Science.gov

Sample records for co-authors birgitta wallstedt

  1. Co-Authoring: Composing through Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, Mark W. F.; Clyde, Jean Anne

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on oral language and writing. Describes typical roles that children take on as they work together to create a piece of text (co-author). Offers suggestions for moving learners to more productive and fulfilling co-authoring relationships. (SR)

  2. Analysis of the Putative Remains of a European Patron Saint–St. Birgitta

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Martina; Possnert, Göran; Edlund, Hanna; Budowle, Bruce; Kjellström, Anna; Allen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Saint Birgitta (Saint Bridget of Sweden) lived between 1303 and 1373 and was designated one of Europe's six patron saints by the Pope in 1999. According to legend, the skulls of St. Birgitta and her daughter Katarina are maintained in a relic shrine in Vadstena abbey, mid Sweden. The origin of the two skulls was assessed first by analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to confirm a maternal relationship. The results of this analysis displayed several differences between the two individuals, thus supporting an interpretation of the two skulls not being individuals that are maternally related. Because the efficiency of PCR amplification and quantity of DNA suggested a different amount of degradation and possibly a very different age for each of the skulls, an orthogonal procedure, radiocarbon dating, was performed. The radiocarbon dating results suggest an age difference of at least 200 years and neither of the dating results coincides with the period St. Birgitta or her daughter Katarina lived. The relic, thought to originate from St. Birgitta, has an age corresponding to the 13th century (1215–1270 cal AD, 2σ confidence), which is older than expected. Thus, the two different analyses are consistent in questioning the authenticity of either of the human skulls maintained in the Vadstena relic shrine being that of St. Birgitta. Of course there are limitations when interpreting the data of any ancient biological materials and these must be considered for a final decision on the authenticity of the remains. PMID:20169108

  3. Narrative self-constitution and vulnerability to co-authoring.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Doug

    2016-02-01

    All people are vulnerable to having their self-concepts shaped by others. This article investigates that vulnerability using a theory of narrative self-constitution. According to narrative self-constitution, people depend on others to develop and maintain skills of self-narration and they are vulnerable to having the content of their self-narratives co-authored by others. This theoretical framework highlights how vulnerability to co-authoring is essential to developing a self-narrative and, thus, the possibility of autonomy. However, this vulnerability equally entails that co-authors can undermine autonomy by contributing disvalued content to the agent's self-narrative and undermining her authorial skills. I illustrate these processes with the first-hand reports of several women who survived sexual abuse as children. Their narratives of survival and healing reveal the challenges involved in (re)developing the skills required to manage vulnerability to co-authoring and how others can help in this process. Finally, I discuss some of the implications of co-authoring for the healthcare professional and the therapeutic relationship. PMID:26983745

  4. Facilitating Co-Authoring: Reflections of Content and Language Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, J.

    2010-01-01

    During a content and language project at a University of Technology (UoT) in Cape Town, South Africa, pairs of language and content lecturers, whose broad definition of integration was "the provision of linguistic access to content knowledge", co-authored ten integrated textbooks. Their intention was to assist first year learners with their…

  5. Co-Authoring: A Natural Form of Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Ann D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a method of improving student term papers that employs an approach requiring students to co-author a paper with other students in a group. Describes the four key elements of successful cooperative learning. Provides details about how this approach can be carried out. (HB)

  6. A new method to construct co-author networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Li, Yunpeng; Ruan, Zichan; Fu, Guangyuan; Chen, Xiaowu; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method to evaluate the importance of nodes in a given network. The proposed method is based on the PageRank algorithm. However, we have made necessary improvements to combine the importance of the node itself and that of its community status. First, we propose an improved method to better evaluate the real impact of a paper. The proposed method calibrates the real influence of a paper over time. Then we propose a scheme of evaluating the contribution of each author in a paper. We later develop a new method to combine the information of the author itself and the structure of the co-author network. We use the number of co-authorship to calculate the effective distance between two authors, and evaluate the strength of their influence to each other with the law of gravity. The strength of influence is used to build a new network of authors, which is a comprehensive topological representation of both the quality of the node and its role in network. Finally, we apply our method to the Erdos co-author community and AMiner Citation Network to identify the most influential authors.

  7. Socioculturally Situated Narratives as Co-Authors of Student Teachers' Learning from Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philpott, Carey

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the ways in which student teachers' experiential learning is mediated by socioculturally situated narrative resources. The research uses Wertsch's idea of the narrative template as a co-author of individual narratives. This idea is developed to be useful in the particular context of initial teacher…

  8. Co-Authoring Classroom Texts: Shifting Participant Roles in Writing Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Joanne; Maier, Maryrita

    2000-01-01

    Shows how one first-grade teacher explicitly modeled her own authorship processes and how students took up those processes in their own writing. Analyzes classroom discourse to illustrate how the teacher and students shifted roles in the participation framework of writing activity among teacher, author, co-author, and overhearer to facilitate the…

  9. [Equally or equitably? Author roles and co-author shares in scientific publication].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades the share of co-authored and, particularly, multi-authored papers has increased immensely. The paper deals with the causes and consequences of this phenomenon, specifically with those connected with scientometric analyses. Possibilities for fractional count of publications and citations, as well as problems of interpreting h-index and self-citation in case of multi-authored papers are focused upon. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(13), 512-516. PMID:26996899

  10. Co-Authoring in the Classroom: Creating an Environment for Effective Collaboration. Theory & Research into Practice (TRIP) Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Helen

    This book is in favor of the inclusion of co-authoring in writing instruction and provides theoretical and research background to support the value of this strategy, which involves more than just peer editing and small-group revision. According to the book, co-authoring builds naturally on the social emphasis of the writing process and…

  11. Coherent measures of the impact of co-authors in peer review journals and in proceedings publications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the coauthor effect in different types of publications, usually not equally respected in measuring research impact. A priori unexpected relationships are found between the total coauthor core value, ma, of a leading investigator (LI), and the related values for their publications in either peer review journals (j) or in proceedings (p). A surprisingly linear relationship is found: ma(j) + 0.4 ma(p) = ma(jp) . Furthermore, another relationship is found concerning the measure of the total number of citations, Aa, i.e. the surface of the citation size-rank histogram up to ma. Another linear relationship exists : Aa(j) + 1.36 Aa(p) = Aa(jp) . These empirical findings coefficients (0.4 and 1.36) are supported by considerations based on an empirical power law found between the number of joint publications of an author and the rank of a coauthor. Moreover, a simple power law relationship is found between ma and the number (rM) of coauthors of an LI: ma ≃ rMμ ; the power law exponent μ depends on the type (j or p) of publications. These simple relations, at this time limited to publications in physics, imply that coauthors are a "more positive measure" of a principal investigator role, in both types of scientific outputs, than the Hirsch index could indicate. Therefore, to scorn upon co-authors in publications, in particular in proceedings, is incorrect. On the contrary, the findings suggest an immediate test of coherence of scientific authorship in scientific policy processes.

  12. A generalized view of self-citation: direct, co-author, collaborative, and coercive induced self-citation.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of self-citation can present in many different forms, including direct, co-author, collaborative, and coercive induced self-citation. It can also pertain to the citation of single scientists, groups of scientists, journals, and institutions. This article presents some case studies of extreme self-citation practices. It also discusses the implications of different types of self-citation. Self-citation is not necessarily inappropriate by default. In fact, usually it is fully appropriate but often it is even necessary. Conversely, inappropriate self-citation practices may be highly misleading and may distort the scientific literature. Coercive induced self-citation is the most difficult to discover. Coercive Induced self-citation may happen directly from reviewers of articles, but also indirectly from reviewers of grants, scientific advisors who steer a research agenda, and leaders of funding agencies who may espouse spending disproportionately large funds in research domains that perpetuate their own self-legacy. Inappropriate self-citation can be only a surrogate marker of what might be much greater distortions of the scientific corpus towards conformity to specific opinions and biases. Inappropriate self-citations eventually affect also impact metrics. Different impact metrics vary in the extent to which they can be gamed through self-citation practices. Citation indices that are more gaming-proof are available and should be more widely used. We need more empirical studies to dissect the impact of different types of inappropriate self-citation and to examine the effectiveness of interventions to limit them. PMID:25466321

  13. Effective Co-Authoring for Business Communication Academicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFrene, Debbie D.; Nelson, Beverly H.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the frequency of coauthoring. Summarizes the issues confronting coauthors. Argues for the formation of business communication coauthorships within the discipline, interdisciplinary coauthorships, and coauthorships with academia and business. (RS)

  14. Answering the World: Adult Literacy and Co-Authoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himley, Margaret; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides reflections on the work of four writing teachers in a neighborhood adult literacy center to understand better the potential "violence" of literacy learning, to reassess assumptions of expressivist pedagogy, and to turn to M. Bakhtin and M. Foucault as interpretive frames for theorizing adult literacy learning. Proposes "coauthoring" as…

  15. Becoming Co-Authors: Toward Sharing Authority in Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an alternative model, the model of shared authority, to the traditional, authoritarian model for authority and obedience for Religious Education. This model moves away from the authoritarian model of a teacher as the authority and the students as obedient listeners in the direction of a shared authority model in which teachers…

  16. Becoming Co-Authors: Toward Sharing Authority in Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an alternative model, the model of shared authority, to the traditional, authoritarian model for authority and obedience for Religious Education. This model moves away from the authoritarian model of a teacher as the authority and the students as obedient listeners in the direction of a shared authority model in which teachers

  17. Discussion about Possibility of Closer Collaboration or Co-authoring

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Matsunaga, Y.

    2012-12-04

    This slide-show presents the status of a fireside corrosion collaboration, including laboratory fireside tests, callide oxy-fuel field exposures, DTA and TGA of SCM ash, and deposit related bell-shaped boiler corrosion and DTA results.

  18. To co-author or not to co-author: how to write, publish, and negotiate issues of authorship with undergraduate research students.

    PubMed

    Burks, Romi L; Chumchal, Matthew M

    2009-01-01

    This Teaching Resource emphasizes the value of publishing with undergraduates and may be particularly helpful to incoming faculty who are new to the process of working with students. Beyond simply extolling the virtues of undergraduate research, we examine how such deep learning experiences for students can translate into unique opportunities for the faculty to demonstrate devotion to both teaching and scholarship. Along with highlighting the reasons faculty should consider publishing with undergraduates, we identify the particular challenges that accompany this suggestion and discuss strategies for overcoming them. Our resource includes two decision trees for helping faculty determine whether publishing with undergraduates represents a reasonable and attainable goal and whether an undergraduate has earned authorship. Based on our experience at primarily undergraduate institutions, we provide a list of strategies that may facilitate writing with undergraduates and lead to certain milestones in the careers of both students and faculty. PMID:19861691

  19. Beyond the Mentor-Mentee Arrangement. Co-authoring Forms of Post-Mentorship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, C. T. Patrick; Mullen, Carol A.

    Two professors provide a duography of their former faculty-student relationship that confronted existing mentoring practices. They explore duography as an arts-based form of qualitative research to extend ways of thinking about and practicing the mentorship of graduate students. Duography is defined as a retrospective written account that two…

  20. Co-Authoring Gender-Queer Youth Identities: Discursive "Tellings" and "Retellings"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltzburg, Susan; Davis, Tamara S.

    2010-01-01

    For youth who challenge the culturally fixed gender dichotomy through nonconventional gender expression, societal reaction can be harsh. Uncovering these youth voices as they pioneer new gender frontiers through pathways of language and social dialogue provides the focus for this manuscript. Drawing from discursive, narrative practices, we sat in…

  1. Multiple narratives: How underserved urban girls engage in co-authoring life stories and scientific stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jessica Jane

    Contemporary critics of science education have noted that girls often fail to engage in learning because they cannot "see themselves" in science. Yet theory on identity, engagement, and the appropriation of scientific discourse remains underdeveloped. Using identity as a lens, I constructed 2-two week lunchtime science sessions for 17 ethnic-minority high school girls who were failing their science classes. The units of instruction were informed by a pilot study and based on principles from literature on engagement in identity work and engagement in productive disciplinary discourse. Primary data sources included 19 hours of videotaped lunchtime sessions, 88 hours of audio-taped individual student interviews (over the course of 3--4 years), and 10 hours of audio-taped small group interviews. Secondary data sources included student journals, 48 hours of observations of science classes, teacher surveys about student participation, and academic school records. I used a case-study approach with narrative and discourse analysis. Not only were the girls individually involved in negotiating ideas about their narratives about themselves and their future selves, but collectively some of the girls productively negotiated multiple identities, appropriated scientific and epistemological discourse and learned science content. This was accomplished through the use of a hybrid discourse that blended identity talk with science talk. The use of this talk supported these girls in taking ownership for or becoming advocates for certain scientific ideas.

  2. Co-Authoring Gender-Queer Youth Identities: Discursive "Tellings" and "Retellings"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltzburg, Susan; Davis, Tamara S.

    2010-01-01

    For youth who challenge the culturally fixed gender dichotomy through nonconventional gender expression, societal reaction can be harsh. Uncovering these youth voices as they pioneer new gender frontiers through pathways of language and social dialogue provides the focus for this manuscript. Drawing from discursive, narrative practices, we sat in

  3. Seismic Imaging and Inversion: Application of Linear Theory (2012), Cambridge University Press, co-authored with Bob Stolt

    SciTech Connect

    Weglein, Arthur B.; Stolt, Bob H.

    2012-03-01

    Extracting information from seismic data requires knowledge of seismic wave propagation and reflection. The commonly used method involves solving linearly for a reflectivity at every point within the Earth, but this book follows an alternative approach which invokes inverse scattering theory. By developing the theory of seismic imaging from basic principles, the authors relate the different models of seismic propagation, reflection and imaging - thus providing links to reflectivity-based imaging on the one hand and to nonlinear seismic inversion on the other. The comprehensive and physically complete linear imaging foundation developed presents new results at the leading edge of seismic processing for target location and identification. This book serves as a fundamental guide to seismic imaging principles and algorithms and their foundation in inverse scattering theory and is a valuable resource for working geoscientists, scientific programmers and theoretical physicists.

  4. The Co-Authored Curriculum: High-School Teachers' Reasons for Including Students' Extra-Curricular Interests in Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagay, Galit; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Peleg, Ran

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of a gap between curricular requirements and what students actually want to know. One of the factors influencing what is taught in the classroom is teachers' attitudes towards integrating their students' interests. This study investigated what prompts high-school teachers who prepare students for national matriculation…

  5. The Serious Joy and the Joyful Work of Play: Children becoming Agentive Actors in Co-Authoring Themselves and Their World through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetsenko, Anna; Ho, Pi-Chun Grace

    2015-01-01

    In most cultures, play seems to matter a great deal to young children. This is evidenced by the vast amount of time children spent playing and the combination of often unsurpassed passion, imagination, and energy which they invest in this activity. This paper explores why play matters through the lens of Bakhtin's dialogic approach combined with

  6. The Role of Postgraduate Students in Co-Authoring Open Educational Resources to Promote Social Inclusion: A Case Study at the University of Cape Town

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl; Paskevicius, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Like many universities worldwide, the University of Cape Town (UCT) in South Africa has joined the open educational resources (OER) movement, making a selection of teaching and learning materials available through its OER directory, UCT OpenContent. However, persuading and then supporting busy academics to share their teaching materials as OER

  7. The Role of Postgraduate Students in Co-Authoring Open Educational Resources to Promote Social Inclusion: A Case Study at the University of Cape Town

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson-Williams, Cheryl; Paskevicius, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Like many universities worldwide, the University of Cape Town (UCT) in South Africa has joined the open educational resources (OER) movement, making a selection of teaching and learning materials available through its OER directory, UCT OpenContent. However, persuading and then supporting busy academics to share their teaching materials as OER…

  8. The Serious Joy and the Joyful Work of Play: Children becoming Agentive Actors in Co-Authoring Themselves and Their World through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetsenko, Anna; Ho, Pi-Chun Grace

    2015-01-01

    In most cultures, play seems to matter a great deal to young children. This is evidenced by the vast amount of time children spent playing and the combination of often unsurpassed passion, imagination, and energy which they invest in this activity. This paper explores why play matters through the lens of Bakhtin's dialogic approach combined with…

  9. Education and the Child Labor Paradox Today. Essay Review of "Children on the Streets of the Americas" (Roslyn A. Mickelson, editor); "The Policy Analysis of Child Labor: A Comparative Study" (Christiaan Grootaert, Harry Anthony Patrinos); "What Works for Working Children?" (Jo Boyden, Birgitta Ling, William Myers); "Child Employment in Britain: A Social and Psychological Analysis" (Sandy Hobbs, Jim McKechnie); and "Bud, Not Buddy" (Christopher Paul Curtis).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, David

    2001-01-01

    Reviews five books on child labor, published 1997-2000, with reference to the International Labour Organization's 1999 convention that retreats from its previous hard stance on child labor. Discusses street children; public policy on child labor, child welfare, and school attendance; types of children's work; and working children as agents…

  10. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include reports, theses,…

  11. Neurolinguistic Papers: Proceedings of the Finnish Conference of Neurolinguistics (2nd, Joensuu, Finland, May 31-June 1, 1985). AFinLA Series No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Jussi, Ed.; Koivuselka-Sallinen, Paivi, Ed.

    A collection of papers on neurolinguistics includes: "Communication Strategies in Aphasia" (Elisabeth Ahlsen); "Speech Planning in the Light of Stuttering" (Ann-Marie Alme); "L. S. Tsvetkova's Aphasia Rehabilitation Method and Its Applications" (Ritva Hanninen); "Semantic Aphasia and Luria's Neurolinguistic Model" (Birgitta Johnsen); "Aphasic…

  12. Retraction of Hard, Lozano, and Tversky (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, B. M.; Lozano, S. C.; Tversky, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reports a retraction of "Hierarchical encoding of behavior: Translating perception into action" by Bridgette Martin Hard, Sandra C. Lozano and Barbara Tversky (Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2006[Nov], Vol 135[4], 588-608). All authors retract this article. Co-author Tversky and co-author Hard believe that the research results cannot…

  13. Corrigendum to "Vertical and horizontal concentration profiles from a tracer experiment in an heterogeneous urban area" [Atmos. Res. 154C (2015) 126-137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connan, O.; Laguionie, P.; Maro, D.; Hébert, D.; Mestayer, P. G.; Rodriguez, F.; Rodrigues, V.; Rosant, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    The authors regret that a co-author was missed in the original article. They would like to add Dr. M. Francis as a co-author of this article. His affiliation is IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS, Laboratoire de Radioécologie, Cherbourg-Octeville, France.

  14. Lonely, Isolated People May Be Prone to Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Holt-Lunstad. An associate professor of psychology and neuroscience at Brigham Young University, she co-authored an ... Holt-Lunstad, Ph.D., associate professor, psychology and neuroscience, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah; April 19, 2016, ...

  15. Could Higher Vitamin D Doses Harm Seniors Prone to Falls?

    MedlinePlus

    ... means that it is safe," cautioned Dr. Steven Cummings, research scientist with California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute in San Francisco. Cummings is co-author, along with Dr. Douglas Kiel, ...

  16. On the Sociology of Higher Education: A Bibliography of Burton R. Clark. Public Administration Series: Bibliography P-763.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quay, Richard H.

    A brief professional biography of Burton R. Clark introduces a bibliography of 59 items written, edited, or co-authored by Dr. Clark since 1954. Items include chapters, handbooks, journal articles, monographs, essays, books, and encyclopedia articles. (MSE)

  17. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Edward Kennedy (D-MA) partnered with Senator Gordon Smith (R-OR) to co-author the Laboratory Test ... introduced by Senator Edward Kennedy and Senator Gordon Smith. August 2006 : Genomics and Personalized Medicine Act of ...

  18. Could IVF Raise Children's Odds for Blood Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers, said Amirian and her editorial co-author, Melissa Bondy, also of Baylor's Duncan Cancer Center. Mothers ... Baylor College of Medicine's Duncan Cancer Center, Houston; Melissa Bondy, Ph.D., professor, cancer prevention, Baylor College ...

  19. Certain Cancers Seem Less Likely for Kids of Hispanic Moms Born Outside U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevention," said Julia Heck, of the University of California, Los Angeles, and her study co-authors. It ... the investigators analyzed data from children born in California between 1983 and 2012. The analysis was limited ...

  20. Graphic Warnings on Cigarettes Help Smokers Consider Quitting

    MedlinePlus

    ... study co-author Ellen Peters, a professor of psychology, said in a university news release. "Policies requiring ... lead author Abigail Evans, a postdoctoral researcher in psychology, said in the university news release. The study ...

  1. Bedbug Gene Mapping May Yield Critter's Secrets

    MedlinePlus

    ... have incredible natural defenses that protect them against pesticides, but they also appear to be particularly vulnerable ... like outer shell serves as a barrier against pesticides in two ways, said co-author of the ...

  2. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clish, PhD, of the Broad Institute and Harvard University. Co-authors are Margaret Torrence, Brian Fiske, Shawn ... Healthcare System; Barbara Cochrane, PhD, RN, of the University of Washington School of Nursing; Simin Liu, MD, ...

  3. The relationship between microbial DNA concentrations and swimming associated health effects at a tropical environment bathing beach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between microbial DNA concentrations and swimming associated health effects at a tropical environment bathing beach. Timothy 1. Wade, presenter. Co-authors: Alfred P. Dufour, Kristen Brenner, Rich Haugland, Larry Wymer, Elizabeth Sams Fecal indicator bacteria (F...

  4. NASA Now Minute: Earth and Space Science: 100 Billion Planets - Duration: 62 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stephen Kane, co-author of the article, “Study Shows Our Galaxy has 100Billion Planets” reveals details about this incredible study explainsjust how common planets are in our Milky Way galaxy...

  5. Depression Research - The STAR*D Study - Relief in Hours?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The STAR*D Study New research reveals that, by working ... Southwestern Medical Center and co-authors of the STAR*D study. Photo courtesy of University of Texas ...

  6. Home Remedy for Skin Cancer May Cause Damage, Mask New Growth

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Home Remedy For Skin Cancer May Cause Damage, Mask New Growth 'Black salve' made FDA's fake ... cancer out,' when, in fact, it just indiscriminately damages anything it touches," study co-author Dr. Mark ...

  7. ISS Update: Nutrition Manager Talks About Children's Book '€œSpace Nutrition' - Duration: 12 minutes.

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean interviews Scott Smith, Manager of Nutritional Biochemistry at Johnson Space Center, about the children'€™s book he co-authored called "Space Nutrition."€ T...

  8. Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pharmacology at the University of Bordeaux in France. Moore is also the co-author of an ... Ph.D., department of pharmacology, University of Bordeaux, France; Shaheda Quraishi, physiatrist, Northwell Health Pain Center, Great ...

  9. Quantum Effects in Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  10. Retraction.

    PubMed

    2015-10-15

    This article has been retracted at the request of: Editor-in-Chief and Co-author 'COX-2 inhibitors suppress integrin ?5 gene expression in human lung carcinoma cells through activation of Erk: involvement of Sp1 and AP-1 sites' by ShouWei Han and Jesse Roman The above article, published online on 11 April 2005 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the co-author, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Peter Lichter, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The Retraction has been agreed because serious errors related to image duplication were identified in some of the figures presented. An investigation found that the errors were performed by the first and corresponding author, ShouWei Han, without the knowledge of the co-author. ShouWei Han has not responded to requests by the journal or the co-author. Therefore, the co-author has requested the Retraction of this article and apologizes to the readers of the journal. Reference Han, S. and Roman, J. (2005), COX-2 inhibitors suppress integrin ?5 expression in human lung carcinoma cells through activation of Erk: Involvement of Sp1 and AP-1 sites. Int. J. Cancer, 116: 536-546. doi: 10.1002/ijc.21125. PMID:26252813

  11. Assessing the true role of coauthors in the h-index measure of an author scientific impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.

    2015-03-01

    A method based on the classical principal component analysis leads to demonstrate that the role of co-authors should give a h-index measure to a group leader higher than usually accepted. The method rather easily gives what is usually searched for, i.e. an estimate of the role (or "weight") of co-authors, as the additional value to an author papers' popularity. The construction of the co-authorship popularity H-matrix is exemplified and the role of eigenvalues and the main eigenvector component are discussed. Examples illustrate the points and serve as the basis for suggesting a generally practical application of the concept.

  12. Contributorships Are Not 'Weighable' to be Equal.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-05-01

    A new trend to assign some authors as 'first co-authors' is noticeable in scientific publications as a statement highlighting that two or more authors 'contributed equally' to a reported work. However, the requirements of scientific rigor, honesty, and accuracy in academic standards make such statements invalid and, thus, should be avoided. A potential solution is to specify the role of each co-author, from study conception to communication of results, and let readers judge the importance of each contribution by themselves. Alternatively, authors should demonstrate how they contributed 'equally' when they are defined as 'equal contributors'. PMID:27025412

  13. The Formation and Development of Co-Operations among South African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebken, Heinke

    2008-01-01

    Organizational collaboration is "en vogue", especially in higher education. So far, little is known about the mechanisms that explain co-operation formation and their impact on the social structure of the research systems. By examining co-authored research papers written at South African universities between 1966 and 2006, co-operation structures…

  14. At the Schoolhouse Gate: Lessons in Intellectual Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Gloria; Lent, ReLeah Cossett

    Over the last two decades, the co-authors of this book have worked together to build a tradition of intellectual freedom within public schools. The book describes their struggles as cultural workers, the pedagogical and legal strategies they employed, the resistance they encountered, the lessons they learned, and the impact that they have seen on…

  15. More than Tolerance for Engineering Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Andrea; Herfat, Safa; Truesdell, Pam; Miller, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Described herein is a science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) secondary lesson created by graduate engineering student Safa Herfat, with modifications by her co-authors. The lessons learned from this case study are explored through an explanation of tolerance, a description of the lesson, the results obtained, and participant…

  16. Research Ideas for the Classroom: High School Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia S., Ed.

    Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the high…

  17. Inspection Judgements on Urban Schools: A Case for the Defence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorton, Julian; Williams, Melanie; Wrigley, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article is co-authored by two urban school Heads in the north of England with the support of an academic partner. The article begins with the phenomenon of official judgements of urban schools, made by the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills, a semi-privatised and supposedly independent arm of government.…

  18. USGS Oceanographer Named to IPCC Report

    Asbury (Abby) H. Sallenger has been named one of the authors of a chapter in the next IPCC report, due to be published in 2014. Sallenger has been assigned to co-author Chapter 5 of the Fifth Assessment Report, entitled Coastal Systems and Low-Lying Areas. This chapter will contain an international ...

  19. On the Nature of Policy and Administration in Higher Education: A Bibliography of Algo D. Henderson. Public Administration Series: Bibliography P-947.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quay, Richard H.

    A bibliography of materials authored, co-authored, or edited by Algo D. Henderson (1932-1978) on the nature of policy and administration in higher education is presented. Topics include: general education in the community college, training university administrators, admitting black students to medical and dental schools, liberal education in the…

  20. Unleashing Deep Smarts: The Most Valuable Untapped Source of Knowledge Lies within the District's Own Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbach, Harold J.; Butler, Alfred R., IV

    2005-01-01

    A widely applied premise in the field of business asserts that the key to an organization's success in today's changing environment is a world-class knowledge management system. The most critical value-added piece of this puzzle lies in what co-authors Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap in their book Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer…

  1. N.Y.C. Study Finds Gains for Charters: Research Shows Schools Closing City-Suburb Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    New York City's charter schools are making strides in closing achievement gaps between disadvantaged inner-city students and their better-off suburban counterparts, a new study concludes. The study, conducted by Stanford University researcher Caroline M. Hoxby and her co-authors Sonali Mararka and Jenny Kang, is based on eight years of data for…

  2. Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Intergenerational Reflections--An Interview with Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTighe Musil, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    In a September 2013 interview, Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu--whose passion for public service is manifested in differing ways and from two dramatically different generational standpoints--discussed insights from their co-authored book, "Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Two Generations Reflect on Public Service (2013)." Septuagenarian Tom…

  3. Intercom, 77. Explorations in the Emergent Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanvey, Robert

    The issue of Intercom promotes an awareness of the world as a system that poses new possibilities and obligations for educators as well as policy makers. The first part includes interviews with and excerpts from the works of Denis Meadows, joint author of Limits to Growth; Mihajlo Mesarovic, co-author of Mankind at the Turning Point; Robert

  4. The Contradictions of Contemporary Culture: A Tribute to Norman Jay Levitt (1943-2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Norman Jay Levitt was the author's good friend, collaborator, and co-author. He was--above, before, and after politics--an honest inquirer. His socio-cultural views evolved continuously. Levitt, truth-seeker and liberal, was impatient with, and a devastating critic of, the political correctness and--even worse--the philosophic triviality that…

  5. Fair Play: Teaching the Logical Fallacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Susan

    This paper describes a freshman composition course which looks at racism and sexism in science, and within which the instructor uses a 1989 "Atlantic Monthly" piece by R.J. Herrnstein, co-author with Charles Murray of "The Bell Curve." In his article, Herrnstein argues that the intelligence of the nation is declining because educated young women…

  6. Implementation of the Biosphere Compatibility Principle in Urban Planning: How to Train Next-Generation Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanova, Zinaida Ilyinichna; Yudenkova, Olga Valeryevna; Ishkov, Aleksandr Dmitrievich; Shnyrenkov, Evgeny Anatolyevich

    2015-01-01

    The co-authors address the relevant issues concerning the need to implement the principle of the biosphere compatibility as the core prerequisite for the symbiotic co-existence of man and nature. Caring treatment of the biosphere, termination of its excessive exploitation, analysis of the ratio between the biospheric potential of specific areas…

  7. From Idea to Product--Translating Knowledge between the Lab and the Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Ayfer Habib

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three essays looking at innovation at Academic Medical Centers. It tries to empirically explore the problem of translating knowledge from the laboratory bench to the clinic and from the clinic to the bench. Chapter 1, co-authored with Iain Cockburn, establishes the importance of in-house complementary knowledge in

  8. More than Tolerance for Engineering Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Andrea; Herfat, Safa; Truesdell, Pam; Miller, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Described herein is a science, mathematics, engineering, and technology (STEM) secondary lesson created by graduate engineering student Safa Herfat, with modifications by her co-authors. The lessons learned from this case study are explored through an explanation of tolerance, a description of the lesson, the results obtained, and participant

  9. Who Writes History? Developing a Social Imagination with Third Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaleski, Joan; Zinnel, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Over her 23 years of teaching elementary school, Vera, a third grade teacher (and co-author of this article), had often fallen into the familiar rhythm of the fall social studies curriculum, with its predictable narrative of discovery, bravery, heroism, and thanksgiving. Her journey to becoming a more reflective, thoughtful, and equitable teacher…

  10. Storytelling as Scholarship: A Writerly Approach to Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Sondra; Counihan, Beth; McCormack, Tim; Schnee, Emily

    2007-01-01

    What does it mean to take a writerly approach to research? Sondra Perl and her co-authors have pondered this question over the past five years as they have each worked with her to design and draft dissertations that combine their work as literacy researchers with their love of writing. Each of them has moved toward storytelling as a compelling and…

  11. Dealing with Diversity: A Key Issue for Educational Management. Proceedings of the ENIRDEM Conference (14th, Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, September 22-25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pol, Milan, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    An anthology of speeches of the 14th conference of the European Network for Improving Research and Development in Educational Management (ENIRDEM), held on 22 to 25 September 2005 in Brno and Telc, the Czech Republic, this book contains 13 contributions by 19 speakers and co-authors, covering various questions related to the topic of diversity in…

  12. Taking the Awful out of the German Language: A Study of a New Way to Teach German Gender and Plural Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraiss, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a study of a method for teaching German gender and plural assignment developed by the late Donald Steinmetz. My primary source for classroom material was the unpublished handbook for students that Steinmetz co-authored with Donald Nelson, The Joy of Gender: A Student Handbook made available to me by his son, Erik Steinmetz. In the

  13. A World of Ideas: International Survey Gives a Voice to Teachers Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Kristen Weatherby is a senior policy analyst at OECD in the education directorate. She runs the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and is author or co-author of publications and blog posts on TALIS and teachers. She started her career as a classroom teacher in the United States before working in education in the private sector in

  14. Positioning New Patterns of Privilege in Learning: A Response to Ware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxton-Buursma, Debra J.; Mariage, Troy V.

    2011-01-01

    This special series represents collective courage because what is willing to be risked may be profound. At center is a willingness to reach out and cultivate new conversations on disability. Indeed, the artists who contribute to Ware's article are key co-authors; their art ushers us into a new disability literacy that extends and challenges…

  15. The Roles of a Visual Literacy Component in Middle School Language Arts Curricula: A Case Study with At-Risk Students and Their Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Virginia; Dressler, Becky; Hoback, John

    As a co-author of the GEAR-UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant proposal to the Department of Education in 1999, the primary author (Kohl) of this paper is in her third year of working at Franklin Middle School, which largely serves at-risk minority students through the University of South Florida (USF),…

  16. Lipid Analysis: Isolation, separation, identification and lipidomic analysis - Fourth Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Review of book, Lipid Analysis, Isolation, separation, identification and lipidomic analysis - Fourth Edition, by W.W. Chrisitie and X. Han, 2010. William W. Christie is considered by many to be the most prominent international authority on lipid analysis. The co-author, Dr. Xianlin Han, is a pion...

  17. Reaching for the Stars in Gifted Education: A Critique of the WICS Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldhusen, John F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is, in one sense, a Sternberg review. It references 36 papers first authored by him and three co-authored or 42% of all the papers cited. Most of it deals with what should be viewed as goals of gifted education, very little of it with practical aspects of the process of identifying/selecting youth for specific programmes. The paper is…

  18. From Idea to Product--Translating Knowledge between the Lab and the Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Ayfer Habib

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three essays looking at innovation at Academic Medical Centers. It tries to empirically explore the problem of translating knowledge from the laboratory bench to the clinic and from the clinic to the bench. Chapter 1, co-authored with Iain Cockburn, establishes the importance of in-house complementary knowledge in…

  19. Fraud strikes top genome lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1996-11-08

    Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

  20. Learning to Teach Inclusively: Student Teachers' Classroom Inquiries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Celia

    2006-01-01

    This book--co-authored by a teacher educator, a diverse group of five pre-service student teachers, and their student teaching supervisor--takes a unique, illuminating look at the experience of student teaching from the perspective of student teachers. It is premised on learning to teach as an inquiry process enriched by collaborative

  1. Producing a Documentary in the Third Grade: Reaching All Students through Movie Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce; Heckart, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article details the work of third grade teacher, co-author Kim Heckart, as she engaged her students in making historical documentaries: a project that succeeded in reaching all of her third-grade students. For the last five years, Kim has required students to make historical documentaries. As her students produced these works, Kim conversed…

  2. Reflection on the Role of Artists: A Case Study on the Hidden Visual Curriculum of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marissa H.; Ng-He, Carol; Lopez-Bosch, Maria Acaso

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, Maria Acaso, professor in Art Education at the Universidad Complutense Madrid in Spain and a co-author of this article, conducted a comparative research project on visual configurations at different art schools in Europe and the United States. The study of hidden visual curriculum examines how knowledge and cultural/political/social…

  3. Conference Summary: The Central Parsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townes, C. H.; Stolovy, S. R.; Falcke, H.

    1999-06-01

    This is an edited transcript of the summary talk of the Galactic Center conference ``The Central Parsecs'' in Tucson, Arizona, Sep. 7-11, 1998, given by C. Townes. The talk was taped, transcribed, and finally edited by editors who are listed as co-authors.

  4. A World of Ideas: International Survey Gives a Voice to Teachers Everywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Kristen Weatherby is a senior policy analyst at OECD in the education directorate. She runs the Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) and is author or co-author of publications and blog posts on TALIS and teachers. She started her career as a classroom teacher in the United States before working in education in the private sector in…

  5. That's Another Story: An Alternative to the "Official" Way the Urban School Story Is Told

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harridge, Sarah; Stokoe, Sarah; Tan, Jon E. C.

    2014-01-01

    This article, co-authored by two research-active teachers with the support of their academic partner, reports on the resistance of an urban primary school in a northern city of England to the label "disadvantaged school" and various judgements that refuse to take into account its holistic work with students and families from different…

  6. Studying Research Collaboration Patterns via Co-authorship Analysis in the Field of TeL: The Case of "Educational Technology & Society" Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zervas, Panagiotis; Tsitmidelli, Asimenia; Sampson, Demetrios G.; Chen, Nian-Shing; Kinshuk

    2014-01-01

    Research collaboration is studied in different research areas, so as to provide useful insights on how researchers combine existing distributed scientific knowledge and transform it into new knowledge. Commonly used metrics for measuring research collaborative activity include, among others, the co-authored publications (concerned with who works…

  7. The First-Year Urban High School Teacher: Holding the Torch, Lighting the Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Paul J.; Weinberg, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The book tracks co-author Paul Weinberg during his first year of teaching as he is introduced to the daily tribulations of an urban Los Angeles high school. Paul's father Carl Weinberg, who fifty years earlier himself began his career in education an urban secondary school teacher, shares his experiences side-by-side with those of his son.…

  8. Advances in Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Land Surface Modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 10 years ago, John Norman and co-authors proposed a thermal-based land surface modeling strategy that treated the energy exchange and kinetic temperatures of the soil and vegetated components in a unique “Two-Source Model” (TSM) approach. The TSM formulation addresses key factors affecting the...

  9. "Code 99"--SOHN chapter extreme makeover.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Cindy J; Whitaker, Jeanine C

    2005-01-01

    Regional Chapters, both old and new, often experience a lack of participation and interest despite large membership numbers. Often, a few overworked members keep the Chapter afloat. This article, co-authored by two Chapter leaders, explores reasons for these changes and offers some tips for an "Extreme Chapter Makeover". PMID:15754870

  10. Research Ideas for the Classroom: Middle Grades Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Douglas T., Ed.

    Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the middle…

  11. User's Guide: Innovation Configurations for NSDC's Standards for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    This 75-page guidebook is a companion to "Moving NSDC's Staff Development Standards into Practice: Innovation Configurations" Volumes I (ED522734) and II (ED522581). Innovation Configurations are a tool that helps educators better understand what the standards look like in practice. Roy, who co-authored the original volumes, introduces a process…

  12. Teaching in Educational Leadership Using Web 2.0 Applications: Perspectives on What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinsky, E. John; Stevens, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    To prepare 21st Century school leaders, educational leadership professors need to learn and teach the utilization of increasingly sophisticated technologies in their courses. The co-authors, a professor and an educational specialist degree candidate, describe how the use of advanced technologies--such as Wikis, Google Docs, Wimba Classroom, and…

  13. Learning to Teach Inclusively: Student Teachers' Classroom Inquiries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyler, Celia

    2006-01-01

    This book--co-authored by a teacher educator, a diverse group of five pre-service student teachers, and their student teaching supervisor--takes a unique, illuminating look at the experience of student teaching from the perspective of student teachers. It is premised on learning to teach as an inquiry process enriched by collaborative…

  14. Restoring Bonds of Respect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In writing about the Circle of Courage, Martin Brokenleg and his co-authors brought together different professions, racial backgrounds, and upbringing (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). While the Circle of Courage philosophy transcends culture, they initially used Native American images and stories to express these ideas. Because…

  15. A Dialogue on Reclaiming Troubled Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aichhorn, August; Redl, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    This discussion is drawn from the writings of two eminent founders of strength-based approaches to troubled children and adolescents. August Aichhorn is best known for his classic book, "Wayward Youth," and Fritz Redl as co-author of "Children Who Hate". August Aichhorn and Anna Freud mentored a young educational psychologist, Fritz Redl…

  16. The International Symposium on the Further Education of Special School Teachers (Prague, October 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabele, Frantisek

    A symposium on the problems of educating teachers of handicapped youth was organized by the European Information Centre for Further Education of Teachers (Prague, Czechoslovakia) in 1977. The Czechoslovak position on special education teachers was given in the symposium's main paper. Co-authors Frantisek Kabele and Ludvik Edelsberger described the…

  17. General conclusions regarding the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.; Tattersall, R.; Solheim, J.-E.; Charvatova, I.; Scafetta, N.; Jelbring, H.; Wilson, I. R.; Salvador, R.; Willson, R. C.; Hejda, P.; Soon, W.; Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Humlum, O.; Archibald, D.; Yndestad, H.; Easterbrook, D.; Casey, J.; Gregori, G.; Henriksson, G.

    2013-12-01

    In a collection of research papers devoted to the problem of solar variability and its origin in planetary beat, it is demonstrated that the forcing function originates from gravitational and inertial effects on the Sun from the planets and their satellites. This conclusion is shared by nineteen co-authors.

  18. Internationalization on Small College Campuses and the Role of Presidential Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities not only have the opportunity, but also the responsibility, to shape globally-minded citizens. In January 2013, Under Secretary of Education, Martha Kanter, co-authored the lead article in "Change: The Magazine of Higher Education," arguing that "knowledgeable, engaged, globally minded citizens hold the key…

  19. The Formation and Development of Co-Operations among South African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebken, Heinke

    2008-01-01

    Organizational collaboration is "en vogue", especially in higher education. So far, little is known about the mechanisms that explain co-operation formation and their impact on the social structure of the research systems. By examining co-authored research papers written at South African universities between 1966 and 2006, co-operation structures

  20. Beyond the First Workshop: What Else Can You Do to Help Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soven, Margot

    1988-01-01

    Follow-up activities are essential to maintaining a writing-across-the-curriculum program. La Salle University created a second stage of program development through new workshops and symposia, collaborative teaching and co-authoring, and opportunities for student involvement. (MSE)

  1. After "In the Middle."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, Nancie

    1989-01-01

    Nancie Atwell describes her professional experiences after writing "In the Middle." Notes that the birth of her child led to her resignation from teaching. Discusses her involvement in directing a writing project, co-authoring a book about writing, editing a new journal, and documenting the language acquisition of her daughter. (RS)

  2. Essie's Story: The Life and Legacy of a Shoshone Teacher. American Indian Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Esther Burnett; McBeth, Sally

    The life story of Esther Burnett Horne records the memories and experiences of a Native woman born in 1909, who was both pupil and teacher in Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding schools. An introduction by Sally McBeth examines methodological and cultural concerns of collecting and co-authoring a life history. In Chapter 1, Essie begins with oral…

  3. Australia and France on Fire: An Anti-Colonial Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dei, George Sefa; Kempf, Arlo

    2006-01-01

    Professor George Sefa Dei has written and taught extensively in the fields of anti-colonialism and anti-racism. His latest work on the subject is "Anti-Colonialism and Education: The Politics of Resistance," co-edited with Arlo Kempf for Sense Publishers (2006). Dei and Kempf are also co-authoring a forthcoming volume on anti-colonial theory. Arlo…

  4. Facets: The Joys and Frustrations of Writing Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English Journal, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Examines: (l) disagreements with publishers during 36 years of authoring textbooks, (2) difficulties of co-authoring textbooks in view of the haste with which they are produced, (3) necessity for high textbook standards from both teachers and publishers, (4) the fact that there are few textbooks authored by teachers. (NKA)

  5. Gender and Collaboration Patterns in Distance Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; von Prummer, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the associations between gender, collaboration and research methods in distance education research. Following a bibliometric approach, collaboration is operationalised through co-author relationships. The study is based on a review of 695 papers published in five prominent distance education journals between 2000 and 2008. It…

  6. Building Humans and Dances: Exploring Cultural Relevancy as Teaching Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Ellen V. P.; VanDenend Sorge, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    As dance educators in Philadelphia's schools and instructors of dance pedagogy at the university level, the authors offer a glimpse into their teaching practices as a resource for others. The co-authors have a collective twenty years of teaching experience in urban environments, from Shanghai to Chicago, and Philadelphia, where they met as…

  7. Producing a Documentary in the Third Grade: Reaching All Students through Movie Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce; Heckart, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article details the work of third grade teacher, co-author Kim Heckart, as she engaged her students in making historical documentaries: a project that succeeded in reaching all of her third-grade students. For the last five years, Kim has required students to make historical documentaries. As her students produced these works, Kim conversed

  8. Children's Services: Partnerships for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamant-Cohen, Betsy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Co-author of the popular titles "Booktalking Bonanza" and "The Early Literacy Kit", Betsy Diamant-Cohen brings together 18 examples of successful outreach partnerships that children's librarians and administrators can adapt to their own situations. Contributors from the U.S and Canada explain how they partnered with schools, community…

  9. The National Mapping of Teacher Professional Learning Project: A Multi-Dimensional Space?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doecke, Brenton; Parr, Graham

    2011-01-01

    This essay focuses on the "National Mapping of Teacher Professional Learning" (2008), a report that we co-authored along with a number of other researchers on the basis of extensive surveys and interviews relating to the policies and practices of teacher professional learning in Australia. The report is an update of an earlier survey conducted by…

  10. A. F. Ames, Village Schoolmaster. A Memoir.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Edward C.

    This booklet sketches the life, educational theories, and accomplishments of Albert F. Ames (1888-1931). Ames was trained as a mathematician, and served six years as a mathematics teacher in Canada before becoming superintendent of schools in Riverside, Illinois. He co-authored five mathematics textbooks with J. A. McLellan. These texts,…

  11. The Future of the American Faculty: An Interview with Martin J. Finkelstein and Jack H. Schuster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, R. Eugene

    2004-01-01

    Martin J. Finkelstein and Jack H. Schuster have teamed up to continue tracing the changes taking place in faculty work with their Project on the American Faculty. They have published The New Academic Generation: A Profession in Transformation (1998), co-authored with Robert Seal, and are preparing a new manuscript to appear in 2004 with a working…

  12. CORRIGENDUM: Study of turbulent fluctuations driven by the electron temperature gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Study of turbulent fluctuations driven by the electron temperature gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2010-02-01

    We wish to correct the omission of the following co-authors in this article: C. Domier and N. Luhmann, UC Davis, Davis, California, USA and H. Park, POSTECH, Pohang, Korea. The UC Davis work was supported by US DOE Contract No DE-FG02-99ER54518.

  13. Rejecting Ahmed's "Melancholy Migrant": South Sudanese Australians in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anne; Marlowe, Jay; Nyuon, Nyadol

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on related research studies in two urban centres (Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia) with South Sudanese men and women engaged in varying degrees with higher education. The co-authors examine some gendered differences in the process and demands of resettlement, including within employment and education, and its implications for…

  14. (Tenth international conference on conduction and breakdown in dielectric liquids)

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-05

    The traveler attended the 10th International Conference on Conduction and Breakdown in dielectric Liquids held in Grenoble, France, September 10--14, 1990. He chaired the opening session of the conference, presented one paper, co-authored a second paper presented at the meeting, participated in the discussions during the formal sessions, and had informal discussions with many of the participants.

  15. Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Intergenerational Reflections--An Interview with Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTighe Musil, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    In a September 2013 interview, Thomas Ehrlich and Ernestine Fu--whose passion for public service is manifested in differing ways and from two dramatically different generational standpoints--discussed insights from their co-authored book, "Civic Work, Civic Lessons: Two Generations Reflect on Public Service (2013)." Septuagenarian Tom

  16. Collaborative Publication by University Librarians: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the results of a survey conducted at Penn State University that examined the collaborative publications of academic librarians. Discusses co-authors' views of the benefits of collaboration and whether collaboration produces a higher quality journal article than does a single-authored article. (Contains 29 references.) (LRW)

  17. A Paradigm Shift in the Application of Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Land Surface Modeling: John Norman's Critical Contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 10 years ago, John Norman and co-authors proposed a thermal-based land surface modeling strategy that treated the energy exchange and kinetic temperatures of the soil and vegetated components in a unique “two-source” approach addressing the key factors affecting the convective and radiative exc...

  18. John Falk and Lynn Dierking: Building the Field of Informal/Free-Choice Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Léonie J.

    2016-01-01

    This article establishes the importance of "context", a concept that underpins the academic contributions that John Falk and Lynn Dierking have made in building the field of informal/free-choice learning in science education. I consider, in turn, the individual contributions made by each of them prior to their seminal co-authored work,…

  19. The First-Year Urban High School Teacher: Holding the Torch, Lighting the Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Paul J.; Weinberg, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The book tracks co-author Paul Weinberg during his first year of teaching as he is introduced to the daily tribulations of an urban Los Angeles high school. Paul's father Carl Weinberg, who fifty years earlier himself began his career in education an urban secondary school teacher, shares his experiences side-by-side with those of his son.

  20. The Decisive Difference between Dean and Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2009-01-01

    A friend and fellow academic recently told the author that her dean, who directs a professional school at a state university, spends most of his time at conferences hanging out with professors from his institution, as well as with their graduate students and his co-authors on research papers. She said, and the author agreed, that such habits…

  1. Teaching with Folk Stories of the Hmong: An Activity Book. Learning through Folklore Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Dia; Livo, Norma J.

    This book is designed as a guide for teaching students about Hmong culture while building appreciation of worldwide cultural diversity. After providing an overview of the distinct history and customs of the Hmong, co-author Dia Cha shares her experiences growing up in Laotian villages, escaping from communist soldiers, living in refugee camps in…

  2. Opening Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2011-01-01

    Beth Kanter is working hard to get the word out about how best to get the word out. Kanter is CEO of Zoetica, which provides word-of-mouth communication services to nonprofits and socially conscious companies; a decade-long blogger on the topic of social media and nonprofits; and a popular conference speaker and trainer. She is also co-author of…

  3. Taking the Awful out of the German Language: A Study of a New Way to Teach German Gender and Plural Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraiss, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a study of a method for teaching German gender and plural assignment developed by the late Donald Steinmetz. My primary source for classroom material was the unpublished handbook for students that Steinmetz co-authored with Donald Nelson, The Joy of Gender: A Student Handbook made available to me by his son, Erik Steinmetz. In the…

  4. Research Ideas for the Classroom: Middle Grades Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Douglas T., Ed.

    Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the middle

  5. Teaching Engineering Concepts through a Middle School Transmedia Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansell, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brenda; Zimmerman, Ellen; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the background and experiences of three graduate students who co-authored a print-based transmedia book during the summer of 2013. The article provides information about why the transmedia engineering book was designed and provides an overview of the book's creation process. The project was funded through a National

  6. Tai Chi Could Be a Healthy Move for Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... in improving quality of life in patients with cardiovascular diseases -- the leading cause of disability and death in the world," study co-author Yu Liu, said in a journal news release. "But the physical and psychological benefits to these patients of this increasingly popular ...

  7. Who Writes History? Developing a Social Imagination with Third Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaleski, Joan; Zinnel, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Over her 23 years of teaching elementary school, Vera, a third grade teacher (and co-author of this article), had often fallen into the familiar rhythm of the fall social studies curriculum, with its predictable narrative of discovery, bravery, heroism, and thanksgiving. Her journey to becoming a more reflective, thoughtful, and equitable teacher

  8. Generalizability and Specificity of Interpretive Arguments: Observations Inspired by the Commentaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author echoes his co-author's and colleague's pleasure (Hill, this issue) at the thoughtfulness and far-ranging nature of the comments to their initial attempts at test validation for the mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) measures using the validity argument approach. Because of the large number of commentaries they…

  9. From Collaboration to Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Jerry; Marshall, Jill

    2010-01-01

    As co-authors of a recent publication in "Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research", we have received inquiries about the publication process. We will describe the process of creating an article based on team work, in our case the work of the Texas Physics Assessment Team. Many physics teachers have opportunities to participate in

  10. Keeping Students and Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufresne, Jerilyn

    2005-01-01

    This article is based on an interview with a noted expert on school violence who recently co-authored the book Targeting Innocence--When Terrorism Comes to School. Central to school safety are supportive bonds with adults who help create school climates free of bullying. The expert interviewed is Michael Dorn. He recommends that in regard to

  11. Identity Matters in a Short-Term, International Service-Learning Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Peter C.; Karbley, Megan; Yamamoto, Makiko

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the role that identity and the identity development process play in a short-term, international service-learning experience. Employing narrative inquiry, two of the co-authors, student participants in a 2-week service-learning program in Honduras, describe and interpret their service-learning experience in the context of life…

  12. JPL stories: story on the story (series) Careering through JPL, presented by Alice M. Fairhurst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrickson, S.

    2002-01-01

    Alice Fairhurst, co-author of Effective Teaching, Effective Learning, presented an enthusiastic overview of her tenure as a JPL career development and mentoring coordinator (1991-2001). Among other things, Alice is an expert in Keirseyian Temperament and Myers-Briggs typology.

  13. Keeping Students and Schools Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufresne, Jerilyn

    2005-01-01

    This article is based on an interview with a noted expert on school violence who recently co-authored the book Targeting Innocence--When Terrorism Comes to School. Central to school safety are supportive bonds with adults who help create school climates free of bullying. The expert interviewed is Michael Dorn. He recommends that in regard to…

  14. Selected Papers of Joseph T. Impellitteri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Anna DeSantis; Gilli, Angelo C., Sr.

    1975-01-01

    The collection of selected papers of Joseph T. Impellitteri reprints in full, or excerpts from, 46 unpublished position and conference papers, research and program proposals, and project reports, and from 20 published articles, chapters from edited collections, bulletins and special studies which Impellitteri authored or co-authored. The papers…

  15. Exercise Physiology and the Academy: Contributions to Physiological Concepts and Biological Systems during the Commemorative Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the contributions made by Academy Fellows during the past 75 years to concepts within the body of knowledge associated with exercise physiology, a literature search was undertaken. Of the charter Fellows, Hetherington and eight others (34%) were identified. Schneider in 1933 was the first of 18 Fellows who became authors, co-authors,…

  16. Return of the Google Game: More Fun Ideas to Transform Students into Skilled Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Katrine

    2008-01-01

    Teens are impatient and unsophisticated online researchers who are often limited by their poor reading skills. Because they are attracted to clean and simple Web interfaces, they often turn to Google--and now Wikipedia--to help meet their research needs. The Google Game, co-authored by this author, teaches kids that there is a well-thought-out…

  17. Becoming Connected, Being Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Julienne; Ashburner, Charlotte; Holman, Cheryl

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights perspectives on action research in education, health and social care and was originally presented as a keynote at the International Practitioner Research Conference and Collaborative Action Research Conference in 2005. The paper links with the other conference keynote given by Stephen Kemmis, co-author of "Becoming Critical".…

  18. Bandura, Ross, and Ross: Observational Learning and the Bobo Doll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artino, Anthony R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Since the publication of their seminal article entitled, "Transmission of Aggression Through Imitation of Aggressive Models" (Bandura, Ross, & Ross, 1961), the work of Albert Bandura and his co-authors has had an immeasurable impact on the field of psychology, in general, and educational psychology, more specifically. The purpose of this report is…

  19. Teaching Engineering Concepts through a Middle School Transmedia Book

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansell, Alicia; Quintanilla, Brenda; Zimmerman, Ellen; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the background and experiences of three graduate students who co-authored a print-based transmedia book during the summer of 2013. The article provides information about why the transmedia engineering book was designed and provides an overview of the book's creation process. The project was funded through a National…

  20. Building Humans and Dances: Exploring Cultural Relevancy as Teaching Artists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Ellen V. P.; VanDenend Sorge, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    As dance educators in Philadelphia's schools and instructors of dance pedagogy at the university level, the authors offer a glimpse into their teaching practices as a resource for others. The co-authors have a collective twenty years of teaching experience in urban environments, from Shanghai to Chicago, and Philadelphia, where they met as

  1. Collaborators' Attitudes about Differences of Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.

    The attitudes of long-term collaborators on research publications about the negotiation of substantive differences of opinion were studied. Long-term collaborators were those who had co-authored publications with another academic for 10 years or more. Multiple sources of data collected from both members of 12 collaborative pairs included…

  2. From Collaboration to Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Jerry; Marshall, Jill

    2010-01-01

    As co-authors of a recent publication in "Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research", we have received inquiries about the publication process. We will describe the process of creating an article based on team work, in our case the work of the Texas Physics Assessment Team. Many physics teachers have opportunities to participate in…

  3. Despotism, Democracy, and the Evolutionary Dynamics of Leadership and Followership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vugt, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Responds to comments made by George B. Graen and Stephen J. Guastello on the current author's article Leadership, followership, and evolution: Some lessons from the past by Van Vugt, Hogan, and Kaiser. In the original article my co-authors and I proposed a new way of thinking about leadership, informed by evolutionary (neo-Darwinian) theory. In…

  4. Who's on First? Listing Authors by Relative Contribution Trumps the Alphabet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Political science as a discipline lacks any convention on the order in which authors should be listed in co-authored publications. As a result, the order of authors' surnames currently provides no information to other scholars, hiring and promotion committees, and other reviewers about the relative contributions of each collaborator. This lack of

  5. Research Ideas for the Classroom: Early Childhood Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Robert J., Ed.

    Research Ideas for the Classroom is a three-volume series of research interpretations for early childhood, middle grades, and high school mathematics classrooms. Each volume looks at research from the perspective of the learner, the content, and the teacher, and chapters are co-authored by a researcher and a teacher. Chapter titles in the early…

  6. COEO's Landmark Research Summary: "Reconnecting Children through Outdoor Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linney, Grant

    2007-01-01

    Over the past year, Andrea Foster reviewed a wide array of current and international research into the multiple, powerful and lasting outcomes produced through utilizing outdoor and experiential education (OEE) as a key learning methodology. As co-authors, Foster and Linney produced an 80-page document that reports the findings according to the…

  7. The Freakonomics of Tenure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The ever-simmering question of whether the tenure system should be reformed lit up the blogosphere, ignited by an online essay from the (tenured) professor Steven D. Levitt, co-author of the publishing phenomenon "Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything" and the popular blog Freakonomics. When Levitt posted "Let's…

  8. Three Essays on Estimating Causal Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutsch, Jonah

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is composed of three distinct chapters, each of which addresses issues of estimating treatment effects. The first chapter empirically tests the Value-Added (VA) model using school lotteries. The second chapter, co-authored with Michael Wood, considers properties of inverse probability weighting (IPW) in simple treatment effect…

  9. A Bibliometric Analysis of Collaboration in the Field of Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Ying; Foo, Schubert; Chowdhury, Gobinda

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the collaborative patterns of the information retrieval research field using co-authored articles retrieved from "Social Science Citation Index" for a period of 11 years, from 1987 to 1997. Results reveal an upward trend of collaborative research with interdisciplinary and intra-disciplinary scholarly communication. (Author/LRW)

  10. Exercise Physiology and the Academy: Contributions to Physiological Concepts and Biological Systems during the Commemorative Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the contributions made by Academy Fellows during the past 75 years to concepts within the body of knowledge associated with exercise physiology, a literature search was undertaken. Of the charter Fellows, Hetherington and eight others (34%) were identified. Schneider in 1933 was the first of 18 Fellows who became authors, co-authors,

  11. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The

  12. On the Nature of Policy and Administration in Higher Education: A Bibliography of Algo D. Henderson. Public Administration Series: Bibliography P-947.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quay, Richard H.

    A bibliography of materials authored, co-authored, or edited by Algo D. Henderson (1932-1978) on the nature of policy and administration in higher education is presented. Topics include: general education in the community college, training university administrators, admitting black students to medical and dental schools, liberal education in the

  13. Ethnographic Research and Globalization: A Discussion of Joseph Tobin's Model of Video-Cued Multivocal Ethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Joseph Tobin made an impact on the field of comparative education in 2009 when he used a unique form of ethnography to illuminate the effects of world-wide forces, such as modernization, on schools in specific countries. Earlier, in 1989, he published "Preschool in Three Cultures" with co-authors David Wu and Dana Davidson. The…

  14. Close Encounters of a Congenial Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeath, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a co-director's and co-author's review of and commentary on research carried out with Maurice Galton over the past decade. Its principal focus is the burden that recent education policies and ascent of a deleterious culture of performativity have inflicted on teachers' professional and domestic lives. It reports on four studies…

  15. Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. Advances in Learning and Instruction Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillenbourg, Pierre, Ed.

    Intended to illustrate the benefits of collaboration between scientists from psychology and computer science, namely machine learning, this book contains the following chapters, most of which are co-authored by scholars from both sides: (1) "Introduction: What Do You Mean by 'Collaborative Learning'?" (Pierre Dillenbourg); (2) "Learning Together:…

  16. Special Education in High School Redesign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National High School Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This annotated bibliography, co-authored by the National High School Center and the National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center, identifies articles that address high school redesign as it relates to students with disabilities and special education's role in such initiatives. The articles are organized around the National High School…

  17. "The University and the Teachers": A Cross-National Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemosse, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The totally unusual experience of participating in the writing of "The University and the Teachers: France, the United States, England" is recalled here by one of the co-authors. This was a collective enterprise, under the direction of Harry Judge, and the other members of the team were two American researchers, Lynn Paine and Michael Sedlak. The…

  18. Intercom, 77. Explorations in the Emergent Present.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanvey, Robert

    The issue of Intercom promotes an awareness of the world as a system that poses new possibilities and obligations for educators as well as policy makers. The first part includes interviews with and excerpts from the works of Denis Meadows, joint author of Limits to Growth; Mihajlo Mesarovic, co-author of Mankind at the Turning Point; Robert…

  19. Knowledge Production, Publication Productivity, and Intimate Academic Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with college faculty who had co-authored with a spouse or partner were conducted to identify patterns of co-authorship. Most participants did not perceive that a partner sharing their occupation had a direct impact on scholarly productivity. Contribution to productivity was greatest among partners sharing research interests and…

  20. Maya Calendars in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Cynthia E.; Rehm, Megan A.; Catepilln, Ximena

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a lesson in which least common multiples helps students not only develop a perspective on an ancient culture but also draw on the cultural background of classmates. The Maya calendar received a lot of attention in the years leading up to December 21, 2012, because of the mythological end of "creation." Co-author

  1. Journal of Geophysical Research Publications: Community Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Porter, A.

    2009-12-01

    Do earth science publications differ by subfield or gender? To figure this out we analyzed publications in JGR Atmosphere, Oceans, and Solid Earth for the year 2000. We assumed that the first author exerted controlling influence over publication characteristics and then we looked at the number of co-authors, number of institutions represented by co-author affiliations, page length of the article, number of references cited, number of subject categories represented in the cited references, number of times the article was cited, and the time between the date the article was submitted and the date when it was accepted for publication. We found that, within each field, there was remarkable similarity between the publications led by women and those led by men. Interesting differences showed up between subfields: for example, Solid Earth authors use more references than do authors publishing in Atmosphere or Oceans.

  2. Unpacking teacher-researcher collaboration with three theoretical frameworks: a case of expansive learning activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade, Sharada

    2015-09-01

    Long association with a mathematics teacher at a Grade 4-6 school in Sweden, is basis for reporting a case of teacher-researcher collaboration. Three theoretical frameworks used to study its development over time are relational knowing, relational agency and cogenerative dialogue. While relational knowing uses narrative perspectives to explore the experiential and relational nature of collaboration; relational agency, draws on activity theory perspectives and identifies the change in the purpose of collaboration, from initially conducting classroom interventions to co-authoring research. Finally, cogenerative dialogue, deploys hermeneutic-phenomenological perspectives and investigates the dialogue that transpired between Lotta and the author, as they co-authored their research report. Such analysis sheds invaluable light on a case of expansive learning activity.

  3. Yuri I. Galperin (1932-2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Muliarchik, Tatiana; Stepanov, Vladimir

    Yuri I. Galperin, head of the Laboratory of Auroral Physics Phenomena at the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, passed away on 28 December 2001 due to a heart attack. He was a pioneer of auroral and upper atmospheric physics and contributed significantly to the development of space plasma physics. He had been an AGU member (SM) since 1974.Galperin authored and co-authored more than 200 publications in scientific journals and was a co-author of three monographs on experimental space physics. In addition to AGU, Galperin was a member of many scientific councils in Russia, and he had also been a member of the International Astronomical Union since 1958 and the International Academy of Astronautics since 1975.

  4. Using AVIRIS In The NASA BAA Project To Evaluate The Impact Of Natural Acid Drainage On Colorado Watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauff, Phoebe L.; Coulter, David W.; Peters, Douglas C.; Sares, Matthew A.; Prosh, Eric C.; Henderson, Frederick B., III; Bird, David

    2004-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey and the co-authors of this paper were awarded one of 15 NASA Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) grants in 2001. The project focuses on the use of hyperspectral remote sensing to map acid-generating minerals that affect water quality within a watershed, and to identify the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to that drainage. A further objective is to define the most cost-effective remote sensing instrument configuration for this application.

  5. On Being Called an Anti-Semite in Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Richard

    2007-01-01

    As the coordinator of a university lecture series, the author is always on the lookout for good speakers. He thought that he had found one in Stephen Walt, a political scientist at Harvard University and the co-author of an article about the influence of the pro-Israel lobby on U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East. In this article, the author…

  6. Learning dynamics for systems with space structure. Comment on the paper "Collective learning modeling based on the kinetic theory of active particles" by D. Burini et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhad, Nadia

    2016-03-01

    I have examined paper [1] based also on my scientific experience, namely the derivation of macroscopic models from the underlying description delivered at the microscopic scale by kinetic theory models. More precisely, I refer to the approach developed by Bellouquid and co-authors, from [2] to more recent results, on the derivation of macroscopic models for large systems of self-propelled particles [3], and fractal systems [4].

  7. Science and religion in a high school physics class: revisiting the source materials of ``The interaction of scientific and religious discourses''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2010-03-01

    In and with this text, I introduce the Forum that centers around a series of essays written by a high school student and an interview with his teacher all collected as part of a larger study about students' discourses with respect to (nature of) science, learning, and knowing. I provide a brief review of the original findings, which had been published in a study co-authored by the student and myself, his physics teacher.

  8. (Quantitative structure-activity relationships in environmental toxicology)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.E.

    1990-10-04

    The traveler attended the Fourth International Workshop on QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships) in Environmental Toxicology. He was an author or co-author on one platform and two poster presentations. The subject of the workshop offers a framework for analyzing and predicting the fate of chemical pollutants in organisms and the environment. QSAR is highly relevant to the ORNL program on the physicochemical characterization of chemical pollutants for health protection.

  9. Stigma from the Viewpoint of the Patient.

    PubMed

    Woods, Joycelyn Sue; Joseph, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Stigma has become a primary social force facing patients in methadone and buprenorphine treatment. For quality methadone and buprenorphine treatment to flourish it will be necessary to confront and reduce this negative influence. This article, co-authored by a patient and professional, discusses stigma and prejudice from the viewpoint of patients. Educational and national strategies using the media and targeted to patients, programs, and the general public are discussed. PMID:26076048

  10. DOCK6 Mutations Are Responsible for a Distinct Autosomal-Recessive Variant of Adams-Oliver Syndrome Associated with Brain and Eye Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Sukalo, Maja; Tilsen, Felix; Kayserili, Hülya; Müller, Dietmar; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Ruddy, Deborah M; Wakeling, Emma; Ørstavik, Karen Helene; Bramswig, Nuria C; Snape, Katie M; Trembath, Richard; De Smedt, Maryse; van der Aa, Nathalie; Skalej, Martin; Mundlos, Stefan; Wuyts, Wim; Southgate, Laura; Zenker, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The original article to which this Erratum refers was published in Human Mutation 36(6):593–598(DOI:10.1002/humu22795).The authors realized that a co-author, Nuria C. Bramswig, was left off of the title page of this article at the time of submission. This erratum serves to correct this error by including Dr. Bramswig and Dr. Bramswig's institution in the title page information.The authors regret the error. PMID:26457590

  11. Gender differences in collaboration patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Amaral, Luis A. N.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration plays an increasingly important role in research productivity and impact. However, it remains unclear whether female and male researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines differ significantly from each other in their collaboration propensity. Here, we report on an empirical analysis of the complete publication records of 3,920 faculty members in six STEM disciplines at selected top U.S. research universities. We find that while female faculty have significantly fewer co-authors over their careers, this can be fully explained by their lower number of publications. Indeed, we also find that females tend to distribute their co-authoring opportunities among their co-authors more evenly than males do. Our results suggest that females have had a greater propensity to collaborate, in order to succeed in a historically men-dominated academic world. Surprisingly, we find evidence that in molecular biology there has been a gender segregation within sub-disciplines. Female faculty in molecular biology departments tend to collaborate with smaller teams and publish in journals and fields where typical team size is smaller. Our results identify gender-specific collaborative behaviors as well as disciplines with distinct patterns. The authors thank the support from the following grants: NSF SBE 0624318, NSF IIS 0830388, and Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  12. Blood flow and vascular pressure in the dental pulp. Summary.

    PubMed

    Tønder, K J

    1980-01-01

    The present summary is a review and a discussion of the following papers (I-V), submitted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor Odontologiae at the University of Bergen. I. Blood flow in the dental pulp in dogs measured by local H2 gas desaturation technique. Arch. Oral Biol. 1975, 20, 73-79. Co-author: K. Aukland II. The effect of variations in arterial blood pressure and baroreceptor reflexes on pulpal blood flow in dogs. Arch. Oral. Biol.1975, 20, 345-349 III. Effect of vasodilating drugs on external carotid and pulpal blood flow in dogs: "Stealing" of dental perfusion pressurE. Acta Physiol. Scand. 1976, 97, 75-87 IV. Nervous control of blood flow in the dental pulp in dogs. Acta Physiol. Scand. 1978, 104, 13-23. Co-author: G. Naess V. Microvascular pressure in the dental pulp and gingiva in cats. Acta Odontol. Scand. 1979, 37, 161-168. Co-author: G. Naess Other papers are referred to in the conventional manner. PMID:6998253

  13. [Scientometric characteristics of the published scientific works of Prof. Konstantin Chilov].

    PubMed

    Petkova, M

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive scientificometric study was carried out on the publications of Corresponding member Prof Dr. K. Cilov, covering 127 monographs, textbooks and papers, published within the period 1929-1957. The results obtained were mathematically--statistically processed according to the methods of statistical grouping and alternative analysis and illustrated via table method and graphic analysis. The criteria of observation concern the quantitative, type and thematic characteristic of the co-authors of Prof K. Cilov. The analysis established an evenness in the scientific and publication creative work of Prof K. Cilov during the periods of his scientific maturing, his scientific interests directed mainly to the clinical-laboratory and cardiological problems, infectious and endocrine diseases. The percentage of his publications, with he as a sole author is 69,29%, and of team publications--30,71%. The personified co-authors are 32, and non-personified ones--65, with a predomination of the inconstant collaborators, so 70,87% of the co-authors are with a duration of the collaboration to 1 year. PMID:6390965

  14. Network Effects on Scientific Collaborations

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat; Rasmussen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Background The analysis of co-authorship network aims at exploring the impact of network structure on the outcome of scientific collaborations and research publications. However, little is known about what network properties are associated with authors who have increased number of joint publications and are being cited highly. Methodology/Principal Findings Measures of social network analysis, for example network centrality and tie strength, have been utilized extensively in current co-authorship literature to explore different behavioural patterns of co-authorship networks. Using three SNA measures (i.e., degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality), we explore scientific collaboration networks to understand factors influencing performance (i.e., citation count) and formation (tie strength between authors) of such networks. A citation count is the number of times an article is cited by other articles. We use co-authorship dataset of the research field of ‘steel structure’ for the year 2005 to 2009. To measure the strength of scientific collaboration between two authors, we consider the number of articles co-authored by them. In this study, we examine how citation count of a scientific publication is influenced by different centrality measures of its co-author(s) in a co-authorship network. We further analyze the impact of the network positions of authors on the strength of their scientific collaborations. We use both correlation and regression methods for data analysis leading to statistical validation. We identify that citation count of a research article is positively correlated with the degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of its co-author(s). Also, we reveal that degree centrality and betweenness centrality values of authors in a co-authorship network are positively correlated with the strength of their scientific collaborations. Conclusions/Significance Authors’ network positions in co-authorship networks influence the performance (i.e., citation count) and formation (i.e., tie strength) of scientific collaborations. PMID:23469021

  15. [Prof. Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements. Part 3: books written by prof. Dr. M. Matsuoka].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2009-03-01

    In addition to articles written by Prof. Dr. M. Matsuoka previously reported in Part 2, books written by him are presented as Part 3 of the articles regarding his academic achievements. He published four text books, including the first textbook of orthopaedic surgery in Japan that was written by a Japanese doctor and a monograph on the x-ray atlas of congenital dislocation of the hip that was written in German and published in Germany. He was also invited to submit articles to three books as co-author. Furthermore, his five educational lectures given to the public were published in two books. PMID:19831253

  16. Less reality, more security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekert, Artur

    2009-09-01

    On 25 March 1935 John Tate, the then editor of Physical Review, received a paper that Einstein had co-authored with Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen, his younger colleagues at Princeton. The logbooks of Physical Review show that the EPR paper, as it has since become known, bypassed the refereeing process and went straight to press. Four printed pages of beautifully constructed argument appeared in the 15 May issue. They were heralded by a brief article in the New York Times titled "Einstein attacks quantum theory". And so he did.

  17. Receiver design, performance analysis, and evaluation for space-borne laser altimeters and space-to-space laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic M.; Sun, Xiaoli; Field, Christopher T.

    1995-01-01

    This Interim report consists of a manuscript, 'Receiver Design for Satellite to Satellite Laser Ranging Instrument,' and copies of two papers we co-authored, 'Demonstration of High Sensitivity Laser Ranging System' and 'Semiconductor Laser-Based Ranging Instrument for Earth Gravity Measurements. ' These two papers were presented at the conference Semiconductor Lasers, Advanced Devices and Applications, August 21 -23, 1995, Keystone Colorado. The manuscript is a draft in the preparation for publication, which summarizes the theory we developed on space-borne laser ranging instrument for gravity measurements.

  18. Have We Hatched the Addiction Egg: Reward Deficiency Syndrome Solution System™

    PubMed Central

    Downs, BW; Oscar-Berman, M; Waite, RL; Madigan, MA; Giordano, J; Beley, T; Jones, S; Simpatico, T; Hauser, M; Borsten, J; Marcelo, F; Braverman, ER; Lohmann, R; Dushaj, K; Helman, M; Barh, D; Schoenthaler, ST; Han, D; Blum, K

    2013-01-01

    This article co-authored by a number of scientists, ASAM physicians, clinicians, treatment center owners, geneticists, neurobiologists, psychologists, social workers, criminologists, nurses, nutritionist, and students, is dedicated to all the people who have lost loved ones in substance-abuse and “reward deficiency syndrome” related tragedies. Why are we failing at reducing the incidence of ‘Bad Behaviors’? Are we aiming at the wrong treatment targets for behavioral disorders? We are proposing a paradigm shift and calling it “Reward Deficiency Solution System” providing evidence for its adoption. PMID:24077767

  19. In Memoriam: Herbert E. Wright, Jr., 1917-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Cathy; Stein, Julie K.; Fritz, Sherilyn

    2016-01-01

    Professor Herbert E. Wright passed away on November 12, 2015 in his 98th year. His passing leaves many in Quaternary community reflecting on his enormous contributions to the discipline, as well as the many ways in which he touched our lives. Herb's legacy, writ large, is evidenced by decades of scholarly contributions to the fields of glacial geology, geomorphology, paleoecology, paleolimnology, paleoclimatology, and archaeology. During the course of his career, he authored and co-authored over 250 scientific publications and co-edited 16 influential volumes on the Quaternary.

  20. Space application research of EMCCDs for bioluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao

    The detection of bioluminescense is widely used on the ground, while the detection of bioluminescence in space is still at the stage of detecting bright bioluminescense. With the rapid development of research in Space Life Sciences, it will be necessary to develop a detection technology to detect weak bioluminescense. Compared to other low-light detection techniques for ground, there are more advantages of EMCCDs for space application. Build a space bioluminescence imaging detection system, analysis the feasibility and capability of its will be significant. Co-Author:Xie Zongbao,Zheng Weibo

  1. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS About Ginzburg-Landau, and a bit on others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, Evgenii G.

    2011-02-01

    This note is a brief history of how the theory of Ginzburg and Landau came to be. Early publications on the macroscopic theory of superconductivity are reviewed in detail. Discussions that the two co-authors had with their colleagues and between themselves are described. The 1952 review by V L Ginzburg is discussed, in which a number of well-defined requirements on the yet-to-be-developed microscopic theory of superconductivity were formulated, constituting what J Bardeen called the 'Ginzburg energy gap model'.

  2. Retraction: Wettability-gradient-driven micropump for transporting discrete liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardaweel, Hamzeh K.; Zamuruyev, Konstantin; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Davis, Cristina E.

    2013-06-01

    This is a Retraction for the article 2013 J. Micromech. Microeng. 23 035036. The science reported in this article is not incorrect. This article does not include all co-authors who contributed to the work. The article incorrectly attributes work performed at the University of California to the University of Jordan, and fails to acknowledge contributions from Georgia Institute of Technology. This article does not acknowledge the sources of funding for the work and the reference list is incomplete. This article was submitted by Hamzeh K Bardaweel without the knowledge of the other authors.

  3. Seizing opportunities for realising savings.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Conor; Baldwin, Ed; Dick, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    Conor Ellis, global account leader, Health; Ed Baldwin, partner, and Dr Rachel Dick, consultant, at international built asset consultancy, EC Harris, provide an updated assessment on the current NHS estate, and, in the wake of the publication of an earlier detailed paper on the subject in late 2010, examine the extent to which NHS Trusts have made progress over the past year against 10 key steps to "unlocking value" outlined in the previous document. This article is an adapted version of the co-authors' 2011 paper, NHS Service and Estate Efficiency Report: Seizing The Opportunity. PMID:22049675

  4. Resolving Dilemmas Through Bodywork

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Pamela Ellen; Persinger, Debra; Steele, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Pamela Ellen Ferguson and Debra Persinger, co-authors and co-editors of Sand to Sky—Conversations with Teachers of Asian Medicine (Bloomington, IN: iUniverse; 2008), interview Marianne Steele in Germany on her shiatsu and massage therapy work in various forms of trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder. The interview was conducted in a series of e-mail exchanges and telephone calls during late 2009 and early 2010 and is intended for a future German edition of Sand to Sky. PMID:21589702

  5. Final Report to Jupiter Oxygen Corporation on CRADA Phase 1 Activities, January 1, 2004, through June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-06-30

    In January of 2004, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was signed with the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation; its term extends from January 2004 to January 1, 2009. The statement of work is attached as Appendix A. Under Phase I of this agreement, ARC was to provide technical expertise to develop computer models of existing power plants relative to retrofitting with oxy-fuel combustion; help design experiments to verify models and analyze data from experiments; help produce designs at larger scales; help design a new technology oxy-fuel power plant; and co-author technical papers on this work for presentation at appropriate conferences.

  6. Olgierd (Olek) Cecil Zienkiewicz (1921-2009): A Biographical Tribute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, D.; Owen, J.; Wood, Richard D.

    2010-06-01

    In this tribute the authors present a personal and academic biography of O. C. Zienkiewicz.(1921-2009) who is recognized as having been one of the pioneers of the Finite Element Method. O. C. Zienkiewicz co-authored the first text book on the method which was largely responsible for the introduction of the concept to a worldwide audience. His contribution to the computational mechanics community encompasses structural, geotechnical and fluid flow analysis as well as numerous fundamental finite element developments. This paper presents these achievements within the context of his life and includes personal recollections by the authors who were his colleagues.

  7. Retracted: Impact of polymorphisms in the oestrogen receptors alpha and beta (ESR1, ESR2) genes on risk of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The above article from Andrology, 'Impact of polymorphisms in the oestrogen receptors alpha and beta (ESR1, ESR2) genes on risk of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction' by M. R. Safarinejad, A. Taghva, N. Shafiei and S. Safarinejad published online on 20 May 2013 in Wiley Online Library has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editors-in-Chief, Douglas Carrell and Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts and John Wiley and Sons Ltd. The retraction has been decided due to failure by the lead author to verify the data contained in the study, and to provide evidence of the role of co-authors and their institutional affiliations. PMID:23686919

  8. Mediterranean Holocene climate, environment and human societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Karin; Gogou, Alexandra.; Izdebski, Adam.; Luterbacher, Juerg.; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Xoplaki, Elena

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the reader to a special issue of articles that explores links and processes behind societal change, climate change and environmental change in a Holocene perspective in the Mediterranean region. All papers are, by purpose, co-authored by scientists representing different disciplines. The cross-cutting theme has been to reach beyond simple explanations of potential climate-society relationships and advance our understanding on how to improve research methods and theories in the field. The thirteen papers in this issue address these questions in three different ways, by i) conceptual/methodological approaches; ii) review papers; and iii) case studies.

  9. Spectral theory of Sturm-Liouville differential operators: proceedings of the 1984 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H.G.; Zettl, A.

    1984-12-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the workshop which was held at Argonne during the period May 14 through June 15, 1984. The report contains 22 articles, authored or co-authored by the participants in the workshop. Topics covered at the workshop included the asymptotics of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions; qualitative and quantitative aspects of Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems with discrete and continuous spectra; polar, indefinite, and nonselfadjoint Sturm-Liouville eigenvalue problems; and systems of differential equations of Sturm-Liouville type.

  10. Creative revision - From rough draft to published paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    The process of revising a technical or scientific paper can be performed more efficiently by the people involved (author, co-author, supervisor, editor) when the revision is controlled by breaking it into a series of steps. The revision process recommended here is based on the levels-of-edit concept that resulted from a study of the technical editorial function at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology. Types of revision discussed are Substantive, Policy, Language, Mechanical Style, Format, Integrity, and Copy Clarification.

  11. A citation-based, author- and age-normalized, logarithmic index for evaluation of individual researchers independently of publication counts

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Aleksey V.; Belikov, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    The use of citation metrics for evaluation of individual researchers has dramatically increased over the last decade. However, currently existing indices either are based on misleading premises or are cumbersome to implement. This leads to poor assessment of researchers and creates dangerous trends in science, such as overproduction of low quality articles. Here we propose an index (namely, the L-index) that does not depend on the number of publications, accounts for different co-author contributions and age of publications, and scales from 0.0 to 9.9. Moreover, it can be calculated with the help of freely available software. PMID:26664709

  12. Retiree health care benefits: strategies for a changing workforce.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D

    1998-01-01

    Demographic, economic and cultural trends foretell a dramatically different environment for retiree health care coverage. This article will focus on the redesign of retiree health benefits to meet the retirement objectives of employers and employees, anticipate changing demographics, and respond to changes in Medicare and other government initiatives, including the Consumer Bill of Rights. The material will discuss recent design trends, including managed care, and present results of a study the author co-authored for the Kaiser Family Foundation on changes in retiree health plans. PMID:10387157

  13. Looking for Daisy: constructing teacher identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2009-09-01

    Research on teacher identities is both important and increasing. In this forum contribution I re-interpret assertions about an African American science teacher's identities in terms of Jonathon Turner's (2002) constructs of role identity and sub-identity. I contest the notion of renegotiation of identities, suggesting that particular role identities can be brought to the foreground and then backgrounded depending on the situation and the need to confirm a sub-identity. Finally, I recommend the inclusion of teachers' voices in identity research through greater use of co-authoring roles for teachers.

  14. Field guide to the continental Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Raton basin, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pillmore, C.L.; Nichols, D.J.; Fleming

    1999-01-01

    This guide consists of three general sections: an introduction that includes discussions of Raton basin stratigraphy and the Cretaceous Tertiary (K-T) boundary; descriptions of the geology along the route from Denver, Colorado, to Raton, New Mexico; and descriptions of several K-T sites in the Raton basin. Much of the information is from previous articles and field guides by the authors together with R. M. Flores and from road logs co-authored with Glenn R. Scott, both of the U.S.Geological Survey.

  15. Are alexithymia and schizoid personality disorder synonymous diagnoses?

    PubMed

    Coolidge, Frederick L; Estey, Alisa J; Segal, Daniel L; Marle, Peter D

    2013-02-01

    Relationships among alexithymia, personality disorders, and higher-order psychopathological and interpersonal dimensions were examined in 199 college students and a close relative of each. Alexithymia, the difficulty to express and identify emotions, was measured by the Observer Alexithymia Scale (OAS; [Haviland, M. G., Warren, W. L., & Riggs, M. L. (2000). An observer scale to measure alexithymia. Psychosomatics, 41, 385-392]), which was completed by each student's relative. Each student completed three self-report measures: the Coolidge Axis II Inventory (CATI; [Coolidge, F. L. (2000). Coolidge Axis II Inventory: Manual. Colorado Springs, CO: Author.), the Five Dimensional Personality Test (5DPT; [van Kampen, D. (2009). Personality and psychopathology: A theory-based revision of Eysenck's PEN model. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health, 5, 9-21]), and the Horney-Coolidge Tridimensional Inventory (HCTI; [Coolidge, F. L. (1998). Horney-Coolidge Tridimensional Inventory: Manual. Colorado Springs, CO: Author]). Results indicated that higher levels of alexithymia are associated with personality disorders and their traits, such as schizoid, avoidant, and paranoid. With regard to the issue of the similarity and difference between alexithymia and schizoid personality disorder, there was sufficient evidence across all of the measures to suggest that they are not synonymous entities. Finally, alexithymic traits were associated with concurrent depressive traits even in a non-clinical sample. PMID:23021894

  16. Displaying Science: The Exhibits Revolution in Science and Natural History Museums, 1900--1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Once defined primarily by their collections, by the end of the twentieth century, American natural history and science museums had become institutions defined largely by their displays. This talk will use life science and physics exhibits to illustrate how and why this transformation occurred. Efforts to modernize displays shaped and were themselves shaped by new institutional roles and identities for museums in twentieth-century science education and in American culture. Drawing on a forthcoming co-authored book (``Life on Display,'' U. Chicago, 2014) this talk will reveal the controversies that accompanied exhibition building, chronicling how and why curators, designers, and educators worked with and against one another to build displays intended to communicate new ideas about topics like evolution, animal behavior, and radiation to the American public. It explains that scientists were extraordinarily invested in the success of museums' displays and saw display as an integral element of their own public outreach work and research agendas. In turn, rapidly professionalizing exhibit designers were periodic participants in the research process, supplementing and sometimes prompting research projects through the displays they built. Presenting work that is co-authored by Rader and Victoria E.M. Cain (Northeastern University).

  17. Statistical Reporting Errors and Collaboration on Statistical Analyses in Psychological Science

    PubMed Central

    Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Dominguez-Alvarez, Linda; van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.; Wicherts, Jelte M.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical analysis is error prone. A best practice for researchers using statistics would therefore be to share data among co-authors, allowing double-checking of executed tasks just as co-pilots do in aviation. To document the extent to which this ‘co-piloting’ currently occurs in psychology, we surveyed the authors of 697 articles published in six top psychology journals and asked them whether they had collaborated on four aspects of analyzing data and reporting results, and whether the described data had been shared between the authors. We acquired responses for 49.6% of the articles and found that co-piloting on statistical analysis and reporting results is quite uncommon among psychologists, while data sharing among co-authors seems reasonably but not completely standard. We then used an automated procedure to study the prevalence of statistical reporting errors in the articles in our sample and examined the relationship between reporting errors and co-piloting. Overall, 63% of the articles contained at least one p-value that was inconsistent with the reported test statistic and the accompanying degrees of freedom, and 20% of the articles contained at least one p-value that was inconsistent to such a degree that it may have affected decisions about statistical significance. Overall, the probability that a given p-value was inconsistent was over 10%. Co-piloting was not found to be associated with reporting errors. PMID:25493918

  18. Patterns of authorship in the IPCC Working Group III report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbera, Esteve; Calvet-Mir, Laura; Hughes, Hannah; Paterson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has completed its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Here, we explore the social scientific networks informing Working Group III (WGIII) assessment of mitigation for the AR5. Identifying authors’ institutional pathways, we highlight the persistence and extent of North-South inequalities in the authorship of the report, revealing the dominance of US and UK institutions as training sites for WGIII authors. Examining patterns of co-authorship between WGIII authors, we identify the unevenness in co-authoring relations, with a small number of authors co-writing regularly and indicative of an epistemic community’s influence over the IPCC’s definition of mitigation. These co-authoring networks follow regional patterns, with significant EU-BRICS collaboration and authors from the US relatively insular. From a disciplinary perspective, economists, engineers, physicists and natural scientists remain central to the process, with insignificant participation of scholars from the humanities. The shared training and career paths made apparent through our analysis suggest that the idea that broader geographic participation may lead to a wider range of viewpoints and cultural understandings of climate change mitigation may not be as sound as previously thought.

  19. A citation-analysis of economic research institutes.

    PubMed

    Ketzler, Rolf; Zimmermann, Klaus F

    2013-06-01

    The citation analysis of the research output of the German economic research institutes presented here is based on publications in peer-reviewed journals listed in the Social Science Citation Index for the 2000-2009 period. The novel feature of the paper is that a count data model quantifies the determinants of citation success and simulates their citation potential. Among the determinants of the number of cites the quality of the publication outlet exhibits a strong positive effect. The same effect has the number of the published pages, but journals with size limits also yield more cites. Field journals get less citations in comparison to general journals. Controlling for journal quality, the number of co-authors of a paper has no effect, but it is positive when co-authors are located outside the own institution. We find that the potential citations predicted by our best model lead to different rankings across the institutes than current citations indicating structural change. PMID:23667276

  20. Final Technical Report-Grant # DE-FG02-97ER45628 ?Structural Diorder in Materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Edward A

    2009-02-23

    Since the grant was renewed in 2000 and 2003 final technical reports of the grant have been previously submitted for those years. For that reason this final technical report covers the last four years of the grant. We had an exceptionally successful and productive last four years under the support of the grant. Our progress takes three different aspects, described in more detail below: 1.1 instrumentation, infrastructure, and other research support at Sector 20 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS); 1.2 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were PI?s; and 1.3 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were co-PI?s or where Drs. Dale Brewe or Julie Cross were authors or co-authors. Drs. Brewe and Cross are the two research scientists (permanently stationed at sector 20) who are supported by the grant. They provide support to the scientific goals of the grant and more broadly provide research support for many general users at Sector 20. Finally, in section 1.4 we provide a complete list of publications resulting from funding in the grant on which at least one of Stern, Seidler, Cross, or Brewe were co-authors. Given the inclusion of operations funding in the grant, this is of course a subset of the full scientific impact of the grant.

  1. Costing considerations for maintenance and new construction coating work

    SciTech Connect

    Reina, M.P.; Shields, K.R.; MeLampy, M.F.

    1998-12-31

    This paper updates ``Updated Protective Coating Costs, Products, and Service Life`` on protective coating costing and selection co-authored by G. H. Brevoort, M. F. MeLampy and K. R. Shields. Beginning with this edition, data collection and publication will be co-authored by K. R. Shields, M. F. MeLampy and M. P. Reina. Designed to assist the coatings engineer or specifier in identifying suitable protective coating systems for specific industrial environments, this paper provides guidelines for calculating approximate installed costs, expected coating life for each identified system, and how to determine the most cost-effective systems. The effect of maintenance sequences on long-term costs and system performance is also reviewed. New features of this paper include life-cycle and material costs for hot dip galvanizing. Included in the paper are (1) most commonly used generic systems in typical industrial environments, (2) service life for each, (3) current material costs, and (4) current field and shop painting costs. Guidelines for developing long-term life-cycle costs, and number of paintings for the expected life of the structure are included. The basic elements of economic analysis and justification, and how to prepare a Present Value Analysis are also addressed. Worksheets and examples are provided to aid the reader in the proper use of the information.

  2. Research Performance of Chinese Geoscientists and International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Li, S.

    2011-12-01

    International collaboration has become increasingly important for Chinese geoscientists to excel in their careers. Here we present bibliometric evidence that top performing geoscientists in China tend to have international collaboration experiences. In this work we define top performers as those who have published most papers in American Geophysical Union (AGU)'s journals, and international collaboration as having co-authored papers with people whose major affiliations are not in China. We selected top performers as the 50 scientists who published most papers in AGU journals in all years excluding 2011. Among the top performers 96% of them have published with foreign co-authors in AGU journals. This is a clear indication that international collaboration can be very important to enhance performance. Another indication of the importance of international collaboration is that number of citations that each paper received by internationally collaborated papers is significantly higher than that by China-affiliation-alone papers. An example is that the top 10 papers that received most citations are all international collaboration papers.

  3. Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Myerson, Robert J. Garofalo, Michael C.; El Naqa, Issam; Abrams, Ross A.; Apte, Aditya; Bosch, Walter R.; Das, Prajnan; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kim, J.J. John; Willett, Christopher G.; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning and for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.

  4. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3--7, 1988 DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 5 include environmental assessments and program strategies, waste treatment technologies, and regulations and compliance studies.

  5. Fabrication of Si nanowires on Si (100) using a scanning probe tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua; Davis, Robert; Dang, Ying Yi; Fedder, Gary; Bain, Jim; Ricketts, David

    2009-03-01

    Reliable fabrication on the nanoscale is becoming increasingly important. The co-author team is investigating a nanolithography technique for the deposition of nanoscale features entitled ``Tip-directed, field-emission assisted nanomanufacturing'' (TFAN). The TFAN process involves the adsorption of a layer of silicon-containing gas, such as disilane, to a substrate and the selective patterning of the surface with field-emitted electrons from a scanning probe tip. The electrons crack the Si containing molecules, which results in the deposition of Si on the substrate. The adsorption of the Si-containing molecules to the substrate surface is critical to the success of this approach. The investigation involves the determination of the coverage, sticking coefficient, and time constant of disilane on the Si(100) surface using temperature programmed desorption and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  6. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation: Effects of History and Lift Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This work is co-authored with my doctoral student Shujing Xu and is dedicated to the memory of my doctoral advisor Howard Brenner who enjoyed thought experiments related to rotating systems. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation refers to our theoretical discovery that within a liquid-filled container that rotates in an oscillatory manner about a fixed axis as a rigid body, a suspended particle can be made to migrate on average in the direction opposite to that of ordinary centrifugation. That is, a heavy (or light) particle can move toward (or away from) the rotation axis, when the frequency of oscillations is high enough. In this work we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Saffman lift force on particle trajectories and find that the counter-centrifugation phenomenon persists even when these forces are active.

  7. An Extended Observation of Blazar 3C279

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    The gamma-ray observations of the quasar 3C 279 during the reporting period were carried out and analyzed by Dr. Robert Hartman, the overall project principal investigator. As had been hoped, a flare was observed in late January / early February 1996. The flare was detected at X-ray energies by RXTE as well (the PI of the RXTE observations was Dr. Ian McHardy of the University of Southampton, England). The PI of this grant, Dr. Alan Marscher, observed with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 43 GHz after the flare and provided theoretical interpretation. The results and interpretation of the multiwaveband observations are reported in a paper by Wehrle et al. published in the Astrophysical Journal, on which the PI is a co-author.

  8. It Started in Hawai'i Kai: Reminiscences of 43 Years (and Counting) of Collaboration and Friendship.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Fay, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the 43+ year collaboration of Arthur Popper and Richard Fay. Over these years, we have co-authored over 30 papers and 55 books. The collaboration benefits from a strong friendship that includes our spouses and children. By any measure, our collaboration must be seen as being successful. The basis for this success is, we think, twofold. First, we have very complementary and overlapping research interests. This has enabled us to tackle issues, whether in research or in planning meetings or books, from different perspectives. Second, a hallmark of our successful collaboration has been our deep and close friendship and the extension of that friendship to our spouses and children. In this paper, we discuss some of the events that have shaped our collaboration, and some of the people who have impacted our lives. PMID:26515309

  9. [African silhouettes and field photography. M. Griaule's contribution to the Maussian "discovery" of body techniques].

    PubMed

    Despoix, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    This essay focuses on the interaction between the new reproduction media and corresponding reconfiguration of research fields in anthropology using the case of the "techniques of the body" - a concept developed by Marcel Mauss (1872-1950). For Mauss, the initiator of this discipline in France, body skills constituted the most important anthropological entity resulting from the confrontation of technical images and his interest in walking techniques. Three scenarios are especially significant for Mauss's formulation of "body techniques" as a genuine concept: the front during the World War I, a New Yorke hospital in 1926, and an ethnographical field study conducted in Africa during the ate 1920s. Both, the photographic media as well as the Abyssinian expedition of his student Marcel Griaule, whose research publication Mauss co-authored (Silhouettes et graffiti abyssins) n 1933, take centre stage here. PMID:21249525

  10. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Patrick K.

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 NASA/ASEE KSC History Project focused on a series of seven history initiatives designed to acquire, preserve, and interpret the history of Kennedy Space Center. These seven projects included the co-authoring of Voices From the Cape, historical work with NASA historian Roger Launius, the completion of a series of oral histories with key KSC personnel, a monograph on Public Affairs, the development of a Historical Concept Map (CMap) for history knowledge preservation, advice on KSC history database and web interface capabilities, the development of a KSC oral history program and guidelines of training and collection, and the development of collaborative relationships between Kennedy Space Center, the University of West Florida, and the University of Central Florida.

  11. Acid-rain publications by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979-1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Villella, R.F.

    1989-08-01

    This report is an annotated bibliography of acid-rain and related air-quality publications authored or co-authored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees or that have been supported by Service funding. The bibliography covers 10 years of research from 1979 to 1989. Research projects have covered the effects of acidity on water chemistry, aquatic invertebrates, amphibians, fish, and waterfowl. Specific projects have addressed important fish species such as rainbow trout, brook trout, Atlantic salmon, and striped bass. In addition to lake and stream studies, wetland and some terrestrial habitat work has also been conducted. Also included in the report is research on the ecological effects of liming surface waters and surrounding watersheds.

  12. Evidence-Based of Nonoperative Treatment in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Until now because there are many published journals with a variety of opinions so I will stratify these articles by giving weighted value on grade evaluation which depend on each institution (written author and co-authors) and external evaluate status (SCI, SCIE, impact factor) rather than the outcomes provided by each article. Consequently, before evaluating publicized papers, study quality assessment of each interesting paper should be performed by mean of gauging the quality of evidence. Reviewing these articles, a grade of medical literature was divided into the following 5 levels as level I (randomized controlled study), level II (non-randomized controlled study), level III (case-control study), level IV (case series), and level V (expert opinions). However, in present article I concluded only involved medical literatures with weighted value of level I and II evidence. PMID:25346826

  13. Pulsar timing and the Fermi mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-04-01

    We request time to observe 180 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  14. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  15. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  16. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Kerr, Matthew; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2013-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 43 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently five students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  17. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2010-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  18. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Brook, Paul

    2013-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently for students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  19. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  20. Young Pulsar Timing and the Fermi Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We request time to observe 230 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  1. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  2. Temporal analysis of the usage log of a research networking system.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Trembowelski, Sylvia; Steinman, Richard C; Bakken, Suzanne; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of research networking systems (RNS), their value and usage remains unknown. This study aims to characterize the temporal usage of an RNS, Columbia University Scientific Profiles (CUSP), and to inform the designs of general RNSs. We installed a free usage logging service, Google Analytics, on CUSP and applied time series analysis to compare the usage patterns of the two modes of CUSP: restricted (authenticated) and open access. More users searched by person names than by topics, although the latter enables in-depth vertical search of co-author or co-investigator networks for grants or publications. The open-access mode received more page views but less average time spent on each page than the restricted access mode. The numbers of unique users and searches have increased over the time. This study contributes a trend analysis framework for understanding the usage of RNSs and early knowledge of the usage of an open-access RNS. PMID:25954587

  3. Rare-event simulation methods for equilibrium and non-equilibrium events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Rare events are those that occur with a very low probability in experiment, or are common but difficult to sample using standard computer simulation techniques. Such processes require advanced methods in order to obtain useful results in reasonable amounts of computer time. We discuss some of those techniques here, including the ``barrier'' method, splitting methods, and a Forward-Flux Sampling in Time (FFST) algorithm, and apply them to measure the nucleation times of the first-order transition in the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model of surface catalysis, including nucleation in finite equilibrium states, which are measured to occur with probabilities as low as 10°C(-40). We also study the transitions in the Maier-Stein model of chemical kinetics, and use the methods to find the harmonic measure in percolation and Diffusion-Limited Aggregation (DLA) clusters. co-authors: David Adams, Google, and Leonard Sander, University of Michigan.

  4. Community College Non-Science Undergraduates Observe Exoplanet Transits with 8-inch Observatory in Glendale, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleim, Brian; Esteban, Henry; Lincoln, Connor; Price, Jason; Giroux, Elizabeth; Lentowski, Noreen; Valencia, Leslie; Morris, Bryce; Smith, Blake; Leffler, Chris; Bonilla, Matt; Watt, Sara D.

    2015-01-01

    Using the 8-inch Celestron telescopes at the Glendale Community College North Observatory in Glendale, Arizona, a group of undergraduate students, most of whom are non-science majors, observed exoplanet transits during the Fall 2014 semester. These students, members of the Glendale Community College's Astronomy Students for Telescope Research and Outreach (A.S.T.R.O.) Club, selected targets observable with telescopes of this size and the conditions of the sky. With these observations and using concepts and skills learned in introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, the co-authors recorded detections of exoplanet transits consistent with published professional results. These results demonstrate that post-secondary institutions can teach hands-on, practical astronomy experience given equipment that is readily available and affordable, regardless of the size of the student body majoring in the physical sciences.

  5. Combining Research and Teaching in the Undergraduate Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Bridging the gap between scholarship and teaching is perhaps the most difficult challenge facing faculty members in the sciences. Here I discuss a pedagogical strategy that combines these seemingly disconnected areas. In a semester-long, upper-level astronomical techniques class that has been offered three times at Macalester College, I have integrated a major research component into the curriculum. In each iteration of the course, students have analyzed new scientific data acquired with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (either from General Observer programs or from the "Observing for University Classes" program). Each of the three courses has produced a journal article in the peer-reviewed literature (Cannon et al. 2010, 2011, 2012); every student enrolled in these three courses is now a co-author on one of these manuscripts. Representative course design materials are presented here to motivate faculty members with diverse research specialties to undertake similar endeavors.

  6. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 1 are Environmental Data Management, Site characterization technology, Wastewater treatment, Waste management in foreign countries, Transuranic waste management, and Groundwater characterization and treatment.

  7. Coldwater fish in wadeable streams: chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunham, Jason B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Thurow, Russell F.; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Howell, Philip J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardizing sampling methods for fish populations across large regions is important for consistent measurement of large-scale effects of climate or geography. In addition, pooling samples creates larger sample sizes and can facilitate data sharing among scientists and land managers. Sampling freshwater fish has largely not been standardized due to the diversity of fish and habitats. USGS aquatic ecologist Jason Dunham and co-authors contributed a chapter about sampling coldwater fish in wadeable streams to a new book that details common methods, protocols, and guidelines for sampling fish across North America. Topics include three common sampling methods: electrofishing, snorkeling, and nest counts. Each method provides complementary information about different species and life stages. The information will be useful for initiating new or fine-tuning ongoing sampling programs.

  8. Wright Flyer Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The wind tunnel test results have been published in the literature as summarized at the end of this report. As part of the education program, an introduction to engineering course module was designed and tested on 80 freshman engineering students at Old Dominion University. The five-week module required that five-person teams design, build and fly a radio-controlled airplane using only the wind tunnel data developed by the Wright brothers in 1902. That module is described in Sparks and Ash (2001). The Principal Investigator has co-authored one dozen publications resulting from this research, as listed at the end of this report. The Principal Investigator has given fourteen lectures on the Wright brother testing program and has appeared in two documentary television programs (summarized at the end of this report). Speaking invitations have continued since the completion of the project.

  9. Microbial biodiversity of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Ann Maureen

    Microorganisms are critical to the functioning of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and may also play a role in the functioning of the atmosphere. However, little is known about the diversity and function of microorganisms in the atmosphere. To investigate the forces driving the assembly of bacterial microbial communities in the atmosphere, I measured temporal variation in bacterial diversity and composition over diurnal and inter-day time scales. Results suggest that bacterial communities in the atmosphere markedly vary over diurnal time scales and are likely structured by inputs from both local terrestrial and long-distance sources. To assess the potential functions of bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere, I characterized total and potentially active communities using both RNA- and DNA-based data. Results suggest there are metabolically active microorganisms in the atmosphere that may affect atmospheric functions including precipitation development and carbon cycling. This dissertation includes previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

  10. A vascular physician's view of venous thromboembolism and apixaban.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander; Wu, Wing Han

    2014-11-01

    Alexander Cohen speaks to Wing Han Wu, Commissioning Editor: Dr Cohen is a vascular physician and epidemiologist involved in clinical work, designing, managing and analyzing clinical trials from Phase I to IV. He is the Chairman and member of many international steering committees for multicenter trials, and epidemiological and pharmaco-economic studies. Dr Cohen graduated with honors in Medicine and Surgery from the University of Melbourne, Australia (MBBS). He achieved his fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (FRACP) in 1990, and received an MSc in Epidemiology in 1991 from the University of London. His MSc thesis in 1991 was on the Metabolic Syndrome in South Asia. In 1998, he achieved MD with a thesis on Epidemiology of VTE and Thromboprophylaxis. He has written or co-authored over 300 publications since 1990, including 40 publications in The Lancet and New England Journal of Medicine. PMID:25495808

  11. Reduced arterial stiffness may contribute to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor induced improvements in walking time in peripheral arterial disease patients: Retraction.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    J Hypertension 2008, 26:1037–1042. The following authors, Drs A.M. Dart, A. Lawler, P.A. Blombery, Prof. B.A. Kingwell, have requested retraction of a paper by A.A. Ahimastos et al. An investigation by the Research Conduct Office of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute found irregularities in a study, including falsification of patients' records and misrepresentation of results, from which this article was derived. On the basis of this investigation the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute strongly supports retraction and points out the co-authors asking for retraction were found not be involved in the research misconduct. The article is retracted. PMID:26536094

  12. Case stories in general practice: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Flottorp, Signe; Stensland, Per

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the interactive process of sharing case stories in small-group activity in general practice. Design Qualitative focus group study. Setting Peer-group meetings of doctors attending specialist training or continuous medical education in general practice. Participants Twenty female and 30 male doctors working in general practice in Norway. Results The storyline of case presentations included detailed stories with emotional engagement, co-authored by other group members. The stories initiated discussions and reflections concerning patients’ and doctors’ perspectives, medical ethics as well as clinical problems. The safe atmosphere allowed testing out boundaries of socially shared knowledge. Conclusions Sharing case stories in small groups in general practice initiated interaction that facilitated meaning-making, reflection and peer support. PMID:22874630

  13. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    H.J. Herzog; E.E. Adams

    2000-08-23

    The specific objective of our project on CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration is to investigate its technical feasibility and to improve the understanding of any associated environmental impacts. Our ultimate goal is to minimize any impacts associated with the eventual use of ocean carbon sequestration to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The project will continue through March 31, 2002, with a field experiment to take place in the summer of 2001 off the Kona Coast of Hawaii. At GHGT-4 in Interlaken, we presented a paper detailing our plans. The purpose of this paper is to present an update on our progress to date and our plans to complete the project. The co-authors of this paper are members of the project's Technical Committee, which has been formed to supervise the technical aspects and execution of this project.

  14. Race, gender and the econophysics of income distribution in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Anwar; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Wiener, Noe

    2014-12-01

    The econophysics “two-class” theory of Yakovenko and his co-authors shows that the distribution of labor incomes is roughly exponential. This paper extends this result to US subgroups categorized by gender and race. It is well known that Males have higher average incomes than Females, and Whites have higher average incomes than African-Americans. It is also evident that social policies can affect these income gaps. Our surprising finding is that nonetheless intra-group distributions of pre-tax labor incomes are remarkably similar and remain close to exponential. This suggests that income inequality can be usefully addressed by taxation policies, and overall income inequality can be modified by also shifting the balance between labor and property incomes.

  15. A Jungian approach to dreams reported by soldiers in a modern combat zone.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Rob; Goodwyn, Erik; Ignatowski, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Treating combat deployed soldiers is becoming more prevalent and needed in psychiatry. Modern combat produces unique psychological challenges, including those without criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This article will attempt to share the primary author's experience with psychotherapy in a combat zone, along with understanding the general themes of dreams the author encountered while being deployed. Toward that end, the primary author [RW] discusses his personal experiences in Iraq working with soldiers whom he saw and treated while in theatre, with a particular focus on the dreams they reported. The co-authors [EG and MI] afterward collaborated with the primary author to formulate and provide insight into the dreams from a Jungian perspective. PMID:21434901

  16. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: George Gamow: World line 1904-1933 (On the ninetieth anniversary of G A Gamov's birth)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel', Viktor Ya

    1994-08-01

    One of his articles written with a co-author Gamov called 'My half-article'. Here his 'half-biography' is presented. It covers the first very important part of his life, starting from his youth in Odessa, his student years in Petrograd-Leningrad and several of his visits to Germany, Denmark, and England in connection with his scientific work. Special attention is devoted to his first scientific researches (1926-1928) at the Leningrad State University and to his relations with fellow students—M P Bronstein, D D Ivanenko, and L D Landau. His research into α-decay—its genesis and subsequent fate—is analysed. This article is in many respects based on new archive material.

  17. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 3 include treatment of soils, waste characterization and certification, waste minimization site remediation management plans and programs, and training programs.

  18. The analysis of PIP and BLZ latitude data and the free diurnal nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damljanovic, Goran; et al.

    The values of the period (0.61 years from PIP and 0.58 years from BLZ data), the amplitude (0.012 arcseconds from PIP, 0.014 arcseconds from BLZ) and the phase (300 degrees from PIP, 320 degrees from BLZ; epoch: 1900.0) of the free diurnal nutation were computed using 13 years of Punta Indio (PIP data in the Hipparcos reference frame) and 37 years of the Belgrade (BLZ data in FK5 reference frame) homogenized latitude data. Both reductions are in line with MERIT Standards, with the standard IAU 1976 precession and IAU 1980 nutation. Direct Fourier transform analysis was applied to the data, and the results presented here (compared with each other and with the others) can be used to make some remarks concerning the IAU 1980 nutation model and polar motion. Co-Author: Maria Silvina De Biasi/UNLP, Argentina.

  19. Relationship Education Research: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Markman, Howard J.; Rhoades, Galena K.

    2011-01-01

    The overarching aim of this paper is to review research on relationship education programs and approaches that have been published or accepted for publication since the last review article in 2002. This paper provides a critical overview of the relationship education field and sets an agenda for research and practice for the next decade. A theme weaved throughout the paper are the ways in which relationship education is similar and different from couples therapy and we conclude that there can be a synergistic, healthy marriage between the two. We then provide recommendations for future directions for research in the relationship education field. Finally, the co-authors comment on our experiences in both the relationship education field and couples therapy field as both researchers and interventionists. PMID:22283386

  20. Modeling Asteroid Geometries using Photometry at the Glendale Community College North Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleim, Brian; Santana, Cristian; Smith, Blake; Cheff, Martha; Muniz, Gonzalo; Boyer, Elizabeth; Keegan, Justin; Dixon, Justin; Baker, Frankie; Karpurk, Kaitlynn; Rodriguez, Anjelica; Bolinaga, Andres; Acosta, Erik; Powell, Bailie; Watt, Sara D.; Eardley, Brandon; Watt, Keith; Jones, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    The students of the Glendale Community College's Astronomy Students for Telescope Research and Outreach (A.S.T.R.O.) Club have expanded their exoplanet transit observing program into observing asteroids. The students, most of whom are non-science majoring undergraduates, observed the asteroid 15 Eunomia using the 8-inch telescopes at the GCC North Observatory in Glendale, Arizona.Using concepts and skills learned in introductory astronomy courses for non-science majors, the co-authors measured the variability of the asteroid due to its rotation and constructed its lightcurve. Using the lightcurve inversion software from the Database of Asteroid Models from Inversion Techniques (DAMIT), a 3-dimensional model of the shape of 15 Eunomia was calculated. These results demonstrate that, given equipment that is readily available and affordable, asteroid observations have long-term educational potential for authentic, practical experience in both observational astronomy and numerical modeling, even with a small student body majoring in the physical sciences.

  1. ‘The world is full of big bad wolves’: investigating the experimental therapeutic spaces of R.D. Laing and Aaron Esterson

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In conjunction with the recent critical assessments of the life and work of R.D. Laing, this paper seeks to demonstrate what is revealed when Laing’s work on families and created spaces of mental health care are examined through a geographical lens. The paper begins with an exploration of Laing’s time at the Tavistock Clinic in London during the 1960s, and of the co-authored text with Aaron Esterson entitled, Sanity, Madness and the Family (1964). The study then seeks to demonstrate the importance Laing and his colleague placed on the time-space situatedness of patients and their worlds. Finally, an account is provided of Laing’s and Esterson’s spatial thinking in relation to their creation of both real and imagined spaces of therapeutic care. PMID:25114145

  2. The Initial Nine Space Settlements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Anita E.; Edwards, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    The co-authors describe a chronology of space infrastructure development illustrating how each element of infrastructure enables development of subsequent more ambitious infrastructure. This is likened to the ``Southern California freeway phenomenon'', wherein a new freeway built in a remote area promotes establishment of gas stations, restaurants, hotels, housing, and eventually entire new communities. The chronology includes new launch vehicles, inter-orbit vehicles, multiple LEO space stations, lunar mining, on-orbit manufacturing, tourist destinations, and supporting technologies required to make it all happen. The space settlements encompassed by the chronology are in Earth orbit (L5 and L4), on the lunar surface, in Mars orbit, on the Martian surface, and in the asteroid belt. Each space settlement is justified with a business rationale for construction. This paper is based on materials developed for Space Settlement Design Competitions that enable high school students to experience the technical and management challenges of working on an industry proposal team.

  3. Seeing emotions: a review of micro and subtle emotion expression training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Ernest Andre

    2016-01-01

    In this review I explore and discuss the use of micro and subtle expression training in the social sciences. These trainings, offered commercially, are designed and endorsed by noted psychologist Paul Ekman, co-author of the Facial Action Coding System, a comprehensive system of measuring muscular movement in the face and its relationship to the expression of emotions. The trainings build upon that seminal work and present them in a way for either the layperson or researcher to easily add to their personal toolbox for a variety of purposes. Outlined are my experiences across the training products, how they could be used in social science research, a brief comparison to automated systems, and possible next steps.

  4. Contextual Semantic: A Context-aware Approach for Semantic Web Based Data Extraction from Scientific Articles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumlander, Deniss

    The paper explores whether the semantic context is good enough to cope with ever increasing number of available resources in different repositories including the web. Here a problem of identifying authors of scientific papers is used as an example. A set of problem still do arise in case we apply exclusively the semantic context. Fortunately contextual semantic can be used to derive more information required to separate ambiguous cases. Semantic tags, well-structured documents and available databases of articles do provide a possibility to be more context-aware. Under the context we use co-authors names, references and headers to extract key-words and identify the subject. The real complexity of the considering problem comes from the dynamical behaviour of authors as they can change the topic of the research in the next paper. As the final judge the paper proposes applying words usage patterns analysis. Final the contextual intelligence engine is described.

  5. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  6. Nanoparticles in Polymers: Assembly, Rheology and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yuanqiao

    Inorganic nanoparticles have the potential of providing functionalities that are difficult to realize using organic materials; and nanocomposites is an effective mean to impart processibility and construct bulk materials with breakthrough properties. The dispersion and assembly of nanoparticles are critical to both processibility and properties of the resulting product. In this talk, we will discuss several methods to control the hierarchical structure of nanoparticles in polymers and resulting rheological, mechanical and optical properties. In one example, polymer-particle interaction and secondary microstructure were designed to provide a low viscosity composition comprising exfoliated high aspect ratio clay nanoparticles; in another example, the microstructure control through templates was shown to enable unique thermal mechanical and optical properties. Jeff Munro, Stephanie Potisek, Phillip Hustad; all of the Dow Chemical Company are co-authors.

  7. John Falk and Lynn Dierking: building the field of informal/free-choice science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Lonie J.

    2015-10-01

    This article establishes the importance of "context", a concept that underpins the academic contributions that John Falk and Lynn Dierking have made in building the field of informal/free-choice learning in science education. I consider, in turn, the individual contributions made by each of them prior to their seminal co-authored work, entitled The Museum Experience. I then document their joint contributions to the field, pointing out that although their interests and skills overlap in complementary ways to produce their jointly authored works, both have continued to make their individual contributions; Falk in his work on identity and impact, and Dierking in her work on community, youth, family and equity. Finally I come to the present, describing how they each continue their research and publication in lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning, with a particular focus on free-choice learning and the role it can play in addressing critical issues in the world.

  8. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  9. How do the Various Components of the Inner 100 Parsecs Interact With Each Other?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, W. M.; Coker, R. F.; Cotera, A.

    1999-06-01

    This is an edited transcript of a discussion session about the various components (Sgr A East & West, CND, ionized gas, large-scale radio structure etc.) filling the inner 10 to 100 parsecs of the Galactic Center that took place during the Galactic Center conference ``The Central Parsecs'' in Tucson, Arizona, Sep. 7-11, 1998. The session was chaired by the moderator as indicated in the author list. The discussions were taped, transcribed, and finally edited by editors who are listed as co-authors. The contributions of the conference participants are preceded by their names and thus references to specific aspects and ideas of this discussion session must also include a reference to the respective speaker(s), e.g., in a footnote.

  10. A consensus statement for safety monitoring guidelines of treatments for major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Seetal; Malhi, Gin S; Tiller, John; Schweitzer, Isaac; Hickie, Ian; Khoo, Jon Paul; Bassett, Darryl L; Lyndon, Bill; Mitchell, Philip B; Parker, Gordon; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Udina, Marc; Singh, Ajeet; Moylan, Steven; Giorlando, Francesco; Doughty, Carolyn; Davey, Christopher G; Theodoras, Michael; Berk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objective This paper aims to present an overview of screening and safety considerations for the treatment of clinical depressive disorders and make recommendations for safety monitoring. Method Data were sourced by a literature search using MEDLINE and a manual search of scientific journals to identify relevant articles. Draft guidelines were prepared and serially revised in an iterative manner until all co-authors gave final approval of content. Results Screening and monitoring can detect medical causes of depression. Specific adverse effects associated with antidepressant treatments may be reduced or identified earlier by baseline screening and agent-specific monitoring after commencing treatment. Conclusion The adoption of safety monitoring guidelines when treating clinical depression is likely to improve overall physical health status and treatment outcome. It is important to implement these guidelines in the routine management of clinical depression. PMID:21888608

  11. ChemiX: a Bragg crystal spectrometer for the Interhelioprobe interplanetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, J.; B?ka?a, J.; Szaforz, ?.; Kowali?ski, M.; Kordylewski, Z.; P?ocieniak, S.; Podgrski, P.; Sylwester, B.; Trzebi?ski, W.; St??licki, M.; H. Phillips, K. J.; Dudnik, O. V.; Kurbatov, E.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Kuzin, S.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Interhelioprobe (IHP), an analogue to the ESA Solar Orbiter, is the prospective Russian space solar observatory intended for in-situ and remote sensing investigations of the Sun and the inner heliosphere from a heliocentric orbit with the perihelion of about 60 solar radii. One of several instruments on board will be the Bragg crystal spectrometer ChemiX which will measure X-ray spectra from solar corona structures. Analysis of the spectra will allow the determination of the elemental composition of plasma in hot coronal sources like flares and active regions. ChemiX is under development at the Wroc?aw Solar Physics Division of the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in collaboration with an international team (see the co-author list). This paper gives an overview of the ChemiX scientific goals and design preparatory to phase B of the instrument development.

  12. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 4 include site characterization and remediation projects, environmental monitoring and modeling; disposal site selection and facility design, risk assessment, safety and health issues, and site remediation technology.

  13. Comment on "Soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from an afforested lowland raised peatbog in Scotland: implications for drainage and restoration" by Yamulki et al. (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, R. R. E.; Chapman, S. J.; Saunders, M.; Evans, C.; Matthews, R.

    2013-06-01

    Yamulki and co-authors address in their recent publication the important issue of net emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from peatlands where land use conversion has taken place. In their case, they studied conversion to forestry versus peatland restoration after a first rotation of plantation forestry. They monitored soil-derived fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) using chamber measurements on planted and unplanted control treatments (with or without drainage), and an unplanted plot within a restored (felled) block on former lowland raised bog. They propose that their measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at these sites suggest that the total net GHG emissions, in 100 yr carbon dioxide equivalents, of the restored peatbog would be higher than that of the peatbog with trees. We believe there are a number of issues with the measurement, calculation and comparison of these greenhouse budgets that may invalidate this conclusion.

  14. Comment on "Soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from an afforested lowland raised peat bog in Scotland: implications for drainage and restoration" by Yamulki et al. (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, R. R. E.; Chapman, S. J.; Saunders, M.; Evans, C. D.; Matthews, R. B.

    2013-11-01

    Yamulki and co-authors address in their recent publication the important issue of net emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from peatlands where land use conversion has taken place. In their case, they studied conversion to forestry versus peatland restoration after a first rotation of plantation forestry. They monitored soil-derived fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) using opaque chamber measurements on planted and unplanted control treatments (with or without drainage), and an unplanted plot within a restored (felled) block on former lowland raised bog. They propose that their measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at these sites suggest that the total net GHG emissions, in 100 yr carbon dioxide equivalents, of the restored peat bog would be higher than that of the peat bog with trees. We believe there are a number of issues with the measurement, calculation and comparison of these greenhouse budgets that may invalidate this conclusion.

  15. Perspectives from South and East Asia on clinical and research ethics: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Van, Cassandra; Cong, Yali; Rashid, Harun; Kumar, Nandini; Ahmad, Aasim; Upshur, Ross; Loff, Bebe

    2014-04-01

    A review was conducted of English-language peer-reviewed and gray literature on health and ethics written by authors from Bangladesh, China, India, and Pakistan. This was supplemented by the knowledge of co-authors who are involved in bioethics capacity building in these countries. Of the identified literature that focused on the application of Western principles, it largely discussed informed consent and revealed norms in clinical decision-making that include physician paternalism, family involvement in decision-making, and reluctance to provide information that might upset patients. It appears that Western ethical principles may be interpreted and applied in unexpected ways. The literature further indicates that, although there is some consistency with Western ideas, Islamic, Confucian, and Indian religious and philosophical traditions contain concepts not reflected in international guidance. Findings suggest scholars from these countries seek to enter into a bioethics dialogue with the potential to enrich and inform "international" frameworks. PMID:24782072

  16. A look at the relationship between industrial dynamics and aggregate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Domenico Delli; Gaffeo, Edoardo; Gallegati, Mauro

    Starting with the pioneering work of [23], the study of the determinants and the shape of the steady-state distribution of firms' size has long fascinated economists. While the conventional view received from the seminal work of e.g. [29], [27] and [42] holds that the firms' size distribution is significantly right-skewed and approximately log-normal, recent empirical research has lent support to the view suggested by H. Simon and his co-author ([32]), according to whom a Pareto-Levy (or power law) distribution seems to return a better fit to the data for the whole distribution ([3]), or at least for its upper tail (Ramsden and Kiss-Haypal, 2000; [18]).

  17. A Journal Paper Filtering Using the Multiple Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masao; Kinukawa, Hiroshi

    A paper filtering system that supports the effective collection of related journal papers is becoming important as the technological progress has been rapid. However, previous systems realized insufficient filtering effectiveness, because of lack of available information in abstract part of journal papers that is available to the public. In this paper, we propose a paper filtering method using the multiple information such as structure, co-author, subject category, terminology, and terms in patent document. By the evaluation for 15 examinees using 4,875 journal papers, it became clear that for all examinees the effectiveness of proposed method exceeds the conventional method, when the all information above are used, which became closer to practical use.

  18. Reliability of the term 'support' in singing.

    PubMed

    Sand, Susanne; Sundberg, Johan

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of a term depends on the extent to which it means the same thing to different people. In this investigation we examine the term 'support', commonly used in vocal pedagogy. Singing lessons given by co-author SS to five students at varying stages were recorded on DAT. By listening to these recordings, she selected 42 examples, each a few seconds long, that she found representative of different degrees of support ranging from perfect to nil. These examples were presented in random order to nine experts, all with a professional involvement in singing. Thirteen of the stimuli occurred twice in the test. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were found to be high, Cronbach alpha=0.910, and mean correlation 0.743 (SD 0.137). These data support the assumption that the term support has a similar meaning to voice experts and should thus be useful in voice terminology. PMID:16147223

  19. Effects of Summer Flow Augmentation on the Migratory Behavior and Survival of Juvenile Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Connor, William P.

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2004 and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall Chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2004. Publication is a high priority of our staff. Publication provides our results to a wide audience, and it insures that our work meets high scientific standards. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 1991-02900 that were written or published from 1998 to 2005.

  20. Theodore Millon (1928-2014).

    PubMed

    Tringone, Robert; Jolosky, Theo; Strack, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Theodore Millon was born on August 18, 1928. On January 29, 2014, Ted died peacefully in his sleep of congestive heart failure. Ted was a scholar and prolific writer. He penned--literally, since he never used a keyboard--and edited more than 30 books and authored or co-authored more than 100 book chapters and research articles. Ted may be most recognizable for the family of objective inventories that bear his name. His development of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory in the 1970s revolutionized personality assessment here and abroad. Over time, many new instruments were developed that targeted adolescent (MAPI, MACI), preadolescent (M-PACI), medical (MBMD), college (MCCI), and normal (MIPS) populations. Beginning in 2004, Ted funded the American Psychological Foundation's annual award, given in his name, honoring an outstanding psychologist engaged in advancing the science of personality psychology. PMID:25046723

  1. IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Halzen, Francis

    2010-11-24

    Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. Its scientific missions include the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies more than two orders of magnitude beyond those produced by accelerator beams. In these lectures, we will focus on IceCube's most publicized mission, the search for the sources of cosmic rays. We will conclude with an overview of the first results obtained with the partially completed detector.These lectures are based on a review paper co-authored with Spencer Klein (arXiv:astroph.HE/1007.1247) to be published in Review of Scientific Instruments.

  2. Generation Y Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Garret; Painting, Kristen; Barrera, Aaron; Skytland, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Are you familiar with the famed Generation Y, or "Gen Yers?" Generation Y is projected to be 47 percent of the workforce by 2014. They were born roughly between 1977 and 2000, but that is definitely not their only defining factor. But who is this group, and what do they have to do with the future of the space program and the Johnson Space Center (JSC)? During 2007, a group of Gen Yers at JSC participated on a committee to address the NASA Headquarters strategic communications plan. Fitzpatrick, along with his co-authors, created a presentation to share the Gen Yers' perspective on their generation in conjunction with the strategic communications strategy released. This knowledge capture (KC) event is that presentation.

  3. Pop science's big bang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2008-10-01

    Physicists have a long history of writing books for outsiders – often to enlighten, sometimes to persuade and occasionally to assuage. Galileo's Dialogues bypassed the conventional channels of scholarly debate and addressed the general public directly; Newton was happy for others to use his work in the public arena and to see the Newtonian "system of the world", as outlined in his Principia, extend far beyond physics. Few people could read Newton, but everyone read about him. In a similar vein, Einstein's public reputation rose steadily upwards, enhanced, ironically, by a reputation for his work being stratospherically difficult to comprehend. This reassured people that they really did not need to make the effort to understand it, merely know that it was very important. Even his own elegant efforts at popularization with co-author Leopold Infeld in 1938, The Evolution of Physics, were unable to sweep away this myth.

  4. PinBus Interface for Interoperable, Grid-Responsive Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-12-02

    A very simple appliance interface was suggested by this author and his co-authors during Grid-Interop 2007. The approach was based on a successful collaboration between utilities, a major appliance manufacture, and the manufacturer of a load control module during the U.S. Department of Energys Grid Friendly Appliance project. The suggested approach was based on the assumption that demand-response objectives could be effectively communicated to and from many small electrical loads like appliances by simply agreeing on the meaning of the binary states of several shared connector pins. It was argued that this approach could pave the way for a wave of demand-response-ready appliances and greatly reduced expenses for utilities future demand-response programs. The approach could be supported by any of the many competing serial communication protocols and would be generally applicable to most end-use devices.

  5. John Falk and Lynn Dierking: building the field of informal/free-choice science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Léonie J.

    2016-03-01

    This article establishes the importance of "context", a concept that underpins the academic contributions that John Falk and Lynn Dierking have made in building the field of informal/free-choice learning in science education. I consider, in turn, the individual contributions made by each of them prior to their seminal co-authored work, entitled The Museum Experience. I then document their joint contributions to the field, pointing out that although their interests and skills overlap in complementary ways to produce their jointly authored works, both have continued to make their individual contributions; Falk in his work on identity and impact, and Dierking in her work on community, youth, family and equity. Finally I come to the present, describing how they each continue their research and publication in lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning, with a particular focus on free-choice learning and the role it can play in addressing critical issues in the world.

  6. Assessing research productivity in an oncology research institute: the role of the documentation center.

    PubMed Central

    Ugolini, D; Bogliolo, A; Parodi, S; Casilli, C; Santi, L

    1997-01-01

    An evaluation method used to assess the quality of research productivity and to provide priorities for budget allocation purposes is presented. This method, developed by a working group of the National Institute for Research on Cancer (IST), Genoa, Italy, is based on the partitioning of categories of the Science Citation Index and Journal Citation Reports (SCI-JCR) into deciles, which normalizes journal impact factors in order to gauge the quality of the productivity. A second parameter related to the number of staff of each institute department co-authoring a given paper has been introduced in order to guide departmental budget allocations. The information scientists of the IST Documentation Center who participated in the working group played a pivotal role in developing the computerized database of publications, providing and analyzing data, supplying and evaluating literature on the topic, and placing international bibliographic databases at the working group's disposal. PMID:9028569

  7. [Reply to “Wasting public money?” by Judith Totman] Politically motivated request?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    Judith Totman Parrish (Forum,Eos, 86(32), 9 August 2005, p. 294) asks Thomas Crowley to provide evidence that the U.S. Rep. Joe Barton's (R.-N.Y) request for information from me, and from my colleagues Michael Mann and Malcolm Hughes, was politically motivated.Among a host of items, here are some of the things Barton specifically asked for: “…all financial support you have received related to your research, including, but not limited to, all private, state, and federal assistance, grants, contracts (including subgrants or subcontracts), or other financial awards or honoraria…the location of all data archives relating to each published study for which you were an author or co-author… [a list of all] requests…you or your co-authors [have] received for data relating to the climate change studies, what was your response, and why?”

  8. Development Challenges of Game-Changing Entry System Technologies from Concept to Mission Infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin; Ellerby, Don; Feldman, Jay; Gage, Peter; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Realization within the US and NASA that future exploration both Human and Robotic will require innovative new technologies led to the creation of the Space Technology Mission Directorate and investment in game changing technologies with high pay-off. Some of these investments will see success and others, due to many of the constraints, will not attain their goal. The co-authors of this proposed presentation have been involved from concept to mission infusion aspects of entry technologies that are game changing. The four example technologies used to describe the challenges experienced along the pathways to success are at different levels of maturity. They are Conformal, 3-D MAT, HEEET and ADEPT. The four examples in many ways capture broad aspects of the challenges of maturation and illustrate what led some to be exceptionally successful and how others had to be altered in order remain viable game changing technologies. Subsystem technologies for robotic and human missions?

  9. Development Challenges of Game-Changing Entry System Technologies From Concept to Mission Infusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin; Ellerby, Don; Feldman, Jay; Gage, Peter; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Realization within the US and NASA that future exploration both Human and Robotic will require innovative new technologies led to the creation of the Space Technology Mission Directorate and investment in game changing technologies with high pay-off. Some of these investments will see success and others, due to many of the constraints, will not attain their goal. The co-authors of this proposed presentation have been involved from concept to mission infusion aspects of entry technologies that are game changing. The four example technologies used to describe the challenges experienced along the pathways to success are at different levels of maturity. They are Conformal, 3-D MAT, HEEET and ADEPT. The four examples in many ways capture broad aspects of the challenges of maturation and illustrate what led some to be exceptionally successful and how others had to be altered in order remain viable game changing technologies.

  10. Comparison of some models of reaction kinetics in HV circuit breakers with SF6 after current zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlová, M.; Coufal, O.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the solutions of three models of reaction kinetics in HV circuit breakers with SF6 after current zero are presented and compared. One model has been proposed by Bartlová, the co-author of this paper, the other two models under comparison have been taken over from the literature. In all the three models a constant pressure p(t) = 4 atm and the same dependence of temperature on time T(t) are assumed. For the description of the relation between equilibrium and kinetic composition in a system, the concept of asymptotic composition is introduced. A comparison of the composition and enthalpy of the products of SF6 dissociation and ionization for the given pressure and T(t) is made. General conclusions have been derived from the comparison.

  11. Pierre Curie, 1859–1906

    PubMed Central

    Mould, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    The year 2006 marked 100 years since the death of Pierre Curie. It is therefore appropriate that we remember his life and his work, which was cut short by his untimely death from an accident on the Pont Neuf, Paris, on April 19, 1906. He had already accomplished much during his life, both before the discovery of radium with Marie Curie, in work co-authored with his brother Jacques on piezoelectricity, and afterwards, when he published the results of several experimental studies with radium and radon. He came from a medical family, and his grandfather Pierre Curie was a famous homeopathic physician. He has, in print, unfairly been relegated to the background—his own scientific contributions having been overtaken by the fame of Marie Curie, probably because she outlived him by 28 years. PMID:17576470

  12. A NASA/University Joint Venture in Space Science (JOVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Danny M.

    1997-01-01

    Several papers have been given to national level meeting and a paper has been published in an international journal. Several additional papers have been co-author by students. The initial research project on the Atchafalaya Delta seems to have died in part due to a transfer of the NASA colleague to another location and subsequent reassigment to another job title. I have continued to include credit to NASA for many of my papers presented and published: A major debris flow along the Wasatch front in Northern Ogden; Spatial and volumetric changes in the Atchafalaya delta, Louisiana; An analysis of prehistoric Greenstone artifact in northern Alabama; An assessment of surfacing algorithm; Analysis of georeferencing algorithms to assess spatial accuracy.

  13. Combinatorial construction of tilings by barycentric simplex orbits (D symbols) and their realizations in Euclidean and other homogeneous spaces.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Emil

    2005-11-01

    A new method, developed in previous works by the author (partly with co-authors), is presented which decides algorithmically, in principle by computer, whether a combinatorial space tiling (Tau, Gamma) is realizable in the d-dimensional Euclidean space E(d) (think of d = 2, 3, 4) or in other homogeneous spaces, e.g. in Thurston's 3-geometries: E(3), S(3), H(3), S(2) x R, H(2) x R, SL(2)R, Nil, Sol. Then our group Gamma will be an isometry group of a projective metric 3-sphere PiS(3) (R, < , >), acting discontinuously on its above tiling Tau. The method is illustrated by a plane example and by the well known rhombohedron tiling (Tau, Gamma), where Gamma = R3m is the Euclidean space group No. 166 in International Tables for Crystallography. PMID:16244403

  14. Teaching Density Functional Theory Through Experiential Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-09-01

    Today, quantum mechanical density functional theory is often the method of choice for performing accurate calculations on atomic, molecular and condensed matter systems. Here, I share some of my experiences in teaching the necessary basics of solid state physics, as well as the theory and practice of density functional theory, in a number of workshops held in developing countries over the past two decades. I discuss the advantages of supplementing the usual mathematically formal teaching methods, characteristic of graduate courses, with the use of visual imagery and analogies. I also describe a successful experiment we carried out, which resulted in a joint publication co-authored by 67 lecturers and students participating in a summer school.

  15. X-Ray Emission from Pre-Main-Sequence Stars - Testing the Solar Analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    1998-01-01

    This LTSA award funds my research on the origin of stellar X-ray emission and the solar-stellar analogy. The focus during most of this reporting period continued to be on the reduction and analysis of data acquired with the ASCA observatory (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). During the last few months of this reporting period, considerable time and effort was also devoted to the submission of AXAF observing proposals in preparation for the upcoming AXAF launch. During this reporting period, five papers appeared in refereed journals for which I was either author or co-author, and two additional papers have recently been submitted to ApJ. Also, three conference proceedings papers were submitted. These publications are listed in the attached bibliography.

  16. KSC History Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 NASA/ASEE KSC History Project focused on a series of six history initiatives designed to acquire, preserve, and interpret the history of Kennedy Space Center. These six projects included the completion of Voices From the Cape, historical work co-authored with NASA historian Roger Launius, the completion of a series of oral histories with key KSC personnel, expansion of monograph on Public Affairs into two comprehensive pieces on KSC press operations and KSC visitor operations, the expansion of KSC Historical Concept Maps (Cmap) for history knowledge preservation, the expansion of the KSC oral history program through the administration of an oral history workshop for KSC-based practitioners, and the continued collaborative relationships between Kennedy Space Center, the University of West Florida, the University of Central Florida and other institutions including the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

  17. The Magnetotelluric Sounding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Gaston

    Anyone interested in acquiring this new book is likely to remember another book co-authored by G.V. Keller: Electrical Methods in Geophysical Prospecting (the second author was Frank C. Frischknecht). The high standard of the first book and its timeliness certainly helped it to become a classic in its field. It has already been reprinted several times. The prospective buyer of the new text will first be struck, however, by the exceedingly high price of the book, and then, as one leafs through it, by the inordinate amount of mathematics presented. The small potential market and the high cost of production may be invoked to explain the price, but a different, less highly mathematical approach would have reduced costs and widened the market, especially because the subject of magnetotellurics is now a topical one.

  18. Space Colony from a Commercial Asteroid Mining Company Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Thomas C.; Grandl, Werner; Pinni, Martina; Benaroya, Haym

    2008-01-01

    Commercial mining towns on Earth become cities. Company towns need commerce to drive the growth and economy of early space colonies. Water is an early resource for camp consumables plus propellant export sales from asteroid mining operations at proposed burned out comets with water methane ice cores for sustainable growth over 50 years, financed from profits and capable with affordable logistics to support resource recovery. One co-author's perspective includes remote resource recovery sites on Earth. Other co-authors' experiences include architecture, lunar habitation, and architectural space colony concepts. This paper combines these experiences to propose commercial opportunities possible as mankind moves beyond one planet. Alaska's North Slope commercial history indicates that different multiple logistics transportation systems are required to reduce the risk to humans and families moved in before the oil flowed. Commercial enterprises have risked $20 billion and spent hundreds of billions in private money after profits were created. The lessons learned are applied to a burned out comet designated Wilson-Harrington (1979) and explores the architecture for early living within the burned out comet disk created from ice recovery and later sealed with an expected methane ice interior. Considered is the recovery of the resources, the transport of water back to Earth orbit or L-1, plus later the development of more comfortable space colony living. Commercial markets produce cities on Earth and the same can happen on Space Colonies. The key is an ``in place'' affordable commercial logistics system that can service, stimulate and sustain a 50-year commercial propellant market.

  19. The role of a space patrol of solar X-ray radiation in the provisioning of the safety of orbital and interplanetary manned space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, S. V.; Kovalenok, V. V.; Savinykh, V. P.; Ivanchenkov, A. S.; Voronin, N. A.; Trchounian, A.; Baranova, L. A.

    2015-04-01

    In interplanetary flight, after large solar flares, cosmonauts are subjected to the action of energetic solar protons and electrons. These energetic particles have an especially strong effect during extravehicular activity or (in the future) during residence on the surface of Mars, when they spend an extended time there. Such particles reach the orbits of the Earth and of Mars with a delay of several hours relative to solar X-rays and UV radiation. Therefore, there is always time to predict their appearance, in particular, by means of an X-ray-UV radiometer from the apparatus complex of the Space Solar Patrol (SSP) that is being developed by the co-authors of this paper. The paper discusses the far unexplored biophysical problem of manned flight to Mars, scheduled for the next decade. In long-term manned space flights on the orbital stations "Salyut" Soviet cosmonaut crews from three of the co-authors (cosmonauts V.V. Kovalenok, A.S. Ivanchenkov, and V.P. Savinykh) had repeatedly observed the effect of certain geophysical conditions on the psychological state of each crew. These effects coincide with the increased intensity of global illumination in the upper ionosphere space on flight altitudes (300-360 km). It is important that during all of these periods, most of the geomagnetic pulsations were completely absent. Possible ways to study the synergistic effects of the simultaneous absence of the geomagnetic field, the magnetic pulsations and the microwave radiation of the terrestrial ionosphere are considered for a flight to Mars.

  20. Long-Term Trends in foF2: A Comparison of Various Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, J.; Mikhailov, A. V.; Ulich, T.; Bremer, J.; Elias, A. G.; Ortiz de Adler, N.; Foppiano, A. J.; Jara, V.; Abarca del Rio, R.; Ovalle, E.

    2005-05-01

    Results of various authors on long-term trends in foF2, i.e. in the maximum electron density in the ionosphere, and their interpretation do not reveal a consistent pattern. Therefore a joint analysis of one carefully selected data set was performed by five teams, which used different approaches to trend determination. High-quality data of station Juliusruh (54.6N, 13.4E) for noon (average from 10-14 UT) with a small number of gaps were used. The data covered the period of two solar cycles from minimum to minimum (1976-1996). Data gaps were filled in by interpolation using Juliusruh measurements at other times and measurements of neighbor stations. Juliusruh is relatively sensitive to geomagnetic activity as an almost subauroral station, which might play some role in interpretation of trend results. Various methods provide results, which differ to some extent. Even when one co-author applies various modifications of his method,the results differ. Another source of differences are various ways of removal (or at least large suppression) of effects of solar (and geomagnetic) activity. Also interpretation is not unique - co-authors consider either the long-term change in geomagnetic activity, or greenhouse effect to be predominantly responsible for trends. Nevertheless, there is some output from the joint analysis. All trends are either negative or insignificant. Data corrections with sunspot number (R), F10.7 adjusted to the Sun-Earth distance, and observed F10.7 result in somewhat different trends; the observed F10.7 appears to be the best correcting factor. The Juliusruh dip angle increased over the period 1976-1996 from 68.6 to 68.8 deg, but the possible impact of that increase is negligibly small and it would make the trend more positive. The paper will present results in more detail.

  1. Long-term trends in foF2: A comparison of various methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latovi?ka, J.; Mikhailov, A. V.; Ulich, T.; Bremer, J.; Elias, A. G.; Ortiz de Adler, N.; Jara, V.; Abarca Del Rio, R.; Foppiano, A. J.; Ovalle, E.; Danilov, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    Results of various authors on long-term trends in foF2, which is equivalent to the maximum electron density in the ionosphere, and their interpretation do not reveal a consistent pattern. Therefore, a joint analysis of one carefully selected dataset was performed by six teams, which used different approaches to trend determination. High-quality data of station Juliusruh (54.6N, 13.4E) for noon (average from 10 to 14 UT) were used for the period of two solar cycles from minimum to minimum (1976 1996). Juliusruh is relatively sensitive to geomagnetic activity as an almost subauroral station, which might play some role in interpretation of trend results. Various methods provide results, which differ to some extent, even when one co-author applies different methods. Another source of differences is application of various ways of removal (or at least large suppression) of the effect of solar (and geomagnetic) activity. Nevertheless finally most teams obtained quite comparable results. Interpretation of the observed trends is not uniqueco-authors consider either the long-term change in geomagnetic activity, or anthropogenic effects to be predominantly responsible for trends. There is some generally accepted output from the joint analysis. All trends are either negative or insignificant. Data corrections with sunspot number (R), F10.7 adjusted to the Sun Earth distance, observed F10.7, adjusted E10.7 and observed E10.7 result in somewhat different trends; the observed F10.7 and E10.7 appear to be the best correcting factor. The trends in foF2 are very small, of the order of -0.01 MHz/year, much smaller than the solar cycle effect and, therefore, sensitive to the solar activity correction. The Juliusruh dip angle increased very little over the period 1976 1996 and the possible impact of that increase on trends is negligibly small.

  2. From the guest editors.

    PubMed

    Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013. PMID:24245643

  3. Bridging the gap between data acquisition and inference ontologies: toward ontology-based link discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Michel L.; Morris, Steven A.; Yen, Gary G.

    2003-09-01

    Bridging the gap between low level ontologies used for data acquisition and high level ontologies used for inference is essential to enable the discovery of high-level links between low-level entities. This is of utmost importance in many applications, where the semantic distance between the observable evidence and the target relations is large. Examples of these applications would be detection of terrorist activity, crime analysis, and technology monitoring, among others. Currently this inference gap has been filled by expert knowledge. However, with the increase of the data and system size, it has become too costly to perform such manual inference. This paper proposes a semi-automatic system to bridge the inference gap using network correlation methods, similar to Bayesian Belief Networks, combined with hierarchical clustering, to group and organize data so that experts can observe and build the inference gap ontologies quickly and efficiently, decreasing the cost of this labor-intensive process. A simple application of this method is shown here, where the co-author collaboration structure ontology is inferred from the analysis of a collection of journal publications on the subject of anthrax. This example uncovers a co-author collaboration structures (a well defined ontology) from a scientific publication dataset (also a well defined ontology). Nevertheless, the evidence of author collaboration is poorly defined, requiring the use of evidence from keywords, citations, publication dates, and paper co-authorship. The proposed system automatically suggests candidate collaboration group patterns for evaluation by experts. Using an intuitive graphic user interface, these experts identify, confirm and refine the proposed ontologies and add them to the ontology database to be used in subsequent processes.

  4. Fabric measurement along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe; Eichler, Jan; Fujita, Shuji; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Samyn, Denis; Svensson, Anders; Weikusat, Ilka

    2014-05-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) profile along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland, is presented in this work. Data were measured in the field by an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin climatic transition. A similar strengthening, toward an anisotropic single maximum-type fabric, has been observed in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and can be attributed to a positive feedback between changes in ice viscosity at the climatic transition, and the impact of a shear component of stress. Centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the folding hypothesis used for a climatic reconstruction by Dahl-Jensen and co authors (2013). Comparison is made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NorthGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. The fabric profile clearly reflects the increase in shear deformation when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NorthGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NorthGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NorthGRIP. References: Dahl-Jensen, D. and 120 co-authors. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core, Nature, 493, 489-493, 2013.

  5. IAPPP and the Pro-Am Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D. S.

    2004-05-01

    IAPPP (International Amateur-Professional Photoelectric Photometry) was born in June 1980 at a time when amateurs doing photoelectric photometry were few in number and working largely in isolation and without guidance or respect from professional astronomers. The IAPPP credo is "to facilitate collaborative research between amateur and professional astronomers". Included almost from the beginning were college professors (not necessarily astronomers by specialty) wishing to do meaningful research with their small campus telescopes and involving their students. Today we see a different and better world. To date, issues of the quarterly IAPPP Communications have been mailed to members/subscribers in 73 different countries and 78 IAPPP Symposia, many including technical how-to workshops, have been held in 8 different countries. A regular feature in the Communications has documented 518 scientific papers published and co-authored by amateurs in mainstream astronomical journals. More than 71 new variable stars have been discovered photoelectrically by amateurs, 42 percent of naked-eye brightness. A Special Session of the 165th AAS meeting in Tucson was dedicated to IAPPP. Amateurs, not professionals, were behind the renaissance of remote computer-controlled photometric telescopes that today are mainstream. Full-length books on photoelectric photometry have been authored or co-authored by almost as many amateurs as professionals. Photoelectric observing projects outlined in past issues of the Communications have involved not only stars (variable and otherwise) but also galaxies (including quasars and blazars), Solar System objects (the Sun, planets, moons, asteroids, and comets), occultation events, and even light pollution and atmospheric extinction. IAPPP has naturally embraced the advent of CCD photometry, inasmuch as CCD's are photoelectric devices - photons in, electrons out. Meaningful research by amateurs using the powerful technique of photoelectric photometry is no longer a potential touted by only a few professionals. It is a reality recognized by most. For more on amateur/professional collaboration, photoelectric photometry, and IAPPP, contact douglas.s.hall@vanderbilt.edu.

  6. Milky Way Past Was More Turbulent Than Previously Known

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    Results of 1001 observing nights shed new light on our Galaxy [1] Summary A team of astronomers from Denmark, Switzerland and Sweden [2] has achieved a major breakthrough in our understanding of the Milky Way, the galaxy in which we live. After more than 1,000 nights of observations spread over 15 years, they have determined the spatial motions of more than 14,000 solar-like stars residing in the neighbourhood of the Sun. For the first time, the changing dynamics of the Milky Way since its birth can now be studied in detail and with a stellar sample sufficiently large to allow a sound analysis. The astronomers find that our home galaxy has led a much more turbulent and chaotic life than previously assumed. PR Photo 10a/04: Distribution on the sky of the observed stars. PR Photo 10b/04: Stars in the solar neigbourhood and the Milky Way galaxy (artist's view). PR Video Clip 04/04: The motions of the observed stars during the past 250 million years. Unknown history Home is the place we know best. But not so in the Milky Way - the galaxy in which we live. Our knowledge of our nearest stellar neighbours has long been seriously incomplete and - worse - skewed by prejudice concerning their behaviour. Stars were generally selected for observation because they were thought to be "interesting" in some sense, not because they were typical. This has resulted in a biased view of the evolution of our Galaxy. The Milky Way started out just after the Big Bang as one or more diffuse blobs of gas of almost pure hydrogen and helium. With time, it assembled into the flattened spiral galaxy which we inhabit today. Meanwhile, generation after generation of stars were formed, including our Sun some 4,700 million years ago. But how did all this really happen? Was it a rapid process? Was it violent or calm? When were all the heavier elements formed? How did the Milky Way change its composition and shape with time? Answers to these and many other questions are 'hot' topics for the astronomers who study the birth and evolution of the Milky Way and other galaxies. Now the rich results of a 15 year-long marathon survey by a Danish-Swiss-Swedish research team [2] are providing some of the answers. 1,001 nights at the telescopes ESO PR Photo 10a/04 ESO PR Photo 10a/04 Sky distribution of the observed stars [Preview - JPEG: 518 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 1035 x 800 pix - 897k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 10a/04 shows the distribution on the sky of the approx. 14,000 observed stars. The region on the left that is denser than its surroundings is the nearby Hyades star cluster. The team spent more than 1,000 observing nights over 15 years at the Danish 1.5-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory at La Silla (Chile) and at the Swiss 1-m telescope of the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France). Additional observations were made at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in the USA. A total of more than 14,000 solar-like stars (so-called F- and G-type stars) were observed at an average of four times each - a total of no less than 63,000 individual spectroscopic observations! This now complete census of neighbourhood stars provides distances, ages, chemical analysis, space velocities and orbits in the general rotation of the Milky Way. It also identifies those stars (about 1/3 of them all) which the astronomers found to be double or multiple. This very complete data set for the stars in the solar neighbourhood will provide food for thought by astronomers for years to come. A dream come true ESO PR Photo 10b/04 ESO PR Photo 10b/04 Stars in the solar neighbourhood [Preview - JPEG: 459 x 400 pix - 29k] [Normal - JPEG: 918 x 800 pix - 441k] [FullRes - JPEG: 3000 x 2613 pix - 4.4Mb] Caption: ESO PR Photo 10b/04 provides an artist's view of the observed group of stars orbiting the Milky Way together with the Sun, as seen by an imaginary observer outside the Galaxy. The orbit of the Sun is shown. For clarity, the stars surrounding the local volume have been removed here. These observations provide the long-sought missing pieces of the puzzle to get a clear overview of the solar neighbourhood. They effectively mark the conclusion of a project started more than twenty years ago.. In fact, this work marks the fulfilment of an old dream by Danish astronomer Bengt Strömgren (1908-1987), who pioneered the study of the history of the Milky Way through systematic studies of its stars. Already in the 1950's he designed a special system of colour measurements to determine the chemical composition and ages of many stars very efficiently. And the Danish 50-cm and 1.5-m telescopes at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) were constructed to make such projects possible. Another Danish astronomer, Erik Heyn Olsen made the first step in the 1980's by measuring the flux (light intensity) in several wavebands (in the "Strömgren photometric system") of 30,000 A, F and G stars over the whole sky to a fixed brightness limit. Next, ESA's Hipparcos satellite determined precise distances and velocities in the plane of the sky for these and many other stars. The missing link was the motions along the line of sight (the so-called radial velocities). They were then measured by the present team from the Doppler shift of spectral lines of the stars (the same technique that is used to detect planets around other stars), using the specialized CORAVEL instrument. Stellar orbits in the Milky Way ESO PR Video Clip 04/04 ESO Video Clip 04/04 Motions of the observed stars in the Milky Way [MPG - 1.3Mb] [Quick Time Video - 248k] [Animated GIF - 128k] Caption: ESO PR Video Clip 04/04 shows the stars studied during the present programme making their most recent orbital revolution around the Galactic centre before converging into the small volume where they were observed by the team. The duration of the video corresponds to about 250 million years. The yellow dot and white curve show how the Sun moved during this last of its about 20 laps around our Galaxy. With the velocity information completed, the astronomers can now compute how the stars have wandered around in the Galaxy in the past, and where they will go in the future, cf. PR Video Clip 04/04. Birgitta Nordström, leader of the team, explains: "For the first time we have a complete set of observed stars that is a fair representation of the stellar population in the Milky Way disc in general. It is large enough for a proper statistical analysis and also has complete velocity and binary star information. We have just started the analysis of this dataset ourselves, but we know that our colleagues worldwide will rush to join in the interpretation of this treasure trove of information." The team's initial analysis indicates that objects like molecular clouds, spiral arms, black holes, or maybe a central bar in the Galaxy, have stirred up the motion of the stars throughout the entire history of the Milky Way disc. This in turn reveals that the evolution of the Milky Way was far more complex and chaotic than traditional, simplified models have long so far assumed. Supernova explosions, galaxy collisions, and infall of huge gas clouds have made the Milky Way a very lively place indeed!

  7. NASA'S Chandra Finds Superfluid in Neutron Star's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered the first direct evidence for a superfluid, a bizarre, friction-free state of matter, at the core of a neutron star. Superfluids created in laboratories on Earth exhibit remarkable properties, such as the ability to climb upward and escape airtight containers. The finding has important implications for understanding nuclear interactions in matter at the highest known densities. Neutron stars contain the densest known matter that is directly observable. One teaspoon of neutron star material weighs six billion tons. The pressure in the star's core is so high that most of the charged particles, electrons and protons, merge resulting in a star composed mostly of uncharged particles called neutrons. Two independent research teams studied the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, the remains of a massive star 11,000 light years away that would have appeared to explode about 330 years ago as observed from Earth. Chandra data found a rapid decline in the temperature of the ultra-dense neutron star that remained after the supernova, showing that it had cooled by about four percent over a 10-year period. "This drop in temperature, although it sounds small, was really dramatic and surprising to see," said Dany Page of the National Autonomous University in Mexico, leader of a team with a paper published in the February 25, 2011 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters. "This means that something unusual is happening within this neutron star." Superfluids containing charged particles are also superconductors, meaning they act as perfect electrical conductors and never lose energy. The new results strongly suggest that the remaining protons in the star's core are in a superfluid state and, because they carry a charge, also form a superconductor. "The rapid cooling in Cas A's neutron star, seen with Chandra, is the first direct evidence that the cores of these neutron stars are, in fact, made of superfluid and superconducting material," said Peter Shternin of the Ioffe Institute in St Petersburg, Russia, leader of a team with a paper accepted in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Both teams show that this rapid cooling is explained by the formation of a neutron superfluid in the core of the neutron star within about the last 100 years as seen from Earth. The rapid cooling is expected to continue for a few decades and then it should slow down. "It turns out that Cas A may be a gift from the Universe because we would have to catch a very young neutron star at just the right point in time," said Page's co-author Madappa Prakash, from Ohio University. "Sometimes a little good fortune can go a long way in science." The onset of superfluidity in materials on Earth occurs at extremely low temperatures near absolute zero, but in neutron stars, it can occur at temperatures near a billion degrees Celsius. Until now there was a very large uncertainty in estimates of this critical temperature. This new research constrains the critical temperature to between one half a billion to just under a billion degrees. Cas A will allow researchers to test models of how the strong nuclear force, which binds subatomic particles, behaves in ultradense matter. These results are also important for understanding a range of behavior in neutron stars, including "glitches," neutron star precession and pulsation, magnetar outbursts and the evolution of neutron star magnetic fields. Small sudden changes in the spin rate of rotating neutron stars, called glitches, have previously given evidence for superfluid neutrons in the crust of a neutron star, where densities are much lower than seen in the core of the star. This latest news from Cas A unveils new information about the ultra-dense inner region of the neutron star. "Previously we had no idea how extended superconductivity of protons was in a neutron star," said Shternin's co-author Dmitry Yakovlev, also from the Ioffe Institute. The cooling in the Cas A neutron star was first discovered by co-author Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, Canada, and Wynn Ho from the University of Southampton, UK, in 2010. It was the first time that astronomers have measured the rate of cooling of a young neutron star. Page's co-authors were Prakash, James Lattimer (State University of New York at Stony Brook), and Andrew Steiner (Michigan State University.) Shternin's co-authors were Yakovlev, Heinke, Ho, and Daniel Patnaude (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.) More information, including images and other multimedia, can be found at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov

  8. Evolution of Cooperation Patterns in Psoriasis Research: Co-Authorship Network Analysis of Papers in Medline (1942–2013)

    PubMed Central

    González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Park, Jinseo; Huamaní, Charles; Belinchón, Isabel; Ramos, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although researchers have worked in collaboration since the origins of modern science and the publication of the first scientific journals in the eighteenth century, this phenomenon has acquired exceptional importance in the last several decades. Since the mid-twentieth century, new knowledge has been generated from within an ever-growing network of investigators, working cooperatively in research groups across countries and institutions. Cooperation is a crucial determinant of academic success. Objective The aim of the present paper is to analyze the evolution of scientific collaboration at the micro level, with regard to the scientific production generated on psoriasis research. Methods A bibliographic search in the Medline database containing the MeSH terms “psoriasis” or “psoriatic arthritis” was carried out. The search results were limited to articles, reviews and letters. After identifying the co-authorships of documents on psoriasis indexed in the Medline database (1942–2013), various bibliometric indicators were obtained, including the average number of authors per document and degree of multi-authorship over time. In addition, we performed a network analysis to study the evolution of certain features of the co-authorship network as a whole: average degree, size of the largest component, clustering coefficient, density and average distance. We also analyzed the evolution of the giant component to characterize the changing research patterns in the field, and we calculated social network indicators for the nodes, namely betweenness and closeness. Results The main active research clusters in the area were identified, along with their authors of reference. Our analysis of 28,670 documents sheds light on different aspects related to the evolution of scientific collaboration in the field, including the progressive increase in the mean number of co-authors (which stood at 5.17 in the 2004–2013 decade), and the rise in multi-authored papers signed by many different authors (in the same decade, 25.77% of the documents had between 6 and 9 co-authors, and 10.28% had 10 or more). With regard to the network indicators, the average degree gradually increased up to 10.97 in the study period. The percentage of authors pertaining to the largest component also rose to 73.02% of the authors. The clustering coefficient, on the other hand, remained stable throughout the entire 70-year period, with values hovering around 0.9. Finally, the average distance peaked in the decades 1974–1983 (8.29) and 1984–2003 (8.12) then fell over the next two decades, down to 5.25 in 2004–2013. The construction of the co-authorship network (threshold of collaboration ≥ 10 co-authored works) revealed a giant component of 161 researchers, containing 6 highly cohesive sub-components. Conclusions Our study reveals the existence of a growing research community in which collaboration is increasingly important. We can highlight an essential feature associated with scientific collaboration: multi-authored papers, with growing numbers of collaborators contributing to them, are becoming more and more common, therefore the formation of research groups of increasing depth (specialization) and breadth (multidisciplinarity) is now a cornerstone of research success. PMID:26658481

  9. Pullback attractors in nonautonomous dynamical systems with delay: Applications to an ENSO model with seasonal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickaël.; Zaliapin, Ilya; Ghil, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Recent work by two of the co-authors (MDC and MG) on random dynamical systems and their attractors has motivated us to consider also a closely related problem, namely the pullback attractors (PBAs) of deterministic dynamical systems driven by time-dependent forcing. Two obvious examples of such forcing in climate dynamics are: (i) periodic forcing by the seasonal cycle; and (ii) slow forcing by an interdecadal warming trend. We illustrate these two types of forcing in a highly idealized model for El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability, previously studied by two of the co-authors (MG and IZ). The model is governed by a delay differential equation (DDE) for sea surface temperature T in the Tropical Pacific, and it combines two key mechanisms that participate in ENSO dynamics: delayed negative feedback and seasonal forcing. We perform a theoretical and numerical study of the model in the three-dimensional space of its physically relevant parameters: strength of seasonal forcing, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and propagation period of oceanic waves across the Tropical Pacific. We report several findings that are consistent with the observed dynamics of ENSO, as well as with more detailed and realistic models: quasi-periodic behavior with the correct "period" values, phase locking, and sensitive dependence on model parameters. We demonstrate, furthermore, that the transition from smooth period-1 behavior to more realistic --- quasi-periodic or chaotic --- behavior occurs in a sequence of bifurcations similar to those observed in classical chaotic systems. We study next a multi-dimensional manifold of solutions, given by constant or piecewise constant initial histories, e.g. a constant, year-long warm (El Nino) or cold (La Nina) state. To do so, we apply the PBA concept in order to study the model dynamics in the model-parameter region where sensitivity to parameter values is high, as well as in the transition region from smooth to sensitive behavior. Computation of the model's PBAs clearly demonstrates that its dynamics --- whether periodic (smooth) or quasi-periodic (sensitive) --- occurs on a two-dimensional torus. This behavior reflects the competition between two oscillatory mechanisms: an external one due to the seasonal forcing and an internal one due to the delayed feedbacks. Such an interpretation is much harder to obtain from the complex, parameter-sensitive dynamics of the model using more traditional approaches for autonomous systems. Finally, we study the model dynamics subject to long-tem global warming scenarios and interpret the results in the context of the ongoing research on long-term climate projections.

  10. Recommendations for strengthening the infrared technology component of any condition monitoring program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Jack R., Jr.; Young, R. K.

    1999-03-01

    This presentation provides insights of a long term 'champion' of many condition monitoring technologies and a Level III infra red thermographer. The co-authors present recommendations based on their observations of infra red and other components of predictive, condition monitoring programs in manufacturing, utility and government defense and energy activities. As predictive maintenance service providers, trainers, informal observers and formal auditors of such programs, the co-authors provide a unique perspective that can be useful to practitioners, managers and customers of advanced programs. Each has over 30 years experience in the field of machinery operation, maintenance, and support the origins of which can be traced to and through the demanding requirements of the U.S. Navy nuclear submarine forces. They have over 10 years each of experience with programs in many different countries on 3 continents. Recommendations are provided on the following: (1) Leadership and Management Support (For survival); (2) Life Cycle View (For establishment of a firm and stable foundation for a program); (3) Training and Orientation (For thermographers as well as operators, managers and others); (4) Analyst Flexibility (To innovate, explore and develop their understanding of machinery condition); (5) Reports and Program Justification (For program visibility and continued expansion); (6) Commitment to Continuous Improvement of Capability and Productivity (Through application of updated hardware and software); (7) Mutual Support by Analysts (By those inside and outside of the immediate organization); (8) Use of Multiple Technologies and System Experts to Help Define Problems (Through the use of correlation analysis of data from up to 15 technologies. An example correlation analysis table for AC and DC motors is provided.); (9) Root Cause Analysis (Allows a shift from reactive to proactive stance for a program); (10) Master Equipment Identification and Technology Application (To place the condition monitoring program in perspective); (11) Use of procedures for Predictive, Condition Monitoring and maintenance in general (To get consistent results); (12) Developing a scheme for predictive, condition monitoring personnel qualification and certification (To provide a career path and incentive to advance skill level and value to the company); (13) Analyst Assignment to Technologies and Related Duties (To make intelligent use of the skills of individuals assigned); (14) Condition Monitoring Analyst Selection Criteria (Key attributes for success are mentioned.); (15) Design and Modification to Support Monitoring (For old and new machinery to facilitate data acquisition); (16) Establishment of a Museum of Components and Samples Pulled from Service for Cause (For orientation and awareness training of operators and managers and exchange of information between analysts); (17) Goals (To promote a proactive program approach for machinery condition improvement).

  11. Studies in planetary crustal deformation: Venus and the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Christopher David

    Presented in this dissertation are various works related to crustal deformation on the Earth and Venus. Chapter 1, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, presents relationships and techniques for determining the heights and slopes of discretely dipping surfaces, such as normal fault scarps, on the surface of Venus from measurements of their widths in Magellan stereo synthetic aperture radar images. The methods take into account radar distortion effects, and allow one to determine whether a slope is foreshortened, laid over, elongated, or in radar shadow. Chapter 2, co-authored with John Suppe, uses the techniques derived in Chapter 1 to measure the height and slope of 170 surfaces interpreted to be manifestations of normal faults to show that the mean topographic slope is about 36.4 +/- 1.2, regardless of height, suggesting that most faults have collapsed to tallus slopes, approximately at an angle of repose. Through the use of this mean topographic slope, we show that crustal extension due to faulting and folding for the most recent deformation in the Beta rift zone is <20 km. Chapter 3, co-authored with John Suppe, presents an analysis of compressive deformation in the Salinas Grandes basin of the Puna plateau of northwestern Argentina. A balanced cross section over the center of the basin documents a total of 4.8 km of Late Neogene shortening and 43.8 kin of Early Neogene shortening. Flexural modeling of the basal unconformity in basin suggests that the effective elastic thickness of the upper crust is about 5 km, and we infer that internal basin development in the plateau may be due to this weak crustal state in the Puna. In the Appendices are reproductions of two papers published in the Journal of Geophysical Research in which my contribution was less than that of the first authors. The works show that the many similarities in the topographic profiles of compressive mountain belts on Venus and the central Andes can be explained by modeling the mountains as critically tapered wedges where different parts of the wedge undergo a transition from brittle to plastic deformation with depth.

  12. Essays in financial economics and econometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Spada, Gabriele

    Chapter 1 (my job market paper) asks the following question: Do asset managers reach for yield because of competitive pressures in a low rate environment? I propose a tournament model of money market funds (MMFs) to study this issue. I show that funds with different costs of default respond differently to changes in interest rates, and that it is important to distinguish the role of risk-free rates from that of risk premia. An increase in the risk premium leads funds with lower default costs to increase risk-taking, while funds with higher default costs reduce risk-taking. Without changes in the premium, low risk-free rates reduce risk-taking. My empirical analysis shows that these predictions are consistent with the risk-taking of MMFs during the 2006--2008 period. Chapter 2, co-authored with Fabrizio Lillo and published in Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics and Econometrics (2014), studies the effect of round-off error (or discretization) on stationary Gaussian long-memory process. For large lags, the autocovariance is rescaled by a factor smaller than one, and we compute this factor exactly. Hence, the discretized process has the same Hurst exponent as the underlying one. We show that in presence of round-off error, two common estimators of the Hurst exponent, the local Whittle (LW) estimator and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), are severely negatively biased in finite samples. We derive conditions for consistency and asymptotic normality of the LW estimator applied to discretized processes and compute the asymptotic properties of the DFA for generic long-memory processes that encompass discretized processes. Chapter 3, co-authored with Fabrizio Lillo, studies the effect of round-off error on integrated Gaussian processes with possibly correlated increments. We derive the variance and kurtosis of the realized increment process in the limit of both "small" and "large" round-off errors, and its autocovariance for large lags. We propose novel estimators for the variance and lag-one autocorrelation of the underlying, unobserved increment process. We also show that for fractionally integrated processes, the realized increments have the same Hurst exponent as the underlying ones, but the LW estimator applied to the realized series is severely negatively biased in medium-sized samples.

  13. Essays in microeconomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Tim

    This dissertation consists of three essays in applied microeconomics. Each essay explores a different issue of economic interest. The essay in Chapter 2 describes an experiment designed to investigate if using assets with an intrinsic value that increases over time leads to persistent undervaluation in laboratory asset trading markets. This question has not previously been investigated by researchers. Results from ten sessions are reported. Three used assets with an intrinsic value that decreased over time. The results from these sessions are consistent with the findings by prior researchers who frequently observed price bubbles in laboratory asset trading experiments. The remaining seven sessions used assets with an intrinsic value that increased over time. In all these sessions trading generally occurred at prices below the asset's intrinsic value. In Chapter 3, in an essay co-authored with Adrian Stoian, we study road running races. Tournaments, where ordinal position determines rewards, are an important component of our economy. By studying sporting tournaments, we hope to shed light on the nature of other economically significant tournaments where data may be less readily available. We separately quantify the sorting and incentive effects of tournament prizes by employing a novel two-part model which we apply to a unique data set of road running race results. We present a counterfactual example of how a hypothetical change in prizes would be predicted to change race participation and speed. In Chapter 4, in an essay co-authored with Jedidiah Brewer and Joseph Cullen, we examine the combined effects of the locations and the brands of retail gasoline outlets in Tucson, Arizona on market prices. We apply an innovative approach to model the impact of competing gas stations that avoids limiting analysis to predetermined nearby locations. We show that increased brand diversity is associated with higher prices and that gas stations affiliated with mass-merchandisers and grocery stores reduce market prices by a larger amount and over a greater distance than other types of gas stations. We demonstrate that our conclusions are not sensitive to the choice of distance metric.

  14. Learning to Rank Figures within a Biomedical Article

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feifan; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of millions of figures are available in biomedical literature, representing important biomedical experimental evidence. This ever-increasing sheer volume has made it difficult for scientists to effectively and accurately access figures of their interest, the process of which is crucial for validating research facts and for formulating or testing novel research hypotheses. Current figure search applications can't fully meet this challenge as the “bag of figures” assumption doesn't take into account the relationship among figures. In our previous study, hundreds of biomedical researchers have annotated articles in which they serve as corresponding authors. They ranked each figure in their paper based on a figure's importance at their discretion, referred to as “figure ranking”. Using this collection of annotated data, we investigated computational approaches to automatically rank figures. We exploited and extended the state-of-the-art listwise learning-to-rank algorithms and developed a new supervised-learning model BioFigRank. The cross-validation results show that BioFigRank yielded the best performance compared with other state-of-the-art computational models, and the greedy feature selection can further boost the ranking performance significantly. Furthermore, we carry out the evaluation by comparing BioFigRank with three-level competitive domain-specific human experts: (1) First Author, (2) Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article but who works in the same field of the corresponding author of the article, and (3) Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert who is not the author nor co-author of an article and who may or may not work in the same field of the corresponding author of an article. Our results show that BioFigRank outperforms Non-Author-Out-Domain-Expert and performs as well as Non-Author-In-Domain-Expert. Although BioFigRank underperforms First Author, since most biomedical researchers are either in- or out-domain-experts for an article, we conclude that BioFigRank represents an artificial intelligence system that offers expert-level intelligence to help biomedical researchers to navigate increasingly proliferated big data efficiently. PMID:24625719

  15. Origin of active blind-thrust faults in the southern Inner California Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero-Ramirez, Carlos Alberto

    This dissertation describes the origins, three-dimensional geometry, slip history and present activity of a regional system of blind-thrust faults located in the Inner California Borderlands, and analyses the new earthquake scenarios they imply for the nearby coastal region of southern California. Chapter 1 is an overview of the main observations and inferences derived from geophysical data (seismic reflection profiles, well information, and seismicity) and coastal tectonics studies that are used to document the reactivation of two regional, low-angle Miocene detachments---the Oceanside and the Thirtymile faults. These active blind-thrusts comprise the Inner California Blind-Thrust System. The paper is co-authored by Prof. John H. Shaw (Harvard University) and Prof. Karl Muller (University of Colorado), and was published in the journal Geology. In this paper we associate the 1986 (ML 5.3) Oceanside earthquake and uplift of coastal marine terraces with activity on these blind-thrust faults, demonstrating their current activity and earthquake potential. We also describe the structural interactions of the blind-thrust system with regional strike-slip fault zones, and propose new earthquake hazards scenarios for the Inner California Borderlands based on these interactions. Chapter 2 presents a methodology used to generate regional 3D velocity models that allows converting seismic reflection data and derived geological surfaces into the depth domain. This chapter is co-authored with Dr. Peter Suss (University of Tubingen) and Prof. John H. Shaw (Harvard University), who developed aspects of the methodology used here in their velocity modeling of the Los Angeles basin. In our study, geologic constraints are employed to guide the interpolation of velocity structure in the Inner California Borderlands, yielding a comprehensive 3D velocity model that is consistent with the structural and stratigraphic architectures of the offshore basins. The need to properly scale time sections into depth to perform structural analyses makes this a very important component of our strategy to develop comprehensive, 3D models of the Oceanside and Thirtymile Bank blind thrusts, and thus is the unifying link between Chapter 1 and 3. Chapter 3 presents a comprehensive structural analysis of faults in the Inner California Borderlands, focusing on the tectonic reactivation of the Oceanside and Thirtymile detachments as blind-thrust faults. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Using Co-authorship Networks to Map and Analyse Global Neglected Tropical Disease Research with an Affiliation to Germany

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Max Ernst; Edwards, Suzanne; von Philipsborn, Peter; Steinbeis, Fridolin; Keil, Thomas; Tinnemann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Research on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) has increased in recent decades, and significant need-gaps in diagnostic and treatment tools remain. Analysing bibliometric data from published research is a powerful method for revealing research efforts, partnerships and expertise. We aim to identify and map NTD research networks in Germany and their partners abroad to enable an informed and transparent evaluation of German contributions to NTD research. Methodology/Principal Findings A SCOPUS database search for articles with German author affiliations that were published between 2002 and 2012 was conducted for kinetoplastid and helminth diseases. Open-access tools were used for data cleaning and scientometrics (OpenRefine), geocoding (OpenStreetMaps) and to create (Table2Net), visualise and analyse co-authorship networks (Gephi). From 26,833 publications from around the world that addressed 11 diseases, we identified 1,187 (4.4%) with at least one German author affiliation, and we processed 972 publications for the five most published-about diseases. Of those, we extracted 4,007 individual authors and 863 research institutions to construct co-author networks. The majority of co-authors outside Germany were from high-income countries and Brazil. Collaborations with partners on the African continent remain scattered. NTD research within Germany was distributed among 220 research institutions. We identified strong performers on an individual level by using classic parameters (number of publications, h-index) and social network analysis parameters (betweenness centrality). The research network characteristics varied strongly between diseases. Conclusions/Significance The share of NTD publications with German affiliations is approximately half of its share in other fields of medical research. This finding underlines the need to identify barriers and expand Germany’s otherwise strong research activities towards NTDs. A geospatial analysis of research collaborations with partners abroad can support decisions to strengthen research capacity, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, which were less involved in collaborations than high-income countries. Identifying knowledge hubs within individual researcher networks complements traditional scientometric indicators that are used to identify opportunities for collaboration. Using free tools to analyse research processes and output could facilitate data-driven health policies. Our findings contribute to the prioritisation of efforts in German NTD research at a time of impending local and global policy decisions. PMID:26719978

  17. SIX DECADES OF THE PULA NEUROPSYCHIATRIC MEETINGS--FROM NEUROPSYCHIATRY TO BORDERLANDS OF NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY BRAIN AND MIND.

    PubMed

    Barac, Bosko; Demarin, Vida

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, the International Neuropsychiatric Pula Symposia, from 2005 Congresses (INPS/INPC), founded in 1961 by Zagreb and Graz University Neuropsychiatry Departments, celebrated their 50th anniversary of successful development. The co-author of the paper, Bosko Barac, witnessed their growth from 1966, collaborating in their organization from 1974 with the first Secretary General Gerald Grinschgl; elected for his successor after his unexpected death in 1985, he was leading the Kuratorium (Scientific Board) as Secretary General for 23 years, collaborating in this period with his Austrian partner and friend Helmut Lechner. In 2007, Barac handed over this responsible function to the co-author Vida Demarin. Starting when neuropsychiatry was a unique discipline, the INPC followed the processes of emancipation of neurology and psychiatry and their evolution to independent disciplines with new subspecialties. These respectable conferences greatly surpassed the significance of the two disciplines, neurology and psychiatry, granting collaboration of borderland medical and non-medical disciplines, connecting experts from the region, European countries and the world. Inaugurated in 'cold-war' times, in their first phase they enabled to make professional and human contacts between scientists from the two divided 'blocs' thanks to the 'non-aligned' position of the then Yugoslavia, fostering the ideas of mutual understanding and collaboration. On the other hand, the scientific development of the meetings took in the center of their study fields connecting the two disciplines, giving a quite unique quality to these meetings. For many years, the meetings cherished specific neurologic and psychiatric topics, at the same time planning increasing important topics of the 'borderland areas' in their programs. For the important achievements, they earned the title of the Pula School of Science and Humanism, promoting interdisciplinary scientific collaboration important for humanistic goals of medicine. Medicine, as science and practice, although founded on biological grounds, is primarily a human activity serving to individual man and the whole human race. Modern neurology and psychiatry are no longer restricted to diagnosing and curing brain and nerves or psychiatric disorders, and are nowadays important as a science of human mind and discipline caring about the human brain, the complex organ of each individual man, collective human consciousness and our mental life. Such atmosphere contributed to the fall of the totalitarian, narrow-minded political, ideological or nationalistic thinking, aiming to tolerance and humane democratic developments in the united Europe and the preparation for peaceful living of various nations, races, religions and viewpoints in the 21st century. PMID:27017726

  18. Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) and breast cancer incidence worldwide: A revisit of earlier findings with analysis of current trends.

    PubMed

    Rybnikova, Natalia; Haim, Abraham; Portnov, Boris A

    2015-01-01

    In a study published in Cancer Causes & Control in 2010, Kloog with co-authors tested, apparently for the first time, the association between population-level ambient exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) and incidence of several cancers in women from 164 countries worldwide. The study was based on 1996-2002 data and concluded that breast cancer (BC) incidence was significantly and positively associated with ALAN, while no such association was revealed for other cancer types. An open question, however, remains whether the trends revealed by Kloog and co-authors were time specific or also hold true for more recent data. Using information obtained from the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2002 and 2012 databases, we reanalyzed the strength of association between BC incidence rates in 180 countries worldwide and ALAN, controlling for several country-level predictors, including birth rates, percent of urban population, per capita GDP and electricity consumption. We also compared BC age-standardized rates (ASRs) with multi-annual ALAN measurements, considering potentially different latency periods. Compared with the results of Kloog et al.'s analysis of the year-2002 BC-data, the association between BC and ALAN appears to have weakened overall, becoming statistically insignificant in the year 2012 after being controlled for potential confounders (t < 0.3; p > 0.5). However, when the entire sample of countries was disaggregated into geographic clusters of similarly developed countries, a positive BC-ALAN association re-emerged as statistically significant (t > 2.2; p < 0.01), helping to explain, along with other factors covered by the analysis, about 65-85% of BC ASR variability worldwide, depending on the model type. Although the present analysis reconfirms a positive BC-ALAN association, this association appeared to diverge regionally in recent years, with countries in Western Europe showing the highest levels of such association, while countries in Southeast Asia and Gulf States exhibiting relatively low BC rates against the backdrop of relatively high ALAN levels. This regional stratification may be due to additional protective mechanisms, diminishing BC risks and potentially attributed to the local diet and lifestyles. PMID:26102518

  19. Nonlinear and stochastic effects in ENSO variability: From observations to intermediate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickael David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; Neelin, David; Ghil, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon dominates interannual climate signals in and around the Tropical Pacific and affects the atmospheric circulation and air-sea interaction over many parts of the globe. Observational campaigns over the last decades have helped infer the most relevant processes, time scales and spatial patterns. A hierarchy of models has been developed to understand these processes and their interaction. These models have been, by-and-large, either deterministic and nonlinear or stochastic and linear, and have been applied to the prediction of future variability as well. The purpose of our work is to combine these two complementary points of view, and thus account for (i) the most robust and relevant aspects of the observations; (ii) the advances in understanding the nonlinear, deterministic interactions between the largest and most energetic scales; and (iii) the impact of small-scale ("noise") and remote ("external") processes. The main thrust of our approach is based on the concepts and tools of the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS). So far, two of the co-authors (MC & MG), in collaboration with E. Simonnet, have successfully applied RDS theory to, and described in detail the random attractors of several idealized climate models, such as the Lorenz (JAS, 1963) model of convection and the ENSO model of Timmermann and Jin (GRL, 2002). In the present work, we are extending these results to more detailed and realistic models, on the way to their eventual application to IPCC-class general circulation models (GCMs). Specifically, we address here two classes of such intermediate models. The first class is that of nonlinear inverse models derived by empirical mode reduction (EMR), as developed by two of the co-authors (MG and DK), in collaboration with S. Kravtsov, A. W. Robertson and others. In particular, we are studying the random attractor of the ENSO model derived in 2005 from sea surface temperature data over the past century, and being routinely applied to ENSO prediction since. The second class is that of intermediate models developed by one of the coauthors (JDN) in the early 1990s. These models are based on thermodynamical and fluid mechanical principles classically used in ENSO theory. This particular model has also been used over several years in routine ENSO prediction, as summarized over two decades by NOAA's Experimental Long-Lead Forecast Bulletin (ELLFB) and, more recently, by the "ENSO prediction plume" of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI). In both types of intermediate models, we study the effects of stochastic forcing that exhibits spatial correlations with the twofold purpose of (i) helping parameterize the unresolved processes, and (ii) improving prediction capabilities.

  20. RETRACTED: An overview of mathematical modeling of electrochemical supercapacitors/ultracapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ike, Innocent S.; Sigalas, Iakovos; Iyuke, Sunny; Ozoemena, Kenneth I.

    2015-01-01

    This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief, with agreement of the authors: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal. Substantial parts of this review paper are similar to the texts of existing papers in the literature. The co-authors state that the corresponding author submitted the manuscript without their approval. The following works are affected: IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, 26 (2011) 3472-3480, http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TPEL.2011.2161096 The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 4 (2013) 1260-1267, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jz4002967 The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 4 (2013), 3367-3376, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jz4014163 Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 16 (2014), 6519-6538, http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c3cp55186e The Authors unreservedly apologise for this violation of the publishing policies, and offer sincere apologies to the parties affected. The journal apologises to its readers and the authors that the overlap was not detected during the submission and review process.

  1. Asynclitism: a literature review of an often forgotten clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Malvasi, Antonio; Barbera, Antonio; Di Vagno, Giovanni; Gimovsky, Alexis; Berghella, Vincenzo; Ghi, Tullio; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Tinelli, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Asynclitism is defined as the "oblique malpresentation of the fetal head in labor". Asynclitism is a clinical diagnosis that may be difficult to make; it may be found during vaginal examination. It is significant because it may cause failure of progress operative or cesarean delivery. We reviewed all literature for asynclitism by performing an extensive electronic search of studies from 1959 to 2013. All studies were first reviewed by a single author and discussed with co-authors. The following studies were identified: 8 book chapters, 14 studies on asynclitism alone and 10 papers on both fetal occiput posterior position and asynclitism. The fetal head in a laboring patient may be associated with some degree of asynclitism; this is seen as usual way of the fetal head to adjust to maternal pelvic diameters. However, marked asynclitism is often detected in presence of a co-existing fetal head malposition, especially the transverse and occipital posterior positions. Digital diagnosis of asynclitism is enhanced by intrapartum ultrasound with transabdominal or transperineal approach. The accurate diagnosis of asynclitism, in an objective way, may provide a better assessment of the fetal head position that will help in the correct application of vacuum and forceps, allowing the prevention of unnecessary cesarean deliveries. PMID:25283847

  2. Textual standardization and the DSM-5 "common language".

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patty A

    2014-06-01

    In February 2010, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) launched their DSM-5 website with details about the development of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The APA invited "the general public" to review the draft diagnostic criteria and provide written comments and suggestions. This revision marks the first time the APA has solicited public review of their diagnostic manual. This article analyzes reported speech on the DSM-5 draft diagnostic criteria for the classification Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. It demonstrates how textual standardization facilitates the cultural portability of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria such that a community of speakers beyond the borders of the APA come to be seen as exemplary speakers, writers, and revisers of the professional style. Furthermore, analysis shows how co-authoring practices recontextualize the "voice" and persona of putative patient reported speech on Criterion D2. As a consequence of textual standardization, spoken discourse becomes recontextualized as the product of scientific inquiry and the organization of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:24682628

  3. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  4. Linguistic Traces of a Scientific Fraud: The Case of Diederik Stapel

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, David M.; Hancock, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    When scientists report false data, does their writing style reflect their deception? In this study, we investigated the linguistic patterns of fraudulent (N  =  24; 170,008 words) and genuine publications (N  =  25; 189,705 words) first-authored by social psychologist Diederik Stapel. The analysis revealed that Stapel's fraudulent papers contained linguistic changes in science-related discourse dimensions, including more terms pertaining to methods, investigation, and certainty than his genuine papers. His writing style also matched patterns in other deceptive language, including fewer adjectives in fraudulent publications relative to genuine publications. Using differences in language dimensions we were able to classify Stapel's publications with above chance accuracy. Beyond these discourse dimensions, Stapel included fewer co-authors when reporting fake data than genuine data, although other evidentiary claims (e.g., number of references and experiments) did not differ across the two article types. This research supports recent findings that language cues vary systematically with deception, and that deception can be revealed in fraudulent scientific discourse. PMID:25153333

  5. The Acid Test for Biological Science: STAP Cells, Trust, and Replication.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Cheryl

    2016-02-01

    In January 2014, a letter and original research article were published in Nature describing a process whereby somatic mouse cells could be converted into stem cells by subjecting them to stress. These "stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency" (STAP) cells were shown to be capable of contributing to all cell types of a developing embryo, and extra-embryonic tissues. The lead author of the publications, Haruko Obokata, became an overnight celebrity in Japan, where she was dubbed the new face of Japanese science. However, in the weeks that followed publication of the research, issues arose. Other laboratories and researchers (including authors on the original papers) found that they were unable to replicate Obokata et al.'s work. Closer scrutiny of the papers by the scientific community also suggested that there was manipulation of images that had been published, and Obokata was accused of misconduct. Those who should have been supervising her work (also her co-authors on the publications) were also heavily criticised. The STAP cell saga of 2014 is used as an example to highlight the importance of trust and replication in twenty-first century biological science. The role of trust in the scientific community is highlighted, and the effects on interactions between science and the public examined. Similarly, this essay aims to highlight the importance of replication, and how this is understood by researchers, the media, and the public. The expected behaviour of scientists in the twenty-first century is now more closely scrutinised. PMID:25649070

  6. Evolution of Galaxies and the Star Formation Rate in the Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahre, Michael A.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    A central goal of extragalactic observational astronomy is to understand how normal galaxies evolve with redshift, and particularly when galaxies formed their stars. While optical and rest-frame UV observations have begun to address these issues, the interpretation of such data is particularly challenging because of the sensitivity to dust obscuration (at optical and UV wavelengths). The absorbed light is re-radiated at IR wavelengths, hence the optimal indicators of the star formation rate (SFR) is at a rest-frame wavelength of approx. 60 microns. The Spitzer Space Telescope mission is revolutionizing the study of the global properties and evolution of galaxies. Spitzer reaches nearly two orders of magnitude more sensitivity than previous IR space missions. This research program is to study the SFR using statistical samples of galaxies in the local universe, at intermediate redshifts, and set the stage for continuing studies up to z=5. The overall research program is divided into three main investigations: A Mid-IR Hubble Atlas and SFR estimators in the local universe, Evolution of the SFR at 0 < z < 1 using pencil beam redshift surveys, and Galaxy formation and evolution at 1 < z < 5. The first papers from Spitzer were published during the last year, including ten refereed journal papers where the PI was first or co-author.

  7. CHRONOMICS AND GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Cornélissen, G.; Katinas, G.; Dušek, J.; Homolka, P.; Karpíšek, Z.; P. Sonkowsky, R. P.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Fišer, B.; Siegelová, J.

    2008-01-01

    The mapping of time structures, chronomes, constitutes an endeavor spawned by chronobiology: chronomics. This cartography in time shows signatures on the surface of the earth, cycles, also accumulating in life on the earth‘s surface. We append a glossary of these and other cycles, the names being coined in the light of approximate cycle length. These findings are transdisciplinary, in view of their broad representation and critical importance in the biosphere. Suggestions of mechanisms are derived from an analytical statistical documentation of characteristics with superposed epochs and superposed cycles and other „remove-and-replace“ approaches. These approaches use the spontaneously changing presence or absence of an environmental, cyclic or other factor for the study of any corresponding changes in the biosphere. We illustrate the indispensability of the mapping of rhythm characteristics in broader structures, chronomes, along several or all available different time scales. We present results from a cooperative cartography of about 10, about 20, and about 50-year rhythms in the context of a broad endeavor concerned with the Biosphere and the Cosmos, the BIOCOS project. The participants in this project are our co-authors worldwide, beyond Brno and Minneapolis; the studies of human blood pressure and heart rate around the clock and along the week may provide the evidence for those influences that Mendel sought in meteorology and climatology. PMID:19710947

  8. Does research through Structured Operational Research and Training (SORT IT) courses impact policy and practice?

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Tripathy, J. P.; Guillerm, N.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Berger, S. Dar; Bissell, K.; Reid, A. J.; Zachariah, R.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) courses are well known for their output, with nearly 90% of participants completing the course and publishing in scientific journals. Objective: We assessed the impact of research papers on policy and practice that resulted from six SORT IT courses initiated between July 2012 and March 2013. Design: This was a cross-sectional study involving e-mail-based, self-administered questionnaires and telephone/skype/in-person responses from first and/or senior co-authors of course papers. A descriptive content analysis of the responses was performed and categorised into themes. Results: Of 72 participants, 63 (88%) completed the course. Course output included 81 submitted papers, of which 76 (94%) were published. Of the 81 papers assessed, 45 (55%) contributed to a change in policy and/or practice: 29 contributed to government policy/practice change (20 at national, 4 at subnational and 5 at hospital level), 11 to non-government organisational policy change and 5 to reinforcing existing policy. The changes ranged from modifications of monitoring and evaluation tools, to redrafting of national guidelines, to scaling up existing policies. Conclusion: More than half of the SORT IT course papers contributed to a change in policy and/or practice. Future assessments should include more robust and independent verification of the reported change(s) with all stakeholders. PMID:27051612

  9. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  10. Assessing your publication potential.

    PubMed

    Keegan, L

    1999-01-01

    To be published in a professional nursing journal is an admirable goal and one that is obtainable if you have skills, knowledge, and tenacity and if you want to share information with others. Everything we do or accomplish in life is built on steps, and that translates into taking one step after another. Writing for publication is no different; this article enumerates and describes the 11 steps to becoming published. Self-answer questions direct the reader to consider whether to compose solo or with a co-author(s). The nursing journal review processes and options of where to submit queries or completed articles are covered. Books to help writers begin writing or refining their work are included. This article states that the first rule of becoming published is "where there's a will, there's a way." It concludes with the dictate, start now. Procrastination has stifled more projects than any other obstacle. Pick up your pen or turn on your computer and go to work. PMID:10476197

  11. Inviscid and viscous flow computations by means of a lambda methodology: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, B.

    1997-08-01

    The present paper provides a review of the more important results obtained by the author, sometimes with co-authors, solving inviscid and viscous compressible flows by means of a lambda methodology. In particular, an implicit numerical algorithm, called fast solver, has always been applied. This methodology separately integrates the compatibility conditions, written in terms of generalized Riemann variables, along appropriate bicharacteristic lines. The multi-dimensional flow problem is, thus, reduced to a sequence of simple quasi one-dimensional problems. The merits of this approach are demonstrated by means of the application of the method to the solution of three dimensional (3-D) subsonic and transonic inviscid flows, of two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D viscous flows and of the 2-D flow around a vertical axis wind turbine. In the transonic case the shock wave is computed by means of a shock fitting technique, which enforces the proper shock jumps by an explicit use of the Rankine-Hugoniot equations; in the wind turbine case the blades are represented in a time-averaged sense by means of an actuator porous cylinder, having the turbine radius. The results are then compared with other numerical results and with experimental results.

  12. Quantum Simulation of Frustrated Magnetism with Many Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Crystal

    2013-05-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions is an excellent system for simulating quantum many-body physics, like magnetism, which may be difficult to access via classical computation or traditional condensed-matter experiments. Our large crystals of 10-20 ions comprise a platform to study a long-range quantum Ising model with tunable couplings in a 1D spin chain. State-dependent optical dipole forces exploit the Coulomb interaction to generate the spin-spin couplings, and fluorescence measurements on a camera are used to read out individual spin states. We investigated the spin order resulting from changing the range of antiferromagnetic interactions or the strength of an axial magnetic field, demonstrating our control over the amount of frustration present. We are turning to the study of dynamics in this system, with the aim of exploring topics including adiabaticity, spectroscopy of the Hamiltonian, the emergence of Kibble-Zurek-like behavior in a finite system, thermalization in an isolated quantum system, and nonequilibrium phase transitions. There is great promise in extending the system to 30+ spins, where computations become classically intractable. Co-authors are R. Islam, P. Richerme, W. C. Campbell, S. Korenblit, J. Smith, A. Lee, E. E. Edwards, C.-C. J. Wang, J. K. Freericks, and C. Monroe. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  13. Retraction: 'Amelioration of Osteoporosis and Hypovitaminosis D by Sunlight Exposure in Hospitalized Elderly Women With Alzheimer's Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial'.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Jun; Kanoko, Tomohiro; Satoh, Kei

    2015-12-01

    The above article, published online on 4 April 2005 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in JBMR Volume 20, Issue 8, pages 1327-1333, together with a subsequent Expression of Concern published online in JBMR on 24 June 2015, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editor in Chief, Juliet Compston, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to duplication of text and concerns about the underlying data to which the authors have given no satisfactory response. Dr. Sato acknowledges that his co-authors are named as such for honorary reasons and are not responsible for the content of the manuscript. References 1. Sato Y, Iwamoto J, Kanoko T, Satoh K. Amelioration of osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D by sunlight exposure in hospitalized, elderly women with Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled trial. J Bone Miner Res. 2005; 20:1327-33. DOI: 10.1359/JBMR050402. 2. Sato Y, Iwamoto J, Kanoko T, Satoh K. Expression of concern: Amelioration of osteoporosis and hypovitaminosis D by sunlight exposure in hospitalized elderly women with Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled trial. J Bone Miner Res. 2015; 30:1745. DOI: 10.1002/jbmr.2583. PMID:26516759

  14. A bottom-up, scientist-based initiative for the communication of climate sciences with the general public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourqui, Michel; Bolduc, Cassandra; Paul, Charbonneau; Marie, Charrière; Daniel, Hill; Angelica, Lopez; Enrique, Loubet; Philippe, Roy; Barbara, Winter

    2015-04-01

    This talk introduces a scientists-initiated, new online platform whose aim is to contribute to making climate sciences become public knowledge. It takes a unique bottom-up approach, strictly founded on individual-based participation, high scientific standards and independence The main purpose is to build an open-access, multilingual and peer-reviewed journal publishing short climate articles in non-scientific language. The targeted public includes journalists, teachers, students, local politicians, economists, members of the agriculture sector, and any other citizens from around the world with an interest in climate sciences. This journal is meant to offer a simple and direct channel for scientists wishing to disseminate their research to the general public. A high standard of climate articles is ensured through: a) requiring that the main author is an active climate scientist, and b) an innovative peer-review process involving scientific and non-scientific referees with distinct roles. The platform fosters the direct participation of non-scientists through co-authoring, peer-reviewing, language translation. It furthermore engages the general public in the scientific inquiry by allowing non-scientists to invite manuscripts to be written on topics of their concern. The platform is currently being developed by a community of scientists and non-scientists. In this talk, I will present the basic ideas behind this new online platform, its current state and the plans for the next future. The beta version of the platform is available at: http://www.climateonline.bourquiconsulting.ch

  15. Acoustical design in architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Steven

    2005-09-01

    Cyril Harris's name is best known to the general public for the outstanding concert halls he has designed. But his impact on reduction of noise and vibration through the application of established fundamental engineering design principles is far greater through the work of others who have benefited from the books (and particularly handbooks) he has written and edited. His first book, co-authored with Vern Knudsen, Acoustical Design in Architecture, was published over a half-century ago. It was the first milestone on a continuing quest to explain the physics and engineering of acoustics, as well as noise and vibration control, to those who are responsible for the design of habitable structures. [See the excellent review in J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 22, 521 (1950).] To expand the utility of this approach, Professor Harris assembled and regularly revised two comprehensive compilations: the Shock and Vibration Handbook (now in its fourth edition) and the Handbook of Acoustical Measurements and Noise Control (now in its third edition and available from ASA). Those handbooks make the application and the evaluation of required techniques accessible to the entire community of noise control engineers and architects. The presentation will also briefly describe his books on architecture and architectural history.

  16. Researchers’ Individual Publication Rate Has Not Increased in a Century

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Daniele; Larivière, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Debates over the pros and cons of a “publish or perish” philosophy have inflamed academia for at least half a century. Growing concerns, in particular, are expressed for policies that reward “quantity” at the expense of “quality,” because these might prompt scientists to unduly multiply their publications by fractioning (“salami slicing”), duplicating, rushing, simplifying, or even fabricating their results. To assess the reasonableness of these concerns, we analyzed publication patterns of over 40,000 researchers that, between the years 1900 and 2013, have published two or more papers within 15 years, in any of the disciplines covered by the Web of Science. The total number of papers published by researchers during their early career period (first fifteen years) has increased in recent decades, but so has their average number of co-authors. If we take the latter factor into account, by measuring productivity fractionally or by only counting papers published as first author, we observe no increase in productivity throughout the century. Even after the 1980s, adjusted productivity has not increased for most disciplines and countries. These results are robust to methodological choices and are actually conservative with respect to the hypothesis that publication rates are growing. Therefore, the widespread belief that pressures to publish are causing the scientific literature to be flooded with salami-sliced, trivial, incomplete, duplicated, plagiarized and false results is likely to be incorrect or at least exaggerated. PMID:26960191

  17. Authentic Research Experience for University of the Fraser Valley Undergraduate Students through the Global Rivers Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, S. J.; Gillies, S. L.; Ehrenbrink, B. P. E.; Voss, B.; Janmaat, A.; Yakemchuk, A.; Smith, S.; Faber, A.; Luymes, R.; Epp, A.; Bennett, M. C.; Fanslau, J.; Downey, B.; Wiebe, B.; VanKoughnett, H.; Macklam-Harron, G.; Herbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The University of the Fraser Valley has undertaken the time series sampling of water chemistry of the Fraser River at Fort Langley, British Columbia, Canada as a member of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is organized by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. In addition, we have been afforded the opportunity to undertake a time series sampling of Fraser Valley tributaries of the Fraser River. These small salmon bearing streams are being threatened by increased urbanization within their watersheds and runoff from agricultural activity. Students in upper level courses and individual research students have had the opportunity to become involved in GRO research projects. These students have been instructed in the sampling protocol and techniques and have become more aware of the threats to both local streams and the Fraser River watershed. Additionally, individual research students have been able to develop their own research projects within the larger project and present their findings at academic conferences. They have also been involved in peer-reviewed publications as co-authors of research papers.

  18. The Forgotten History of the 4050 Å Group of C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    A series of absorption bands near 4050 Å was first observed in emission in the spectrum of Comet Tebbutt by Sir William Huggins in 1881. In his proceedings paper from the Symposium on Interstellar Lines at the Yerkes Observatory in 1941, Gerhard Herzberg suggested that the so-called "λ 4050 group" might be due to CH2, and stated that "the writer expects to carry out experiments in the near future with a view to reproducing the λ 4050 group in the laboratory." In 1942, Herzberg published a letter in the ApJ, reporting his observations of the group in an interrupted methane discharge. In a later paper (1965), Herzberg and co-authors explicitly claim that this was the first laboratory observation of the 4050-Å group, which had been correctly assigned to C3 by Alex Douglas in 1951. The fact that the 4050-Å group was observed in the laboratory by Charles Raffety in 1916 seems to have been completely forgotten since Herzberg's "discovery" in 1942. This is all the more remarkable considering that this group was referred to as the "Raffety bands" as late as 1941, when Swings, Elvey, and Babcock discussed the change of nomenclature to the "λ 4050 group." The term Raffety bands even appeared in the title of a review paper by Bobrovnikoff in the ApJ in 1931.

  19. Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

    2007-03-01

    This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

  20. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, William P.

    2003-02-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 2000, 2001, and years previous to aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin. The report is divided into sections and self-standing chapters. For detailed summaries, we refer the reader to the abstracts given on the second page of each chapter. The Annual Reporting section includes information provided to fishery managers in-season and post-season, and it contains a detailed summary of life history and survival statistics on wild Snake River fall chinook salmon juveniles for the years 1992-2001. The Journal Manuscripts section includes complete copies of papers submitted or published during 2000 and 2001 that were not included in previous annual reports. Publication is a high priority for this project because it provides our results to a wide audience, it ensures that our work meets high scientific standards, and we believe that it is a necessary obligation of a research project. The Bibliography of Published Journal Articles section provides citations for peer-reviewed papers co-authored by personnel of project 199102900 that were published from 1998 to 2001.

  1. Creating a Cadre of Junior Investigators to Address the Challenges of Cancer-Related Health Disparities: Lessons Learned from the Community Networks Program

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Tisha M.; Brandt, Heather M.; Armstead, Cheryl; Cavicchia, Philip P.; Braun, Kathryn L.; Adams, Swann A.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Tanjasiri, Sora; Steck, Susan E.; Smith, Emily R.; Daguisé, Virginie G.; Hébert, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) initiatives such as the National Cancer Institute’s Community Networks Program (CNP) (2005–2010) often emphasize training of junior investigators from underrepresented backgrounds to address health disparities. From July to October 2010, a convenience sample of 80 participants from the 25 CNP national sites completed our 45-item, web-based survey on the training and mentoring of junior investigators. This study assessed the academic productivity and CBPR-related experiences of the CNP junior investigators (n=37). Those from underrepresented backgrounds reported giving more presentations in non-academic settings (9 vs. 4 in last 5 years, p=0.01), having more co-authored publications (8 vs. 3 in last 5 years, p=0.01), and spending more time on CBPR-related activities than their non-underrepresented counterparts. Regardless of background, junior investigators shared similar levels of satisfaction with their mentors and CBPR experiences. This study provides support for the success of the CNP’s training program, especially effort directed at underrepresented investigators. PMID:22528636

  2. Ancient Jets of Fiery Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    Chondrules are intriguing millimeter-sized crystallized droplets that are abundant in chondrites, so named because of the presence of numerous chondrules. They have puzzled cosmochemists since they were described by English scientist H. C. Sorby in 1877. Everyone agrees that they formed as molten droplets of silicates, but nobody agrees on how the little things formed. Ideas range from impacts onto asteroids, primary condensation in the solar nebula, shock waves and/or lightening in the solar nebula, or by processes operating as planets began to form. A new twist on this last idea was investigated in a new way by Brandon Johnson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT) and co-authors David Minton and Jay Melosh (Purdue University), and Maria Zuber at MIT. Johnson and coworkers modeled the effects of impacts between planetesimals 100-1000 kilometers in diameter. When such objects hit each other, the first thing that happens is jetting of molten rock. Johnson and colleagues propose that the jets will subdivide into droplets as the jetted material is shot into space. They estimate that the chondrules would have the correct cooling rates (as determined from previous studies of chondrules) and the collision frequency would be high enough to produce abundant chondrules. Johnson and coworkers suggest that chondrules are a "byproduct of [planetary] accretion."

  3. Analysis of Data from the Energetic Gamma-ray Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    The work under the Grant has involved participation with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) Team in the analysis of data obtained during instrument operations and the preparation of scientific papers and proposals for future observations. The Principal Investigator (PI) has been a co-author on a total of 90 papers published in refereed professional journals since the beginning of 1991, plus many other non-refereed publications, and contributed and invited papers at professional meetings and IAU telegrams. On seven of these papers he was the lead author. The EGRET team continues to submit IAU Astronomical telegrams and present many papers at scientific meetings. The effort by the PI has involved working remotely by internet connection on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computers where the EGRET data are archived. Students have monitored instrument performance, performed Viewing Period Analyses and analyzed data remotely. The PI has completed the detailed analysis of over 20 viewing periods to search for point sources and this work has been used in developing the first and second EGRET catalog of sources, published in Supplements to the Astrophysical Journal.

  4. Low-grade inflammation, diet composition and health: current research evidence and its translation.

    PubMed

    Minihane, Anne M; Vinoy, Sophie; Russell, Wendy R; Baka, Athanasia; Roche, Helen M; Tuohy, Kieran M; Teeling, Jessica L; Blaak, Ellen E; Fenech, Michael; Vauzour, David; McArdle, Harry J; Kremer, Bas H A; Sterkman, Luc; Vafeiadou, Katerina; Benedetti, Massimo Massi; Williams, Christine M; Calder, Philip C

    2015-10-14

    The importance of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathology of numerous age-related chronic conditions is now clear. An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development. The present position paper is the most recent in a series produced by the International Life Sciences Institute's European Branch (ILSI Europe). It is co-authored by the speakers from a 2013 workshop led by the Obesity and Diabetes Task Force entitled 'Low-grade inflammation, a high-grade challenge: biomarkers and modulation by dietary strategies'. The latest research in the areas of acute and chronic inflammation and cardiometabolic, gut and cognitive health is presented along with the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying inflammation-health/disease associations. The evidence relating diet composition and early-life nutrition to inflammatory status is reviewed. Human epidemiological and intervention data are thus far heavily reliant on the measurement of inflammatory markers in the circulation, and in particular cytokines in the fasting state, which are recognised as an insensitive and highly variable index of tissue inflammation. Potential novel kinetic and integrated approaches to capture inflammatory status in humans are discussed. Such approaches are likely to provide a more discriminating means of quantifying inflammation-health/disease associations, and the ability of diet to positively modulate inflammation and provide the much needed evidence to develop research portfolios that will inform new product development and associated health claims. PMID:26228057

  5. Energy justice and foundations for a sustainable sociology of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleman, Hannah Ann

    This dissertation proposes an approach to energy that transcends the focus on energy as a mere technical economic or engineering problem, is connected to sociological theory as a whole, and takes issues of equality and ecology as theoretical starting points. In doing so, the work presented here puts ecological and environmental sociological theory, and the work of environmental justice scholars, feminist ecologists, and energy scholars, in a context in which they may complement one another to broaden the theoretical basis of the current sociology of energy. This theoretical integration provides an approach to energy focused on energy justice. Understanding energy and society in the terms outlined here makes visible energy injustice, or the interface between social inequalities and ecological depredations accumulating as the social and ecological debts of the modern energy regime. Systems ecology is brought into this framework as a means for understanding unequal exchange, energy injustice more generally, and the requirements for long-term social and ecological reproduction in ecological terms. Energy developments in Ecuador and Cuba are used here as case studies in order to further develop the idea of energy justice and the theory of unequal ecological exchange. The point is to broaden the framework of the contemporary critical sociology of energy, putting energy justice at its heart. This dissertation contains previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

  6. Computer Model Predicts the Movement of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new computer model of the atmosphere can now actually pinpoint where global dust events come from, and can project where they're going. The model may help scientists better evaluate the impact of dust on human health, climate, ocean carbon cycles, ecosystems, and atmospheric chemistry. Also, by seeing where dust originates and where it blows people with respiratory problems can get advanced warning of approaching dust clouds. 'The model is physically more realistic than previous ones,' said Mian Chin, a co-author of the study and an Earth and atmospheric scientist at Georgia Tech and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. 'It is able to reproduce the short term day-to-day variations and long term inter-annual variations of dust concentrations and distributions that are measured from field experiments and observed from satellites.' The above images show both aerosols measured from space (left) and the movement of aerosols predicted by computer model for the same date (right). For more information, read New Computer Model Tracks and Predicts Paths Of Earth's Dust Images courtesy Paul Giroux, Georgia Tech/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  7. [The changes in values and beliefs through the first 50 years of the department of Psychiatry at the University of Montreal].

    PubMed

    Borgeat, François; Dongier, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    This essay attempts to describe and discuss the major changes in values and fundamental beliefs related to clinical practice within the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal since its creation fifty years ago.Being an essay, the methods include shared recollections, discussions with colleagues, especially between the co-authors, and the study of some documents related to the practice of psychiatry 40 to 50 years ago.Five major axes of change are proposed: 1- From psychoanalysis to brain diseases, 2- From "Can a non-physician practice psychoanalysis?" to "Can a psychiatrist still perform psychotherapy?" 3- From continuity of care to episodes of treatment, 4- From treatment first to repeated assessments of patients, 5- From love that can heal and repair to a taboo of love.Finally it is suggested that the increasing emphasis on psychopharmacology and on DSM classifications has contributed to a shift from attempts to understand the intimate nature of symptoms and suffering to a priority given to rather mechanical clinical assessments in search of "objective" criteria. PMID:26559213

  8. Young Voices on Climate Change: The Paul F-Brandwein 2010 NSTA Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Lynne

    2011-04-01

    Lynne Cherry Brandwein Lecture March 2010 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Conference, Philadelphia, PA. Young Voices on Climate Change: Inspired and Empowered Youth Tackle Climate Science and Find Climate Solutions. As a child, Lynne Cherry was profoundly connected to the natural world and a special place. She watched the destruction of her world. Now, through her Young Voices on Climate Change project, she is trying to give teachers and young people the tools to prevent planetary meltdown on a greater scale. Global climate change is upon us and the need for education and action is immediate. Outreach, visual storytelling, and scientific understanding are especially necessary in light of the recent polls that show that the public is becoming more confused and less concerned about climate change. Cherry's climate book, co-authored with photojournalist Gary Braasch, and her Young Voices on Climate Change films feature climate solutions. They're about win-win—save the environment, protect human health, reduce global warming gases, demonstrate youth making a difference with practical tools, motivate engagement in climate science, take pride in increased science literacy, reach young people through their hearts as well as their minds, and save money. Although young people can help their parents, peers and communities understand climate science, they can also show them that reducing CO2 is in their economic interest, and spur them to take action. School carbon reduction initiatives are spilling over into communities yielding measurable results in both global warming gas reductions and significant monetary savings.

  9. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2008-07-01

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  10. Integral Observations of the Reflection Component of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabian, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The data were analyzed by Dr. Fabian's student Adrian Turner and included in his thesis (completed Sept 2004). We did not detect MCG-6 using the then current software and the spectrum of the Circinus galaxy turned out to be even worse then the published BeppoSAX spectrum. We decided not to do any more work on it. We were contacted about the data in March by Thierry Courvoisier (the data were thea public) as he had a student, Simona Soidi, working on a compilation of spectra. Dr. Fabian sent them the chapter from Adrian's thesis and we provided some general comments on what they were doing on 6 objects. This has since been accepted for publication with Fabian as a co-author. A paper on the Integral AGN catalogue appeared on astro-ph a few days ago which contains an detection of MCG-6 with a very poor spectrum. We didn't detect it because the software back then required a source to be detected within something like 30 min exposure in order to work. Integral is NOT very sensitive.

  11. Researchers' Individual Publication Rate Has Not Increased in a Century.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Daniele; Larivière, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Debates over the pros and cons of a "publish or perish" philosophy have inflamed academia for at least half a century. Growing concerns, in particular, are expressed for policies that reward "quantity" at the expense of "quality," because these might prompt scientists to unduly multiply their publications by fractioning ("salami slicing"), duplicating, rushing, simplifying, or even fabricating their results. To assess the reasonableness of these concerns, we analyzed publication patterns of over 40,000 researchers that, between the years 1900 and 2013, have published two or more papers within 15 years, in any of the disciplines covered by the Web of Science. The total number of papers published by researchers during their early career period (first fifteen years) has increased in recent decades, but so has their average number of co-authors. If we take the latter factor into account, by measuring productivity fractionally or by only counting papers published as first author, we observe no increase in productivity throughout the century. Even after the 1980s, adjusted productivity has not increased for most disciplines and countries. These results are robust to methodological choices and are actually conservative with respect to the hypothesis that publication rates are growing. Therefore, the widespread belief that pressures to publish are causing the scientific literature to be flooded with salami-sliced, trivial, incomplete, duplicated, plagiarized and false results is likely to be incorrect or at least exaggerated. PMID:26960191

  12. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid [sup 3]He, [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  13. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid {sup 3}He, {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  14. [The life story of Joaquim Alberto Cardoso de Melo: Quincas, Um berro à vida].

    PubMed

    Zancan, Lenira; Matida, Álvaro Hideyoshi

    2015-10-01

    The article seeks to reflect on the contribution of Joaquim Alberto Cardoso de Melo (1936-1993) to the field of public health relating his life story and his scientific production with core issues of education and health, present in his time and which remain in debate to this day. His contribution resulted in the production of new meanings for health practices, with the understanding as social and transdisciplinary phenomena. Based on conversations with co-authors and friends and rereading of his texts, it was decided to approach his biography from: (i) his skills and participation in initiatives and practices of preventive medicine and popular education, which fomented the critical analysis of health education; (ii) his presence as an educator in public health courses throughout the country, eliciting the deconstruction of the theories and practices of education and health with managers, students, professionals and teachers; (iii) his availability for transdisciplinary dialogue with the humanities and social sciences in the search for "epistemological sutures" between reason and passion, capable of responding to the dilemmas and challenges of healthcare work. These three trajectories indicate that the performance of "Quincas" must be understood from his restlessness as a health professional and educator, engaged in the production of knowledge and practices related to the complexity of the phenomenon of life. PMID:26465867

  15. Licensing review of foreign I and C systems for Ukrainian nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Brenman, O.; Denning, R. S.; Cybulskis, P.; Vynogradskaia, S. V.; Yastrebenetsky, M. A.; Afanasiev, N. V.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the licensing process of the foreign-supplied systems for Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants, starting from the tender package and specifications (Terms of Reference), through the implementation activities, and to the system final acceptance. Special attention is given to the licensing reviews of I and C software and Preliminary and Final Safety Analysis Reports. The actual licensing process involves the submission of many documents from the plant designer, the NPP, the foreign supplier, expert institution, and others, such as the State Scientific-and-Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SSTC NRS), and requires various expert reviews and approvals from the Ukrainian regulatory body State Nuclear Regulatory Commission of Ukraine (SNRCU). It is extremely important for each foreign supplier to understand the split of responsibilities and scope of activities carried out by all parties involved in the licensing process. The paper summarizes extensive experience of the co-authors and provides some recommendations for international vendors who are considering supplying their I and C systems to Ukraine. (authors)

  16. Electron acceleration by laser fields in a gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of the project is an investigation of topics related to the high-energy acceleration of electrons by means of suitably shaped laser beams in an inert gaseous medium. By slowing down the phase velocity of the fields by its index of refraction, the gas allows a cumulative interaction with the electrons resulting in net acceleration and also focusing. The objectives of the work reported here were twofold: (1) to participate as a consultant in the design and analysis of demonstration experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory by STI Optronics, a Belleview, WA company, under a separate DOE funded contract; (2) to perform further analytic and design work on the laser acceleration scheme originally proposed and explore a possible extension of the method to acceleration in vacuum using the same field configuration and analogous interaction process as with a gas. This report thus comprises an account of both activities. Section 2 is an overview of the various laser acceleration methods that have been proposed, in order to provide a framework to the work reported. Section 3 contains a list of meetings attended by the Principal Investigator to present his work and interact with research community colleagues and STI staff, and a list of publications containing work he co-authored or was acknowledged for. Section 4 summarizes the work performed by STI to which he contributed. Section 5 consists of the technical reports the Principal Investigator wrote describing his independent theoretical work elaborating and extending the scope of the original project.

  17. Sweet old things: moral complexities in old age in Muriel Spark's Memento Mori.

    PubMed

    England, Suzanne E; Rust, Martha D

    2015-04-01

    Through the lens of Muriel Spark's dark comedic novel, Memento Mori, this paper explores questions of morality, mortality, and the moral choices and performances in old age and in the systems and places of care. Spark's elderly characters are complex moral actors - some virtuous and some decidedly not - who have been receiving mysterious phone calls telling them simply, "Remember you must die." We, the co-authors, are from two different disciplines, namely Renaissance and medieval literature, and social work and critical gerontology. Among the questions that interest us is the paradox of a master narrative that on the one hand exempts the old from moral criticism yet holds them to a higher moral standard - essentially positioning them as moral nonentities, and relieving the old, their caretakers, and society of moral responsibility. Another is the question of whether moral agency in old age has distinctive aspects, and whether consciousness of one's impending mortality effects moral reasoning and performance. In this paper we offer our individual readings of the ways the novel opens up conceptual space in aging theory, and conclude with our thoughts about what our collaboration suggests for continuing cross-disciplinary dialogue. PMID:25841732

  18. Geometer energy unified field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Susana; Rivera, Anacleto

    GEOMETER - ENERGY UNIFIED FIELD THEORY Author: Anacleto Rivera Nivón Co-author: Susana Rivera Cabrera This work is an attempt to find the relationship between the Electromagnetic Field and the Gravitational Field. Despite it is based on the existence of Strings of Energy, it is not the same kind of strings that appears on other theories like Superstring Theory, Branas Theory, M - Theory, or any other related string theories. Here, the Strings are concentrated energy lines that vibrates, and experiences shrinking and elongations, absorbing and yielding on each contraction and expansion all that is found in the Universe: matter and antimatter, waves and energy in all manifestations. In contrast to superstring theory, which strings are on the range of the Length of Planck, these Strings can be on the cosmological size, and can contain many galaxies, or clusters, or groups of galaxies; but also they can reach as small sizes as subatomic levels. Besides, and contrary to what it is stated in some other string theories that need the existence of ten or more dimensions, the present proposal sustains in only four particular dimensions. It has been developed a mathematical support that will try to help to improve the understanding of the phenomena that take place at the Universe.

  19. Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model: Application for Understanding Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2002-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs). The CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (size about 2-200 km). The CRMs also allow explicit interaction between out-going longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation with clouds. Observations can provide the initial conditions and validation for CRM results. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model, a cloud-resolving model, has been developed and improved at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center over the past two decades. Dr. Joanne Simpson played a central role in GCE modeling developments and applications. She was the lead author or co-author on more than forty GCE modeling papers. In this paper, a brief discussion and review of the application of the GCE model to (1) cloud interactions and mergers, (2) convective and stratiform interaction, (3) mechanisms of cloud-radiation interaction, (4) latent heating profiles and TRMM, and (5) responses of cloud systems to large-scale processes are provided. Comparisons between the GCE model's results, other cloud-resolving model results and observations are also examined.

  20. Brenner's bi-velocity fluid mechanics and gradient effects in general continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joe

    2014-11-01

    The field of bi-velocity fluid mechanics represents a notable contribution to the impressive scientific legacy of Professor Howard Brenner. Dating approximately from 2004, Brenner authored or co-authored some thirty papers concerned with the possible breakdown of the Navier Stokes/Fourier models of momentum and heat transport in fluids, a body of work often cited in the literature on statistical and continuum mechanics. Central to the theory is the notion that the barycentric velocity, which represents inertial terms in the Navier Stokes equations, differs generally from the velocity that represents viscous stress, denoted variously by Brenner as ``volume'' or ``work'' velocity. The present paper, based heavily on a previous publication by the present author (Int. J. Eng. Sci. 48 1279, 2010), shows that, while the work of Brenner poses a challenge to certain continuum mechanical notions of material points and velocities, it is also subsumed in a more general framework of higher-gradient models of continuous media. Within this framework, linear constitutive models represent weak non-locality as an expansion in spatial wave number or Knudsen number. Some comments are also offered on Brenner's concept of a non-material volume velocity.

  1. The proper scope of the principle of procreative beneficence revisited.

    PubMed

    Holm, Søren; Bennett, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The principle of procreative beneficence (PB), first suggested by Julian Savulescu, argues that: If couples (or single reproducers) have decided to have a child, and selection is possible, then they have a significant moral reason to select the child, of the possible children they could have, whose life is expected, in light of the relevant available information, to go best or at least not worse than any.of the others. (Savulescu and Kahane 2009, p. 274). While the validity of this moral principle has been widely contested, in this paper we move away from these issues and grant, for the sake of argument, that PB is a valid moral principle, and that the justification for PBprovided by Savulescu and co-authors is sound. We do this in order to explore the implications and consequences of accepting PB and show that even if we put aside questions about the validity and theoretical foundations of this principle, PB has many interesting, astonishing and highly problematic implications that have not been made explicit in the writing of Savulescu and others who support the notion of an obligation to bring to birth the best child possible (Glover, in: Justice between age groops and generations, 1992; Harris, J Med Ethics 28(3):204, 2002). We suggest that these implications should be taken into account when considering both the soundness and strength of PB. PMID:25434062

  2. General practice based teaching exchanges in Europe. Experiences from the EU Socrates programme 'primary health care'.

    PubMed

    van Weel, Chris; Mattsson, Bengt; Freeman, George K; de Meyere, Marc; von Fragstein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of international exchange of medical students for general practice. The experience is based on the EU Socrates programme 'Primary Health Care' that offers, since 1992, clinical attachments and research electives in primary care. This programme involves 11 university departments of general practice/primary care in eight countries: Austria - Vienna; Belgium - Gent; Germany Düsseldorf; Italy - Monza, Udine; Netherlands Nijmegen; Slovenia - Ljubljana; Sweden - Göteborg; and the UK - Edinburgh, Imperial College London and Nottingham. More than 150 students have taken part in the programme, most in the last four years. For clinical attachment communication to patients is essential, and students should be able to speak the language of the host university. A research elective in primary care is less demanding and requires students' ability to communicate in English. Despite marked differences in health care structure in the countries involved, it is quite possible to provide a valuable teaching environment in general practice, and the experience gained by students in the exchanges more than equals that what they would gain at home. The added value is in experiencing the influence of another health care system and of working in another academic primary care centre. A substantial number of research electives have been published in international peer reviewed scientific journals with the student as first (occasionally second) author and staff members of the student's host and home university as co-authors. A further benefit of the exchange programme lies in the transfer teaching innovations between universities. PMID:16671316

  3. Residual stresses in high temperature corrosion of pure zirconium using elasto-viscoplastic model: Application to the deflection test in monofacial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fettré, D.; Bouvier, S.; Favergeon, J.; Kurpaska, L.

    2015-12-01

    The paper is devoted to modeling residual stresses and strains in an oxide film formed during high temperature oxidation. It describes the deflection test in isothermal high-temperature monofacial oxidation (DTMO) of pure zirconium. The model incorporates kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and takes into account elastic, viscoplastic, growth and chemical strains. Different growth strains models are considered, namely, isotropic growth strains given by Pilling-Bedworth ratio, anisotropic growth strains defined by Parise and co-authors and physically based model for growth strain proposed by Clarke. Creep mechanisms based on dislocation slip and core diffusion, are used. A mechanism responsible for through thickness normal stress gradient in the oxide film is proposed. The material parameters are identified using deflection tests under 400 °C, 500 °C and 600 °C. The effect of temperature on creep and stress relaxation is analyzed. Numerical sensitivity study of the DTMO experiment is proposed in order to investigate the effects of the initial foil thickness and platinum coating on the deflection curves.

  4. [The presence of charity books in the inventory of the College of Pharmacy].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    The inventory of the Library of the College of Pharmacy was redacted in 1781-1782 and was completed in 1787. It contained seven charity books : Toutes les CEuvres Charitables by Philibert Guybert, Les Secrets touchant la Medecine, Le Medecin et le Chirurgien des Pauvres by Paul Dubé, La medecine abbreggée en faveur des Pauvres by the same Paul Dubé, Le Traité des-Maladies les plus fréquentes by Helvetius, Les Remedes faciles & domestiques by Mrs Fouquet, and the Manuel des Dames de Charité by Arnaut de Nobleville and his co-authors. If these seven books were representative of the charity books in France, they only represented 2 percents of the total amount of books mentioned in the inventory. That is not surprising because this kind of books were not redacted for pharmacists but for not educated people. All these books had been published before the middle of the 18th century and the charity books recently published were not present. That comforted the hypothesis that the books of the Library came only from gifts by members of the College at the end of their Professional life. PMID:26827553

  5. Non-reciprocity observed by the VLF reception of NWC (19.8 kHz) over trans-equatorial east-west paths to India with reception over a non-equatorial west-east path of similar length to Dunedin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Kenneth; Singh, Rajesh; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Veenadhari, Bhasakara; More, Chandrakant; Brundell, James

    2012-07-01

    VLF diurnal phase and amplitude variations from NWC (19.8kHz) received over trans-equatorial east-west VLF paths at a number of sites in India are compared with the diurnal variations of NWC received in Dunedin, New Zealand over a non-equatorial west-east path of similar length. Transequatorial non-reciprocity is evident at the Indian sites as a marked and erratic reduction in night amplitude below the daytime value and changes in the sunrise modal interference minima relative to those in New Zealand. Night amplitudes in New Zealand were relatively steady and uniformly higher than day values. In contrast, the diurnal phase shifts at all sites were consistent with middle latitude values and the slight non-reciprocity known to be present there. The diurnal phase measurements confirm measurements made by Meara (1973) that east-west transequatorial propagation does not affect the phase velocity of the dominant night mode at frequencies at and above 18.6 kHz. This result contrasts with east-west transequatorial VLF measurements at Omega frequencies below 14 kHz which show an apparent increase in average phase velocity at night. Co-authors: James Brundell, Sandip K. Chakrabarti, Sushanta Kumar Mondal, Rajesh Singh, B. Veenadhari, Morris B Cohen, C.T. More

  6. Interview with a quality leader. Sister Mary Jean Ryan on the first Baldrige Award in healthcare. Interview by Susan V. White and Mary Savitsky.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Mary Jean

    2003-01-01

    Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, Franciscan Sister of Mary, is president/chief executive officer of SSM Health Care (SSMHC), one of the largest Catholic healthcare systems in the United States, with 23,000 employees and 5,000 affiliated physicians serving in 21 hospitals and 3 nursing homes. This year SSMHC became the first healthcare recipient of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. During her 16-year tenure, Sr. Mary Jean has emphasized three key themes: preservation of the earth's resources, valuing ethnic and gender diversity, and commitment to continuous quality improvement (CQI). She is co-author of CQI and the Renovation of an American Health Care System: A Culture Under Construction, published by ASQ Quality Press in 1997. Sr. Mary Jean has received numerous honors, including the Brotherhood/Sisterhood Award from the National Conference of Community and Justice; (one of) 20 Distinguished Women/St. Louis area; Governor's Quality Leadership Award (Missouri); (one of) 25 Most Influential Women in Business in St. Louis; and the Corporation that Makes a Difference Award from the International Women's Forum. She serves on a number of healthcare and local, state, and national boards. She received a master's degree in hospital and health administration from Xavier University in Cincinnati. She is a nurse and has been a Franciscan Sister of Mary for more than 40 years. PMID:12774644

  7. Majorana Fermions in Chiral Topological Ferromagnetic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Eugen; Roberts, Brenden; Tewari, Sumanta; Sau, Jay D.

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment in which zero-bias peaks have been observed in STM experiments performed on chains of magnetic atoms on a superconductor, we show that a multichannel ferromagnetic wire deposited on a spin-orbit coupled superconducting substrate can realize a non-trivial chiral topological superconducting state with Majorana bound states localized at the wire ends. The non-trivial topological state occurs for generic parameters requiring no fine tuning, at least for very large exchange spin splitting in the wire. We theoretically obtain the signatures which appear in the presence of an arbitrary number of Majorana modes in multi-wire systems incorporating the role of finite temperature, finite potential barrier at the STM tip, and finite wire length. These signatures are presented in terms of spatial profiles of STM differential conductance which clearly reveal zero energy Majorana end modes and the prediction of a multiple Majorana based fractional Josephson effect. Co-author: S. Das Sarma. Work supported by AFOSR (FA9550-13-1-0045) at Clemson University and by LPS-CMTC and JQI-NSF-PFC at the University of Maryland.

  8. Exploring the Sexuality of African American Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Laganá, Luciana; White, Theresa; Bruzzone, Daniel E.; Bruzzone, Cristine E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To identify sexually-related themes of the sexuality of older African American women. Study Design Mixed method. Place and Duration of Study Department of Psychology, California State University Northridge, between July 2009 and June 2011. Methodology We included 13 African American older women (57 to 82 years of age), 11 of whom self-identified as heterosexual, one as bisexual, and one as lesbian. We used a semi-structured interview protocol through which we explored some aspects of the respondents’ sexuality (assessed at a superficial level, to be as tactful as possible). Moreover, we collected information on demographics and self-rated physical health. Two co-authors served as coders, and used content analysis to identify the most salient sexuality themes. Results Emerging themes were (in order from most to least endorsed): having sexual desire (often unfulfilled); engaging in less sexual activity in older age; experiencing changes in one’s sexual life as a function of absence of a spouse; and exercising control over how one’s sexual life is conducted. Motivated by the paucity of our sexuality data, we have also provided suggestions to scholars interested in conducting more in-depth further research on this topic with older African American women. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the common notion that older women are asexual is a myth, while lack of a suitable sexual partner is a problem reported by many African American older women who would otherwise enjoy sexual interaction. PMID:25632380

  9. Profiles in Leadership: Clifton J. Latiolais, MSc, DSc

    PubMed Central

    White, Sara; Godwin, Harold N.; Weber, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Director’s Forum series is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. August 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of pharmacy services in the United States. The late Clifton J. Latiolais, MS, DSc, served as the assistant program director for the study and was a co-author of the Mirror. The late Don E. Francke, MS, DSc, was the lead author of the Mirror and the principal investigator of the federally funded study that reviewed hospital pharmacy services across the United States. The next 2 articles in Director’s Forum profile the leadership of Drs. Latiolais and Francke. This article highlights Dr. Latiolais (“Clif”) by briefly reviewing his biography and key career accomplishments, describing his leadership philosophy, and translating that philosophy to today’s health care challenges. Clif’s influence on health system pharmacy serves as an example of effective leadership. This historical perspective on Clif’s leadership, as seen through the eyes of those who knew him, provides directors of pharmacy a valuable leadership viewpoint as they develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:24421540

  10. Overview of NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image) Program: Highlights of the Model Improvement and the New Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, I.; George, Kerry; Cornforth, M. N.; Loucas, B. D.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    This presentation summarizes several years of research done by the co-authors developing the NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image) program and supporting it with scientific data. The goal of the program is to support NASA mission to achieve a safe space travel for humans despite the perils of space radiation. The program focuses on selected topics in radiation biology that were deemed important throughout this period of time, both for the NASA human space flight program and to academic radiation research. Besides scientific support to develop strategies protecting humans against an exposure to deep space radiation during space missions, and understanding health effects from space radiation on astronauts, other important ramifications of the ionizing radiation were studied with the applicability to greater human needs: understanding the origins of cancer, the impact on human genome, and the application of computer technology to biological research addressing the health of general population. The models under NASARTI project include: the general properties of ionizing radiation, such as particular track structure, the effects of radiation on human DNA, visualization and the statistical properties of DSBs (DNA double-strand breaks), DNA damage and repair pathways models and cell phenotypes, chromosomal aberrations, microscopy data analysis and the application to human tissue damage and cancer models. The development of the GUI and the interactive website, as deliverables to NASA operations teams and tools for a broader research community, is discussed. Most recent findings in the area of chromosomal aberrations and the application of the stochastic track structure are also presented.

  11. Multiple vantage points on the mental health effects of mass shootings.

    PubMed

    Shultz, James M; Thoresen, Siri; Flynn, Brian W; Muschert, Glenn W; Shaw, Jon A; Espinel, Zelde; Walter, Frank G; Gaither, Joshua B; Garcia-Barcena, Yanira; O'Keefe, Kaitlin; Cohen, Alyssa M

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of mass shootings has emerged over the past 50 years. A high proportion of rampage shootings have occurred in the United States, and secondarily, in European nations with otherwise low firearm homicide rates; yet, paradoxically, shooting massacres are not prominent in the Latin American nations with the highest firearm homicide rates in the world. A review of the scientific literature from 2010 to early 2014 reveals that, at the individual level, mental health effects include psychological distress and clinically significant elevations in posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms in relation to the degree of physical exposure and social proximity to the shooting incident. Psychological repercussions extend to the surrounding affected community. In the aftermath of the deadliest mass shooting on record, Norway has been in the vanguard of intervention research focusing on rapid delivery of psychological support and services to survivors of the "Oslo Terror." Grounded on a detailed review of the clinical literature on the mental health effects of mass shootings, this paper also incorporates wide-ranging co-author expertise to delineate: 1) the patterning of mass shootings within the international context of firearm homicides, 2) the effects of shooting rampages on children and adolescents, 3) the psychological effects for wounded victims and the emergency healthcare personnel who care for them, 4) the disaster behavioral health considerations for preparedness and response, and 5) the media "framing" of mass shooting incidents in relation to the portrayal of mental health themes. PMID:25085235

  12. Nightly variation of disorder in a Canadian nightclub

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Rémi; Geoffrion, Steve; Ouellet, Frédéric; Felson, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper aims to study nightly disorder within a single bar over an extended period, in order to analyse variations across time (n = 258 nights). Methods The security staff of a large Canadian nightclub agreed to note detailed information on every intervention in which they were involved. Bouncers wrote detailed narratives of each incident of aggression and incivility that occurred in the bar. Environmental characteristics (e.g. number of admissions and alcohol sales) were collected by one of the co-authors. Results “Hot nights” were observed. The number of problem events was particularly high on Tuesday nights, which had the highest number of customers admitted and higher alcohol sales. The average alcohol sale per customer was also higher during long weekends, and alcohol sales were positively related to problem events. Finally, path analyses revealed that the presence of more bouncers was a deterrent. Conclusions The level of disorder in a bar varies greatly over time. Contrary to what is often postulated, bars are not always high- or low-risk. The results strongly support responsible alcohol-serving policies and highlight the benefits of adequate surveillance. PMID:24976790

  13. Whose data set is it anyway? Sharing raw data from randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Background Sharing of raw research data is common in many areas of medical research, genomics being perhaps the most well-known example. In the clinical trial community investigators routinely refuse to share raw data from a randomized trial without giving a reason. Discussion Data sharing benefits numerous research-related activities: reproducing analyses; testing secondary hypotheses; developing and evaluating novel statistical methods; teaching; aiding design of future trials; meta-analysis; and, possibly, preventing error, fraud and selective reporting. Clinical trialists, however, sometimes appear overly concerned with being scooped and with misrepresentation of their work. Both possibilities can be avoided with simple measures such as inclusion of the original trialists as co-authors on any publication resulting from data sharing. Moreover, if we treat any data set as belonging to the patients who comprise it, rather than the investigators, such concerns fall away. Conclusion Technological developments, particularly the Internet, have made data sharing generally a trivial logistical problem. Data sharing should come to be seen as an inherent part of conducting a randomized trial, similar to the way in which we consider ethical review and publication of study results. Journals and funding bodies should insist that trialists make raw data available, for example, by publishing data on the Web. If the clinical trial community continues to fail with respect to data sharing, we will only strengthen the public perception that we do clinical trials to benefit ourselves, not our patients. PMID:16704733

  14. The best medicine. Interview by Jim Montague.

    PubMed

    Adams, P

    1994-07-20

    Laughter can be crucial to patient care, but physician and clown Patch Adams, M.D., sees nothing funny about the greed he finds in the nation's health care system and in current reform plans. Adams has spent almost 25 years infusing practitioners with a sense of humor. This philosophy extends into his work as founder of the not-for-profit Gesundheit Institute, which is trying to build an "ultimate fantasy" hospital on 310 acres in rural West Virginia. So far, he's raised $1.1 million, built one of three main buildings, and broken ground on a second. However, millions of dollars still need to be raised. Adams sees the very notion of his dream hospital as a necessary pie in the face of the traditional health care system. Besides speaking and performing, Adams takes groups of clowns to Russia, where they perform in hospitals, orphanages, prisons and on the street. Adams has co-authored a book about his philosophies, Gesundheit, and sold the rights to a Hollywood studio. He spoke recently with staff editor Jim Montague. PMID:8025607

  15. Human biology: From a love to profession and back again.

    PubMed

    Brozek, Josef

    1999-01-01

    In 1937-1939, while working with my right hand as psychologist in the Bata Shoe Co. in Zlín, Moravia, with my left hand I was involved in research on age changes in body dimensions and profited from the interdisciplinary orientation of the (Czech) Biotypological Society, of which I was an active member. In 1941 I joined the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene, a research and teaching unit in the School of Public Health of the University of Minnesota. My contributions ranged from philosophy of science through a broadly conceived physical anthropology, including nutritional anthropometry, to the study of behavior. I did field work both in Yugoslavia and in the United States. The research topics included aging, the effects of smoking, and etiology of coronary heart disease. In the collaborative monograph on The Biology of Human Starvation, I co-authored chapters on body weight, physical appearance and external dimension, body fat, a synthesizing chapter on compartments of the body, special senses, neuromuscular functions and motor performance, and seven chapters devoted to psychology. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 11:143-155, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:11533938

  16. NASA Science Mission Directorate Education and Public Outreach: Engaging with Scientists and Educators through the Higher Education Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory R.; Gross, Nicholas; Buxner, Sanlyn; Low, Russanne; Moldwin, Mark; Fraknoi, Andrew; Grier, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) Forums have established a Higher Education Working Group (HEWG), which has explored and surveyed the higher education landscape with regard to different subjects, such as community colleges and diversity. The HEWG is composed of representatives from each of the SMD EPO Forums, along with 'external' members who have rotated in and out, and the co-authors here constitute the present membership, chaired by Nicholas Gross. Most recently, the HEWG has worked to identify the key characteristics of higher education STEM programs that reach diverse populations. While increasing the involvement of students from diverse backgrounds in SMD EPO is a core goal for our community, engaging these students meaningfully requires a dedicated strategy using proven techniques. In reality, while most educational programs have this goal, undertaking it meaningfully is more challenging. For higher education, diversity is a long-standing issue, and the working group could have taken many different paths to explore this important topic. The HEWG has undertaken a review of programs that involve engaging undergraduates from diverse backgrounds in SMD-related research internships or hands-on STEM experiments. This information will be synthesized and documented so that future education efforts can incorporate the most valuable components. Meanwhile, the working group is exploring ways that NASA SMD can be more helpful to higher education faculty and students, and community input is solicited as part of this presentation.

  17. Pattern of articles published in the Ethiopian Medical Journal.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Yirga, Hanna

    2002-10-01

    Five Hundred and Thirty Nine articles published between January 1984 and December 2000 in the Ethiopian Medical Journal were analysed to assess the research pattern and the citations of published articles. Hand-in-hand search of the journals and the Science Citation Index database were used. Majority (69%) of the articles were original articles. The median number of authors per article was 2 with a range of 9 (Maximum 10 and Minimum 1). Majority of first authors were affiliated to teaching institutions (69.6%). Foreign nationals were first authors in 19.9% and co-authors in 26.7% of the articles. Multiple authored articles [OR (95% CI) = 1.17 (1.03-1.33)], original articles [OR (95% CI) = 12.0 (4.43-32.48) and articles dealing with intestinal parasites [OR (95% CI) = 3.88 (1.24-12.08)] were more likely to be cited. Although, encouraging efforts were seen in addressing issues of public health importance in the last five years (1996-2000) of the study period, the findings of the study suggest that there is still a need to address them in a more vigorous way. It was also recommended efforts should be initiated to improve the citation of articles published by the Ethiopian Medical Journal and enhance the publication of editorials and brief communications. PMID:12596651

  18. Integrated assessment of artisanal and small-scale gold mining in Ghana--part 1: human health review.

    PubMed

    Basu, Niladri; Clarke, Edith; Green, Allyson; Calys-Tagoe, Benedict; Chan, Laurie; Dzodzomenyo, Mawuli; Fobil, Julius; Long, Rachel N; Neitzel, Richard L; Obiri, Samuel; Odei, Eric; Ovadje, Lauretta; Quansah, Reginald; Rajaee, Mozhgon; Wilson, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    This report is one of three synthesis documents produced via an integrated assessment (IA) that aims to increase understanding of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. Given the complexities surrounding ASGM, an IA framework was utilized to analyze economic, social, health, and environmental data, and co-develop evidence-based responses with pertinent stakeholders. The current analysis focuses on the health of ASGM miners and community members, and synthesizes extant data from the literature as well as co-authors' recent findings regarding the causes, status, trends, and consequences of ASGM in Ghana. The results provide evidence from across multiple Ghanaian ASGM sites that document relatively high exposures to mercury and other heavy metals, occupational injuries and noise exposure. The work also reviews limited data on psychosocial health, nutrition, cardiovascular and respiratory health, sexual health, and water and sanitation. Taken together, the findings provide a thorough overview of human health issues in Ghanaian ASGM communities. Though more research is needed to further elucidate the relationships between ASGM and health outcomes, the existing research on plausible health consequences of ASGM should guide policies and actions to better address the unique challenges of ASGM in Ghana and potentially elsewhere. PMID:25985314

  19. Science convention "Rijeka and its Citizens in Medical History" 2000-2009 - history of medicine as a component of scientific visibility.

    PubMed

    Eterovic, Igor

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the form and content of the first ten science conventions "Rijeka and its Citizens in Medical History" ("Rijeka i Riječani u medicinskoj povjesnici") which were held in the period between 2000 and 2009 according to the archive data of the convention organizers Croatian Scientific Society for the History of Health Culture. It presents data on the inception of the idea of a science convention, its organisational features (organising committees, presiding committees, convention topics, venue, patrons) and number of participants. A total of 174 presentations whose abstracts were published in individual Convention Collections were given at the ten conventions by 103 different authors from Croatia and neighbouring countries. After the first ten years the entire material was compiled and published with an analytical comment in the anniversary issue Znanstveni skup Rijeka i Riječani u medicinskoj povjesnici 2000-2009 (Scientific Convention Rijeka and its Citizens in Medical History 2000-2009) within Biblioteka AMHA. Most of the papers printed in extenso are published in the magazine AMHA - Acta medico historica Adriatica. The analysis of all presentations provides quantity data on the number of presented papers, number of presenters and number of co-authored papers, as well as quality determinants within the evaluation of the achievement of science convention objectives. The end gives a review of the significance of this convention within the regional, national and international aspect. PMID:22047478

  20. Interview: Interview with Professor Malcolm Rowland.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Malcolm

    2010-03-01

    Malcolm Rowland is Professor Emeritus and former Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and a member and former director (1996-2000), of the Centre for Applied Pharmacokinetic Research, University of Manchester. He holds the positions of Adjunct Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco; Member, Governing Board, EU Network of Excellence in Biosimulation; Founder member of NDA Partners; academic advisor to a Pharmaceutical initiative in prediction of human pharmacokinetics and Scientific Advisor to the EU Microdose AMS Partnership Program. He was President of the EU Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences (1996-2000); Vice-President of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (2001-2009) and a Board Member of the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs, 2004-2008). He received his degree in Pharmacy and PhD at the University of London and was on faculty (School of Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco [1967-1975]) before taking up a professorship at Manchester. His main research interest is physiologically based pharmacokinetics and its application to drug discovery, development and use. He is author of over 300 scientific articles and co-author, with TN Tozer, of the textbooks Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: Concepts and Applications and Introduction to Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics. He was editor of the Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics (formerly Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics, 1973-2007) and, since 1977, has organized regular residential workshops in pharmacokinetics. PMID:21083248

  1. On advanced estimation techniques for exoplanet detection and characterization using ground-based coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  2. Jim Starnes' Contributions to Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Harris, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    A summary of advances in residual strength analyses methods for metallic structures that were realized under the leadership of Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr., is presented. The majority of research led by Dr. Starnes in this area was conducted in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Dr. Starnes, respectfully referred to herein as Jim, had a passion for studying complex response phenomena and dedicated a significant amount of research effort toward advancing damage tolerance and residual strength analysis methods for metallic structures. Jim's efforts were focused on understanding damage propagation in built-up fuselage structure with widespread fatigue damage, with the goal of ensuring safety in the aging international commercial transport fleet. Jim's major contributions in this research area were in identifying the effects of combined internal pressure and mechanical loads, and geometric nonlinearity, on the response of built-up structures with damage. Analytical and experimental technical results are presented to demonstrate the breadth and rigor of the research conducted in this technical area. Technical results presented herein are drawn exclusively from papers where Jim was a co-author.

  3. An analysis of the structure and evolution of the scientific collaboration network of computer intelligence in games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Cabrera, R.; Cotta, C.; Fernández-Leiva, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Games constitute a research domain that is attracting the interest of scientists from numerous disciplines. This is particularly true from the perspective of computational intelligence. In order to examine the growing importance of this area in the gaming domain, we present an analysis of the scientific collaboration network of researchers working on computational intelligence in games (CIG). This network has been constructed from bibliographical data obtained from the Digital Bibliography & Library Project (DBLP). We have analyzed from a temporal perspective several properties of the CIG network at the macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic levels, studying the large-scale structure, the growth mechanics, and collaboration patterns among other features. Overall, computational intelligence in games exhibits similarities with other collaboration networks such as for example a log-normal degree distribution and sub-linear preferential attachment for new authors. It also has distinctive features, e.g. the number of papers co-authored is exponentially distributed, the internal preferential attachment (new collaborations among existing authors) is linear, and fidelity rates (measured as the relative preference for publishing with previous collaborators) grow super-linearly. The macroscopic and mesoscopic evolution of the network indicates the field is very active and vibrant, but it is still at an early developmental stage. We have also analyzed communities and central nodes and how these are reflected in research topics, thus identifying active research subareas.

  4. Practitioner insights on obesity prevention: the voice of South Australian OPAL workers.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge based on science has been central to implementing community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions. The art of practitioner wisdom is equally critical to ensure locally relevant responses. In South Australia (SA), the OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle) program has been implemented to reduce childhood obesity across 20 communities reaching nearly one quarter of the state's population. Staff from across the State come together at regular intervals to share practice challenges and insights and refine the model of practice. Over a 3-year period 12 reflective practice workshops were held with OPAL staff (n = 46). OPAL staff were guided by an external facilitator using inquiring questions to reflect on their health promotion practice within local government. Three themes were identified as central within the reflections. The first theme is shared clarity through the OPAL obesity prevention model highlighting the importance of working to a clearly articulated, holistic obesity prevention model. The second theme is practitioner skill and sensitivity required to implement the model and deal with the 'politics' of obesity prevention. The final theme is the power of relationships as intrinsic to effective community based health promotion. Insights into the daily practices and reflections from obesity prevention practitioners are shared to shed light on the skills required to contribute to individual and social change. OPAL staff co-authored this paper. PMID:25700429

  5. 2008 Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Avery, Nachael B.

    2008-11-01

    For the fifth year, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, invited graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, university faculty, and students entering graduate students from around the world to participate in the Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics. The institute offers participants the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in top-notch research laboratories while working along internationally respected mentors. Of the 38 applicants, 20 were accepted for the 8- to 10-week program. The participants came from universities as close as Seattle and Portland and as far away as Germany and Singapore. At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 20 participants were mentored by 13 scientists. These mentors help tailor the participant’s experience to the needs of that person. Further, the mentors provide guidance on experimental and theoretical techniques, research design and completion, and other aspects of scientific careers in interfacial and condensed phase chemical physics. The research conducted at the institute can result in tangible benefits for the participants. For example, many have co-authored papers that have been published in peer-reviewed journals, including top-rated journals such as Science. Also, they have presented their research at conferences, such as the Gordon Research Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces and the AVS national meeting. Beyond that, many of the participants have started building professional connections with researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, connections that will serve them well during their careers.

  6. Development of the merchant plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfinger, R.; Gilliss, M.B.

    1998-07-01

    The co-authors of this paper are currently involved in over 1500 megawatts of merchant plant developments in the US. This paper will discuss the latest in combined cycle steam reheat ``H and G'' technology. Big improvements in heat rates along with substantial drop in installed cost will make this power cycle the leading merchant plant of the future. This paper will compare the actual present day performance and clearing price of a state-of-the-art merchant plant versus utility dispatch cost duration curves, known as ``system lambda''. Deregulation of the power market will ultimately provide an open market for these efficient plants to compete effectively against aging utility plants. Comparison of utility system heat rates versus merchant plant heat rates along with an increase need for generation capacity and forecasts of stable gas prices supports to the potential for a large scale building program of these high efficiency generators. This paper will also review the capacity crunch in the Northeast and Wisconsin and how problems with nuclear plants may accelerate the need for merchant plants. This paper will compare the required capacity for the population growth in the SERC Region and in Florida and how this will produce a potential ``hot bed'' for merchant plant development.

  7. The founding charter of the Genomic Observatories Network.

    PubMed

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Clark, Melody S; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Faith, Daniel P; Geller, Jonathan; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirsch, Penny R; Leong, Jo-Ann; Meyer, Chris; Obst, Matthias; Planes, Serge; Scholin, Chris; Vogler, Alfried P; Gates, Ruth D; Toonen, Rob; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Barbier, Michèle; Barker, Katherine; Bertilsson, Stefan; Bicak, Mesude; Bietz, Matthew J; Bobe, Jason; Bodrossy, Levente; Borja, Angel; Coddington, Jonathan; Fuhrman, Jed; Gerdts, Gunnar; Gillespie, Rosemary; Goodwin, Kelly; Hanson, Paul C; Hero, Jean-Marc; Hoekman, David; Jansson, Janet; Jeanthon, Christian; Kao, Rebecca; Klindworth, Anna; Knight, Rob; Kottmann, Renzo; Koo, Michelle S; Kotoulas, Georgios; Lowe, Andrew J; Marteinsson, Viggó Thór; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Myrold, David D; Pafilis, Evangelos; Parker, Stephanie; Parnell, John Jacob; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Roderick, George K; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Schonrogge, Karsten; Simon, Nathalie; Valette-Silver, Nathalie J; Springer, Yuri P; Stone, Graham N; Stones-Havas, Steve; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Thibault, Kate M; Wecker, Patricia; Wichels, Antje; Wooley, John C; Yahara, Tetsukazu; Zingone, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    The co-authors of this paper hereby state their intention to work together to launch the Genomic Observatories Network (GOs Network) for which this document will serve as its Founding Charter. We define a Genomic Observatory as an ecosystem and/or site subject to long-term scientific research, including (but not limited to) the sustained study of genomic biodiversity from single-celled microbes to multicellular organisms.An international group of 64 scientists first published the call for a global network of Genomic Observatories in January 2012. The vision for such a network was expanded in a subsequent paper and developed over a series of meetings in Bremen (Germany), Shenzhen (China), Moorea (French Polynesia), Oxford (UK), Pacific Grove (California, USA), Washington (DC, USA), and London (UK). While this community-building process continues, here we express our mutual intent to establish the GOs Network formally, and to describe our shared vision for its future. The views expressed here are ours alone as individual scientists, and do not necessarily represent those of the institutions with which we are affiliated. PMID:24606731

  8. [The celebrity of Polish and French medicine--Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babiński (1857-1932)].

    PubMed

    Skalski, Janusz H; Gładki, Marcin; Pypłacz, Dariusz

    2007-07-01

    The paper presents a biography of Polish and French medical scientist, Józef Julian Franciszek Feliks Babiński (1857-1932), a son of Polish exiles to France after the unsuccessful insurrection against the Russian occupants. Born in Paris, Babiński considered Poland as his own home-country, being faithful and grateful citizen of France, his adopted country. He made his neurological department in Paris a world famous medical centre at the turn of the 20th century. Currently for every student of medicine or physician practitioner, the name of Babiński immediately associates with the "toe phenomenon" (phénomène des orteils). The discovery of this "sign" (1896) is the crowning point of Babiński's work in semiology. He was a co-author of discoveries known under eponym names of syndromes: Babinski-Nageotte, Babinski-Fröhlich, Anton-Babinski and many others. Babiński emphasized his Polish origins, expressing his feeling towards two home countries (1922): "I am proud to have two countries--to one, I owe the knowledge, to the other, the country of my ancestors, the elements of my Polish soul...". PMID:17966600

  9. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges: Response to "Is estrogen receptor negative breast cancer risk associated with a fast life history strategy?".

    PubMed

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER-) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER- breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER- breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER- breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. PMID:26874356

  10. Resource Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jon M.

    2000-01-01

    Resource Economics is a text for students with a background in calculus, intermediate microeconomics, and a familiarity with the spreadsheet software Excel. The book covers basic concepts, shows how to set up spreadsheets to solve dynamic allocation problems, and presents economic models for fisheries, forestry, nonrenewable resources, stock pollutants, option value, and sustainable development. Within the text, numerical examples are posed and solved using Excel's Solver. These problems help make concepts operational, develop economic intuition, and serve as a bridge to the study of real-world problems of resource management. Through these examples and additional exercises at the end of Chapters 1 to 8, students can make dynamic models operational, develop their economic intuition, and learn how to set up spreadsheets for the simulation of optimization of resource and environmental systems. Book is unique in its use of spreadsheet software (Excel) to solve dynamic allocation problems Conrad is co-author of a previous book for the Press on the subject for graduate students Approach is extremely student-friendly; gives students the tools to apply research results to actual environmental issues

  11. The Atavistic Model of Cancer: Evidence, Objections, Therapeutic Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles

    2014-03-01

    As cancer progresses tumor cells dedifferentiate. In the atavistic model this dedifferentiation is interpreted as a reversion to phylogenetically earlier capabilities (Davies & Lineweaver 2011). Since there is an identifiable order to the evolution of capabilities, the more recently evolved capabilities are more likely to be compromised first during cancer progression. A loss of capabilities based on the phylogenetic order of evolution suggests a therapeutic strategy for targeting cancer - design challenges that can only be met by the recently evolved capabilities still intact in normal cells, but lost in cancer cells. Such a target-the-weakness therapeutic strategy contrasts with most current therapies that target the main strength of cancer: cell proliferation. Here, we describe several examples of this target-the-weakness strategy. Our most detailed example involves the immune system. As cancer progresses, the atavistic model suggests that cancer cells lose contact with the more recently evolved adaptive immune system of the host (the basis of vaccination). The absence of adaptive immunity in immunosuppressed tumor environments is an irreversible weakness of cancer that can be exploited by creating a challenge that only the presence of adaptive immunity can meet. Thus, we propose the post-vaccination inoculation of disease at dosages that the recently evolved (and vaccination-primed) adaptive immune system will be able to destroy in normal cells, but not in the immunosuppressed microenvironment of tumor cells. Co-author: Paul Davies (Arizona State University)

  12. Interview with a quality leader: Kate Goonan on performance excellence. Interview by Pamela K. Scarrow.

    PubMed

    Goonan, Kathleen Jennison

    2010-01-01

    Kathleen Jennison Goonan, MD, is Executive Director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Center for Performance Excellence (CPE) at Massachusetts General Hospital. CPE guides transformational change in healthcare management and helps leaders, administrators, and practitioners in the healthcare workforce nationwide achieve and sustain performance excellence (http://www.mghcpe.org). An internist trained at the Massachusetts General Hospital, she has more than two decades' experience leading healthcare quality assessment and improvement initiatives. Before joining the CPE in 2002, she held a number of senior executive positions, including Senior Vice President of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Dr. Goonan has served as a judge for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, the Joint Commission's Codman Award, and for the American Hospital Association's McKesson Quest for Quality Award. She teaches extensively about achieving organizational performance excellence. Dr. Goonan co-authored Journey to Excellence: How the Baldrige Health Care Leaders Succeed, authored The Juran Prescription: Clinical Quality Management, and has written numerous articles and book chapters on performance improvement in healthcare. Dr. Goonan was faculty for the Harvard School of Public Health Leadership Development Program for Physicians from Academic Health Centers (1995-2007) and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (1999-2005). PMID:20500778

  13. An atomistic approach to viral mechanical oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Otto F.

    2009-03-01

    Viruses are the simplest ``life'' form. These parasites reproduce by borrowing the machinery of their host cell. Many are pathogenic to plants, animals, and humans. Viruses possess an outer protein coat (capsid) that protects its genomic material that resides inside. We have developed a theoretical technique to model the very low frequency mechanical modes of the viral capsid with atomic resolution. The method uses empirical force fields and a mathematical framework borrowed from electronic structure theory for finding low energy states. The low frequency modes can be ``pinged'' with an ultra-short laser pulse and the aim of the light/vibrational coupling is to interfere with the viral life cycle. The theoretical work here is motivated by the recent work of Tsen et al. [2] who have used ultra-short pulsed laser scattering to inactivate viruses. The methodology can be applied to many systems, and the coupled mechanical oscillations of other floppy biomolecules such as a complete ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter) will also be discussed. Co-authors of this work are Dr. Eric Dykeman, Prof. K.-T. Tsen and Daryn Benson. [4pt] [1] E.C. Dykeman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 028101 (2008). [0pt] [2] K-T. Tsen et al., J. of Physics -- Cond. Mat. 19, 472201 (2007).

  14. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-01ER54617 Computer Modeling of Microturbulence and Macrostability Properties of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Noel Leboeuf

    2004-03-04

    OAK-B135 We have made significant progress during the past grant period in several key areas of the UCLA and national Fusion Theory Program. This impressive body of work includes both fundamental and applied contributions to MHD and turbulence in DIII-D and Electric Tokamak plasmas, and also to Z-pinches, particularly with respect to the effect of flows on these phenomena. We have successfully carried out interpretive and predictive global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell calculations of DIII-D discharges. We have cemented our participation in the gyrokinetic PIC effort of the SciDAC Plasma Microturbulence Project through working membership in the Summit Gyrokinetic PIC Team. We have continued to teach advanced courses at UCLA pertaining to computational plasma physics and to foster interaction with students and junior researchers. We have in fact graduated 2 Ph. D. students during the past grant period. The research carried out during that time has resulted in many publications in the premier plasma physics and fusion energy sciences journals and in several invited oral communications at major conferences such as Sherwood, Transport Task Force (TTF), the annual meetings of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, of the European Physical Society, and the 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, FEC 2002. Many of these have been authored and co-authored with experimentalists at DIII-D.

  15. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  16. The sibling experience of living with childhood chronic illness and disability.

    PubMed

    Van Riper, Marcia

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this integrative review is to summarize existing nursing research on the sibling experience of living in a family that includes a child with a chronic illness or disability, specifically highlighting nurse researchers who have conducted more than two studies concerning the sibling experience. A secondary purpose is to determine to what extent nurse researchers interested in the sibling experience have used or been informed by a developmental science perspective. A final purpose is to discuss future research needed to further develop the existing knowledge base concerning the sibling experience of living with childhood chronic illness and disability. Forty of 86 published research articles were authored or co-authored by nurses. There were four nurse researchers with programs of research. Most studies used a categorical approach and were descriptive, cross-sectional designs; there were few longitudinal studies. Multiple factors were identified that affect how siblings respond to childhood chronic illness and disability. Future research needs to focus on siblings and families from diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, and outcomes need to be assessed at multiple levels. Furthermore, intervention studies building on the descriptive research are needed. PMID:12858700

  17. A century-old leadership style revitalizes the heroic hospital.

    PubMed

    Kania, A J

    1993-01-01

    "Those who fail history are destined to repeat it." Emmett C. Murphy, Ph.D., an international business consultant found that the key to individual and organizational leadership is a heroic commitment to service and the reengineering of the work that it requires. Murphy, whose clients include IBM, General Motors, Johns Hopkins, Centers for Disease Control, Johnson & Johnson, and Memorial Sloan Kettering; was a consultant with Booz-Allen Hamilton and served on the faculties of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the State University of New York before founding E. C. Murphy, Ltd. His firm focuses on the application of quality improvement and work reengineering strategies for creating a patient-focused "heroic" organization. Recently, Dr. Murphy and Michael Snell co-authored an intriguing management book based on the fundamental business strategies historically found in an unlikely western figure. The The Genius of Sitting Bull (Prentice Hall, 1993), Murphy and Snell examine the leadership styles of the Sioux chief and General Custer at the peaks of their careers and used 13 heroic strategies common to Sitting Bull's management style as a metaphor for for successful leadership on the great plains of American health care and business life. PMID:10123388

  18. Quantum nanophotonics: Controlling a photon with a single spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waks, Edo

    The implementation of quantum network and distributive quantum computation replies on strong interactions between stationary matter qubits and flying photons. The spin of a single electron confined in a quantum dot is considered as a promising matter qubit as it possesses microsecond coherence time and allows picosecond timescale control using optical pulses. The quantum dot spin can also interact with a photon by controlling the optical response of a strongly coupled cavity. In this talk I will discuss our recent work on an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum phase switch using a single spin in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. We show large modulation of the cavity reflection spectrum by manipulating the spin states of the quantum dot, which enables us to control the quantum state of a reflected photon. We also show the complementary effect where the presence of a single photon switches the quantum state of the spin. The reported spin-photon quantum phase operation can switch spin or photon states in picoseconds timescale, representing an important step towards GHz semiconductor based quantum logic devices on-a-chip and solid-state implementations of quantum networks. Shuo Sun, Hyochul Kim, Glenn Solomon, co-authors.

  19. Accomplishments of Heinz Baumberger PhD: a remarkable patient with ankylosing spondylitis for 72 years.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad A

    2016-06-01

    This is the story of a remarkable Swiss patient-Heinz Baumberger, PhD-who was born in 1931 and has suffered from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) since 1943. He has survived many manifestations and co-morbid conditions associated with his disease and its treatment. These include severe episodes of acute anterior uveitis, osteoporosis with fragility fractures, and also post-traumatic spinal fractures on three different occasions. In addition, he has suffered from multiple basal cell carcinomas as a late complication of a 3-week course of spinal radiation in 1952 and another one in 1962. It was only in 1971 that Dr. Baumberger for the first time met a fellow sufferer from AS, and he subsequently helped establish the Swiss AS patient support group, the second such national group in the world. He co-authored with his rheumatologist an excellent and well-illustrated book on AS for patients and their family members and for allied healthcare professionals. He travelled extensively around the globe lecturing and participating in various meetings and congresses in his zeal to spread the idea of self-help organizations for patients with AS. PMID:27108588

  20. Theory and detection scheme of seismic EM signals transferred into the atmosphere from the oceanic and continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novik, Oleg; Ershov, Sergey; Ruzhin, Yuri; Smirnov, Fedor; Volgin, Maxim

    2014-07-01

    Due to the compound structure of the medium and large portions of energy transferred, a seismic excitation in the oceanic or continental lithosphere disturbs all types of geophysical fields. To investigate the problem of electromagnetic (EM) disturbances in the atmosphere from the seismically activated lithosphere, we have formulated two mathematical models of interaction of fields of different physical nature resulting in arising of the low-frequency (from 0.1 to 10 Hz by amplitude of a few hundreds of pT) EM signals in the atmosphere. First we have considered the EM field generation in the moving oceanic lithosphere and then in the moving continental one. For both cases, the main physical principles and geological data were applied for formulation of the model and characteristics of the computed signals of different nature agree with measurements of other authors. On the basis of the 2D model of the seismo-hydro-EM-temperature interaction in the lithosphere-Ocean-atmosphere domain, a block-scheme of a multisensory vertically distributed (from a seafloor up to the ionosphere) tsunami precursors' detection system is described. On the basis of the 3D model of the seismo-EM interaction in a lithosphere-atmosphere domain, we explain why Prof. Kopytenko (Inst. IZMIRAN of Russian Acad. Sci.) and co-authors were able to estimate location of the future seismic epicenter area from their magnetic field measurements in the atmosphere near the earth's surface.

  1. The AAVSO 2011 Demographic and Background Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.

    2012-04-01

    In 2011, the AAVSO conducted a survey of 615 people who are or were recently active in the organization. The survey included questions about their demographic background and variable star interests. Data are descriptively analyzed and compared with prior surveys. Results show an organization of very highly educated, largely male amateur and professional astronomers distributed across 108 countries. Participants tend to be loyal, with the average time of involvement in the AAVSO reported as 14 years. Most major demographic factors have not changed much over time. However, the average age of new members is increasing. Also, a significant portion of the respondents report being strictly active in a non-observing capacity, reflecting the growing mission of the organization. Motivations of participants are more aligned with scientific contribution than with that reported by other citizen science projects. This may help explain why a third of all respondents are an author or co-author of a paper in an astronomical journal. Finally, there is some evidence that participation in the AAVSO has a greater impact on the respondents' view of their role in astronomy compared to that expected through increasing amateur astronomy experience alone.

  2. Bioprocess monitoring and computer control: key roots of the current PAT initiative.

    PubMed

    Junker, B H; Wang, H Y

    2006-10-01

    This review article has been written for the journal, Biotechnology and Bioengineering, to commemorate the 70th birthday of Daniel I.C. Wang, who served as doctoral thesis advisor to each of the co-authors, but a decade apart. Key roots of the current PAT initiative in bioprocess monitoring and control are described, focusing on the impact of Danny Wang's research as a professor at MIT. The history of computer control and monitoring in biochemical processing has been used to identify the areas that have already benefited and those that are most likely to benefit in the future from PAT applications. Past applications have included the use of indirect estimation methods for cell density, expansion of on-line/at-line and on-line/in situ measurement techniques, and development of models and expert systems for control and optimization. Future applications are likely to encompass additional novel measurement technologies, measurements for multi-scale and disposable bioreactors, real time batch release, and more efficient data utilization to achieve process validation and continuous improvement goals. Dan Wang's substantial contributions in this arena have been one key factor in steering the PAT initiative towards realistic and attainable industrial applications. PMID:16933288

  3. The Origin and Distribution of Heavy Elements in the CD Groups MKW 4 and AWM 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrtilek, Jan; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    At this point, data for MKW4 have been received and those for AWM4 are still awaited. The MKW4 data have been fully analyzed and a complete manuscript is available and in final review by co-authors before submission for refereed publication. The following is a summary of our principal findings: We examined the distribution and properties of the hot gas which makes up the group halo. The inner halo shows some signs of structure, with circular or elliptical beta-models providing a poor fit to the surface brightness profile. This may be evidence of large-scale motion in the inner halo, but we do not find evidence of sharp fronts or edges in the emission. The temperature of the halo declines in the core, with deprojected spectral fits showing a central temperature of approximately 1.3keV compared to approximately 3keV at 250 arcsec. However, cooling flow models provide poor fits to the inner regions of the group and the estimated cooling time of the gas is long except within the central dominant galaxy, NGC4073. Abundance profiles show a sharp increase in the core of the group. We conclude that MKW4 is a fairly relaxed group, which has developed a strong central temperature gradient but not a large-scale cooling flow.

  4. Interactive visualization and analysis of transitional flow.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory P; Calo, Victor M; Gaither, Kelly P

    2008-01-01

    A stand-alone visualization application has been developed by a multi-disciplinary, collaborative team with the sole purpose of creating an interactive exploration environment allowing turbulent flow researchers to experiment and validate hypotheses using visualization. This system has specific optimizations made in data management, caching computations, and visualization allowing for the interactive exploration of datasets on the order of 1TB in size. Using this application, the user (co-author Calo) is able to interactively visualize and analyze all regions of a transitional flow volume, including the laminar, transitional and fully turbulent regions. The underlying goal of the visualizations produced from these transitional flow simulations is to localize turbulent spots in the laminar region of the boundary layer, determine under which conditions they form, and follow their evolution. The initiation of turbulent spots, which ultimately lead to full turbulence, was located via a proposed feature detection condition and verified by experimental results. The conditions under which these turbulent spots form and coalesce are validated and presented. PMID:18988992

  5. Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Space Velocities and Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The original proposal for this LTSA grant was for X-ray studies of pulsars, and especially pulsar wind nebulae and what they could tell us about pulsar properties, especially their space velocities. By any metric, this program has been very successful. No fewer than 14 papers on directly related topics (and several dozen more on related topics) have been published in refereed journals with the PI as lead or co-author, all observational results that have had significant impact on the field. These include the first X-ray detection of the "Duck" pulsar, a clear demonstration that estimated pulsar ages can be off by over an order of magnitude (via observations of the young supernova remnant G11.2-0.3) and the detection of the first pulsar wind nebula around a millisecond pulsar. These publications have also resulted in 4 press releases. Moreover, they also represent the thesis work of two PhD students at MIT (Froney Crawford and Mike Pivovaroff) and one postdoctoral fellow, Bryan Gaensler, now Assistant Professor at Harvard.

  6. Towards a North Atlantic Marine Radiocarbon Calibration Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, William; Reimer, Paula; Blaauw, Maarten; Bryant, Charlotte; Rae, James; Burke, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Service du dejeuner! Twenty years ago, in 1995, I sailed as a post-doctoral researcher based at the University of Edinburgh (UK) on the first scientific mission of the new Marion Dufresne II. In this presentation, I will provide an update on the work that first quantified North Atlantic marine radiocarbon reservoir ages, highlighting how advances in marine tephrochronology over the last twenty years have significantly improved our understanding (and ability to test) land-ice-ocean linkages. The mechanistic link that connects marine radiocarbon reservoir ages to ocean ventilation state will also be discussed with reference to the Younger Dryas climate anomaly, where models and data have been successfully integrated. I will discuss the use of reference chronologies in the North Atlantic region and evaluate the common practice of climate synchronization between the Greenland ice cores and some of the key MD records that are now available. The exceptional quality of the MD giant piston cores and their potential to capture high-resolution last glacial sediment records from the North Atlantic provides an exciting opportunity to build new regional marine radiocarbon calibration curves. I will highlight new efforts by my co-authors and others to build such curves, setting-out a new agenda for the next twenty years of the IMAGES programme.

  7. Parasporins as new natural anticancer agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Okassov, Almas; Nersesyan, Armen; Kitada, Sakae; Ilin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In 1999 Mizuki and co-authors studied for the first time the parasporal inclusion proteins extracted from B. thuringiensis strains (a Gram-positive, soil-dwelling bacterium) for cytotoxic activity against human leukaemia T-cells. Later some other proteins with this unusual property to recognize human leukemic cells were isolated from this strain of bacteria and named parasporins. At present 6 types of parasporins are identified and characterized. This review summarizes the properties of these new potentially useful antitumor agents of natural origin. Various types of parasporins possess unique cytotoxic mechanisms against cancer cells. The cytotoxic activity for cancer cells makes parasporins possible candidates for anticancer agents in clinical oncology. Recently, genetic engineering was applied for the production of parasporins and the gene responsible for the production of the proteins was expressed in E. coli. However, there are virtually no data regarding the cytotoxic (antitumor) activity of parasporins in vivo. These relatively new cytotoxic proteins warrant further investigation, especially in rodents, for possible application in clinical oncology. PMID:25778289

  8. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    H.J. Herzog; E.E. Adams

    1999-08-23

    The ocean represents the largest potential sink for anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. In order to better understand this potential, Japan, Norway, and the United States signed a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration in December 1997; since that time, Canada and ABB (Switzerland) have joined the project. The objective of the project is to investigate the technical feasibility of, and improve understanding of the environmental impacts from, CO{sub 2} ocean sequestration in order to minimize the impacts associated with the eventual use of this technique to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The project will continue through March 31, 2002, with a field experiment to take place in the summer of 2000 off the Kona Coast of Hawaii. The implementing research organizations are the Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (Japan), the Norwegian Institute for Water Research (Norway), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (USA). The general contractor for the project will be the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research in Hawaii. A Technical Committee has been formed to supervise the technical aspects and execution of this project. The members of this committee are the co-authors of this paper. In this paper we discuss key issues involved with the design, ocean engineering, measurements, siting, and costs of this experiment.

  9. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%–100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  10. Listening to Consumer Perspectives to Inform Addictions and Housing-Related Practice and Research

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Marianne; Henderlong, Derek; Lowe, Robert A.; Amann, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The study, funded by the Northwest Health Foundation of Portland, Oregon and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), was conducted as part of the HEARTH collaborative (Housing, Employment and Recovery Together for Health). HEARTH, established in 2010, is a community-academic partnership involving partners from Portland State University (PSU), Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), and Central City Concern (CCC). Using the approaches of community-based participatory research (CBPR), these diverse stakeholders collaborated to co-develop research of direct relevance to the local community and to national academic and policy communities. This study employed qualitative methods and community-based participatory research principles to solicit personal experiences with housing, employment, and recovery programs. We recruited interview participants via CCC-operated housing programs, including Alcohol and Drug Free Community Housing (ADFC), family housing, transitional housing, and non-ADFC (low barrier) housing units. The manuscript presents interview themes based on the five broad categories of interview questions: housing, employment programs, recovery programs, definitions of recovery, and definitions of success. Co-authors describe recommendations for practice and research protocol based on our findings. Our results highlight the importance of involving consumers in the development, data collection, and analysis of research, and present the unique perspectives of those who experience homelessness, recovery, and the programs designed to assist them. PMID:25580474

  11. The current duration design for estimating the time to pregnancy distribution: a nonparametric Bayesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Gasbarra, Dario; Arjas, Elja; Vehtari, Aki; Slama, Rémy; Keiding, Niels

    2015-10-01

    This paper was inspired by the studies of Niels Keiding and co-authors on estimating the waiting time-to-pregnancy (TTP) distribution, and in particular on using the current duration design in that context. In this design, a cross-sectional sample of women is collected from those who are currently attempting to become pregnant, and then by recording from each the time she has been attempting. Our aim here is to study the identifiability and the estimation of the waiting time distribution on the basis of current duration data. The main difficulty in this stems from the fact that very short waiting times are only rarely selected into the sample of current durations, and this renders their estimation unstable. We introduce here a Bayesian method for this estimation problem, prove its asymptotic consistency, and compare the method to some variants of the non-parametric maximum likelihood estimators, which have been used previously in this context. The properties of the Bayesian estimation method are studied also empirically, using both simulated data and TTP data on current durations collected by Slama et al. (Hum Reprod 27(5):1489-1498, 2012). PMID:26067898

  12. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of lifestyle diet and exercise interventions for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Messier, S P; Callahan, L F; Golightly, Y M; Keefe, F J

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to develop a set of "best practices" for use as a primer for those interested in entering the clinical trials field for lifestyle diet and/or exercise interventions in osteoarthritis (OA), and as a set of recommendations for experienced clinical trials investigators. A subcommittee of the non-pharmacologic therapies committee of the OARSI Clinical Trials Working Group was selected by the Steering Committee to develop a set of recommended principles for non-pharmacologic diet/exercise OA randomized clinical trials. Topics were identified for inclusion by co-authors and reviewed by the subcommittee. Resources included authors' expert opinions, traditional search methods including MEDLINE (via PubMed), and previously published guidelines. Suggested steps and considerations for study methods (e.g., recruitment and enrollment of participants, study design, intervention and assessment methods) were recommended. The recommendations set forth in this paper provide a guide from which a research group can design a lifestyle diet/exercise randomized clinical trial in patients with OA. PMID:25952349

  13. Recent Advances In Structural Vibration And Failure Mode Control In Mainland China: Theory, Experiments And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hui; Ou Jinping

    2008-07-08

    A number of researchers have been focused on structural vibration control in the past three decades over the world and fruit achievements have been made. This paper introduces the recent advances in structural vibration control including passive, active and semiactive control in mainland China. Additionally, the co-author extends the structural vibration control to failure mode control. The research on the failure mode control is also involved in this paper. For passive control, this paper introduces full scale tests of buckling-restrained braces conducted to investigate the performance of the dampers and the second-editor of the Code of Seismic Design for Buildings. For active control, this paper introduces the HMD system for wind-induced vibration control of the Guangzhou TV tower. For semiactive control, the smart damping devices, algorithms for semi-active control, design methods and applications of semi-active control for structures are introduced in this paper. The failure mode control for bridges is also introduced.

  14. The spatial extent of star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    We employ a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealized major mergers (stellar mass ratio ˜2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at larger galactocentric radii. The radial dependence of the star formation enhancement is stronger in the less massive galaxy than in the primary, and is also more pronounced in mergers of more closely aligned disc spin orientations. Conversely, these trends are almost entirely independent of the encounter’s impact parameter and orbital eccentricity. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.Co-authors: Paul Torrey, Sara Ellison, David Patton, Asa Bluck, Gunjan Bansal & Lars Hernquist

  15. [Stanis?awa Adamowiczowa--first editor in-chief of Journal "Przeglad Epidemiologiczny"].

    PubMed

    Gromulska, Marta

    2010-01-01

    First issue of Epidemiological Review was published in 1920. First editor in chief was Stanis?awa Adamowiczowa, PhD (1888-1965), who had worked in National Central Epidemiological Institute since 1919, and later, for period of 45 years, interrupted by breaks resulting from political situation, worked in National Institute of Hygiene. In this jubilee article, we present scientific resume of S. Adamowiczowa which focuses on her achievements in infectious diseases epidemiology, and particularly in analysis and evaluation of current epidemiological data distribution in Poland and worldwide in the period. She was the pioneer in systemic organization of registries of new cases of diseases in the highly populated Polish cities; she initiated use of statistical methods in this field. As editor in chief of Epidemiological Review, she started publishing Epidemiological Chronicle, which is continuously added as a supplement to every second issue, each year. Name of S. Adamowiczowa is associated with Ludwik Rajchman--director of Hygiene Section in League of Nations, with Witold Chod?ko PhD--she led courses in National School of Hygiene in Warsaw, with prof. Marcin Kacprzak--as co-author and co-editor of books on hygiene and epidemiology. A brief list of scientific publications of S. Adamowiczowa is also presented. PMID:20499652

  16. Protein side-chain packing problem: a maximum edge-weight clique algorithmic approach.

    PubMed

    Dukka Bahadur, K C; Tomita, Etsuji; Suzuki, Jun'ichi; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2005-02-01

    "Protein Side-chain Packing" has an ever-increasing application in the field of bio-informatics, dating from the early methods of homology modeling to protein design and to the protein docking. However, this problem is computationally known to be NP-hard. In this regard, we have developed a novel approach to solve this problem using the notion of a maximum edge-weight clique. Our approach is based on efficient reduction of protein side-chain packing problem to a graph and then solving the reduced graph to find the maximum clique by applying an efficient clique finding algorithm developed by our co-authors. Since our approach is based on deterministic algorithms in contrast to the various existing algorithms based on heuristic approaches, our algorithm guarantees of finding an optimal solution. We have tested this approach to predict the side-chain conformations of a set of proteins and have compared the results with other existing methods. We have found that our results are favorably comparable or better than the results produced by the existing methods. As our test set contains a protein of 494 residues, we have obtained considerable improvement in terms of size of the proteins and in terms of the efficiency and the accuracy of prediction. PMID:15751115

  17. A new introductory quantum mechanics curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnle, Antje; Bozhinova, Inna; Browne, Dan; Everitt, Mark; Fomins, Aleksejs; Kok, Pieter; Kulaitis, Gytis; Prokopas, Martynas; Raine, Derek; Swinbank, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Physics New Quantum Curriculum consists of freely available online learning and teaching materials (quantumphysics.iop.org) for a first course in university quantum mechanics starting from two-level systems. This approach immediately immerses students in inherently quantum-mechanical aspects by focusing on experiments that have no classical explanation. It allows from the start a discussion of the interpretive aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum information theory. This paper gives an overview of the resources available from the IOP website. The core text includes around 80 articles which are co-authored by leading experts, arranged in themes, and can be used flexibly to provide a range of alternative approaches. Many of the articles include interactive simulations with accompanying activities and problem sets that can be explored by students to enhance their understanding. Much of the linear algebra needed for this approach is included in the resource. Solutions to activities are available to instructors. The resources can be used in a variety of ways, from being supplemental to existing courses to forming a complete programme.

  18. UK National Clinical Guidelines in Paediatric Dentistry: diagnosis, prevention and management of dental erosion.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, E; Milosevic, A

    2008-11-01

    This revised Clinical Guideline in Paediatric Dentistry replaces the previously published ninth guideline (Shaw L, O'Sullivan E. Int J Paediatr Dent 2000; 10: 356-365). The process of guideline production began in 1994, resulting in first publication in 1997. Each guideline has been circulated widely for consultation to all UK consultants in paediatric dentistry, council members of the British Society of Paediatric Dentistry (BSPD), and to people of related specialities recognized to have expertise in the subject. The final version of this guideline is produced from a combination of this input and thorough review of the published literature. In the case of the present guideline, an internationally recognized expert in the field was invited to be a co-author (AM). The intention is to encourage improvement in clinical practice and to stimulate research and clinical audit in areas where scientific evidence is inadequate. Evidence underlying recommendations is scored according to the SIGN classification and guidelines should be read in this context. Further details regarding the process of paediatric dentistry guideline production in the UK is described in the Int J Paediatr Dent 1997; 7: 267-268. PMID:18808545

  19. John Bolton and the discovery of discrete radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    John Bolton was born in Sheffield in 1922 and educated at Cambridge University. After wartime service in the Royal Navy, in 1946 he joined the CSIRO's Radiophysics Laboratory in Sydney and began work in the fledgling field of radio astronomy. Radio emission from our Galaxy had been discovered and studied during the 1930s by the Americans Karl Jansky and Grote Reber. It was thought that the emission emanated from interstellar space, but the mechanism was unknown. In June 1947, observing from Dover Heights near the entrance to Sydney Harbour, Bolton discovered that strong emission from the constellation of Cygnus came from a discrete point-like source. By the end of the year, with colleagues Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee ( a co-author of this paper) , Bolton had discovered a further five of these discrete sources. However, the positions measured for them were not accurate enough to allow them to be identified optically with any known celestial objects. In 1948 Bolton organised a three-month expedition to New Zealand where there were observing sites superior to the one at Dover Heights. The new observations gave more accurate positions and allowed Bolton to identify three of the sources: one was a supernova remnant in our Galaxy and two were unusual extragalactic objects. This paper will document this remarkable chapter in the development of twentieth century astronomy.

  20. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  1. In-Situ Resource Utilization for Space Exploration: Resource Processing, Mission-Enabling Technologies, and Lessons for Sustainability on Earth and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Palaszewski, B. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jaworske, D. A.; Colozza, A. J.; Kulis, M. J.; Heller, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    As humanity begins to reach out into the solar system, it has become apparent that supporting a human or robotic presence in transit and/or on station requires significant expendable resources including consumables (to support people), fuel, and convenient reliable power. Transporting all necessary expendables is inefficient, inconvenient, costly, and, in the final analysis, a complicating factor for mission planners and a significant source of potential failure modes. Over the past twenty-five years, beginning with the Space Exploration Initiative, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), academic collaborators, and industrial partners have analyzed, researched, and developed successful solutions for the challenges posed by surviving and even thriving in the resource limited environment(s) presented by near-Earth space and non-terrestrial surface operations. In this retrospective paper, we highlight the efforts of the co-authors in resource simulation and utilization, materials processing and consumable(s) production, power systems and analysis, fuel storage and handling, propulsion systems, and mission operations. As we move forward in our quest to explore space using a resource-optimized approach, it is worthwhile to consider lessons learned relative to efficient utilization of the (comparatively) abundant natural resources and improving the sustainability (and environment) for life on Earth. We reconsider Lunar (and briefly Martian) resource utilization for potential colonization, and discuss next steps moving away from Earth.

  2. Case studies of stakeholder decision making on radioactive waste management in the US and UK

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, W.F.; Whitton, J.

    2007-07-01

    A case study of stakeholder engagement for UK nuclear decommissioning and waste management and another for waste management decision making in the US are presented. The UK nuclear industry has begun to consult stakeholders more widely in recent years. Historically, methods of engagement within the industry have varied, however, recent discussions have generally been carried out with the explicit understanding that engagement with stakeholders will be 'dialogue based' and will 'inform' the final decision made by the decision maker. Engagement is currently being carried out at several levels within the industry; at the national level (via the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority's (NDA) National Stakeholder Group (NSG)); at a local site level (via Site Stakeholder Groups) and at a project level (usually via the Best Practicable Environmental Option process (BPEO)). Work by the co-author focuses on the preliminary findings of a questionnaire that has been issued to all members of the NDA NSG and associated sub-groups to assess stakeholder perceptions of the engagement process to date. Findings are reviewed. In the US case study, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Citizens Advisory Board (CAB), in Aiken, SC, considered upgrading the seismic design for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at SRS. This decision, proposed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB), provoked heated debate among DOE, SRSCAB and DNFSB representatives. Theory advances are reviewed. (authors)

  3. Transforming Introductory Physics for Life Scientists: Researching the consequences for students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpen, Chandra

    2011-10-01

    In response to policy documents calling for dramatic changes in pre-medical and biology education [1-3], the physics and biology education research groups at the University of Maryland are rethinking how to teach physics to life science majors. As an interdisciplinary team, we are drastically reconsidering the physics topics relevant for these courses. We are designing new in-class tasks to engage students in using physical principles to explain aspects of biological phenomena where the physical principles are of consequence to the biological systems. We will present examples of such tasks as well as preliminary data on how students engage in these tasks. Lastly, we will share some barriers encountered in pursuing meaningful interdisciplinary education.[4pt] Co-authors: Edward F. Redish and Julia Svaboda [4pt] [1] National Research Council, Bio2010: Transforming Undergraduate Education for Future Research Biologists (NAP, 2003).[0pt] [2] AAMC-HHMI committee, Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (AAMC, 2009).[0pt] [3] American Association for the Advancement of Science, Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: A Call to Action (AAAS, 2009).

  4. Gender and the Publication Output of Graduate Students: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pezzoni, Michele; Mairesse, Jacques; Stephan, Paula; Lane, Julia

    2016-01-01

    We examine gender differences among the six PhD student cohorts 2004–2009 at the California Institute of Technology using a new dataset that includes information on trainees and their advisors and enables us to construct detailed measures of teams at the advisor level. We focus on the relationship between graduate student publications and: (1) their gender; (2) the gender of the advisor, (3) the gender pairing between the advisor and the student and (4) the gender composition of the team. We find that female graduate students co-author on average 8.5% fewer papers than men; that students writing with female advisors publish 7.7% more. Of particular note is that gender pairing matters: male students working with female advisors publish 10.0% more than male students working with male advisors; women students working with male advisors publish 8.5% less. There is no difference between the publishing patterns of male students working with male advisors and female students working with female advisors. The results persist and are magnified when we focus on the quality of the published articles, as measured by average Impact Factor, instead of number of articles. We find no evidence that the number of publications relates to the gender composition of the team. Although the gender effects are reasonably modest, past research on processes of positive feedback and cumulative advantage suggest that the difference will grow, not shrink, over the careers of these recent cohorts. PMID:26760776

  5. Cospatial Longslit UV-Optical Spectra of Ten Galactic Planetary Nebulae with HST STIS: Description of observations, global emission-line measurements, and empirical CNO abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Kwitter, K. B.; Shaw, R. A.; Balick, B.; Henry, R. B. C.; Miller, T. R.; Corradi, R. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    This poster describes details of HST Cycle 19 (program GO 12600), which was awarded 32 orbits of observing time with STIS to obtain the first cospatial UV-optical spectra of 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The observational goal was to measure the UV emission lines of carbon and nitrogen with unprecedented S/N and wavelength and spatial resolution along the disk of each object over a wavelength range 1150-10270 Ang . The PNe were chosen such that each possessed a near-solar metallicity but the group together spanned a broad range in N/O. This poster concentrates on describing the observations, emission-line measurements integrated along the entire slit lengths, ionic abundances, and estimated total elemental abundances using empirical ionization correction factors and the ELSA code. Related posters by co-authors in this session concentrate on analyzing CNO abundances, progenitor masses and nebular properties of the best-observed targets using photoionization modeling of the global emission-line measurements [Henry et al.] or detailed analyses of spatial variations in electron temperatures, densities, and abundances along the sub arcsecond resolution slits [Miller et al. & Shaw et al.]. We gratefully acknowledge AURA/STScI for the GO 12600 program support, both observational and financial.

  6. Ending overly broad HIV criminalization: Canadian scientists and clinicians stand for justice

    PubMed Central

    Kazatchkine, Cécile; Bernard, Edwin; Eba, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, people living with HIV who do not disclose their HIV status prior to sexual acts risk prosecution for aggravated sexual assault even if they have sex with a condom or while having a low (or undetectable) viral load, they had no intent to transmit HIV, and no transmission occurred. In 2013, six distinguished Canadian HIV scientists and clinicians took ground-breaking action to advance justice by co-authoring the “Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of the criminal law.” This effort was born out of the belief that the application of criminal law to HIV non-disclosure was being driven by a poor appreciation of the science of HIV. More than 75 HIV scientists and clinicians Canada-wide have now endorsed the statement, agreeing that “[they] have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret current medical and scientific evidence regarding HIV.” As some 61 countries have adopted laws that specifically allow for HIV criminalization, and prosecutions for HIV non-disclosure, exposure and transmission have been reported in at least 49 countries, the authors hope that others around the world will take similar action. PMID:26194348

  7. The Effects of Aging on Researchers' Publication and Citation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Yves; Larivière, Vincent; Macaluso, Benoît; Robitaille, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The average age at which U.S. researchers receive their first grant from NIH has increased from 34.3 in 1970, to 41.7 in 2004. These data raise the crucial question of the effects of aging on the scientific productivity and impact of researchers. Drawing on a sizeable sample of 6,388 university professors in Quebec who have published at least one paper between 2000 and 2007, our results identify two turning points in the professors' careers. A first turning point is visible at age 40 years, where researchers start to rely on older literature and where their productivity increases at a slower pace—after having increased sharply since the beginning of their career. A second turning point can be seen around age 50, when researchers are the most productive whereas their average scientific impact is at its lowest. Our results also show that older professors publish fewer first-authored papers and move closer to the end of the list of co-authors. Although average scientific impact per paper decreases linearly until about age 50, the average number of papers in highly cited journals and among highly cited papers rises continuously until retirement. Our results show clearly that productivity and impact are not a simple and declining function of age and that we must take into account the collaborative aspects of scientific research. Science is a collective endeavor and, as our data shows, researchers of all ages play a significant role in its dynamic. PMID:19112502

  8. Attending to and neglecting people: bridging neuroscience, psychology and sociology.

    PubMed

    Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2016-05-01

    Human behaviour is context-dependent-based on predictions and influenced by the environment and other people. We live in a dynamic world where both the social stimuli and their context are constantly changing. Similar dynamic, natural stimuli should, in the future, be increasingly used to study social brain functions, with parallel development of appropriate signal-analysis methods. Understanding dynamic neural processes also requires accurate time-sensitive characterization of the behaviour. To go beyond the traditional stimulus-response approaches, brain activity should be recorded simultaneously from two interacting subjects to reveal why human social interaction is critically different from just reacting to each other. This theme issue onAttending to and neglecting peoplecontains original work and review papers on person perception and social interaction. The articles cover research from neuroscience, psychology, robotics, animal interaction research and microsociology. Some of the papers are co-authored by scientists who presented their own, independent views in the recent Attention and Performance XXVI conference but were brave enough to join forces with a colleague having a different background and views. In the future, information needs to converge across disciplines to provide us a more holistic view of human behaviour, its interactive nature, as well as the temporal dynamics of our social world. PMID:27069043

  9. Attending to and neglecting people: bridging neuroscience, psychology and sociology

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Riitta; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviour is context-dependent—based on predictions and influenced by the environment and other people. We live in a dynamic world where both the social stimuli and their context are constantly changing. Similar dynamic, natural stimuli should, in the future, be increasingly used to study social brain functions, with parallel development of appropriate signal-analysis methods. Understanding dynamic neural processes also requires accurate time-sensitive characterization of the behaviour. To go beyond the traditional stimulus–response approaches, brain activity should be recorded simultaneously from two interacting subjects to reveal why human social interaction is critically different from just reacting to each other. This theme issue on Attending to and neglecting people contains original work and review papers on person perception and social interaction. The articles cover research from neuroscience, psychology, robotics, animal interaction research and microsociology. Some of the papers are co-authored by scientists who presented their own, independent views in the recent Attention and Performance XXVI conference but were brave enough to join forces with a colleague having a different background and views. In the future, information needs to converge across disciplines to provide us a more holistic view of human behaviour, its interactive nature, as well as the temporal dynamics of our social world. PMID:27069043

  10. In-Situ Resource Utilization for Space Exploration: Resource Processing, Mission-Enabling Technologies, and Lessons for Sustainability on Earth and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Palaszewski, B. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jaworske, D. A.; Colozza, A. J.; Kulis, M. J.; Heller, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    As humanity begins to reach out into the solar system, it has become apparent that supporting a human or robotic presence in transit andor on station requires significant expendable resources including consumables (to support people), fuel, and convenient reliable power. Transporting all necessary expendables is inefficient, inconvenient, costly, and, in the final analysis, a complicating factor for mission planners and a significant source of potential failure modes. Over the past twenty-five years, beginning with the Space Exploration Initiative, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), academic collaborators, and industrial partners have analyzed, researched, and developed successful solutions for the challenges posed by surviving and even thriving in the resource limited environment(s) presented by near-Earth space and non-terrestrial surface operations. In this retrospective paper, we highlight the efforts of the co-authors in resource simulation and utilization, materials processing and consumable(s) production, power systems and analysis, fuel storage and handling, propulsion systems, and mission operations. As we move forward in our quest to explore space using a resource-optimized approach, it is worthwhile to consider lessons learned relative to efficient utilization of the (comparatively) abundant natural resources and improving the sustainability (and environment) for life on Earth. We reconsider Lunar (and briefly Martian) resource utilization for potential colonization, and discuss next steps moving away from Earth.

  11. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  12. From bastion to enactment: the 'non-dream' in the theatre of analysis.

    PubMed

    Cassorla, Roosevelt M Smeke

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, the author's objective is to discuss models that express what occurs in the analytical situation. He demonstrates how early models relating to painting and sculpture, to history and archaeology, develop into other models that refer to the relationship between two people. He studies in depth the Barangers' 'analytical field' with its obstructive bastions as a background to understanding what is currently valued as intersubjectivity in psychoanalysis. The container-contained model and the phenomenon of 'recruitment' are also discussed. The author uses clinical material to demonstrate how these models are linked to 'enactment', and a study of this concept provides evidence of the importance of the visual image, the dream and 'non-dream', the 'affective pictogram', as privileged aspects for the understanding and evolution of thought in the analytical process. Its importance leads to a proposal of a model that uses the theatre as a metaphor for the analytical process. In this model, analyst and patient both participate as characters in the scenes, and simultaneously as their co-authors. The analyst should also be responsible for the direction of scenes, as well as acting as critic. His task is to prevent obstructive conspiracies (the 'non-dream') and find new meanings for the scenes, thus allowing the development of new scenes and plots, and the enlarging of the mental universe. PMID:16096071

  13. Gender and the Publication Output of Graduate Students: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Michele; Mairesse, Jacques; Stephan, Paula; Lane, Julia

    2016-01-01

    We examine gender differences among the six PhD student cohorts 2004-2009 at the California Institute of Technology using a new dataset that includes information on trainees and their advisors and enables us to construct detailed measures of teams at the advisor level. We focus on the relationship between graduate student publications and: (1) their gender; (2) the gender of the advisor, (3) the gender pairing between the advisor and the student and (4) the gender composition of the team. We find that female graduate students co-author on average 8.5% fewer papers than men; that students writing with female advisors publish 7.7% more. Of particular note is that gender pairing matters: male students working with female advisors publish 10.0% more than male students working with male advisors; women students working with male advisors publish 8.5% less. There is no difference between the publishing patterns of male students working with male advisors and female students working with female advisors. The results persist and are magnified when we focus on the quality of the published articles, as measured by average Impact Factor, instead of number of articles. We find no evidence that the number of publications relates to the gender composition of the team. Although the gender effects are reasonably modest, past research on processes of positive feedback and cumulative advantage suggest that the difference will grow, not shrink, over the careers of these recent cohorts. PMID:26760776

  14. Swedish Experiences In The Application Of Thermography For Establishing Priorities And Quality Control In Residential Dwelling Retrofits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, Bengt; Holmsten, Dag

    1981-01-01

    The oldest and largest building thermography consultant in Sweden, Riksbyggen, is also an innovative building developer and contractor. By using thermography not only on their own projects, but also offering a wide variety of thermographic services, Riksbyggen has probably acquired more experiences than any other single inspection unit in the world. As a response to the increasing need for a cost-efficient technique to make energy audits on existing buildings as well as to control the workmanship in retrofits made, Bengt Axen at Riksbyggen has developed a unique building inspection program that efficiently utilizes thermography without compromising the benefits of the technique. As an observer from the outside, the co-author, Dag Holmsten of AGA Corporation, has discussed improving inspection efficiency with Bengt Axen on several occasions and has met with the people invloved in the first test of the "Sundsvall model" in northern Sweden. He gives the institutional background to this new and very practical approach to energy auditing and shows the urgent need for such a technique with global applicability in order to avoid expensive misinvestments of energy conservation funds.

  15. Life history theory and breast cancer risk: methodological and theoretical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, Athena

    2016-01-01

    In a meta-analysis published by myself and co-authors, we report differences in the life history risk factors for estrogen receptor negative (ER−) and estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancers. Our meta-analysis did not find the association of ER− breast cancer risk with fast life history characteristics that Hidaka and Boddy suggest in their response to our article. There are a number of possible explanations for the differences between their conclusions and the conclusions we drew from our meta-analysis, including limitations of our meta-analysis and methodological challenges in measuring and categorizing estrogen receptor status. These challenges, along with the association of ER+ breast cancer with slow life history characteristics, may make it challenging to find a clear signal of ER− breast cancer with fast life history characteristics, even if that relationship does exist. The contradictory results regarding breast cancer risk and life history characteristics illustrate a more general challenge in evolutionary medicine: often different sub-theories in evolutionary biology make contradictory predictions about disease risk. In this case, life history models predict that breast cancer risk should increase with faster life history characteristics, while the evolutionary mismatch hypothesis predicts that breast cancer risk should increase with delayed reproduction. Whether life history tradeoffs contribute to ER− breast cancer is still an open question, but current models and several lines of evidence suggest that it is a possibility. PMID:26874356

  16. Narratives, choices, alienation, and identity: learning from an elementary science teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2009-09-01

    As we contemplate on teacher identity research, there is a need to place a teacher's narratives or story-lines at the center of that work. In this forum, in response to the insightful commentary from Stephen Ritchie and Maria Iñez Mafra Goulart and Eduardo Soares, I place a greater emphasis on understanding Daisy's narratives from an existing social identity framework. Narratives tell us intricate and complex actions that a teacher has taken both personally and professionally. Additionally, narratives help us see implicit nature of identity explicitly. Therefore, a greater focus has to be placed on interactions and utterances of a teacher to make sense of who they are and what they do as expressed by their own words (identity and action). Finally, I join with Ritchie and Goulart and Soares to advocate that identity research needs to include participants as co-researchers and co-authors as identities are very personal and complex to be fully understood by the outsiders (researchers).

  17. Healing in forgiveness: A discussion with Amanda Lindhout and Katherine Porterfield, PhD

    PubMed Central

    Porterfield, Katherine A.; Lindhout, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of extremists while traveling as a freelance journalist in Somalia. She and a colleague were held captive for more than 15 months, released only after their families paid a ransom. In this interview, Amanda discusses her experiences in captivity and her ongoing recovery from this experience with Katherine Porterfield, Ph.D. a clinical psychologist at the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture. Specifically, Amanda describes the childhood experiences that shaped her thirst for travel and knowledge, the conditions of her kidnapping, and her experiences after she was released from captivity. Amanda outlines the techniques that she employed to survive in the early aftermath of her capture, and how these coping strategies changed as her captivity lengthened. She reflects on her transition home, her recovery process, and her experiences with mental health professionals. Amanda's insights provide an example of resilience in the face of severe, extended trauma to researchers, clinicians, and survivors alike. The article ends with an discussion of the ways that Amanda's coping strategies and recovery process are consistent with existing resilience literature. Amanda's experiences as a hostage, her astonishing struggle for physical and mental survival, and her life after being freed are documented in her book, co-authored with Sara Corbett, A House in the Sky. PMID:25317259

  18. Estimating the cost effectiveness of atovaquone versus intravenous pentamidine in the treatment of mild-to-moderate Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Zarkin, G A; Bala, M V; Wood, L L; Bennett, C L; Simpson, K; Dohn, M N

    1996-06-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is the most common severe opportunistic infection, and one of the most costly, among people with AIDS. Over 50% of patients experience toxic effects of the major anti-PCP medications- cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and pentamidine. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a new oral drug therapy, atovaquone, as an alternative to pentamidine for the treatment of people with mild-to-moderate PCP who are intolerant of cotrimoxazole. We developed a decision tree model to estimate the costs and cost effectiveness of atovaquone therapy compared with intravenous pentamidine therapy for cotrimoxazole-intolerant patients with mild-to-moderate PCP. Clinical outcomes were based on data from a phase III trial comparing the 2 medications. Our economic outcomes were based on treatment algorithms derived from discharge data, published reports and the clinical judgement of the co-authors. We estimate the total expected cost of treating a patient for an episode of PCP with atovaquone to be $US3990 compared with $US6545 for pentamidine under our baseline scenario (1995 dollars). Our decision model also provides insight into the large cost-savings benefits of treating mild-to-moderate PCP on an outpatient basis. PMID:10160480

  19. Particle theory and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of the research supported by this contract is to further our understanding of the basic building blocks of matter as well as the role fundamental interactions play in cosmology and astrophysics. Astrophysical data, such as from high energy cosmic rays and large scale structure of the universe, are employed to constrain particle physics theories. Particle collisions at Tevatron and higher (SSC) energies are also under investigation. During the past year a systematic reanalysis of the correlation between solar activity and the solar neutrino flux was undertaken. The conclusion seems to be that the Homestake experimental data show a correlation at a significant level, supporting the hypothesis that the neutrino possesses a magnetic moment. A separate, but related, theoretical investigation of electromagnetic properties of elementary particles has led to the discovery of a class of models in which the neutrino is endowed with an appreciable magnetic moment while its remains small. Altogether members of the group have been co-authors of 28 papers during the grant year on topics ranging from fermion masses to the role of ultra-high energy hadronic interactions in cosmic ray physics.

  20. Sidney Blatt's Contributions to Personality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, John S

    2016-01-01

    Over a long, distinguished career, Sidney Blatt contributed to theory and research in personality development, personality assessment, and psychotherapy. Best known for his 2-configurations model of personality and author or co-author of more than 250 articles and 18 books and monographs, Blatt was also a master clinician, a psychoanalyst who was awarded the 1989 Bruno J. Klopfer Award by the Society for Personality Assessment (SPA) for his contributions to both self-report and performance-based assessment. He was also the president of SPA from 1984 to 1986. This special series contains papers by writers who participated in all aspects of Blatt's contributions to personality assessment, both self-report and performance-based. Topics covered include Blatt's 2-configurations model of personality, development, and psychopathology; boundary disturbance and psychosis in performance-based assessment; the interaction of gender and personality on narrative assessments; and the Object Relations Inventory and differentiation relatedness, especially as these relate to therapeutic outcome. PMID:26620319

  1. Unfolding our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolson, Iain

    1999-10-01

    The beauty of the stars, the planets, and other faraway objects of wonder is readily apparent, while the reason for their splendor is not. Now, there exists a source of expert advice that amateur astronomers and interested stargazers can actually understand: Unfolding Our Universe. Popular science writer and award winning author Iain Nicolson opens the world of astronomy to a wide audience. He takes readers into the heart of the Universe, clearly detailing the facts, concepts, methods, and current findings of astronomical science. This unique book strikes a perfect balance between the fundamentals of the subject and cutting-edge research. Step by step, the volume leads to a complete understanding of astronomy. Readers can access the material without referring to any mathematical principles or formulas. The well-designed text allows more ambitious readers to easily delve more deeply into key points and consult basic mathematics found within self-contained boxes. More than 100 full-color photographs beautifully and clearly illustrate all concepts. The wealth of color illustrations and very readable chapters make this book a delight for the casual reader to browse, while the clear and concise explanations will appeal to anyone with an interest in the science of astronomy. Iain Nicolson is the author or co-author of some 17 books, including The Universe (with Patrick Moore) and Heavenly Bodies. In 1995, he received the Eric Zucker Award from the Federation of Astronomical Societies (UK) for his work in popularizing the subject.

  2. Tools for Nonlinear Control Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    This is a brief statement of the research progress made on Grant NAG2-243 titled "Tools for Nonlinear Control Systems Design", which ran from 1983 till December 1996. The initial set of PIs on the grant were C. A. Desoer, E. L. Polak and myself (for 1983). From 1984 till 1991 Desoer and I were the Pls and finally I was the sole PI from 1991 till the end of 1996. The project has been an unusually longstanding and extremely fruitful partnership, with many technical exchanges, visits, workshops and new avenues of investigation begun on this grant. There were student visits, long term.visitors on the grant and many interesting joint projects. In this final report I will only give a cursory description of the technical work done on the grant, since there was a tradition of annual progress reports and a proposal for the succeeding year. These progress reports cum proposals are attached as Appendix A to this report. Appendix B consists of papers by me and my students as co-authors sorted chronologically. When there are multiple related versions of a paper, such as a conference version and journal version they are listed together. Appendix C consists of papers by Desoer and his students as well as 'solo' publications by other researchers supported on this grant similarly chronologically sorted.

  3. Revisiting Bangham's law of adsorption-induced deformation: changes of surface energy and surface stress.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-04-14

    When fluids are adsorbed on a solid surface they induce noticeable stresses, which cause the deformation of the solid. D. H. Bangham and co-authors performed a series of experimental measurements of adsorption-induced strains, and concluded that physisorption causes expansion, which is proportional to the lowering of the surface energy Δγ. This statement is referred to as the Bangham effect or Bangham's law. However, it is known that the quantity that controls the deformation is actually the change in surface stress Δf rather than surface energy Δγ, but this difference has not been considered in the context of adsorption-induced deformation of mesoporous materials. We use the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory to derive both values and show the difference between them. We find the condition when the difference between the two vanishes, and Bangham's law is applicable; it is likely that this condition is satisfied in most cases, and prediction of strain based on Δγ is a good approximation. We show that this is the case for adsorption of argon and water on Vycor glass. Finally, we show that the difference between Δγ and Δf can explain some of the experimental data that contradicts Bangham's law. PMID:27001041

  4. 2D Seismic Velocity Modelling in the Southeastern Romanian Carpathians and its Foreland (Vrancea Zone and Focsani Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, R.; Bocin, A.; Tryggvason, A.

    2003-12-01

    The DACIA-PLAN (Danube and Carpathian Integrated Action on Processes in the Lithosphere and Neotectonics) deep seismic reflection survey was performed in August-September 2001, with the objective of obtaining of new information on the deep structure of the external Carpathians nappes and the architecture of Tertiary/Quaternary basins developed within and adjacent to the seismically-active Vrancea Zone, including the rapidly subsiding Focsani Basin. The DACIA-PLAN profile is about 140 km long, having a roughly NW-SE direction, from near the southeast Transylvanian Basin, across the mountainous southeastern Carpathians and their foreland to near the Danube Dalta. A high resolution 2D velocity model of the upper crust along the seismic profile has been determined from a first-arrival tomographic inversion of the DACIA-PLAN data. The shallowing of Palaeozoic-Mesozoic basement, and related structural heterogeneity within it, beneath the eastern flank of the Focsani Basin is clearly seen. Velocity heterogeneity within the Carpathian nappe belt is also evident and is indicative of internal structural complexity, including the presence of salt bodies and basement involvement in thrusting, thus favouring some current geological models over others. The presence of basement involvement implies the compressional reactivation of pre-existing basement normal faults. Members of the DACIA-PLAN/TomoSeis Working Group (see poster) should be considered as co-authors of this presentation.

  5. Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  6. Calculating Relative Ionization Probabilities of Plutonium for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Support Nuclear Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensegrav, Craig; Smith, Craig; Isselhardt, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on the ionization potential of isotopes of uranium, and the present effort has expanded and extended the previous work by identifying and integrating new data for plutonium isotopes. In addition to extending the effort to this important new element, we have implemented more accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of the laser beams to improve the accuracy of model predictions compared with experiment results as well as an ability to readily incorporate new experimental data as they become available. The model is used to estimate ionization cross sections and to compare relative excitation on two isotopes as a function of wavelength. This allows the study of sensitivity of these measurements to fluctuations in laser wavelength, irradiance, and bandwidth. We also report on initial efforts to include predictions of americium ionization probabilities into our modeling package. I would like to thank my co-authors, Gamani Karunasiri and Fabio Alves. My success is a product of their support and guidance.

  7. Despotism, democracy, and the evolutionary dynamics of leadership and followership.

    PubMed

    Van Vugt, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Responds to comments made by George B. Graen and Stephen J. Guastello on the current author's article Leadership, followership, and evolution: Some lessons from the past by Van Vugt, Hogan, and Kaiser. In the original article my co-authors and I proposed a new way of thinking about leadership, informed by evolutionary (neo-Darwinian) theory. In the first commentary, Graen noted that we ignored a number of recently developed psychological theories of leadership that take into account the leader-follower relationship, most notably LMX theory. LMX theory asserts that leadership effectiveness and team performance are affected by the quality of working relationships between superior and subordinates. Because the original article primarily dealt with questions about the origins of leadership--the phylogenetic and evolutionary causes--we had to be concise in our review of proximate psychological theories of leadership. In the second commentary, Guastello concurred with the importance of an evolutionary game analysis for studying leadership but disagreed with certain details of our analysis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:19209974

  8. "One Health" or Three? Publication Silos Among the One Health Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Manlove, Kezia R; Walker, Josephine G; Craft, Meggan E; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Joseph, Maxwell B; Miller, Ryan S; Nol, Pauline; Patyk, Kelly A; O'Brien, Daniel; Walsh, Daniel P; Cross, Paul C

    2016-04-01

    The One Health initiative is a global effort fostering interdisciplinary collaborations to address challenges in human, animal, and environmental health. While One Health has received considerable press, its benefits remain unclear because its effects have not been quantitatively described. We systematically surveyed the published literature and used social network analysis to measure interdisciplinarity in One Health studies constructing dynamic pathogen transmission models. The number of publications fulfilling our search criteria increased by 14.6% per year, which is faster than growth rates for life sciences as a whole and for most biology subdisciplines. Surveyed publications clustered into three communities: one used by ecologists, one used by veterinarians, and a third diverse-authorship community used by population biologists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, and experts in human health. Overlap between these communities increased through time in terms of author number, diversity of co-author affiliations, and diversity of citations. However, communities continue to differ in the systems studied, questions asked, and methods employed. While the infectious disease research community has made significant progress toward integrating its participating disciplines, some segregation-especially along the veterinary/ecological research interface-remains. PMID:27100532

  9. Induced respiratory system modeling by high frequency chest compression using lumped system identification method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; O'Clock, George; Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) treatment systems are used to promote mucus transport and mitigate pulmonary system clearance problems to remove sputum from the airways in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and at risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Every HFCC system consists of a pump generator, one or two hoses connected to a vest, to deliver the pulsation. There are three different waveforms in use; symmetric sine, the asymmetric sine and the trapezoid waveforms. There have been few studies that compared the efficacy of a sine waveform with the HFCC pulsations. In this study we present a model of the respiratory system for a young normal subject who is one of co-authors. The input signal is the pressure applied by the vest to chest, at a frequency of 6Hz. Using the system model simulation, the effectiveness of different source waveforms is evaluated and compared by observing the waveform response associated with air flow at the mouth. Also the study demonstrated that the ideal rectangle wave produced the maximum peak air flow, and followed by the trapezoid, triangle and sine waveform. The study suggests that a pulmonary system evaluation or modeling effort for CF patient might be useful as a method to optimize frequency and waveform structure choices for HFCC therapeutic intervention. PMID:19965047

  10. From Collaboration to Publication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Jerry; Marshall, Jill

    2010-09-01

    As co-authors of a recent publication in Physical Review Special Topics- Physics Education Research, we have received inquiries about the publication process.2 We will describe the process of creating an article based on team work, in our case the work of the Texas Physics Assessment Team. Many physics teachers have opportunities to participate in collaborations for organizations like the AAPT and state education agencies. We may think of this work as service or professional development rather than research, but it can provide valuable information to the community as a whole and merits publication when presented in an appropriate format. Collaboration can provide a particularly important avenue toward publication for those of us at institutions dedicated primarily to teaching rather than research. Many data-gathering efforts require the collaboration of individuals and institutions at all degree levels. Community colleges have more diverse student populations than large research institutions, and may be able to provide different perspectives on common problems in teaching and learning physics. We will present suggestions for future team work publications, including prospective publications reporting the work of AAPT area committees.

  11. Thirteen years of pair production

    SciTech Connect

    Strayer, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    This talk surveys a thirteen-year collaboration with Chris Bottcher on various aspects of strong field electrodynamics. Most of the work centers on the atomic physics associated with the peripheral collisions of ultrarelativistic heavy atoms. The earliest, beginning in about 1979, dealt with the spontaneous emission of positrons from nuclear quasimolecules and touched briefly on the formation of axions as a possible explanation of the anomalous peaks in the spectrum. This work stimulated the extensive studies of particle production from coherent fields that laid the foundations for investigations of nuclear form factors, structure functions, and production mechanisms for the Higgs and other exotic particles. Chris conjectured that the strong fields that are present in these collisions would give rise to nonperturbative effects. Thus, during this time, Chris also worked to develop basis-spline collocation methods for solving dynamical relativistic fermions in super strong fields. This was perhaps one of the best of times for Chris; on these problems alone, he co-authored fifty articles with more than twenty different collaborators.

  12. Imagining Reproduction in Science and History

    PubMed Central

    Stephanson, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has much to offer in guiding future research, pedagogy, and social policy. The challenges to communication include differences in methodology, professional protocols, specialization, and the increasing speed with which reproductive technology advances. The solutions require a new kind of student who can learn and adapt the approaches from both sides of the disciplinary divide to create new ways of understanding how our current and future concepts of reproduction may be informed by the past. This co-authored introduction reviews the range of interests represented in the essays and represents first steps of a dialogue between a humanist and a reproductive biologist who chart some of the possibilities on what the future of the subject might hold. PMID:19937463

  13. Single-molecule analysis of the full transcription cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strick, Terence

    2005-03-01

    By monitoring the extension of a mechanically stretched, supercoiled DNA molecule containing a single bacterial promoter, we have been able to directly observe in real time the change in DNA extension associated with topological unwinding of ˜1 helical turn of promoter DNA by RNAP during transcription initiation. We find that this stage of transcription initiation is extremely sensitive to the torque acting on the supercoiled DNA. Upon addition of limited sets of nucleotides, changes in the polymerase/promoter interaction which are related to the process of abortive initiation can be studied in detail. Upon addition of the full set of nucleotides, the subsequent stages of transcription -- promoter escape, productive elongation and transcription termination -- can also be observed in real-time. The changes in DNA topology which occur at each of these stages have been determined, and these results provide for the first global view of the entire transcription cycle at the resolution of single molecules. Co-authors: Richard H. Ebright, Chen-Yu Liu and Andrey Revyakin, HHMI & Waksman Institute, Rutgers University.

  14. Analysis of Data from the Energetic Gamma-ray Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffen, Donald A.

    1996-08-01

    The work under the Grant has involved participation with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) Team in the analysis of data obtained during instrument operations and the preparation of scientific papers and proposals for future observations. The Principal Investigator (PI) has been a co-author on a total of 90 papers published in refereed professional journals since the beginning of 1991, plus many other non-refereed publications, and contributed and invited papers at professional meetings and IAU telegrams. On seven of these papers he was the lead author. The EGRET team continues to submit IAU Astronomical telegrams and present many papers at scientific meetings. The effort by the PI has involved working remotely by internet connection on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computers where the EGRET data are archived. Students have monitored instrument performance, performed Viewing Period Analyses and analyzed data remotely. The PI has completed the detailed analysis of over 20 viewing periods to search for point sources and this work has been used in developing the first and second EGRET catalog of sources, published in Supplements to the Astrophysical Journal.

  15. Fusion Talk: A Remote Participation Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. H.; Reis, F.; Fernandes, H.; Neto, A.; Duarte, A.; Oliveira, F.; de Sá, W. P.

    2008-04-01

    Remote participation tools exist for video conferencing, document co-authoring and even for data sharing mainly through graphics. However, no single integrated solution existed to be used, whether in a daily informal basis among few researchers, or as a in more formal virtual gatherings with many participants wanting to share nuclear fusion data coming from heterogeneous databases. CFN is now developing FusionTalk, an open source project consisting of server and client software available to all nuclear fusion research institutes. It is a major complement to FireSignal[l] tools for local and remote experiments, which aims to fill the gap in what video-conferencing, data access and collaboration is concerned. Using FusionTalk web tools one can access and compare data already available on the web and which is often ignored or difficult to use. FusionTalk data search features allow researchers to easily access not only information on CFN's databases but also in other databases (interfaces are already being developed for MDS Plus, DAS Access and SDAS/FireSignal) in laboratories that run a FusionTalk server.

  16. “One Health” or three? Publication silos among the One Health disciplines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manlove, Kezia; Walker, Josephine G; Craft, Meggan E; Huyvaert, Kathryn P.; Joseph, Maxwell B.; Miller, Ryan S.; Nol, Pauline; Patyk, Kelly A.; O'Brian, Daniel; Walsh, Daniel P.; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The One Health initiative is a global effort fostering interdisciplinary collaborations to address challenges in human, animal, and environmental health. While One Health has received considerable press, its benefits remain unclear because its effects have not been quantitatively described. We systematically surveyed the published literature and used social network analysis to measure interdisciplinarity in One Health studies constructing dynamic pathogen transmission models. The number of publications fulfilling our search criteria increased by 14.6% per year, which is faster than growth rates for life sciences as a whole and for most biology subdisciplines. Surveyed publications clustered into three communities: one used by ecologists, one used by veterinarians, and a third diverse-authorship community used by population biologists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, and experts in human health. Overlap between these communities increased through time in terms of author number, diversity of co-author affiliations, and diversity of citations. However, communities continue to differ in the systems studied, questions asked, and methods employed. While the infectious disease research community has made significant progress toward integrating its participating disciplines, some segregation—especially along the veterinary/ecological research interface—remains.

  17. RESEARCH ETHICS CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA: EXPLORING A MODEL FOR INDIVIDUAL SUCCESS

    PubMed Central

    ALI, JOSEPH; HYDER, ADNAN A.; KASS, NANCY E.

    2012-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins-Fogarty African Bioethics Training Program (FABTP) has offered a fully-funded, one-year, non-degree training opportunity in research ethics to health professionals, ethics committee members, scholars, journalists and scientists from countries across sub-Saharan Africa. In the first 9 years of operation, 28 trainees from 13 African countries have trained with FABTP. Any capacity building investment requires periodic critical evaluation of the impact that training dollars produce. In this paper we describe and evaluate FABTP and the efforts of its trainees. Our data show that since 2001, the 28 former FABTP trainees have authored or co-authored 105 new bioethics-related publications; were awarded 33 bioethics-related grants; played key roles on 78 bioethics-related research studies; and participated in 198 bioethics workshops or conferences. Over the past nine years, trainees have collectively taught 48 separate courses related to bioethics and have given 170 presentations on various topics in the field. Many former trainees have pursued and completed doctoral degrees in bioethics; some have become editorial board members for bioethics journals. Female trainees were, on average, less experienced at matriculation and produced fewer post-training outputs than their male counterparts. More comprehensive studies are needed to determine the relationships between age, sex, previous experience and training program outputs. PMID:22708713

  18. “One Health” or Three? Publication Silos Among the One Health Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Meggan E.; Joseph, Maxwell B.; Miller, Ryan S.; Nol, Pauline; Patyk, Kelly A.; O’Brien, Daniel; Walsh, Daniel P.; Cross, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The One Health initiative is a global effort fostering interdisciplinary collaborations to address challenges in human, animal, and environmental health. While One Health has received considerable press, its benefits remain unclear because its effects have not been quantitatively described. We systematically surveyed the published literature and used social network analysis to measure interdisciplinarity in One Health studies constructing dynamic pathogen transmission models. The number of publications fulfilling our search criteria increased by 14.6% per year, which is faster than growth rates for life sciences as a whole and for most biology subdisciplines. Surveyed publications clustered into three communities: one used by ecologists, one used by veterinarians, and a third diverse-authorship community used by population biologists, mathematicians, epidemiologists, and experts in human health. Overlap between these communities increased through time in terms of author number, diversity of co-author affiliations, and diversity of citations. However, communities continue to differ in the systems studied, questions asked, and methods employed. While the infectious disease research community has made significant progress toward integrating its participating disciplines, some segregation—especially along the veterinary/ecological research interface—remains. PMID:27100532

  19. The founding charter of the Genomic Observatories Network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The co-authors of this paper hereby state their intention to work together to launch the Genomic Observatories Network (GOs Network) for which this document will serve as its Founding Charter. We define a Genomic Observatory as an ecosystem and/or site subject to long-term scientific research, including (but not limited to) the sustained study of genomic biodiversity from single-celled microbes to multicellular organisms. An international group of 64 scientists first published the call for a global network of Genomic Observatories in January 2012. The vision for such a network was expanded in a subsequent paper and developed over a series of meetings in Bremen (Germany), Shenzhen (China), Moorea (French Polynesia), Oxford (UK), Pacific Grove (California, USA), Washington (DC, USA), and London (UK). While this community-building process continues, here we express our mutual intent to establish the GOs Network formally, and to describe our shared vision for its future. The views expressed here are ours alone as individual scientists, and do not necessarily represent those of the institutions with which we are affiliated. PMID:24606731

  20. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  1. What does quality healthcare look like to adolescents and young adults? Ask the experts!

    PubMed

    Edwards, Melinda; Lawson, Caron; Rahman, Safiyyah; Conley, Kerry; Phillips, Hannah; Uings, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    It is widely recognised that developmentally appropriate services for adolescents and young people improve both healthcare experience and health outcomes. However, there is limited evidence of using young people's expertise to evaluate services, or of young people participating in service developments or design to meet their healthcare needs. This report covers both the process and outcomes of a collaborative project with a group of young people (aged 17-25 years) who are 'experts by experience'. We used qualitative mixed methodology to derive themes from narrative accounts of these young people's healthcare experiences to develop an assessment framework that they identified as being relevant to evaluating services. Informing young people about other assessment measures currently in use (including the Department of Health's You're Welcome quality criteria) enabled the group to further develop their views and refine their proposed assessment framework. This paper is co-authored with young people, enabling them to directly voice their views about healthcare services. Reflections on this process and recommendations for working more collaboratively with young people to evaluate healthcare services are also given. PMID:27037384

  2. Yup’ik Culture and Context in Southwest Alaska: Community Member Perspectives of Tradition, Social Change, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ayunerak, Paula; Alstrom, Deborah; Moses, Charles; Charlie, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to key aspects of Yup’ik Inuit culture and context from both historical and contemporary community member perspectives. Its purpose is to provide a framework for understanding the development and implementation of a prevention initiative centered on youth in two communities in Southwest Alaska as part of collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Institutes of Health. This paper is written from the perspective of elders and local prevention workers from each of the two prevention communities. The co-authors discuss their culture and their community from their own perspectives, drawing from direct experience and from ancestral knowledge gained through learning and living the Yuuyaraq or the Yup’ik way of life. The authors of this paper identity key aspects of traditional Yup’ik culture that once contributed to the adaptability and survivability of their ancestors, particularly through times of hardship and social disruption. These key processes and practices represent dimensions of culture in a Yup’ik context that contribute to personal and collective growth, protection and wellbeing. Intervention development in Yup’ik communities requires bridging historical cultural frames with contemporary contexts and shifting focus from reviving cultural activities to repairing and revitalizing cultural systems that structure community. PMID:24771075

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED TECHNIQUES FOR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING OF CLOUDS AND RADIATION USING ARM DATA, FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Minnis, Patrick

    2013-06-28

    During the period, March 1997 – February 2006, the Principal Investigator and his research team co-authored 47 peer-reviewed papers and presented, at least, 138 papers at conferences, meetings, and workshops that were supported either in whole or in part by this agreement. We developed a state-of-the-art satellite cloud processing system that generates cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) surface sites and surrounding domains in near-real time and outputs the results on the world wide web in image and digital formats. When the products are quality controlled, they are sent to the ARM archive for further dissemination. These products and raw satellite images can be accessed at http://cloudsgate2.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/site/showdoc?docid=4&cmd=field-experiment-homepage&exp=ARM and are used by many in the ARM science community. The algorithms used in this system to generate cloud properties were validated and improved by the research conducted under this agreement. The team supported, at least, 11 ARM-related or supported field experiments by providing near-real time satellite imagery, cloud products, model results, and interactive analyses for mission planning, execution, and post-experiment scientific analyses. Comparisons of cloud properties derived from satellite, aircraft, and surface measurements were used to evaluate uncertainties in the cloud properties. Multiple-angle satellite retrievals were used to determine the influence of cloud structural and microphysical properties on the exiting radiation field.

  4. Vertically resolved aerosol properties by multi-wavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, M. R.; De Tomasi, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2014-02-01

    An approach based on the graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors (2007) is introduced to estimate the dependence on altitude of the aerosol fine mode radius (Rf) and of the fine mode contribution (η) to the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from three-wavelength lidar measurements. The graphical method of Gobbi and co-authors (2007) was applied to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) spectral extinction observations and relies on the combined analysis of the Ångstrom exponent (å) and its spectral curvature Δå. Lidar measurements at 355, 532 and 1064 nm were used in this study to retrieve the vertical profiles of å and Δå and to estimate the dependence on altitude of Rf and η(532 nm) from the å-Δå combined analysis. Lidar measurements were performed at the Department of Mathematics and Physics of the Universita' del Salento, in south-eastern Italy. Aerosol from continental Europe, the Atlantic, northern Africa, and the Mediterranean Sea are often advected over south-eastern Italy and as a consequence, mixed advection patterns leading to aerosol properties varying with altitude are dominant. The proposed approach was applied to ten measurement days to demonstrate its feasibility in different aerosol load conditions. The selected days were characterized by AOTs spanning the 0.26-0.67, 0.15-0.39, and 0.04-0.27 range at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively. Mean lidar ratios varied within the 31-83, 32-84, and 11-47 sr range at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively, for the high variability of the aerosol optical and microphysical properties. å values calculated from lidar extinction profiles at 355 and 1064 nm ranged between 0.1 and 2.5 with a mean value ± 1 standard deviation equal to 1.3 ± 0.7. Δå varied within the -0.1-1 range with mean value equal to 0.25 ± 0.43. Rf and η(532 nm) values spanning the 0.05-0.3 μm and the 0.3-0.99 range, respectively, were associated with the å-Δå data points. Rf and η values showed no dependence on the altitude. 60% of the data points were in the Δå-å space delimited by the η and Rf curves varying within 0.80-0.99 and 0.05-0.15 μm, respectively, for the dominance of fine-mode particles in driving the AOT over south-eastern Italy. Vertical profiles of the linear particle depolarization ratio retrieved from lidar measurements, aerosol products from AERONET sun photometer measurements collocated in space and time, analytical back trajectories, satellite true colour images, and dust concentrations from the BSC-DREAM (Barcelona Super Computing Center-Dust REgional Atmospheric Model) model were used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Powerful New Technique to Measure Asteroids' Sizes and Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A team of French and Italian astronomers have devised a new method for measuring the size and shape of asteroids that are too small or too far away for traditional techniques, increasing the number of asteroids that can be measured by a factor of several hundred. This method takes advantage of the unique capabilities of ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). ESO PR Photo 04a/09 Asteroid Barbara (artist's impression) "Knowledge of the sizes and shapes of asteroids is crucial to understanding how, in the early days of our Solar System, dust and pebbles collected together to form larger bodies and how collisions and re-accumulation have since modified them," says Marco Delbo from the Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, France, who led the study. Direct imaging with adaptive optics on the largest ground-based telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile (see ESO 21/05 and 18/07), and space telescopes, or radar measurements (ESO 11/07) are the currently favoured methods of asteroid measurement. However, direct imaging, even with adaptive optics, is generally limited to the one hundred largest asteroids of the main belt, while radar measurements are mostly constrained to observations of near-Earth asteroids that experience close encounters with our planet. Delbo and his colleagues have devised a new method that uses interferometry to resolve asteroids as small as about 15 km in diameter located in the main asteroid belt, 200 million kilometres away. This is equivalent to being able to measure the size of a tennis ball a distance of a thousand kilometres. This technique will not only increase the number of objects that can be measured dramatically, but, more importantly, bring small asteroids that are physically very different from the well studied larger ones into reach. The interferometric technique combines the light from two or more telescopes. Astronomers proved their method using ESO's VLTI, combining the light of two of the VLT's 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes. "This is equivalent to having vision as sharp as that of a telescope with a diameter equal to the separation between the two VLT Unit Telescopes used, in this case, 47 metres," says co-author Sebastiano Ligori, from INAF-Torino, Italy. The researchers applied their technique to the main belt asteroid (234) Barbara, which was earlier found, by co-author Alberto Cellino, to have rather unusual properties. Although it is so far away, the VLTI observations also revealed that this object has a peculiar shape. The best fit model is composed of two bodies each the size of a major city - with diameters of 37 and 21 km - separated by at least 24 km. "The two parts appear to overlap," says Delbo, "so the object could be shaped like a gigantic peanut or, it could be two separate bodies orbiting each other." If Barbara proves to be a double asteroid, this is even more significant: by combining the diameter measurements with the parameters of the orbits, astronomers can then compute the density of these objects. "Barbara is clearly a high priority target for further observations," concludes Ligori. Having proven the validity of their new and powerful technique, the team can now start a large observing campaign to study small asteroids.

  6. Can Sea-Ice extent from the 1960s, be determined from reprocessed Nimbus and other historic space based data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaher, D. W.; Wingo, D. R.; Meier, W.; Epps, A.

    2009-12-01

    A critical need in climate research is to obtain continuous high quality data records and images as far back in time as is practical. Nimbus I collected data from 8/28/1964- 9/22/1964. Nimbus II collected data from 5/15/1966-1/18/1969. Nimbus III collected data from 4/14/1969-1/22/1972. Data coverage was global with twice daily. Unfortunately it now appears the original recorded data was stored on two inch Ampex tape media which was erased along with 200,000 other tapes due to a media shortage in the 1970's. This original data contained all the timings and calibration data needed to geo-rectify the data. Fortunately NASA Goddard saved and rescued a later version of the data and this data, without the timings and calibration. This data is now available. An effort underway at the NASA Ames Research Center is the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP). This project has obtained the original first generation 2” Ampex analog instrumentation tapes of the approximately 1748 images taken of the Moon. In this data set two images of the Earth (August 23, 1966, and August 10, 1967) were taken with approximately 5-kilometer resolution. These 570-700 nanometer band images have astounding resolution when considering the 330,000-kilometer distance to the Earth. The LOIRP project has obtained the last surviving Ampex FR-900 tape drives. The Nimbus II and III images were also broadcast from the spacecraft and stored on the same instrumentation tape drives. An opportunity has arisen to obtain the first generation Nimbus II and III images if the duplicate tapes mentioned in the Nimbus literature can be found. An initial search was unsuccessful due the above mentioned tape reuse in the 70’s. However, further research indicates that some of the duplicate tapes may be found at other National Records Center repositories. In further research the co-authors have found other Nimbus II and III era images from the Apollo human spaceflight program. All of the Apollo earth orbiting (Apollo 7 and 9, October 19, 1968 and March 3-13 1969) as well as the Lunar Missions (Apollo 8, 10-12, 14-17) obtained high resolution, high quality visible light color and black and white images of the Earth. The co-authors are in the process of matching the timing between the Apollo images and the Nimbus images in order to provide quality data regarding the state of the Arctic and Antarctic ice pack during this era. The value of obtaining the original Nimbus images as well as the mixed Nimbus/Apollo imagery is to provide images and data to help move back in time the state of the Arctic and Antarctic ice pack to provide a longer term record of space based images of these regions of the Earth. Future efforts would also integrate these images with National Security spacecraft that also imaged these areas during that time period.

  7. Jack Dymond's Deep Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, R. E.; Delaney, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Most people do not know that Jack Dymond was a major influence on several aspects of current deep-sea research. Along with Margaret Leinen and Jack, we were part of the first Alvin dive program on the Endeavour hydrothermal field in 1984. Jack was working with Rick, on a sediment-trap study of the overall carbon fluxes in the vicinity of the Endeavour hydrothermal systems in an effort to address a question that Cindy Lee had posed about the overall carbon production from hydrothermal vents. At the time we were recognizing and naming many of the 20- to 40-meter-high sulfide structures in the Endeavour field (Hulk, Grotto, Dante, Dudley, Bastille), Jack commented that it was a shame that the world could not see these magnificent edifices or watch endlessly awesome black smokers. His feeling was that some vent sites should be converted to National Parks to preserve them from invasion by enthusiastic scientists, yet he clearly had the vision that the public should be given a sense of the grandeur involved locally, as well as the vastness of the 70,000-km ridge-crest system running through every ocean. Within a year we started talking about the RIDGE Program, and Jack was an early and enthusiastic participant in the design and development of RIDGE. Jack was among the first to encourage multi-disciplinary research at the hydrothermal vent sites. Recognizing that deep currents are important to vent processes, he urged physical oceanographers to work with the chemists, biologists, and geologists and was personally responsible for Rick becoming interested in studying vents. We, the co-authors of this abstract, became close friends as a result of having been introduced to each other by Jack. Several years ago, we co-authored the first paper ever written on the possible influence of hydrothermal activity on the circulation of the Europan Ocean, a paper that we here dedicate to the memory of Jack. Finally, it was in part because of Jack's conviction that the world should know more about submarine hydrothermal systems, albeit in a manner we could not then imagine, that eventually led to developing the concept of a cabled ocean observatory. Technology evolved to allow us to design a system that would deliver considerable power and nearly inexhaustible bandwidth to major portions of the ocean basins, enabling an interactive form of oceanography that will be developed within the ORION program and that is now becoming a reality in the form of the Canadian NEPTUNE program. Within five years, these cabled systems will reach into the newly established Canadian Marine Protected area on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge and will bring live-action high-definition video in stereo to anyone capable of logging onto the Internet. Jack Dymond was an inspiration to many communities, one of which was oceanography. We miss him tremendously.

  8. The Dwarf that Carries a World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-11-01

    HARPS Instrument Finds Neptune-Mass Exoplanet Around Small Star A team of French and Swiss astronomers [1] have discovered one of the lightest exoplanets ever found using the HARPS instrument [2] on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla (Chile). The new planet orbits a star belonging to the class of red dwarfs. As these stars are very common, this discovery proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems. "Our finding possibly means that planets are rather frequent around the smallest stars," says Xavier Delfosse, from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (France) and co-author of the paper relating the work. "It certainly tells us that red dwarfs are ideal targets for the search for exoplanets." The host star, Gl 581 [3], is located 20.5 light-years away in the Libra constellation (The Scales), and has a mass of only one third the mass of the Sun. Such red dwarfs are at least 50 times fainter than the Sun and are the most common stars in our Galaxy: among the 100 closest stars to the Sun, 80 belong to this class. Being so numerous in our vicinity, it is thus fundamental to know if such stars also harbour planets. Previous surveys were rather unsuccessful: observations of about 200 red dwarfs revealed only 2 with planets. "But previous surveys may have missed many planets due to their insufficient precision," says Stéphane Udry, from the Geneva Observatory and co-author of the work. "This is why we decided to make use of the ultra-precise, second generation, HARPS spectrograph. Our new result indicates this was the right strategy." ESO PR Photo 37/05 ESO PR Photo 37/05 Radial Velocity Curve of Gliese 581 (HARPS/3.6m) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 550 pix - 30k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1100 pix - 171k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 37/05 shows the radial velocities of the red dwarf Gl 581 as a function of the orbital phase. The amplitude of the detected variation is 13.2 m/s and the curve is consistent with a circular orbit. The orbital period is 5.366 days. The newly found planet is about 17 times the Earth's mass, or about the mass of Neptune. It is therefore one of the smallest ever found [4]. It is rather close to its host star and completes a full circle in only 5.4 days: the mean distance is about 6 million kilometres. By comparison, Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, is at a distance of 58 million kilometres and completes an orbit in 88 days. Being so close, this alien world must be very hot, about 150 degrees. The planet was revealed by the wobble it induces on the host star. With the HARPS very precise measurements, the astronomers found the star to move back and forth with a maximum velocity of 13 metres/second, or a little bit less than 50 km/h. The astronomers have published their results in a Letter to the Editor of Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. VI. A Neptune-mass planet around the nearby M dwarf Gl 518", by X. Bonfils et al., A&A 443, L15, 2005).

  9. Stellar family in crowded, violent neighbourhood proves to be surprisingly normal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, astronomers have obtained one of the sharpest views ever of the Arches Cluster -- an extraordinary dense cluster of young stars near the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. Despite the extreme conditions astronomers were surprised to find the same proportions of low- and high-mass young stars in the cluster as are found in more tranquil locations in our Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 21a/09 The Arches Cluster ESO PR Photo 21b/09 The Centre of the Milky Way ESO PR Photo 21c/09 Around the Arches Cluster ESO PR Video 21a/09 A voyage to the heart of the Milky Way The massive Arches Cluster is a rather peculiar star cluster. It is located 25 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer), and contains about a thousand young, massive stars, less than 2.5 million years old [1]. It is an ideal laboratory to study how massive stars are born in extreme conditions as it is close to the centre of our Milky Way, where it experiences huge opposing forces from the stars, gas and the supermassive black hole that reside there. The Arches Cluster is ten times heavier than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way and is enriched with chemical elements heavier than helium. Using the NACO adaptive optics instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope, located in Chile, astronomers scrutinised the cluster in detail. Thanks to adaptive optics, astronomers can remove most of the blurring effect of the atmosphere, and so the new NACO images of the Arches Cluster are even crisper than those obtained with telescopes in space. Observing the Arches Cluster is very challenging because of the huge quantities of absorbing dust between Earth and the Galactic Centre, which visible light cannot penetrate. This is why NACO was used to observe the region in near-infrared light. The new study confirms the Arches Cluster to be the densest cluster of massive young stars known. It is about three light-years across with more than a thousand stars packed into each cubic light-year -- an extreme density a million times greater than in the Sun's neighbourhood. Astronomers studying clusters of stars have found that higher mass stars are rarer than their less massive brethren, and their relative numbers are the same everywhere, following a universal law. For many years, the Arches Cluster seemed to be a striking exception. "With the extreme conditions in the Arches Cluster, one might indeed imagine that stars won't form in the same way as in our quiet solar neighbourhood," says Pablo Espinoza, the lead author of the paper reporting the new results. "However, our new observations showed that the masses of stars in this cluster actually do follow the same universal law". In this image the astronomers could also study the brightest stars in the cluster. "The most massive star we found has a mass of about 120 times that of the Sun," says co-author Fernando Selman. "We conclude from this that if stars more massive than 130 solar masses exist, they must live for less than 2.5 million years and end their lives without exploding as supernovae, as massive stars usually do." The total mass of the cluster seems to be about 30 000 times that of the Sun, much more than was previously thought. "That we can see so much more is due to the exquisite NACO images," says co-author Jorge Melnick. Note [1] The name "Arches" does not come from the constellation the cluster is located in (Sagittarius, i.e., the Archer), but because it is located next to arched filaments detected in radio maps of the centre of the Milky Way.

  10. The New Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, J. Kelly; Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Chaikin, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    As the definitive guide for the armchair astronomer, The New Solar System has established itself as the leading book on planetary science and solar system studies. Incorporating the latest knowledge of the solar system, a distinguished team of researchers, many of them Principal Investigators on NASA missions, explain the solar system with expert ease. The completely-revised text includes the most recent findings on asteroids, comets, the Sun, and our neighboring planets. The book examines the latest research and thinking about the solar system; looks at how the Sun and planets formed; and discusses our search for other planetary systems and the search for life in the solar system. In full-color and heavily-illustrated, the book contains more than 500 photographs, portrayals, and diagrams. An extensive set of tables with the latest characteristics of the planets, their moon and ring systems, comets, asteroids, meteorites, and interplanetary space missions complete the text. New to this edition are descriptions of collisions in the solar system, full scientific results from Galileo's mission to Jupiter and its moons, and the Mars Pathfinder mission. For the curious observer as well as the student of planetary science, this book will be an important library acquisition. J. Kelly Beatty is the senior editor of Sky & Telescope, where for more than twenty years he has reported the latest in planetary science. A renowned science writer, he was among the first journalists to gain access to the Soviet space program. Asteroid 2925 Beatty was named on the occasion of his marriage in 1983. Carolyn Collins Petersen is an award-winning science writer and co-author of Hubble Vision (Cambridge 1995). She has also written planetarium programs seen at hundreds of facilities around the world. Andrew L. Chaikin is a Boston-based science writer. He served as a research geologist at the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Earth and Planetary Studies. He is a contributing editor to Popular Science and writes frequently for other publications.

  11. Visually impaired researchers get their hands on quantum chemistry: application to a computational study on the isomerization of a sterol.

    PubMed

    Lounnas, Valre; Wedler, Henry B; Newman, Timothy; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Harrison, Jason G; Nepomuceno, Gabriella; Pemberton, Ryan; Tantillo, Dean J; Vriend, Gert

    2014-11-01

    In molecular sciences, articles tend to revolve around 2D representations of 3D molecules, and sighted scientists often resort to 3D virtual reality software to study these molecules in detail. Blind and visually impaired (BVI) molecular scientists have access to a series of audio devices that can help them read the text in articles and work with computers. Reading articles published in this journal, though, is nearly impossible for them because they need to generate mental 3D images of molecules, but the article-reading software cannot do that for them. We have previously designed AsteriX, a web server that fully automatically decomposes articles, detects 2D plots of low molecular weight molecules, removes meta data and annotations from these plots, and converts them into 3D atomic coordinates. AsteriX-BVI goes one step further and converts the 3D representation into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations. These Braille-annotated physical 3D models allow BVI scientists to generate a complete mental model of the molecule. AsteriX-BVI uses Molden to convert the meta data of quantum chemistry experiments into BVI friendly formats so that the entire line of scientific information that sighted people take for granted-from published articles, via printed results of computational chemistry experiments, to 3D models-is now available to BVI scientists too. The possibilities offered by AsteriX-BVI are illustrated by a project on the isomerization of a sterol, executed by the blind co-author of this article (HBW). PMID:25091066

  12. Magma generation and differentiation in the terrestrial planets - a review of the contributions of Michael J. O'Hara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, M.

    2003-04-01

    During the course of the 20th century Earth Scientists argued, seemingly incessantly, about the processes of magma generation and differentiation within the Earth, Moon and other planetary bodies. Whilst N.L. Bowen's (1928) classic publication "The evolution of the Igneous Rocks " undoubtedly represents a benchmark in our understanding, it was not until the mid 1960s that the complexity of these processes was appreciated fully. The fact that we are still debating many of the key issues, forty years later, reflects the scale of the problem; each new step in our understanding seems to generate more questions! 2003 marks the 70th birthday of Michael J. O'Hara, and the 35th anniversary of the publication of two of his classic papers, which influenced the thinking of a generation of petrologists: (1) "The bearing of phase equilibria studies in synthetic and natural systems on the origin of basic and ultrabasic rocks" [Earth Sci. Rev., 4, 69-133; 1968]; (2) "Are ocean floor basalts primary magmas?" [Nature, 220, 683-686; 1968]. Since 1960, Mike has been the first, sole or joint co-author on over 120 publications, directly or indirectly related to magma generation and differentiation. His contributions have encompassed a diverse range of topics including: high P-T experimental petrology, the CMAS projection, the origin and evolution of basic and ultrabasic magmas, upper mantle petrology and dynamics, geothermometry-geobarometry of mantle rocks, RTF magma chambers and the mechanisms of dyke intrusion. Mike played a leading role in the Lunar Science Programme in the early 1970s and is still "stirring the lunar pot" [3]. (3) "Flood Basalts, Basalt Floods or Topless Bushvelds? Lunar Petrogenesis Revisited" [J.Petrology 41, 1545-1651; 2000].

  13. FreshAiR and Field Studies—Augmenting Geological Reality with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Crompton, H.; Dunleavy, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, mobile devices have fomented a revolution in geological mapping. Present Clinton set the stage for this revolution in the year 2000 when he ordered a cessation to Selective Availability, making reliable GPS available for civilian use. Geologists began using personal digital assistants and ruggedized tablet PCs for geolocation and data recording and the pace of change accelerated with the development of mobile apps such as Google Maps, digital notebooks, and digital compass-clinometers. Despite these changes in map-making technologies, most students continue to learn geology in the field the old-fashioned way, by following a field trip leader as a group and trying to hear and understand lecturettes at the outcrop. In this presentation, we demonstrate the potential of a new Augment Reality (AR) mobile app called "FreshAiR" to change fundamentally the way content-knowledge and learning objectives are delivered to students in the field. FreshAiR, which was developed by co-author and ODU alumnus M.D., triggers content delivery to mobile devices based on proximity. Students holding their mobile devices to the horizon see trigger points superimposed on the field of view of the device's built-in camera. When they walk towards the trigger, information about the location pops up. This can include text, images, movies, and quiz questions (multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank). Students can use the app to reinforce the field trip leader's presentations or they can visit outcrops individuals at different times. This creates the possibility for asynchronous field class, a concept that has profound implications for distance education in the geosciences.

  14. Current panorama of temporomandibular disorders' field in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; LIMA, Fernanda Ferruzzi; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the recognition of the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain completed ten years. Given this scenario, it is extremely important to track the current situation of this field of knowledge in Brazil, specifically in the area of research and training. We hope to discuss the importance of the recognition of this specialty and the inclusion of these subjects in undergraduate programs in Dentistry. Objective The objective of this study is to perform a bibliometric survey of researches regarding Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain conducted in the country, determine the number of specialization courses in Orofacial Pain and the number of specialists in the field. Methods The bibliometric survey was conducted based on the Dissertations Portal of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher education Personnel (CAPES) and on PubMed. The panorama of the field of Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular disorders in Brazil was determined by searching on the website of the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Results We found 731 theses and dissertations with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain as the main subjects; 81 accredited/recognized Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction completed; 8 accredited/recognized Specialization Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction still in progress, and 1,064 registered specialists in Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction in the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Search in the PUBMED database yielded 576 articles published with the participation of Brazilian researchers as first authors and/or co-authors in the period from 2000 to 2013. From this amount, only 5 were published in Portuguese, while all the others were published in english. We can also notice that the number of published articles increases over time. Conclusion The number of researches related to temporomandibular disorders has increased over the last ten years, as well as the number of specialization courses and the number of specialists, which represents a major breakthrough for this field of knowledge. PMID:25025553

  15. The practical zealot. Interview by Joe Flower.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, E

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, Ellen Gaucher took an unusual trip. As senior associate director of the University of Michigan's sprawling 11,000-employee Medical Center, she was invited to a conference about a movement that was rapidly growing in the word of business--total quality. The occasion was the organizational conference of the National Demonstration Project on Quality Improvement in Health Care, led by the Harvard Community Health Plan in Boston. Gaucher was skeptical at first. Total quality seemed a great way to make better cars, light bulbs, and aluminum siding, but would it work in a service industry? More to the point, would it work in an industry as complex, as critical, as pressured, as high-tech, as human, and as intellectual as healthcare? But by the second day, she says, "I was sold that this was what we had needed for a long time." She hurried back to Michigan like a missionary trekking into cannibal country. Today, not only is the University Medical Center deep in a total quality conversion experience, so is the University itself, through its president, James J. Duderstadt. He was exposed to the idea through Gaucher: In his ex-officio position as chairman of the Medical Center's board, he had experienced her vivid and enthusiastic educational efforts. Gaucher has related her intense experiences with TQ at conferences, in articles, in the 1990 book, Transforming Healthcare Organizations (winner of the Hamilton Award given by the American College of Healthcare Executives for the best book of the year) as well as the forthcoming Total Quality in Healthcare (both co-authored with Richard Coffey). (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10116129

  16. [Vaccines and autism: a myth to debunk?].

    PubMed

    Battistella, Melania; Carlino, Cristiana; Dugo, Valentina; Ponzo, Patrizia; Franco, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Thanks to vaccinations the incidence of many seriously debilitating or life threatening diseases and the resulting infant mortality or disability have been drastically reduced. In populations, who are no more aware of the risk of these infections, the attitude of suspicion and fear towards the vaccinations is expanding and in some cases reaches a worldwide media coverage as was the case for the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (MMR). In 1998, a British doctor, Andrew Wakefield, and co-authors, published in "Lancet" a study in which he suggested the existence of "a new variant of autism" associated with intestinal inflammation. He proposed the administration of the MMR vaccine as a possible. cause of the inflammatory process. The hypothesis suggested by Wakefield led to a drastic drop in vaccination coverage in the UK and to the failure to achieve adequate levels of immunization in many countries, with a consequent increase in the incidence of measles and its complications. Wakefield work stimulated a broad discussion in the scientific community and many studies conducted over the next few years contradicted the research results of the English physician. In 2004, journalist Brian Deer conducted an accurate investigation that revealed how the Wakefield research presented many not regular aspects and was performed with predominantly economic objectives. In 2010, Wakefield was expelled from the General Medical Council, while the "Lancet" retracted the paper. The scientific research conducted in recent years confirm the inconsistency of the relationship between MMR vaccine and autism. The possible association with other factors, such as autoimmune processes, hyperactivation of mast cells in the hypothalamus, use of paracetamol in genetically predisposed children are currently investigated. PMID:24316883

  17. Bibliography of NASA-related publications on wind turbine technology 1973-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1995-01-01

    A major program of research and development projects on wind turbines for generating electricity was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1973 to 1988. Most of these projects were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as a major element of its Federal Wind Energy Program. One other large-scale wind turbine project was sponsored by the Bureau of Reclamation of the Department of Interior (DOI). The peak years for wind energy work at Lewis were 1979-80, when almost 100 engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel were involved. From 1988 their conclusion in 1995, NASA wind energy activities have been directed toward the transfer of technology to commercial and academic organizations. Wind energy activities at NASA can be divided into two broad categories which are closely related and often overlapping: (1) Designing, building, and testing a series of 12 large-scale, experimental, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT's); and (2) conducting supporting research and technology (SR&T) projects. The purpose of this bibliography is to assist those active in the field of wind energy in locating the technical information they need on wind power planning, wind loads, turbine design and analysis, fabrication and installation, laboratory and field testing, and operations and maintenance. This bibliography contains approximately 620 citations of publications by over 520 authors and co-authors. Sources are: (1) NASA reports authored by government grantee, and contractor personnel, (2) papers presented by attendees at NASA-sponsored workshops and conferences, (3) papers presented by NASA personnel at outside workshops and conferences, and (4) outside publications related to research performed at NASA/ DOE wind turbine sites.

  18. Prediction of junior faculty success in biomedical research: comparison of metrics and effects of mentoring programs

    PubMed Central

    Houmanfar, Ramona; Candido, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Measuring and predicting the success of junior faculty is of considerable interest to faculty, academic institutions, funding agencies and faculty development and mentoring programs. Various metrics have been proposed to evaluate and predict research success and impact, such as the h-index, and modifications of this index, but they have not been evaluated and validated side-by-side in a rigorous empirical study. Our study provides a retrospective analysis of how well bibliographic metrics and formulas (numbers of total, first- and co-authored papers in the PubMed database, numbers of papers in high-impact journals) would have predicted the success of biomedical investigators (n = 40) affiliated with the University of Nevada, Reno, prior to, and after completion of significant mentoring and research support (through funded Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence, COBREs), or lack thereof (unfunded COBREs), in 2000–2014. The h-index and similar indices had little prognostic value. Publishing as mid- or even first author in only one high-impact journal was poorly correlated with future success. Remarkably, junior investigators with >6 first-author papers within 10 years were significantly (p < 0.0001) more likely (93%) to succeed than those with ≤6 first-author papers (4%), regardless of the journal’s impact factor. The benefit of COBRE-support increased the success rate of junior faculty approximately 3-fold, from 15% to 47%. Our work defines a previously neglected set of metrics that predicted the success of junior faculty with high fidelity—thus defining the pool of faculty that will benefit the most from faculty development programs such as COBREs. PMID:26421238

  19. Science of Global Climate Modeling: Confirmation from Discoveries on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    2012-10-01

    As early as 1993, analysis of obliquity changes on Mars revealed irregular cycles of high excursion, over 45°1. Further obliquity analyses indicated that insolation and climatic conditions vary with time, with the four most recent episodes of obliquity >45° occurring about 5.5, 8, 9, and 15 My.2 Various researchers applied global climate models, using Martian parameters and obliquity changes. The models (independent of Martian geomorphological observations) indicate exceptional climate conditions during the high-obliquity episodes at >45°3,4, with localized massive ice deposition effects east of Hellas and on the west slopes of Tharsis.5 At last year’s DPS my co-authors and I detailed evidence of unusual active glaciation in Greg crater, near the center of the predicted area of ice accumulation during high obliquity.6 We found that the timescale of glacial surface layer activity matches the general 5-15 My timescale of the last episodes of high obliquity and ice deposition. Radar results confirm ice deposits in debris aprons concentrated in the same area.7 Less direct evidence has also been found for glacial ice deposits in the west Tharsis region.8 Here I emphasize that if the models can be adjusted to Mars and then successfully indicate unusual, specific features that we see there, it is an argument for the robustness of climate modeling in general. In recent years we have see various public figures casting doubt on the validity of terrestrial global modeling. The successful match of Martian climate modeling with direct Martian geological and chronometric observations provides an interesting and teachable refutation of the attacks on climate science. References: 1. Science 259:1294-1297; 2. LPSC XXXV, Abs. 1600; 3. Nature 412:411-413; 4. Science 295:110-113; 5. Science 311:368-371; 6. EPSC-DPS Abs. 1394; 7. Science 322:1235-1238; 8. Nature 434:346-351.

  20. Efficiency in energy production and consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Ryan Mayer

    This dissertation deals with economic efficiency in the energy industry and consists of three parts. The first examines how joint experience between pairs of firms working together in oil and gas drilling improves productivity. Part two asks whether oil producers time their drilling optimally by taking real options effects into consideration. Finally, I investigate the efficiency with which energy is consumed, asking whether extending Daylight Saving Time (DST) reduces electricity use. The chapter "Learning by Drilling: Inter-Firm Learning and Relationship Persistence in the Texas Oilpatch" examines how oil production companies and the drilling rigs they hire improve drilling productivity by learning through joint experience. I find that the joint productivity of a lead firm and its drilling contractor is enhanced significantly as they accumulate experience working together. Moreover, this result is robust to other relationship specificities and standard firm-specific learning-by-doing effects. The second chapter, "Drill Now or Drill Later: The Effect of Expected Volatility on Investment," investigates the extent to which firms' drilling behavior accords with a key prescription of real options theory: irreversible investments such as drilling should be deferred when the expected volatility of the investments' payoffs increases. I combine detailed data on oil drilling with expectations of future oil price volatility that I derive from the NYMEX futures options market. Conditioning on expected price levels, I find that oil production companies significantly reduce the number of wells they drill when expected price volatility is high. I conclude with "Daylight Time and Energy: Evidence from an Australian Experiment," co-authored with Hendrik Wolff. This chapter assesses DST's impact on electricity demand using a quasi-experiment in which parts of Australia extended DST in 2000 to facilitate the Sydney Olympics. We show that the extension did not reduce overall electricity consumption, but did cause a substantial intra-day shift in demand consistent with activity patterns that are tied to the clock rather than sunrise and sunset.

  1. Surface modification and multiple exciton generation studies of lead(II) sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemke, Jennifer M.

    2011-12-01

    Solar energy is a green alternative to fossil fuels but solar technologies to date have been plagued by low conversion efficiencies and high input costs making solar power inaccessible to much of the developing world. Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) may provide a route to efficient, economical solar devices through a phenomenon called multiple exciton generation (MEG). Through MEG, semiconductor NPs use a high-energy input photon to create more than one exciton (electron-hole pair) per photon absorbed, thereby exhibiting large photoconversion efficiencies. While MEG has been studied in many NP systems, and we understand some of the factors that affect MEG, a rigorous analysis of the NP-ligand interface with respect to MEG is missing. This dissertation describes how the NP ligand shell directly affects MEG and subsequent charge carrier recombination. Chapter I describes the motivation for studying MEG with respect to NP surface chemistry. Chapter II provides an in-depth overview of the transient absorption experiment used to measure MEG in the NP samples. Chapter III highlights the effect of oleic acid and sodium 2, 3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate on MEG in PbS NPs. The differences in carrier recombination were accounted for by two differences between these ligands: the coordinating atom and/or the secondary structure of the ligand. Because of these hypotheses, experiments were designed to elucidate the origin of these effects by controlling the NP ligand shell. Chapter IV details a viable synthetic route to thiol and amine-capped PbS NPs using sodium 3-mercaptopropane sulfonate as an intermediate ligand. With the versatile ligand exchange described in Chapter IV, the MEG yield and carrier recombination was investigated for ligands with varying headgroups but the same secondary structure. The correlation of ligand donor atom to MEG is outlined in Chapter V. Finally, Chapter VI discusses the conclusions and future outlook of the research reported in this dissertation. This dissertation includes previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

  2. The Evolution and Extinction of the Dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastovsky, David E.; Weishampel, David B.

    2005-02-01

    Written for non-specialists, this detailed survey of dinosaur origins, diversity, and extinction is designed as a series of successive essays covering important and timely topics in dinosaur paleobiology, such as "warm-bloodedness," birds as living dinosaurs, the new, non-flying feathered dinosaurs, dinosaur functional morphology, and cladistic methods in systematics. Its explicitly phylogenetic approach to the group is that taken by dinosaur specialists. The book is not an edited compilation of the works of many individuals, but a unique, cohesive perspective on Dinosauria. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of new, specially commissioned illustrations by John Sibbick, world-famous illustrator of dinosaurs, the volume includes multi-page drawings as well as sketches and diagrams. First edition Hb (1996): 0-521-44496-9 David E. Fastovsky is Professor of Geosciences at the University of Rhode Island. Fastovsky, the author of numerous scientific publications dealing with Mesozoic vertebrate faunas and their ancient environments, is also scientific co-Editor of Geology. He has undertaken extensive fieldwork studying dinosaurs and their environments in Montana, North Dakota, Arizona, Mexico, and Mongolia. David B. Weishampel is a professor at the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution at Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. Weishampel is best known for discovering, researching, and naming several rare European dinosaur species. During the 1980s Weishampel gained fame for his work with American paleontologist Jack Horner and later named the famous plant-eating, egg-laying Orodromeus, Horner. Now, a decade after his pioneering studies with Horner, Weishampel is most widely known for his current work on the Romanian dinosaur fauna. He is the author and co-author of many titles, including The Dinosaur Papers, 1676-1906 (Norton, 2003); The Dinosauria, (University of California, 1990); and Dinosaurs of the East Coast, (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996).

  3. Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Systematic Evaluation of Research Capacity in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okorie, Patricia N.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Molyneux, David H.; Kelly-Hope, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nigeria carries the highest burden and diversity of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in sub-Saharan Africa and is preparing to scale up its efforts to control/eliminate these diseases. To achieve this it will require a range of internal technical support and expertise for mapping, monitoring and evaluating, operational research and documenting its success. In order to begin to evaluate this potential in Nigeria, this study collated and analysed information for lymphatic filariasis (LF), onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths (STH), which are currently being targeted with preventive chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA). Methodology/Principal Findings Information from 299 scientific articles published on the selected NTDs in 179 journals between January 2008 and September 2013 was extracted and systematically compiled into a geo-referenced database for analysis and mapping. The highest number of articles was from the southern geo-political zones of the country. The majority of articles focused on one specific disease, and schistosomiasis and STH were found to have the highest and most wide ranging research output. The main type of study was parasitological, and the least was biotechnological. Nigerian authors were mostly affiliated with universities, and there was a wide range of international co-authors from Africa and other regions, especially the USA and UK. The majority of articles were published in journals with no known impact factor. Conclusions/Significance The extensive database and series of maps on the research capacity within Nigeria produced in this study highlights the current potential that exists, and needs to be fully maximized for the control/elimination of NTDs in the country. This study provides an important model approach that can be applied to other low and middle income countries where NTDs are endemic, and NTD programmes require support from the expertise within their own country, as well as internationally, to help raise their profile and importance. PMID:25121582

  4. The CloudSat Education Network: Significant Collaborative Research Between Students and Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, M. A.; Vane, D.

    2009-12-01

    The CloudSat Education Network (CEN) is the primary education and public outreach component of the CloudSat mission. Approximately 116 schools in 16 countries around the world participate in the CEN, and are recruited from schools in the GLOBE program. Students and teachers in the CEN make atmospheric observations of temperature, precipitation, and crucially, of cloud type and cloud cover amount (including photographs of cloud observations), using a modified GLOBE Atmosphere protocol as a guide for observations. CEN observations are taken coincident with CloudSat overpasses, providing coincident spaceborne- and student surface observations. This puts students and teachers participating in the CEN at the forefront of scientific research as directly contributing partners in a collaborative research endeavor. CEN participants make extensive use of the CloudSat/CEN webpage, which is the primary data entry portal for the CEN. Data collected from CEN students is analyzed by CloudSat scientists for quality control purposes, as well as for use in CloudSat-related research. The webpage also provides students with CloudSat overpass dates and times, as well as CEN-specific updates, and articles about CEN projects distributed through a quarterly newsletter. Besides the newsletter, active CEN schools receive periodic visits from CloudSat scientists, providing an opportunity for students and teachers to interact directly with the scientific community. Results from completed student research include an investigation of the effect of different amounts of cloud cover on locally-grown mushroom crops in Thailand, while CloudSat-directed research using student data includes an analysis of the CloudSat cloud classification algorithm using student-collected data as a ground-truth dataset. The results of this latter study are in the process of publication with participating students and teachers listed as co-authors.

  5. Comment on: `The quest for a consistent signal in ground and GRACE gravity time-series', by Michel Van Camp, Olivier de Viron, Laurent Metivier, Bruno Meurers and Olivier Francis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D. J.; Boy, J.-P.; Hinderer, J.; Jahr, T.; Weise, A.; Wziontek, H.; Abe, M.; Förste, C.

    2014-12-01

    The paper in question by Van Camp and co-authors [MVC] challenges previous work showing that ground gravity data arising from hydrology can provide a consistent signal for the comparison with satellite gravity data. The data sets used are similar to those used previously, that is, the gravity field as measured by the GRACE satellites versus ground-based data from superconducting gravimeters (SGs) over the same continental area, in this case Central Europe. One of the main impediments in this paper is the presentation that is frequently confusing and misleading as to what the data analysis really shows, for example, the irregular treatment of annual components that are first subtracted then reappear in the analysis. More importantly, we disagree on specific points. Two calculations are included in our comment to illustrate where we believe that the processing in [MVC] paper is deficient. The first deals with their erroneous treatment of the global hydrology using a truncated spherical harmonic approach which explains almost a factor 2 error in their computation of the loading. The second shows the effect of making the wrong assumption in the GRACE/hydrology/surface gravity comparison by inverting the whole of the hydrology loading for underground stations. We also challenge their claims that empirical orthogonal function techniques cannot be done in the presence of periodic components, and that SG data cannot be corrected for comparisons with GRACE data. The main conclusion of their paper, that there is little coherence between ground gravity stations and this invalidates GRACE comparisons, is therefore questionable. There is nothing in [MVC] that contradicts any of the previous papers that have shown clearly a strong relation between seasonal signals obtained from both ground gravity and GRACE satellite data.

  6. 'There's the record, closed and final': Rough for Theatre II as Psychiatric Encounter.

    PubMed

    Heron, Jonathan; Broome, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    A co-authored collaboration between a theatre practitioner and a clinical psychiatrist, this paper will examine Rough for Theatre II (RFTII) and Beckett's demonstration of the way records are used to understand the human subject. Using Beckett's play to explore interdisciplinary issues of embodiment and diagnosis, the authors will present a dialogue that makes use of the 'best sources' in precisely the same manner as the play's protagonists. One of those sources will be Beckett himself, as Heron will locate the play in its theatrical context through reflections upon his own practice (with Fail Better Productions, UK) as well as recent studies such as Beckett, Technology and the Body (Maude 2009) and Performing Embodiment in Samuel Beckett's Drama (McMullan 2010); another source will be the philosopher Wilhelm Windleband, whose 1901 History of Philosophy was read and noted upon by Beckett in the 1930s, as Broome will introduce a philosophical and psychiatric context to the exchange. Windelband is now a neglected figure in philosophy; but as one of the key figures of Neo-Kantianism in the late 19(th) century, his work was an important impetus to that of Rickert, Weber and Heidegger. Specifically, Windelband gives us the distinction between idiographic and nomothetic understanding of individuals, an approach that is of relevance to the psychiatric encounter. This academic dialogue will consider tensions between subjectivity and objectivity in clinical and performance practice, while examining Beckett's analysis of the use of case notes and relating them back to Windelband's ideas on the understanding of others. The dialogue took place in 2011 at the University of Warwick, and has since been edited by the authors. PMID:26892329

  7. Voluntary control of a phantom limb.

    PubMed

    Walsh, E; Long, C; Haggard, P

    2015-08-01

    Voluntary actions are often accompanied by a conscious experience of intention. The content of this experience, and its neural basis, remain controversial. On one view, the mind just retrospectively ascribes intentions to explain the occurrence of actions that lack obvious triggering stimuli. Here, we use EEG frequency analysis of sensorimotor rhythms to investigate brain activity when a participant (CL, co-author of this paper) with congenital absence of the left hand and arm, prepared and made a voluntary action with the right or the phantom "left hand". CL reported the moment she experienced the intention to press a key. This timepoint was then used as a marker for aligning and averaging EEG. In a second condition, CL was asked to prepare the action on all trials, but then, on some trials, to cancel the action at the last moment. For the right hand, we observed a typical reduction in beta-band spectral power prior to movement, followed by beta rebound after movement. When CL prepared but then cancelled a movement, we found a characteristic EEG pattern reported previously, namely a left frontal increase in spectral power close to the time of the perceived intention to move. Interestingly, the same neural signatures of positive and inhibitory volition were also present when CL prepared and inhibited movements with her phantom left hand. These EEG signals were all similar to those reported previously in a group of 14 healthy volunteers. Our results suggest that conscious intention may depend on preparatory brain activity, and not on making, or ever having made, the corresponding physical body movement. Accounts that reduce conscious volition to mere retrospective confabulation cannot easily explain our participant's neurophenomenology of action and inhibition. In contrast, the results are consistent with the view that specific neural events prior to movement may generate conscious experiences of positive and negative volition. PMID:26116910

  8. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher's career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging transparent communication amongst researchers. PMID:26083381

  9. Co-authorship and bibliographic coupling network effects on citations.

    PubMed

    Biscaro, Claudio; Giupponi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of the co-authorship and bibliographic coupling networks on the citations received by scientific articles. It expands prior research that limited its focus on the position of co-authors and incorporates the effects of the use of knowledge sources within articles: references. By creating a network on the basis of shared references, we propose a way to understand whether an article bridges among extant strands of literature and infer the size of its research community and its embeddedness. Thus, we map onto the article--our unit of analysis--the metrics of authors' position in the co-authorship network and of the use of knowledge on which the scientific article is grounded. Specifically, we adopt centrality measures--degree, betweenneess, and closeness centrality--in the co-authorship network and degree, betweenness centrality and clustering coefficient in the bibliographic coupling and show their influence on the citations received in first two years after the year of publication. Findings show that authors' degree positively impacts citations. Also closeness centrality has a positive effect manifested only when the giant component is relevant. Author's betweenness centrality has instead a negative effect that persists until the giant component--largest component of the network in which all nodes can be linked by a path--is relevant. Moreover, articles that draw on fragmented strands of literature tend to be cited more, whereas the size of the scientific research community and the embeddedness of the article in a cohesive cluster of literature have no effect. PMID:24911416

  10. A Dedicated Space Observatory For Time-domain Solar System Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Ádámkovics, M.; Benecchi, S.; Bjoraker, G.; Clarke, J. T.; de Pater, I.; Hendrix, A. R.; Marchis, F.; McGrath, M.; Noll, K.; Rages, K. A.; Retherford, K.; Smith, E. H.; Strange, N. J.

    2009-09-01

    Time-variable phenomena with scales ranging from minutes to decades have led to a large fraction of recent advances in many aspects of solar system science. We present the scientific motivation for a dedicated space observatory for solar system science. This facility will ideally conduct repeated imaging and spectroscopic observations over a period of 10 years or more. It will execute a selection of long-term projects with interleaved scheduling, resulting in the acquisition of data sets with consistent calibration, long baselines, and optimized sampling intervals. A sparse aperture telescope would be an ideal configuration for the mission, trading decreased sensitivity for reduced payload mass, while preserving spatial resolution. Ultraviolet capability is essential, especially once the Hubble Space Telescope retires. Specific investigations will include volcanism and cryovolcanism (on targets including Io, Titan, Venus, Mars, and Enceladus); zonal flow, vortices, and storm evolution on the giant planets; seasonal cycles in planetary atmospheres; mutual events and orbit determination of multiple small solar system bodies; auroral activity and solar wind interactions; and cometary evolution. The mission will produce a wealth of data products--such as multi-year time-lapse movies of planetary atmospheres--with significant education and public outreach potential. Existing and planned ground- and space-based facilities are not suitable for these time-domain optimized planetary dynamics studies for numerous reasons, including: oversubscription by astrophysical users, field-of-regard limitations, sensitive detector saturation limits that preclude bright planetary targets, and limited mission duration. The abstract author list is a preliminary group of scientists who have shown interest in prior presentations on this topic; interested parties may contact the lead author by 1 September to sign the associated Planetary Science Decadal Survey white paper or by 1 October to co-author the printed DPS poster.

  11. Parametric study of natural circulation flow in molten salt fuel in molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Cioncolini, Andrea; Iacovides, Hector

    2015-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is one of the most promising system proposed by Generation IV Forum (GIF) for future nuclear reactor systems. Advantages of the MSR are significantly larger compared to other reactor system, and is mainly achieved from its liquid nature of fuel and coolant. Further improvement to this system, which is a natural circulating molten fuel salt inside its tube in the reactor core is proposed, to achieve advantages of reducing and simplifying the MSR design proposed by GIF. Thermal hydraulic analysis on the proposed system was completed using a commercial computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software called FLUENT by ANSYS Inc. An understanding on theory behind this unique natural circulation flow inside the tube caused by fission heat generated in molten fuel salt and tube cooling was briefly introduced. Currently, no commercial CFD software could perfectly simulate natural circulation flow, hence, modeling this flow problem in FLUENT is introduced and analyzed to obtain best simulation results. Results obtained demonstrate the existence of periodical transient nature of flow problem, hence improvements in tube design is proposed based on the analysis on temperature and velocity profile. Results show that the proposed system could operate at up to 750MW core power, given that turbulence are enhanced throughout flow region, and precise molten fuel salt physical properties could be defined. At the request of the authors and the Proceedings Editor the name of the co-author Andrea Cioncolini was corrected from Andrea Coincolini. The same name correction was made in the Acknowledgement section on page 030004-10 and in reference number 4. The updated article was published on 11 May 2015.

  12. Readability Analysis of Introductory Astronomy Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, David H.

    2008-05-01

    Increasingly, first-year students have reading deficiencies and do not have the academic discipline to read introductory textbooks. Few students have the skills needed to organize ideas elicited from texts, and even fewer seem capable of evaluating ideas and concepts as to importance. While the amount of pedagogical support has increased in introductory astronomy texts in recent years, it is worthwhile to investigate how the readability of these books has changed with time. Dukes and co-authors (1979, 1980, 1983) surveyed numerous introductory astronomy textbooks using the Flesch Readability index. For a direct comparison to Dukes' work, I have used Flesch's index to survey three groups of introductory astronomy texts. Group I samples editions from Dukes' surveys to normalize the current survey and to provide a text baseline from 25 years ago, while group II includes texts from the 1940s and 1950s and group III current texts to compare the readability of present texts with those from previous decades. At first glance, this study indicates that texts have not changed in readability over the past several decades. However, other issues arise when the results are investigated in detail. Flesch measures readability but not understandability; understandability may have changed. Reading load has increased as texts have increased in size from 478 to 605 pages, on average. While texts may have a grade 11-12 reading level, that is an average and parts of texts soar to post-graduate reading levels; the ups and downs may affect student comprehension. Readability is just one measure for analyzing texts and these other issues may be more important for judging why our students have difficulty reading introductory astronomy books.

  13. The APECS Virtual Poster Session: a virtual platform for science communication and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, A.; Jochum, K.; Jullion, L.; Pavlov, A.; Liggett, D.; Fugmann, G.; Baeseman, J. L.; Apecs Virtual Poster Session Working Group, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Virtual Poster Session (VPS) of the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) was developed by early career scientists as an online tool for communicating and discussing science and research beyond the four walls of a conference venue. Poster sessions often are the backbone of a conference where especially early career scientists get a chance to communicate their research, discuss ideas, data, and scientific problems with their peers and senior scientists. There, they can hone their 'elevator pitch', discussion skills and presentation skills. APECS has taken the poster session one step further and created the VPS - the same idea but independent from conferences, travel, and location. All that is needed is a computer with internet access. Instead of letting their posters collect dust on the computer's hard drive, scientists can now upload them to the APECS website. There, others have the continuous opportunity to comment, give feedback and discuss the work. Currently, about 200 posters are accessible contributed by authors and co-authors from 34 countries. Since January 2010, researchers can discuss their poster with a broad international audience including fellow researchers, community members, potential colleagues and collaborators, policy makers and educators during monthly conference calls via an internet platform. Recordings of the calls are available online afterwards. Calls so far have included topical sessions on e.g. marine biology, glaciology, or social sciences, and interdisciplinary calls on Arctic sciences or polar research activities in a specific country, e.g. India or Romania. They attracted audiences of scientists at all career stages and from all continents, with on average about 15 persons participating per call. Online tools like the VPS open up new ways for creating collaborations and new research ideas and sharing different methodologies for future projects, pushing aside the boundaries of countries and nations, conferences, offices, and disciplines, and provide early career scientists with easily accessible training opportunities for their communication and outreach skills, independent of their location and funding situation.

  14. 25 years of telepathology research: a bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The first appearance of the word “telepathology” in a scientific paper can be tracked down to 1986, in a famous editorial of Ronald Weinstein. Since that paper, research in telepathology grew up developing different subfields, including static and dynamic telepathology and more recently virtual microscopy. The present work attempts an analysis of research in telepathology, starting from the tools provided by bibliometrics. Methods A query has been developed to extract papers related to telepathology and virtual microscopy, and it has been then submitted to Pubmed by means of Entrez Utilities functions. Results obtained in XML have been processed through ad-hoc developed PHP scripts, in order to extract data on Authors, countries, and keywords. Results On PubMed, 967 papers related to telepathology and virtual microscopy have been retrieved, which involved 2904 Authors; corresponding authors were from 37 countries. Of those authors, 2213 co-authored just one paper. Papers were published on 344 different journals, of which only 52 from the Pathology field. An analysis of papers per year has been also attempted, that demonstrates variable research output in time. Conclusions From the proposed analysis, telepathology seems to have been consistently studied, in time, by about 400 researchers, with occasional participation of many other people. Telepathology research seems also to have varied in time, although some peaks in paper publishing are certainly related to the proceedings of the European congress on telepathology series, when they have been published on journals. However, some clear sign appears that suggests research in traditional telepathology, after a peak in 2000, showed some decline until virtual microscopy became mainstream, topic that currently pushes research again. The low number of clinical trials calls for more randomized studies in telepathology, to enable evidence-based application. PMID:21489197

  15. Story telling and social action: engaging young people to act on climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, E.

    2014-12-01

    The realization that well designed graphs and clearly worded summaries were not enough to spur the public and policy makers towards an appropriate understanding of our planet encouraged me to search for other ways to share climate stories with the general public. After co-authoring a popular book on food and climate change and giving many talks to the general public, it struck me that young people were largely missing from the dialogue, and little meaningful progress was being made to design effective solutions. I then started working with faculty and students from the Film and Animation Departments at San Jose State University to develop stories about climate change that would be engaging to younger audiences. The result was the Green Ninja Project, based around the Green Ninja, a superhero who focuses on solutions to climate change using humor and silliness to soften what can be a somewhat challenging topic. The Project includes a) The Green Ninja Show - a series of YouTube videos (over 1,000,000 views) highlighting actions young people can take to reduce climate change, b) The Green Ninja Film Festival where students tell their own climate solutions stories, and c) a collection of educational resources that help teachers bring climate science topics into their classroom using hands-on activities. A key component to this work is promoting social action experiences, so that young people can understand how their actions can make a difference. Based on these experiences, I will provide my own reflections on the challenges and opportunities of communicating climate change with young people.

  16. Gain Evaluation of Micro-Channel-Plate Photomultipliers in the Upgraded High-B Test Facility at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Corinne; DIRC at EIC Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The High-B test facility at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility allows researchers to evaluate the gain of compact photon sensors, such as Micro-Channel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs), in magnetic fields up to 5 T. These ongoing studies support the development of a Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRC) to be used in an Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Here, we present our summer 2015 activities to upgrade and improve the facility, and we show results for MCP-PMT gain changes in high B-fields. To monitor the light stability delivered to the MCP-PMTs being tested, we implemented a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) in the setup and calibrated the ADC reading this sensor. A 405-nm Light-Emitting Diode (LED) housed in an optical tube compatible with neutral density filters was also installed. The filters provide an alternative way of reducing the light output of the LED to operate the MCP-PMTs in a single-photon mode. We calibrated a set of filters by means of a photodiode and measured the photon flux at multiple positions relative to the LED. This information helped us to design 3D-printed holders unique to each MCP-PMT so that the photocathode receives the greatest amount of light. The improvements to the setup allow for more precise PMT gain evaluation. This team includes 7 collaborators/co-authors besides myself: Yordanka Ilieva, Kijun Park, Greg Kalicy, Carl Zorn, Pawel Nadel-Turonski, Tongtong Cao, and Lee.

  17. Interview with the expert: William E. Collins, Ph.D. Interviewed by Vicki Glaser.

    PubMed

    Collins, William E

    2009-10-01

    William Collins, Ph.D., received his B.S. and M.Sc. degrees in entomology from Michigan State University. He completed his Ph.D. at Rutgers University in two years, just before being inducted into the Army to serve in the Korean War. He was assigned to Fort Detrick at the Biological Warfare Research Laboratories and after three years returned to Rutgers as an extension entomologist. He accepted a position in 1959 with the U.S. Public Health Service, with which he has worked for the last 50 years. In 1963, the Public Health Service laboratory moved to Atlanta and Dr. Collins' group began working with non-human primates following the discovery that monkey malarias were transmissible to humans. Parasites from monkeys or apes isolated in Asia, South America, and Africa were sent to the laboratory in Chamblee, Georgia, where they were adapted and transmitted to laboratory-maintained primates and their life cycles described and characterized. Transmissions to human volunteers were also attempted. In 1973, the laboratory operation was transferred to the CDC, and the emphasis changed from the study of monkey malaria in monkeys to that of human malaria in monkeys. During the last 25 to 30 years, different isolates of human malaria parasites have been adapted to New World monkeys to characterize the isolates for the development and testing of drugs and vaccines. Dr. Collins' task has been to identify and choose the best combination of vector-parasite-host combinations for testing each vaccine candidate. He has co-authored more than 450 manuscripts and has been awarded the U.S. Public Health Service Superior Service Award, The Joseph A. LaPrince Medal for Malariology from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, The Distinguished Service Award of the Department of Health and Human Services, the William Watson Medal of Excellence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Hoogstraal Medal from the American Committee of Medical Entomology. PMID:19835479

  18. The active participation of German-speaking countries in conferences of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) between 2005 and 2013: A reflection of the development of medical education research?

    PubMed Central

    Raes, Patricia; Bauer, Daniel; Schöppe, Franziska; Fischer, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Medical education is gaining in significance internationally. A growing interest in the field has been observed in German-speaking countries (Austria, Germany, Switzerland) since the early 2000s. This interest is not, however, reflected in an increase in the number of publications on medical education of German-speaking authors in international professional journals. The following investigation examines the potential use of active participant numbers of German-speaking researchers at AMEE conferences as a means of measuring said development. Methods: The AMEE conference proceedings from the categories poster presentations, short communications, research papers and plenary presentations from the years 2005-2013 were examined for evidence of Austrian, German and Swiss participation. The abstracts were subsequently analysed in terms of content and categorised according to study design, methodology, object of study, and research topic. Results: Of the 9,446 analysed abstracts, 549 contributions show at least one first, last or co-author from Austria, Germany or Switzerland. The absolute number of contributions per conference varied between 44 in 2010 and 77 in 2013. The percentage fluctuated between 10% in 2005 and 4.1% in 2010. From the year 2010 onwards, however, participation increased continually. The research was predominantly descriptive (62.7%). Studies on fundamental questions of teaching and learning (clarification studies) were less frequent (4.0%). For the most part, quantitative methods (51.9%) were implemented in addressing subjects such as learning and teaching methods (33%), evaluation and assessment (22.4%) or curriculum development (14.4%). The study population was usually comprised of students (52.5%). Conclusions: The number of contributions from Austria, Germany and Switzerland peak at the beginning and at the end of the evaluated period of time. A continual increase in active participation since 2005 was not observed. These observations do not reflect the actual increase of interest in medical education research in German-speaking countries. PMID:25228930

  19. Ringberg15: Earth's Climate Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bony, Sandrine; Hegerl, Gabi; Schmidt, Gavin; Sherwood, Steven; Webb, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To assess gaps in understanding of Earth's climate sensitivities a workshop was organised under the auspices of the WCRP (World Climate Research Programme) Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity (Ringberg15). The workshop took place in March 2015 and gathered together over thirty experts from around the world for one week. Attendees each gave short presentations and participated in moderated discussions of specific questions related to understanding Earth's climate sensitivities. Most of the time was focused on understanding of the equilibrium climate sensitivity, defined as the equilibrium near-surface warming associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop produced nine recommendations, many of them focusing on specific research avenues that could be exploited to advance understanding of climate sensitivity. Many of these dealt, in one fashion or another, with the need to more sharply focus research on identifying and testing story lines for a high (larger than 4 degrees Kelvin) or low (less than 2 degrees Kelvin) equilibrium climate sensitivity. Additionally, a subset of model intercomparison projects (CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project), PMIP (Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project), PDRMIP (Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project), RFMIP (Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project) and VolMIP (Volcanic Forcings Model Intercomparison Project)) that have been proposed for inclusion within CMIP were identified as being central to resolving important issues raised at the workshop; for this reason modelling groups were strongly encouraged to participate in these projects. Finally the workshop participants encouraged the WCRP to initiate and support an assessment process lead by the Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity on the topic of Earth's Climate Sensitivities, culminating in a report that will be published in 2019, forty years after the seminal report by Charney and co-authors.

  20. Probing local conformation and dynamics of molecular complexes using phase-selective fluorescence correlation and coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Geoffrey Adam

    When two or more fluorescent chromophores are closely spaced in a macromolecular complex, dipolar coupling leads to delocalization of the excited states, forming excitons. The relative transition frequencies and magnitudes are sensitive to conformation, which can then be studied with optical spectroscopy. Non-invasive fluorescence spectroscopy techniques are useful tools for the study of dilute concentrations of such naturally fluorescent or fluorescently labeled biological systems. This dissertation presents two phase-selective fluorescence spectroscopy techniques for the study of dynamical processes in bio-molecular systems across a wide range of timescales. Polarization-modulated Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (PM-FICS) is a novel phase-selective fluorescence spectroscopy for simultaneous study of translational and conformational dynamics. We utilize modulated polarization and intensity gratings with phase-sensitive signal collection to monitor the collective fluctuations of an ensemble of fluorescent molecules. The translational and conformational dynamics can be separated and analyzed separately to generate 2D spectral densities and joint probability distributions. We present results of PM-FICS experiments on DsRed, a fluorescent protein complex. Detailed information on thermally driven dipole-coupled optical switching pathways is found, for which we propose a conformation transition mechanism. 2D phase-modulation electronic coherence spectroscopy is a third-order nonlinear spectroscopy that uses collinear pulse geometry and acousto-optic phase modulation to isolate rephasing and nonrephasing contributions to the collected fluorescence signal. We generate 2D spectra, from which we are able to determine relative dipole orientations, and therefore structural conformation, in addition to detailed coupling information. We present results of experiments on magnesium tetraphenylporphyrin dimers in lipid vesicle bilayers. The 2D spectra show clearly resolved diagonal and off-diagonal features, evidence of exciton behavior. The amplitudes of the distinct spectral features change on a femtosecond timescale, revealing information on time-dependent energy transfer dynamics. This dissertation includes co-authored and previously published material.

  1. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, F.; Düll-Pfaff, N.; Gumarova, L.; Zenchenko, T. A.; Schwartzkopff, O.; Freytag, E. M.; Freytag, J.; Cornelissen, G.

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud (“Traute”) Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to “translate” the Dülls’ contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

  2. Turcotte Receives 2003 William Bowie Medal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, Lawrence M.; Turcotte, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    ``Few have contributed more to fundamental geophysics, or been better at encouraging others to contribute, than Donald L. Turcotte. Don trained as an engineer, receiving a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1958. After a year at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, he joined the Cornell Graduate School of Aeronautical Engineering, rising to full professor. He established expertise on seeded combustion, magnetohydrodynamic and electrical phenomena in turbulent boundary layers, and shock waves and authored a book, Space Propulsion, and co-authored a textbook, Statistical Thermodynamics. ``In 1965 he went on sabbatical to Oxford and returned an Earth scientist. The catalyst was Ron Oxburgh. Plate tectonics was just on the horizon, and Don joined his quantitative abilities and physical intuition with Ron's skills and knowledge of geology to produce over the next decade a remarkable series of 24 papers that explored topics such as the many implications of the Earth's thermal boundary layer, ridge melting, subduction zone volcanism, and intraplate tectonics and magmatism, and established the physical bases for many of the processes operating on our planet. Shifting to the Cornell Department of Geological Sciences in 1973, Don explored virtually every aspect of physical Earth geology and became an expert on planetary remote sensing and geophysical interpretation. He published over 150 papers on thermal subsidence in sedimentary basins, two-phase hydrothermal porous media convection, lithosphere flexure, cyclic sedimentation, and stick-slip earthquakes and the lithospheres and mantles of the other planets. He worked and published with outstanding students and colleagues including Ken Torrance, Gerald Schubert, David Spence, Marc Parmentier, Bill Haxby, John Ockendon, Kevin Burke, Jud Ahern, Steve Emerman, and Charlie Angevine. In 1982 he published Geodynamics with Jerry Schubert, a book that became the primary reference in the field.

  3. Spin pumping in electrodynamically coupled magnon-photon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lihui

    The electronics industry is quickly approaching the limitation of Moore's Law due to Joule heating in high density-integrated devices. To achieve new higher-speed devices and reduce energy consumption, researchers are turning to spintronics where the intrinsic spin, rather than the charge of electrons, is used to carry information in devices. Advances in spintronics have led to the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin transfer torque etc. Another subject, cavity electrodynamics, promises a completely new quantum algorithm by studying the properties of a single electron interacting with photons inside of a cavity. By merging both spintronics and cavity electrodynamics, a new cutting edge field called Cavity Spintronics is forming, which draws on the advantages of both subjects to develop new spintronics devices utilizing light-matter interaction. In this work, we use electrical detection, in combination with microwave transmission, to investigate both resonant and nonresonant magnon-photon coupling in a microwave cavity at room temperature. Spin pumping in a dynamically coupled magnon-photon system is found to be distinctly different from previous experiments. Characteristic coupling features such as modes anticrossing, linewidth evolution, peculiar line shape, and resonance broadening are systematically measured and consistently analyzed by a theoretical model set on the foundation of classical electrodynamic coupling. Our experimental and theoretical approach paves the way for pursuing microwave coherent manipulation of pure spin current via the combination of spin pumping and magnon-photon coupling. Co-authored with M. Harder, C.-M. Hu from University of Manitoba, Y. P. Chen, J. Q. Xiao from University of Delaware, and X. Fan from Univeristy of Denver.

  4. Integrating natural language processing and web GIS for interactive knowledge domain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Fangming

    Recent years have seen a powerful shift towards data-rich environments throughout society. This has extended to a change in how the artifacts and products of scientific knowledge production can be analyzed and understood. Bottom-up approaches are on the rise that combine access to huge amounts of academic publications with advanced computer graphics and data processing tools, including natural language processing. Knowledge domain visualization is one of those multi-technology approaches, with its aim of turning domain-specific human knowledge into highly visual representations in order to better understand the structure and evolution of domain knowledge. For example, network visualizations built from co-author relations contained in academic publications can provide insight on how scholars collaborate with each other in one or multiple domains, and visualizations built from the text content of articles can help us understand the topical structure of knowledge domains. These knowledge domain visualizations need to support interactive viewing and exploration by users. Such spatialization efforts are increasingly looking to geography and GIS as a source of metaphors and practical technology solutions, even when non-georeferenced information is managed, analyzed, and visualized. When it comes to deploying spatialized representations online, web mapping and web GIS can provide practical technology solutions for interactive viewing of knowledge domain visualizations, from panning and zooming to the overlay of additional information. This thesis presents a novel combination of advanced natural language processing - in the form of topic modeling - with dimensionality reduction through self-organizing maps and the deployment of web mapping/GIS technology towards intuitive, GIS-like, exploration of a knowledge domain visualization. A complete workflow is proposed and implemented that processes any corpus of input text documents into a map form and leverages a web application framework to let users explore knowledge domain maps interactively. This workflow is implemented and demonstrated for a data set of more than 66,000 conference abstracts.

  5. Disclosure of Financial Conflicts of Interests in Interventions to Improve Child Psychosocial Health: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Manuel; Humphreys, David K.; Wilson, Philip; Gardner, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Academic journals increasingly request a full disclosure of financial conflict of interest (CoI). The Committee for Publication Ethics provides editors with guidance about the course of action in the case of suspected non-disclosure. No prior study has examined the extent to which journal articles on psychosocial interventions disclose CoI, and how journal editors process requests to examine suspected undisclosed CoI. Four internationally disseminated psychosocial interventions were examined. 136 articles related to an intervention, co-authored by intervention developers and published in health sciences journals were retrieved as requiring a CoI statement. Two editors refused consent to be included in the study. COI disclosures and editor responses were coded for 134 articles. Overall, 92/134 (71%) of all articles were found to have absent, incomplete or partly misleading CoI disclosures. Disclosure rates for the four programs varied significantly between 11% and 73%. Journal editors were contacted about 92 published articles with no CoI disclosure or a disclosure that was considered problematic. In 65/92 (71%) of all cases the editors published an ‘erratum’ or ‘corrigendum’. In 16 of these cases the journal had mishandled a submitted disclosure. The most frequent reason for non-publication of an erratum was that the journal had no disclosure policy at the time of the publication (16 cases). Consumers of research on psychosocial interventions published in peer-reviewed journals cannot currently assume that CoI disclosures are adequate and complete. More efforts are needed to achieve transparency. PMID:26606667

  6. 3min. poster presentations of B01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    We give a report on recommendations from ILEWG International conferences held at Cape Canaveral in 2008 (ICEUM10), and in Beijing in May 2010 with IAF (GLUC -ICEUM11). We discuss the different rationale for Moon exploration. Priorities for scientific investigations include: clues on the formation and evolution of rocky planets, accretion and bombardment in the inner solar system, comparative planetology processes (tectonic, volcanic, impact cratering, volatile delivery), historical records, astrobiology, survival of organics; past, present and future life. The ILEWG technology task group set priorities for the advancement of instrumenta-tion: Remote sensing miniaturised instruments; Surface geophysical and geochemistry package; Instrument deployment and robotic arm, nano-rover, sampling, drilling; Sample finder and collector. Regional mobility rover; Autonomy and Navigation; Artificially intelligent robots, Complex systems. The ILEWG ExogeoLab pilot project was developed as support for instru-ments, landers, rovers,and preparation for cooperative robotic village. The ILEWG lunar base task group looked at minimal design concepts, technologies in robotic and human exploration with Tele control, telepresence, virtual reality; Man-Machine interface and performances. The ILEWG ExoHab pilot project has been started with support from agencies and partners. We discuss ILEWG terrestrial Moon-Mars campaigns for validation of technologies, research and human operations. We indicate how Moon-Mars Exploration can inspire solutions to global Earth sustained development: In-Situ Utilisation of resources; Establishment of permanent robotic infrastructures, Environmental protection aspects; Life sciences laboratories; Support to human exploration. Co-Authors: ILEWG Task Groups on: Science, Technology, Robotic village, Lunar Bases , Commercial and Societal aspects, Roadmap synergies with other programmes, Public en-gagemnet and Outreach, Young Lunar Explorers.

  7. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher’s career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging transparent communication amongst researchers. PMID:26083381

  8. Mentoring and Training of Cancer-Related Health Disparities Researchers Committed to Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Tisha M.; Braun, Kathryn L.; Brandt, Heather M.; Khan, Samira; Tanjasiri, Sora; Friedman, Daniela B.; Armstead, Cheryl A.; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; Hébert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Networks Program Centers (CNPCs) provide community-based participatory research (CBPR)-oriented mentoring and training to prepare early-stage/midcareer investigators and student trainees (trainees) in disparities reduction. This paper describes the academic, mentoring, training, and work–life balance experiences of CNPC-affiliated trainees. Methods We used a collaborative and iterative process to develop a 57-item, web-based questionnaire completed by trainees from the 23 CNPCs between August 2012 and February 2013. Their CNPC mentors completed a 47-item questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results The final analytic sample included 189 of 269 individuals (70%) identified as active participants in CNPC research or training/mentoring. Mentors (n = 45) were mostly non-Hispanic White (77.8%) and 48.9% were male. Mentors published a median of 6 (interquartile range [IQR], 3–12) first-authored and 15 (IQR, 6–25) senior authored manuscripts, and secured 15 (IQR, 11–29) grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other sources in the previous 5 years. Most trainees (n = 144) were female (79.2%), 43.7% were underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities, and 36.8% were first-generation college graduates. Over the previous 5 years, trainees reported a median of 4 (IQR, 1–6) publications as first author and 4 (IQR, 2–8) as co-author; 27.1% reported having one or more NIH R01s. Trainees reported satisfaction with their CNPC mentor (79.1%) and confidence in demonstrating most CBPR competencies. Conclusion The CNPC training program consists of a scientifically productive pool of mentors and trainees. Trainees reported rates of scholarly productivity comparable to other national training programs and provided insights into relationships with mentors, academic pressures, and professional–personal life balance. PMID:26213409

  9. 27-day cycles in human mortality: Traute and Bernhard Düll.

    PubMed

    Halberg, F; Düll-Pfaff, N; Gumarova, L; Zenchenko, T A; Schwartzkopff, O; Freytag, E M; Freytag, J; Cornelissen, G

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to her parents by one co-author (NDP) is the fruit of a more than a decade-long search by the senior author (FH) for the details of the lives of Bernhard and Gertraud ("Traute") Düll. These pioneers studied how space/terrestrial weather may differentially influence human mortality from various causes, the 27-day mortality pattern being different whether death was from cardiac or respiratory disease, or from suicide. FH is the translator of personal information about her parents provided by NDP in German. Figuratively, he also attempts to "translate" the Dülls' contribution in the context of the literature that had appeared before their work and after their deaths. Although the Dülls published in a then leading journal, among others (and FH had re-analyzed some of their work in a medical journal), they were unknown to academies or libraries (where FH had inquired about them). The Dülls thoroughly assembled death certificates to offer the most powerful evidence for an effect of solar activity reflected in human mortality, as did others before them. They went several steps further than their predecessors, however. They were the first to show possibly differential effects of space and/or Earth weather with respect to suicide and other deaths associated with the nervous and sensory systems vs. death from cardiac or respiratory disease as well as overall death by differences in the phase of a common 27-day cycle characterizing these mortality patterns. Furthermore, Bernhard Düll developed tests of human visual and auditory reaction time to study effects of weather and solar activity, publishing a book (his professorial dissertation) on the topic. His unpublished finding of an increased incidence of airplane crashes in association with higher solar activity was validated after his death, among others, by Tatiana Zenchenko and A. M. Merzlyi. PMID:24224144

  10. Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Terradas, Jaume; Verth, Gary; Soler, Roberto

    Doppler displacements in kink MHD waves in solar flux tubes Presenting author: M. Goossens Co-authors: R. Soler, J. Terradas, T. Van Doorsselaere, G. Verth The standard interpretation of the transverse MHD waves observed in the solar atmosphere is that they are non-axisymmetric kink m=1) waves on magnetic flux tubes. This interpretation is based on the fact that axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fluting waves do not displace the axis of the loop and the loop as a whole while kink waves indeed do so. A uniform transverse motion produces a Doppler displacement that is constant across the magnetic flux tube. A recent development is the observation of Doppler displacements that vary across the loop. The aim of the present contribution is to show that spatial variations of the Doppler displacements across the loop can be caused by kink waves. The motion associated with a kink wave is purely transverse only when the flux tube is uniform and sufficiently thin. Only in that case do the radial and azimuthal components of displacement have the same amplitude and is the azimuthal component a quarter of a period ahead of the radial component. This results in a unidirectional or transverse displacement. When the flux tube is non-uniform and has a non-zero radius the conditions for the generation of a purely transverse motion are not any longer met. In that case the motion in a kink wave is the sum of a transverse motion and a non-axisymmetric rotational motion that depends on the azimuthal angle. It can produce complicated variations of the Doppler displacement across the loop. I shall discuss the various cases of possible Doppler displacenents that can occur depending on the relative sizes of the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal components of the displacement in the kink wave and on the orientation of the line of sight.

  11. JPL/Student Independent Research Internship (SIRI): Research and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Alvidrez, R. F.; Kahn, R. A.; Whitney, W.

    2006-09-01

    One of NASA's Strategic goals is the education and retention of students in math and science, and providing outreach experiences to all levels of the public (formal and informal). At JPL, an innovative program, SIRI, was initiated in 2003 with the following goals: 1. Provide local college students, with strong support from their faculty advisors, hands-on experience in scientific research and engineering while they are still forming their higher-education and career plans. 2. JPL and NASA education office interests in providing more help to college students in preparing for careers in science and engineering. Following its initial pilot program with eight students from two local community colleges, the SIRI program branched out in two directions: (1) providing research opportunities to students from a wider range of colleges and (2) research apprenticeship or RA program, so eligible students could continue their research after completing their semester. With support of their JPL mentors, students derived educational and technical benefits. Currently, the SIRI Program includes eight local 2-year and 4-year colleges; serves approximately 25-30 students per year. To date, nearly 50% of interns become apprentices to their JPL mentors. The SIRI program is currently complementary to many undergraduate internship programs as the SIRI interns participate during school year for credit. The RA students are empowered to attend scientific meetings; co-author peer-reviewed papers; continue their research through fellowships, and mentor other students. The success of the SIRI program stems both from the contributions of the students to their mentors’ efforts and JPL's outreach efforts to afford exposure and research experience to students in all fields of science to develop the next generation of scientists. Specific examples of SIRI projects will be showcased.

  12. Is traumatic stress research global? A bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Kinga E.; Unterhitzenberger, Johanna; Chou, Chia-Ying; Kartal, Dzenana; Leistner, Sarah; Milosavljevic, Maja; Nocon, Agnes; Soler, Laia; White, Jenifer; Yoo, Seonyoung; Alisic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background The representation of low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in traumatic stress research is important to establish a global evidence base, build research capacity, and reduce the burden of unmet mental health needs around the world. Reviews of the traumatic stress literature up to 2002 showed trends toward globalization although LMIC were only marginally represented compared to high-income countries (HIC). Objective To examine the global nature of current traumatic stress research. In particular, we were interested in the extent to which traumatic stress research is: (1) conducted in LMIC, (2) conducted by LMIC researchers, and (3) accessible to them. Method Using the databases PubMed, PsychInfo, and PILOTS, we systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles on traumatic stress published in any language in the year 2012. Out of the 3,123 unique papers identified, we coded a random sample (N=1,000) for study, author, article, and journal characteristics. Results Although our sample involved research in 56 different countries, most papers (87%) involved research in HIC, with 51% of all papers describing studies in the United States. In 88% of the papers, the author team was affiliated with HIC only. Less than 5% of all author teams involved collaborations between HIC and LMIC researchers. Moreover, 45% of the articles on LMIC studies published by a HIC corresponding author did not involve any LMIC co-authors. LMIC researchers appeared to publish empirical studies in lower impact journals. Of the 1,000 articles in our sample, 32% were open access and 10% were made available via different means; over half of the papers were not accessible without subscription. Conclusions Traumatic stress research is increasingly global but still strongly dominated by HIC. Important opportunities to build capacity in LMIC appear to be missed. Implications toward more international traumatic stress research are discussed. PMID:24563730

  13. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  14. Substance use disorders in Arab countries: research activity and bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders, which include substance abuse and substance dependence, are present in all regions of the world including Middle Eastern Arab countries. Bibliometric analysis is an increasingly used tool for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research productivity in the field of substance use disorders in Arab countries using bibliometric indicators. Methodology Original or review research articles authored or co-authored by investigators from Arab countries about substance use disorders during the period 1900 – 2013 were retrieved using the ISI Web of Science database. Research activity was assessed by analyzing the annual research productivity, contribution of each Arab country, names of journals, citations, and types of abused substances. Results Four hundred and thirteen documents in substance use disorders were retrieved. Annual research productivity was low but showed a significant increase in the last few years. In terms of quantity, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (83 documents) ranked first in research about substance use disorders while Lebanon (17.4 documents per million) ranked first in terms of number of documents published per million inhabitants. Retrieved documents were found in different journal titles and categories, mostly in Drug and Alcohol Dependence Journal. Authors from USA appeared in 117 documents published by investigators from Arab countries. Citation analysis of retrieved documents showed that the average citation per document was 10.76 and the h - index was 35. The majority of retrieved documents were about tobacco and smoking (175 documents) field while alcohol consumption and abuse research was the least with 69 documents. Conclusion The results obtained suggest that research in this field was largely neglected in the past. However, recent research interest was observed. Research output on tobacco and smoking was relatively high compared to other substances of abuse like illicit drugs and medicinal agents. Governmental funding for academics and mental health graduate programs to do research in the field of substance use disorders is highly recommended. PMID:25148888

  15. Ethical guidelines for publishing in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle: update 2015.

    PubMed

    von Haehling, Stephan; Morley, John E; Coats, Andrew J S; Anker, Stefan D

    2015-12-01

    This article details the principles of ethical authorship and publishing in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (JCSM). At the time of submission to JCSM, the corresponding author, on behalf of all co-authors, needs to certify adherence to these principles. The principles are as follows: (i) all authors listed on a manuscript considered for publication have approved its submission and (if accepted) publication as provided to JCSM; (ii) no person who has a right to be recognized as author has been omitted from the list of authors on the submitted manuscript; (iii) no person who has a right to be recognized as author has been omitted from the list of authors on the submitted manuscript; (iv) the submitted work is original and is neither under consideration elsewhere nor that it has been published previously in whole or in part other than in abstract form; (v) all authors certify that the work is original and does not contain excessive overlap with prior or contemporaneous publication elsewhere, and where the publication reports on cohorts, trials, or data that have been reported on before these other publications must be referenced; (vi) all original research work are approved by the relevant bodies such as institutional review boards or ethics committees; (vii) all conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise, that may affect the authors' ability to present data objectively, and relevant sources of funding have been duly declared in the manuscript; (viii) the manuscript in its published form will be maintained on the servers of JCSM as a valid publication only as long as all statements in the guidelines on ethical publishing remain true; and (ix) If any of the aforementioned statements ceases to be true, the authors have a duty to notify the Editors of JCSM as soon as possible so that the available information regarding the published article can be updated and/or the manuscript can be withdrawn. PMID:26672494

  16. Effect of zinc supplementation on pregnancy and infant outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chaffee, Benjamin W; King, Janet C

    2012-07-01

    Poor maternal zinc status has been associated with foetal loss, congenital malformations, intra-uterine growth retardation, reduced birth weight, prolonged labour and preterm or post-term deliveries. A meta-analysis completed in 2007 showed that maternal zinc supplementation resulted in a small but significant reduction in preterm birth. The purposes of this analysis are to update that previous review and expand the scope of assessment to include maternal, infant and child health outcomes. Electronic searches were carried out to identify peer-reviewed, randomised controlled trials where daily zinc supplementation was given for at least one trimester of pregnancy. The co-authors applied the study selection criteria, assessed trial quality and abstracted data. A total of 20 independent intervention trials involving more than 11,000 births were identified. The 20 trials took place across five continents between 1977 and 2008. Most studies assessed the zinc effect against a background of other micronutrient supplements, but five were placebo-controlled trials of zinc alone. The provided dose of supplemental zinc ranged from 5 to 50 mg/day. Only the risk of preterm birth reached statistical significance (summary relative risk 0.86 [95% confidence interval 0.75, 0.99]). There was no evidence that supplemental zinc affected any parameter of foetal growth (risk of low birth weight, birth weight, length at birth or head circumference at birth). Six of the 20 trials were graded as high quality. The evidence that maternal zinc supplementation lowers the risk of preterm birth was graded low; evidence for a positive effect on other foetal outcomes was graded as very low. The effect of zinc supplementation on preterm birth, if causal, might reflect a reduction in maternal infection, a primary cause of prematurity. While further study would be needed to explore this possibility in detail, the overall public health benefit of zinc supplementation in pregnancy appears limited. PMID:22742606

  17. An introduction to the INQUA Dunes Atlas Chronologic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Nicholas; Bristow, Charlie; Bubenzer, Olaf; Burrough, Sallie; Duller, Geoff; Halfen, Alan; Hesse, Paul; Roskin, Joel; Singhvi, Ashok; Thomas, David; Tripaldi, Alfonsina; Yang, Xiaoping; Wolfe, Stephen; Zarate, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    The INQUA Dunes Atlas project has developed a global digital database of chronologic information for periods of desert sand dune accumulation and stabilization. The database currently contains 3278 luminescence and 535 radiocarbon records of directly dated periods of aeolian sand deposition from 1200 inland dune locations throughout the world, mostly in low- and mid-latitudes. Co-authors of this abstract have compiled data for their geographic region of expertise. Additional data are being added from publications, reports, and theses and dissertations as they become available. In addition to age data, the database includes information on the site location (including coordinates), dune type, and stratigraphic context, pertinent analytical information (e.g. luminescence procedures), and literature citations to the original data source (with doi). The database has so far enabled: (1) analysis of patterns of dated dune deposits at multiple temporal and spatial scales; (2) correlation of these patterns with other paleoclimatic proxies; and (3) assessment of the paleoclimatic and paleohydrologic implications of periods of aeolian deposition. The database has highlighted several issues with the available luminescence data set, especially the uneven spatial coverage of dated dune deposits and the heterogenous nature of the dune sedimentary record in many areas. It is clear that resolution of these issues to provide a better understanding of dune and dunefield responses to Quaternary climate change is not just a matter of additional dates. A systematic dating program that reflects fundamental patterns of dunefield sensitivity to climatic and hydrologic changes and relates dated deposits to patterns of dune morphology and sedimentology is needed as a research priority.

  18. Bibliography of NASA-related publications on wind turbine technology 1973-1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1995-04-01

    A major program of research and development projects on wind turbines for generating electricity was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center from 1973 to 1988. Most of these projects were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as a major element of its Federal Wind Energy Program. One other large-scale wind turbine project was sponsored by the Bureau of Reclamation of the Department of Interior (DOI). The peak years for wind energy work at Lewis were 1979-80, when almost 100 engineers, technicians, and administrative personnel were involved. From 1988 their conclusion in 1995, NASA wind energy activities have been directed toward the transfer of technology to commercial and academic organizations. Wind energy activities at NASA can be divided into two broad categories which are closely related and often overlapping: (1) Designing, building, and testing a series of 12 large-scale, experimental, horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT's); and (2) conducting supporting research and technology (SR&T) projects. The purpose of this bibliography is to assist those active in the field of wind energy in locating the technical information they need on wind power planning, wind loads, turbine design and analysis, fabrication and installation, laboratory and field testing, and operations and maintenance. This bibliography contains approximately 620 citations of publications by over 520 authors and co-authors. Sources are: (1) NASA reports authored by government grantee, and contractor personnel, (2) papers presented by attendees at NASA-sponsored workshops and conferences, (3) papers presented by NASA personnel at outside workshops and conferences, and (4) outside publications related to research performed at NASA/ DOE wind turbine sites.

  19. Ernst Rüdin: Hitler's Racial Hygiene Mastermind.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jay; Wetzel, Norbert A

    2013-01-01

    Ernst Rüdin (1874-1952) was the founder of psychiatric genetics and was also a founder of the German racial hygiene movement. Throughout his long career he played a major role in promoting eugenic ideas and policies in Germany, including helping formulate the 1933 Nazi eugenic sterilization law and other governmental policies directed against the alleged carriers of genetic defects. In the 1940s Rüdin supported the killing of children and mental patients under a Nazi program euphemistically called "Euthanasia." The authors document these crimes and discuss their implications, and also present translations of two publications Rüdin co-authored in 1938 showing his strong support for Hitler and his policies. The authors also document what they see as revisionist historical accounts by leading psychiatric genetic authors. They outline three categories of contemporary psychiatric genetic accounts of Rüdin and his work: (A) those who write about German psychiatric genetics in the Nazi period, but either fail to mention Rüdin at all, or cast him in a favorable light; (B) those who acknowledge that Rüdin helped promote eugenic sterilization and/or may have worked with the Nazis, but generally paint a positive picture of Rüdin's research and fail to mention his participation in the "euthanasia" killing program; and (C) those who have written that Rüdin committed and supported unspeakable atrocities. The authors conclude by calling on the leaders of psychiatric genetics to produce a detailed and complete account of their field's history, including all of the documented crimes committed by Rüdin and his associates. PMID:23180223

  20. The work of Glenn F. Webb.

    PubMed

    Fitzgibbon, William E

    2015-08-01

    It is my distinct pleasure to introduce this volume honoring the 70th birthday of Professor Glenn F. Webb. The existence of this compiled volume is in itself a testimony of Glenn's dedication to, his pursuit of, and his achievement of scientific excellence. As we honor Glenn, we honor what is excellent in our profession. Aristotle clearly articulated his concept of excellence. ``We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit." As we look over the course of his career we observe ample evidence of Glenn Webb's habitual practice of excellence. Beginning with Glenn's first paper [1], one observes a constant stream of productivity and high impact work. Glenn has authored or co-authored over 160 papers, written one research monograph, and co-edited six volumes. He has delivered plenary lectures, colloquia, and seminars across the globe, and he serves on the editorial boards of 11 archival journals. He is a Fellow of the American Mathematical Society. Glenn's scientific career chronicles an evolution of scientific work that began with his interest in nonlinear semigroup theory and leads up to his current activity in biomedical mathematics. At each stage we see seminal contributions in the areas of nonlinear semigroups, functional differential equations, infinite dimensional dynamical systems, mathematical population dynamics, mathematical biology and biomedical mathematics. Glenn's work is distinguished by a clarity and accessibility of exposition, a precise identification and description of the problem or model under consideration, and thorough referencing. He uses elementary methods whenever possible but couples this with an ability to employ power abstract methods when necessitated by the problem. PMID:25974339