing Deep Smarts: The Most Valuable Untapped Source of Knowledge Lies within the District's Own Personnel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A widely applied premise in the field of business asserts that the key to an organization's success in today's changing environment is a world-class knowledge management system. The most critical value-added piece of this puzzle lies in what co-authors Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap in their book Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer…

Burbach, Harold J.; Butler, Alfred R., IV

2005-01-01

140

Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher. American Indian Lives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The life story of Esther Burnett Horne records the memories and experiences of a Native woman born in 1909, who was both pupil and teacher in Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding schools. An introduction by Sally McBeth examines methodological and cultural concerns of collecting and co-authoring a life history. In Chapter 1, Essie begins with oral…

Horne, Esther Burnett; McBeth, Sally

141

The Micelle Micelle: (pronounced: my-cell) 1) Unit of structure built up from  

E-print Network

will be offered to students with backgrounds in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Prof. Stottrup is really looking forward to this course. Prof. Stottrup and Ravi Tavakley were co-authors on a paper published made news across the web. Prof. Stottrup gave presentations to the University of Minnesota's Chemistry

Stottrup, Benjamin L.

142

Ben van der Veken Honor Issue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In acclamation of Ben van der Veken, a former editor of Spectrochimica Acta, many co-authors and friends have submitted papers in his honor. He has collaborated with many scientists from the United States, Russia, England, Scotland as well as some in other countries. His research is known throughout the world.

Durig, James

2015-02-01

143

Jacqueline Jones Royster is Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, holds the Ivan Allen Jr. Dean's Chair in Liberal Arts and Technology, and is Professor of English  

E-print Network

. She is the author of three books: Southern Horrors and Other Writings: The Anti-Lynching Campaign Women (2000), and Profiles of Ohio Women, 1803-2003 (2003). She co-authored Feminist Rhetorical Studies (2003). She was consulting writer for Writer's Choice, a textbook series for grades 6 ­ 8, and co

Das, Suman

144

CURRICULUM VITAE Lonce Ndikumana  

E-print Network

from sub-Saharan Africa: magnitudes, causes, and consequences; - Macroeconomic policies in African. Forthcoming. "Is there a case for formal inflation targeting in sub-Saharan Africa?" co-authored with James Heintz, in Journal of African Economies. 41. "New Estimates of Capital Flight from Sub-Saharan African

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

145

Email: hansonpj@ornl.gov One Bethel Valley Road Phone: 865-574-5361 P.O. Box 2008, MS-6301  

E-print Network

from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul in plant and forest tree physiology in 1983 and 1986, and biogeochemical cycles of North American forest ecosystems. He has authored or co-authored over 150 journal articles and book chapters and has co-edited and authored a book titled North American Temperate Deciduous

146

"The University and the Teachers": A Cross-National Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The totally unusual experience of participating in the writing of "The University and the Teachers: France, the United States, England" is recalled here by one of the co-authors. This was a collective enterprise, under the direction of Harry Judge, and the other members of the team were two American researchers, Lynn Paine and Michael Sedlak. The…

Lemosse, Michel

2008-01-01

147

In Northeast, Weather Changes May Mean More Ticks, Earlier  

MedlinePLUS

... the researchers said. "The risk is changing with climate change. We need to prepare ourselves for tick avoidance education earlier in the season," said research co-author Richard Ostfeld, a senior scientist with the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y. "The fact of ...

148

U.S. Deploys Unmanned Vehicles Combat robots garner enthusiasm and skepticism.  

E-print Network

from an unmanned aer- ial vehicle, or UAV. The CIA hailed the hit as a major success for U.S. attack-drone% in the last six years. The U.S. military hopes to soon use drones for cargo transportation and refueling and her co-authors lay out various tasks that drones might be able to perform in the near future

de Weck, Olivier L.

149

Event Relations in Plan-Based Plot Composition Angelo E. M. Ciarlini1  

E-print Network

, are understood by the co-authors of the story [Wallis]. A few computational systems and approaches have been-Fruin & Harrigan]. Although some believe that story and game are in direct opposition [Costikyan], most agree that successful narrative in games is possible, and a few argue for the importance of story creation as part

Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira

150

kudos: a selection of recent awards and honors received by Rutgers-Newark faculty, alumni and staff  

E-print Network

Norte-Sur, 2013). more Jon Dubin, associate dean, School of Law ­ Newark, co-authored Social Security-authored the following articles: "Problem-Oriented Policing and Open- Air Drug Markets: Examining the Pulling Levers Disability Law and Procedure in Federal Court, 2013 ed. (ThomsonReuters/West Publishing Co.). The public

Hanson, Stephen José

151

Fraud strikes top genome lab  

SciTech Connect

Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

Marshall, E.

1996-11-08

152

The UCF Department of Criminal Justice and The Valencia College Criminal Justice Institute  

E-print Network

, law enforcement administrators, and criminal justice undergraduate and graduate students of Criminal Justice CoAuthor "Choosing to Serve: Volunteerism in Law Enforcement" (forthcoming) Reserve UnitThe UCF Department of Criminal Justice and The Valencia College Criminal Justice Institute present

Van Stryland, Eric

153

Stewart Macaulay "Contracts, New Legal Realism, and  

E-print Network

Experience of Criminal Clinics: The Criminal Appeals Project at the University of Wisconsin Law School Criminal Discovery: Why Old Objections Must Yield to New Realities," 2006 Wisconsin Law Review 541 (2006 in Criminal Cases," co-author Keith Findley, 2006 Wisconsin Law Review 291 (2006). D. Gordon Smith "The

Liblit, Ben

154

Publications of Australian LIS Academics in Databases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines aspects of journal articles published from 1967 to 2008, located in eight databases, and authored or co-authored by academics serving for at least two years in Australian LIS programs from 1959 to 2008. These aspects are: inclusion of publications in databases, publications in journals, authorship characteristics of…

Wilson, Concepcion S.; Boell, Sebastian K.; Kennan, Mary Anne; Willard, Patricia

2011-01-01

155

Who was Where, When? Spatiotemporal Analysis of Researcher Mobility in Nuclear Science  

E-print Network

analysis on such dynamic co- authorship networks enables us to understand the `mobility patterns. Digital libraries are increasingly used for extraction of co-authorship networks where two authors are connected by an edge if they have co-authored at least one paper. Co-authorship networks that span multiple

Sadeh, Norman M.

156

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National Security Challenges: Abstract Submission  

E-print Network

NOAA, 2012 Climate Prediction Applications Science Workshop (CPASW), Climate Services for National approach to tackling climate change for public health agencies Presenter and Co-author: Gino D. Marinucci, MPH, Strategy and Policy Advisor, Climate and Health Program, Division of Environmental Hazards

Miami, University of

157

Research Ideas for the Classroom: High School Mathematics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the high…

Wilson, Patricia S., Ed.

158

A Dialogue on Reclaiming Troubled Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This discussion is drawn from the writings of two eminent founders of strength-based approaches to troubled children and adolescents. August Aichhorn is best known for his classic book, "Wayward Youth," and Fritz Redl as co-author of "Children Who Hate". August Aichhorn and Anna Freud mentored a young educational psychologist, Fritz Redl…

Aichhorn, August; Redl, Fritz

2012-01-01

159

Copyright (c) 1994-2000 Cem Kaner. Licensed under the GNU Free Doc License. 1 Win Friends,  

E-print Network

. Mission-critical and life-critical software development efforts involve specific and rigorous procedures License. 2 NoticeNotice These slides are modified from my seminar on software testing. That seminar is based on TESTING COMPUTER SOFTWARE (2nd Ed., a book co- authored with Jack Falk and Hung Quoc Nguyen

160

Taking the Awful out of the German Language: A Study of a New Way to Teach German Gender and Plural Assignment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a study of a method for teaching German gender and plural assignment developed by the late Donald Steinmetz. My primary source for classroom material was the unpublished handbook for students that Steinmetz co-authored with Donald Nelson, The Joy of Gender: A Student Handbook made available to me by his son, Erik Steinmetz. In the…

Kraiss, Andrew

2014-01-01

161

Dr. Carlos Gonzalez's Bio Dr. Gonzalez received his Ph.D in Theoretical Chemistry at Wayne State  

E-print Network

industry identify and utilize effective computational solutions to problems limiting realization, and is one of the co-authors of the Gaussian suite of programs, the most popular ab initio electronic properties of a wide variety of chemical systems, chemical reactivity, long-range interactions in molecules

Magee, Joseph W.

162

Kidney Dialysis Increasing for Pregnant Women  

MedlinePLUS

... data had been collected on pregnancy outcomes for women on hemodialysis in the United States," study co-author Dr. Mala Sachdeva, of Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, said in a news release from the National ... 32 percent of the women began dialysis while they were pregnant. Most -- 58 ...

163

Agencies of Change 1 Agencies of Change  

E-print Network

at the University of Arizona Jeni Hart Lindy Brigham Mary Good Barbara Mills Jan Monk June 13, 2005 Report submitted on an initial draft of the report at a meeting at Rutgers in March, 2005. Jeni Hart, one of the co- authors

Wong, Pak Kin

164

SUMMER 2011 + President Kaler  

E-print Network

as dyslexia but has received much less attention (and research funding). Varma and his co-authors documented dyscalculia--as common as dyslexia. Why do some people struggle so much to learn math? #12;CEHD.UMN.EDU 1 from

Blanchette, Robert A.

165

Discovery Park Directors April 2008 1  

E-print Network

in 1973, and his PhD in 1975, both from Purdue University. Following a brief stay in mixed animal p Dr as an experimental pathologist at the Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico-in-chief of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Rebar is the author or co-author of 11 books

166

Keeping Students and Schools Safe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is based on an interview with a noted expert on school violence who recently co-authored the book Targeting Innocence--When Terrorism Comes to School. Central to school safety are supportive bonds with adults who help create school climates free of bullying. The expert interviewed is Michael Dorn. He recommends that in regard to…

Dufresne, Jerilyn

2005-01-01

167

Gender and Collaboration Patterns in Distance Education Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the associations between gender, collaboration and research methods in distance education research. Following a bibliometric approach, collaboration is operationalised through co-author relationships. The study is based on a review of 695 papers published in five prominent distance education journals between 2000 and 2008. It…

Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; von Prummer, Christine

2010-01-01

168

From Collaboration to Publication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As co-authors of a recent publication in "Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research", we have received inquiries about the publication process. We will describe the process of creating an article based on team work, in our case the work of the Texas Physics Assessment Team. Many physics teachers have opportunities to participate in…

O'Connor, Jerry; Marshall, Jill

2010-01-01

169

Green Jobs and Energy Economy  

E-print Network

Green Jobs and the Clean Energy Economy THOUGHT LEADERSHIP SERIES Co-authors Ditlev Engel, Chief Simons Januario Vestas Wind Systems A/S Thought Leadership Series #4 Green Jobs and the Clean Energy environmental bene ts from reduced greenhouse gas emissions and signi cant, positive economic impacts. Job

Kammen, Daniel M.

170

Green Jobs and Energy Economy  

E-print Network

Green Jobs and the Clean Energy Economy ThoughT Leadership series Co-authors Daniel M. Kammen Series #4 Green Jobs and the Clean Energy Economy #12;Green is the new blue... blue collar and significant, positive economic impacts. Job creation is an especially pressing issue as we confront both our

Kammen, Daniel M.

171

Learning Needs and Adaptation Problems of Foreign Graduate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the learning needs and adaptation problems of foreign graduate students, and is based on the experiences of the five co-authors' graduate studies in Canada and the United States. It reviews the factors that contributed to their decision to study abroad, pre-sojourn expectations and arrival, their arrival in the host country,…

Huxur, Gulbahar; Mansfield, Earl; Nnazor, Reginald; Schuetze, Hans; Segawa, Megumi

1996-01-01

172

Recommendation letters are extraordinarily important during the academic job search process. You should start thinking about who your letter writers will be well in advance of application deadlines.  

E-print Network

should start thinking about who your letter writers will be well in advance of application deadlines. SELECTING REFERENCES Detailed & Positive: Letter writers should be able to speak deeply and passionately first-hand knowledge of your skills ­ they've seen you teach, co-authored articles with you, worked

Manchak, John

173

Smoothing parameter selection in two frameworks for penalized splines  

E-print Network

Introduction Since works of Grace Wahba and co-authors, smoothing splines with the cross-validated smoothing parameter have become an established nonparametric regression tool. One of the attractive features of spline this Courant Research Center "Poverty, equity and growth" and Institute for Mathematical Stochastics, Georg

Krivobokova, Tatyana

174

Antonio Pascual-Leone, PhD, is a psychologist, a clinical Associate Professor, and the director of  

E-print Network

of Psychotherapy Integration, and a Distinguished Publication Award for, "Best empirical research article of 2009 of psychotherapy, with a special focus on the role of emotion, and a co-authored book on Emotion Focused Therapy study on an emotion focused treatment for domestically violent men and several papers on psychotherapy

175

From Idea to Product--Translating Knowledge between the Lab and the Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dissertation is composed of three essays looking at innovation at Academic Medical Centers. It tries to empirically explore the problem of translating knowledge from the laboratory bench to the clinic and from the clinic to the bench. Chapter 1, co-authored with Iain Cockburn, establishes the importance of in-house complementary knowledge in…

Ali, Ayfer Habib

2012-01-01

176

Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. Advances in Learning and Instruction Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to illustrate the benefits of collaboration between scientists from psychology and computer science, namely machine learning, this book contains the following chapters, most of which are co-authored by scholars from both sides: (1) "Introduction: What Do You Mean by 'Collaborative Learning'?" (Pierre Dillenbourg); (2) "Learning Together:…

Dillenbourg, Pierre, Ed.

177

Coming out in Spain: 'Los Invisibles Published Thursday 24th February 11  

E-print Network

Coming out in Spain: 'Los Invisibles Published Thursday 24th February 11 Dr Richard Cleminson in Spain. His co-authored 'Los Invisibles': A History of Male Homosexuality in Spain, 1850 been published in Spain. "The history of this period must never be forgotten. It serves not only

Berzins, M.

178

April 28, July 16, August 2, 2010 Little Boxes: The Simplest Demonstration of the Failure of Einstein's  

E-print Network

of the Franklin Institute 221, 349-382 (1936); A. Einstein, "Autobiographical Notes" in Albert Einstein of the Failure of Einstein's Attempt to Show the Incompleteness of Quantum Theory John D. Nortona To appear in American Journal of Physics. The failure of Einstein's co-authored "EPR" attempt

179

Teaching with Folk Stories of the Hmong: An Activity Book. Learning through Folklore Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is designed as a guide for teaching students about Hmong culture while building appreciation of worldwide cultural diversity. After providing an overview of the distinct history and customs of the Hmong, co-author Dia Cha shares her experiences growing up in Laotian villages, escaping from communist soldiers, living in refugee camps in…

Cha, Dia; Livo, Norma J.

180

Kathryn Morris Ph.D. Philosophy of the Arts, Comparative Studies Program  

E-print Network

she was approached by Dr. Patricia Liehr of the Christine E. Lynn School of Nursing at FAU and Dr at the Ford Aviation Museum. It is the hope of all involved that With Their Voices Raised will eventually, Mary Ann Leavitt, and Dr. Ryutaro Takahashi co-authored the nursing article, "Translating Research

Fernandez, Eduardo

181

Last updated February 2011 Staff Publications 1989-2010  

E-print Network

or co-authored by IFSH, NCFST/IIT, FDA CFSAN Division of Food Processing, Science and Technology staff.S. Jackson, and S.M. Gendel. 2010. Determination of protein levels in soy and peanut oils by colorimetric of infrared radiation. In: Infrared Heating for Food and Agricultural Processing. Zhongli Pan (ed.). CRC Press

Saniie, Jafar

182

The First-Year Urban High School Teacher: Holding the Torch, Lighting the Fire  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The book tracks co-author Paul Weinberg during his first year of teaching as he is introduced to the daily tribulations of an urban Los Angeles high school. Paul's father Carl Weinberg, who fifty years earlier himself began his career in education an urban secondary school teacher, shares his experiences side-by-side with those of his son.…

Weinberg, Paul J.; Weinberg, Carl

2008-01-01

183

DIST ANCE, OPEN AND VIRT UAL LIF EL ONG L EARNING : SHAPING THE TRANSIT ION WIT HIN A  

E-print Network

technical aspects to pedagogical issues, including various difficulties and psychological barriers research interests include computer-mediated communication. She is co-author of an introductory book on ICT, technologies de l'information et de la communication éducatives » -- Multimedia, teaching, educational

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

Research Ideas for the Classroom: Middle Grades Mathematics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the middle…

Owens, Douglas T., Ed.

185

ALAN J. KUPERMAN, Ph.D. Associate Professor  

E-print Network

@mail.utexas.edu ____________________________________________________________________________________________ (Updated ­ January 5, 2010) Books Authored The Limits of Humanitarian Intervention: Genocide in Rwanda," in Adam Jones, ed., Prevention, Intervention, and Accountability, vol. 4 in Adam Jones, ed., Genocide, 4), co-authored with Timothy W. Crawford, pp. vii-xi. #12;- 2 - "How Media Missed Rwandan Genocide

Pillow, Jonathan

186

I all f ..DFO officials adamantly deny the I C S 0 r III q Ulry contentsof thearticle,accusingthe  

E-print Network

,accusingthe . d authors of selectively quoting govern- IlltO epartment ~:~~ reports to "construct a stoly him The article, which hasenragedgov- oneof North America'sleadingyoung ernment officials The article is co-authored by journal's peer-review process, quotes Richard Haedrich of Newfoundland

Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

187

Teaching in Educational Leadership Using Web 2.0 Applications: Perspectives on What Works  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To prepare 21st Century school leaders, educational leadership professors need to learn and teach the utilization of increasingly sophisticated technologies in their courses. The co-authors, a professor and an educational specialist degree candidate, describe how the use of advanced technologies--such as Wikis, Google Docs, Wimba Classroom, and…

Shinsky, E. John; Stevens, Hans A.

2011-01-01

188

What have I learned from the IM submission?  

E-print Network

to claim that our analysis is in real-time, but in automatic manner. I think it's okay because the target is that it could be automated by obtaining data from different data-plane and control-plane sources." (My comment, .... Is this true?" ­ "It is unclear which part of MonoScope is `automatic'?" 2 #12;The co-authors' contributions

Chang, Rocky Kow-Chuen

189

Healthy Liver = Healthy You  

Microsoft Academic Search

is a medical journalist who has been researching and writing on the subject of nutritional medicine for over 20 years. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry. The author of An A-Z Woman's Guide to Vibrant Health and co-author of No More HRT.

Lorna R. Vanderhaeghe; Cheryl Wright; Michael Murray; Eclipta Alba

190

Inside this issue: Around Campus  

E-print Network

and some pictures once we get the program rolling. As the weather turns warmer, we'll hold our annual Earth've heard of the Limits of Growth, which he co- authored. Still not ringing a bell? Then, check out more

Kidd, William S. F.

191

Children's Services: Partnerships for Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Co-author of the popular titles "Booktalking Bonanza" and "The Early Literacy Kit", Betsy Diamant-Cohen brings together 18 examples of successful outreach partnerships that children's librarians and administrators can adapt to their own situations. Contributors from the U.S and Canada explain how they partnered with schools, community…

Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, Ed.

2010-01-01

192

Primoridal germ cell specification: a context-dependent cellular differentiation event  

E-print Network

special attention to author names, affiliations and contact details, and figures, tables and their captions. If you or your co-authors have an ORCID ID please supply this with your corrections. More information about ORCID can be found at http://orcid...

Günesdogan, Ufuk; Magnúsdóttir, Erna; Surani, M. Azim

2014-01-01

193

Source: 24 Hours Edmonton | KEVIN MAIMANN | 29 Jun 2012 ANCIENT FOSSIL DISCOVERED  

E-print Network

Source: 24 Hours Edmonton | KEVIN MAIMANN | 29 Jun 2012 ANCIENT FOSSIL DISCOVERED University. Geologists Ernesto Pecoits and Natalie Aubet found fossilized tracks in Uruguay they believe was left behind-microbiologist at the university, co-authored the study published Thursday in the journal Science. He said the fossils have been

Machel, Hans

194

ION IMPLANTATION INDUCED DEFECT FORMATION AND AMORPHIZATION IN THE GROUP IV SEMICONDUCTORS: DIAMOND, SILICON AND GERMANIUM  

E-print Network

: DIAMOND, SILICON AND GERMANIUM By DIANE P. HICKEY A DISSERTATION PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL at the University of California ­ Berkeley, provided the high-purity germanium for this study, and co-authored the germanium papers that resulted from this work. Dr. Rob Chodelka was the original industrial science advisor

Florida, University of

195

Spiritually Sensitive Social Work: An Overview of American and International Trends Plenary Address for International Conference on Social Work and Counseling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acknowledgment: The author thanks Oxford University Press for permission to excerpt and adapt portions of the book, Spiritual Diversity in Social Work: The Heart of Helping, second edition (2009). The author also thanks Dr. Leola Dyrud Furman, co-author of the book, especially for her leadership in the surveys mentioned in this article. Abstract This article presents an overview of the

Edward R. Canda

196

Quantum Effects in Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alŕn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Man?al; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alŕn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

2014-08-01

197

Unpacking teacher-researcher collaboration with three theoretical frameworks: a case of expansive learning activity?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long association with a mathematics teacher at a Grade 4-6 school in Sweden, is basis for reporting a case of teacher-researcher collaboration. Three theoretical frameworks used to study its development over time are relational knowing, relational agency and cogenerative dialogue. While relational knowing uses narrative perspectives to explore the experiential and relational nature of collaboration; relational agency, draws on activity theory perspectives and identifies the change in the purpose of collaboration, from initially conducting classroom interventions to co-authoring research. Finally, cogenerative dialogue, deploys hermeneutic-phenomenological perspectives and investigates the dialogue that transpired between Lotta and the author, as they co-authored their research report. Such analysis sheds invaluable light on a case of expansive learning activity.

Gade, Sharada

2015-02-01

198

Journal of Geophysical Research Publications: Community Characteristics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Do earth science publications differ by subfield or gender? To figure this out we analyzed publications in JGR Atmosphere, Oceans, and Solid Earth for the year 2000. We assumed that the first author exerted controlling influence over publication characteristics and then we looked at the number of co-authors, number of institutions represented by co-author affiliations, page length of the article, number of references cited, number of subject categories represented in the cited references, number of times the article was cited, and the time between the date the article was submitted and the date when it was accepted for publication. We found that, within each field, there was remarkable similarity between the publications led by women and those led by men. Interesting differences showed up between subfields: for example, Solid Earth authors use more references than do authors publishing in Atmosphere or Oceans.

Pfirman, S. L.; Porter, A.

2009-12-01

199

[Reply to “Wasting public money?” by Judith Totman] Politically motivated request?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Judith Totman Parrish (Forum,Eos, 86(32), 9 August 2005, p. 294) asks Thomas Crowley to provide evidence that the U.S. Rep. Joe Barton's (R.-N.Y) request for information from me, and from my colleagues Michael Mann and Malcolm Hughes, was politically motivated.Among a host of items, here are some of the things Barton specifically asked for: “…all financial support you have received related to your research, including, but not limited to, all private, state, and federal assistance, grants, contracts (including subgrants or subcontracts), or other financial awards or honoraria…the location of all data archives relating to each published study for which you were an author or co-author… [a list of all] requests…you or your co-authors [have] received for data relating to the climate change studies, what was your response, and why?”

Bradley, Raymond S.

200

Yuri I. Galperin (1932-2001)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Yuri I. Galperin, head of the Laboratory of Auroral Physics Phenomena at the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, passed away on 28 December 2001 due to a heart attack. He was a pioneer of auroral and upper atmospheric physics and contributed significantly to the development of space plasma physics. He had been an AGU member (SM) since 1974.Galperin authored and co-authored more than 200 publications in scientific journals and was a co-author of three monographs on experimental space physics. In addition to AGU, Galperin was a member of many scientific councils in Russia, and he had also been a member of the International Astronomical Union since 1958 and the International Academy of Astronautics since 1975.

Zelenyi, Lev; Muliarchik, Tatiana; Stepanov, Vladimir

201

The multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating was funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The initial work on the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modeled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

Persoon, Ann M.

1993-01-01

202

Multi-ion, multi-event test of ion cyclotron resonance heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The multi-ion, multi-event study of ion cyclotron resonance heating has been funded to study ion energization through ion cyclotron resonance with low frequency broadband electromagnetic turbulence. The modeling algorithm for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of oxygen ions was presented in Crew et al. (1990). Crew and his co-authors developed a two-parameter representation of selected oxygen conic distributions and modelled the conic formation in terms of resonance heating. The first year of this study seeks to extend the work of Crew and his co-authors by testing the applicability of the ICRH mechanism to helium ion conic distributions, using data obtained from the Energetic Ion Composition Spectrometer and the Plasma Wave Instrument on Dynamics Explorer 1.

Persoon, Ann M.

1993-01-01

203

SIM Science Studies to Enhance Planet-Finding and Characterizing Capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This talk will describe the results from five SIM Science Studies carried out by the co-authors. These diverse studies quantified several important planet-finding and characterizing capabilities of SIM-Lite beyond the Key Projects. 1. Resonant multiplanet systems are detectable with SIM-Lite, but the optimal timing and number of observations is different than for non-resonant systems. This study improves the capability of

Andrew Howard; E. Ford; B. S. Gaudi; R. Olling; J. Subasavage; A. Tanner

2010-01-01

204

Do you really mean what you actually enforced?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In their works on the theoretical side of Polymer, Ligatti and his co-authors have identified a new class of enforcement mechanisms\\u000a based on the notion of edit automata that can transform sequences and enforce more than simple safety properties. We show\\u000a that there is a gap between the edit automata that one can possibly write (e.g., by Ligatti et al in

Nataliia Bielova; Fabio Massacci

205

Using AVIRIS In The NASA BAA Project To Evaluate The Impact Of Natural Acid Drainage On Colorado Watersheds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Colorado Geological Survey and the co-authors of this paper were awarded one of 15 NASA Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) grants in 2001. The project focuses on the use of hyperspectral remote sensing to map acid-generating minerals that affect water quality within a watershed, and to identify the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to that drainage. A further objective is to define the most cost-effective remote sensing instrument configuration for this application.

Hauff, Phoebe L.; Coulter, David W.; Peters, Douglas C.; Sares, Matthew A.; Prosh, Eric C.; Henderson, Frederick B., III; Bird, David

2004-01-01

206

Benchmarking Corporate Energy Management  

E-print Network

's energy management procedures and perfonnance compare to that of other companies. Energy management involves everything from setting goals and targets to implementing best maintenance practices. This paper, however, discusses benchmarking energy... co-authored by me for the IETC 2000 titled "Corporate Energy Management: A Survey of Large Manufacturing Companies," eight elements of best energy management practice were presented and data on the energy management practices of 23 companies...

Norland, D. L.

207

A rule based fuzzy model for the prediction of petrophysical rock parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach for the prediction of petrophysical rock parameters based on a rule-based fuzzy model is presented. The rule-based fuzzy model corresponds to the Takagi–Sugeno–Kang method of fuzzy reasoning proposed by Sugeno and his co-authors. This fuzzy model is defined by a set of fuzzy implications with linear consequent parts, each of which establishes a local linear input–output relationship

Jose Finol; Yi Ke Guo; Xu Dong Jing

2001-01-01

208

On Being Called an Anti-Semite in Montana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the coordinator of a university lecture series, the author is always on the lookout for good speakers. He thought that he had found one in Stephen Walt, a political scientist at Harvard University and the co-author of an article about the influence of the pro-Israel lobby on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. In this article, the author…

Drake, Richard

2007-01-01

209

Geovisualization of knowledge diffusion: Visualization of bibliographic data 1995-2009  

E-print Network

networks. The advent of Google Maps and Google Earth offered a more accessible GIS for a variety of applications, including researchers interested in mapping bibliographic data. Chaomei Chen and his colleagues have used Google Earth to map several co...-author networks (Chen 2007, Chen et al. 2007, Chen et al. 2008) involving research on Avian Flu, data and knowledge engineering, and terrorism. In a similar manner, Leydesdorff and Persson (2010) employed both Google Maps and Google Earth to map co...

Hubbard, David E.

210

Library And Information Science Research in Developing Countries and Eastern European Countries: A Brief Bibliometric Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined a set of 21 core journals in the field of library and information science (LIS) from 1980–1999 for articles with either principal or co-authors from developing countries (DCs) and the formerly socialist Eastern European countries (EECs). We found that only 826 (7·9%) of a total of 10 400 articles published in 21 journals are from DCs or EECs.

ALI UZUN

2002-01-01

211

Ethics in Sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Editor, William J. Morgan.Includes chapters by former College at Brockport faculty members:Warren P. Fraleigh. Intentional rules violations: one more time.R. Scott Kretchmar (co-author). In defense of competition and winning: revisiting athletic tests and contests.The latest edition of Ethics in Sport doesn't rest on its laurels as the finest and most comprehensive collection of literature to date on moral and ethical

William John Morgan; Warren P. Fraleigh; R. Scott Kretchmar

2007-01-01

212

Dynamically mapping screen real estate optimality  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research paper brings together the fields of systems engineering and media studies to investigate the cinema\\/television\\/computer\\/mobile device screen as a dynamic interface through which points of engagement or how the aesthetics and narrative structures presented on the screen engage the user and create meaning. The co-authors work towards the development of a “screen real estate grammar” or ontology by

Luigi Benedicenti; Sheila Petty

2010-01-01

213

Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond  

E-print Network

greatly indebted to him for his guidance. Many thanks to my co-authors, Avanti Ketkar, Santosh Kumar, Salah Aly, Martin R¨otteler, and Markus Grassl, for the many illuminating discussions and their role in en- hancing my understanding. Martin... closed form expressions for their dimensions and simple criteria to identify dual containing BCH codes. The material in Chapters III and IV is due to a joint work [83] with Andreas Klap- penecker, Avanti Ketkar, and Santosh Kumar. Part of this material...

Sarvepalli, Pradeep Kiran

2008-10-10

214

International Center for Gibbon Studies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Center for Gibbon Studies Web site has a variety of information to advocate the study, preservation, and propagation of this highly endangered primate. General information is included about the Center and about gibbons, along with a bibliography of scientific literature authored or co-authored by the Center's director. Several photo galleries include photos of the Center's gibbons and text about the various species.

215

Evaluating the potential for invasion by alien freshwater fishes in northern Kyushu Island, Japan, using the Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential invasiveness of 28 freshwater fishes in northern Kyushu Island, Japan, was evaluated using the Fish Invasiveness\\u000a Scoring Kit (FISK). The five co-authors scored the level of invasiveness for each species and calculated the total FISK scores;\\u000a the maximum and minimum scores were then eliminated, and the mean of the remaining three scores was used as the final score

Norio Onikura; Jun Nakajima; Ryutei Inui; Hiroshi Mizutani; Midori Kobayakawa; Shinji Fukuda; Takahiko Mukai

216

Preparing prospective teacher education students at two-year post secondary institutions: an assessment of proficiency in technology usage  

E-print Network

of transferring facts from one person to another, but when the teacher's goal is to empower students as thinkers and problem solvers" (p. 176). Gimbert and Zembal-Saul (2002) co-authored an article in which they examine the successful integration of technology... that the model "is designed to raise the status of prospective teachers? conceptions of supporting children?s learning using technology" (Gimbert & Zembal-Saul, 2002; Friedrichsen, Dana, Zembal-Saul, Munford, & Tsur, 2001). 23 According to the ?Learning...

Cavenall, Pamela Elaine Rogers

2009-05-15

217

Mentoring Interns and Postdoctoral Residents in Academic Health Sciences Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article was co-authored by a senior mentor and one of her students who worked with her as both an intern and a postdoctoral\\u000a fellow. It is an expanded version of a presentation given by the first author after receiving the Association of Psychologists\\u000a in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Distinguished Achievement in Teaching Award. The article offers a historical view

Nadine J. Kaslow; Nathan A. Mascaro

2007-01-01

218

STRATEGIES TO ENHANCE NURSES CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS (short  

E-print Network

Please find enclosed a manuscript for consideration for publication in the International Journal of Nursing Practice. This article has not been published elsewhere. The co-author has contributed significantly to this body of work and is in agreement with the content of the manuscript. We believe the content of this manuscript should be of interest to the wide readership of your journal. We look forward to your reviewers ? comments. Yours sincerely,

Elaine Simpson; Phd Rn; Elaine Simpson; Mary Courtney

2007-01-01

219

Obituary: Peter Robert Wilson, 1929-2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is with great sadness that I report the passing of Peter Robert Wilson, a well-known and well-loved figure in the solar physics community. Peter was on the faculty of the Department of Applied Mathematics at the University of Sydney for 39 years, and Chair of the department for 24 of these years. He was the author or co-author of

Herschel B. Snodgrass

2009-01-01

220

TOWARD A GLOBAL \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Morton H. Halperin is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and co-author of Self-Determination in the New World Order (1992). Kristen Lomasney is a second-year master's candidate at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. As democracy spreads throughout the globe, many people are rediscovering a truth understood by the Framers

Morton H. Halperin; Kristen Lomasney

1993-01-01

221

Relief During the Great Depression in Australia and America  

Microsoft Academic Search

I compare and contrast the relief efforts in response to the extraordinary employment of the Great Depression in the U.S. and Australia. The effectiveness of relief spending in America at the local level is discussed with reference to a series of studies that I have performed with a series of co-authors. To compare the U.S. demographic results with the impact

Price V. Fishback

2012-01-01

222

Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification – a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing  

E-print Network

Target topic: achieving sustainability, saving energy, and improving occupant comfort? Lead Author Wolfram Trinius, PhD, Ingenieurb?ro Trinius, Hamburg, Germany and University of Gavle, Sweden Co Authors Harry Hirsch, HH Consulting, Baden... Baden, Germany Simone Lakenbrink, DU Diederichs Project Management, Munich, Germany Title Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification ? a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing The move from...

Trinius, W.; Hirsch, H.

223

The Life of Brian Brian Cox is a man of many diverse talents. He has become the most popular presenter of science  

E-print Network

presenter of science documentaries on UK TV, with his BBC series on The Wonders of the Solar System drawing for the Manchester Particle Physics team, he was science advisor for the cinema blockbuster "Sunshine", and he has co-authored the popular book on Relativity "Why does E=mc 2 (and why should we care)" which jumped straight up the US non-fiction

224

Assessing the effectiveness of technology integration: message boards for strengthening literacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports current findings from a multi-phased research project that is an offshoot of a 3-year, $155,000 “Best Practices in the Use of Technology” grant awarded to one of the co-authors, 1998–2001. The expanded Phase 1 portion of the study has a general focus on the cognitive complexity of student written responses over time in Virtual Literature Circles or

Matt Thomas; David Hofmeister

2002-01-01

225

Stigma and Discrimination: the Mumbai Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Title: Stigma & Discrimination: The Mumbai Experience\\u000aMain Author: Amresh Shrivastava MD, DPM, MRCPsych, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.\\u000aCo-Authors: Gopa Sarkhel, MA, Iyer Sunita MA, Thakar Meghana MA, Shah Nilesh, MD, DPM\\u000aAddress of Presenter: Executive Director, Mental health foundation of India (PRERANA Charitable Trust) Mumbai, India; Currently at Department of Psychiatry, The University of Western Ontario,

Amresh Srivastava

2009-01-01

226

The Encyclopedia of Writing and Illustrating Children's Books: From Creating Characters to Developing Stories, a Step-by-step Guide to Making Magical Picture Books (hardcover)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A practical and theoretical guide to creating successful childrens books. Co- authored by Sue Thornton and Yadzia Williams. Publishers Description The latest in our best selling Encyclopedia of Art series now focuses on a popular topic for both writers and illustrators: how to make, craft, and sell children’s books. This practical book is a step-by-step guide to becoming a successful

Desdemona McCannon; Susan Thornton; Yadzia Williams

2008-01-01

227

Tsunamis, hurricanes and neotectonics as driving mechanisms in coastal evolution (Proceedings of the Bonaire Field Symposium, March 2-6, 2006. A contribution to IGCP 495)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using field oberservations and remote sensing data from the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004 impact at Banda Aceh and Lhok Nga districts (Indonesia) F.Lavigne, R.Paris, P.Wassmer, Ch.Gomez, D.Brunstein and 11 other Co-authors present a field data-based methodology to calibrate simulation codes for tsunami inundation models. The presented preliminary results are part of the French-Indonesian TSUNAMIRISQUE programme with the aim to improve

Anja Scheffers; Dieter Kelletat

2006-01-01

228

George Gamow: World line 1904–1933 (On the ninetieth anniversary of G A Gamov's birth)  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of his articles written with a co-author Gamov called 'My half-article'. Here his 'half-biography' is presented. It covers the first very important part of his life, starting from his youth in Odessa, his student years in Petrograd–Leningrad and several of his visits to Germany, Denmark, and England in connection with his scientific work. Special attention is devoted to his

1994-01-01

229

Multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinarity, and patterns of research collaboration in nanoscience and nanotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper first describes the recent development that scientists and engineers of many disciplines, countries, and institutions\\u000a increasingly engage in nanoscale research at breathtaking speed. By co-author analysis of over 600 papers published in “nano\\u000a journals” in 2002 and 2003, I investigate if this apparent concurrence is accompanied by new forms and degrees of multi- and\\u000a interdisciplinarity as well as

Joachim Schummer

2004-01-01

230

Public Service, Governance and Web 2.0 Technologies : Future Trends in Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Edited by Ed Downey and Matt Jones.Imncludes a chapter co-authored by two College at Brockport faculty members: Melchor De Guzman and Korni Swaroop Kumar: Using Web 2.0 as a Community Policing Strategy: An Examination of the United States Municipal Police Departments.Web 2.0 can create value for political processes by decreasing costs and increasing opportunities for civic engagement, and, as a

Edward H. Downey; Matthew A. Jones; Melchor De Guzman; Korni Swaroop Kumar

2012-01-01

231

Overshooting Convection from High-resolution NEXRAD Observations  

E-print Network

- ysis time relative to Amax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4.8 Cumulative percentage coverage within each month relative to Amax. 23 iv 4.9 Year long time series. Black lines represent percent area of the sampled study domain covered... and Co-authors, 2007; Gettelman et al., 2011). Because the lifetimes of many trace constituents are long in the UTLS, transport is often the dominant factor affecting their distributions. Many previous studies focusing on Stratosphere- Troposphere...

Solomon, David

2014-01-09

232

A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices  

E-print Network

This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of citations) and the social sciences (20%), the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. By analyzing these social references, we characterize the social...

Wallace, Matthew L; Gingras, Yves

2011-01-01

233

Anton in America: A Novel from German-American Life  

E-print Network

was Francis (or Franz—he used both versions of his first name) Daniel Pastorius who co-authored the first protest against African slavery in the English colonies in 1688 (for which he later was memorialized by John Greenleaf Whittier) and also wrote...-famous German business novel; it includes a Dickensian trustworthy street urchin and a Harriet-Beecher-Stowe-inspired New England spinster- reformer; and it alludes to many authors, not only Schiller and Goethe but also Shakespeare, Bacon, Boccaccio, Camôes...

Solger, Reinhold; Vanchena, Lorie A.

2006-01-01

234

Have We Hatched the Addiction Egg: Reward Deficiency Syndrome Solution System™  

PubMed Central

This article co-authored by a number of scientists, ASAM physicians, clinicians, treatment center owners, geneticists, neurobiologists, psychologists, social workers, criminologists, nurses, nutritionist, and students, is dedicated to all the people who have lost loved ones in substance-abuse and “reward deficiency syndrome” related tragedies. Why are we failing at reducing the incidence of ‘Bad Behaviors’? Are we aiming at the wrong treatment targets for behavioral disorders? We are proposing a paradigm shift and calling it “Reward Deficiency Solution System” providing evidence for its adoption. PMID:24077767

Downs, BW; Oscar-Berman, M; Waite, RL; Madigan, MA; Giordano, J; Beley, T; Jones, S; Simpatico, T; Hauser, M; Borsten, J; Marcelo, F; Braverman, ER; Lohmann, R; Dushaj, K; Helman, M; Barh, D; Schoenthaler, ST; Han, D; Blum, K

2013-01-01

235

Scattering properties of weakly-bound dimers of Fermi atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We discuss the behavior of weakly bound bosonic dimers formed in a two-component Fermi gas with a large positive scattering length for the interspecies interaction. We present a theoretical approach for solving a few-body scattering problem and describe the physics of dimer-dimer elastic and inelastic scattering. We explain why these diatomic molecules, while in the highest ro-vibrational level, are characterized by remarkable collisional stability. Co-authors are Christophe Salomon, LKB, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France; Georgy Shlyapnikov, LPTMS, University of South Paris, Orsay, France.

Petrov, Dmitry

2005-03-01

236

Worldwatchers push for sustainable development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

"Recognizing the limits of natural systems is often seen as a call for no growth, but the issue is not growth versus no growth. The question is, What kind of growth? And where?" write Lester Brown and one of his 13 co-authors, Jennifer Mitchell, in the 1998 issue of "State of the World: A Worldwatch Institute Report on Progress toward a Sustainable Society."Now in its 15th annual edition, the book, which is published by a Washington, D.C. based nonprofit organization, this year focuses on the future of growth and on building a new economy.

Showstack, Randy

237

Authorship issues in multi-centre clinical trials: the importance of making an authorship contract.  

PubMed

Discussions about authorship often arise in multi-centre clinical trials. Such trials may involve up to hundreds of contributors of whom some will eventually co-author the final publication. It is, however, often impossible to involve all contributors in the manuscript process sufficiently for them to qualify for authorship as defined by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Therefore, rules for authorship in multi-centre trials are strongly recommended. We propose two contracts to prevent conflicts regarding authorship; both are freely available for use without pay but with reference to the original source. PMID:25634509

Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Vinther, Siri

2015-02-01

238

Ernst Wynder: citation analysis.  

PubMed

Ernst Wynder published nearly 800 papers during his lifetime. I used the ISI Web of Science to analyze his publications and the subsequent literature citing his work. More than half of his papers were published in just ten journals, including Cancer, Preventive Medicine (which he founded and edited), JNCI, and Cancer Research. The 87 papers in Cancer covered all of the major cancer sites including breast, colon, lung, and prostate, and many others. Twenty-five papers and one book were cited in over 200 publications. His publications included 441 co-authors from a broad range of scientific disciplines. PMID:16997365

Stellman, Steven D

2006-10-01

239

Revised Views of Classroom Assessment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Classroom Assessment Project to Improve Teaching and Learning (CAPITAL), a collaborative research initiative between Stanford University and middle school science teachers in nearby school districts, examined classroom-based assessment in science. The teachers shared ideas with one another, and the university staff introduced research findings and ideas into the conversations. The CAPITAL teachers co-authoring this chapter described themselves as moving away from the role of teacher as giver of grades to teacher as conductor of learning. They increased their interactions with students during class time and better assisted students toward achieving the learning goals.

Elaine Fong

2006-01-01

240

Creative revision - From rough draft to published paper  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The process of revising a technical or scientific paper can be performed more efficiently by the people involved (author, co-author, supervisor, editor) when the revision is controlled by breaking it into a series of steps. The revision process recommended here is based on the levels-of-edit concept that resulted from a study of the technical editorial function at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. Types of revision discussed are Substantive, Policy, Language, Mechanical Style, Format, Integrity, and Copy Clarification.

Buehler, M. F.

1976-01-01

241

Boston University Digital Common  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Boston University has a range of scholars, from those who research the hospitality field to others who are fascinated by the world of photonics. The University's Digital Common Repository contains thousands of documents and publications that span this wide range, authored or co-authored by BU faculty, students, and staff. The different communities here are divided into sections that include College of Arts and Sciences, Centers & Institutes, and Metropolitan College. Visitors will find religious sermons, pieces of music, working economics papers, and a vast cornucopia of other materials. Also, visitors are encouraged to use the Browse feature to look for documents by title, subject, author, or date.

242

Geron Corporation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Geron Corporation is a biopharmaceutical company specializing in therapeutic and diagnostic products for age-related diseases. Geron owns several telomerase related patents. Calvin B. Harley of Geron is one of the co-authors of the Science article. Their page describes programs and products related to cellular aging and Cancer Therapeutics. There has been a recent finding regarding telomerase, a gene which affects the mechanisms controlling human cell replication. The site above provides general information on telomerase, current telomere research, and the use of telemorase in medical practice. Telomerase increases the life-span of a cell, and is thus central to both aging and cancer.

243

Core OL-92 from Owens Lake, southeast California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The drilling project at Owens Lake commenced in April, 1991. This Open-File Report represents an effort to make available to other researchers our preliminary data collected during the first year of study following completion of the core-drilling phase. Nineteen data collections and preliminary interpretations are presented in the following sections. They are the work of fifteen first-authors and their numerous co-authors. Broadly, their topics include a field log of the core (1 contribution), sedimentological analyses (1), clay- mineral identification (1), geochemical analyses (5), dating and age estimates of the cored sediments (4), and identifications of fossil materials (7).

Smith, George I., (Edited By); Bischoff, James L.

1993-01-01

244

Riley Guide: Employment Opportunities and Job Resources on the Internet  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Riley Guide was one of the earliest Web sites dedicated to job resources. The site contains introductions and annotated pointers to resources by career field, employer type, and location. There are also sections on resume preparation, and recruiting online, as well as handouts for libraries to use with patrons wanting to use the Internet for job hunting. Margaret Riley is a columnist for the National Business Employment Weekly and is one of the co-authors of the 1996 book, The Guide to Internet Job Searching.

245

Internet Research News/ ResearchBuzz  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A companion site to the book Official Netscape Guide to Internet Research (2nd edition), this current awareness resource features a selection of Internet finds on a variety of topics, with a primary focus on tools for research and more efficient searching online. Updated several times a week, the site and its weekly email newsletter, ResearchBuzz, are maintained by Tara Calishain, the book's co-author. Additional resources at the site include a periodic series of articles on Internet research, Quick Tips for searching online, and an internal search engine.

246

Looking for Daisy: constructing teacher identities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on teacher identities is both important and increasing. In this forum contribution I re-interpret assertions about an African American science teacher's identities in terms of Jonathon Turner's (2002) constructs of role identity and sub-identity. I contest the notion of renegotiation of identities, suggesting that particular role identities can be brought to the foreground and then backgrounded depending on the situation and the need to confirm a sub-identity. Finally, I recommend the inclusion of teachers' voices in identity research through greater use of co-authoring roles for teachers.

Ritchie, Stephen M.

2009-09-01

247

Simple one-dimensional lattice model for lipids in water  

E-print Network

A lattice model for binary mixture of lipids and water is introduced and investigated. The orientational degrees of freedom of the amphiphilic molecules are taken into account in the same way as in the model for oil-water-surfactant mixtures introduced earlier by Johan H\\o ye and co-authors. The ground state of the model is discussed in detail, and the mean-field stability analysis of the disordered phase is performed. The model is compared to the recently introduced lattice model for colloidal self-assembly.

Alina Ciach; Jakub P?kalski

2014-07-03

248

Receiver design, performance analysis, and evaluation for space-borne laser altimeters and space-to-space laser ranging systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Interim report consists of a manuscript, 'Receiver Design for Satellite to Satellite Laser Ranging Instrument,' and copies of two papers we co-authored, 'Demonstration of High Sensitivity Laser Ranging System' and 'Semiconductor Laser-Based Ranging Instrument for Earth Gravity Measurements. ' These two papers were presented at the conference Semiconductor Lasers, Advanced Devices and Applications, August 21 -23, 1995, Keystone Colorado. The manuscript is a draft in the preparation for publication, which summarizes the theory we developed on space-borne laser ranging instrument for gravity measurements.

Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli; Field, Christopher T.

1995-01-01

249

Spectral theory of Sturm-Liouville differential operators: proceedings of the 1984 workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the proceedings of the workshop which was held at Argonne during the period May 14 through June 15, 1984. The report contains 22 articles, authored or co-authored by the participants in the workshop. Topics covered at the workshop included the asymptotics of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions; qualitative and quantitative aspects of Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems with discrete and continuous spectra; polar, indefinite, and nonselfadjoint Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems; and systems of differential equations of Sturm-Liouville type.

Kaper, H.G.; Zettl, A. (eds.)

1984-12-01

250

Halliday-Resnick Plus 50  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Last year marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Halliday and Resnick's classic introductory textbook ``Physics.'' I used the first edition of the the textbook as an undergraduate students, the second editions as a graduate teaching assistant, the the third edition as a newly hired assistant professor, and I became a co-author for the fourth and fifth editions. In this talk I will offer some views of how this book came to re-define the introductory physics course and how this textbook and other introductory physics texts have changed over 50 years.

Krane, Kenneth

2011-10-01

251

International Soil Reference and Information Centre  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The International Soil Reference and Information Centre (ISRIC), which is associated with the Centre for Development and Environment, University of Berne, Switzerland, aims to "provide a better understanding of soils and to promote sustainable use of the land." The ISRIC Web site gives visitors several areas to explore, but of special note are the reports and publications link within the publications page, which contains downloadable annual and biannual reports, conference proceedings, soil briefs, technical papers, and more. These publications have been authored or co-authored by staff members, and guest researchers of ISRIC or the former International Soil Museum.

252

Statistical Reporting Errors and Collaboration on Statistical Analyses in Psychological Science  

PubMed Central

Statistical analysis is error prone. A best practice for researchers using statistics would therefore be to share data among co-authors, allowing double-checking of executed tasks just as co-pilots do in aviation. To document the extent to which this ‘co-piloting’ currently occurs in psychology, we surveyed the authors of 697 articles published in six top psychology journals and asked them whether they had collaborated on four aspects of analyzing data and reporting results, and whether the described data had been shared between the authors. We acquired responses for 49.6% of the articles and found that co-piloting on statistical analysis and reporting results is quite uncommon among psychologists, while data sharing among co-authors seems reasonably but not completely standard. We then used an automated procedure to study the prevalence of statistical reporting errors in the articles in our sample and examined the relationship between reporting errors and co-piloting. Overall, 63% of the articles contained at least one p-value that was inconsistent with the reported test statistic and the accompanying degrees of freedom, and 20% of the articles contained at least one p-value that was inconsistent to such a degree that it may have affected decisions about statistical significance. Overall, the probability that a given p-value was inconsistent was over 10%. Co-piloting was not found to be associated with reporting errors. PMID:25493918

Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Nuijten, Michčle B.; Dominguez-Alvarez, Linda; van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.; Wicherts, Jelte M.

2014-01-01

253

Are alexithymia and schizoid personality disorder synonymous diagnoses?  

PubMed

Relationships among alexithymia, personality disorders, and higher-order psychopathological and interpersonal dimensions were examined in 199 college students and a close relative of each. Alexithymia, the difficulty to express and identify emotions, was measured by the Observer Alexithymia Scale (OAS; [Haviland, M. G., Warren, W. L., & Riggs, M. L. (2000). An observer scale to measure alexithymia. Psychosomatics, 41, 385-392]), which was completed by each student's relative. Each student completed three self-report measures: the Coolidge Axis II Inventory (CATI; [Coolidge, F. L. (2000). Coolidge Axis II Inventory: Manual. Colorado Springs, CO: Author.), the Five Dimensional Personality Test (5DPT; [van Kampen, D. (2009). Personality and psychopathology: A theory-based revision of Eysenck's PEN model. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 5, 9-21]), and the Horney-Coolidge Tridimensional Inventory (HCTI; [Coolidge, F. L. (1998). Horney-Coolidge Tridimensional Inventory: Manual. Colorado Springs, CO: Author]). Results indicated that higher levels of alexithymia are associated with personality disorders and their traits, such as schizoid, avoidant, and paranoid. With regard to the issue of the similarity and difference between alexithymia and schizoid personality disorder, there was sufficient evidence across all of the measures to suggest that they are not synonymous entities. Finally, alexithymic traits were associated with concurrent depressive traits even in a non-clinical sample. PMID:23021894

Coolidge, Frederick L; Estey, Alisa J; Segal, Daniel L; Marle, Peter D

2013-02-01

254

Final Technical Report-Grant # DE-FG02-97ER45628 ?Structural Diorder in Materials?  

SciTech Connect

Since the grant was renewed in 2000 and 2003 final technical reports of the grant have been previously submitted for those years. For that reason this final technical report covers the last four years of the grant. We had an exceptionally successful and productive last four years under the support of the grant. Our progress takes three different aspects, described in more detail below: 1.1 instrumentation, infrastructure, and other research support at Sector 20 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS); 1.2 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were PI?s; and 1.3 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were co-PI?s or where Drs. Dale Brewe or Julie Cross were authors or co-authors. Drs. Brewe and Cross are the two research scientists (permanently stationed at sector 20) who are supported by the grant. They provide support to the scientific goals of the grant and more broadly provide research support for many general users at Sector 20. Finally, in section 1.4 we provide a complete list of publications resulting from funding in the grant on which at least one of Stern, Seidler, Cross, or Brewe were co-authors. Given the inclusion of operations funding in the grant, this is of course a subset of the full scientific impact of the grant.

Stern, Edward A

2009-02-23

255

Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning and for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.

Myerson, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)], E-mail: myerson@radonc.wustl.edu; Garofalo, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Apte, Aditya; Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale AZ (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, J.J. John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

2009-07-01

256

A novel material processing and manufacturing measurement system by using electronic datum (notice of removal)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper (SPIE Paper 68251G) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 19 August 2008 upon learning that two individuals listed as additional co-authors on the manuscript had no prior knowledge of the paper, did not contribute to it, and did not consent to having their names included as co-authors. The names of these two individuals have been or will be deleted from this and all other bibliographic records as far as possible since they have no connection to this paper. Additionally, the names now associated with this publication record, Xiang-Wen Xiong and Wynn L. Bear, are actually the same individual and not two different authors. This is not sanctioned by SPIE. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, "SPIE considers it the professional responsibility of all authors to ensure that the authorship of submitted papers properly reflects the contributions and consent of all authors." A serious violation of these guidelines is evident in this case. It is SPIE policy to remove papers from the SPIE Digital Library where serious professional misconduct has occurred and to impose additional sanctions as appropriate.

Bear, Wynn L.; Xiong, Xiang-Wen; Roth, John T.; Schoen, Marco P.

2008-03-01

257

Ultra-accuracy parallel electronic datum optical metrology system of systems (notice of removal)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper (SPIE Paper 682925) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 19 August 2008 upon learning that two individuals listed as additional co-authors on the manuscript had no prior knowledge of the paper, did not contribute to it, and did not consent to having their names included as co-authors. The names of these two individuals have been or will be deleted from this and all other bibliographic records as far as possible since they have no connection to this paper. Additionally, the remaining names associated with this publication record, Xiang-Wen Xiong and Wynn L. Bear, are actually the same individual and not two different authors. This is not sanctioned by SPIE. As stated in the SPIE Guidelines for Professional Conduct and Publishing Ethics, "SPIE considers it the professional responsibility of all authors to ensure that the authorship of submitted papers properly reflects the contributions and consent of all authors." A serious violation of these guidelines is evident in this case. It is SPIE policy to remove papers from the SPIE Digital Library where serious professional misconduct has occurred and to impose additional sanctions as appropriate.

Xiong, Xiang-Wen; Bear, Wynn L.; Roth, John T.; Schoen, Marco P.

2008-03-01

258

New Study Documents the Dramatic Effect of Industrial Fishing across the World's Oceans  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In a study published in the journal _Nature_, co-authors Ramsom Myers and Boris Worm concluded that 90 percent of the world's large fishes have disappeared from the world's oceans over the past fifty years, attributing this phenomenon to industrial fishing. Utilizing data from the past 47 years, Myers and Worm looked at the precipitous decline in the populations of species such as tuna, marlin, and swordfish. The report noted that the largest population decline began when industrial fishing became increasingly ubiquitous in the early 1950s around the world. As Myers noted in a recent interview, "Humans have always been very good at killing big animals. Ten thousand years ago, with just some pointed sticks, humans managed to wipe out the wooly mammoth, saber tooth tigers, mastodons and giant vampire bats." While several individuals in the fishing industry took exception to the tone of the report, co-author Worm noted that there were potential solutions to the problem, including declaring certain fishing areas as "off-limits." Other experts have commented that it also makes sense for the fishing industry to investigate the expansion of aquaculture, along with a more strict adherence to conservation policies.The first link will take visitors to an online news article from CNN.com about this recent study that contains comments from the co-authors and representatives of the fishing industry. The second link leads to the report by Myers and Worm in the most recent issue of the journal _Nature_. The third link will take visitors to a site maintained by the United Nations Division for Sustainable Development that highlights partnerships and programs developed by various countries to effectively maintain the productivity and viability of their coastlines and surrounding oceans. The fourth link leads to a nice compendium of international fishing treaties and agreements that stretches back to the 1923 Convention for the Preservation of the Halibut Treaty. The fifth link leads to the homepage of the Global Aquaculture Alliance, and contains information about ongoing projects in aquaculture around the world. The final link leads to a site devoted to providing "complete background information on every species of whale, dolphin, and porpoise," along with offering details about whale watching and the evolution of cetaceans. [KMG

Grinnell, Max

259

1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 1 are Environmental Data Management, Site characterization technology, Wastewater treatment, Waste management in foreign countries, Transuranic waste management, and Groundwater characterization and treatment.

Not Available

1988-01-01

260

1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

These Proceedings of the October 3--7, 1988 DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 5 include environmental assessments and program strategies, waste treatment technologies, and regulations and compliance studies.

Not Available

1988-01-01

261

‘The world is full of big bad wolves’: investigating the experimental therapeutic spaces of R.D. Laing and Aaron Esterson  

PubMed Central

In conjunction with the recent critical assessments of the life and work of R.D. Laing, this paper seeks to demonstrate what is revealed when Laing’s work on families and created spaces of mental health care are examined through a geographical lens. The paper begins with an exploration of Laing’s time at the Tavistock Clinic in London during the 1960s, and of the co-authored text with Aaron Esterson entitled, Sanity, Madness and the Family (1964). The study then seeks to demonstrate the importance Laing and his colleague placed on the time-space situatedness of patients and their worlds. Finally, an account is provided of Laing’s and Esterson’s spatial thinking in relation to their creation of both real and imagined spaces of therapeutic care. PMID:25114145

2014-01-01

262

Triggering Events for the First Space Settlement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We know where humankind is now in its limited ability to venture into space, and we can envision technologies that include routine space flight and large human populations in space; the challenge is to figure out how to get from where we are now to what we can envision. Although the technical challenges of space infrastructure development will be significant, the factors most responsible for preventing us from surmounting those challenges are politics and economics. Various rationales have been proposed by other authors and are summarized, with assessments of the hurdles involved in each. In an effort to make Space Settlement Design Competitions for high school students as realistic as possible, the co-authors developed a compelling rationale for building the first community in space and the infrastructure required to support it, which passes the tests of economic necessity and political appeal.

Gale, Anita E.; Edwards, Richard P.

2003-01-01

263

Equipment and skills shortage in Uzbekistan.  

PubMed

In this article, supplied with the help of the International Federation of Hospital Engineering (IFHE), five co-authors from the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)--a German organisation that seeks to encourage and co-ordinate international cooperation in areas ranging from sustainable development to fund management, and its partner organisation, IFHE member, the Republican Research Center of Emergency Medicine (RRCEM) in Uzbekistan, discuss the use of medical technology in the central Asian country. They also explain how a GIZ project is helping to boost the number of skilled staff, improve quality assurance and management in procurement, logistics, and maintenance, and promote good training of medical and technical staff, across Uzbekistan. PMID:24930180

Khodjibaev, Abdukhakim M; Anvarov, Khikmat; Borisova, Elena; Schmitt, Roger; Murotova, Nigora

2014-05-01

264

College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This year, the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded jointly to economist Alvin E. Roth and mathematician Lloyd S. Shapley for their work on market design and matching theory, which relate to how people and companies find and select one another in everything from marriage to school choice to jobs to organ donations. Shapley first developed his ideas on analyzing resource allocation in a classic early paper co-authored with David Gale titled "College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage". Recently, the Mathematical Association of America plucked this 1962 article out of their fine archives and placed it online for the general public. Today, the article remains one of the American Mathematical Monthly's most cited works.

265

Pierre Curie, 1859–1906  

PubMed Central

The year 2006 marked 100 years since the death of Pierre Curie. It is therefore appropriate that we remember his life and his work, which was cut short by his untimely death from an accident on the Pont Neuf, Paris, on April 19, 1906. He had already accomplished much during his life, both before the discovery of radium with Marie Curie, in work co-authored with his brother Jacques on piezoelectricity, and afterwards, when he published the results of several experimental studies with radium and radon. He came from a medical family, and his grandfather Pierre Curie was a famous homeopathic physician. He has, in print, unfairly been relegated to the background—his own scientific contributions having been overtaken by the fame of Marie Curie, probably because she outlived him by 28 years. PMID:17576470

Mould, R.F.

2007-01-01

266

Finite-size energy of non-interacting Fermi gases  

E-print Network

We prove the asymptotics of the difference of the ground-state energies of two non-interacting $N$-particle Fermi gases on the half line of length $L$ in the thermodynamic limit up to order $1/L$. We are particularly interested in subdominant terms proportional to $1/L$, called finite-size energy. In the nineties Affleck and co-authors [Aff97, ZA97, AL94] claimed that the finite-size energy equals the decay exponent occuring in Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe. It turns out that the finite-size energy depends on the details of the thermodynamic limit and typically also includes a linear term in the scattering phase shift.

Martin Gebert

2014-06-14

267

Retraction of "Co-culture of microtic chondrocyte with BMSC to generate tissue engineered cartilage".  

PubMed

The Editors of Tissue Engineering: Part A are officially retracting the accepted article entitled "Co-culture of microtic chondrocyte with BMSC to generate tissue engineered cartilage," (DOI: 10.1089/ten.tea.2011.0443; online ahead of print) at the request of the submitting author, Lu Zhang, M.D. Ph.D, from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the Shanghai 9th People's Hospital of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in Shanghai, China. Dr. Zhang had submitted this paper for publication without the knowledge or authorization of one of the co-authors on the manuscript, Dr. Yilin Cao, who was also Dr. Zhang’s mentor. Dr. Zhang apologizes to Dr. Cao, the Publisher, and the Journal's readership. PMID:22731627

2012-07-01

268

Combinatorial construction of tilings by barycentric simplex orbits (D symbols) and their realizations in Euclidean and other homogeneous spaces.  

PubMed

A new method, developed in previous works by the author (partly with co-authors), is presented which decides algorithmically, in principle by computer, whether a combinatorial space tiling (Tau, Gamma) is realizable in the d-dimensional Euclidean space E(d) (think of d = 2, 3, 4) or in other homogeneous spaces, e.g. in Thurston's 3-geometries: E(3), S(3), H(3), S(2) x R, H(2) x R, SL(2)R, Nil, Sol. Then our group Gamma will be an isometry group of a projective metric 3-sphere PiS(3) (R, < , >), acting discontinuously on its above tiling Tau. The method is illustrated by a plane example and by the well known rhombohedron tiling (Tau, Gamma), where Gamma = R3m is the Euclidean space group No. 166 in International Tables for Crystallography. PMID:16244403

Molnár, Emil

2005-11-01

269

Acid-rain publications by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is an annotated bibliography of acid-rain and related air-quality publications authored or co-authored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees or that have been supported by Service funding. The bibliography covers 10 years of research from 1979 to 1989. Research projects have covered the effects of acidity on water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Specific projects have addressed important fish species such as rainbow trout, brook trout, Atlantic salmon, and striped bass. In addition to lake and stream studies, wetland and some terrestrial habitat work has also been conducted. Also included in the report is research on the ecological effects of liming surface waters and surrounding watersheds.

Villella, R.F.

1989-08-01

270

Theodore Millon (1928-2014).  

PubMed

Theodore Millon was born on August 18, 1928. On January 29, 2014, Ted died peacefully in his sleep of congestive heart failure. Ted was a scholar and prolific writer. He penned--literally, since he never used a keyboard--and edited more than 30 books and authored or co-authored more than 100 book chapters and research articles. Ted may be most recognizable for the family of objective inventories that bear his name. His development of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory in the 1970s revolutionized personality assessment here and abroad. Over time, many new instruments were developed that targeted adolescent (MAPI, MACI), preadolescent (M-PACI), medical (MBMD), college (MCCI), and normal (MIPS) populations. Beginning in 2004, Ted funded the American Psychological Foundation's annual award, given in his name, honoring an outstanding psychologist engaged in advancing the science of personality psychology. PMID:25046723

Tringone, Robert; Jolosky, Theo; Strack, Stephen

2014-01-01

271

A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem  

E-print Network

In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

2015-01-01

272

Federal Grand Jury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Everything about a grand jury is cloaked in secrecy," proclaims Susan Brenner and Greg Lockhart, Professors of Law at the University of Dayton School of Law and co-authors of Federal Grand Jury Practice. At their Website devoted to grand juries, they effectively elucidate the complex rules and processes of both federal and state grand juries. They uncover the mysteries behind the grand jury system by providing a detailed FAQ, two clearly written and illustrated sections on federal and state grand juries, and a highly educational section entitled Multimedia Overview: A State Grand Jury at Work, which is a virtual tour of the grand jury process. For more inquisitive citizens, a selective list of grand jury links is also available.

273

KSC History Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 2002 NASA/ASEE KSC History Project focused on a series of seven history initiatives designed to acquire, preserve, and interpret the history of Kennedy Space Center. These seven projects included the co-authoring of Voices From the Cape, historical work with NASA historian Roger Launius, the completion of a series of oral histories with key KSC personnel, a monograph on Public Affairs, the development of a Historical Concept Map (CMap) for history knowledge preservation, advice on KSC history database and web interface capabilities, the development of a KSC oral history program and guidelines of training and collection, and the development of collaborative relationships between Kennedy Space Center, the University of West Florida, and the University of Central Florida.

Moore, Patrick K.

2002-01-01

274

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The specific objective of our project on CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration is to investigate its technical feasibility and to improve the understanding of any associated environmental impacts. Our ultimate goal is to minimize any impacts associated with the eventual use of ocean carbon sequestration to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The project will continue through March 31, 2002, with a field experiment to take place in the summer of 2001 off the Kona Coast of Hawaii. At GHGT-4 in Interlaken, we presented a paper detailing our plans. The purpose of this paper is to present an update on our progress to date and our plans to complete the project. The co-authors of this paper are members of the project's Technical Committee, which has been formed to supervise the technical aspects and execution of this project.

H.J. Herzog; E.E. Adams

2000-08-23

275

Community College Non-Science Undergraduates Observe Exoplanet Transits with 8-inch Observatory in Glendale, Arizona  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the 8-inch Celestron telescopes at the Glendale Community College North Observatory in Glendale, Arizona, a group of undergraduate students, most of whom are non-science majors, observed exoplanet transits during the Fall 2014 semester. These students, members of the Glendale Community College's Astronomy Students for Telescope Research and Outreach (A.S.T.R.O.) Club, selected targets observable with telescopes of this size and the conditions of the sky. With these observations and using concepts and skills learned in introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, the co-authors recorded detections of exoplanet transits consistent with published professional results. These results demonstrate that post-secondary institutions can teach hands-on, practical astronomy experience given equipment that is readily available and affordable, regardless of the size of the student body majoring in the physical sciences.

Gleim, Brian; Esteban, Henry; Lincoln, Connor; Price, Jason; Giroux, Elizabeth; Lentowski, Noreen; Valencia, Leslie; Morris, Bryce; Smith, Blake; Leffler, Chris; Bonilla, Matt; Watt, Sara D.

2015-01-01

276

The Initial Nine Space Settlements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The co-authors describe a chronology of space infrastructure development illustrating how each element of infrastructure enables development of subsequent more ambitious infrastructure. This is likened to the ``Southern California freeway phenomenon'', wherein a new freeway built in a remote area promotes establishment of gas stations, restaurants, hotels, housing, and eventually entire new communities. The chronology includes new launch vehicles, inter-orbit vehicles, multiple LEO space stations, lunar mining, on-orbit manufacturing, tourist destinations, and supporting technologies required to make it all happen. The space settlements encompassed by the chronology are in Earth orbit (L5 and L4), on the lunar surface, in Mars orbit, on the Martian surface, and in the asteroid belt. Each space settlement is justified with a business rationale for construction. This paper is based on materials developed for Space Settlement Design Competitions that enable high school students to experience the technical and management challenges of working on an industry proposal team.

Gale, Anita E.; Edwards, Richard P.

2003-01-01

277

Caffeine Appears To Be Beneficial In MalesÂ?But Not FemalesÂ?With Lou GehrigÂ?s Disease  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an APS press release on a study, entitled 'Caffeine Reduces Motor Performance and Antioxidant Enzyme Capacity in the Brain of Female G93A Mice, An Animal Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)', that was conducted by Rajini Seevaratnam1 supervised by Mazen J. Hamadeh1,2 , and co-authored by Sandeep Raha2 and Mark A. Tarnopolsky2 (1School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Pediatrics and Medicine, McMaster University Hamilton, ON, Canada). The researchers will present their findings at the 122nd Annual Meeting of the American Physiological Society (APS; www.the-aps.org/press), which is part of the Experimental Biology 2009 scientific conference. The meeting that was held April 18-22, 2009 in New Orleans.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2006-04-17

278

Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology: Calendar Year 1991  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This [summary of] U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 92-585 contains a listing of publications authored or co-authored by members of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology during 1991. Results of Branch investigations are distributed in a variety of ways, including maps, journal articles, abstracts and U.S.G.S. publications. Copies of U.S.G.S. Open File Reports may generally be obtained from the author. Book publications can be obtained from U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Reports Sales, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225. Copies of U.S.G.S. Maps may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey, Map Sales, Federal Center, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225

Mons-Wengler, Margaret C.; Oldale, Robert N.

1992-01-01

279

Diagnosing a daily index of tornado variability with global reanalysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent record setting tornado outbreaks in April 2011 has spurred a lot of discussion and debate of the causes of this record setting month. Global warming and the decaying La Nińa were both common causes suggested as the reason behind such a destructive tornado season. Due to the inhomogeneity of the observed tornado record, there are few published studies that relate climate variability to occurrences of tornados. We employ a method developed by Harold Brooks and co-authors in 2003 that discriminates tornadic and severe weather soundings from everyday convection to circumvent the problems with the observed tornado record. We will show how this index, derived from the CFS-R, realistically reproduces the observed variability in tornadoes, and the relative impacts of different modes of climate variability on tornadoes over the United States. This analysis will provide a baseline that will be expanded to climate model simulations of the 20th Century and future projections.

Pegion, P. J.; Hoerling, M. P.

2011-12-01

280

Coldwater fish in wadeable streams: chapter 8  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Standardizing sampling methods for fish populations across large regions is important for consistent measurement of large-scale effects of climate or geography. In addition, pooling samples creates larger sample sizes and can facilitate data sharing among scientists and land managers. Sampling freshwater fish has largely not been standardized due to the diversity of fish and habitats. USGS aquatic ecologist Jason Dunham and co-authors contributed a chapter about sampling coldwater fish in wadeable streams to a new book that details common methods, protocols, and guidelines for sampling fish across North America. Topics include three common sampling methods: electrofishing, snorkeling, and nest counts. Each method provides complementary information about different species and life stages. The information will be useful for initiating new or fine-tuning ongoing sampling programs.

Dunham, Jason B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Thurow, Russell F.; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Howell, Philip J.

2009-01-01

281

Obesity and what we need do about it- an interview with John Wass.  

PubMed

In this podcast we talk to Professor John Wass, co-author of the 'Action on obesity: Comprehensive care for all' report, and Chair of the Working Party for Action on Obesity in the UK. In this interview Prof Wass discusses the gaps in care for obese patients in current UK healthcare services, and outlines his recommendations on what actions should be taken to tackle these issues, including how education about nutrition and obesity should be offered to the public as well as within the formal medical education system.The podcast for this interview is available at: http://media.biomedcentral.com/content/movies/supplementary/johnwass-audio-v1.mp3. PMID:25163891

Wass, John

2014-01-01

282

International experiences in nursing education: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Service learning and study abroad opportunities have become increasingly popular in nursing education in the past decade. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore existing literature concerning global health experiences in nursing education. Twenty-three empirical articles from 2003 to 2010 were reviewed, building upon existing reviews of international nursing education literature. Research on two-way exchange experiences and models for best practice were found to be lacking. While an array of countries were represented as the visiting or hosting side of the experience, few co-authors from host countries were found, particularly in literature originating from the U.S. The authors recommend that two-way exchange programs be evaluated to identify successful strategies and barriers to success. Ongoing evaluation of exchanges is necessary to ensure continued sustainable partnership and exchange in immersion experiences for nursing students. PMID:22628353

Kulbok, Pamela A; Mitchell, Emma M; Glick, Doris F; Greiner, Doris

2012-01-01

283

Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2004 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall Chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2004. Publication is a high priority of our staff. Publication provides our results to a wide audience, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 1991-02900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2005.

Tiffan, Kenneth F. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA); Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2006-03-01

284

CEOs for Cities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The past few years have seen a growing number of organizations, institutions, and national think tanks express an increasing concern for sustaining the competitive economic advantage of major urban areas. One such group is CEOS for Cities, which is a national bipartisan alliance of mayors, corporate executives, university presidents, and other nonprofit leaders whose primary directive is to advance the economic competitiveness of cities. The group's executive committee includes such powerful leaders as Mayor Richard M. Daley of Chicago and Paul S. Grogan, the CEO of the Boston Foundation. One of the site's best features is the Trends and Data Analysis Reports, coupled with the Best Practice reports. Many of these documents are co-authored with other like-minded institutions, such as the Brookings Institution, and delve into such topics as What the IT Revolution Means for Regional Economic Development and Leveraging Colleges and Universities for Urban Economic Revitalization: An Action Agenda.

285

People Make Places: Growing the Public Life of Cities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Demos is a public policy and advocacy think-tank based in Britain that is well-regarded for its diverse studies on such timely issues as urban governance, the public and the media, and a number of other topics. This latest report from co-authors Melissa Mean and Charlie Tims takes on the always-timely theme of how cities might create more effective public spaces in cities that will work well for a wide host of constituencies. The 41-page report is based on intensive qualitative research done in the British towns of Cardiff, Preston, and Swindon. The report has a broad agenda, as it offers a number of suggestions and policy initiatives for how effective public spaces might boost peopleâ??s participation in public space and â??the wider public life of their town or cityâ?ť.

2005-01-01

286

Theory of BCS-BEC Crossover in Ultracold Fermi Gases: Insights into Thermodynamical and Spectroscopic Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk we summarize our theoretical understanding of the atomic Fermi superfluids with an emphasis on understanding current experiments. We compare and contrast different theoretical approaches for dealing with finite temperature, and discuss their respective implications for these trapped gases. Armed with a basic picture of the thermodynamics we turn to a variety of different measurements based on radio frequency spectroscopy, including both momentum integrated and momentum resolved experiments. As recently reviewed in arXiv 0810.1940 and 0810.1938, we show how a broad range of experimental phenomena can be accomodated within our natural extension of the BCS-Leggett ground state to finite temperature, and briefly touch on the applicability of BCS-BEC crossover theory to the high temperature superconductors. Co-authors: Qijin Chen, Yan He and Chih-Chun Chien

Levin, Kathryn

2009-05-01

287

Museum of Southwestern Biology: Division of Birds-Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Division of Birds at the University of New Mexico's Museum of Southwestern Biology, this website contains a collection of downloadable publications regarding a number of bird species. The publications are all authored (or co-authored) by Robert W. Dickerman, a Research Associate Professor and Acting Curator for the Division of Birds. Professor Dickerman's articles have appeared in such publications as _Journal of Raptor Research_, _Western Birds_, _Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington_, _The Southwestern Naturalist_, and _The AUK_ between the years 1991 and 2004. Titles found at this site include "A review of the North American subspecies of the Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)," "Talon-Locking in the Red-Tailed Hawk," "An Extinct Subspecies of Sharp-Tailed Grouse," and "On the Validity of Bubo virginianus occidentalis Stone," to name a few.

288

Evidence-based of nonoperative treatment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.  

PubMed

Until now because there are many published journals with a variety of opinions so I will stratify these articles by giving weighted value on grade evaluation which depend on each institution (written author and co-authors) and external evaluate status (SCI, SCIE, impact factor) rather than the outcomes provided by each article. Consequently, before evaluating publicized papers, study quality assessment of each interesting paper should be performed by mean of gauging the quality of evidence. Reviewing these articles, a grade of medical literature was divided into the following 5 levels as level I (randomized controlled study), level II (non-randomized controlled study), level III (case-control study), level IV (case series), and level V (expert opinions). However, in present article I concluded only involved medical literatures with weighted value of level I and II evidence. PMID:25346826

Kim, Hak-Sun

2014-10-01

289

Race, gender and the econophysics of income distribution in the USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The econophysics “two-class” theory of Yakovenko and his co-authors shows that the distribution of labor incomes is roughly exponential. This paper extends this result to US subgroups categorized by gender and race. It is well known that Males have higher average incomes than Females, and Whites have higher average incomes than African-Americans. It is also evident that social policies can affect these income gaps. Our surprising finding is that nonetheless intra-group distributions of pre-tax labor incomes are remarkably similar and remain close to exponential. This suggests that income inequality can be usefully addressed by taxation policies, and overall income inequality can be modified by also shifting the balance between labor and property incomes.

Shaikh, Anwar; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Wiener, Noe

2014-12-01

290

[The functional activity, energetics and survival of the heart under hypothermia].  

PubMed

Adequate blood supply to tissue, which is the most important prerequisite for survival of the organisms when put under hypothermal conditions and taken out of these conditions depends, above all, on the cardial function. Detailed exploration of the automatic reactions, response to stimulation, conductivity and systole of hypothermal cardium using a cardio-pulmonary preparation has been reported by V. M. Pokrovski? and co-authors. As far as we are informed, this monographic volume is the only available review of developments in the last decades in studies of cardium under hypothermal conditions. In this article we shall touch upon the issues not covered by the above monograph including energy status of hypothermal cardium and the issues important the physiological and medical perspectives: cardium functional status in situ under accidental hypothermal conditions (hypothermal freezing), and maintaining functionality of cardium after its stoppage in hypothermal conditions. PMID:9749458

Aliukhin, Iu S

1998-01-01

291

1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 4 include site characterization and remediation projects, environmental monitoring and modeling; disposal site selection and facility design, risk assessment, safety and health issues, and site remediation technology.

Not Available

1988-01-01

292

Becoming one person: living with dissociative identity disorder.  

PubMed

Dissociative identity disorder is a rare diagnosis, although people currently with a diagnosis of psychosis may in fact be experiencing what is associated with the disorder. This article is co-authored by a nurse and a person who has lived with alters (multiple personalities) for nearly all of her life. Because of the rarity of the diagnosis, there is much misunderstanding and ignorance among lay people and mental health professionals. This article therefore clarifies historical and contemporary issues surrounding this particular mental health problem both through examining the literature and through narrative of the person's experience. Special attention is given to the reality of coping with the difficulties that dissociative identity disorder create. PMID:16608473

Stickley, T; Nickeas, R

2006-04-01

293

Soma-to-germline feedback is implied by the extreme polymorphism at IGHV relative to MHC: The manifest polymorphism of the MHC appears greatly exceeded at Immunoglobulin loci, suggesting antigen-selected somatic V mutants penetrate Weismann's Barrier.  

PubMed

Soma-to-germline feedback is forbidden under the neo-Darwinian paradigm. Nevertheless, there is a growing realization it occurs frequently in immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region genes. This is a surprising development. It arises from a most unlikely source in light of the exposure of co-author EJS to the haplotype data of RL Dawkins and others on the polymorphism of the Major Histocompatibility Complex, which is generally assumed to be the most polymorphic region in the genome (spanning ?4?Mb). The comparison between the magnitude of MHC polymorphism with estimates for the human heavy chain immunoglobulin V locus (spanning ?1?Mb), suggests IGHV could be many orders of magnitude more polymorphic than the MHC. This conclusion needs airing in the literature as it implies generational churn and soma-to-germline gene feedback. Pedigree-based experimental strategies to resolve the IGHV issue are outlined. PMID:25810320

Steele, Edward J; Lloyd, Sally S

2015-05-01

294

A consensus statement for safety monitoring guidelines of treatments for major depressive disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective This paper aims to present an overview of screening and safety considerations for the treatment of clinical depressive disorders and make recommendations for safety monitoring. Method Data were sourced by a literature search using MEDLINE and a manual search of scientific journals to identify relevant articles. Draft guidelines were prepared and serially revised in an iterative manner until all co-authors gave final approval of content. Results Screening and monitoring can detect medical causes of depression. Specific adverse effects associated with antidepressant treatments may be reduced or identified earlier by baseline screening and agent-specific monitoring after commencing treatment. Conclusion The adoption of safety monitoring guidelines when treating clinical depression is likely to improve overall physical health status and treatment outcome. It is important to implement these guidelines in the routine management of clinical depression. PMID:21888608

Dodd, Seetal; Malhi, Gin S; Tiller, John; Schweitzer, Isaac; Hickie, Ian; Khoo, Jon Paul; Bassett, Darryl L; Lyndon, Bill; Mitchell, Philip B; Parker, Gordon; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Udina, Marc; Singh, Ajeet; Moylan, Steven; Giorlando, Francesco; Doughty, Carolyn; Davey, Christopher G; Theodoras, Michael; Berk, Michael

2011-01-01

295

PRINT VERSION  

E-print Network

All the respective authors are the sole owner and responsible of published research and research papers are published after full consent of respective author or co-author(s). For any discussion on research subject or research matter, the reader should directly contact to undersigned authors. COPYRIGHT Copyright©2012 IJSRP.ORG All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as described below, without the permission in writing of the Publisher. Copying of articles is not permitted except for personal and internal use, to the extent permitted by national copyright law, or under the terms of a license issued by the national Reproduction Rights Organization. All the published research can be referenced by readers/scholars/researchers in their further research with proper citation given to original authors. DISCLAIMER

unknown authors

2013-01-01

296

Promoting Interdisciplinary Research in Departments of Medicine: Results from Two Models at Boston University School of Medicine  

PubMed Central

We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) — a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ?$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM. PMID:23874035

Coleman, David L.; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

2013-01-01

297

The Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics: a Web Site  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Forgotten the third verse of "Eyes of the World?" Wondering just what Jerry mumbled after "Eight sided whispering hallelujah hatrack" on your copy of "The Eleven?" from Las Vegas in 1968? Or would you like to know what Robert Hunter meant by the "the transitive nightfall of diamonds?" Look no further than this site, created and maintained by David Dodd, Branch Manager of the Civic Center Branch of the Marin County Free Library, and co-author of The Grateful Dead and the Deadheads: An Annotated Bibliography. Clearly a labor of love, the site offers the full text of songs by Robert Hunter and John Perry Barlow, the Dead's principal lyricists, accompanied by footnotes and possible explanations of various passages by Dodd and others. In addition, the site includes discographies, bibliographies, and thematic essays. Grateful Dead enthusiasts and tape collectors will undoubtedly enjoy this site.

Barlow, John P. (John Perry).

298

X-Ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This LTSA award funds my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the solar-stellar analogy. The focus during most of this reporting period continued to be on the reduction and analysis of data acquired with the ASCA observatory (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). During the last few months of this reporting period, considerable time and effort was also devoted to the submission of AXAF observing proposals in preparation for the upcoming AXAF launch. During this reporting period, five papers appeared in refereed journals for which I was either author or co-author, and two additional papers have recently been submitted to ApJ. Also, three conference proceedings papers were submitted. These publications are listed in the attached bibliography.

Skinner, Stephen L.

1998-01-01

299

US Environmental Protection Agency Watershed Academy Web: Online Training in Watershed Management  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s Watershed Academy offers training opportunities for ecologists, managers, and others interested in watersheds. Additionally, 20 Academy 2000 Distance Learning Modules are now available online to highlight key watershed management topics. While some modules are under construction, those currently available provide a solid backbone in many important areas such as Principles of Watershed Management, Human Alteration of the Global Nitrogen Cycle, Watershed Modeling, Economics of Sustainability, and Stream Corridor Restoration. Modules vary in depth (and intended audience), but all are (co)-authored by prominent scientists in the field of watershed ecology. Designed to reach a broad audience, many modules are provided in slide format (navigable by clicking on arrows) and could be supplemented with more technical readings; others are given in .pdf format. The inclusion of color photographs throughout, such as in the Ohio's Virtual Watershed Tour module, supplements the learning experience by providing illustrations and examples of important concepts.

300

Narratives, choices, alienation, and identity: learning from an elementary science teacher  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As we contemplate on teacher identity research, there is a need to place a teacher's narratives or story-lines at the center of that work. In this forum, in response to the insightful commentary from Stephen Ritchie and Maria Ińez Mafra Goulart and Eduardo Soares, I place a greater emphasis on understanding Daisy's narratives from an existing social identity framework. Narratives tell us intricate and complex actions that a teacher has taken both personally and professionally. Additionally, narratives help us see implicit nature of identity explicitly. Therefore, a greater focus has to be placed on interactions and utterances of a teacher to make sense of who they are and what they do as expressed by their own words (identity and action). Finally, I join with Ritchie and Goulart and Soares to advocate that identity research needs to include participants as co-researchers and co-authors as identities are very personal and complex to be fully understood by the outsiders (researchers).

Upadhyay, Bhaskar

2009-09-01

301

The analysis of PIP and BLZ latitude data and the free diurnal nutation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The values of the period (0.61 years from PIP and 0.58 years from BLZ data), the amplitude (0.012 arcseconds from PIP, 0.014 arcseconds from BLZ) and the phase (300 degrees from PIP, 320 degrees from BLZ; epoch: 1900.0) of the free diurnal nutation were computed using 13 years of Punta Indio (PIP data in the Hipparcos reference frame) and 37 years of the Belgrade (BLZ data in FK5 reference frame) homogenized latitude data. Both reductions are in line with MERIT Standards, with the standard IAU 1976 precession and IAU 1980 nutation. Direct Fourier transform analysis was applied to the data, and the results presented here (compared with each other and with the others) can be used to make some remarks concerning the IAU 1980 nutation model and polar motion. Co-Author: Maria Silvina De Biasi/UNLP, Argentina.

Damljanovic, Goran; et al.

302

Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Alexander Hamilton was not only a member of the First Continental Congress but was also a co-author of the Federalist Papers and a vital force behind the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. To honor Hamilton the New York Historical Society has created a special museum exhibit that is due to open in September 2004 at its building in New York City. The actual exhibit is complemented nicely by this online exhibit that offers a timeline of events during (and after) his life, the Hamilton Log which offers highlights from his writings, and a biographical gallery of his peers, such as DeWitt Clinton and Robert Morris. The site is rounded out by a twenty-question quiz that tests visitor's knowledge of Alexander Hamilton and his various accomplishments.

303

Palm & Cycad Societies of Florida: Virtual Cycad Encyclopedia  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Palm & Cycad Societies of Florida, the Virtual Cycad Encyclopedia is great resource for information and stories about the ancient cycads. The Encyclopedia comprises numerous articles organized under such topics as Cycad Taxonomy, Biology, Evolution, Horticulture, Conservation, and more. Examples of encyclopedia articles include: a 59-frame slide show on Growing and Collecting Cycads; an interactive Key to Cycad Genera; an older article on Pollination Biology of Cycads co-authored by staff at the New York Botanical Garden and the Fairchild Tropical Garden; and a Compiled List of Cycad Genera. The site also contains a Photo Gallery with many good-quality cycad images listed by scientific name. Site visitors will also find a collection of related links, and a list of reference books.

304

X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

Pal, Main

305

Combining Research and Teaching in the Undergraduate Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bridging the gap between scholarship and teaching is perhaps the most difficult challenge facing faculty members in the sciences. Here I discuss a pedagogical strategy that combines these seemingly disconnected areas. In a semester-long, upper-level astronomical techniques class that has been offered three times at Macalester College, I have integrated a major research component into the curriculum. In each iteration of the course, students have analyzed new scientific data acquired with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (either from General Observer programs or from the "Observing for University Classes" program). Each of the three courses has produced a journal article in the peer-reviewed literature (Cannon et al. 2010, 2011, 2012); every student enrolled in these three courses is now a co-author on one of these manuscripts. Representative course design materials are presented here to motivate faculty members with diverse research specialties to undertake similar endeavors.

Cannon, John M.

2013-01-01

306

1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 3 include treatment of soils, waste characterization and certification, waste minimization site remediation management plans and programs, and training programs.

Not Available

1988-01-01

307

Assessing research productivity in an oncology research institute: the role of the documentation center.  

PubMed Central

An evaluation method used to assess the quality of research productivity and to provide priorities for budget allocation purposes is presented. This method, developed by a working group of the National Institute for Research on Cancer (IST), Genoa, Italy, is based on the partitioning of categories of the Science Citation Index and Journal Citation Reports (SCI-JCR) into deciles, which normalizes journal impact factors in order to gauge the quality of the productivity. A second parameter related to the number of staff of each institute department co-authoring a given paper has been introduced in order to guide departmental budget allocations. The information scientists of the IST Documentation Center who participated in the working group played a pivotal role in developing the computerized database of publications, providing and analyzing data, supplying and evaluating literature on the topic, and placing international bibliographic databases at the working group's disposal. PMID:9028569

Ugolini, D; Bogliolo, A; Parodi, S; Casilli, C; Santi, L

1997-01-01

308

Evidence-Based of Nonoperative Treatment in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis  

PubMed Central

Until now because there are many published journals with a variety of opinions so I will stratify these articles by giving weighted value on grade evaluation which depend on each institution (written author and co-authors) and external evaluate status (SCI, SCIE, impact factor) rather than the outcomes provided by each article. Consequently, before evaluating publicized papers, study quality assessment of each interesting paper should be performed by mean of gauging the quality of evidence. Reviewing these articles, a grade of medical literature was divided into the following 5 levels as level I (randomized controlled study), level II (non-randomized controlled study), level III (case-control study), level IV (case series), and level V (expert opinions). However, in present article I concluded only involved medical literatures with weighted value of level I and II evidence. PMID:25346826

2014-01-01

309

Relationship Education Research: Current Status and Future Directions  

PubMed Central

The overarching aim of this paper is to review research on relationship education programs and approaches that have been published or accepted for publication since the last review article in 2002. This paper provides a critical overview of the relationship education field and sets an agenda for research and practice for the next decade. A theme weaved throughout the paper are the ways in which relationship education is similar and different from couples therapy and we conclude that there can be a synergistic, healthy marriage between the two. We then provide recommendations for future directions for research in the relationship education field. Finally, the co-authors comment on our experiences in both the relationship education field and couples therapy field as both researchers and interventionists. PMID:22283386

Markman, Howard J.; Rhoades, Galena K.

2011-01-01

310

FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: George Gamow: World line 1904-1933 (On the ninetieth anniversary of G A Gamov's birth)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of his articles written with a co-author Gamov called 'My half-article'. Here his 'half-biography' is presented. It covers the first very important part of his life, starting from his youth in Odessa, his student years in Petrograd-Leningrad and several of his visits to Germany, Denmark, and England in connection with his scientific work. Special attention is devoted to his first scientific researches (1926-1928) at the Leningrad State University and to his relations with fellow students—M P Bronstein, D D Ivanenko, and L D Landau. His research into ?-decay—its genesis and subsequent fate—is analysed. This article is in many respects based on new archive material.

Frenkel', Viktor Ya

1994-08-01

311

A NASA/University Joint Venture in Space Science (JOVE)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several papers have been given to national level meeting and a paper has been published in an international journal. Several additional papers have been co-author by students. The initial research project on the Atchafalaya Delta seems to have died in part due to a transfer of the NASA colleague to another location and subsequent reassigment to another job title. I have continued to include credit to NASA for many of my papers presented and published: A major debris flow along the Wasatch front in Northern Ogden; Spatial and volumetric changes in the Atchafalaya delta, Louisiana; An analysis of prehistoric Greenstone artifact in northern Alabama; An assessment of surfacing algorithm; Analysis of georeferencing algorithms to assess spatial accuracy.

Vaughn, Danny M.

1997-01-01

312

The Different Wavelengths of Radio Science  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radio Science covers many different avenues. This summer I attempted to work in each of the different avenues to learn the full range of subjects covered by Radio Science. I began my summer by traveling to Greece for the 3rd International Planetary Probe Workshop (IPPW-3). I went as a co-author of the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE) team paper. My first job when I returned from Greece was to update the Radio Science activities webpage. I then used Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to find radio signals in recorded Radio Science experimental data and determine frequencies and powers. I read about and ran Fortran code being used to determine wind measurements on Huygens. I formatted and revised the abstracts and data lengths for the DVD data sets. By performing these tasks, I also learned the Unix operating system as well as a small amount of shell programming.

Malecha, Jessica L.

2005-01-01

313

Is a gift authorship really a grift authorship?  

PubMed

A senior resident wrote an innovative paper comparing several different endovascular techniques. Working closely with his faculty mentor, he designed the study, got permission from the Institutional Review Board, collected the data, and wrote the paper. A faculty mentor supervised the study, allowing his patients to be included, and made design suggestions. A departmental statistician analyzed the data. Now that the paper is ready for submission, the mentor suggests that he, the statistician, another widely published senior faculty member, and especially the chair, be included as co-authors. The reasoning is that the resident will benefit from the good will of the senior faculty member and chair and likely will be incorporated on the included faculty's bylines as well. He was told: "It is a widely accepted practice and will certainly thicken your CV." The resident should. PMID:25814373

Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

2015-04-01

314

Rutgers University: Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences -Deep Sea Microbiology Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the Institute of Marine & Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University, Dr. Costantino Vetriani's Deep Sea Microbiology Lab focuses on "the physiology, ecology and evolutionary relationships of deep-sea prokaryotes, with an emphasis on deep-sea hydrothermal vents and cold seeps"." The Microbiology Lab website includes a Publications section which lists book chapters and a number of downloadable, refereed journal articles that have been authored, or co-authored, by Dr. Vetriani. The site also contains a short summary of a current research project, and a listing of oceanographic expeditions dating back to 1995. The site's Deep-Sea Video Clips include some brief, yet interesting coverage of tube worms, zoarcid fish, Pompeii worms, crabs, and more. The site also contains a few intriguing DSML underwater images of microorganisms from hydrothermal vents.

315

Fabric measurement along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) profile along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland, is presented in this work. Data were measured in the field by an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin climatic transition. A similar strengthening, toward an anisotropic single maximum-type fabric, has been observed in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and can be attributed to a positive feedback between changes in ice viscosity at the climatic transition, and the impact of a shear component of stress. Centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the folding hypothesis used for a climatic reconstruction by Dahl-Jensen and co authors (2013). Comparison is made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NorthGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. The fabric profile clearly reflects the increase in shear deformation when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NorthGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NorthGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NorthGRIP. References: Dahl-Jensen, D. and 120 co-authors. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core, Nature, 493, 489-493, 2013.

Montagnat, Maurine; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe; Eichler, Jan; Fujita, Shuji; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Samyn, Denis; Svensson, Anders; Weikusat, Ilka

2014-05-01

316

Space Colony from a Commercial Asteroid Mining Company Town  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Commercial mining towns on Earth become cities. Company towns need commerce to drive the growth and economy of early space colonies. Water is an early resource for camp consumables plus propellant export sales from asteroid mining operations at proposed burned out comets with water methane ice cores for sustainable growth over 50 years, financed from profits and capable with affordable logistics to support resource recovery. One co-author's perspective includes remote resource recovery sites on Earth. Other co-authors' experiences include architecture, lunar habitation, and architectural space colony concepts. This paper combines these experiences to propose commercial opportunities possible as mankind moves beyond one planet. Alaska's North Slope commercial history indicates that different multiple logistics transportation systems are required to reduce the risk to humans and families moved in before the oil flowed. Commercial enterprises have risked $20 billion and spent hundreds of billions in private money after profits were created. The lessons learned are applied to a burned out comet designated Wilson-Harrington (1979) and explores the architecture for early living within the burned out comet disk created from ice recovery and later sealed with an expected methane ice interior. Considered is the recovery of the resources, the transport of water back to Earth orbit or L-1, plus later the development of more comfortable space colony living. Commercial markets produce cities on Earth and the same can happen on Space Colonies. The key is an ``in place'' affordable commercial logistics system that can service, stimulate and sustain a 50-year commercial propellant market.

Taylor, Thomas C.; Grandl, Werner; Pinni, Martina; Benaroya, Haym

2008-01-01

317

Comment on "Weekly Precipitation Cycles? Lack of Evidence from United States Surface Stations"  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is a good deal of interest lately in whether or not rainfall varies with the day of the week in response to the weekly variations in human activity. The most likely cause of such changes in the U.S. would be from the weekly variations in pollution levels that are known to occur throughout the country. A paper on this topic will soon be published by the Journal of Geophysical Research entitled, "Midweek Increase in U.S. Summer Rain and Storm Heights Suggests Air Pollution Invigorates Rainstorms, by T. L. Bell, D. Rosenfeld, K.-M. Kim, J.-M. Yoo, M.-I. Lee, and M. Hahnenberger (referred to here as "Bell et al."). A paper by D. M. Schultz and co-authors was recently published in Geophysical Research Letters that claimed to contradict some of the results in Bell et al. The paper can be found here: . Our Comment points out that Schultz and co-authors ignored the fact that the results from satellite data obtained by Bell et al. were for a later time period than Schultz et al. examined, and that Bell et al. in fact also analyzed rainfall data for the same time period as Schultz et al. and, like them, also failed to find signs of a weekly cycle in rainfall during this time period. The contradictions claimed by Schultz et al. are non-existent. We point out some other problems with the methods and presentation by Schultz et al.

Bell, Thomas L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel

2008-01-01

318

RETRACTED: Redox regulation of the glutathione reductase/iso-glutaredoxin system in germinating pea seed exposed to cadmium.  

PubMed

This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). The editors would like to confirm the retraction of this paper at the request of the co-authors who had no prior knowledge on the actions of the lead author. This article contains data that was duplicated in: Smiri M, Chaoui A, Rouhier N, Gelhaye E, Jacquot JP, El Ferjani E. Cadmium Affects the Glutathione/Glutaredoxin System in Germinating Pea Seeds. Biol. Trace Elem. Res., 142 (2010) 93-105, doi:10.1007/s12011-010-8749-3; Smiri M, Chaoui A, Rouhier N, Gelhaye E, Jacquot JP, El Ferjani E. Effect of cadmium on resumption of respiration in cotyledons of germinating pea seeds. Ecotox. Environ. Safe., 73 (2010) 1246-1254, doi:10.1016/j.ecoenv.2010.05.015; Smiri M, Chaoui A, Rouhier N, Gelhaye E, Jacquot JP, El Ferjani E. NAD pattern and NADH oxidase activity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) under cadmium toxicity. Physiol. Mol. Biol. Plants, 16 (2010) 305-315, doi:10.1007/s12298-010-0033-7; Smiri M, Chaoui A, Rouhier N, Gelhaye E, Jacquot JP, El Ferjani E. Oxidative damage and redox change in pea seeds treated with cadmium. C. R. Biol., 333 (2010) 801-807, doi:10.1016/j.crvi.2010.09.002; Smiri M, Chaoui A, Rouhier N, Kamel C, Gelhaye E, Jacquot JP, El Ferjani E. Cadmium induced mitochondrial redox changes in germinating pea seed. BioMetals, 23 (2010) 973-984, doi:10.1007/s10534-010-9344-y. The co-authors apologize for this unfortunate incident. PMID:21802601

Smiri, Moęz; Chaoui, Abdelilah; Rouhier, Nicolas; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; El Ferjani, Ezzedine

2010-11-01

319

EDITORIAL: Photonic Crystal Devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The engineering of electromagnetic modes at optical frequencies in artificial dielectric structures with periodic and random variation of the refractive index, enabling control of the radiative properties of the materials and photon localization, was first proposed independently by Yablonovitch and John in 1987. It is possible to control the flow of light in the periodic dielectric structures, known as photonic crystals (PC). As light waves scatter within the photonic crystal, destructive interference cancels out light of certain wavelengths, thereby forming a photonic bandgap, similar to the energy bandgap for electron waves in a semiconductor. Photons whose energies lie within the gap cannot propagate through the periodic structure. This property can be used to make a low-loss cavity. If a point defect, such as one or more missing periods, is introduced into the periodic structure a region is obtained within which the otherwise forbidden wavelengths can be locally trapped. This property can be used to realize photonic microcavities. Similarly, a line of defects can serve as a waveguide. While the realization of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals received considerable attention initially, planar two-dimensional (2D) structures are currently favoured because of their relative ease of fabrication. 2D photonic crystal structures provide most of the functionality of 3D structures. These attributes have generated worldwide research and development of sub-?m and ?m size active and passive photonic devices such as single-mode and non- classical light sources, guided wave devices, resonant cavity detection, and components for optical communication. More recently, photonic crystal guided wave devices are being investigated for application in microfludic and biochemical sensing. Photonic crystal devices have been realized with bulk, quantum well and quantum dot active regions. The Cluster of articles in this issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics provides a glimpse of some of the most recent advances in the application of photonic crystals. The modelling of PC defect-mode cavities are described by Zhou et al. Ye and co-authors describe the concept and realization of a novel 3D silicon-based spiral PC. It is, in fact, the only article on 3D PCs. The design and realization of ultra-high Q heterostructure PC nanocavities are described by Song and co-authors. The concept of self-collimation of light in PCs and its applications are presented by Prather and co-workers. Experimental and numerical studies on the negative refraction related phenomenon in 2D PCs are the subject of the next article by Ozbay and co-authors. The emerging subject of slow light generation, control and propagation in PCs is presented in the next two articles by Baba and Mori and by Krauss. Finally, the progress made in the development of PC microcavity lasers and electrically injected microcavity light emitters and arrays is described, respectively, by O'Brien et al and by Chakravarty et al. It is hoped that readers will get a sense of the exciting developments and the possibilities presented by heterostructure photonic crystals and their devices from reading the articles in this Cluster.

Bhattacharya, Pallab K.

2007-05-01

320

Essays in microeconomics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation consists of three essays in applied microeconomics. Each essay explores a different issue of economic interest. The essay in Chapter 2 describes an experiment designed to investigate if using assets with an intrinsic value that increases over time leads to persistent undervaluation in laboratory asset trading markets. This question has not previously been investigated by researchers. Results from ten sessions are reported. Three used assets with an intrinsic value that decreased over time. The results from these sessions are consistent with the findings by prior researchers who frequently observed price bubbles in laboratory asset trading experiments. The remaining seven sessions used assets with an intrinsic value that increased over time. In all these sessions trading generally occurred at prices below the asset's intrinsic value. In Chapter 3, in an essay co-authored with Adrian Stoian, we study road running races. Tournaments, where ordinal position determines rewards, are an important component of our economy. By studying sporting tournaments, we hope to shed light on the nature of other economically significant tournaments where data may be less readily available. We separately quantify the sorting and incentive effects of tournament prizes by employing a novel two-part model which we apply to a unique data set of road running race results. We present a counterfactual example of how a hypothetical change in prizes would be predicted to change race participation and speed. In Chapter 4, in an essay co-authored with Jedidiah Brewer and Joseph Cullen, we examine the combined effects of the locations and the brands of retail gasoline outlets in Tucson, Arizona on market prices. We apply an innovative approach to model the impact of competing gas stations that avoids limiting analysis to predetermined nearby locations. We show that increased brand diversity is associated with higher prices and that gas stations affiliated with mass-merchandisers and grocery stores reduce market prices by a larger amount and over a greater distance than other types of gas stations. We demonstrate that our conclusions are not sensitive to the choice of distance metric.

Davies, Tim

321

Recommendations for strengthening the infrared technology component of any condition monitoring program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation provides insights of a long term 'champion' of many condition monitoring technologies and a Level III infra red thermographer. The co-authors present recommendations based on their observations of infra red and other components of predictive, condition monitoring programs in manufacturing, utility and government defense and energy activities. As predictive maintenance service providers, trainers, informal observers and formal auditors of such programs, the co-authors provide a unique perspective that can be useful to practitioners, managers and customers of advanced programs. Each has over 30 years experience in the field of machinery operation, maintenance, and support the origins of which can be traced to and through the demanding requirements of the U.S. Navy nuclear submarine forces. They have over 10 years each of experience with programs in many different countries on 3 continents. Recommendations are provided on the following: (1) Leadership and Management Support (For survival); (2) Life Cycle View (For establishment of a firm and stable foundation for a program); (3) Training and Orientation (For thermographers as well as operators, managers and others); (4) Analyst Flexibility (To innovate, explore and develop their understanding of machinery condition); (5) Reports and Program Justification (For program visibility and continued expansion); (6) Commitment to Continuous Improvement of Capability and Productivity (Through application of updated hardware and software); (7) Mutual Support by Analysts (By those inside and outside of the immediate organization); (8) Use of Multiple Technologies and System Experts to Help Define Problems (Through the use of correlation analysis of data from up to 15 technologies. An example correlation analysis table for AC and DC motors is provided.); (9) Root Cause Analysis (Allows a shift from reactive to proactive stance for a program); (10) Master Equipment Identification and Technology Application (To place the condition monitoring program in perspective); (11) Use of procedures for Predictive, Condition Monitoring and maintenance in general (To get consistent results); (12) Developing a scheme for predictive, condition monitoring personnel qualification and certification (To provide a career path and incentive to advance skill level and value to the company); (13) Analyst Assignment to Technologies and Related Duties (To make intelligent use of the skills of individuals assigned); (14) Condition Monitoring Analyst Selection Criteria (Key attributes for success are mentioned.); (15) Design and Modification to Support Monitoring (For old and new machinery to facilitate data acquisition); (16) Establishment of a Museum of Components and Samples Pulled from Service for Cause (For orientation and awareness training of operators and managers and exchange of information between analysts); (17) Goals (To promote a proactive program approach for machinery condition improvement).

Nicholas, Jack R., Jr.; Young, R. K.

1999-03-01

322

Pullback attractors in nonautonomous dynamical systems with delay: Applications to an ENSO model with seasonal forcing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent work by two of the co-authors (MDC and MG) on random dynamical systems and their attractors has motivated us to consider also a closely related problem, namely the pullback attractors (PBAs) of deterministic dynamical systems driven by time-dependent forcing. Two obvious examples of such forcing in climate dynamics are: (i) periodic forcing by the seasonal cycle; and (ii) slow forcing by an interdecadal warming trend. We illustrate these two types of forcing in a highly idealized model for El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability, previously studied by two of the co-authors (MG and IZ). The model is governed by a delay differential equation (DDE) for sea surface temperature T in the Tropical Pacific, and it combines two key mechanisms that participate in ENSO dynamics: delayed negative feedback and seasonal forcing. We perform a theoretical and numerical study of the model in the three-dimensional space of its physically relevant parameters: strength of seasonal forcing, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and propagation period of oceanic waves across the Tropical Pacific. We report several findings that are consistent with the observed dynamics of ENSO, as well as with more detailed and realistic models: quasi-periodic behavior with the correct "period" values, phase locking, and sensitive dependence on model parameters. We demonstrate, furthermore, that the transition from smooth period-1 behavior to more realistic --- quasi-periodic or chaotic --- behavior occurs in a sequence of bifurcations similar to those observed in classical chaotic systems. We study next a multi-dimensional manifold of solutions, given by constant or piecewise constant initial histories, e.g. a constant, year-long warm (El Nino) or cold (La Nina) state. To do so, we apply the PBA concept in order to study the model dynamics in the model-parameter region where sensitivity to parameter values is high, as well as in the transition region from smooth to sensitive behavior. Computation of the model's PBAs clearly demonstrates that its dynamics --- whether periodic (smooth) or quasi-periodic (sensitive) --- occurs on a two-dimensional torus. This behavior reflects the competition between two oscillatory mechanisms: an external one due to the seasonal forcing and an internal one due to the delayed feedbacks. Such an interpretation is much harder to obtain from the complex, parameter-sensitive dynamics of the model using more traditional approaches for autonomous systems. Finally, we study the model dynamics subject to long-tem global warming scenarios and interpret the results in the context of the ongoing research on long-term climate projections.

Chekroun, Mickaël.; Zaliapin, Ilya; Ghil, Michael

2010-05-01

323

Nonlinear and stochastic effects in ENSO variability: From observations to intermediate models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon dominates interannual climate signals in and around the Tropical Pacific and affects the atmospheric circulation and air-sea interaction over many parts of the globe. Observational campaigns over the last decades have helped infer the most relevant processes, time scales and spatial patterns. A hierarchy of models has been developed to understand these processes and their interaction. These models have been, by-and-large, either deterministic and nonlinear or stochastic and linear, and have been applied to the prediction of future variability as well. The purpose of our work is to combine these two complementary points of view, and thus account for (i) the most robust and relevant aspects of the observations; (ii) the advances in understanding the nonlinear, deterministic interactions between the largest and most energetic scales; and (iii) the impact of small-scale ("noise") and remote ("external") processes. The main thrust of our approach is based on the concepts and tools of the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS). So far, two of the co-authors (MC & MG), in collaboration with E. Simonnet, have successfully applied RDS theory to, and described in detail the random attractors of several idealized climate models, such as the Lorenz (JAS, 1963) model of convection and the ENSO model of Timmermann and Jin (GRL, 2002). In the present work, we are extending these results to more detailed and realistic models, on the way to their eventual application to IPCC-class general circulation models (GCMs). Specifically, we address here two classes of such intermediate models. The first class is that of nonlinear inverse models derived by empirical mode reduction (EMR), as developed by two of the co-authors (MG and DK), in collaboration with S. Kravtsov, A. W. Robertson and others. In particular, we are studying the random attractor of the ENSO model derived in 2005 from sea surface temperature data over the past century, and being routinely applied to ENSO prediction since. The second class is that of intermediate models developed by one of the coauthors (JDN) in the early 1990s. These models are based on thermodynamical and fluid mechanical principles classically used in ENSO theory. This particular model has also been used over several years in routine ENSO prediction, as summarized over two decades by NOAA's Experimental Long-Lead Forecast Bulletin (ELLFB) and, more recently, by the "ENSO prediction plume" of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI). In both types of intermediate models, we study the effects of stochastic forcing that exhibits spatial correlations with the twofold purpose of (i) helping parameterize the unresolved processes, and (ii) improving prediction capabilities.

Chekroun, Mickael David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Neelin, David; Ghil, Michael

2010-05-01

324

Improved Method for Analysis of Airborne Asbestos Fibers Using Phase Contrast Microscopy and FTIR Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, some studies have tried to improve Phase Contrast Microscopy (PCM) for counting asbestos fibers. Due to the lack of a universally accepted alternative method, this study aimed to improve PCM for better counting of asbestos fibers. Materials and Methods Confirmed asbestos standards were applied using a dust generator for sampling. Sampling from the dust generator was carried out according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ID-160 method and 95 samples with diverse densities were prepared to be counted using conventional and modern PCM. All samples were counted single blindly by a co-author of this study and the obtained data were analyzed by paired t-test, correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. Duplicate samples were prepared for qualitative analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray. Results Asbestos densities on filters were in the range of less than 100 to 600 fibers/mm2. Statistically, significant differences were observed for the count density of the 95 samples counted by the two phase contrast microscopes (P<0.001). Nikon microscope demonstrated higher counts compared to conventional microscope and had a lower coefficient of variation. Samples were analyzed qualitatively using FT-IR and SEM, and the presence of asbestos fibers was confirmed. Conclusion The improved PCM and FT-IR methods presented in this study demonstrated more precise and accurate determination of personal exposure to airborne asbestos fibers and subsequent risk assessment. PMID:25713590

Azari, Mansour R.; Yazdian, Asil; Souri, Hamid; Khodakarim, Soheila; Peirovi, Habibalalah; Panahi, Davod; Kazempour, Marzieh

2014-01-01

325

Cutaneous myiasis caused by Hypoderma lineatum.  

PubMed

Cutaneous myiasis is a temporary parasitic infestation of the skin of domestic and wild animals and occasionally of humans by the larvae of flies. Larvae of many flies from various geographic areas can cause myiasis: in Central and South America, human cutaneous myiasis is mainly caused by the larvae of Dermatobia hominis; in Africa, by the larvae of Cordylobia anthropophaga; in the northern hemisphere (North America, Europe, Africa and Asia), by the larvae of Hypoderma spp. A case of cutaneous myiasis in a 47-year-old woman, co-author of the present report, is described. She returned to Slovenia from a three-week trip to Ladakh in Northern India. The parasite, nested in tumor-like swelling about 1-2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm high in her neck, was removed. The parasite was identified by its morphological characteristics as the larva of Hypoderma lineatum. After the removal of the larva, which was yellowish-white, oval-shaped and about 6 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, the lesion healed in two weeks without further treatment. Clinical and laboratory staff will need to be alert in the future, not only to myiasis caused by Dermatobia and Cordylobia larvae from tropical and subtropical areas but also to Hypoderma larvae from the Himalayan area from where the patient returned to Slovenia. PMID:19083166

Logar, Jernej; Marinic-Fiser, Natasa

2008-01-01

326

Written Discourse in Scientific Communities: A conversation with two scientists about their views of science, use of language, role of writing in doing science, and compatibility between their epistemic views and language  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This autobiographical case study of two scientists involved in earlier studies documents a profile of each scientist. These profiles were used to develop semi-structured interview protocols and email surveys for each scientist. The central issues of these data collections were whether these modern, evaluativist scientists believe that the review react revise process of publishing a peer-reviewed research report simply improves the quality of the language or actually changes the science, and how their metacognitive awareness and executive control were demonstrated in their science inquiry and science writing. The scientists served both as informants and co-authors. Both scientists believed that writing and revising research reports improved the science as well as the clarity of the text; that their use of absolutist language related to their beliefs about inquiry and not about science knowledge; that addressing comments about their writing forced them to assess, monitor, and regulate their science inquiries and research reports; and that traditional forms of knowledge about nature and natural events were valuable information sources that stress description rather than physical causality

Yore, Larry D.; Florence, Marilyn K.; Pearson, Terry W.; Weaver, Andrew J.

2006-02-01

327

John Bolton and the discovery of discrete radio sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

John Bolton was born in Sheffield in 1922 and educated at Cambridge University. After wartime service in the Royal Navy, in 1946 he joined the CSIRO's Radiophysics Laboratory in Sydney and began work in the fledgling field of radio astronomy. Radio emission from our Galaxy had been discovered and studied during the 1930s by the Americans Karl Jansky and Grote Reber. It was thought that the emission emanated from interstellar space, but the mechanism was unknown. In June 1947, observing from Dover Heights near the entrance to Sydney Harbour, Bolton discovered that strong emission from the constellation of Cygnus came from a discrete point-like source. By the end of the year, with colleagues Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee ( a co-author of this paper) , Bolton had discovered a further five of these discrete sources. However, the positions measured for them were not accurate enough to allow them to be identified optically with any known celestial objects. In 1948 Bolton organised a three-month expedition to New Zealand where there were observing sites superior to the one at Dover Heights. The new observations gave more accurate positions and allowed Bolton to identify three of the sources: one was a supernova remnant in our Galaxy and two were unusual extragalactic objects. This paper will document this remarkable chapter in the development of twentieth century astronomy.

Robertson, Peter; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

2014-11-01

328

Q&A: Annette Totten on a geriatrics framework for home care: A quality improvement approach.  

PubMed

Annette Totten, PhD MPA, is director of the Geriatrics Framework Project at the Center for Home Care Policy and Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, New York, NY. She has held a variety of policy, research, and project management positions in government, private foundations, and university-based research centers including the Ohio House of Representatives, the John A. Hartford Foundation, the New York State Department of Health, the New York University Department of Nursing, the Columbia University School of Nursing, the State Health Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) at the University of Minnesota, and the Veterans Administration. Before joining the Center for Home Care Policy & and Research, Annette was the Director of the Center for the Study of Aging and an Assistant Research Professor at Boise State University. She earned her doctorate in health services research from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and also holds a Masters of Public Administration from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. Her research interests include the organization, financing, and quality of care for chronic conditions and long-term care. She co-authored the book, Meeting the Challenge of Chronic Illness (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005) and has developed and taught graduate course on aging, health, and social policy; chronic disease epidemiology; and research methods. PMID:19350880

Totten, Annette

2009-01-01

329

The Price of Paying Taxes: How Tax Preparation and Refund Loan Fees Erode the Benefits of the EITC  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For the first time scholars and researchers have gotten together and prepared an analytical survey on the relationship between Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) recipients and the location of tax preparation services (such as H&R Block and Jackson Hewitt) that offer e-filing and tax returns. Available in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf), and co-authored by the Brookings Urban Center and the Progressive Policy Institute, this report "analyzes information on the commercial tax preparation industry and the spatial distribution of its firms." The report also contains information regarding the concentration of "fast cash" refund loan facilities within low-income communities throughout the nationâ??s 100 largest metropolitan areas, and provides an estimate of the total amount spent on tax preparation and loans by EITC recipients. According to the report, EITC recipients dished-out approximately $2 billion for tax preparation services and products in 1999, with more than half of all low-income families purchasing refund loans in some of the nation's largest cities and suburbs. To help decrease the amount of money spent on these types of services, the authors of the report outlined a policy agenda that would help EITC recipients maintain the full value of their return. Some of the agenda recommendations include simplifying tax credits for low-income families; broadening the availability of free and affordable tax preparation assistance and electronic filing of returns; and expanding access to low-cost bank accounts to promote direct deposit of EITC refunds.

Berube, Alan.

2002-01-01

330

Storage, interference and mechanical effects of single photons in coupled optical cavities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study different phenomena associated with single-photon propagation in optical cavities coupled through optical fibers. We first address the issue of storing and delaying single-photon wavepackets in an array of microcavities. This has possible applications in developing reliable and efficient quantum repeaters that will be utilized in building long distance quantum networks. Second, we investigate a Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) type of interference between two photons that are produced in two coupled atom-cavity systems. The HOM effect in this setup can test the degree of indistinguishability between photons when they are stored inside cavities. This part of the dissertation also includes the study of entanglement between atoms, cavities and atom-cavity systems induced by the photons. Finally, we focus on single-photon interactions with a tiny movable mirror in the context of quantum optomechanics. We investigate how the mechanical motion of the mirror leaves its imprints on the optical spectrum of the photon. This dissertation includes previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

Mirza, Imran Majid

331

Ancient Jets of Fiery Rain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chondrules are intriguing millimeter-sized crystallized droplets that are abundant in chondrites, so named because of the presence of numerous chondrules. They have puzzled cosmochemists since they were described by English scientist H. C. Sorby in 1877. Everyone agrees that they formed as molten droplets of silicates, but nobody agrees on how the little things formed. Ideas range from impacts onto asteroids, primary condensation in the solar nebula, shock waves and/or lightening in the solar nebula, or by processes operating as planets began to form. A new twist on this last idea was investigated in a new way by Brandon Johnson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT) and co-authors David Minton and Jay Melosh (Purdue University), and Maria Zuber at MIT. Johnson and coworkers modeled the effects of impacts between planetesimals 100-1000 kilometers in diameter. When such objects hit each other, the first thing that happens is jetting of molten rock. Johnson and colleagues propose that the jets will subdivide into droplets as the jetted material is shot into space. They estimate that the chondrules would have the correct cooling rates (as determined from previous studies of chondrules) and the collision frequency would be high enough to produce abundant chondrules. Johnson and coworkers suggest that chondrules are a "byproduct of [planetary] accretion."

Taylor, G. J.

2015-04-01

332

The founding charter of the Genomic Observatories Network.  

PubMed

The co-authors of this paper hereby state their intention to work together to launch the Genomic Observatories Network (GOs Network) for which this document will serve as its Founding Charter. We define a Genomic Observatory as an ecosystem and/or site subject to long-term scientific research, including (but not limited to) the sustained study of genomic biodiversity from single-celled microbes to multicellular organisms.An international group of 64 scientists first published the call for a global network of Genomic Observatories in January 2012. The vision for such a network was expanded in a subsequent paper and developed over a series of meetings in Bremen (Germany), Shenzhen (China), Moorea (French Polynesia), Oxford (UK), Pacific Grove (California, USA), Washington (DC, USA), and London (UK). While this community-building process continues, here we express our mutual intent to establish the GOs Network formally, and to describe our shared vision for its future. The views expressed here are ours alone as individual scientists, and do not necessarily represent those of the institutions with which we are affiliated. PMID:24606731

Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Clark, Melody S; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Faith, Daniel P; Geller, Jonathan; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirsch, Penny R; Leong, Jo-Ann; Meyer, Chris; Obst, Matthias; Planes, Serge; Scholin, Chris; Vogler, Alfried P; Gates, Ruth D; Toonen, Rob; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Barbier, Michčle; Barker, Katherine; Bertilsson, Stefan; Bicak, Mesude; Bietz, Matthew J; Bobe, Jason; Bodrossy, Levente; Borja, Angel; Coddington, Jonathan; Fuhrman, Jed; Gerdts, Gunnar; Gillespie, Rosemary; Goodwin, Kelly; Hanson, Paul C; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoekman, David; Jansson, Janet; Jeanthon, Christian; Kao, Rebecca; Klindworth, Anna; Knight, Rob; Kottmann, Renzo; Koo, Michelle S; Kotoulas, Georgios; Lowe, Andrew J; Marteinsson, Viggó Thór; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Myrold, David D; Pafilis, Evangelos; Parker, Stephanie; Parnell, John Jacob; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Roderick, George K; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Schonrogge, Karsten; Simon, Nathalie; Valette-Silver, Nathalie J; Springer, Yuri P; Stone, Graham N; Stones-Havas, Steve; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Thibault, Kate M; Wecker, Patricia; Wichels, Antje; Wooley, John C; Yahara, Tetsukazu; Zingone, Adriana

2014-01-01

333

Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

2005-01-01

334

The mapping of Spanish social psychology through its conferences: a bibliometric perspective.  

PubMed

This study of papers gathered from the proceedings presented at Spanish social psychology conferences explores the use of bibliometrics for studying scientific disciplines. A reference database of all the papers included in the conference proceedings of events held from 1983 to 2000 was generated and classified by thematic area, paper type and author institutional affiliation. The references were laid out on contingency tables and mapped with correspondence analysis. The results show that there is a growing number of co-authored papers and a predominance of empirical over theoretical paper types. Some institutions have a higher concentration of theoretical papers while others work mostly in the areas of organizational and health psychology. In terms of empirical papers, there is a tendency towards generating more qualitative-based studies over the span of time captured by this work. There are also a number of papers written about such areas as cultural psychology that points to the emergence of an interest in critical social psychology. Concluding remarks underline the role of conferences and scientific meetings as an important indicator of the dynamic development of a scientific discipline. PMID:18630656

Ińiguez-Rueda, Lupicinio; Martínez-Martínez, Luz María; Muńoz-Justicia, Juan Manuel; Peńaranda-Cólera, Ma Carmen; Sahagún-Padilla, Miguel Angel; Alvarado, José Gerardo

2008-05-01

335

[The celebrity of Polish and French medicine--Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babi?ski (1857-1932)].  

PubMed

The paper presents a biography of Polish and French medical scientist, Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babi?ski (1857-1932), a son of Polish exiles to France after the unsuccessful insurrection against the Russian occupants. Born in Paris, Babi?ski considered Poland as his own home-country, being faithful and grateful citizen of France, his adopted country. He made his neurological department in Paris a world famous medical centre at the turn of the 20th century. Currently for every student of medicine or physician practitioner, the name of Babi?ski immediately associates with the "toe phenomenon" (phénomčne des orteils). The discovery of this "sign" (1896) is the crowning point of Babi?ski's work in semiology. He was a co-author of discoveries known under eponym names of syndromes: Babinski-Nageotte, Babinski-Fröhlich, Anton-Babinski and many others. Babi?ski emphasized his Polish origins, expressing his feeling towards two home countries (1922): "I am proud to have two countries--to one, I owe the knowledge, to the other, the country of my ancestors, the elements of my Polish soul...". PMID:17966600

Skalski, Janusz H; G?adki, Marcin; Pyp?acz, Dariusz

2007-07-01

336

[Application of the hydrogen washout technique to orthopedic research (author's transl)].  

PubMed

Since the first description by Aukland and co-authors in 1964, the hydrogen washout has been shown to be an accurate method in determining regional tissue blood flow. The presence of hydrogen molecules within the tissue is detected with a platinum electrode where a small amount of current is generated by oxidation of molecular hydrogen to hydrogen ions. Therefore, construction of the suitable electrode for the tissue to be measured is essential. The author applied the hydrogen washout technique to the blood flow measurement of bone, muscle, skin, digit and peripheral nerve, and found that the technique was valuable in basic and clinical studies in orthopedics. As a typical experimental study using the hydrogen washout technique, the study on the effect of adrenaline on bone blood flow was presented and the experimental method was explained in detail. Although the hydrogen washout technique has been developed to measure the blood flow, the technique has been found useful in detecting the pathways of microcirculation between different tissues. As an example, the study on nutritional pathways of the intervertebral disk was described. Since the hydrogen gas is harmless, it is possible to apply the technique to the clinical studies including the blood flow measurement of replanted digits, diagnosis of the compartment syndrome and the blood flow measurement of skin flaps. Furthermore, several problems in the hydrogen washout technique were discussed. PMID:7310209

Ogata, K

1981-08-01

337

Solving nuclear shape conundrum at HIE-ISOLDE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is the purpose of this paper to illustrate some of the low-energy nuclear physics that we want to pursue at the new HIE-ISOLDE radioactive-ion-beam facility at CERN. The University of the Western Cape leads an experimental proposal and co-authors two Letters of Intent, in collaboration with European institutions, at HIE-ISOLDE. Timely topics such as the "Exploration of K-isomerism using unique high-K isomeric beams - CERN-INTC-I-101" and "Shape changes and proton-neutron pairing around the N = Z line - CERN-INTC-I-102" are addressed in these Letters of Intent. Our experimental proposal aims at performing a multi-step Coulomb-excitation of radioactive 70Se ion beams using the 208Pb(70Se,70Se*)208Pb* reaction at a bombarding energy of 5.5 MeV/u. The physics goal is a precise measurement of the (2+1 || Ę2 || 2+1) diagonal matrix element, related to the spectroscopic quadrupole moment, in 70Se. Full simulations presented in this work show distinct angular distributions for plausible values of the spectroscopic quadrupole moment; with a predicted uncertainty of approximately ±0.1 eb. Additional diagonal and transitional matrix elements will also be obtained. These results will shed light onto the origin of rarely-found oblate shapes and shape coexistence in this region of rapidly-changing shell structure.

Orce, J. N.

2013-08-01

338

2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

2008-11-01

339

Publications of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology for Calendar Year 1992  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report contains a listing of publications authored or co-authored by members of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology and published in calendar year 1992. The Branch conducts a broad geologic and geophysical research and mapping program, primarily along the U.S. Atlantic Margin, in the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean and polar regions. A long range objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the geology of the continental margin and a predictive capability to guide and assess the consequences of its use. Headquarters of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology are located in Woods Hole, MA., and personnel are located in Woods Hole, MA., St Petersburg, FL., Reston, VA., Denver, CO., and San Juan, Puerto Rico. A brochure describing the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology may be obtained by writing to Chief, Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology, Quissett Campus, Woods Hole, MA 02543. Results of Branch investigations are distributed in a variety of ways, including maps, journal articles, abstracts and U.S.G.S. publications. Copies of U.S.G.S. Open File Reports may be obtained from the author. Book publications can be obtained from U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Reports Sales, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225. Copies of U.S.G.S. Maps may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey, Map Sales, Federal Center, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225.

Mons-Wengler, Margaret C.; Oldale, Robert N.

1993-01-01

340

Publications of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology for Calendar Year 1990  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report [extract] contains a listing of publications authored or co-authored by members of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology and published in calendar year 1990. The Branch conducts a broad geologic and geophysical research and mapping program, primarily along the U.S. Atlantic Margin, in the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean and polar regions. A long range objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the geology of the continental margin and a predictive capability to guide and assess the consequences of its use. Headquarters of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology are located in Woods Hole, MA., and personnel are located in Woods Hole, MA., St Petersburg, FL., Reston, VA., Denver, CO., and San Juan, Puerto Rico. A brochure describing the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology may be obtained by writing to Chief, Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology, Quissett Campus, Woods Hole, MA 02543. Results of Branch investigations are distributed in a variety of ways, including maps, journal articles, abstracts and U.S.G.S. publications. Copies of U.S.G.S. Open File Reports may be obtained from the author. Book publications can be obtained from U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Reports Sales, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225. Copies of U.S.G.S. Maps may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey, Map Sales, Federal Center, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225.

Mons-Wengler, Margaret C.; Oldale, Robert N.

1991-01-01

341

Publications of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology for Calendar Year 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report [extract] contains a listing of publications authored or co-authored by members of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology and published in calendar year 1993. The Branch conducts a broad geologic and geophysical research and mapping program, primarily along the U.S. Atlantic Margin, in the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean and polar regions. A long range objective of this program is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the geology of the continental margin and a predictive capability to guide and assess the consequences of its use. Headquarters of the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology are located in Woods Hole, MA., and personnel are located in Woods Hole, MA., St Petersburg, FL., Reston, VA., Denver, CO., and San Juan, Puerto Rico. A brochure describing the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology may be obtained by writing to Chief, Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology, Quissett Campus, Woods Hole, MA 02543. Results of Branch investigations are distributed in a variety of ways, including maps, journal articles, abstracts and U.S.G.S. publications. Copies of U.S.G.S. Open File Reports may be obtained from the author. Book publications can be obtained from U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Reports Sales, Federal Center, Box 25425, Denver, CO 80225. Copies of U.S.G.S. Maps may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey, Map Sales, Federal Center, Box 25286, Denver, CO 80225.

Mons-Wengler, Margaret C.; Oldale, Robert N.

1994-01-01

342

A century-old leadership style revitalizes the heroic hospital.  

PubMed

"Those who fail history are destined to repeat it." Emmett C. Murphy, Ph.D., an international business consultant found that the key to individual and organizational leadership is a heroic commitment to service and the reengineering of the work that it requires. Murphy, whose clients include IBM, General Motors, Johns Hopkins, Centers for Disease Control, Johnson & Johnson, and Memorial Sloan Kettering; was a consultant with Booz-Allen Hamilton and served on the faculties of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the State University of New York before founding E. C. Murphy, Ltd. His firm focuses on the application of quality improvement and work reengineering strategies for creating a patient-focused "heroic" organization. Recently, Dr. Murphy and Michael Snell co-authored an intriguing management book based on the fundamental business strategies historically found in an unlikely western figure. The The Genius of Sitting Bull (Prentice Hall, 1993), Murphy and Snell examine the leadership styles of the Sioux chief and General Custer at the peaks of their careers and used 13 heroic strategies common to Sitting Bull's management style as a metaphor for for successful leadership on the great plains of American health care and business life. PMID:10123388

Kania, A J

1993-01-01

343

Linguistic Traces of a Scientific Fraud: The Case of Diederik Stapel  

PubMed Central

When scientists report false data, does their writing style reflect their deception? In this study, we investigated the linguistic patterns of fraudulent (N ?=? 24; 170,008 words) and genuine publications (N ?=? 25; 189,705 words) first-authored by social psychologist Diederik Stapel. The analysis revealed that Stapel's fraudulent papers contained linguistic changes in science-related discourse dimensions, including more terms pertaining to methods, investigation, and certainty than his genuine papers. His writing style also matched patterns in other deceptive language, including fewer adjectives in fraudulent publications relative to genuine publications. Using differences in language dimensions we were able to classify Stapel's publications with above chance accuracy. Beyond these discourse dimensions, Stapel included fewer co-authors when reporting fake data than genuine data, although other evidentiary claims (e.g., number of references and experiments) did not differ across the two article types. This research supports recent findings that language cues vary systematically with deception, and that deception can be revealed in fraudulent scientific discourse. PMID:25153333

Markowitz, David M.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

2014-01-01

344

The proper scope of the principle of procreative beneficence revisited.  

PubMed

The principle of procreative beneficence (PB), first suggested by Julian Savulescu, argues that: If couples (or single reproducers) have decided to have a child, and selection is possible, then they have a significant moral reason to select the child, of the possible children they could have, whose life is expected, in light of the relevant available information, to go best or at least not worse than any.of the others. (Savulescu and Kahane 2009, p. 274). While the validity of this moral principle has been widely contested, in this paper we move away from these issues and grant, for the sake of argument, that PB is a valid moral principle, and that the justification for PBprovided by Savulescu and co-authors is sound. We do this in order to explore the implications and consequences of accepting PB and show that even if we put aside questions about the validity and theoretical foundations of this principle, PB has many interesting, astonishing and highly problematic implications that have not been made explicit in the writing of Savulescu and others who support the notion of an obligation to bring to birth the best child possible (Glover, in: Justice between age groops and generations, 1992; Harris, J Med Ethics 28(3):204, 2002). We suggest that these implications should be taken into account when considering both the soundness and strength of PB. PMID:25434062

Holm, Sřren; Bennett, Rebecca

2014-01-01

345

Exploring the Sexuality of African American Older Women  

PubMed Central

Aims To identify sexually-related themes of the sexuality of older African American women. Study Design Mixed method. Place and Duration of Study Department of Psychology, California State University Northridge, between July 2009 and June 2011. Methodology We included 13 African American older women (57 to 82 years of age), 11 of whom self-identified as heterosexual, one as bisexual, and one as lesbian. We used a semi-structured interview protocol through which we explored some aspects of the respondents’ sexuality (assessed at a superficial level, to be as tactful as possible). Moreover, we collected information on demographics and self-rated physical health. Two co-authors served as coders, and used content analysis to identify the most salient sexuality themes. Results Emerging themes were (in order from most to least endorsed): having sexual desire (often unfulfilled); engaging in less sexual activity in older age; experiencing changes in one’s sexual life as a function of absence of a spouse; and exercising control over how one’s sexual life is conducted. Motivated by the paucity of our sexuality data, we have also provided suggestions to scholars interested in conducting more in-depth further research on this topic with older African American women. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the common notion that older women are asexual is a myth, while lack of a suitable sexual partner is a problem reported by many African American older women who would otherwise enjoy sexual interaction. PMID:25632380

Laganá, Luciana; White, Theresa; Bruzzone, Daniel E.; Bruzzone, Cristine E.

2014-01-01

346

Basal vertebrates clarify the evolutionary history of ciliopathy-associated genes Tmem138 and Tmem216.  

PubMed

Recently, Lee et al. (Lee JH, Silhavy JL, Lee JE, et al. (30 co-authors). 2012. Evolutionarily assembled cis-regulatory module at a human ciliopathy locus. Science (335:966-969.) demonstrated that mutation in either of the transmembrane protein encoding genes, TMEM138 or TMEM216, causes phenotypically indistinguishable ciliopathy. Furthermore, on the basis of the observation that their orthologs are linked in a head-to-tail configuration in other mammals and Anolis, but present on different scaffolds or chromosomes in Xenopus tropicalis and zebrafish, the authors concluded that the two genes were joined by chromosomal rearrangement at the evolutionary amphibian-to-reptile transition to form a functional module. We have sequenced these gene loci in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark, and found that the two genes together with a related gene (Tmem80) constitute a tandem cluster. This suggests that the two genes were already linked in the vertebrate ancestor and then rearranged independently in Xenopus and zebrafish. Analyses of the coelacanth and lamprey genomes support this hypothesis. Our study highlights the importance of basal vertebrates as critical reference genomes. PMID:22936720

Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ravi, Vydianathan; Lee, Alison P; Warren, Wesley C; Brenner, Sydney

2013-01-01

347

RefSponse: A Literature Evaluation System for the Professional Astrophysics Community  

E-print Network

We describe an implementation of a semi-automated review system for the astrophysics literature. Registered users identify names under which they publish, and provide scores for individual papers of their choosing. Scores are held confidentially, and combined in a weighted average grade for each paper. The grade is divided among the co-authors as assigned credit. The credit accumulated by each user (their ``mass'') provides the weight by which their score is averaged into papers' grades. Thus, papers' grades and users' masses are mutually dependent and evolve in time as scores are added. Likewise, a user's influence on the grade of a paper is determined from the perceived original scientific contribution of all the user's previous papers. The implementation, called RefSponse -- currently hosted at http://bororo.physics.mcgill.ca -- includes papers in astro-ph, the ApJ, AJ, A&A, MNRAS, PASP, PASJ, New Astronomy, Nature, ARA&A, Phys. Rev. Letters, Phys. Rev. D. and Acta Astronomica from 1965 to the present, making extensive use of the NASA/ADS abstract server. We describe some of the possible utilities of this system in enabling progress in the field.

Robert E. Rutledge

2004-06-28

348

Statistical physics applied to ecology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding an ecosystem is a formidable many-body problem. One has an interacting system, made up of individuals of various species with imperfectly known interactions, mainly governed by chance and characterized by a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, in tropical forests across the globe, ecologists have been able to measure certain quantities such as the relative species abundance distribution, the species area relationship, and beta diversity, the probability that two trees separated by a given distance belong to the same species. In order to make progress, it is important to distill what one hopes are the essential ingredients of an ecosystem and incorporate them in tractable models whose predictions can then be compared with the observed data. Such an interplay between empirical data and theory is useful for the formulation of realistic models of ecosystems. A summary of recent work along these lines will be presented. Co-author: Amos Maritan Collaborators: John Damuth, Fangliang He, Steve Hubbell, Andrea Rinaldo, Igor Volkov and Tommaso Zillio

Banavar, Jayanth

2005-03-01

349

Milton Schwebel (1914-2013).  

PubMed

Milton Schwebel was born May 11, 1914, in Troy, New York, the son of Frank Schwebel and Sarah Oxenhandler Schwebel. He died October 3, 2013, in Tucson, Arizona. His 99 years were filled with love, activism, scholarship, and leadership. In educational psychology, he was a career-long proponent of educating disadvantaged children. A pioneer in peace psychology, Schwebel helped establish the field's intellectual foundation. Recognizing that politics, current events, and international affairs influenced children's mental and physical health. Over a remarkable 73-year publishing career, Schwebel's scholarly contributions included authoring, editing, or co-authoring 14 books and innumerable articles. Schwebel was always working to improve the human condition, and his scholarship was most prominent in three interwoven areas. Schwebel will long be remembered as a treasured friend and mentor who cared deeply about vulnerable people, particularly children, the underprivileged, and the disadvantaged. He enjoyed listening to diverse perspectives and was a renowned teacher, clinician, and lecturer, beloved by students and colleagues. His life serves as a beacon to all who seek to promote human well-being. PMID:25046718

Schwebel, David C; Schwebel, Robert; Wessells, Michael

2014-01-01

350

Analysis and numerical modeling of electrohydrodynamic instability in a three-layer stratified flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic-aqueous liquid (phenol) extraction is one of many standard techniques to efficiently purify DNA directly from cells. Effective dispersion of one fluid phase in the other increases the surface area over which biological component partitioning may occur, and hence enhances DNA extraction efficiency. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) instability can be harnessed to achieve this goal, and has been experimentally demonstrated by one of the co-authors (JDZ). In this work, analysis and simulation are combined to investigate EHD instability in a three-layer, stratified, and immiscible microchannel flow. Such instability induces droplet formation, thereby increasing the interfacial area available for partitioning. A linear analysis is carried out with a Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method, whereas a fully nonlinear simulation is implemented using a finite volume, immersed boundary method. The results from both models compare favorably with each other. The linear analysis reveals basic instability characteristics such as kink and sausage modes, while the nonlinear simulation predicts surface deformation in the strongly nonlinear regime pertinent to droplet formation. The eventual objective is to utilize these numerical tools to determine relevant parameters for maximizing interfacial surface area for optimized DNA extraction.

Narayanan, Venkat R. T.; Li, Jianbo; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Lin, Hao

2008-11-01

351

Regular and chaotic regimes in Saltzman model of glacial climate dynamics under the influence of additive and parametric noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well-known that the climate system, due to its nonlinearity, can be sensitive to stochastic forcing. New types of dynamical regimes caused by the noise-induced transitions are revealed on the basis of the classical climate model previously developed by Saltzman with co-authors and Nicolis. A complete parametric classification of dynamical regimes of this deterministic model is carried out. On the basis of this analysis, the influence of additive and parametric noises is studied. For weak noise, the climate system is localized nearby deterministic attractors. A mixture of the small and large amplitude oscillations caused by noise-induced transitions between equilibria and cycle attraction basins arise with increasing the noise intensity. The portion of large amplitude oscillations is estimated too. The parametric noise introduced in two system parameters demonstrates quite different system dynamics. Namely, the noise introduced in one system parameter increases its dispersion whereas in the other one leads to the stabilization of the climatic system near its unstable equilibrium with transitions from order to chaos.

Alexandrov, Dmitry V.; Bashkirtseva, Irina A.; Fedotov, Sergei P.; Ryashko, Lev B.

2014-10-01

352

Automatic noncontact 3-dimensional gauging via sensor fusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Manufacturers are now driving toward the increased use of automation and the goal of zero-defects. As quality is improved and defect rates approach the popularized " Six-Sigma" level (customarily 3. 4 defects per million) manual or sampled measurementtechniques limit the achievementof product quality and manufacturing cost objectives. New automated inspection and gaging technology is required for process verification and control. To be competitive in the current manufacturing environment new gaging technology must be integrated into the manufacturing process to provide on-line feedback. The co-authors are founders of CogniSense a technology company dedicated to industrial inspection and gaging applications which use non-contact sensing techniques. CogniSense is currently applying its technology in the precision metalforming and other manufacturing industries to perform automatic dimensional measurement and provide real time information used to control and fine-tune the manufacturing process. A variety of sensors are used to detect the characteristics of parts on-line as they are produced. Data from multiple sensors is " fused" and analyzed by a dedicated microcomputer which evaluates the sensory signature and calculates critical dimensions from the sensor input to determine whether parts are within the acceptable tolerance range. Pattern recognition algorithms are used to automatically select the sensors which provide the most important information about critical part characteristics and dimensions. These algorithms operate by observing the changes in sensor output as critical features of the part are varied. The decision-making algorithms

Buckley, Shawn; Tavormina, Joseph J.

1993-09-01

353

Can model weighting improve probabilistic projections of climate change?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, Räisänen and co-authors proposed a weighting scheme in which the relationship between observable climate and climate change within a multi-model ensemble determines to what extent agreement with observations affects model weights in climate change projection. Within the Third Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3) dataset, this scheme slightly improved the cross-validated accuracy of deterministic projections of temperature change. Here the same scheme is applied to probabilistic temperature change projection, under the strong limiting assumption that the CMIP3 ensemble spans the actual modeling uncertainty. Cross-validation suggests that probabilistic temperature change projections may also be improved by this weighting scheme. However, the improvement relative to uniform weighting is smaller in the tail-sensitive logarithmic score than in the continuous ranked probability score. The impact of the weighting on projection of real-world twenty-first century temperature change is modest in most parts of the world. However, in some areas mainly over the high-latitude oceans, the mean of the distribution is substantially changed and/or the distribution is considerably narrowed. The weights of individual models vary strongly with location, so that a model that receives nearly zero weight in some area may still get a large weight elsewhere. Although the details of this variation are method-specific, it suggests that the relative strengths of different models may be difficult to harness by weighting schemes that use spatially uniform model weights.

Räisänen, Jouni; Ylhäisi, Jussi S.

2012-10-01

354

Theory and detection scheme of seismic EM signals transferred into the atmosphere from the oceanic and continental lithosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the compound structure of the medium and large portions of energy transferred, a seismic excitation in the oceanic or continental lithosphere disturbs all types of geophysical fields. To investigate the problem of electromagnetic (EM) disturbances in the atmosphere from the seismically activated lithosphere, we have formulated two mathematical models of interaction of fields of different physical nature resulting in arising of the low-frequency (from 0.1 to 10 Hz by amplitude of a few hundreds of pT) EM signals in the atmosphere. First we have considered the EM field generation in the moving oceanic lithosphere and then in the moving continental one. For both cases, the main physical principles and geological data were applied for formulation of the model and characteristics of the computed signals of different nature agree with measurements of other authors. On the basis of the 2D model of the seismo-hydro-EM-temperature interaction in the lithosphere-Ocean-atmosphere domain, a block-scheme of a multisensory vertically distributed (from a seafloor up to the ionosphere) tsunami precursors' detection system is described. On the basis of the 3D model of the seismo-EM interaction in a lithosphere-atmosphere domain, we explain why Prof. Kopytenko (Inst. IZMIRAN of Russian Acad. Sci.) and co-authors were able to estimate location of the future seismic epicenter area from their magnetic field measurements in the atmosphere near the earth's surface.

Novik, Oleg; Ershov, Sergey; Ruzhin, Yuri; Smirnov, Fedor; Volgin, Maxim

2014-07-01

355

Healing in forgiveness: A discussion with Amanda Lindhout and Katherine Porterfield, PhD  

PubMed Central

In 2008, Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of extremists while traveling as a freelance journalist in Somalia. She and a colleague were held captive for more than 15 months, released only after their families paid a ransom. In this interview, Amanda discusses her experiences in captivity and her ongoing recovery from this experience with Katherine Porterfield, Ph.D. a clinical psychologist at the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture. Specifically, Amanda describes the childhood experiences that shaped her thirst for travel and knowledge, the conditions of her kidnapping, and her experiences after she was released from captivity. Amanda outlines the techniques that she employed to survive in the early aftermath of her capture, and how these coping strategies changed as her captivity lengthened. She reflects on her transition home, her recovery process, and her experiences with mental health professionals. Amanda's insights provide an example of resilience in the face of severe, extended trauma to researchers, clinicians, and survivors alike. The article ends with an discussion of the ways that Amanda's coping strategies and recovery process are consistent with existing resilience literature. Amanda's experiences as a hostage, her astonishing struggle for physical and mental survival, and her life after being freed are documented in her book, co-authored with Sara Corbett, A House in the Sky. PMID:25317259

Porterfield, Katherine A.; Lindhout, Amanda

2014-01-01

356

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA

2013-06-28

357

Young Voices on Climate Change: The Paul F-Brandwein 2010 NSTA Lecture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lynne Cherry Brandwein Lecture March 2010 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Young Voices on Climate Change: Inspired and Empowered Youth Tackle Climate Science and Find Climate Solutions. As a child, Lynne Cherry was profoundly connected to the natural world and a special place. She watched the destruction of her world. Now, through her Young Voices on Climate Change project, she is trying to give teachers and young people the tools to prevent planetary meltdown on a greater scale. Global climate change is upon us and the need for education and action is immediate. Outreach, visual storytelling, and scientific understanding are especially necessary in light of the recent polls that show that the public is becoming more confused and less concerned about climate change. Cherry's climate book, co-authored with photojournalist Gary Braasch, and her Young Voices on Climate Change films feature climate solutions. They're about win-win—save the environment, protect human health, reduce global warming gases, demonstrate youth making a difference with practical tools, motivate engagement in climate science, take pride in increased science literacy, reach young people through their hearts as well as their minds, and save money. Although young people can help their parents, peers and communities understand climate science, they can also show them that reducing CO2 is in their economic interest, and spur them to take action. School carbon reduction initiatives are spilling over into communities yielding measurable results in both global warming gas reductions and significant monetary savings.

Cherry, Lynne

2011-04-01

358

Co-Authorship and Bibliographic Coupling Network Effects on Citations  

PubMed Central

This paper analyzes the effects of the co-authorship and bibliographic coupling networks on the citations received by scientific articles. It expands prior research that limited its focus on the position of co-authors and incorporates the effects of the use of knowledge sources within articles: references. By creating a network on the basis of shared references, we propose a way to understand whether an article bridges among extant strands of literature and infer the size of its research community and its embeddedness. Thus, we map onto the article – our unit of analysis – the metrics of authors' position in the co-authorship network and of the use of knowledge on which the scientific article is grounded. Specifically, we adopt centrality measures – degree, betweenneess, and closeness centrality – in the co-authorship network and degree, betweenness centrality and clustering coefficient in the bibliographic coupling and show their influence on the citations received in first two years after the year of publication. Findings show that authors' degree positively impacts citations. Also closeness centrality has a positive effect manifested only when the giant component is relevant. Author's betweenness centrality has instead a negative effect that persists until the giant component - largest component of the network in which all nodes can be linked by a path - is relevant. Moreover, articles that draw on fragmented strands of literature tend to be cited more, whereas the size of the scientific research community and the embeddedness of the article in a cohesive cluster of literature have no effect. PMID:24911416

Biscaro, Claudio; Giupponi, Carlo

2014-01-01

359

The Citation Wake of Publications Detects Nobel Laureates' Papers  

PubMed Central

For several decades, a leading paradigm of how to quantitatively assess scientific research has been the analysis of the aggregated citation information in a set of scientific publications. Although the representation of this information as a citation network has already been coined in the 1960s, it needed the systematic indexing of scientific literature to allow for impact metrics that actually made use of this network as a whole, improving on the then prevailing metrics that were almost exclusively based on the number of direct citations. However, besides focusing on the assignment of credit, the paper citation network can also be studied in terms of the proliferation of scientific ideas. Here we introduce a simple measure based on the shortest-paths in the paper's in-component or, simply speaking, on the shape and size of the wake of a paper within the citation network. Applied to a citation network containing Physical Review publications from more than a century, our approach is able to detect seminal articles which have introduced concepts of obvious importance to the further development of physics. We observe a large fraction of papers co-authored by Nobel Prize laureates in physics among the top-ranked publications. PMID:25437855

Klosik, David F.; Bornholdt, Stefan

2014-01-01

360

The founding charter of the Genomic Observatories Network  

PubMed Central

The co-authors of this paper hereby state their intention to work together to launch the Genomic Observatories Network (GOs Network) for which this document will serve as its Founding Charter. We define a Genomic Observatory as an ecosystem and/or site subject to long-term scientific research, including (but not limited to) the sustained study of genomic biodiversity from single-celled microbes to multicellular organisms. An international group of 64 scientists first published the call for a global network of Genomic Observatories in January 2012. The vision for such a network was expanded in a subsequent paper and developed over a series of meetings in Bremen (Germany), Shenzhen (China), Moorea (French Polynesia), Oxford (UK), Pacific Grove (California, USA), Washington (DC, USA), and London (UK). While this community-building process continues, here we express our mutual intent to establish the GOs Network formally, and to describe our shared vision for its future. The views expressed here are ours alone as individual scientists, and do not necessarily represent those of the institutions with which we are affiliated. PMID:24606731

2014-01-01

361

Jim Starnes' Contributions to Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Structures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summary of advances in residual strength analyses methods for metallic structures that were realized under the leadership of Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr., is presented. The majority of research led by Dr. Starnes in this area was conducted in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Dr. Starnes, respectfully referred to herein as Jim, had a passion for studying complex response phenomena and dedicated a significant amount of research effort toward advancing damage tolerance and residual strength analysis methods for metallic structures. Jim's efforts were focused on understanding damage propagation in built-up fuselage structure with widespread fatigue damage, with the goal of ensuring safety in the aging international commercial transport fleet. Jim's major contributions in this research area were in identifying the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads, and geometric nonlinearity, on the response of built-up structures with damage. Analytical and experimental technical results are presented to demonstrate the breadth and rigor of the research conducted in this technical area. Technical results presented herein are drawn exclusively from papers where Jim was a co-author.

Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Harris, Charles E.

2005-01-01

362

Asynclitism: a literature review of an often forgotten clinical condition.  

PubMed

Abstract Asynclitism is defined as the "oblique malpresentation of the fetal head in labor". Asynclitism is a clinical diagnosis that may be difficult to make; it may be found during vaginal examination. It is significant because it may cause failure of progress operative or cesarean delivery. We reviewed all literature for asynclitism by performing an extensive electronic search of studies from 1959 to 2013. All studies were first reviewed by a single author and discussed with co-authors. The following studies were identified: 8 book chapters, 14 studies on asynclitism alone and 10 papers on both fetal occiput posterior position and asynclitism. The fetal head in a laboring patient may be associated with some degree of asynclitism; this is seen as usual way of the fetal head to adjust to maternal pelvic diameters. However, marked asynclitism is often detected in presence of a co-existing fetal head malposition, especially the transverse and occipital posterior positions. Digital diagnosis of asynclitism is enhanced by intrapartum ultrasound with transabdominal or transperineal approach. The accurate diagnosis of asynclitism, in an objective way, may provide a better assessment of the fetal head position that will help in the correct application of vacuum and forceps, allowing the prevention of unnecessary cesarean deliveries. PMID:25283847

Malvasi, Antonio; Barbera, Antonio; Di Vagno, Giovanni; Gimovsky, Alexis; Berghella, Vincenzo; Ghi, Tullio; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Tinelli, Andrea

2014-10-29

363

Computer Model Predicts the Movement of Dust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new computer model of the atmosphere can now actually pinpoint where global dust events come from, and can project where they're going. The model may help scientists better evaluate the impact of dust on human health, climate, ocean carbon cycles, ecosystems, and atmospheric chemistry. Also, by seeing where dust originates and where it blows people with respiratory problems can get advanced warning of approaching dust clouds. 'The model is physically more realistic than previous ones,' said Mian Chin, a co-author of the study and an Earth and atmospheric scientist at Georgia Tech and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. 'It is able to reproduce the short term day-to-day variations and long term inter-annual variations of dust concentrations and distributions that are measured from field experiments and observed from satellites.' The above images show both aerosols measured from space (left) and the movement of aerosols predicted by computer model for the same date (right). For more information, read New Computer Model Tracks and Predicts Paths Of Earth's Dust Images courtesy Paul Giroux, Georgia Tech/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

2002-01-01

364

Ap stars with variable periods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The majority of magnetic chemically peculiar (mCP) stars exhibit periodic light, magnetic, radio, and spectroscopic variations that can be modelled adequately as a rigidly-rotating main-sequence star with persistent surface structures. Nevertheless, there is a small sample of diverse mCP stars whose rotation periods vary on timescales of decades while the shapes of their phase curves remain unchanged. Alternating period increases and decreases have been suspected in the hot CP stars CU Vir and V901 Ori, while rotation in the moderately cool star BS Cir has been decelerating. These examples bring new insight into this theoretically unpredicted phenomenon. We discuss possible causes of such behaviour, and propose that dynamic interactions between a thin, outer, magnetically-confined envelope braked by the stellar wind, and an inner faster-rotating stellar body, are able to explain the observed rotational variability. The article is dedicated to one of its co-authors - Dr. Jozef Žiž?ovský who passed away on 15 June 2013.

Mikulášek, Z.; Krti?ka, J.; Janík, J.; Zejda, M.; Henry, G. W.; Paunzen, E.; Žiž?ovský, J.; Zverko, J.

2014-11-01

365

Applying Logic Analysis to Genomic Data and Phylogenetic Profiles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the main goals of comparative genomics is to understand how all the various proteins in a cell relate to each other in terms of pathways and interaction networks. Various computational ideas have been explored with this goal in mind. In the original phylogenetic profile method, `functional linkages' were inferred between pairs of proteins when the two proteins, A and B, showed identical (or statistically similar) patterns of presence vs. absence across a set of completely sequenced genomes. Here we describe a new generalization, logic analysis of phylogenetic profiles (LAPP), from which higher order relationships can be identified between three (or more) different proteins. For instance, in one type of triplet logic relation -- of which there are eight distinct types -- a protein C may be present in a genome iff proteins A and B are both present (C=AB). An application of the LAPP method identifies thousands of previously unidentified relationships between protein triplets. These higher order logic relationships offer insights -- not available from pairwise approaches -- into branching, competition, and alternate routes through cellular pathways and networks. The results also make it possible to assign tentative cellular functions to many novel proteins of unknown function. Co-authors: Peter Bowers, Shawn Cokus, Morgan Beeby, and David Eisenberg

Yeates, Todd

2005-03-01

366

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

Connor, William P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID)

2003-02-01

367

Poisoned social climate, collective responsibility, and the abuse at Abu Ghraib--Or, the establishment of "rule that is lack of rule".  

PubMed

The authors draw upon the experiences of one of the co-authors as an expert witness in sociology for mitigation at three of the courts-martial pertaining to the abuse at Abu Ghraib that were held at Ft. Hood, Texas in the year 2005 (for Javal Davis, Sabrina Harman, and Lynndie England). In addition, this paper is based upon the thousands of pages of affidavits, testimony, and U.S. Government reports concerning Abu Ghraib. These internal government reports, as well as the Levin-McCain report, point to collective responsibility and the responsibility of individuals high in the chain of command for establishing unlawful techniques. We review the shortcomings of a purely psychological approach for understanding the abuse, and turn to Durkheim's original understanding of anomie as a state of social derangement or rule by lack of rule to introduce the ideas of the social origins of and social responsibility for the abuse. We conclude with sociological suggestions for reforming some of the legal, medical, psychiatric, and other professional complicity in the abuse at Abu Ghraib. PMID:22153587

Mestrovic, Stjepan G; Romero, Rachel

2012-01-01

368

Yup’ik Culture and Context in Southwest Alaska: Community Member Perspectives of Tradition, Social Change, and Prevention  

PubMed Central

This paper provides an introduction to key aspects of Yup’ik Inuit culture and context from both historical and contemporary community member perspectives. Its purpose is to provide a framework for understanding the development and implementation of a prevention initiative centered on youth in two communities in Southwest Alaska as part of collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Institutes of Health. This paper is written from the perspective of elders and local prevention workers from each of the two prevention communities. The co-authors discuss their culture and their community from their own perspectives, drawing from direct experience and from ancestral knowledge gained through learning and living the Yuuyaraq or the Yup’ik way of life. The authors of this paper identity key aspects of traditional Yup’ik culture that once contributed to the adaptability and survivability of their ancestors, particularly through times of hardship and social disruption. These key processes and practices represent dimensions of culture in a Yup’ik context that contribute to personal and collective growth, protection and wellbeing. Intervention development in Yup’ik communities requires bridging historical cultural frames with contemporary contexts and shifting focus from reviving cultural activities to repairing and revitalizing cultural systems that structure community. PMID:24771075

Ayunerak, Paula; Alstrom, Deborah; Moses, Charles; Charlie, James

2014-01-01

369

Wave propagation in materials with non convex equation of state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exhaustive studies have described the behaviour of materials and wave propagation across them when they obey to Bethe's first condition. This means that the equations of state and the isentropes in the (P,V) plane are convex and that the sound speed is an increasing function of the density. In that case, steady dynamic pressure waves are compression shock waves or expansion fans. But materials can often reach states where this condition is violated. This happens for instance with phase transitions, dissociations, near the critical point, and in BZT fluids. Across these thermodynamic states, wave propagation has been studied only in a few specific cases by Zel'dovitch, Duvall, Plohr, Menikoff, Brun and their co-authors, but the general case remained to be explained. Our purpose is to provide the explanation of the successive waves which can occur in the general case when a wave propagates through a material with a non convex equation of state. We show that decrease of the sound speed introduces isentropic compression waves in the middle of shock waves and released shocks in the middle of expansion fans. After basic phenomena explanations, we illustrate them on the example of a virtual material which gathers all these cases. Hydrocode calculations based on this material show the difficulties of numerical schemes to reproduce the physical features.

Heuze, Olivier; Jaouen, Stephane; Jourdren, Herve

2007-06-01

370

Case studies of stakeholder decision making on radioactive waste management in the US and UK  

SciTech Connect

A case study of stakeholder engagement for UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management and another for waste management decision making in the US are presented. The UK nuclear industry has begun to consult stakeholders more widely in recent years. Historically, methods of engagement within the industry have varied, however, recent discussions have generally been carried out with the explicit understanding that engagement with stakeholders will be 'dialogue based' and will 'inform' the final decision made by the decision maker. Engagement is currently being carried out at several levels within the industry; at the national level (via the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's (NDA) National Stakeholder Group (NSG)); at a local site level (via Site Stakeholder Groups) and at a project level (usually via the Best Practicable Environmental Option process (BPEO)). Work by the co-author focuses on the preliminary findings of a questionnaire that has been issued to all members of the NDA NSG and associated sub-groups to assess stakeholder perceptions of the engagement process to date. Findings are reviewed. In the US case study, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Citizens Advisory Board (CAB), in Aiken, SC, considered upgrading the seismic design for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at SRS. This decision, proposed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), provoked heated debate among DOE, SRSCAB and DNFSB representatives. Theory advances are reviewed. (authors)

Lawless, W.F. [Paine College, Augusta, GA (United States); Whitton, J. [Nexia Solutions, Risley, Warrington, Chesire, WA (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01

371

Particle theory and cosmology  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the research supported by this contract is to further our understanding of the basic building blocks of matter as well as the role fundamental interactions play in cosmology and astrophysics. Astrophysical data, such as from high energy cosmic rays and large scale structure of the universe, are employed to constrain particle physics theories. Particle collisions at Tevatron and higher (SSC) energies are also under investigation. During the past year a systematic reanalysis of the correlation between solar activity and the solar neutrino flux was undertaken. The conclusion seems to be that the Homestake experimental data show a correlation at a significant level, supporting the hypothesis that the neutrino possesses a magnetic moment. A separate, but related, theoretical investigation of electromagnetic properties of elementary particles has led to the discovery of a class of models in which the neutrino is endowed with an appreciable magnetic moment while its remains small. Altogether members of the group have been co-authors of 28 papers during the grant year on topics ranging from fermion masses to the role of ultra-high energy hadronic interactions in cosmic ray physics.

Not Available

1990-01-01

372

Development of the merchant plant  

SciTech Connect

The co-authors of this paper are currently involved in over 1500 megawatts of merchant plant developments in the US. This paper will discuss the latest in combined cycle steam reheat ``H and G'' technology. Big improvements in heat rates along with substantial drop in installed cost will make this power cycle the leading merchant plant of the future. This paper will compare the actual present day performance and clearing price of a state-of-the-art merchant plant versus utility dispatch cost duration curves, known as ``system lambda''. Deregulation of the power market will ultimately provide an open market for these efficient plants to compete effectively against aging utility plants. Comparison of utility system heat rates versus merchant plant heat rates along with an increase need for generation capacity and forecasts of stable gas prices supports to the potential for a large scale building program of these high efficiency generators. This paper will also review the capacity crunch in the Northeast and Wisconsin and how problems with nuclear plants may accelerate the need for merchant plants. This paper will compare the required capacity for the population growth in the SERC Region and in Florida and how this will produce a potential ``hot bed'' for merchant plant development.

Wolfinger, R.; Gilliss, M.B.

1998-07-01

373

Interview with a quality leader. Sister Mary Jean Ryan on the first Baldrige Award in healthcare. Interview by Susan V. White and Mary Savitsky.  

PubMed

Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, Franciscan Sister of Mary, is president/chief executive officer of SSM Health Care (SSMHC), one of the largest Catholic healthcare systems in the United States, with 23,000 employees and 5,000 affiliated physicians serving in 21 hospitals and 3 nursing homes. This year SSMHC became the first healthcare recipient of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. During her 16-year tenure, Sr. Mary Jean has emphasized three key themes: preservation of the earth's resources, valuing ethnic and gender diversity, and commitment to continuous quality improvement (CQI). She is co-author of CQI and the Renovation of an American Health Care System: A Culture Under Construction, published by ASQ Quality Press in 1997. Sr. Mary Jean has received numerous honors, including the Brotherhood/Sisterhood Award from the National Conference of Community and Justice; (one of) 20 Distinguished Women/St. Louis area; Governor's Quality Leadership Award (Missouri); (one of) 25 Most Influential Women in Business in St. Louis; and the Corporation that Makes a Difference Award from the International Women's Forum. She serves on a number of healthcare and local, state, and national boards. She received a master's degree in hospital and health administration from Xavier University in Cincinnati. She is a nurse and has been a Franciscan Sister of Mary for more than 40 years. PMID:12774644

Ryan, Mary Jean

2003-01-01

374

Error models for quantum state and parameter estimation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the field of Quantum Information Processing, we study two subjects: For quantum state tomography, one common assumption is that the experimentalist possesses a stationary source of identical states. We challenge this assumption and propose a method to detect and characterize the drift of nonstationary quantum sources. We distinguish diffusive and systematic drifts and examine how quickly one can determine that a source is drifting. Finally, we give an implementation of this proposed measurement for single photons. For quantum computing, fault-tolerant protocols assume that errors are of certain types. But how do we detect errors of the wrong type? The problem is that for large quantum states, a full state description is impossible to analyze, and so one cannot detect all types of errors. We show through a quantum state estimation example (on up to 25 qubits) how to attack this problem using model selection. We use, in particular, the Akaike Information Criterion. Our example indicates that the number of measurements that one has to perform before noticing errors of the wrong type scales polynomially both with the number of qubits and with the error size. This dissertation includes previously published co-authored material.

Schwarz, Lucia

375

Criminalising research fraud.  

PubMed

The incidence of research fraud has reached troubling levels. Too often peer review has failed to prevent it. The harm caused by such conduct extends to patients, co-authors, supervisors, employing institutions, funders, journals, publishers, and importantly the area and direction of the research itself and its potential influence are tarnished. A number of commentators have raised the option of criminal charges being preferred against those responsible for such fraud. This has occurred in the United States, in particular, but also in the United Kingdom, Korea and Australia in high-profile cases. There is much to be said for this form of prosecutorial response to the phenomenon of research fraud given its multi-level ramifications, the considered nature of the conduct, and the fact that it is engaged in by persons well positioned to appreciate the harm that their deceit may cause. The involvement of the criminal law enhances the potential for deterrence from yielding to the temptation and opportunity to engage in research fraud. PMID:25715528

Freckelton, I

2014-12-01

376

Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-01ER54617 Computer Modeling of Microturbulence and Macrostability Properties of Magnetically Confined Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 We have made significant progress during the past grant period in several key areas of the UCLA and national Fusion Theory Program. This impressive body of work includes both fundamental and applied contributions to MHD and turbulence in DIII-D and Electric Tokamak plasmas, and also to Z-pinches, particularly with respect to the effect of flows on these phenomena. We have successfully carried out interpretive and predictive global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell calculations of DIII-D discharges. We have cemented our participation in the gyrokinetic PIC effort of the SciDAC Plasma Microturbulence Project through working membership in the Summit Gyrokinetic PIC Team. We have continued to teach advanced courses at UCLA pertaining to computational plasma physics and to foster interaction with students and junior researchers. We have in fact graduated 2 Ph. D. students during the past grant period. The research carried out during that time has resulted in many publications in the premier plasma physics and fusion energy sciences journals and in several invited oral communications at major conferences such as Sherwood, Transport Task Force (TTF), the annual meetings of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, of the European Physical Society, and the 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, FEC 2002. Many of these have been authored and co-authored with experimentalists at DIII-D.

Jean-Noel Leboeuf

2004-03-04

377

An analysis of the structure and evolution of the scientific collaboration network of computer intelligence in games  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Games constitute a research domain that is attracting the interest of scientists from numerous disciplines. This is particularly true from the perspective of computational intelligence. In order to examine the growing importance of this area in the gaming domain, we present an analysis of the scientific collaboration network of researchers working on computational intelligence in games (CIG). This network has been constructed from bibliographical data obtained from the Digital Bibliography & Library Project (DBLP). We have analyzed from a temporal perspective several properties of the CIG network at the macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic levels, studying the large-scale structure, the growth mechanics, and collaboration patterns among other features. Overall, computational intelligence in games exhibits similarities with other collaboration networks such as for example a log-normal degree distribution and sub-linear preferential attachment for new authors. It also has distinctive features, e.g. the number of papers co-authored is exponentially distributed, the internal preferential attachment (new collaborations among existing authors) is linear, and fidelity rates (measured as the relative preference for publishing with previous collaborators) grow super-linearly. The macroscopic and mesoscopic evolution of the network indicates the field is very active and vibrant, but it is still at an early developmental stage. We have also analyzed communities and central nodes and how these are reflected in research topics, thus identifying active research subareas.

Lara-Cabrera, R.; Cotta, C.; Fernández-Leiva, A. J.

2014-02-01

378

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The ocean represents the largest potential sink for anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. In order to better understand this potential, Japan, Norway, and the United States signed a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration in December 1997; since that time, Canada and ABB (Switzerland) have joined the project. The objective of the project is to investigate the technical feasibility of, and improve understanding of the environmental impacts from, CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration in order to minimize the impacts associated with the eventual use of this technique to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The project will continue through March 31, 2002, with a field experiment to take place in the summer of 2000 off the Kona Coast of Hawaii. The implementing research organizations are the Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (Japan), the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (Norway), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA). The general contractor for the project will be the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research in Hawaii. A Technical Committee has been formed to supervise the technical aspects and execution of this project. The members of this committee are the co-authors of this paper. In this paper we discuss key issues involved with the design, ocean engineering, measurements, siting, and costs of this experiment.

H.J. Herzog; E.E. Adams

1999-08-23

379

Evolution of Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate in the Infrared  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A central goal of extragalactic observational astronomy is to understand how normal galaxies evolve with redshift, and particularly when galaxies formed their stars. While optical and rest-frame UV observations have begun to address these issues, the interpretation of such data is particularly challenging because of the sensitivity to dust obscuration (at optical and UV wavelengths). The absorbed light is re-radiated at IR wavelengths, hence the optimal indicators of the star formation rate (SFR) is at a rest-frame wavelength of approx. 60 microns. The Spitzer Space Telescope mission is revolutionizing the study of the global properties and evolution of galaxies. Spitzer reaches nearly two orders of magnitude more sensitivity than previous IR space missions. This research program is to study the SFR using statistical samples of galaxies in the local universe, at intermediate redshifts, and set the stage for continuing studies up to z=5. The overall research program is divided into three main investigations: A Mid-IR Hubble Atlas and SFR estimators in the local universe, Evolution of the SFR at 0 < z < 1 using pencil beam redshift surveys, and Galaxy formation and evolution at 1 < z < 5. The first papers from Spitzer were published during the last year, including ten refereed journal papers where the PI was first or co-author.

Pahre, Michael A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

2005-01-01

380

Multiple vantage points on the mental health effects of mass shootings.  

PubMed

The phenomenon of mass shootings has emerged over the past 50 years. A high proportion of rampage shootings have occurred in the United States, and secondarily, in European nations with otherwise low firearm homicide rates; yet, paradoxically, shooting massacres are not prominent in the Latin American nations with the highest firearm homicide rates in the world. A review of the scientific literature from 2010 to early 2014 reveals that, at the individual level, mental health effects include psychological distress and clinically significant elevations in posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms in relation to the degree of physical exposure and social proximity to the shooting incident. Psychological repercussions extend to the surrounding affected community. In the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting on record, Norway has been in the vanguard of intervention research focusing on rapid delivery of psychological support and services to survivors of the "Oslo Terror." Grounded on a detailed review of the clinical literature on the mental health effects of mass shootings, this paper also incorporates wide-ranging co-author expertise to delineate: 1) the patterning of mass shootings within the international context of firearm homicides, 2) the effects of shooting rampages on children and adolescents, 3) the psychological effects for wounded victims and the emergency healthcare personnel who care for them, 4) the disaster behavioral health considerations for preparedness and response, and 5) the media "framing" of mass shooting incidents in relation to the portrayal of mental health themes. PMID:25085235

Shultz, James M; Thoresen, Siri; Flynn, Brian W; Muschert, Glenn W; Shaw, Jon A; Espinel, Zelde; Walter, Frank G; Gaither, Joshua B; Garcia-Barcena, Yanira; O'Keefe, Kaitlin; Cohen, Alyssa M

2014-09-01

381

Unfolding our Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The beauty of the stars, the planets, and other faraway objects of wonder is readily apparent, while the reason for their splendor is not. Now, there exists a source of expert advice that amateur astronomers and interested stargazers can actually understand: Unfolding Our Universe. Popular science writer and award winning author Iain Nicolson opens the world of astronomy to a wide audience. He takes readers into the heart of the Universe, clearly detailing the facts, concepts, methods, and current findings of astronomical science. This unique book strikes a perfect balance between the fundamentals of the subject and cutting-edge research. Step by step, the volume leads to a complete understanding of astronomy. Readers can access the material without referring to any mathematical principles or formulas. The well-designed text allows more ambitious readers to easily delve more deeply into key points and consult basic mathematics found within self-contained boxes. More than 100 full-color photographs beautifully and clearly illustrate all concepts. The wealth of color illustrations and very readable chapters make this book a delight for the casual reader to browse, while the clear and concise explanations will appeal to anyone with an interest in the science of astronomy. Iain Nicolson is the author or co-author of some 17 books, including The Universe (with Patrick Moore) and Heavenly Bodies. In 1995, he received the Eric Zucker Award from the Federation of Astronomical Societies (UK) for his work in popularizing the subject.

Nicolson, Iain

1999-10-01

382

An analysis of the abstracts presented at the annual meetings of the Society for Neuroscience from 2001 to 2006  

E-print Network

We extracted and processed abstract data from the SFN annual meeting abstracts during the period 2001-2006, using techniques and software from natural language processing, database management, and data visualization and analysis. An important first step in the process was the application of data cleaning and disambiguation methods to construct a unified database, since the data were too noisy to be of full utility in the raw form initially available. The resulting co-author graph in 2006, for example, had 39,645 nodes (with an estimated 6% error rate in our disambiguation of similar author names) and 13,979 abstracts, with an average of 1.5 abstracts per author, 4.3 authors per abstract, and 5.96 collaborators per author (including all authors on shared abstracts). Recent work in related areas has focused on reputational indices such as highly cited papers or scientists and journal impact factors, and to a lesser extent on creating visual maps of the knowledge space. In contrast, there has been relatively les...

Lin, J M; Burns, G; Allen, C B; Mitra, P P

2007-01-01

383

Improved phylogenomic taxon sampling noticeably affects nonbilaterian relationships.  

PubMed

Despite expanding data sets and advances in phylogenomic methods, deep-level metazoan relationships remain highly controversial. Recent phylogenomic analyses depart from classical concepts in recovering ctenophores as the earliest branching metazoan taxon and propose a sister-group relationship between sponges and cnidarians (e.g., Dunn CW, Hejnol A, Matus DQ, et al. (18 co-authors). 2008. Broad phylogenomic sampling improves resolution of the animal tree of life. Nature 452:745-749). Here, we argue that these results are artifacts stemming from insufficient taxon sampling and long-branch attraction (LBA). By increasing taxon sampling from previously unsampled nonbilaterians and using an identical gene set to that reported by Dunn et al., we recover monophyletic Porifera as the sister group to all other Metazoa. This suggests that the basal position of the fast-evolving Ctenophora proposed by Dunn et al. was due to LBA and that broad taxon sampling is of fundamental importance to metazoan phylogenomic analyses. Additionally, saturation in the Dunn et al. character set is comparatively high, possibly contributing to the poor support for some nonbilaterian nodes. PMID:20378579

Pick, K S; Philippe, H; Schreiber, F; Erpenbeck, D; Jackson, D J; Wrede, P; Wiens, M; Alié, A; Morgenstern, B; Manuel, M; Wörheide, G

2010-09-01

384

Ernst Rüdin: Hitler's Racial Hygiene Mastermind.  

PubMed

Ernst Rüdin (1874-1952) was the founder of psychiatric genetics and was also a founder of the German racial hygiene movement. Throughout his long career he played a major role in promoting eugenic ideas and policies in Germany, including helping formulate the 1933 Nazi eugenic sterilization law and other governmental policies directed against the alleged carriers of genetic defects. In the 1940s Rüdin supported the killing of children and mental patients under a Nazi program euphemistically called "Euthanasia." The authors document these crimes and discuss their implications, and also present translations of two publications Rüdin co-authored in 1938 showing his strong support for Hitler and his policies. The authors also document what they see as revisionist historical accounts by leading psychiatric genetic authors. They outline three categories of contemporary psychiatric genetic accounts of Rüdin and his work: (A) those who write about German psychiatric genetics in the Nazi period, but either fail to mention Rüdin at all, or cast him in a favorable light; (B) those who acknowledge that Rüdin helped promote eugenic sterilization and/or may have worked with the Nazis, but generally paint a positive picture of Rüdin's research and fail to mention his participation in the "euthanasia" killing program; and (C) those who have written that Rüdin committed and supported unspeakable atrocities. The authors conclude by calling on the leaders of psychiatric genetics to produce a detailed and complete account of their field's history, including all of the documented crimes committed by Rüdin and his associates. PMID:23180223

Joseph, Jay; Wetzel, Norbert A

2013-01-01

385

Listening to Consumer Perspectives to Inform Addictions and Housing-Related Practice and Research  

PubMed Central

The study, funded by the Northwest Health Foundation of Portland, Oregon and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), was conducted as part of the HEARTH collaborative (Housing, Employment and Recovery Together for Health). HEARTH, established in 2010, is a community-academic partnership involving partners from Portland State University (PSU), Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), and Central City Concern (CCC). Using the approaches of community-based participatory research (CBPR), these diverse stakeholders collaborated to co-develop research of direct relevance to the local community and to national academic and policy communities. This study employed qualitative methods and community-based participatory research principles to solicit personal experiences with housing, employment, and recovery programs. We recruited interview participants via CCC-operated housing programs, including Alcohol and Drug Free Community Housing (ADFC), family housing, transitional housing, and non-ADFC (low barrier) housing units. The manuscript presents interview themes based on the five broad categories of interview questions: housing, employment programs, recovery programs, definitions of recovery, and definitions of success. Co-authors describe recommendations for practice and research protocol based on our findings. Our results highlight the importance of involving consumers in the development, data collection, and analysis of research, and present the unique perspectives of those who experience homelessness, recovery, and the programs designed to assist them. PMID:25580474

Farquhar, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Marianne; Henderlong, Derek; Lowe, Robert A.; Amann, Ted

2014-01-01

386

Tools for Nonlinear Control Systems Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a brief statement of the research progress made on Grant NAG2-243 titled "Tools for Nonlinear Control Systems Design", which ran from 1983 till December 1996. The initial set of PIs on the grant were C. A. Desoer, E. L. Polak and myself (for 1983). From 1984 till 1991 Desoer and I were the Pls and finally I was the sole PI from 1991 till the end of 1996. The project has been an unusually longstanding and extremely fruitful partnership, with many technical exchanges, visits, workshops and new avenues of investigation begun on this grant. There were student visits, long term.visitors on the grant and many interesting joint projects. In this final report I will only give a cursory description of the technical work done on the grant, since there was a tradition of annual progress reports and a proposal for the succeeding year. These progress reports cum proposals are attached as Appendix A to this report. Appendix B consists of papers by me and my students as co-authors sorted chronologically. When there are multiple related versions of a paper, such as a conference version and journal version they are listed together. Appendix C consists of papers by Desoer and his students as well as 'solo' publications by other researchers supported on this grant similarly chronologically sorted.

Sastry, S. S.

1997-01-01

387

Transforming Introductory Physics for Life Scientists: Researching the consequences for students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to policy documents calling for dramatic changes in pre-medical and biology education [1-3], the physics and biology education research groups at the University of Maryland are rethinking how to teach physics to life science majors. As an interdisciplinary team, we are drastically reconsidering the physics topics relevant for these courses. We are designing new in-class tasks to engage students in using physical principles to explain aspects of biological phenomena where the physical principles are of consequence to the biological systems. We will present examples of such tasks as well as preliminary data on how students engage in these tasks. Lastly, we will share some barriers encountered in pursuing meaningful interdisciplinary education.[4pt] Co-authors: Edward F. Redish and Julia Svaboda [4pt] [1] National Research Council, Bio2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists (NAP, 2003).[0pt] [2] AAMC-HHMI committee, Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (AAMC, 2009).[0pt] [3] American Association for the Advancement of Science, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action (AAAS, 2009).

Turpen, Chandra

2011-10-01

388

NASA Science Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach: Engaging with Scientists and Educators through the Higher Education Working Group  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Forums have established a Higher Education Working Group (HEWG), which has explored and surveyed the higher education landscape with regard to different subjects, such as community colleges and diversity. The HEWG is composed of representatives from each of the SMD EPO Forums, along with 'external' members who have rotated in and out, and the co-authors here constitute the present membership, chaired by Nicholas Gross. Most recently, the HEWG has worked to identify the key characteristics of higher education STEM programs that reach diverse populations. While increasing the involvement of students from diverse backgrounds in SMD EPO is a core goal for our community, engaging these students meaningfully requires a dedicated strategy using proven techniques. In reality, while most educational programs have this goal, undertaking it meaningfully is more challenging. For higher education, diversity is a long-standing issue, and the working group could have taken many different paths to explore this important topic. The HEWG has undertaken a review of programs that involve engaging undergraduates from diverse backgrounds in SMD-related research internships or hands-on STEM experiments. This information will be synthesized and documented so that future education efforts can incorporate the most valuable components. Meanwhile, the working group is exploring ways that NASA SMD can be more helpful to higher education faculty and students, and community input is solicited as part of this presentation.

Schultz, Gregory R.; Gross, Nicholas; Buxner, Sanlyn; Low, Russanne; Moldwin, Mark; Fraknoi, Andrew; Grier, Jennifer A.

2015-01-01

389

Profiles in Leadership: Clifton J. Latiolais, MSc, DSc  

PubMed Central

The Director’s Forum series is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. August 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of pharmacy services in the United States. The late Clifton J. Latiolais, MS, DSc, served as the assistant program director for the study and was a co-author of the Mirror. The late Don E. Francke, MS, DSc, was the lead author of the Mirror and the principal investigator of the federally funded study that reviewed hospital pharmacy services across the United States. The next 2 articles in Director’s Forum profile the leadership of Drs. Latiolais and Francke. This article highlights Dr. Latiolais (“Clif”) by briefly reviewing his biography and key career accomplishments, describing his leadership philosophy, and translating that philosophy to today’s health care challenges. Clif’s influence on health system pharmacy serves as an example of effective leadership. This historical perspective on Clif’s leadership, as seen through the eyes of those who knew him, provides directors of pharmacy a valuable leadership viewpoint as they develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:24421540

White, Sara; Godwin, Harold N.; Weber, Robert J.

2013-01-01

390

Stereoscopic CAD and Environmental Sculpture: Enhancement of the Design Process in the Visual Arts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, co-authors Robert Fisher and Pier Luigi Bandini describe their personal observations concerning stereo enhancements of computer graphics images employed in their research. in Part One, Robert Fisher, a professional sculptor, Professor and Artist-in-Residence in the College of Engineering at Penn State, cites three recent environmental sculpture projects: "See-scape," "A Page from the Book of Skies," and an as yet untitled work. Wireframe images, interior views of architectural spaces, and complex imagery are rendered comprehensible by stereo 3-D. In Part Two, Pier L. Bandini, Associate Professor of Architecture and Director of the Architecture CAD Lab at Penn State, describes the virtues of the stereo-enhanced wireframe model--the benefits of the "see-through coupled with a complete awareness of the whole space." The final example, of a never-realized XVIII-century project, suggests a new and profound application of stereo 3-D to historical inquiry, namely, the experience of ancient spaces and structures that are no longer existing or that were never constructed.

Fisher, Robert N.; Bandini, Pier L.

1989-09-01

391

Teaching successful medication administration today: more than just knowing your 'rights'.  

PubMed

Medication administration is an important skill taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Student learning for this activity includes not only how to prepare and administer medications, but also includes interventions such as patient and family teaching. Students also are taught a series of 'rights' in order to prevent medication errors. There are many factors, both personal and system related, which contribute to medication errors in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for teaching students medication administration that encompass the multiple factors involved to ensure safe practice. This opinion paper is based on the authors' considerable years of teaching experience (35 years clinical setting and classroom teaching with senior students in final year of baccalaureate program for 1st author and 16 years total for co-author). Recommendations put forth by the authors are: a) leveling students' clinical experiences in administering medications to include understanding of system factors, b) structured scenarios and purposeful linking of theory to clinical courses to advance students' knowledge and skills related to medication administration as they progress through the program, 3) revisiting math skills. PMID:24857050

Fothergill Bourbonnais, Frances; Caswell, Wenda

2014-08-01

392

Interview with a quality leader: Kate Goonan on performance excellence. Interview by Pamela K. Scarrow.  

PubMed

Kathleen Jennison Goonan, MD, is Executive Director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Center for Performance Excellence (CPE) at Massachusetts General Hospital. CPE guides transformational change in healthcare management and helps leaders, administrators, and practitioners in the healthcare workforce nationwide achieve and sustain performance excellence (http://www.mghcpe.org). An internist trained at the Massachusetts General Hospital, she has more than two decades' experience leading healthcare quality assessment and improvement initiatives. Before joining the CPE in 2002, she held a number of senior executive positions, including Senior Vice President of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Dr. Goonan has served as a judge for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, the Joint Commission's Codman Award, and for the American Hospital Association's McKesson Quest for Quality Award. She teaches extensively about achieving organizational performance excellence. Dr. Goonan co-authored Journey to Excellence: How the Baldrige Health Care Leaders Succeed, authored The Juran Prescription: Clinical Quality Management, and has written numerous articles and book chapters on performance improvement in healthcare. Dr. Goonan was faculty for the Harvard School of Public Health Leadership Development Program for Physicians from Academic Health Centers (1995-2007) and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (1999-2005). PMID:20500778

Goonan, Kathleen Jennison

2010-01-01

393

A new introductory quantum mechanics curriculum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Institute of Physics New Quantum Curriculum consists of freely available online learning and teaching materials (quantumphysics.iop.org) for a first course in university quantum mechanics starting from two-level systems. This approach immediately immerses students in inherently quantum-mechanical aspects by focusing on experiments that have no classical explanation. It allows from the start a discussion of the interpretive aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. This paper gives an overview of the resources available from the IOP website. The core text includes around 80 articles which are co-authored by leading experts, arranged in themes, and can be used flexibly to provide a range of alternative approaches. Many of the articles include interactive simulations with accompanying activities and problem sets that can be explored by students to enhance their understanding. Much of the linear algebra needed for this approach is included in the resource. Solutions to activities are available to instructors. The resources can be used in a variety of ways, from being supplemental to existing courses to forming a complete programme.

Kohnle, Antje; Bozhinova, Inna; Browne, Dan; Everitt, Mark; Fomins, Aleksejs; Kok, Pieter; Kulaitis, Gytis; Prokopas, Martynas; Raine, Derek; Swinbank, Elizabeth

2014-01-01

394

Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

2011-12-01

395

Overview of NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image) Program: Highlights of the Model Improvement and the New Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation summarizes several years of research done by the co-authors developing the NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image) program and supporting it with scientific data. The goal of the program is to support NASA mission to achieve a safe space travel for humans despite the perils of space radiation. The program focuses on selected topics in radiation biology that were deemed important throughout this period of time, both for the NASA human space flight program and to academic radiation research. Besides scientific support to develop strategies protecting humans against an exposure to deep space radiation during space missions, and understanding health effects from space radiation on astronauts, other important ramifications of the ionizing radiation were studied with the applicability to greater human needs: understanding the origins of cancer, the impact on human genome, and the application of computer technology to biological research addressing the health of general population. The models under NASARTI project include: the general properties of ionizing radiation, such as particular track structure, the effects of radiation on human DNA, visualization and the statistical properties of DSBs (DNA double-strand breaks), DNA damage and repair pathways models and cell phenotypes, chromosomal aberrations, microscopy data analysis and the application to human tissue damage and cancer models. The development of the GUI and the interactive website, as deliverables to NASA operations teams and tools for a broader research community, is discussed. Most recent findings in the area of chromosomal aberrations and the application of the stochastic track structure are also presented.

Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, I.; George, Kerry; Cornforth, M. N.; Loucas, B. D.; Wu, Honglu

2014-01-01

396

Energy justice and foundations for a sustainable sociology of energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation proposes an approach to energy that transcends the focus on energy as a mere technical economic or engineering problem, is connected to sociological theory as a whole, and takes issues of equality and ecology as theoretical starting points. In doing so, the work presented here puts ecological and environmental sociological theory, and the work of environmental justice scholars, feminist ecologists, and energy scholars, in a context in which they may complement one another to broaden the theoretical basis of the current sociology of energy. This theoretical integration provides an approach to energy focused on energy justice. Understanding energy and society in the terms outlined here makes visible energy injustice, or the interface between social inequalities and ecological depredations accumulating as the social and ecological debts of the modern energy regime. Systems ecology is brought into this framework as a means for understanding unequal exchange, energy injustice more generally, and the requirements for long-term social and ecological reproduction in ecological terms. Energy developments in Ecuador and Cuba are used here as case studies in order to further develop the idea of energy justice and the theory of unequal ecological exchange. The point is to broaden the framework of the contemporary critical sociology of energy, putting energy justice at its heart. This dissertation contains previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

Holleman, Hannah Ann

397

Life's Solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

Morris, Simon Conway

2004-11-01

398

Life's Solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

Morris, Simon Conway

2003-09-01

399

Geometer energy unified field theory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GEOMETER - ENERGY UNIFIED FIELD THEORY Author: Anacleto Rivera Nivón Co-author: Susana Rivera Cabrera This work is an attempt to find the relationship between the Electromagnetic Field and the Gravitational Field. Despite it is based on the existence of Strings of Energy, it is not the same kind of strings that appears on other theories like Superstring Theory, Branas Theory, M - Theory, or any other related string theories. Here, the Strings are concentrated energy lines that vibrates, and experiences shrinking and elongations, absorbing and yielding on each contraction and expansion all that is found in the Universe: matter and antimatter, waves and energy in all manifestations. In contrast to superstring theory, which strings are on the range of the Length of Planck, these Strings can be on the cosmological size, and can contain many galaxies, or clusters, or groups of galaxies; but also they can reach as small sizes as subatomic levels. Besides, and contrary to what it is stated in some other string theories that need the existence of ten or more dimensions, the present proposal sustains in only four particular dimensions. It has been developed a mathematical support that will try to help to improve the understanding of the phenomena that take place at the Universe.

Rivera, Susana; Rivera, Anacleto

400

An atomistic approach to viral mechanical oscillations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Viruses are the simplest ``life'' form. These parasites reproduce by borrowing the machinery of their host cell. Many are pathogenic to plants, animals, and humans. Viruses possess an outer protein coat (capsid) that protects its genomic material that resides inside. We have developed a theoretical technique to model the very low frequency mechanical modes of the viral capsid with atomic resolution. The method uses empirical force fields and a mathematical framework borrowed from electronic structure theory for finding low energy states. The low frequency modes can be ``pinged'' with an ultra-short laser pulse and the aim of the light/vibrational coupling is to interfere with the viral life cycle. The theoretical work here is motivated by the recent work of Tsen et al. [2] who have used ultra-short pulsed laser scattering to inactivate viruses. The methodology can be applied to many systems, and the coupled mechanical oscillations of other floppy biomolecules such as a complete ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter) will also be discussed. Co-authors of this work are Dr. Eric Dykeman, Prof. K.-T. Tsen and Daryn Benson. [4pt] [1] E.C. Dykeman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 028101 (2008). [0pt] [2] K-T. Tsen et al., J. of Physics -- Cond. Mat. 19, 472201 (2007).

Sankey, Otto F.

2009-03-01

401

Beyond the City: The Rural Contribution to Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The situation of rural communities in Latin America and the Caribbean is in some cases quite dire, and this report from the World Bank offers some timely commentary on the economic opportunities in these areas of the world. Released in February 2005, this 352-page report prepared by a team of researchers led by Guillermo Perry evaluates the effect of the rural sector on national growth, poverty reduction, and environmental degradation. The casual visitor may want to peruse some highlights from the report, browse through a presentation, or listen to an audio interview with co-author Daniel Lederman. In the report, Lederman remarks that "The rural contribution to development in the region has been hampered by insufficient investment in public services". The report offers a number of policy recommendations, including the suggestion that "success in reducing poverty in marginalized regions will depend on the ability of both central and local governments to work with local communities to identify economic opportunities and constraints and to balance local needs with national interests."

402

CHRONOMICS AND GENETICS  

PubMed Central

The mapping of time structures, chronomes, constitutes an endeavor spawned by chronobiology: chronomics. This cartography in time shows signatures on the surface of the earth, cycles, also accumulating in life on the earth‘s surface. We append a glossary of these and other cycles, the names being coined in the light of approximate cycle length. These findings are transdisciplinary, in view of their broad representation and critical importance in the biosphere. Suggestions of mechanisms are derived from an analytical statistical documentation of characteristics with superposed epochs and superposed cycles and other „remove-and-replace“ approaches. These approaches use the spontaneously changing presence or absence of an environmental, cyclic or other factor for the study of any corresponding changes in the biosphere. We illustrate the indispensability of the mapping of rhythm characteristics in broader structures, chronomes, along several or all available different time scales. We present results from a cooperative cartography of about 10, about 20, and about 50-year rhythms in the context of a broad endeavor concerned with the Biosphere and the Cosmos, the BIOCOS project. The participants in this project are our co-authors worldwide, beyond Brno and Minneapolis; the studies of human blood pressure and heart rate around the clock and along the week may provide the evidence for those influences that Mendel sought in meteorology and climatology. PMID:19710947

Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Katinas, G.; Dušek, J.; Homolka, P.; Karpíšek, Z.; P. Sonkowsky, R. P.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Fišer, B.; Siegelová, J.

2008-01-01

403

Jupiter's Radio Spectrum from 0.074 up to 15 GHz  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have conducted a brief campaign in September 1998 to determine Jupiter's radio spectrum from 74 MHz up to 15 GHz. Jupiter was clearly detected at 74 MHz, the lowest frequency at which this planet's synchrotron radiation has been observed without contamination by the intense decametric emissions (there is no decametric emission at frequencies over 40 MHz). Simultaneously with the 74/330 MHz observations at the VLA, the planet was observed with the following telescopes: CLFST (151 MHz), WSRT (350, 610, 840, and 1380 MHz), MOST (843 MHz), Parkes (1350 MHz), 140-foot Green Bank (1370, 1470 MHz), DSN-Goldstone (2295 MHz, 8480 MHz), Effelsberg (2695, 4850 MHz), and HartRAO (8580, 5000 MHz). In Jan. 1996 we observed Jupiter with the VLA at 2 and 20 cm; these data will be combined with the Sep. 1998 data to extend the spectrum up to 15 GHz. The Goldstone data were obtained by the NASA/JPL Jupiter Patrol, and the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope project. Jupiter's spectrum appears to be quite flat from 74 MHz up to 1.4 GHz, beyond which the flux density drops markedly. Model calculations as published by de Pater and co-authors match the spectral shape quite well. At the meeting we will show Jupiuter's spectrum and the spectra of several calibrators used to finetune the final spectral calibration.

de Pater, I.; Butler, B.

2001-12-01

404

Cospatial Longslit UV-Optical Spectra of Ten Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST STIS: Description of observations, global emission-line measurements, and empirical CNO abundances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This poster describes details of HST Cycle 19 (program GO 12600), which was awarded 32 orbits of observing time with STIS to obtain the first cospatial UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The observational goal was to measure the UV emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented S/N and wavelength and spatial resolution along the disk of each object over a wavelength range 1150-10270 Ang . The PNe were chosen such that each possessed a near-solar metallicity but the group together spanned a broad range in N/O. This poster concentrates on describing the observations, emission-line measurements integrated along the entire slit lengths, ionic abundances, and estimated total elemental abundances using empirical ionization correction factors and the ELSA code. Related posters by co-authors in this session concentrate on analyzing CNO abundances, progenitor masses and nebular properties of the best-observed targets using photoionization modeling of the global emission-line measurements [Henry et al.] or detailed analyses of spatial variations in electron temperatures, densities, and abundances along the sub arcsecond resolution slits [Miller et al. & Shaw et al.]. We gratefully acknowledge AURA/STScI for the GO 12600 program support, both observational and financial.

Dufour, R. J.; Kwitter, K. B.; Shaw, R. A.; Balick, B.; Henry, R. B. C.; Miller, T. R.; Corradi, R. L. M.

2015-01-01

405

Stellar family in crowded, violent neighbourhood proves to be surprisingly normal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have obtained one of the sharpest views ever of the Arches Cluster -- an extraordinary dense cluster of young stars near the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. Despite the extreme conditions astronomers were surprised to find the same proportions of low- and high-mass young stars in the cluster as are found in more tranquil locations in our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 21a/09 The Arches Cluster ESO PR Photo 21b/09 The Centre of the Milky Way ESO PR Photo 21c/09 Around the Arches Cluster ESO PR Video 21a/09 A voyage to the heart of the Milky Way The massive Arches Cluster is a rather peculiar star cluster. It is located 25 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer), and contains about a thousand young, massive stars, less than 2.5 million years old [1]. It is an ideal laboratory to study how massive stars are born in extreme conditions as it is close to the centre of our Milky Way, where it experiences huge opposing forces from the stars, gas and the supermassive black hole that reside there. The Arches Cluster is ten times heavier than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way and is enriched with chemical elements heavier than helium. Using the NACO adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in Chile, astronomers scrutinised the cluster in detail. Thanks to adaptive optics, astronomers can remove most of the blurring effect of the atmosphere, and so the new NACO images of the Arches Cluster are even crisper than those obtained with telescopes in space. Observing the Arches Cluster is very challenging because of the huge quantities of absorbing dust between Earth and the Galactic Centre, which visible light cannot penetrate. This is why NACO was used to observe the region in near-infrared light. The new study confirms the Arches Cluster to be the densest cluster of massive young stars known. It is about three light-years across with more than a thousand stars packed into each cubic light-year -- an extreme density a million times greater than in the Sun's neighbourhood. Astronomers studying clusters of stars have found that higher mass stars are rarer than their less massive brethren, and their relative numbers are the same everywhere, following a universal law. For many years, the Arches Cluster seemed to be a striking exception. "With the extreme conditions in the Arches Cluster, one might indeed imagine that stars won't form in the same way as in our quiet solar neighbourhood," says Pablo Espinoza, the lead author of the paper reporting the new results. "However, our new observations showed that the masses of stars in this cluster actually do follow the same universal law". In this image the astronomers could also study the brightest stars in the cluster. "The most massive star we found has a mass of about 120 times that of the Sun," says co-author Fernando Selman. "We conclude from this that if stars more massive than 130 solar masses exist, they must live for less than 2.5 million years and end their lives without exploding as supernovae, as massive stars usually do." The total mass of the cluster seems to be about 30 000 times that of the Sun, much more than was previously thought. "That we can see so much more is due to the exquisite NACO images," says co-author Jorge Melnick. Note [1] The name "Arches" does not come from the constellation the cluster is located in (Sagittarius, i.e., the Archer), but because it is located next to arched filaments detected in radio maps of the centre of the Milky Way.

2009-06-01

406

Powerful New Technique to Measure Asteroids' Sizes and Shapes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A team of French and Italian astronomers have devised a new method for measuring the size and shape of asteroids that are too small or too far away for traditional techniques, increasing the number of asteroids that can be measured by a factor of several hundred. This method takes advantage of the unique capabilities of ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). ESO PR Photo 04a/09 Asteroid Barbara (artist's impression) "Knowledge of the sizes and shapes of asteroids is crucial to understanding how, in the early days of our Solar System, dust and pebbles collected together to form larger bodies and how collisions and re-accumulation have since modified them," says Marco Delbo from the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France, who led the study. Direct imaging with adaptive optics on the largest ground-based telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile (see ESO 21/05 and 18/07), and space telescopes, or radar measurements (ESO 11/07) are the currently favoured methods of asteroid measurement. However, direct imaging, even with adaptive optics, is generally limited to the one hundred largest asteroids of the main belt, while radar measurements are mostly constrained to observations of near-Earth asteroids that experience close encounters with our planet. Delbo and his colleagues have devised a new method that uses interferometry to resolve asteroids as small as about 15 km in diameter located in the main asteroid belt, 200 million kilometres away. This is equivalent to being able to measure the size of a tennis ball a distance of a thousand kilometres. This technique will not only increase the number of objects that can be measured dramatically, but, more importantly, bring small asteroids that are physically very different from the well studied larger ones into reach. The interferometric technique combines the light from two or more telescopes. Astronomers proved their method using ESO's VLTI, combining the light of two of the VLT's 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes. "This is equivalent to having vision as sharp as that of a telescope with a diameter equal to the separation between the two VLT Unit Telescopes used, in this case, 47 metres," says co-author Sebastiano Ligori, from INAF-Torino, Italy. The researchers applied their technique to the main belt asteroid (234) Barbara, which was earlier found, by co-author Alberto Cellino, to have rather unusual properties. Although it is so far away, the VLTI observations also revealed that this object has a peculiar shape. The best fit model is composed of two bodies each the size of a major city - with diameters of 37 and 21 km - separated by at least 24 km. "The two parts appear to overlap," says Delbo, "so the object could be shaped like a gigantic peanut or, it could be two separate bodies orbiting each other." If Barbara proves to be a double asteroid, this is even more significant: by combining the diameter measurements with the parameters of the orbits, astronomers can then compute the density of these objects. "Barbara is clearly a high priority target for further observations," concludes Ligori. Having proven the validity of their new and powerful technique, the team can now start a large observing campaign to study small asteroids.

2009-02-01

407

A tribute to Dr. Robert C. Allen, an inspirational teacher, humanitarian, and friend (Nov. 18, 1950-Mar. 24, 2005).  

PubMed

Dr. Robert C. Allen was a gifted educator, as well as experienced ophthalmologist, who was a close personal friend of Dr. Edlich at the University of Virginia Health System. While serving on the faculty at the University of Virginia Health System, Dr. Allen proved to be a compassionate physician, who developed close personal relationships with the residents, faculty, and his patients. Dr. Allen was invited by Dr Edlich to be a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants. When Dr. Allen told Dr. Edlich that he had ocular melanoma in 2000, this news was a wake-up call to Dr. Edlich on the need to prevent skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Empowered by this news, Dr. Edlich was honored to co-author four articles on skin cancer prevention, as well as the latest article focusing on prevention of ocular melanoma. The Ocular Melanoma Foundation (Richmond, VA (USA)) was founded in 2003 by Dr. Robert C. Allen to increase awareness, enhance education, and provide advocacy among both patients and health care professionals regarding this rare, but potentially lethal cancer. It has a website that provides patient information, up-to-date information and enables communication/ discourse between and among patients and practitioners (admin@ocularmelanoma.org). Dr. Allen died on March 24, 2005, at his home surrounded by family and loved ones. When surgeons are faced with challenging healthcare diseases, Dr. Edlich's mentor, Dr. Owen Wangensteen, advised Dr. Edlich that he should seek the advice and guidance of skilled basic scientists, who are familiar with the problem. Dr. Wangensteen is recognized as the greatest surgical teacher during the 20th century. Consequently, Dr. Edlich enlisted the advice and guidance from the two co-authors of the next article regarding the scientific basis for the selection of sunglasses to prevent the development of cataracts, pterygia, skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Dr. Reichow is a Professor of Optometry at Pacific University College of Optometry (Forest Grove, OR (USA)). Dr. Citek is Associate Professor of Optometry at Pacific University College of Optometry (Forest Grove (USA)). In their comprehensive evaluation of sunglasses, they found some disturbing results. Despite being endorsed by The Skin Cancer Foundation, the Walgreens eyewear samples offer only partial protection to the potential hazards of sunlight exposure. Those individuals who spend considerable time outdoors should seek sun filter eyewear with impact resistant polycarbonate lenses that provide 100% ultraviolet filtration, high levels of blue light filtration, and full visual field lens/frame coverage as provided by high wrap eyewear. There are several brands that offer products with such protective characteristics. Performance sun eyewear by Nike Vision (Nike Inc., Portland OR [USA]), available in both corrective and plano (nonprescription) forms, is one such brand incorporating these protective features, as well as patented optical and tint designs. Numerous Nike styles offer interchangeable lens options to meet the changing environmental conditions encountered outdoors. These technologies are incorporated into performance-driven frame designs inspired by feedback from some of the world's best athletes. Nonprescription Nike eyewear are available on-line at http://www.nike.com/nikevision, as well as at various well-known retail outlets. Nonprescription and prescription Nike eyewear are also available at the offices of many eye care professionals. Even though our latest report did not include soft contact lens, it is important to emphasize that Dr. Reichow and Dr. Citek have played a leadership role in coordinating the development of the Nike MAXSIGHT, an innovative fully tinted soft contact lens. This contact lens provides distortion-free optics, whether or not you wear prescription contacts. They filter out more than 90% of harmful blue light and 95% of UVA and UVB. For the contact lens, you should go to the website for more information http://www.nike.com/nikevision/content.html

Edlich, Richard F; Greene, Jill A; Long, William B

2006-01-01

408

Vertically resolved aerosol properties by multi-wavelength lidar measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An approach based on the graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors (2007) is introduced to estimate the dependence on altitude of the aerosol fine mode radius (Rf) and of the fine mode contribution (?) to the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from three-wavelength lidar measurements. The graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors (2007) was applied to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) spectral extinction observations and relies on the combined analysis of the Ĺngstrom exponent (ĺ) and its spectral curvature ?ĺ. Lidar measurements at 355, 532 and 1064 nm were used in this study to retrieve the vertical profiles of ĺ and ?ĺ and to estimate the dependence on altitude of Rf and ?(532 nm) from the ĺ-?ĺ combined analysis. Lidar measurements were performed at the Department of Mathematics and Physics of the Universita' del Salento, in south-eastern Italy. Aerosol from continental Europe, the Atlantic, northern Africa, and the Mediterranean Sea are often advected over south-eastern Italy and as a consequence, mixed advection patterns leading to aerosol properties varying with altitude are dominant. The proposed approach was applied to ten measurement days to demonstrate its feasibility in different aerosol load conditions. The selected days were characterized by AOTs spanning the 0.26-0.67, 0.15-0.39, and 0.04-0.27 range at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively. Mean lidar ratios varied within the 31-83, 32-84, and 11-47 sr range at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively, for the high variability of the aerosol optical and microphysical properties. ĺ values calculated from lidar extinction profiles at 355 and 1064 nm ranged between 0.1 and 2.5 with a mean value ± 1 standard deviation equal to 1.3 ± 0.7. ?ĺ varied within the -0.1-1 range with mean value equal to 0.25 ± 0.43. Rf and ?(532 nm) values spanning the 0.05-0.3 ?m and the 0.3-0.99 range, respectively, were associated with the ĺ-?ĺ data points. Rf and ? values showed no dependence on the altitude. 60% of the data points were in the ?ĺ-ĺ space delimited by the ? and Rf curves varying within 0.80-0.99 and 0.05-0.15 ?m, respectively, for the dominance of fine-mode particles in driving the AOT over south-eastern Italy. Vertical profiles of the linear particle depolarization ratio retrieved from lidar measurements, aerosol products from AERONET sun photometer measurements collocated in space and time, analytical back trajectories, satellite true colour images, and dust concentrations from the BSC-DREAM (Barcelona Super Computing Center-Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) model were used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method.

Perrone, M. R.; De Tomasi, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

2014-02-01

409

X-ray Emissions Detected From Elusive Cosmic Objects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A type of celestial object that has long stumped astronomers has been found to emit X-rays, thus proving a theory of how the objects form. Dr. Steven Pravdo of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and other scientists have concluded that these objects, called Herbig Haro objects, are produced by high velocity shocks. Pravdo is the lead author of a paper published in the Oct. 18 issue of the journal Nature. Herbig Haro objects are found in regions where new stars are forming. They are nebulas, or dust and gas clouds. They form when high-velocity gas emitted from young stars collides with clouds of interstellar material. The collision heats the gas in the surrounding nebula to sufficiently high temperatures to produce X-rays. Observations for the past 20 years showed no evidence of X-ray emission from these objects, which are named for astronomers George Herbig and Guillermo Haro. Previous instruments lacked the resolution and sensitivity necessary to 'see' these X-rays. The discovery of the X-ray emissions was possible through the very powerful Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, which has been in orbit since 1999. On Oct. 8, 2000, astrophysicists used the instrument to study HH2, one of the brightest and closest Herbig Haro objects in the Orion Nebula. They determined that HH2 contains shock-heated material with a temperature of about 1 million degrees Kelvin. Pravdo and his team used three criteria to rule out the possibility that the emissions came from any other source. First, Chandra's high spatial resolution pinpointed the location of the X-rays at HH2. Second, the X-rays appeared to be covering a region bigger than a star. Third, the temperature of the X-rays was about 1 million degrees, cooler than nearby X-ray stars. One million degrees is about the temperature expected if material moving at about 300 kilometers per second (about 600,000 miles per hour) collides. At this speed, you could go from Los Angeles to San Diego and back in one second. The principal investigator of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, Dr. Gordon Garmire of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, is a co-author of the paper. Other co-authors include Drs. Yohko Tsuboi, Yoshitomo Maeda and Eric Feigelson, all from Pennsylvania State University, and Dr. John Bally from the University of Colorado, Boulder. The Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer X-ray camera was developed for NASA by Pennsylvania State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass. Images associated with this release are available on the World Wide Web at: http://chandra.harvard.edu AND http://chandra.nasa.gov The Chandra X-ray Observatory is managed for NASA by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass. JPL is managed for NASA by the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2001-10-01

410

In-situ production of organic molecules at the poles of the Moon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samples returned by the Apollo missions showed no trace of organic materials. However, the poles of the Moon are utterly unlike the equatorial regions, and the LCROSS impactor detected a range of organic compounds including C2H4, CH3OH, and CH4 (Colaprete et al., 2010). These compounds may be of cometary origin, or they may have developed in situ. The lunar poles feature plausible conditions for production of organics from indigenous inorganic material and may provide an opportunity to test models of inorganic synthesis that can be applied to many surfaces in the solar system and interstellar clouds. Production of organics in situ requires the presence of the relevant elements (combinations of C, H, O, and N), sufficient mobility of elements to react with one another, and an energy source to drive reactions. Because of the low obliquity of the Moon, regions in topographic lows at the poles are permanently shaded from sunlight and measurements from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer have confirmed the extremely cold nature of some of these regions (Paige et al., 2010). The temperatures are low enough to trap even very volatile ices such as CO, but these low temperatures can also inhibit ion mobility. However, indirect illumination by light reflected off local topographic highs as well as the bombardment of the lunar surface by meteorites create temperature variation in the top 20 cm of regolith and expose icy material to a range of depths and temperatures. In addition to the presence of organic elements and temperature cycling, an energy source is needed to break bonds and enable reactions. Possible energy sources include scattered interstellar Lyman alpha UV radiation and galactic cosmic ray protons. However, Lyman alpha is confined to the optical surface and erodes surface ice (Morgan and Shemansky, 1991), so we investigate the deeper penetrating protons in the upper few centimeters where ices are better protected from loss. Laboratory measurements have demonstrated that energetic protons can stimulate organic synthesis in simple mixtures of C, H, O, and N-bearing ices. For example, a column density on the order of 10^17 molecules/cm^2 of CH3OH was produced from an H2O + CH4 ice mixture after a proton irradiation dose of 10 eV/molecule, and rose with increasing dose (Moore and Hudson, 1998). This establishes a rough order of magnitude for the dose required in the uppermost surface to produce organics from simple ices. We use the particle transport code MCNPX to calculate proton flux from cosmic rays at the poles to determine a dose rate and use lab measurements (Moore and Hudson, 1998) to estimate the production of organics from this process over time. Colaprete, A, and 16 co-authors (2010), Detection of water in the LCROSS ejecta plume, Science, 330, 463-467. Moore, MH and RL Hudson (1998), Infrared study of ion-irradiated water-ice mixtures with hydrocarbons relevant to comets, Icarus, 135(2), 518-527. Morgan, TH and DE Shemansky (1991), Limits to the lunar atmosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 96(A2), 1351-1367. Paige, DA, and 26 co-authors (2010), Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations of cold traps in the Moon's South Polar region, Science, 330, 479-482.

Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Lawrence, D. J.

2011-12-01

411

Can Sea-Ice extent from the 1960s, be determined from reprocessed Nimbus and other historic space based data?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A critical need in climate research is to obtain continuous high quality data records and images as far back in time as is practical. Nimbus I collected data from 8/28/1964- 9/22/1964. Nimbus II collected data from 5/15/1966-1/18/1969. Nimbus III collected data from 4/14/1969-1/22/1972. Data coverage was global with twice daily. Unfortunately it now appears the original recorded data was stored on two inch Ampex tape media which was erased along with 200,000 other tapes due to a media shortage in the 1970's. This original data contained all the timings and calibration data needed to geo-rectify the data. Fortunately NASA Goddard saved and rescued a later version of the data and this data, without the timings and calibration. This data is now available. An effort underway at the NASA Ames Research Center is the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP). This project has obtained the original first generation 2” Ampex analog instrumentation tapes of the approximately 1748 images taken of the Moon. In this data set two images of the Earth (August 23, 1966, and August 10, 1967) were taken with approximately 5-kilometer resolution. These 570-700 nanometer band images have astounding resolution when considering the 330,000-kilometer distance to the Earth. The LOIRP project has obtained the last surviving Ampex FR-900 tape drives. The Nimbus II and III images were also broadcast from the spacecraft and stored on the same instrumentation tape drives. An opportunity has arisen to obtain the first generation Nimbus II and III images if the duplicate tapes mentioned in the Nimbus literature can be found. An initial search was unsuccessful due the above mentioned tape reuse in the 70’s. However, further research indicates that some of the duplicate tapes may be found at other National Records Center repositories. In further research the co-authors have found other Nimbus II and III era images from the Apollo human spaceflight program. All of the Apollo earth orbiting (Apollo 7 and 9, October 19, 1968 and March 3-13 1969) as well as the Lunar Missions (Apollo 8, 10-12, 14-17) obtained high resolution, high quality visible light color and black and white images of the Earth. The co-authors are in the process of matching the timing between the Apollo images and the Nimbus images in order to provide quality data regarding the state of the Arctic and Antarctic ice pack during this era. The value of obtaining the original Nimbus images as well as the mixed Nimbus/Apollo imagery is to provide images and data to help move back in time the state of the Arctic and Antarctic ice pack to provide a longer term record of space based images of these regions of the Earth. Future efforts would also integrate these images with National Security spacecraft that also imaged these areas during that time period.

Gallaher, D. W.; Wingo, D. R.; Meier, W.; Epps, A.

2009-12-01

412

In situ analysis of aqueous structure and adsorption at fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and mineral surfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Altering and controlling the properties of solid surfaces in aqueous or other liquid phase environments has been a sought after objective for decades. With the discovery of chemisorbed self-assembled monolayers, this dream has become a reality. Oxide and metal surfaces can now be readily coated with an array of commercially available products to produce a desired fnctionality. The presence of these coatings on solid surfaces affects properties of the interfacial region by altering interfacial electrostatic fields, changing the structure of interfacial water molecules and altering the interactions of adsorbed species. This dissertation reports on in situ studies of adsorption at several solid/aqueous interfaces using vibrational sum-frequency spectroscopy, a surface specific technique. These studies are augmented by the use of atomic force microscopy and contact angle goniometry to characterize the prepared surfaces and their interactions with adsorbates. The studies investigate how changes in the surface structure and chemistry, as well as the bulk aqueous phase, affect interfacial structure. The studies within are primarily focused on the interactions of water with bare and functionalized fused silica and the relationship between the aqueous phase composition and the structure of fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon self-assembled monolayers. The variations in aqueous structure are then examined in detail using ionic strength controlled experiments to understand the direct interactions of water hydrophobically coated silica. This analysis is followed by an investigation of the competitive adsorption of methanol and water at fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon monolayers which show spectroscopic signatures of the interaction strength between fluorocarbons and hydrocarbons. Further studies are performed using butylammonium chloride to verify these spectroscopic signatures and reveal different molecular structures of adsorbed species at chemically different hydrophobic surfaces. Lastly, specific ion effects on the CaF2/water interface are shown using equilibrium and time-resolved sum-frequency spectroscopy. The results of all these studies have implications for an array of surface chemical applications from mineral flotation to biocompatibility. This dissertation includes previously published co-authored material.

Hopkins, Adam Justin

413

Study Factors Influencing Ventricular Enlargement in Schizophrenia: A 20 Year Follow-Up Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

A meta-analysis was performed on studies employing the ventricular-brain ratio to compare schizophrenic subjects to that of normal controls. This was a follow-up to a similar meta-analysis published in 1992 in which study-, in addition to clinical-, factors were found to contribute significantly to the reported difference between patients with schizophrenia and controls. Seventy-two (N=72) total studies were identified from the peer reviewed literature, 39 from the original meta-analysis, and 33 additional studies published since which met strict criteria for inclusion and analysis– thus representing ~30 years of schizophrenia ventricular enlargement research. Sample characteristics from schizophrenics and controls were coded for use as predictor variables against within sample VBR values as well as for between sample VBR differences. Additionally, a number of factors concerning how the studies were conducted and reported were also coded. Obtained data was subjected to unweighted univariate as well as multiple regression analyses. In particular, results indicated significant differences between schizophrenics and controls in ventricular size but also the influence of the diagnostic criteria used to define schizophrenia on the magnitude of the reported VBR. This suggests that differing factors of the diagnostic criteria may be sensitive to ventricular enlargement and might be worthy of further examination. Interestingly, we observed an inverse relationship between VBR difference and the number of co-authors on the study. This latter finding suggests that larger research groups report smaller VBR differences and may be more conservative or exacting in their research methodology. The diagnostic criteria used for defining schizophrenia were also predictive of between group differences. Analyses weighted by sample size provided identical conclusions. The effects of study factors such as these are helpful for understanding the variation in the size of the reported differences in VBR between patients and controls as well as for understanding the evolution of research on complex clinical syndromes employing neuroimaging morphometrics. PMID:21787868

Sayo, Angelo; Jennings, Robin G.

2012-01-01

414

Effect of Zinc Supplementation on Pregnancy and Infant Outcomes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Poor maternal zinc status has been associated with foetal loss, congenital malformations, intrauterine growth retardation, reduced birth weight, prolonged labour and preterm or post-term deliveries. A meta-analysis completed in 2007 showed that maternal zinc supplementation resulted in a small but significant reduction in preterm birth. The purposes of this analysis are to update that previous review and expand the scope of assessment to include maternal, infant and child health outcomes. Electronic searches were carried out to identify peer-reviewed, randomised controlled trials where daily zinc supplementation was given for at least one trimester of pregnancy. The co-authors applied the study selection criteria, assessed trial quality and abstracted data. A total of 20 independent intervention trials involving more than 11 000 births were identified. The 20 trials took place across five continents between 1977 and 2008. Most studies assessed the zinc effect against a background of other micronutrient supplements, but five were placebo-controlled trials of zinc alone. The provided dose of supplemental zinc ranged from 5 to 50 mg/day. Only the risk of preterm birth reached statistical significance (summary relative risk 0.86 [95% confidence interval 0.75, 0.99]). There was no evidence that supplemental zinc affected any parameter of foetal growth (risk of low birth weight, birth weight, length at birth or head circumference at birth). Six of the 20 trials were graded as high quality. The evidence that maternal zinc supplementation lowers the risk of preterm birth was graded low; evidence for a positive effect on other foetal outcomes was graded as very low. The effect of zinc supplementation on preterm birth, if causal, might reflect a reduction in maternal infection, a primary cause of prematurity. While further study would be needed to explore this possibility in detail, the overall public health benefit of zinc supplementation in pregnancy appears limited. PMID:22742606

Chaffee, Benjamin W.; King, Janet C.

2013-01-01

415

Involving service users in trials: developing a standard operating procedure  

PubMed Central

Background Many funding bodies require researchers to actively involve service users in research to improve relevance, accountability and quality. Current guidance to researchers mainly discusses general principles. Formal guidance about how to involve service users operationally in the conduct of trials is lacking. We aimed to develop a standard operating procedure (SOP) to support researchers to involve service users in trials and rigorous studies. Methods Researchers with experience of involving service users and service users who were contributing to trials collaborated with the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health, a registered clinical trials unit, to develop the SOP. Drafts were prepared in a Task and Finish Group, reviewed by all co-authors and amendments made. Results We articulated core principles, which defined equality of service users with all other research team members and collaborative processes underpinning the SOP, plus guidance on how to achieve these. We developed a framework for involving service users in research that defined minimum levels of collaboration plus additional consultation and decision-making opportunities. We recommended service users be involved throughout the life of a trial, including planning and development, data collection, analysis and dissemination, and listed tasks for collaboration. We listed people responsible for involving service users in studies and promoting an inclusive culture. We advocate actively involving service users as early as possible in the research process, with a minimum of two on all formal trial groups and committees. We propose that researchers protect at least 1% of their total research budget as a minimum resource to involve service users and allow enough time to facilitate active involvement. Conclusions This SOP provides guidance to researchers to involve service users successfully in developing and conducting clinical trials and creating a culture of actively involving service users in research at all stages. The UK Clinical Research Collaboration should encourage clinical trials units actively to involve service users and research funders should provide sufficient funds and time for this in research grants. PMID:23866730

2013-01-01

416

[Rashba Olena Iakivna--a gifted scientist and science organizer].  

PubMed

Professor Olena Yakivna Rashba, doctor of science in biology, was born in Kyiv, to the physician's family; graduated from the Medical-Prophylactic Faculty of the First Medical Institute (1927-1931). Since 1933 she had been working at the Institute of Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of Ukr.SSR: first as a laborant and then as a junior and as a senior scientific worker. In 1939 O. Ya. Rashba defended a thesis for the Candidates degree in biology, and in 1951 the thesis for the Doctor's degree. From 1943 to 1945 O. Ya. Rashba was at the front as the major of Medical Service. She was awarded the Red Star Order and medals For Capture of Berlin and For the Victory over Germany in the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. Before 1941 Olena Yakivna investigated, under the supervision of Acad. O. V. Palladin, biochemical topography of departments of the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as variations in content of protein and its metabolism products in different departments of brain during embryonal development of vertebral animals. In 1945-1951 O. Ya. Rashba began investigating peculiarities of carbohydrate metabolism in the brain. The data obtained by the scientist evidence that two enzymes (amylase and maltase) function in the brain which split glycogen to glucose in hydrolytic way. Interrelation between amylolytic and phospholytic enzymatic systems was detected in these experiments. Olena Yakivna has also developed the method of obtaining nuclei from the cells of nerve tissue and studied their composition. From 1951 to 1973 O. Ya. Rashba headed the Department of Microorganisms of the Institute of Microbiology of AS of Ukr.SSR and was a co-author of the efficient drug against bacterial cancer of tomatos "Arenarin". O. Ya. Rashbe has published about 100 scientific works, 2 monographs among them; she obtained 2 author's certificates. PMID:20684238

Vynohradova, R P

2010-01-01

417

Variability in Tropospheric Ozone Observed Through Ozone Soundings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Profiles from ozonesondes (taken with electrochemical concentration cell instruments, simultaneously with radiosondes for pressure, temperature and humidity data) record ozone concentration at 5 m resolution from the surface to 5-10 hPa. These measurements, taken regularly (normally weekly) at stations worldwide, are vital for ground-truthing satellites, studying processes like the "ozone hole" and determining trends. The co- authors have operated the two long-term US ozonesonde stations (in Colorado http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ozwv/ozsondes/ and Virginia http://uairp.wff.nasa.gov) and designed networks for specific scientific purposes. Two such networks, the SHADOZ tropical network http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz, operating since 1998 and the short-term IONS mid-latitude network, http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/intex/ions.html, in 2004 and 2006, have been invaluable for investigating tropospheric processes and trends. In this paper, examples will be presented from the following: - Classification of ozone profiles by statistical methods for mid- and tropical latitudes. Coherence with meteorological patterns is a better way than standard "means" to study interannual variability. - Budget analysis: quantified contributions of deep convection, stratospheric exchange and pollution advection in UT/LS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere) ozone over North America. - Interaction of chemical pollution and climate dynamics in tropical ozone; signatures of El Nino episodes and the Madden-Julian Oscillation are clear. - Trends in upper tropospheric ozone distributions in the tropics, from the 1980's to the present. Modified convection patterns appear to correlate with the change.

Thompson, A. M.; Stone, J. B.; Miller, S. K.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.

2006-05-01

418

SIM Science Studies to Enhance Planet-Finding and Characterizing Capabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This talk will describe the results from five SIM Science Studies carried out by the co-authors. These diverse studies quantified several important planet-finding and characterizing capabilities of SIM-Lite beyond the Key Projects. 1. Resonant multiplanet systems are detectable with SIM-Lite, but the optimal timing and number of observations is different than for non-resonant systems. This study improves the capability of SIM-Lite by using resonant planets to test and potentially distinguish between models of planet formation, migration, and eccentricity excitation. 2. Astrometric measurements during planetary transits yield a wealth of information, including orbital orientations and stellar radii. This study describes the feasibility of such complementary measurements with SIM-Lite. 3. SIM-Lite has the capability of detecting very long period giant exoplanets. To constrain models of planetary formation and migration, this study will probe the mass and period estimation of SIM-Lite detections of giant planets and brown dwarfs with periods of up to 1000 years. 4. No planets have been detected around white dwarfs to date, largely because their featureless spectra make for poor RV targets. Their planets are detectable with astrometry, however, and they offer a key probes of planet abundance down to 10 Earth masses for a broad range of the main sequence (B to K). 5. Finally, the capability of SIM-Lite to detect planets around M dwarfs is compared to the radial velocity technique with 10 cm/s precision. Astrophysical jitter from granulation, star spots, flares, and acoustic oscillations will ultimately limit detection prospects for low-mass planets in habitable zone orbits (especially for RV). This study will guide the SIM-Lite observing strategy for M dwarfs.

Howard, Andrew; Ford, E.; Gaudi, B. S.; Olling, R.; Subasavage, J.; Tanner, A.

2010-01-01

419

Numerical Solution of Hamiltonian Systems in Reaction-Diffusion by Symplectic Difference Schemes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Discrete models in time and space of Fishers equation, {?u}/{?t} = {? 2u }/{?x 2} + f(u) , in reaction diffusion are numerous in mathematical biology ( Weinberger, SIAM J. Math. Anal.13, 353 (1982) and the references therein). For f( u) = u(1- u) and no dissipation, May ( Nature261, 459 (1976) ), using the Euler discretization of the time derivative, found stable solutions (period 2 in time) provided the time step satisfies 2 < k ? ?6, the linearized stability for period 1 solutions being 0 < k ? 2. When the dissipation term in discretised form is added to May's ordinary difference scheme, it is shown by Grifliths and Mitchell ( IMA J. Numer. Anal.8, 435 (1988); Numerical Analysis, Pitman Res. Notes in Math., Vol. 140, Longman, Sci. Tech., Harlow, 1986) , and Sleeman ( Proc. Roy. Soc. London Ser. A425, 17 (1989) ) that the stable period 2 in time solutions persist. Here it is shown (Sleeman, op. cit.), that when the dissipation term in continuous form is added to May's difference equation, solutions period 2 in time for each value of x satisfy a Hamiltonian system in space. The latter, being non integrable, is solved numerically by Symplectic difference schemes constructed to maintain the values of the Hamiltonain energy up to large values of the space variable ( Feng Kang and his co-authors ( J. Comput. Math.4, 279 (1986); Lect. Notes in Math., Vol. 1297, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1987) ). The shape of the solution, in calculations involving 200,000 space steps, is shown to depend crucially on the type and location of the fixed points of the Hamiltonian system in phase space at the position of the initial data at x=0 relative to these fixed points.

Mitchell, A. R.; Murray, B. A.; Sleeman, B. D.

1991-08-01

420

JPL/Student Independent Research Internship (SIRI): Research and Outreach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of NASA's Strategic goals is the education and retention of students in math and science, and providing outreach experiences to all levels of the public (formal and informal). At JPL, an innovative program, SIRI, was initiated in 2003 with the following goals: 1. Provide local college students, with strong support from their faculty advisors, hands-on experience in scientific research and engineering while they are still forming their higher-education and career plans. 2. JPL and NASA education office interests in providing more help to college students in preparing for careers in science and engineering. Following its initial pilot program with eight students from two local community colleges, the SIRI program branched out in two directions: (1) providing research opportunities to students from a wider range of colleges and (2) research apprenticeship or RA program, so eligible students could continue their research after completing their semester. With support of their JPL mentors, students derived educational and technical benefits. Currently, the SIRI Program includes eight local 2-year and 4-year colleges; serves approximately 25-30 students per year. To date, nearly 50% of interns become apprentices to their JPL mentors. The SIRI program is currently complementary to many undergraduate internship programs as the SIRI interns participate during school year for credit. The RA students are empowered to attend scientific meetings; co-author peer-reviewed papers; continue their research through fellowships, and mentor other students. The success of the SIRI program stems both from the contributions of the students to their mentors’ efforts and JPL's outreach efforts to afford exposure and research experience to students in all fields of science to develop the next generation of scientists. Specific examples of SIRI projects will be showcased.

Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Alvidrez, R. F.; Kahn, R. A.; Whitney, W.

2006-09-01

421

Melt-processing of lunar ceramics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of this project is to produce useful ceramics materials from lunar resources using the by products of lunar oxygen production processes. Emphasis is being placed on both fabrication of a variety of melt-processed ceramics, and on understanding the mechanical properties of these materials. Previously, glass-ceramics were formed by casting large glass monoliths and heating these to grow small crystallites. The strengths of the resulting glass-ceramics were found to vary with the inverse square root of the crystal grain size. The highest strengths (greater than 300 MPa) were obtained with the smallest crystal sizes (less than 10 microns). During the past year, the kinetics of crystallization in simulated lunar regolith were examined in an effort to optimize the microstructure and, hence, mechanical properties of glass ceramics. The use of solar energy for melt-processing of regolith was examined, and strong (greater than 630 MPa) glass fibers were successfully produced by melt-spinning in a solar furnace. A study of the mechanical properties of simulated lunar glasses was completed during the past year. As on Earth, the presence of moisture was found to weaken simulated lunar glasses, although the effects of surface flaws was shown to outweigh the effect of atmospheric moisture on the strength of lunar glasses. The effect of atmospheric moisture on the toughness was also studied. As expected, toughness was found to increase only marginally in an anhydrous atmosphere. Finally, our efforts to involve undergraduates in the research lab fluorished this past year. Four undergraduates worked on various aspects of these projects; and two of them were co-authors on papers which we published.

Fabes, B. D.; Poisl, W. H.; Allen, D.; Minitti, M.; Hawley, S.; Beck, T.

1992-01-01

422

Spin and charge excitations in pure and Ca-doped NaV2O5  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Co-authors: C. Presura, A. Damascelli, M. Dischner, C. Geibel, R. K. Kremer, J. Jegoudez, and A. Revcolevschi We investigate the temperature dependent optical properties of pure and Ca-doped ?'-NaV_2O5 with up to 20 percent Ca-doping, in the energy range 4 meV to 4 eV for temperatures down to 4K. By varying the Ca-concentration we control the relative abundance of V^4+ and V^5+. We observe that the intensity of the main optical absorption peak at 1 eV is proportional to the number of V^5+-ions. This rules out the interpretation as a V^4+ d-d excitation, and it establishes that this is the on-rung bonding-anti-bonding transition. The analysis of the electronic excitations detected in the optical conductivity, provides direct evidence for a charge disproportionate electronic ground-state, at least on a locale scale. We observe a pronounced decrease of the intensity of the 1 eV peak upon increasing temperature with an activation energy of about 25meV, indicating that a finite fraction of the rungs becomes occupied with two electrons while others are emptied as temperature increases. No appreciable shift of frequency occurs, showing that the change in the valence state of individual V atoms at the phase transition is very small. A remarkable inflection of the temperature dependence of the intensity of the 1 eV peak at the phase transition at 34 K, indicates that charge ordering is associated with the low temperature phase.

van der Marel, Dirk

2001-03-01

423

A taxonomy for community-based care programs focused on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care in resource-poor settings  

PubMed Central

Community-based care (CBC) can increase access to key services for people affected by HIV/AIDS through the mobilization of community interests and resources and their integration with formal health structures. Yet, the lack of a systematic framework for analysis of CBC focused on HIV/AIDS impedes our ability to understand and study CBC programs. We sought to develop taxonomy of CBC programs focused on HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings in an effort to understand their key characteristics, uncover any gaps in programming, and highlight the potential roles they play. Our review aimed to systematically identify key CBC programs focused on HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings. We used both bibliographic database searches (Medline, CINAHL, and EMBASE) for peer-reviewed literature and internet-based searches for gray literature. Our search terms were ‘HIV’ or ‘AIDS’ and ‘community-based care’ or ‘CBC’. Two co-authors developed a descriptive taxonomy through an iterative, inductive process using the retrieved program information. We identified 21 CBC programs useful for developing taxonomy. Extensive variation was observed within each of the nine categories identified: region, vision, characteristics of target populations, program scope, program operations, funding models, human resources, sustainability, and monitoring and evaluation strategies. While additional research may still be needed to identify the conditions that lead to overall program success, our findings can help to inform our understanding of the various aspects of CBC programs and inform potential logic models for CBC programming in the context of HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings. Importantly, the findings of the present study can be used to develop sustainable HIV/AIDS-service delivery programs in regions with health resource shortages. PMID:23594416

Rachlis, Beth; Sodhi, Sumeet; Burciul, Barry; Orbinski, James; Cheng, Amy H.Y.; Cole, Donald

2013-01-01

424

27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll.  

PubMed

This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud ("Traute") Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to "translate" the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

Halberg, F; Düll-Pfaff, N; Gumarova, L; Zenchenko, T A; Schwartzkopff, O; Freytag, E M; Freytag, J; Cornelissen, G

2013-01-01

425

Mollie Stevens Smart (1916-2012).  

PubMed

Presents an obituary for Mollie Stevens Smart (1916-2012). Mollie attended the University of Toronto, from which she graduated with honors in psychology at age 20 in 1936. She studied and worked at the Merrill-Palmer Institute in Detroit, earning a master's degree in child development from the University of Michigan in 1941. She earned her doctorate in educational psychology at the University of Delhi in 1969. An author, teacher, and mentor, Mollie won Fulbright research grants to India and New Zealand and lectured in the United States, India, New Zealand, Canada, and China. She wrote 26 books, most co-authored with her husband, Russell (Rus) C. Smart. Beginning in the 1940s, when Freudian theory had a strong grip on the popular view of child development, the books placed the developing child in the context of family and community systems. The Smarts' best-selling college textbook Children: Development and Relationships (1967, 1973, 1977, 1982) was based on the theories of Erik Erikson and Jean Piaget. Mollie was a member of the American Psychological Association throughout her professional career and held memberships also in the Society for Research in Child Development, the National Council on Family Relations, the Groves Conference on Marriage and Family, and the Fulbright Association. After moving to Ridgefield, Washington, in 2003 with her daughter Ellen following Rus's death in 1996, she applied her great knowledge to advise a community-based organization that serves the needs of new babies born into destitute families. Mollie died at home in Ridgefield on October 22, 2012, at age 96. PMID:24016121

Smart, Laura S; Prochaska, James O

2013-09-01

426

Real-time Science and Educational Collaboration Online from the Indian Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During Summer of 2007, scientists and students (via the web) jointly participated in research during the Ninety East Ridge Expedition (cruise KNOX06RR) . Staff organizers from Joint Oceanographic Institutions" JOI Learning and the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program planned and implemented an interactive website to allow students to directly participate with scientists during the site survey aboard the R/V Roger Revelle. Dr. Will Sager and middle school teacher Rory Wilson collaborated daily during the scientific expedition with science team, ship crew and students. From the outset, students were involved and helped to guide the program; this included coming up with the website name and initial design work. Communication with students included the website, individual and group emails and video conferences with student groups. Seven secondary schools from the USA, Europe, India and Thailand participated actively in the project from June to August. Students viewed daily updates on the website, sent in answers for weekly science challenge questions, and interacted with scientists and crew. Student participants learned about navigation, geophysics and petrology, as well as ship operations and technology. Students and educators tracked the expedition's progress in a multi-media environment. Website statistics were recorded; participation began well and increased during the expedition as more people became engaged with the website. All of the crew and scientists wrote self-profiles to help students learn about the range of ocean careers; several of the scientists and graduate students on board wrote or co- authored website articles for students. During this presentation, we will explore and review the major features of the outreach program using the Sea90e website to demonstrate how this real-time interaction engages students in science learning. We will discuss the benefits of collaboration for science and education in our "classroom at sea."

Wilson, R. H.; Sager, W. W.

2007-12-01

427

Quantifying Selection Acting on a Complex Trait Using Allele Frequency Time Series Data  

PubMed Central

When selection is acting on a large genetically diverse population, beneficial alleles increase in frequency. This fact can be used to map quantitative trait loci by sequencing the pooled DNA from the population at consecutive time points and observing allele frequency changes. Here, we present a population genetic method to analyze time series data of allele frequencies from such an experiment. Beginning with a range of proposed evolutionary scenarios, the method measures the consistency of each with the observed frequency changes. Evolutionary theory is utilized to formulate equations of motion for the allele frequencies, following which likelihoods for having observed the sequencing data under each scenario are derived. Comparison of these likelihoods gives an insight into the prevailing dynamics of the system under study. We illustrate the method by quantifying selective effects from an experiment, in which two phenotypically different yeast strains were first crossed and then propagated under heat stress (Parts L, Cubillos FA, Warringer J, et al. [14 co-authors]. 2011. Revealing the genetic structure of a trait by sequencing a population under selection. Genome Res). From these data, we discover that about 6% of polymorphic sites evolve nonneutrally under heat stress conditions, either because of their linkage to beneficial (driver) alleles or because they are drivers themselves. We further identify 44 genomic regions containing one or more candidate driver alleles, quantify their apparent selective advantage, obtain estimates of recombination rates within the regions, and show that the dynamics of the drivers display a strong signature of selection going beyond additive models. Our approach is applicable to study adaptation in a range of systems under different evolutionary pressures. PMID:22114362

Illingworth, Christopher J.R.; Parts, Leopold; Schiffels, Stephan; Liti, Gianni; Mustonen, Ville

2012-01-01

428

The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

1999-01-01

429

The active participation of German-speaking countries in conferences of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) between 2005 and 2013: A reflection of the development of medical education research?  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Medical education is gaining in significance internationally. A growing interest in the field has been observed in German-speaking countries (Austria, Germany, Switzerland) since the early 2000s. This interest is not, however, reflected in an increase in the number of publications on medical education of German-speaking authors in international professional journals. The following investigation examines the potential use of active participant numbers of German-speaking researchers at AMEE conferences as a means of measuring said development. Methods: The AMEE conference proceedings from the categories poster presentations, short communications, research papers and plenary presentations from the years 2005-2013 were examined for evidence of Austrian, German and Swiss participation. The abstracts were subsequently analysed in terms of content and categorised according to study design, methodology, object of study, and research topic. Results: Of the 9,446 analysed abstracts, 549 contributions show at least one first, last or co-author from Austria, Germany or Switzerland. The absolute number of contributions per conference varied between 44 in 2010 and 77 in 2013. The percentage fluctuated between 10% in 2005 and 4.1% in 2010. From the year 2010 onwards, however, participation increased continually. The research was predominantly descriptive (62.7%). Studies on fundamental questions of teaching and learning (clarification studies) were less frequent (4.0%). For the most part, quantitative methods (51.9%) were implemented in addressing subjects such as learning and teaching methods (33%), evaluation and assessment (22.4%) or curriculum development (14.4%). The study population was usually comprised of students (52.5%). Conclusions: The number of contributions from Austria, Germany and Switzerland peak at the beginning and at the end of the evaluated period of time. A continual increase in active participation since 2005 was not observed. These observations do not reflect the actual increase of interest in medical education research in German-speaking countries. PMID:25228930

Raes, Patricia; Bauer, Daniel; Schöppe, Franziska; Fischer, Martin R.

2014-01-01

430

Psychometric properties of the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Effective management of depression is predicated upon reliable assessment. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) is a depression severity scale with both self-rated (QIDS-SR16) and clinician-rated (QIDS-C16) versions. Although widely used in research, the psychometric properties of the QIDS16 have not been systematically reviewed. We performed a systematic review of studies of the psychometric properties (factor structure, internal consistency, convergent validity, discriminant validity, test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change) of the QIDS-SR16 or QIDS-C16. Six databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CinAHL, Web of Science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Findings were summarised, bias assessed and correlations with reference standards were pooled. 37 studies (17,118 participants) were included in the review. Both versions of the QIDS16 were unidimensional. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.69 to 0.89 for the QIDS-SR16 and 0.65 to 0.87 for the QIDS-C16. The QIDS-SR16 correlated moderately to highly with several depression severity scales. Seven studies were pooled where QIDS-SR16 was correlated with the HRSD-17 (r = 0.76, CI 0.69, 0.81) in patients diagnosed with depression. Four studies examined convergent validity with the QIDS-C16. Four studies examined discriminant validity, for the QIDS-SR16 alone. Eighteen studies had at least one author who was a co-author of the original QIDS16 study. Most studies were conducted in the USA (n = 26). The QIDS-SR16 and the QIDS-C16 are unidimensional rating scales with acceptable internal consistency. To justify the use of the QIDS16 scale in clinical practice, more research is needed on convergent and discriminant validity, and in populations outside the USA. PMID:25300442

Reilly, Thomas J; MacGillivray, Steve A; Reid, Ian C; Cameron, Isobel M

2015-01-01

431

PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technological Processes (IC-CMTP2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Competitiveness is one of the most important factors in our life and it plays a key role in the efficiency both of organizations and societies. The more scientifically supported and prepared organizations develop more competitive materials with better physical, chemical and biological properties and the leading companies apply more competitive equipment and technology processes. The aims of the 2nd International Conference on Competitive Materials and Technology Processes (ic-cmtp2) are the following: Promote new methods and results of scientific research in the fields of material, biological, environmental and technology sciences; Change information between the theoretical and applied sciences as well as technical and technological implantations. Promote the communication between the scientist of different nations, countries and continents. Among the major fields of interest are materials with extreme physical, chemical, biological, medical, thermal, mechanical properties and dynamic strength; including their crystalline and nano-structures, phase transformations as well as methods of their technological processes, tests and measurements. Multidisciplinary applications of materials science and technological problems encountered in sectors like ceramics, glasses, thin films, aerospace, automotive and marine industry, electronics, energy, construction materials, medicine, biosciences and environmental sciences are of particular interest. In accordance to the program of the conference ic-cmtp2, more than 250 inquiries and registrations from different organizations were received. Researchers from 36 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa, North and South America arrived at the venue of conference. Including co-authors, the research work of more than 500 scientists are presented in this volume. Professor Dr Gömze A László Chair, ic-cmtp2 The PDF also contains lists of the boards, session chairs and sponsors.

László, Gömze A.

2013-12-01

432

Visually impaired researchers get their hands on quantum chemistry: application to a computational study on the isomerization of a sterol.  

PubMed

In molecular sciences, articles tend to revolve around 2D representations of 3D molecules, and sighted scientists often resort to 3D virtual reality software to study these molecules in detail. Blind and visually impaired (BVI) molecular scientists have access to a series of audio devices that can help them read the text in articles and work with computers. Reading articles published in this journal, though, is nearly impossible for them because they need to generate mental 3D images of molecules, but the article-reading software cannot do that for them. We have previously designed AsteriX, a web server that fully automatically decomposes articles, detects 2D plots of low molecular weight molecules, removes meta data and annotations from these plots, and converts them into 3D atomic coordinates. AsteriX-BVI goes one step further and converts the 3D representation into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations. These Braille-annotated physical 3D models allow BVI scientists to generate a complete mental model of the molecule. AsteriX-BVI uses Molden to convert the meta data of quantum chemistry experiments into BVI friendly formats so that the entire line of scientific information that sighted people take for granted-from published articles, via printed results of computational chemistry experiments, to 3D models-is now available to BVI scientists too. The possibilities offered by AsteriX-BVI are illustrated by a project on the isomerization of a sterol, executed by the blind co-author of this article (HBW). PMID:25091066

Lounnas, Valčre; Wedler, Henry B; Newman, Timothy; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Harrison, Jason G; Nepomuceno, Gabriella; Pemberton, Ryan; Tantillo, Dean J; Vriend, Gert

2014-11-01

433

Why Are Medical and Health-Related Studies Not Being Published? A Systematic Review of Reasons Given by Investigators  

PubMed Central

Objective About half of medical and health-related studies are not published. We conducted a systematic review of reports on reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies in peer-reviewed journals. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS (until 13/09/2013), and references of identified articles were searched to identify reports of surveys that provided data on reasons given by investigators for not publishing studies. The proportion of non-submission and reasons for non-publication was calculated using the number of unpublished studies as the denominator. Because of heterogeneity across studies, quantitative pooling was not conducted. Exploratory subgroup analyses were conducted. Results We included 54 survey reports. Data from 38 included reports were available to estimate proportions of at least one reason given for not publishing studies. The proportion of non-submission among unpublished studies ranged from 55% to 100%, with a median of 85%. The reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies included: lack of time or low priority (median 33%), studies being incomplete (median 15%), study not for publication (median 14%), manuscript in preparation or under review (median 12%), unimportant or negative result (median 12%), poor study quality or design (median 11%), fear of rejection (median 12%), rejection by journals (median 6%), author or co-author problems (median 10%), and sponsor or funder problems (median 9%). In general, the frequency of reasons given for non-publication was not associated with the source of unpublished studies, study design, or time when a survey was conducted. Conclusions Non-submission of studies for publication remains the main cause of non-publication of studies. Measures to reduce non-publication of studies and alternative models of research dissemination need to be developed to address the main reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies, such as lack of time or low priority and fear of being rejected by journals. PMID:25335091

Song, Fujian; Loke, Yoon; Hooper, Lee

2014-01-01

434

Spatially heterogeneous diapycnal mixing in the abyssal ocean: A comparison of two parameterizations to observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spatial distributions of the diapycnal diffusivity predicted by two abyssal mixing schemes are compared to each other and to observational estimates based on microstructure surveys and large-scale hydrographic inversions. The parameterizations considered are the tidal mixing scheme by Jayne, St. Laurent and co-authors (JSL01) and the Roughness Diffusivity Model (RDM) by Decloedt and Luther. Comparison to microstructure surveys shows that both parameterizations are conservative in estimating the vertical extent to which bottom-intensified mixing penetrates into the stratified water column. In particular, the JSL01 exponential vertical structure function with fixed scale height decays to background values much nearer topography than observed. JSL01 and RDM yield dramatically different horizontal spatial distributions of diapycnal diffusivity, which would lead to quite different circulations in OGCMs, yet they produce similar basin-averaged diffusivity profiles. Both parameterizations are shown to yield smaller basin-mean diffusivity profiles than hydrographic inverse estimates for the major ocean basins, by factors ranging from 3 up to over an order of magnitude. The canonical 10-4 m2 s-1abyssal diffusivity is reached by the parameterizations only at depths below 3 km. Power consumption by diapycnal mixing below 1 km of depth, between roughly 32°S and 48°N, for the RDM and JSL01 parameterizations is 0.40 TW & 0.28 TW, respectively. The results presented here suggest that present-day mixing parameterizations significantly underestimate abyssal mixing. In conjunction with other recently published studies, a plausible interpretation is that parameterizing the dissipation of bottom-generated internal waves is not sufficient to approximate the global spatial distribution of diapycnal mixing in the abyssal ocean.

Decloedt, Thomas; Luther, Douglas S.

2012-11-01

435

Amaranth oil application for coronary heart disease and hypertension  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the Nation's leading killer for both men and women among all racial and ethnic groups. Development and progression of CVD is linked to the presence of risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. It is known that cholesterol is an indicator of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Low-density cholesterol (LDL) above 130 mg/dl high-density cholesterol (HDL) cholesterol below 35 mg/dl and total blood cholesterol above 200 mg/dl are indicators of problematic cholesterol. Proper ranges of cholesterol are important in the prevention of CVD. It has been suggested that a reduction in the consumption of saturated and an increase in unsaturated fatty acids is beneficial and prevents CVD. Amaranth grain contains tocotrienols and squalene compounds, which are known to affect cholesterol biosynthesis. The cholesterol precursors squalene, lanosterol and other methyl sterols, reflect cholesterol synthesis [1-3], whereas plant sterols and cholestanol, a metabolite of cholesterol, reflect the efficiency of cholesterol absorption in normal and hyperlipidemic populations [4-6]. Qureshi with co-authors [7] showed that feeding of chickens with amaranth oil decreases blood cholesterol levels, which are supported by the work of others [8]. Previously, we have shown that Amaranth oil modulates the cell membrane fluidity [9] and stabilized membranes that could be one reason as to why it is beneficial to those who consume it. It is known that in hypertension, the cell membrane is defective and hence, the movement of the Na and K ions across the cell membranes could defective that could contribute to the development of increase in blood pressure. Based on these properties of amaranth oil we hypothesize that it could be of significant benefit for patients with CVD. PMID:17207282

Martirosyan, Danik M; Miroshnichenko, Lidia A; Kulakova, Svetlana N; Pogojeva, Ala V; Zoloedov, Vladimir I

2007-01-01

436

Interventions provided in the acute phase for mild traumatic brain injury: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Most patients who sustain mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have persistent symptoms at 1 week and 1 month after injury. This systematic review investigated the effectiveness of interventions initiated in acute settings for patients who experience mTBI. Methods We performed a systematic review of all randomized clinical trials evaluating any intervention initiated in an acute setting for patients experiencing acute mTBI. All possible outcomes were included. The primary sources of identification were MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central register of Controlled Trials, from 1980 to August 2012. Hand searching of proceedings from five meetings related to mTBI was also performed. Study selection was conducted by two co-authors, and data abstraction was completed by a research assistant specialized in conducting systematic reviews. Study quality was evaluated using Cochrane’s Risk of Bias assessment tool. Results From a potential 15,156 studies, 1,268 abstracts were evaluated and 120 articles were read completely. Of these, 15 studies fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria. One study evaluated a pharmacological intervention, two evaluated activity restriction, one evaluated head computed tomography scan versus admission, four evaluated information interventions, and seven evaluated different follow-up interventions. Use of different outcome measures limited the possibilities for analysis. However, a meta-analysis of three studies evaluating various follow-up strategies versus routine follow-up or no follow-up failed to show any effect on three outcomes at 6 to 12 months post-trauma. In addition, a meta-analysis of two studies found no effect of an information intervention on headache at 3 months post-injury. Conclusions There is a paucity of well-designed clinical studies for patients who sustain mTBI. The large variability in outcomes measured in studies limits comparison between them. PMID:23924958

2013-01-01

437

ROAST: Peer Review as a Learning and Assessment Tool in Graduate Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Constructivist learning theory and inquiry-based educational practice stress the parallels between learning and research. Although peer review has long been a central feature of the working lives of research scientists, it has rarely found its way into the classroom. Motivated by this thought, an imaginary journal, Reviews of Atmospheric Science Topics (ROAST), has been integrated into a graduate-level course in atmospheric thermodynamics. The instructor acts as editor of ROAST. Students in the class are divided into teams and assigned topics on which to write survey papers and give in-class presentations, using the text, the Internet, the library, and other resources. The assigned topics range over the subject matter of the course. The submitted survey papers are sent by the ROAST editor to other members of the class, acting as anonymous reviewers. Just as in the case of real research journals, the editor asks the authors to respond to criticisms of reviewers and then sends the revised papers back to the reviewers. Each student is thus a researcher and co-author of one paper as well as an anonymous reviewer of several others. ROAST has proven to be not only a useful means of fostering learning, but also a natural and effective assessment tool. The peer review mechanism allows the student authors to address the defects in their papers, and hence in their learning, as pointed out not by an authority figure or an examination but by their own peers. As an important side benefit, the students gain experience with the peer review process itself and come to appreciate its strengths and weaknesses in evaluating scientific papers.

Somerville, R. C.

2003-12-01

438

Has Large-Scale Named-Entity Network Analysis Been Resting on a Flawed Assumption?  

PubMed Central

The assumption that a name uniquely identifies an entity introduces two types of errors: splitting treats one entity as two or more (because of name variants); lumping treats multiple entities as if they were one (because of shared names). Here we investigate the extent to which splitting and lumping affect commonly-used measures of large-scale named-entity networks within two disambiguated bibliographic datasets: one for co-author names in biomedicine (PubMed, 2003–2007); the other for co-inventor names in U.S. patents (USPTO, 2003–2007). In both cases, we find that splitting has relatively little effect, whereas lumping has a dramatic effect on network measures. For example, in the biomedical co-authorship network, lumping (based on last name and both initials) drives several measures down: the global clustering coefficient by a factor of 4 (from 0.265 to 0.066); degree assortativity by a factor of ?13 (from 0.763 to 0.06); and average shortest path by a factor of 1.3 (from 5.9 to 4.5). These results can be explained in part by the fact that lumping artificially creates many intransitive relationships and high-degree vertices. This effect of lumping is much less dramatic but persists with measures that give less weight to high-degree vertices, such as the mean local clustering coefficient and log-based degree assortativity. Furthermore, the log-log distribution of collaborator counts follows a much straighter line (power law) with splitting and lumping errors than without, particularly at the low and the high counts. This suggests that part of the power law often observed for collaborator counts in science and technology reflects an artifact: name ambiguity. PMID:23894639

Fegley, Brent D.; Torvik, Vetle I.

2013-01-01

439

Resorption Rate Tunable Bioceramic: Si, Zn-Modified Tricalcium Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation is organized in an alternate format. Several manuscripts which have already been published or are to be submitted for publication have been included as separate chapters. Chapter 1 is a general introduction which describes the dissertation organization and introduces the human bone and ceramic materials as bone substitute. Chapter 2 is the background and literature review on dissolution behavior of calcium phosphate, and discussion of motivation for this research. Chapter 3 is a manuscript entitled ''Si,Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate: a phase composition and crystal structure study'', which was published in ''Key Engineering Materials'' [1]. Chapter 4 gives more crystal structure details by neutron powder diffraction, which identifies the position for Si and Zn substitution and explains the stabilization mechanism of the structure. A manuscript entitled ''Crystal structure analysis of Si, Zn-modified Tricalcium phosphate by Neutron Powder Diffraction'' will be submitted to Biomaterials [2]. Chapter 5 is a manuscript, entitled ''Dissolution behavior and cytotoxicity test of Si, Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'', which is to be submitted to Biomaterials [3]. This paper discusses the additives effect on the dissolution behavior of TCP, and cytotoxicity test result is also included. Chapter 6 is the study of hydrolysis process of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in the simulated body fluid, and the phase development during drying process is discussed. A manuscript entitled ''Hydrolysis of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate in simulated body fluid and phase transformation during drying process'' is to be submitted to Biomaterials [4]. Ozan Ugurlu is included as co-authors in these two papers due to his TEM contributions. Appendix A is the general introduction of the materials synthesis, crystal structure and preliminary dissolution result. A manuscript entitled ''Resorption rate tunable bioceramic: Si and Zn-modified tricalcium phosphate'' was published in Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings (the 29th International Conference on Advanced Ceramics and Composites - Advances in Bioceramics and Biocomposites) [5].

Xiang Wei

2006-08-09

440

Control of New Kinetic Barriers & Design of Nanorods  

SciTech Connect

The accomplishments of this project include three elements. The first element directly relates to the focus of this project. Specifically, we have determined the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers, with and without surfactants, and two manuscripts in preparation; references refer to the list of journal publications. Further, we have discovered a characteristic length scale - the dimension of atomic islands bounded by multiple-layer surface steps. This discovery has made it possible to understand scientifically why nanorods synthesis is possible at all, will enable science-based design of nanorods, and may impact energy technology through nanomaterials design and synthesis. The second element relates to an exploration - synthesis of nanowires. This exploration is made possible through additional support of a Small Grant Exploratory Research from NSF. Through a combination of atomistic simulations, theories, and experiments, the PI and colleagues have made two contributions to the field. Specifically, they have revealed the physical reason why periodic twins develop during growth of SiC nanowires. Further, they have discovered that SiC nanowire films have an order-of-magnitude higher friction that their macroscopic counterpart, something that has never been reported before. The third elements relates to knowledge dissemination. The PI has co-edited (with Helena van Swygenhoven of PSI) an issue of MRS Bulletin, with the theme of Atomistic Simulations of Mechanics of Nanostructures, co-authored a review article in JOM, and authored a review paper in connection with a Banff workshop series co-sponsored by Canada, US, and Mexico.

Hanchen Huang

2012-05-29

441

Contribution of Arab researchers to ophthalmology: a bibliometric and comparative analysis.  

PubMed

Through history, Arabs and Muslims have made valuable contribution to medicine and science. The main objective of this study was to assess the contribution of Arab researchers to ophthalmology using bibliometric indicators. Published articles in "Ophthalmology" authored by Arab researchers were screened and analyzed using ISI Web of Science database. Worldwide research productivity in ophthalmology was 216,921 documents while that from Arab countries; Israel, Turkey and Iran were 2083, 2932, 3027 and 859 documents respectively. Those from Arab countries were published in 85 peer-reviewed ophthalmology related journals with 280 (13.44%) documents published in Journal Francais d Ophtalmologie. Among Arab countries, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia had the highest (828 (39.75%)) research output followed by Egypt (461 (22.13%)) and Tunisia 210 (10.08). Countries with highest collaboration with researchers in Arab world in ophthalmology research were USA; (397; 19.06%) followed by England (92; 4.42%) and Spain (91; 4.37%). The most research productive organization in Arab countries was King Khalid Eye Specialist Hospital (396; 19.01%). Ophthalmology articles authored or co-authored by an Arab researcher had a total citation f 21098 with an average citation of 10.13 per document and an h-index of 51. In conclusion, the present data show promising increase but relatively low ophthalmology research productivity from Arab countries. Wide variation in research productivity do exists. Compared with other non-Arab countries in the Middle East, Arab countries showed lesser ophthalmology research activity than Israel and Turkey but higher than that in Iran. PMID:25674499

Sweileh, Waleed M; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Shanti, Yousef I; Sawalha, Ansam F; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

2015-01-01

442

Substance use disorders in Arab countries: research activity and bibliometric analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Substance use disorders, which include substance abuse and substance dependence, are present in all regions of the world including Middle Eastern Arab countries. Bibliometric analysis is an increasingly used tool for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research productivity in the field of substance use disorders in Arab countries using bibliometric indicators. Methodology Original or review research articles authored or co-authored by investigators from Arab countries about substance use disorders during the period 1900 – 2013 were retrieved using the ISI Web of Science database. Research activity was assessed by analyzing the annual research productivity, contribution of each Arab country, names of journals, citations, and types of abused substances. Results Four hundred and thirteen documents in substance use disorders were retrieved. Annual research productivity was low but showed a significant increase in the last few years. In terms of quantity, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (83 documents) ranked first in research about substance use disorders while Lebanon (17.4 documents per million) ranked first in terms of number of documents published per million inhabitants. Retrieved documents were found in different journal titles and categories, mostly in Drug and Alcohol Dependence Journal. Authors from USA appeared in 117 documents published by investigators from Arab countries. Citation analysis of retrieved documents showed that the average citation per document was 10.76 and the h - index was 35. The majority of retrieved documents were about tobacco and smoking (175 documents) field while alcohol consumption and abuse research was the least with 69 documents. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that research in this field was largely neglected in the past. However, recent research interest was observed. Research output on tobacco and smoking was relatively high compared to other substances of abuse like illicit drugs and medicinal agents. Governmental funding for academics and mental health graduate programs to do research in the field of substance use disorders is highly recommended. PMID:25148888

2014-01-01

443

Agricultural sectoral demand and crop productivity response across the world  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With an increasing and increasingly affluent population, humans will need to roughly double agricultural production by 2050. Continued yield growth forms the foundation of all future strategies aiming to increase agricultural production while slowing or eliminating cropland expansion. However, a recent analysis by one of our co-authors has shown that yield trends in many important maize, wheat and rice growing regions have begun stagnating or declining from the highs seen during the green revolution (Ray et al. 2013). Additional research by our group has shown that nearly 50% of new agricultural production since the 1960s has gone not to direct human consumption, but instead to animal feed and other industrial uses. Our analysis for GLP looks at the convergence of these two trends by examining time series utilization data for 16 of the biggest crops to determine how demand from different sectors has shaped our land-use and intensification strategies around the world. Before rushing headlong into the next agricultural doubling, it would be prudent to first consult our recent agricultural history to better understand what was driving past changes in production. Using newly developed time series dataset - a fusion of cropland maps with historic agricultural census data gathered from around the world - we can examine yield and harvested area trends over the last half century for 16 top crops. We combine this data with utilization rates from the FAO Food Balance Sheet to see how demand from different sectors - food, feed, and other - has influenced long-term growth trends from the green revolution forward. We will show how intensification trends over time and across regions have grown or contracted depending on what is driving the change in production capacity. Ray DK, Mueller ND, West PC, Foley JA (2013) Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050. PLoS ONE 8(6): e66428. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0066428

Johnston, M.; Ray, D. K.; Cassidy, E. S.; Foley, J. A.

2013-12-01

444

Bibliography of NASA-related publications on wind turbine technology 1973-1995  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major program of research and development projects on wind turbines for generating electricity was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1973 to 1988. Most of these projects were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as a major element of its Federal Wind Energy Program. One other large-scale wind turbine project was sponsored by the Bureau of Reclamation of the Department of Interior (DOI). The peak years for wind energy work at Lewis were 1979-80, when almost 100 engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel were involved. From 1988 their conclusion in 1995, NASA wind energy activities have been directed toward the transfer of technology to commercial and academic organizations. Wind energy activities at NASA can be divided into two broad categories which are closely related and often overlapping: (1) Designing, building, and testing a series of 12 large-scale, experimental, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT's); and (2) conducting supporting research and technology (SR&T) projects. The purpose of this bibliography is to assist those active in the field of wind energy in locating the technical information they need on wind power planning, wind loads, turbine design and analysis, fabrication and installation, laboratory and field testing, and operations and maintenance. This bibliography contains approximately 620 citations of publications by over 520 authors and co-authors. Sources are: (1) NASA reports authored by government grantee, and contractor personnel, (2) papers presented by attendees at NASA-sponsored workshops and conferences, (3) papers presented by NASA personnel at outside workshops and conferences, and (4) outside publications related to research performed at NASA/ DOE wind turbine sites.

Spera, David A.

1995-04-01

445

Bibliography of NASA-related publications on wind turbine technology 1973-1995  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A major program of research and development projects on wind turbines for generating electricity was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1973 to 1988. Most of these projects were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as a major element of its Federal Wind Energy Program. One other large-scale wind turbine project was sponsored by the Bureau of Reclamation of the Department of Interior (DOI). The peak years for wind energy work at Lewis were 1979-80, when almost 100 engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel were involved. From 1988 their conclusion in 1995, NASA wind energy activities have been directed toward the transfer of technology to commercial and academic organizations. Wind energy activities at NASA can be divided into two broad categories which are closely related and often overlapping: (1) Designing, building, and testing a series of 12 large-scale, experimental, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT's); and (2) conducting supporting research and technology (SR&T) projects. The purpose of this bibliography is to assist those active in the field of wind energy in locating the technical information they need on wind power planning, wind loads, turbine design and analysis, fabrication and installation, laboratory and field testing, and operations and maintenance. This bibliography contains approximately 620 citations of publications by over 520 authors and co-authors. Sources are: (1) NASA reports authored by government grantee, and contractor personnel, (2) papers presented by attendees at NASA-sponsored workshops and conferences, (3) papers presented by NASA personnel at outside workshops and conferences, and (4) outside publications related to research performed at NASA/ DOE wind turbine sites.

Spera, David A.

1995-01-01

446

WRF tests on sensitivity to PBL and LSM schemes during atmospheric transition periods: validation with BLLAST case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The structure and properties at a certain time of the atmospheric or planetary boundary layer (PBL) has a major importance in land-atmosphere interaction and exchange processes, i.e. in pollutants concentration, humidity or different energy vertical fluxes. Transition periods at this part of the troposphere are found difficult to properly interpret, as far as among all the processes taking place at that timing, it is not clearly stated the predominance of just one of them; moreover, a drastic change in the motion scales present in the lower atmosphere is sometimes produced. Atmospheric global models fail at representing transitional events in the PBL, mainly because of sub-grid scale phenomena. These micrometeorological processes require to be better simulated. Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model offers a considerable amount of physical options and parameterizations, including different PBL and land surface model (LSM) schemes. This fact justifies a model experiment to evaluate its behavior and try to understand the differences in model performance for transition periods in the atmosphere, specifically when it moves on from a convective to a stratified stable structure at its lower region. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulent (BLLAST) project organized and conducted a field campaign [1] during summer 2011 in Lannemezan (France), getting together a wide amount of meteorological instrumentation. The available extensive experimental dataset from that campaign offers an excellent opportunity for model validation. Results of WRF sensitivity tests are presented, comparing simulations among themselves and validating them with the observational data. Different atmospheric variables involved in the late afternoon and evening transition processes are considered, both at surface (i.e. energy balance) and at higher levels (thermodynamic vertical structure), in order to obtain a wider view of the problem. [1] Lothon, M. and co-authors (2012): The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment. Paper 14B.1, 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and turbulence, Boston, MA, Amer. Meteor. Soc., 12 pp.

Sastre, Mariano; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio

2014-05-01

447

A taxonomy for community-based care programs focused on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care in resource-poor settings.  

PubMed

Community-based care (CBC) can increase access to key services for people affected by HIV/AIDS through the mobilization of community interests and resources and their integration with formal health structures. Yet, the lack of a systematic framework for analysis of CBC focused on HIV/AIDS impedes our ability to understand and study CBC programs. We sought to develop taxonomy of CBC programs focused on HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings in an effort to understand their key characteristics, uncover any gaps in programming, and highlight the potential roles they play. Our review aimed to systematically identify key CBC programs focused on HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings. We used both bibliographic database searches (Medline, CINAHL, and EMBASE) for peer-reviewed literature and internet-based searches for gray literature. Our search terms were 'HIV' or 'AIDS' and 'community-based care' or 'CBC'. Two co-authors developed a descriptive taxonomy through an iterative, inductive process using the retrieved program information. We identified 21 CBC programs useful for developing taxonomy. Extensive variation was observed within each of the nine categories identified: region, vision, characteristics of target populations, program scope, program operations, funding models, human resources, sustainability, and monitoring and evaluation strategies. While additional research may still be needed to identify the conditions that lead to overall program success, our findings can help to inform our understanding of the various aspects of CBC programs and inform potential logic models for CBC programming in the context of HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings. Importantly, the findings of the present study can be used to develop sustainable HIV/AIDS-service delivery programs in regions with health resource shortages. PMID:23594416

Rachlis, Beth; Sodhi, Sumeet; Burciul, Barry; Orbinski, James; Cheng, Amy H Y; Cole, Donald

2013-01-01

448

[Co-authorship and collaboration networks in Spanish research into multiple sclerosis (1996-2010)].  

PubMed

INTRODUCTION. Scientific collaboration is vital for to the advance of knowledge and is especially important in health sciences. The aim of this study is to identify scientific collaboration indicators and co-authorship networks of researchers and Spanish institutions that publish on multiple sclerosis (MS) during the period 1996-2010. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The analyzed papers were obtained from Web of Science and Scopus international databases, and IBECS and IME national databases, applying specific search profiles in each one of them. In order to identify collaboration networks all signed papers were quantified and co-authored measures were obtained, as the different indexes, degree, intermediation and closeness. RESULTS. 1,613 articles were published in the period 1996-2010, 92% of them in collaboration. With 10 or more works signed in collaboration, 20 Spanish research groups in MS were identified. 64.23% of the papers were published in collaboration between Spanish institutions, and 33.85% were in collaboration with foreign institutions. The institutional participation analysis has identified a large network of institutional partnerships that integrates 27 institutions, with the Hospital Vall d'Hebron in a central position. International collaboration is headed by the U.S. and European countries, most notably the UK and Italy. CONCLUSION. The most collaborative authors, institutions, and work groups in Spanish research in MS have been identified. Despite these indicators that characterize the collaboration in this area, it is necessary to enhance cooperation between them, since this collaboration is positively related to the quality and impact of research and publications. PMID:23884870

Aleixandre-Benavent, R; Alonso-Arroyo, A; Gonzalez de Dios, J; Sempere, A P; Castello-Cogollos, L; Bolanos-Pizarro, M; Valderrama-Zurian, J C

2013-08-16

449

University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In FY86 the Laboratory has produced a list of accomplishments in which it takes pride. LLE has met every laser-fusion program milestone to date in a program of research for direct-drive ultraviolet laser fusion originally formulated in 1981. LLE scientists authored or co-authored 135 scientific papers during 1985 to 1986. The collaborative experiments with NRL, LANL, and LLNL have led to a number of important ICF results. The cryogenic target system developed by KMS Fusion for LLE will be used in future high-density experiments on OMEGA to demonstrate the compression of thermonuclear fuel to 100 to 200 times that of solid (20 to 40 g/cm) in a test of the direct-drive concept, as noted in the National Academy of Sciences' report. The excellence of the advanced technology efforts at LLE is illustrated by the establishment of the Ultrafast Science Center by the Department of Defense through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Research in the Center will concentrate on bridging the gap between high-speed electronics and ultrafast optics by providing education, research, and development in areas critical to future communications and high-speed computer systems. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics continues its pioneering work on the interaction of intense radiation with matter. This includes inertial-fusion and advanced optical and optical electronics research; training people in the technology and applications of high-power, short-pulse lasers; and interacting with the scientific community, business, industry, and government to promote the growth of laser technology.

1987-01-01

450

The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Written for non-specialists, this detailed survey of dinosaur origins, diversity, and extinction is designed as a series of successive essays covering important and timely topics in dinosaur paleobiology, such as "warm-bloodedness," birds as living dinosaurs, the new, non-flying feathered dinosaurs, dinosaur functional morphology, and cladistic methods in systematics. Its explicitly phylogenetic approach to the group is that taken by dinosaur specialists. The book is not an edited compilation of the works of many individuals, but a unique, cohesive perspective on Dinosauria. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of new, specially commissioned illustrations by John Sibbick, world-famous illustrator of dinosaurs, the volume includes multi-page drawings as well as sketches and diagrams. First edition Hb (1996): 0-521-44496-9 David E. Fastovsky is Professor of Geosciences at the University of Rhode Island. Fastovsky, the author of numerous scientific publications dealing with Mesozoic vertebrate faunas and their ancient environments, is also scientific co-Editor of Geology. He has undertaken extensive fieldwork studying dinosaurs and their environments in Montana, North Dakota, Arizona, Mexico, and Mongolia. David B. Weishampel is a professor at the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. Weishampel is best known for discovering, researching, and naming several rare European dinosaur species. During the 1980s Weishampel gained fame for his work with American paleontologist Jack Horner and later named the famous plant-eating, egg-laying Orodromeus, Horner. Now, a decade after his pioneering studies with Horner, Weishampel is most widely known for his current work on the Romanian dinosaur fauna. He is the author and co-author of many titles, including The Dinosaur Papers, 1676-1906 (Norton, 2003); The Dinosauria, (University of California, 1990); and Dinosaurs of the East Coast, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996).

Fastovsky, David E.; Weishampel, David B.

2005-02-01

451

Fish culture: an annotated bibliography of publications of the National Fisheries Center, Leetown, 1972-1980  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is an annotated bibliography of the publications authored or co-authored by the staff of the National Fisheries Center - Leetown (NFC-L) from 1972 through 1980. It includes publications from NFC-L staff at the Fish Farming Experimental Station, Stuttgart, AR; the Fish Genetics Laboratory, Beulah, WY; the Hagerman Field Station of the Tunison Laboratory of Fish Nutrition, Hagerman, ID; the National Fisheries Research and Development Laboratory, Marison, AL; and, the Tunison Laboratory of Fish Nutrition, Cortland, NY. It also includes publications from NFC-L staff at the Aquaculture Production/Demonstration Station, Fisheries Academy, Fish Genetics Station, National Fish Health Research Laboratory, and Technical Information Services, each located in Kearneysville, WV. Prior to 1977, each functioned as a separate entity within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1977, the administrative and program activities of these components were merged into the Natkonal Fisheries Center. This bibliography lists the publications issued by each of these entities both before and after becoming joined into the Center. Publications from these components prior to 1972 are documents in U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Resource Publication 120, Bibliography of Research Publications of the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, 1928-72. Entries in this bibliography are arranged under broad subject categories, similar to those used in U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Sport Fishery Abstracts. Within these categories, the publications are then arranged alphabetically by author and sequentially by date of publication. They cover a wide range of scientific and technical disciplines applicable to the field of aquaculture. The annotations were submitted by each NFC-L component, and were modified to some extent for uniformity. An author index is included at the end of the bibliography.

Mann, Joyce A.; Catrow, Violet J.; McKenzie, Lora C.; Engle, Faye V.

1982-01-01

452

The assimilation of Western medicine into a semi-nomadic healthcare system: a case study of the Indigenous Aeta Magbukún, Philippines.  

PubMed

The Aeta Magbukún are a genetically and culturally distinct group of Indigenous people living in an isolated mountain forest in the municipality of Mariveles, in the province of Bataan, Philippines. This research aims to document some healthcare related information of the people, inform future decisions regarding maximising benefits of modern conveniences, and minimise negative consequences on their culture and health. Using an ethnographic approach, data were collated from a community health survey in combination with field notes from three of the co-authors while living with the Aetas. Despite major implications from rapid ecological and cultural changes, traditional ethnomedical systems continue to be revered as an essential healing practice, although they are increasingly used in conjunction with Western medicines and healthcare. At the Aeta village level, the changing socio-political influence among the kagun (traditional healer), the NGOs, and the Municipal Council in terms of healthcare provision is pivotal, as the kagun has chosen to integrate the Western medicine and healthcare services into their traditional healthcare system, without simply rejecting them. In turn, Western-style healthcare interventions have the potential to be carefully managed to integrate traditional Aeta Magbukún socio-political structures, healthcare, and cultural continuity. The cumulative influence of numerous other novel aspects to Aeta life (e.g., permanent housing, a highway through the village, literacy, cash economies, energy-dense foods, communication/entertainment devices, etc.) will place additional pressure on the traditional ethnomedical healthcare system. However, enabling the continuity of access to appropriate healthcare knowledge (both the transfer of knowledge from Western medicine to the Aeta Magbukún, and vice versa) can assist many cultures through the inherent stresses of increasingly rapid acculturation and development. PMID:24643860

Balilla, Vincent S; McHenry, Julia Anwar; McHenry, Mark P; Parkinson, Riva Marris; Banal, Danilo T

2014-09-01

453

High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)  

ScienceCinema

Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2012-06-28

454

Especially for High School Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alternative Assessment The trend in several states to use high-stakes achievement test scores to evaluate districts, schools, and teachers appears to be at odds with the intent of the National Science Education Assessment Standards. Recently I read several postings on an Internet discussion list in which several high school teachers expressed differing opinions on how to deal with the situation. There seemed to be general agreement, however, that as increased emphasis is placed on preparation for high-stakes end-of-course examinations it becomes more difficult to assess conceptual understanding. High school chemistry teachers are an innovative lot, and I am confident that ways will be found to evaluate understanding no matter what. This month's issue contains two examples of using student-constructed posters as a means of assessment. Although we most often associate poster presentations with research, such as a science fair project, these articles show that posters may also be used to assess student learning in class settings. The examples are from lower-division college courses, but they may be equally useful in high school chemistry courses. An article titled Using Poster Sessions as an Alternative to Written ExaminationsThe Poster Exam by Pamela Mills and four co-authors contains a detailed explanation of how student-constructed posters can be used to assess student learning. A number of related articles are listed in the Literature Cited section. Another example is found in A Poster Session in Organic Chemistry That Markedly Enhanced Student Learning by P. A. Huddle. The same author also contributed the article How to Present a Paper or Poster in which useful, straightforward suggestions for communicating information and ideas clearly are provided.

Howell, J. Emory

2000-09-01

455

Is traumatic stress research global? A bibliometric analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The representation of low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in traumatic stress research is important to establish a global evidence base, build research capacity, and reduce the burden of unmet mental health needs around the world. Reviews of the traumatic stress literature up to 2002 showed trends toward globalization although LMIC were only marginally represented compared to high-income countries (HIC). Objective To examine the global nature of current traumatic stress research. In particular, we were interested in the extent to which traumatic stress research is: (1) conducted in LMIC, (2) conducted by LMIC researchers, and (3) accessible to them. Method Using the databases PubMed, PsychInfo, and PILOTS, we systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles on traumatic stress published in any language in the year 2012. Out of the 3,123 unique papers identified, we coded a random sample (N=1,000) for study, author, article, and journal characteristics. Results Although our sample involved research in 56 different countries, most papers (87%) involved research in HIC, with 51% of all papers describing studies in the United States. In 88% of the papers, the author team was affiliated with HIC only. Less than 5% of all author teams involved collaborations between HIC and LMIC researchers. Moreover, 45% of the articles on LMIC studies published by a HIC corresponding author did not involve any LMIC co-authors. LMIC researchers appeared to publish empirical studies in lower impact journals. Of the 1,000 articles in our sample, 32% were open access and 10% were made available via different means; over half of the papers were not accessible without subscription. Conclusions Traumatic stress research is increasingly global but still strongly dominated by HIC. Important opportunities to build capacity in LMIC appear to be missed. Implications toward more international traumatic stress research are discussed. PMID:24563730

Fodor, Kinga E.; Unterhitzenberger, Johanna; Chou, Chia-Ying; Kartal, Dzenana; Leistner, Sarah; Milosavljevic, Maja; Nocon, Agnes; Soler, Laia; White, Jenifer; Yoo, Seonyoung; Alisic, Eva

2014-01-01

456

The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

1999-12-01

457

UK-Nuclear decommissioning authority and US Salt-stone waste management issues  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: We update two case studies of stakeholder issues in the UK and US. Earlier versions were reported at Waste Management 2006 and 2007 and at ICEM 2005. UK: The UK nuclear industry has begun to consult stakeholders more widely in recent years. Historically, methods of engagement within the industry have varied, however, recent discussions have generally been carried out with the explicit understanding that engagement with stakeholders will be 'dialogue based' and will 'inform' the final decision made by the decision maker. Engagement is currently being carried out at several levels within the industry; at the national level (via the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's (NDA) National Stakeholder Group (NSG)); at a local site level (via Site Stakeholder Groups) and at a project level (usually via the Best Practicable Environmental Option process (BPEO)). This paper updates earlier results by the co-author with findings from a second questionnaire issued to the NSG in Phase 2 of the engagement process. An assessment is made regarding the development of stakeholder perceptions since Phase 1 towards the NDA process. US: The US case study reviews the resolution of issues on salt-stone by Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Citizens Advisory Board (CAB), in Aiken, SC. Recently, SRS-CAB encouraged DOE and South Carolina's regulatory Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC-DHEC) to resolve a conflict preventing SC-DHEC from releasing a draft permit to allow SRS to restart salt-stone operations. It arose with a letter sent from DOE blaming the Governor of South Carolina for delay in restarting salt processing. In reply, the Governor blamed DOE for failing to assure that Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) would be built. SWPF is designed to remove most of the radioactivity from HLW prior to vitrification, the remaining fraction destined for salt-stone. (authors)

Lawless, William [Paine College, 1235 Fifteenth Street, Augusta, GA 30901 (United States); Whitton, John [Nexia Solutions Ltd, The British Technology Centre, Sellafield, Seascale, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01

458

Measuring co-authorship and networking-adjusted scientific impact.  

PubMed

Appraisal of the scientific impact of researchers, teams and institutions with productivity and citation metrics has major repercussions. Funding and promotion of individuals and survival of teams and institutions depend on publications and citations. In this competitive environment, the number of authors per paper is increasing and apparently some co-authors don't satisfy authorship criteria. Listing of individual contributions is still sporadic and also open to manipulation. Metrics are needed to measure the networking intensity for a single scientist or group of scientists accounting for patterns of co-authorship. Here, I define I(1) for a single scientist as the number of authors who appear in at least I(1) papers of the specific scientist. For a group of scientists or institution, I(n) is defined as the number of authors who appear in at least I(n) papers that bear the affiliation of the group or institution. I(1) depends on the number of papers authored N(p). The power exponent R of the relationship between I(1) and N(p) categorizes scientists as solitary (R>2.5), nuclear (R = 2.25-2.5), networked (R = 2-2.25), extensively networked (R = 1.75-2) or collaborators (R<1.75). R may be used to adjust for co-authorship networking the citation impact of a scientist. I(n) similarly provides a simple measure of the effective networking size to adjust the citation impact of groups or institutions. Empirical data are provided for single scientists and institutions for the proposed metrics. Cautious adoption of adjustments for co-authorship and networking in scientific appraisals may offer incentives for more accountable co-authorship behaviour in published articles. PMID:18648663

Ioannidis, John P A

2008-01-01

459

27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll  

PubMed Central

This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (“Traute”) Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to “translate” the Dülls’ contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

2013-01-01

460

How Are Academic Age, Productivity and Collaboration Related to Citing Behavior of Researchers?  

PubMed Central

References are an essential component of research articles and therefore of scientific communication. In this study we investigate referencing (citing) behavior in five diverse fields (astronomy, mathematics, robotics, ecology and economics) based on 213,756 core journal articles. At the macro level we find: (a) a steady increase in the number of references per article over the period studied (50 years), which in some fields is due to a higher rate of usage, while in others reflects longer articles and (b) an increase in all fields in the fraction of older, foundational references since the 1980s, with no obvious change in citing patterns associated with the introduction of the Internet. At the meso level we explore current (2006–2010) referencing behavior of different categories of authors (21,562 total) within each field, based on their academic age, productivity and collaborative practices. Contrary to some previous findings and expectations we find that senior researchers use references at the same rate as their junior colleagues, with similar rates of re-citation (use of same references in multiple papers). High Modified Price Index (MPI, which measures the speed of the research front more accurately than the traditional Price Index) of senior authors indicates that their research has the similar cutting-edge aspect as that of their younger colleagues. In all fields both the productive researchers and especially those who collaborate more use a significantly lower fraction of foundational references and have much higher MPI and lower re-citation rates, i.e., they are the ones pushing the research front regardless of researcher age. This paper introduces improved bibliometric methods to measure the speed of the research front, disambiguate lead authors in co-authored papers and decouple measures of productivity and collaboration. PMID:23145111

Milojevi?, Staša

2012-01-01

461

Iranian research output in pediatrics: 1975-2007  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: By providing a picture from published articles in a field, bibliometric studies can inform policy-makers in their challenging research funding decisions. In this regard, we applied bibliometric analysis to the Iranian pediatrics articles published in PubMed indexed journals between 1975 and 2007. METHODS: We evaluated all pediatric articles that had been published from Iran in different PubMed indexed journals from 1975 to 2007. Journal data (i.e. date of publishing, journal name, impact factor of the journal, language), authors data (i.e. number of authors, international collaboration, affiliation of the corresponding author), and paper characteristics [i.e. type of article, research design, study population (neonate, infant, child, and adolescent), and specialty] were registered. RESULTS: During this period of time, 819 articles from Iran had been published in PubMed indexed journals, with a sharp increasing trend after 2002. Impact factors were up to 25.8. Paper had an international co-author in 13.7%. Regarding study population, 24.1% of studies were published on neonates, 23.6% on infants, and the remaining 66.3% of studies were performed on children and adolescents from 2 to 18 years old. Infectious disease was the most frequent area of research, followed by public health and metabolic disease. Original articles were the most frequent type (89.7%) of the published articles. Study design was cross-sectional in 51.2%, retrospective in 36.3%, and prospective in 11.6%. Clinical trials made up 4.8% of the total papers. CONCLUSIONS: Contribution of Iran in production of pediatrics science is showing a sharp increase after 2002, this pattern is in parallel with other research fields. PMID:22973370

Malekahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Moazen, Babak; Khoshdel, Abolfazl; Rahimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

2011-01-01

462

Proposal of an individual scientometric index with emphasis on ponderation of the effective contribution of the first author: h-fac índex.  

PubMed

In the individual assessment of a scientific performance, five scientometric indices have been used most: the h-index, the index g, the h-major index, the contemporary h-index and the normalized h-index. We propose an alternative index ("Index h-fac"), which considers positively the participation of the first author and that, by having a dynamic characteristic, continuously monitors his/her performance and is easily adaptable to particular or individual situations from different research groups. Results from the geometric mean between the original h-index as proposed by Hirsh and a correction factor ("fac", "first author commitment") and, in turn, this value is divided by the mean interval (in years) of all studies. The index emphasizes two scores (X and Y). These scores X and Y were obtained by asking to all 83 cardiovascular surgeons from Southern Brazil (Paraná, Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul) and Specialists, how they realistically estimated, in percentage, their effective contribution in each published paper in which they appeared as first author. Of the total, 80 (96.4%) responded. The average obtained was 78.0% and on this basis, the X score was established as 0.75 and the score Y as 0.25. The new index also considers the total number of citations as first author and as co-author, the average number of coauthors per publication and the total number of papers published. Theoretical examples are presented, discussing the main advantages of application. Serial evaluations in real world situations should be instituted to confirm the diagnostic and prognostic utility of this new index. PMID:23288177

Gregori Júnior, Francisco; Godoy, Moacir Fernandes de; Gregori, Francisco Ferreira

2012-01-01

463

Platform-to-platform sample transfer, distribution, dilution, and dosing via electrothermal vaporization and electrostatic deposition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel system for solid sample pretreatment, handling and dosing for analytical atomic spectrometry is described. A primary solid or liquid sample is vaporized in a graphite furnace and then condensed in a specially designed condensation zone. On the further transport path, the analyte aerosol can be diluted and distributed in pre-set ratios in the laboratory made flow control system. Applying a corona discharge, aerosol particulates are then quantitatively re-collected by means of intra-furnace electrostatic precipitation on the platform of another graphite furnace or by external precipitation on one or a set of platforms. This makes possible to produce a set of secondary platforms with equal analyte compositions from one individual primary sample. Such multitudes allow sequential multi-element determinations with single-element instrumentation or comparative measurements with different techniques. Furthermore, the described procedure allows external thermal sample pretreatment with preceding pyrolysis and additional vaporization, condensation, and re-precipitation that significantly reduces or removes the sample matrix. Owing to different losses, transport efficiencies of electrothermal vaporization (ETV) instrumentation depend on analyte element, matrix, vaporization temperature, ramp rate, and tube history. In order to reduce the losses and therewith such dependencies of the losses, new laboratory constructed ETV unit with analyte condensation in an axially focusing upstream convection zone has been constructed. Analytical performance of the new setup is compared with the performance of a commercial end-on flow-through ETV unit when analyzing both liquid dosed samples and certified solid reference materials. The new system shows much higher transport efficiencies that are, in addition, more uniform for elements of different volatility. The effects of chemical sample modifiers and elements supporting analyte condensation are studied. Most of the analytical measurements were carried out with a continuum source coherent forward scattering multi-element spectrometer. Comparative measurements were also carried out independently in the co-authors' laboratories with atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques.

Hermann, G.; Trenin, A.; Matz, R.; Gafurov, M.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Frech, W.; Björn, E.; Grinshtein, I.; Vasilieva, L.

2004-05-01

464

Readability Analysis of Introductory Astronomy Textbooks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increasingly, first-year students have reading deficiencies and do not have the academic discipline to read introductory textbooks. Few students have the skills needed to organize ideas elicited from texts, and even fewer seem capable of evaluating ideas and concepts as to importance. While the amount of pedagogical support has increased in introductory astronomy texts in recent years, it is worthwhile to investigate how the readability of these books has changed with time. Dukes and co-authors (1979, 1980, 1983) surveyed numerous introductory astronomy textbooks using the Flesch Readability index. For a direct comparison to Dukes' work, I have used Flesch's index to survey three groups of introductory astronomy texts. Group I samples editions from Dukes' surveys to normalize the current survey and to provide a text baseline from 25 years ago, while group II includes texts from the 1940s and 1950s and group III current texts to compare the readability of present texts with those from previous decades. At first glance, this study indicates that texts have not changed in readability over the past several decades. However, other issues arise when the results are investigated in detail. Flesch measures readability but not understandability; understandability may have changed. Reading load has increased as texts have increased in size from 478 to 605 pages, on average. While texts may have a grade 11-12 reading level, that is an average and parts of texts soar to post-graduate reading levels; the ups and downs may affect student comprehension. Readability is just one measure for analyzing texts and these other issues may be more important for judging why our students have difficulty reading introductory astronomy books.

Bruning, David H.

2008-05-01

465

nanoHUB.org - Towards On-Line Simulation for Materials and Nanodevices by Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Challenges in nanoelectronics are the merging notions of material and device. Device lengths have reached the nanometer scale, where material properties are defined. Detailed atomic composition such as strain, interface, doping, and size fluctuations need to be treated. Here the material science and device engineering communities meet on the common ground of quantum mechanics. Success will depend on bridging language and approach barriers between communities. The development of accepted community software will be a significant step.One element of such codes is the NanoElectronic MOdeling Tool. NEMO 3-D enables the computation of strain and electronic structure in an atomistic basis for over 60 and 23 million atoms, corresponding to volumes of (107nm)^3 and (77nm)^3, respectively. NEMO 3-D runs on a serial and parallel platforms, local cluster computers as well as the NSF Teragrid. About 400,000 atoms are treated efficiently on a single 32bit CPU. NEMO uses an atomistic valence force field method (strain) and the empirical tight binding method (electronic structure). Quantitative simulations for quantum dots in the InAs/GaAs and Si/SiGe material systems have been performed. The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) is in the process of developing new community and research codes for the analysis of nano-(electronic/mechanical/bio) devices. These tools are hosted on http://nanohub.org for on-line simulation use free-of-charge. Last year over 1,000 people performed about 64,000 simulations. 2,200 others viewed seminars and nanotechnology curriculum items. nanoHUB is being developed as a community resource that encourages on-line simulation, collaborations and nanotechnology education. Co-author: Mark S. Lundstrom

Klimeck, Gerhard; Lundstrom, Mark

2005-03-01

466

27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (''Traute'') Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to ''translate'' the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi.

Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

2013-04-01

467

The APECS Virtual Poster Session: a virtual platform for science communication and discussion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Virtual Poster Session (VPS) of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) was developed by early career scientists as an online tool for communicating and discussing science and research beyond the four walls of a conference venue. Poster sessions often are the backbone of a conference where especially early career scientists get a chance to communicate their research, discuss ideas, data, and scientific problems with their peers and senior scientists. There, they can hone their 'elevator pitch', discussion skills and presentation skills. APECS has taken the poster session one step further and created the VPS - the same idea but independent from conferences, travel, and location. All that is needed is a computer with internet access. Instead of letting their posters collect dust on the computer's hard drive, scientists can now upload them to the APECS website. There, others have the continuous opportunity to comment, give feedback and discuss the work. Currently, about 200 posters are accessible contributed by authors and co-authors from 34 countries. Since January 2010, researchers can discuss their poster with a broad international audience including fellow researchers, community members, potential colleagues and collaborators, policy makers and educators during monthly conference calls via an internet platform. Recordings of the calls are available online afterwards. Calls so far have included topical sessions on e.g. marine biology, glaciology, or social sciences, and interdisciplinary calls on Arctic sciences or polar research activities in a specific country, e.g. India or Romania. They attracted audiences of scientists at all career stages and from all continents, with on average about 15 persons participating per call. Online tools like the VPS open up new ways for creating collaborations and new research ideas and sharing different methodologies for future projects, pushing aside the boundaries of countries and nations, conferences, offices, and disciplines, and provide early career scientists with easily accessible training opportunities for their communication and outreach skills, independent of their location and funding situation.

Renner, A.; Jochum, K.; Jullion, L.; Pavlov, A.; Liggett, D.; Fugmann, G.; Baeseman, J. L.; Apecs Virtual Poster Session Working Group, T.

2011-12-01

468

Evidence of a suffocation alarm system within the periaqueductal gray matter of the rat.  

PubMed

Dyspnea, hunger for air, and urge to flee are the cardinal symptoms of panic attacks. Patients also show baseline respiratory abnormalities and a higher rate of comorbid and antecedent respiratory diseases. Panic attacks are also precipitated by infusion of sodium lactate and inhalation of 5% CO? in predisposed patients but not in healthy volunteers or patients without panic disorder. Accordingly, Klein [Klein (1993) Arch Gen Psychiatry 50:306-317] suggested that clinical panic is the misfiring of an as-yet-unidentified suffocation alarm system. In rats, selective anoxia of chemoreceptor cells by potassium cyanide (KCN) and electrical and chemical stimulations of periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) produce defensive behaviors, which resemble panic attacks. Thus, here we examined the effects of single or combined administrations of CO? (8% and 13%) and KCN (10-80 ?g, i.v.) on spontaneous and PAG-evoked behaviors of rats either intact or bearing electrolytic lesions of PAG. Exposure to CO? alone reduced grooming while increased exophthalmus, suggesting an arousal response to non-visual cues of environment. Unexpectedly, however, CO? attenuated PAG-evoked immobility, trotting, and galloping while facilitated defecation and micturition. Conversely, KCN produced all defensive behaviors of the rat and facilitated PAG-evoked trotting, galloping, and defecation. There were also facilitatory trends in PAG-evoked exophthalmus, immobility, and jumping. Moreover, whereas the KCN-evoked defensive behaviors were attenuated or even suppressed by discrete lesions of PAG, they were markedly facilitated by CO?. Authors suggest that the PAG harbors an anoxia-sensitive suffocation alarm system which activation precipitates panic attacks and potentiates the subject responses to hypercapnia. PMID:22062132

Schimitel, F G; de Almeida, G M; Pitol, D N; Armini, R S; Tufik, S; Schenberg, L C

2012-01-01

469

Chandra Finds Evidence for Stellar Cannibalism  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evidence that a star has recently engulfed a companion star or a giant planet has been found using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The likely existence of such a "cannibal" star provides new insight into how stars and the planets around them may interact as they age. The star in question, known as BP Piscium (BP Psc), appears to be a more evolved version of our Sun, but with a dusty and gaseous disk surrounding it. A pair of jets several light years long blasting out of the system in opposite directions has also been seen in optical data. While the disk and jets are characteristics of a very young star, several clues -- including the new results from Chandra -- suggest that BP Psc is not what it originally appeared to be. Instead, astronomers have suggested that BP Psc is an old star in its so-called red giant phase. And, rather than being hallmarks of its youth, the disk and jets are, in fact, remnants of a recent and catastrophic interaction whereby a nearby star or giant planet was consumed by BP Psc. When stars like the Sun begin to run out of nuclear fuel, they expand and shed their outer layers. Our Sun, for example, is expected to swell so that it nearly reaches or possibly engulfs Earth, as it becomes a red giant star. "It appears that BP Psc represents a star-eat-star Universe, or maybe a star-eat-planet one," said Joel Kastner of the Rochester Institute of Technology, who led the Chandra study. "Either way, it just shows it's not always friendly out there." Several pieces of information have led astronomers to rethink how old BP Psc might be. First, BP Psc is not located near any star-forming cloud, and there are no other known young stars in its immediate vicinity. Secondly, in common with most elderly stars, its atmosphere contains only a small amount of lithium. Thirdly, its surface gravity appears to be too weak for a young star and instead matches up with one of an old red giant. Chandra adds to this story. Young, low-mass stars are brighter than most other stars in X-rays, and so X-ray observations can be used as a sign of how old a star may be. Chandra does detect X-rays from BP Psc, but at a rate that is too low to be from a young star. Instead, the X-ray emission rate measured for BP Psc is consistent with that of rapidly rotating giant stars. The spectrum of the X-ray emission -- that is how the amount of X-rays changes with wavelength -- is consistent with flares occurring on the surface of the star, or with interactions between the star and the disk surrounding it. The magnetic activity of the star itself might be generated by a dynamo caused by its rapid rotation. This rapid rotation can be caused by the engulfment process. "It seems that BP Psc has been energized by its meal," said co-author Rodolfo (Rudy) Montez Jr., also from the Rochester Institute of Technology. The star's surface is obscured throughout the visible and near-infrared bands, so the Chandra observation represents the first detection at any wavelength of BP Psc itself. "BP Psc shows us that stars like our Sun may live quietly for billions of years," said co-author David Rodriguez from UCLA, "but when they go, they just might take a star or planet or two with them." Although any close-in planets were presumably devastated when BP Psc turned into a giant star, a second round of planet formation might be occurring in the surrounding disk, hundreds of millions of years after the first round. A new paper using observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope has reported possible evidence for a giant planet in the disk surrounding BP Psc. This might be a newly formed planet or one that was part of the original planetary system. "Exactly how stars might engulf other stars or planets is a hot topic in astrophysics today," said Kastner. "We have many important details that we still need to work out, so objects like BP Psc are really exciting to find." These results appeared in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Other co-authors on the study were Nicolas Grosso

2010-09-01

470

How Much Mass Makes a Black Hole? - Astronomers Challenge Current Theories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, European astronomers have for the first time demonstrated that a magnetar - an unusual type of neutron star - was formed from a star with at least 40 times as much mass as the Sun. The result presents great challenges to current theories of how stars evolve, as a star as massive as this was expected to become a black hole, not a magnetar. This now raises a fundamental question: just how massive does a star really have to be to become a black hole? To reach their conclusions, the astronomers looked in detail at the extraordinary star cluster Westerlund 1 [1], located 16 000 light-years away in the southern constellation of Ara (the Altar). From previous studies (eso0510), the astronomers knew that Westerlund 1 was the closest super star cluster known, containing hundreds of very massive stars, some shining with a brilliance of almost one million suns and some two thousand times the diameter of the Sun (as large as the orbit of Saturn). "If the Sun were located at the heart of this remarkable cluster, our night sky would be full of hundreds of stars as bright as the full Moon," says Ben Ritchie, lead author of the paper reporting these results. Westerlund 1 is a fantastic stellar zoo, with a diverse and exotic population of stars. The stars in the cluster share one thing: they all have the same age, estimated at between 3.5 and 5 million years, as the cluster was formed in a single star-formation event. A magnetar (eso0831) is a type of neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field - a million billion times stronger than that of the Earth, which is formed when certain stars undergo supernova explosions. The Westerlund 1 cluster hosts one of the few magnetars known in the Milky Way. Thanks to its home in the cluster, the astronomers were able to make the remarkable deduction that this magnetar must have formed from a star at least 40 times as massive as the Sun. As all the stars in Westerlund 1 have the same age, the star that exploded and left a magnetar remnant must have had a shorter life than the surviving stars in the cluster. "Because the lifespan of a star is directly linked to its mass - the heavier a star, the shorter its life - if we can measure the mass of any one surviving star, we know for sure that the shorter-lived star that became the magnetar must have been even more massive," says co-author and team leader Simon Clark. "This is of great significance since there is no accepted theory for how such extremely magnetic objects are formed." The astronomers therefore studied the stars that belong to the eclipsing double system W13 in Westerlund 1 using the fact that, in such a system, masses can be directly determined from the motions of the stars. By comparison with these stars, they found that the star that became the magnetar must have been at least 40 times the mass of the Sun. This proves for the first time that magnetars can evolve from stars so massive we would normally expect them to form black holes. The previous assumption was that stars with initial masses between about 10 and 25 solar masses would form neutron stars and those above 25 solar masses would produce black holes. "These stars must get rid of more than nine tenths of their mass before exploding as a supernova, or they would otherwise have created a black hole instead," says co-author Ignacio Negueruela. "Such huge mass losses before the explosion present great challenges to current theories of stellar evolution." "This therefore raises the thorny question of just how massive a star has to be to collapse to form a black hole if stars over 40 times as heavy as our Sun cannot manage this feat," concludes co-author Norbert Langer. The formation mechanism preferred by the astronomers postulates that the star that became the magnetar - the progenitor - was born with a stellar companion. As both stars evolved they would begin to interact, with energy derived from their orbital motion expended in ejecting the requisite huge quantities of mass from t

2010-08-01

471

[Prevention is the name of the game].  

PubMed

The review on critical limb ischemia (CLI) by Melamed and his co-authors in this issue of Harefuah focuses on treatment modalities but does not address the important issue of prevention, which, I believe, is the most effective tool in saving limbs. Peripheral arterial occlusion secondary to atherosclerosis (ASO) is common in the western hemisphere. Ten percent of the population between the ages 50-55 years and more than 20% of the population over 70 years of age suffer from some degree of ASO. Three percent of these patients will develop severe forms of ischemia. The problem is even worse amongst diabetic patients, where 1 in 1000 will lose a leg. Most patients with leg pain are treated by the orthopedic surgeon and many of those with minor skin changes are referred to a dermatologist, often without proper vascular evaluation, until the condition deteriorates. The secret of limb preservation is threefold: 1) High level of awareness by the primary medical team 2) Dedicated foot clinics and 3) A multidisciplinary team. A rigid protocol of foot examination, pulse palpation and Doppler evaluation, combined with clinical education regarding proper foot wear, can prevent close to 70% of major limb amputations. These simple, inexpensive and non-invasive modalities enable us to both diagnose arterial disease and follow-up on the treatment. An interdisciplinary team of a diabetes expert, foot orthopedic surgeon, podiatrist and a vascular surgeon can, in most cases, build a treatment plan which will alter the course of the disease at an early stage and prevent the development of CLI. The natural course of CLI without revascularization leads to major limb amputation in 70% of patients within a year or two of diagnosis. When vascular reconstruction is not an option, more conservative measures, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), can also be useful in some patients but over-use and abuse of this modality and other alternative treatments must be avoided. The fact that 30% of those patients do not lose their leg, leads to unsubstantiated claims of limb salvage by unproven methods. A major effort of educating both the medical teams and the patients is required in order to decrease the number of patients who will develop CLI. On the other hand, one must remember that for some patients primary amputation can be the best alternative, offering minimal risk and a reasonable quality of life. PMID:21916101

Bass, Arie

2010-12-01

472

The Ultraviolet Albedo of Ganymede  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large set of ultraviolet images of Ganymede have been acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope over the last 15 years. These images have been used almost exclusively to study Ganymede’s stunning auroral emissions (Feldman et al. 2000; Eviatar et al. 2001; McGrath et al. 2004; Saur et al. 2011; McGrath et al. 2013), and even the most basic information about Ganymede’s UV albedo has yet to be gleaned from these data. We will present a first-cut analysis of both disk-averaged and spatially-resolved UV albedos of Ganymede, with focus on the spatially-resolved Lyman-alpha albedo, which has never been considered previously for this satellite. Ganymede's visibly bright regions are known to be rich in water ice, while the visibly dark regions seem to be more carbonaceous (Carlson et al., 1996). At Lyman-alpha, these two species should also have very different albedo values. References Carlson, R. and 39 co-authors, Near-infrared spectroscopy and spectral mapping of Jupiter and the Galilean satellites: Results from Galileo’s initial orbit, Science, 274, 385-388, 1996. Eviatar, A., D. F. Strobel, B. C. Wolven, P. D. Feldman, M. A. McGrath, and D. J. Williams, Excitation of the Ganymede ultraviolet aurora, Astrophys. J, 555, 1013-1019, 2001. Feldman, P. D., M. A. McGrath, D. F. Strobel, H. W. Moos, K. D. Retherford, and B. C. Wolven, HST/STIS imaging of ultraviolet aurora on Ganymede, Astrophys. J, 535, 1085-1090, 2000. McGrath M. A., Lellouch E., Strobel D. F., Feldman P. D., Johnson R. E., Satellite Atmospheres, Chapter 19 in Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, W. McKinnon, Cambridge University Press, 2004. McGrath M. A., Jia, Xianzhe; Retherford, Kurt; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrell F.; Saur, Joachim, Aurora on Ganymede, J. Geophys. Res., doi: 10.1002/jgra.50122, 2013. Saur, J., S. Duling, S., L. Roth, P. D. Feldman, D. F. Strobel, K. D. Retherford, M. A. McGrath, A. Wennmacher, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2011, abstract #SM23D-08, 2011.

McGrath, Melissa; Hendrix, A.

2013-10-01

473

Exploring safety systems for dispensing in community pharmacies: Focusing on how staff relate to organizational components?  

PubMed Central

Background Identifying risk is an important facet of a safety practice in an organization. To identify risk, all components within a system of operation should be considered. In clinical safety practice, a team of people, technologies, procedures and protocols, management structure and environment have been identified as key components in a system of operation. Objectives To explore risks in relation to prescription dispensing in community pharmacies by taking into account relationships between key components that relate to the dispensing process. Methods Fifteen community pharmacies in England with varied characteristics were identified, and data were collected using non-participant observations, shadowing and interviews. Approximately 360 hours of observations and 38 interviews were conducted by the team. Observation field notes from each pharmacy were written into case studies. Overall, 52,500 words from 15 case studies and interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic and line-by-line analyses. Validation techniques included multiple data collectors co-authoring each case study for consensus, review of case studies by members of the wider team including academic and practicing community pharmacists, and patient safety experts and two presentations (internally and externally) to review and discuss findings. Results Risks identified were related to relationships between people and other key components in dispensing. This included how different levels of staff communicated internally and externally, followed procedures, interacted with technical systems, worked with management, and engaged with the environment. In a dispensing journey, the following categories were identified which show how risks are inextricably linked through relationships between human components and other key components: 1) dispensing with divided attention; 2) dispensing under pressure; 3) dispensing in a restricted space or environment; and, 4) managing external influences. Conclusions To identify and evaluate risks effectively, an approach that includes understanding relationships between key components in dispensing is required. Since teams of people in community pharmacies are a key dispensing component, and therefore part of the operational process, it is important to note how they relate to other components in the environment within which they operate. Pharmacies can take the opportunity to reflect on the organization of their systems and review in particular how they can improve on the four key categories identified. PMID:25108523

Harvey, Jasmine; Avery, Anthony J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Boyd, Matthew; Phipps, Denham L.; Barber, Nicholas

2015-01-01

474

Low frequency electromagnetic signals in the atmosphere caused by geodynamics and solar activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the composed structure of the medium and large portions of energy transferred, a seismic excitation in the oceanic or continental lithosphere disturbs all types of geophysical fields. To investigate the problem of electromagnetic (EM) forcing on the atmosphere from the seismically activated lithosphere, we have formulated two mathematical models of interaction of fields of different physical nature resulting in arising of the low-frequency (from 0.1 to 10 Hz by amplitude of a few hundreds of pT) EM signals in the atmosphere. First we have considered the EM field generation in the moving oceanic lithosphere and then in the moving continental one. For both cases, the main physical principles and geological data were applied for formulation of the model and characteristics of the computed signals of different nature agree with measurements of other authors. On the basis of the 2D model of the seismo-hydro-EM-temperature interaction in a lithosphere-Ocean-atmosphere domain, a block-scheme of a multisensory vertically distributed (from a seafloor up to the ionosphere) tsunami precursors’ detection system is described. On the basis of the 3D model of the seismo-EM interaction in a lithosphere-atmosphere domain, we explain effect of location of the future seismic epicenter area (obtained by Prof. Kopytenko, Yu. A. from Inst. IZMIRAN of Russian Acad. Sci. and co-authors) as the result of the magnetic field measurements in the atmosphere near the earth’s surface. We believe that the biosphere effects of forcing on the atmosphere may not be ignored. We formulate the result of our measurements with the system of micro-voltmeters: low-frequency EM disturbances of the atmosphere caused by solar activity (namely, geomagnetic storms with the geomagnetic index values K = 5 and K = 6), are decreasing temporarily the coherence of oscillations of the electric potentials of different points on the surface of a head, i.e. the coherence of the human brain EM processes. We are grateful to Prof. Kopytenko, Yu. A. and participants of the scientific seminars and conferences in IZMIRAN and Space Research Institute, Russian Acad. Sci., for discussions and researchers of the IZMIRAN observatory for data about the K index dynamics.

Novik, Oleg; Ruzhin, Yuri; Ershov, Sergey; Volgin, Max; Smirnov, Fedor

475

Research Opportunities in Solid Earth Science (RESESS): Broadening Participation in Geology and Geophysics (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RESESS is a multi-year, paid, summer research internship program designed for students from underrepresented groups. The students receive extensive mentoring in science research and communication and become part of a community that provides ongoing support. This has been possible in the initial 5 years of the program through collaboration with Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS), where solid earth students have been an integral part of the SOARS cohort, benefiting from social as well as educational interactions. 11 students have taken part in RESESS for at least one year and of these, four students have graduated in geoscience and entered graduate programs in geophysics and one was recently awarded an NSF graduate fellowship. Students have presented over 20 posters at national science meetings, and one has co-authored a peer-reviewed article. 23 scientists have mentored students over the past 5 years and 17 percent of these mentors are from underrepresented groups in science; 19 other scientists and university/science consortia staff have mentored students in written and verbal presentations and supported their integration into the local communities. Mentorship over a period of years is one important hallmark of this program as students have benefited from the support of UNAVCO, IRIS, USGS, and university scientists and staff during the summer, academic year, and at professional meetings such as AGU, GSA, NABGG, and SACNAS as well as consortia and project science workshops (UNAVCO, IRIS, and EarthScope). One goal of the project has been to educate the scientific community on the benefits of mentoring undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in STEM fields. Increasingly, scientists are approaching RESESS to include this program in their implementation of broader impacts. RESESS has been funded by NSF for the next five years with plans to expand the number of students, geographic and scientific diversity, and sources of funding for a sustainable program. Collaboration with the IRIS REU program and major research programs such as POLENET began over the past three years. Synergistic activities will be increased with the inauguration of the IRIS Minority Speakers Series, partnership with the Colorado Diversity Initiative, and expanded recruitment and research opportunities from universities and colleges nation-wide.

Eriksson, S. C.; Hubenthal, M.

2009-12-01

476

Obesity with irregular menstrual cycle in young girls.  

PubMed

Obesity is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Obese women are at increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hyperlipidemia, rectal carcinoma and gynecological problems including sub fertility, menstrual dysfunction and polycystic ovarian disease. The aim of this study was to assess relationship of obesity with menstrual irregularity in young girls that can help to create awareness among young girls about obesity and how it can affect fertility. It was a case controlled cross sectional study comprising of 220 participants from different colleges and universities of Karachi and from outpatients department of private clinic and Civil Hospital Karachi. A questionnaire was designed to assess the relationship of obesity with irregular menstrual cycle. Questionnaires were filled by co-authors after taking verbal consent. Data was collected from March 2013 to December 2013 and entered and analyzed on SPSS 16.0. Out of 220 participants obese and overweight were 67(30.4%) and 49(22.2%) respectively. Significant association was found between body composition and menstrual cycle irregularity as menstrual irregularity was present in only 9.5% when the BMI was normal and 14.09% and 24% girls in the overweight and obese categories respectively. Waist to hip ratio was found increased in 61.36% of girls. Sixty four point forty four percent (64.44%) of the girls with increased waist to hip ratio reported menstrual irregularity which makes 39.55% of the total sample population. Dysmenorrhea was reported by 63.6% of participants and family history was positive in 77.3%. Hirsutism was reported in 36.7% and 49.2%, acne in 34.6% and 43.2%, weight gain tendency in 85.7% and 98.5%, types 2 diabetes in 0% and 4.4% and hypertension in 8.16% and 31.3% of overweight and obese participants respectively. This study shows considerable association between overall and central obesity with menstrual cycle irregularity. This study provides the grounds on which foundation of health promotion and awareness programs can be laid for targeted age group. PMID:25725683

Mustaqeem, M; Sadullah, S; Waqar, W; Farooq, M Z; Khan, A; Fraz, T R

2015-01-01

477

Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect

On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura Chiarmonte, in collaboration with LBNL, undertook preliminary technical work evaluating the potential for induced seismicity in Solano County. Part 2 presents technical work preformed during Phase I in the development of a preliminary Certification Framework: Leakage Risk Asse