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Sample records for co-evolving genomic groups

  1. Group normalization for genomic data.

    PubMed

    Ghandi, Mahmoud; Beer, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Data normalization is a crucial preliminary step in analyzing genomic datasets. The goal of normalization is to remove global variation to make readings across different experiments comparable. In addition, most genomic loci have non-uniform sensitivity to any given assay because of variation in local sequence properties. In microarray experiments, this non-uniform sensitivity is due to different DNA hybridization and cross-hybridization efficiencies, known as the probe effect. In this paper we introduce a new scheme, called Group Normalization (GN), to remove both global and local biases in one integrated step, whereby we determine the normalized probe signal by finding a set of reference probes with similar responses. Compared to conventional normalization methods such as Quantile normalization and physically motivated probe effect models, our proposed method is general in the sense that it does not require the assumption that the underlying signal distribution be identical for the treatment and control, and is flexible enough to correct for nonlinear and higher order probe effects. The Group Normalization algorithm is computationally efficient and easy to implement. We also describe a variant of the Group Normalization algorithm, called Cross Normalization, which efficiently amplifies biologically relevant differences between any two genomic datasets. PMID:22912661

  2. Genomic adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei group.

    PubMed

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Nakano, Akiyo; Takahata, Muneaki; Murakami, Masaru; Takaki, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Igimi, Shizunobu; Hattori, Masahira; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group) within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG), which we have previously reported. We confirmed that ATCC 393 is distinct from other strains previously described as L. paracasei. The core genome of 10 completely sequenced strains of the L. casei group comprised 1,682 protein-coding genes. Although extensive genome-wide synteny was found among the L. casei group, the genomes of ATCC 53103, JCM 8130, and ATCC 393 contained genomic islands compared with L. paracasei ATCC 334. Several genomic islands, including carbohydrate utilization gene clusters, were found at the same loci in the chromosomes of the L. casei group. The spaCBA pilus gene cluster, which was first identified in GG, was also found in other strains of the L. casei group, but several L. paracasei strains including COM0101 contained truncated spaC gene. ATCC 53103 encoded a higher number of proteins involved in carbohydrate utilization compared with intestinal lactobacilli, and extracellular adhesion proteins, several of which are absent in other strains of the L. casei group. In addition to previously fully sequenced L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei strains, the complete genome sequences of L. casei will provide valuable insights into the evolution of the L. casei group. PMID:24116025

  3. Genomic Adaptation of the Lactobacillus casei Group

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Akiyo; Takahata, Muneaki; Murakami, Masaru; Takaki, Takashi; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Igimi, Shizunobu; Hattori, Masahira; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei, L. paracasei, and L. rhamnosus form a closely related taxonomic group (Lactobacillus casei group) within the facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of L. paracasei JCM 8130 and L. casei ATCC 393, and the draft genome sequence of L. paracasei COM0101, all of which were isolated from daily products. Furthermore, we re-annotated the genome of L. rhamnosus ATCC 53103 (also known as L. rhamnosus GG), which we have previously reported. We confirmed that ATCC 393 is distinct from other strains previously described as L. paracasei. The core genome of 10 completely sequenced strains of the L. casei group comprised 1,682 protein-coding genes. Although extensive genome-wide synteny was found among the L. casei group, the genomes of ATCC 53103, JCM 8130, and ATCC 393 contained genomic islands compared with L. paracasei ATCC 334. Several genomic islands, including carbohydrate utilization gene clusters, were found at the same loci in the chromosomes of the L. casei group. The spaCBA pilus gene cluster, which was first identified in GG, was also found in other strains of the L. casei group, but several L. paracasei strains including COM0101 contained truncated spaC gene. ATCC 53103 encoded a higher number of proteins involved in carbohydrate utilization compared with intestinal lactobacilli, and extracellular adhesion proteins, several of which are absent in other strains of the L. casei group. In addition to previously fully sequenced L. rhamnosus and L. paracasei strains, the complete genome sequences of L. casei will provide valuable insights into the evolution of the L. casei group. PMID:24116025

  4. Assembler: Efficient Discovery of Spatial Co-evolving Patterns in Massive Geo-sensory Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Xiuli; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the wide proliferation of geo-sensory applications wherein a bundle of sensors are deployed at different locations to cooperatively monitor the target condition. Given massive geo-sensory data, we study the problem of mining spatial co-evolving patterns (SCPs), i.e., groups of sensors that are spatially correlated and co-evolve frequently in their readings. SCP mining is of great importance to various real-world applications, yet it is challenging because (1) the truly interesting evolutions are often flooded by numerous trivial fluctuations in the geo-sensory time series; and (2) the pattern search space is extremely large due to the spatiotemporal combinatorial nature of SCP. In this paper, we propose a two-stage method called Assembler. In the first stage, Assembler filters trivial fluctuations using wavelet transform and detects frequent evolutions for individual sensors via a segment-and-group approach. In the second stage, Assembler generates SCPs by assembling the frequent evolutions of individual sensors. Leveraging the spatial constraint, it conceptually organizes all the SCPs into a novel structure called the SCP search tree, which facilitates the effective pruning of the search space to generate SCPs efficiently. Our experiments on both real and synthetic data sets show that Assembler is effective, efficient, and scalable. PMID:26705506

  5. Measurement of organization in complex and co-evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-02-01

    We apply a new method for measurement of organization of complex and co-evolving networks using the quantity of physical action. We consider simple arrangements of elements in a network and constraints to their motion along paths and calculate the amount of organization in each system using the following measure: organization is the inverse of the average sum of physical actions of all elements in a system per unit motion multiplied by the Planck's constant. The meaning of quantity of organization here is the number of quanta of action per one unit motion along a path of an element. A unit motion along a path for a network, such as internet, is the transmission of one bit of information. The calculation can be expanded to systems consisting of many elements and constraints and also can be followed as a function of time with improvement of the organization of a system or connected systems and networks. Thus, the principle of least action becomes the driving force, and the least action state of the system, the attractor for all of the paths of its elements and states of its constraints. We consider also the rate of constraint minimization, or decrease of action per element and motion, as a function of the number of elements i.e. quality as a function of quantity. Increase of quantity, within specified limits, leads to increase of level of organization and vice versa.

  6. Effect of co-evolving amino acid residues on topology of phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Sherbakov, D Yu; Triboy, T I

    2007-12-01

    The presence in proteins of amino acid residues that change in concert during evolution is associated with keeping constant the protein spatial structure and functions. As in the case with morphological features, correlated substitutions may become the cause of homoplasies--the independent evolution of identical non-homological adaptations. Our data obtained on model phylogenetic trees and corresponding sets of sequences have shown that the presence of correlated substitutions distorts the results of phylogenetic reconstructions. A method for accounting for co-evolving amino acid residues in phylogenetic analysis is proposed. According to this method, only a single site from the group of correlated amino acid positions should remain, whereas other positions should not be used in further phylogenetic analysis. Simulations performed have shown that replacement on the average of 8% of variable positions in a pair of model sequences by coordinately evolving amino acid residues is able to change the tree topology. The removal of such amino acid residues from sequences before phylogenetic analysis restores the correct topology. PMID:18205620

  7. Genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I and Group II

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Peck, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in whole genome sequencing have made a substantial contribution to understanding the genomes, neurotoxins and biology of Clostridium botulinum Group I (proteolytic C. botulinum) and C. botulinum Group II (non-proteolytic C. botulinum). Two different approaches are used to study genomics in these bacteria; comparative whole genome microarrays and direct comparison of complete genome DNA sequences. The properties of the different types of neurotoxin formed, and different neurotoxin gene clusters found in C. botulinum Groups I and II are explored. Specific examples of botulinum neurotoxin genes are chosen for an in-depth discussion of neurotoxin gene evolution. The most recent cases of foodborne botulism are summarised. PMID:25445012

  8. Genomic characterization of Italian Clostridium botulinum group I strains.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Pittiglio, Valentina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario; Lista, Florigio

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a gram-positive bacterium capable of producing the botulinum neurotoxin, a powerful poison that causes botulism, a severe neuroparalytic disease. Its genome has been sequenced entirely and its gene content has been analyzed. To date, 19 full genomes and 64 draft genomes are available. The geographical origin of these genomes is predominantly from the US. In the present study, 10 Italian genomes of C. botulinum group I were analyzed and compared with previously sequenced group I genomes, in order to genetically characterize the Italian population of C. botulinum group I and to investigate the phylogenetic relationships among different lineages. Using the suites of software ClonalFrame and ClonalOrigin to perform genomic analysis, we demonstrated that Italian C. botulinum group I population is phylogenetically heterogeneous encompassing different and distant lineages including overseas strains, too. Moreover, a high recombination rate was demonstrated in the evolution of C. botulinum group I species. Finally, genome sequencing of the strain 357 led us to identify a novel botulinum neurotoxin subtype, F8. PMID:26341861

  9. Comparative genomics of the Campylobacter lari group

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Campylobacter lari group is a phylogenetic clade within the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and is part of the thermotolerant campylobacters, a division within the genus that includes the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. The lari group is currently composed of five validly-named sp...

  10. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers.

    PubMed

    Toal, Ted W; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Howell, Tyson; Ron, Mily; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger; Brady, Siobhan M

    2016-09-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  11. Consistency of genome-wide associations across major ancestral groups.

    PubMed

    Ntzani, Evangelia E; Liberopoulos, George; Manolio, Teri A; Ioannidis, John P A

    2012-07-01

    It is not well known whether genetic markers identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confer similar or different risks across people of different ancestry. We screened a regularly updated catalog of all published GWAS curated at the NHGRI website for GWAS-identified associations that had reached genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) in at least one major ancestry group (European, Asian, African) and for which replication data were available for comparison in at least two different major ancestry groups. These groups were compared for the correlation between and differences in risk allele frequencies and genetic effects' estimates. Data on 108 eligible GWAS-identified associations with a total of 900 datasets (European, n = 624; Asian, n = 217; African, n = 60) were analyzed. Risk-allele frequencies were modestly correlated between ancestry groups, with >10% absolute differences in 75-89% of the three pairwise comparisons of ancestry groups. Genetic effect (odds ratio) point estimates between ancestry groups correlated modestly (pairwise comparisons' correlation coefficients: 0.20-0.33) and point estimates of risks were opposite in direction or differed more than twofold in 57%, 79%, and 89% of the European versus Asian, European versus African, and Asian versus African comparisons, respectively. The modest correlations, differing risk estimates, and considerable between-association heterogeneity suggest that differential ancestral effects can be anticipated and genomic risk markers may need separate further evaluation in different ancestry groups. PMID:22183176

  12. Cooperative behavior and phase transitions in co-evolving stag hunt game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, Y. S.; Xu, C.; Hui, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cooperative behavior and different phases in a co-evolving network dynamics based on the stag hunt game is studied. The dynamical processes are parameterized by a payoff r that tends to promote non-cooperative behavior and a probability q for a rewiring attempt that could isolate the non-cooperators. The interplay between the parameters leads to different phases. Detailed simulations and a mean field theory are employed to reveal the properties of different phases. For small r, the cooperators are the majority and form a connected cluster while the non-cooperators increase with q but remain isolated over the whole range of q, and it is a static phase. For sufficiently large r, cooperators disappear in an intermediate range qL ≤ q ≤qU and a dynamical all-non-cooperators phase results. For q >qU, a static phase results again. A mean field theory based on how the link densities change in time by the co-evolving dynamics is constructed. The theory gives a phase diagram in the q- r parameter space that is qualitatively in agreement with simulation results. The sources of discrepancies between theory and simulations are discussed.

  13. Comparative genome analysis of Bacillus cereus group genomes withBacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Sorokin, Alexei; Kapatral, Vinayak; Reznik, Gary; Bhattacharya, Anamitra; Mikhailova, Natalia; Burd, Henry; Joukov, Victor; Kaznadzey, Denis; Walunas, Theresa; D'Souza, Mark; Larsen, Niels; Pusch,Gordon; Liolios, Konstantinos; Grechkin, Yuri; Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman,Eugene; Chu, Lien; Fonstein, Michael; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Overbeek, Ross; Kyrpides, Nikos; Ivanova, Natalia

    2005-09-14

    Genome features of the Bacillus cereus group genomes (representative strains of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis sub spp israelensis) were analyzed and compared with the Bacillus subtilis genome. A core set of 1,381 protein families among the four Bacillus genomes, with an additional set of 933 families common to the B. cereus group, was identified. Differences in signal transduction pathways, membrane transporters, cell surface structures, cell wall, and S-layer proteins suggesting differences in their phenotype were identified. The B. cereus group has signal transduction systems including a tyrosine kinase related to two-component system histidine kinases from B. subtilis. A model for regulation of the stress responsive sigma factor sigmaB in the B. cereus group different from the well studied regulation in B. subtilis has been proposed. Despite a high degree of chromosomal synteny among these genomes, significant differences in cell wall and spore coat proteins that contribute to the survival and adaptation in specific hosts has been identified.

  14. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  15. 77 FR 75425 - Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG): The National Plant Genome Initiative-What's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG): The National Plant Genome Initiative--What's Next? AGENCY: Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION... Group on Plant Genomics (IWGPG). DATES: Saturday, January 12, 2013, 1:30 p.m. to 3:40 p.m....

  16. Comparative Genomics of the Staphylococcus intermedius Group of Animal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Beatson, Scott A.; van den Broek, Adri H. M.; Thoday, Keith L.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus intermedius group consists of three closely related coagulase-positive bacterial species including S. intermedius, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, and Staphylococcus delphini. S. pseudintermedius is a major skin pathogen of dogs, which occasionally causes severe zoonotic infections of humans. S. delphini has been isolated from an array of different animals including horses, mink, and pigeons, whereas S. intermedius has been isolated only from pigeons to date. Here we provide a detailed analysis of the S. pseudintermedius whole genome sequence in comparison to high quality draft S. intermedius and S. delphini genomes, and to other sequenced staphylococcal species. The core genome of the SIG was highly conserved with average nucleotide identity (ANI) between the three species of 93.61%, which is very close to the threshold of species delineation (95% ANI), highlighting the close-relatedness of the SIG species. However, considerable variation was identified in the content of mobile genetic elements, cell wall-associated proteins, and iron and sugar transporters, reflecting the distinct ecological niches inhabited. Of note, S. pseudintermedius ED99 contained a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat locus of the Nmeni subtype and S. intermedius contained both Nmeni and Mtube subtypes. In contrast to S. intermedius and S. delphini and most other staphylococci examined to date, S. pseudintermedius contained at least nine predicted reverse transcriptase Group II introns. Furthermore, S. pseudintermedius ED99 encoded several transposons which were largely responsible for its multi-resistant phenotype. Overall, the study highlights extensive differences in accessory genome content between closely related staphylococcal species inhabiting distinct host niches, providing new avenues for research into pathogenesis and bacterial host-adaptation. PMID:22919635

  17. Analysis of co-evolving soil depths, vegetation patterns, and connectivity on drylands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saco, Patricia; Willgoose, Garry

    2014-05-01

    Arid and semiarid landscapes cover more than 30% of the Earth's surface. Vegetation in these areas is usually patchy due limited resource availability. This self-organized patchiness results from the nonlinear feedbacks between water redistribution, soils, landforms, and biota. These complex interactions make the understanding and prediction of landscape responses to climate and land use change highly challenging. Though several models have been recently developed and used to understand these feedbacks and the emergence of vegetation patterns in drylands, these models do not explicitly incorporate feedbacks with coevolving soil depths. Here we analyse feedback effects resulting from co-evolving soil depths, which play a key role in the redistribution of surface runoff and therefore on the patterns of vegetation and landscape connectivity. We present modelling results using a coupled landform evolution-dynamic vegetation model, which includes a soil depth evolution module accounts and for soil production and sediment erosion and deposition processes. We analyse the co-evolution of soil depths and vegetation patterns for varying soil erodibilities, slopes and plant functional types. We find that for deeper soils, facilitation effects of vegetation gives rise to the formation of regular patterns, and slope and soil erodibility are the key factors for recovery after disturbance. Disturbances in areas with high slope and/or soil erodibility lead to an increase in connectivity and a degraded state. In contrast, we find that for shallow soils, the facilitation effect of vegetation becomes less important and vegetation patterns are more irregular. In this case, soil depth becomes the key factor prescribing surface connectivity and for the recovery of the system after disturbance. These results have critical implications for effective management and restoration efforts, and for understanding the effects of changes in climate and land use.

  18. Simultaneous prediction of transcription factor binding sites in a group of prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Our current understanding of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in sequenced prokaryotic genomes is very limited due to the lack of an accurate and efficient computational method for the prediction of TFBSs at a genome scale. In an attempt to change this situation, we have recently developed a comparative genomics based algorithm called GLECLUBS for de novo genome-wide prediction of TFBSs in a target genome. Although GLECLUBS has achieved rather high prediction accuracy of TFBSs in a target genome, it is still not efficient enough to be applied to all the sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Results Here, we designed a new algorithm based on GLECLUBS called extended GLECLUBS (eGLECLUBS) for simultaneous prediction of TFBSs in a group of related prokaryotic genomes. When tested on a group of γ-proteobacterial genomes including E. coli K12, a group of firmicutes genomes including B. subtilis and a group of cyanobacterial genomes using the same parameter settings, eGLECLUBS predicts more than 82% of known TFBSs in extracted inter-operonic sequences in both E. coli K12 and B. subtilis. Because each genome in a group is equally treated, it is highly likely that similar prediction accuracy has been achieved for each genome in the group. Conclusions We have developed a new algorithm for genome-wide de novo prediction of TFBSs in a group of related prokaryotic genomes. The algorithm has achieved the same level of accuracy and robustness as its predecessor GLECLUBS, but can work on dozens of genomes at the same time. PMID:20653963

  19. Partially satisfied to fully satisfied transitions in co-evolving inverse voter model and possible scaling behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, C. W.; Xu, C.; Hui, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding co-evolving networks characterized by the mutual influence of agents' actions and network structure remains a challenge. We study a co-evolving inverse voter model in which agents adapt to achieve a preferred environment with more opposite-opinion neighbors by rewiring their connections and switching opinion. Numerical studies reveal a transition from a dynamic partially satisfied phase to a frozen fully satisfied phase as the rewiring probability is varied. A simple mean field theory is shown to capture the behavior only qualitatively. An improved mean field theory carrying a longer spatial correlation gives better results. Motivated by numerical results in networks of different degrees and mean field results, we propose a scaling variable that combines the rewiring probability and mean degree in a special form. The scaling variable is shown to work well in analyzing data corresponding to different networks and different rewiring probabilities. An application is to predict the results for networks of different degrees based solely on results obtained from networks of one degree. Studying scaling behavior provides an alternative path for understanding co-evolving agent-based dynamical systems, especially in light of the trade-off between complexity of a theory and its accuracy.

  20. Identification of co-evolving sites in the ligand binding domain of G protein-coupled receptors using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatakia, Sarosh N.; Costanzi, Stefano; Chow, Carson C.

    2008-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest superfamily of membrane proteins in humans. They are involved in signal transduction in numerous cellular processes and are the most common target for pharmacological intervention via activation or inhibition. Identification of functionally important sites is relevant for better understanding the ligand-receptor interaction and therefore for drug delivery. In a superfamily of proteins, functionally important but co-evolving sites are not easily identified in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA). Using a MSA of trans-membrane (TM) domains of GPCR superfamily, we identify sites which co-evolve, and may therefore be functionally important. Assigning the TM site as a node and the MI of site pairs as an inverse inter-node distance, a MI graph is established. Co-evolving sites are then identified via this graph. Nodes characterized by high connectivity are located within the commonly accepted ligand binding site of GPCRs, suggesting that concerted co-evolution of a number of neighboring residues gave rise to a multitude of subfamilies each recognizing a specific set of ligands. MI and graph analysis may serve as a tool for the identification of topologically conserved binding pockets in the families of evolutionarily related proteins.

  1. Complete Genomic Sequence for an Avian Group G Rotavirus from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Stucker, Karla M.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Nyaga, Martin M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Fedorova, Nadia; Akopov, Asmik; Ngoveni, Harry; Peenze, Ina; Seheri, Mapaseka L.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report the first complete sequence for an avian group G rotavirus (RVG) genome from Africa, which is the third publically available RVG genome. These RVG genomes are highly diverse, especially in their VP4, VP7, NSP4, and NSP3 segments, indicating that RVG diversity is comparable to that of rotavirus A. PMID:25767240

  2. Complete genomic sequence for an avian group G rotavirus from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Stucker, Karla M; Stockwell, Timothy B; Nyaga, Martin M; Halpin, Rebecca A; Fedorova, Nadia; Akopov, Asmik; Ngoveni, Harry; Peenze, Ina; Seheri, Mapaseka L; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Wentworth, David E

    2015-01-01

    We report the first complete sequence for an avian group G rotavirus (RVG) genome from Africa, which is the third publically available RVG genome. These RVG genomes are highly diverse, especially in their VP4, VP7, NSP4, and NSP3 segments, indicating that RVG diversity is comparable to that of rotavirus A. PMID:25767240

  3. Principles of Genome Evolution in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Ranz, José M; Maurin, Damien; Chan, Yuk S; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Hillier, LaDeana W; Roote, John; Ashburner, Michael; Bergman, Casey M

    2007-01-01

    That closely related species often differ by chromosomal inversions was discovered by Sturtevant and Plunkett in 1926. Our knowledge of how these inversions originate is still very limited, although a prevailing view is that they are facilitated by ectopic recombination events between inverted repetitive sequences. The availability of genome sequences of related species now allows us to study in detail the mechanisms that generate interspecific inversions. We have analyzed the breakpoint regions of the 29 inversions that differentiate the chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster and two closely related species, D. simulans and D. yakuba, and reconstructed the molecular events that underlie their origin. Experimental and computational analysis revealed that the breakpoint regions of 59% of the inversions (17/29) are associated with inverted duplications of genes or other nonrepetitive sequences. In only two cases do we find evidence for inverted repetitive sequences in inversion breakpoints. We propose that the presence of inverted duplications associated with inversion breakpoint regions is the result of staggered breaks, either isochromatid or chromatid, and that this, rather than ectopic exchange between inverted repetitive sequences, is the prevalent mechanism for the generation of inversions in the melanogaster species group. Outgroup analysis also revealed evidence for widespread breakpoint recycling. Lastly, we have found that expression domains in D. melanogaster may be disrupted in D. yakuba, bringing into question their potential adaptive significance. PMID:17550304

  4. Analysis of co-evolving genes in campylobacter jejuni and C. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The population structure of Campylobacter has been frequently studied by MLST, for which fragments of housekeeping genes are compared. We wished to determine if the used MLST genes are representative of the complete genome. Methods: A set of 1029 core gene families (CGF) was identifie...

  5. Genome sequence of a proteolytic (Group I) Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A and comparative analysis of the clostridial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Sebaihia, Mohammed; Peck, Michael W.; Minton, Nigel P.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Holden, Matthew T.G.; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.; Carter, Andrew T.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Mason, David R.; Crossman, Lisa; Paul, Catherine J.; Ivens, Alasdair; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.; Davis, Ian J.; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M.; Churcher, Carol; Quail, Michael A.; Chillingworth, Tracey; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Goodhead, Ian; Hance, Zahra; Jagels, Kay; Larke, Natasha; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; White, Brian; Whithead, Sally; Parkhill, Julian

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heterogeneous Gram-positive species that comprises four genetically and physiologically distinct groups of bacteria that share the ability to produce botulinum neurotoxin, the most poisonous toxin known to man, and the causative agent of botulism, a severe disease of humans and animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of a representative of Group I (proteolytic) C. botulinum (strain Hall A, ATCC 3502). The genome consists of a chromosome (3,886,916 bp) and a plasmid (16,344 bp), which carry 3650 and 19 predicted genes, respectively. Consistent with the proteolytic phenotype of this strain, the genome harbors a large number of genes encoding secreted proteases and enzymes involved in uptake and metabolism of amino acids. The genome also reveals a hitherto unknown ability of C. botulinum to degrade chitin. There is a significant lack of recently acquired DNA, indicating a stable genomic content, in strong contrast to the fluid genome of Clostridium difficile, which can form longer-term relationships with its host. Overall, the genome indicates that C. botulinum is adapted to a saprophytic lifestyle both in soil and aquatic environments. This pathogen relies on its toxin to rapidly kill a wide range of prey species, and to gain access to nutrient sources, it releases a large number of extracellular enzymes to soften and destroy rotting or decayed tissues. PMID:17519437

  6. Modeling growth and dissemination of lymphoma in a co-evolving lymph node: a diffuse-domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yao-Li; Cristini, Vittorio; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiangrong; Frieboes, Hermann; Lowengrub, John

    2013-03-01

    While partial differential equation models of tumor growth have successfully described various spatiotemporal phenomena observed for in-vitro tumor spheroid experiments, one challenge towards taking these models to further study in-vivo tumors is that instead of relatively static tissue culture with regular boundary conditions, in-vivo tumors are often confined in organ tissues that co-evolve with the tumor growth. Here we adopt a recently developed diffuse-domain method to account for the co-evolving domain boundaries, adapting our previous in-vitro tumor model for the development of lymphoma encapsulated in a lymph node, which may swell or shrink due to proliferation and dissemination of lymphoma cells and treatment by chemotherapy. We use the model to study the induced spatial heterogeneity, which may arise as an emerging phenomenon in experimental observations and model analysis. Spatial heterogeneity is believed to lead to tumor infiltration patterns and reduce the efficacy of chemotherapy, leaving residuals that cause cancer relapse after the treatment. Understanding the spatiotemporal evolution of in-vivo tumors can be an essential step towards more effective strategies of curing cancer. Supported by NIH-PSOC grant 1U54CA143907-01.

  7. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Streptococcus illuminates evolutionary implications of species groups.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into "species groups". However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  8. Comparative Genomics of the Bacterial Genus Streptococcus Illuminates Evolutionary Implications of Species Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiao-Yang; Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Li, Hong-Wei; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Streptococcus within the phylum Firmicutes are among the most diverse and significant zoonotic pathogens. This genus has gone through considerable taxonomic revision due to increasing improvements of chemotaxonomic approaches, DNA hybridization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It is proposed to place the majority of streptococci into “species groups”. However, the evolutionary implications of species groups are not clear presently. We use comparative genomic approaches to yield a better understanding of the evolution of Streptococcus through genome dynamics, population structure, phylogenies and virulence factor distribution of species groups. Genome dynamics analyses indicate that the pan-genome size increases with the addition of newly sequenced strains, while the core genome size decreases with sequential addition at the genus level and species group level. Population structure analysis reveals two distinct lineages, one including Pyogenic, Bovis, Mutans and Salivarius groups, and the other including Mitis, Anginosus and Unknown groups. Phylogenetic dendrograms show that species within the same species group cluster together, and infer two main clades in accordance with population structure analysis. Distribution of streptococcal virulence factors has no obvious patterns among the species groups; however, the evolution of some common virulence factors is congruous with the evolution of species groups, according to phylogenetic inference. We suggest that the proposed streptococcal species groups are reasonable from the viewpoints of comparative genomics; evolution of the genus is congruent with the individual evolutionary trajectories of different species groups. PMID:24977706

  9. PhyloGene server for identification and visualization of co-evolving proteins using normalized phylogenetic profiles

    PubMed Central

    Sadreyev, Ilyas R.; Ji, Fei; Cohen, Emiliano; Ruvkun, Gary; Tabach, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Proteins that function in the same pathways, protein complexes or the same environmental conditions can show similar patterns of sequence conservation across phylogenetic clades. In species that no longer require a specific protein complex or pathway, these proteins, as a group, tend to be lost or diverge. Analysis of the similarity in patterns of sequence conservation across a large set of eukaryotes can predict functional associations between different proteins, identify new pathway members and reveal the function of previously uncharacterized proteins. We used normalized phylogenetic profiling to predict protein function and identify new pathway members and disease genes. The phylogenetic profiles of tens of thousands conserved proteins in the human, mouse, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila genomes can be queried on our new web server, PhyloGene. PhyloGene provides intuitive and user-friendly platform to query the patterns of conservation across 86 animal, fungal, plant and protist genomes. A protein query can be submitted either by selecting the name from whole-genome protein sets of the intensively studied species or by entering a protein sequence. The graphic output shows the profile of sequence conservation for the query and the most similar phylogenetic profiles for the proteins in the genome of choice. The user can also download this output in numerical form. PMID:25958392

  10. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  11. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of the 936 group of lactococcal Siphoviridae phages

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James; Bottacini, Francesca; Mahony, Jennifer; Kelleher, Philip; Neve, Horst; Zomer, Aldert; Nauta, Arjen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing and comparative analysis of bacteriophage collections has greatly enhanced our understanding regarding their prevalence, phage-host interactions as well as the overall biodiversity of their genomes. This knowledge is very relevant to phages infecting Lactococcus lactis, since they constitute a significant risk factor for dairy fermentations. Of the eighty four lactococcal phage genomes currently available, fifty five belong to the so-called 936 group, the most prevalent of the ten currently recognized lactococcal phage groups. Here, we report the genetic characteristics of a new collection of 936 group phages. By combining these genomes to those sequenced previously we determined the core and variable elements of the 936 genome. Genomic variation occurs across the 936 phage genome, such as genetic elements that (i) lead to a +1 translational frameshift resulting in the formation of additional structures on the phage tail, (ii) specify a double neck passage structure, and (iii) encode packaging module-associated methylases. Hierarchical clustering of the gene complement of the 936 group phages and nucleotide alignments allowed grouping of the ninety 936 group phages into distinct clusters, which in general appear to correspond with their geographical origin. PMID:26892066

  12. Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing to an Unusual Outbreak of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Clement, Meredith E.; Sharma Kuinkel, Batu K.; Ruffin, Felicia; Flores, Anthony R.; Levinson, Howard; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Moore, Zack; Fowler, Vance G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome analysis was applied to investigate atypical point-source transmission of 2 invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections. Isolates were serotype M4, ST39, and genetically indistinguishable. Comparison with MGAS10750 revealed nonsynonymous polymorphisms in ropB and increased speB transcription. This study demonstrates the usefulness of whole-genome analyses for GAS outbreaks. PMID:27006966

  13. Sulfur-oxidizing symbionts have not co-evolved with their hydrothermal vent tube worm hosts: an RFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Laue, B E; Nelson, D C

    1997-09-01

    A fine-scale phylogenetic comparison was made among the symbionts of different genera of hydrothermal vent tube worms. These included Riftia pachyptila and Tevnia jerichonona, which inhabit sites along the east Pacific Rise, and Ridgeia piscesae from the Juan de Fuca Ridge. An analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was employed using three symbiont-specific gene probes: eubacterial 16S rRNA, RuBPC/O Form II, and ATP sulfurylase (recently cloned from the Riftia symbiont). Results indicated that all of the symbionts from the three different hosts were conspecific and the Riftia and Tevnia symbionts were indistinguishable over and 1800-km range. Significantly, this indicates that the symbionts have not co-evolved with their respective hosts, which are known to belong to separate families. This study strongly supports the conclusion that the symbionts are acquired de novo by each generation of juvenile tube worms from a common source in the surrounding sea water. PMID:9284558

  14. Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli Group 1 Strain pslb65 Causing Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Melons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tielin; Sun, Baixin; Yang, Yuwen

    2015-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is typed into two groups, mainly based on the host. We determined the draft genome of A. citrulli group 1 strain pslb65. The strain was isolated from melon collected from Xinjiang province, China. The A. citrulli pslb65 genome contains 4,903,443 bp and has a G+C content of 68.8 mol%. PMID:25908136

  15. Phage Morphology Recapitulates Phylogeny: The Comparative Genomics of a New Group of Myoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, André M.; Tremblay, Denise; Moineau, Sylvain; Rattei, Thomas; Kushkina, Alla I.; Tovkach, Fedor I.; Krisch, Henry M.; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Among dsDNA tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales), members of the Myoviridae family have the most sophisticated virion design that includes a complex contractile tail structure. The Myoviridae generally have larger genomes than the other phage families. Relatively few “dwarf” myoviruses, those with a genome size of less than 50 kb such as those of the Mu group, have been analyzed in extenso. Here we report on the genome sequencing and morphological characterization of a new group of such phages that infect a diverse range of Proteobacteria, namely Aeromonas salmonicida phage 56, Vibrio cholerae phages 138 and CP-T1, Bdellovibrio phage φ1422, and Pectobacterium carotovorum phage ZF40. This group of dwarf myoviruses shares an identical virion morphology, characterized by usually short contractile tails, and have genome sizes of approximately 45 kb. Although their genome sequences are variable in their lysogeny, replication, and host adaption modules, presumably reflecting differing lifestyles and hosts, their structural and morphogenesis modules have been evolutionarily constrained by their virion morphology. Comparative genomic analysis reveals that these phages, along with related prophage genomes, form a new coherent group within the Myoviridae. The results presented in this communication support the hypothesis that the diversity of phages may be more structured than generally believed and that the innumerable phages in the biosphere all belong to discrete lineages or families. PMID:22792219

  16. A quantitative measure for organization of complex and co-evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi

    2012-02-01

    To define evolution and self-organization in complex networks a quantitative measure for organization is necessary. Two systems should be numerically distinguishable by their degree of organization and their rate of self-organization. Here we apply as a measure for quantity of organization the inverse of the average sum of physical actions of all elements in a system per unit motion multiplied by the Planck's constant. The meaning of quantity of organization here is the number of quanta of action per one unit motion of an element. For example, a unit motion for electrons on a computer chip is the one necessary for one computation. This definition can be applied to the organization in any complex system. Systems self-organize to decrease the average action per element per unit motion in them. This is the attractor for a dynamical, nonlinear system evolving in time. Constraints increase this average action, so constraint minimization is a basic mechanism for action minimization. Increase of quantity of elements in the network, leads to faster constraint minimization through grouping, decrease of average action per element and motion and therefore faster self-organization and evolution.

  17. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  18. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-01-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation. PMID:26109237

  19. Nitrogen limitation as a driver of genome size evolution in a group of karst plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ming; Wang, Jing; Huang, Hongwen

    2015-06-01

    Genome size is of fundamental biological importance with significance in predicting structural and functional attributes of organisms. Although abundant evidence has shown that the genome size can be largely explained by differential proliferation and removal of non-coding DNA of the genome, the evolutionary and ecological basis of genome size variation remains poorly understood. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are essential elements of DNA and protein building blocks, yet often subject to environmental limitation in natural ecosystems. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test this hypothesis by determining whether leaf N and P availability affects genome sizes in 99 species of Primulina (Gesneriaceae), a group of soil specialists adapted to limestone karst environment in south China. We find that genome sizes in Primulina are strongly positively correlated with plant N content, but the correlation with plant P content is not significant when phylogeny history was taken into account. This study shows for the first time that N limitation might have been a plausible driver of genome size variation in a group of plants. We propose that competition for nitrogen nutrient between DNA synthesis and cellular functions is a possible mechanism for genome size evolution in Primulina under N-limitation.

  20. Multiple Groups of Novel Retroviral Genomes in Pigs and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Patience, Clive; Switzer, William M.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Griffiths, David J.; Goward, Melanie E.; Heneine, Walid; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2001-01-01

    In view of the concern over potential infection hazards in the use of porcine tissues and organs for xenotransplantation to humans, we investigated the diversity of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) genomes in the DNA of domestic pigs and related species. In addition to the three known envelope subgroups of infectious gamma retroviruses (PERV-A, -B, and -C), classed together here as PERV group γ1, four novel groups of gamma retrovirus (γ2 to γ5) and four novel groups of beta retrovirus (β1 to β4) genomes were detected in pig DNA using generic and specific PCR primers. PCR quantification indicated that the retroviral genome copy number in the Landrace × Duroc F1 hybrid pig ranged from 2 (β2 and γ5) to approximately 50 (γ1). The γ1, γ2, and β4 genomes were transcribed into RNA in adult kidney tissue. Apart from γ1, the retroviral genomes are not known to be infectious, and sequencing of a small number of amplified genome fragments revealed stop codons in putative open reading frames in several cases. Analysis of DNA from wild boar and other species of Old World pigs (Suidae) and New World peccaries (Tayassuidae) showed that one retrovirus group, β2, was common to all species tested, while the others were present among all Old World species but absent from New World species. The PERV-C subgroup of γ1 genomes segregated among domestic pigs and were absent from two African species (red river hog and warthog). Thus domestic swine and their phylogenetic relatives harbor multiple groups of hitherto undescribed PERV genomes. PMID:11222700

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of Nine Bacillus cereus Group Phages

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    We report the sequences of nine novel Bacillus cereus group bacteriophages: DIGNKC, Juglone, Nemo, Nigalana, NotTheCreek, Phrodo, SageFayge, Vinny, and Zuko. These bacteriophages are double-stranded DNA-containing Myoviridae isolated from soil samples using B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki as the host bacterium. PMID:27417827

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Nine Bacillus cereus Group Phages.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Samantha; Johnson, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    We report the sequences of nine novel Bacillus cereus group bacteriophages: DIGNKC, Juglone, Nemo, Nigalana, NotTheCreek, Phrodo, SageFayge, Vinny, and Zuko. These bacteriophages are double-stranded DNA-containing Myoviridae isolated from soil samples using B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki as the host bacterium. PMID:27417827

  3. Complete Genome Assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, a Group A β-Hemolytic Reference Strain.

    PubMed

    Minogue, T D; Daligault, H A; Davenport, K W; Bishop-Lilly, K A; Broomall, S M; Bruce, D C; Chain, P S; Chertkov, O; Coyne, S R; Freitas, T; Frey, K G; Gibbons, H S; Jaissle, J; Redden, C L; Rosenzweig, C N; Xu, Y; Johnson, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 (Rosenbach) as submitted to GenBank under accession number CP008926. This group A nonmotile β-hemolytic clinical isolate is used for quality control in a variety of commercially available tests. The assembled genome is 1.84 Mb (38.5% G+C content) and contains 1,788 coding regions. PMID:25258274

  4. Complete Genome Assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615, a Group A β-Hemolytic Reference Strain

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, T. D.; Daligault, H. A.; Davenport, K. W.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Broomall, S. M.; Bruce, D. C.; Chain, P. S.; Chertkov, O.; Coyne, S. R.; Freitas, T.; Frey, K. G.; Gibbons, H. S.; Jaissle, J.; Redden, C. L.; Rosenzweig, C. N.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We present the complete genome assembly of Streptococcus pyogenes ATCC 19615 (Rosenbach) as submitted to GenBank under accession number CP008926. This group A nonmotile β-hemolytic clinical isolate is used for quality control in a variety of commercially available tests. The assembled genome is 1.84 Mb (38.5% G+C content) and contains 1,788 coding regions. PMID:25258274

  5. Co-evolving CENP-A and CAL1 Domains Mediate Centromeric CENP-A Deposition across Drosophila Species.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Leah; Mellone, Barbara G

    2016-04-18

    Centromeres mediate the conserved process of chromosome segregation, yet centromeric DNA and the centromeric histone, CENP-A, are rapidly evolving. The rapid evolution of Drosophila CENP-A loop 1 (L1) is thought to modulate the DNA-binding preferences of CENP-A to counteract centromere drive, the preferential transmission of chromosomes with expanded centromeric satellites. Consistent with this model, CENP-A from Drosophila bipectinata (bip) cannot localize to Drosophila melanogaster (mel) centromeres. We show that this result is due to the inability of the mel CENP-A chaperone, CAL1, to deposit bip CENP-A into chromatin. Co-expression of bip CENP-A and bip CAL1 in mel cells restores centromeric localization, and similar findings apply to other Drosophila species. We identify two co-evolving regions, CENP-A L1 and the CAL1 N terminus, as critical for lineage-specific CENP-A incorporation. Collectively, our data show that the rapid evolution of L1 modulates CAL1-mediated CENP-A assembly, suggesting an alternative mechanism for the suppression of centromere drive. PMID:27093083

  6. Characterization and comparative genomic analysis of bacteriophages infecting members of the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-05-01

    The Bacillus cereus group phages infecting B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis (Bt) have been studied at the molecular level and, recently, at the genomic level to control the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and to prevent phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. A comparative phylogenetic analysis has revealed three different major phage groups with different morphologies (Myoviridae for group I, Siphoviridae for group II, and Tectiviridae for group III), genome size (group I > group II > group III), and lifestyle (virulent for group I and temperate for group II and III). A subsequent phage genome comparison using a dot plot analysis showed that phages in each group are highly homologous, substantiating the grouping of B. cereus phages. Endolysin is a host lysis protein that contains two conserved domains: a cell-wall-binding domain (CBD) and an enzymatic activity domain (EAD). In B. cereus sensu lato phage group I, four different endolysin groups have been detected, according to combinations of two types of CBD and four types of EAD. Group I phages have two copies of tail lysins and one copy of endolysin, but the functions of the tail lysins are still unknown. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group II, the B. anthracis phages have been studied and applied for typing and rapid detection of pathogenic host strains. In the B. cereus sensu lato phage group III, the B. thuringiensis phages Bam35 and GIL01 have been studied to understand phage entry and lytic switch regulation mechanisms. In this review, we suggest that further study of the B. cereus group phages would be useful for various phage applications, such as biocontrol, typing, and rapid detection of the pathogens B. cereus and B. anthracis and for the prevention of phage contamination of the natural insect pesticide Bt. PMID:24264384

  7. StreptoBase: An Oral Streptococcus mitis Group Genomic Resource and Analysis Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenning; Paterson, Ian C.; Mutha, Naresh V. R.; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Tan, Shi Yang; Old, Lesley A.; Jakubovics, Nicholas S.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    The oral streptococci are spherical Gram-positive bacteria categorized under the phylum Firmicutes which are among the most common causative agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE) and are also important agents in septicaemia in neutropenic patients. The Streptococcus mitis group is comprised of 13 species including some of the most common human oral colonizers such as S. mitis, S. oralis, S. sanguinis and S. gordonii as well as species such as S. tigurinus, S. oligofermentans and S. australis that have only recently been classified and are poorly understood at present. We present StreptoBase, which provides a specialized free resource focusing on the genomic analyses of oral species from the mitis group. It currently hosts 104 S. mitis group genomes including 27 novel mitis group strains that we sequenced using the high throughput Illumina HiSeq technology platform, and provides a comprehensive set of genome sequences for analyses, particularly comparative analyses and visualization of both cross-species and cross-strain characteristics of S. mitis group bacteria. StreptoBase incorporates sophisticated in-house designed bioinformatics web tools such as Pairwise Genome Comparison (PGC) tool and Pathogenomic Profiling Tool (PathoProT), which facilitate comparative pathogenomics analysis of Streptococcus strains. Examples are provided to demonstrate how StreptoBase can be employed to compare genome structure of different S. mitis group bacteria and putative virulence genes profile across multiple streptococcal strains. In conclusion, StreptoBase offers access to a range of streptococci genomic resources as well as analysis tools and will be an invaluable platform to accelerate research in streptococci. Database URL: http://streptococcus.um.edu.my. PMID:27138013

  8. StreptoBase: An Oral Streptococcus mitis Group Genomic Resource and Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenning; Tan, Tze King; Paterson, Ian C; Mutha, Naresh V R; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Tan, Shi Yang; Old, Lesley A; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    The oral streptococci are spherical Gram-positive bacteria categorized under the phylum Firmicutes which are among the most common causative agents of bacterial infective endocarditis (IE) and are also important agents in septicaemia in neutropenic patients. The Streptococcus mitis group is comprised of 13 species including some of the most common human oral colonizers such as S. mitis, S. oralis, S. sanguinis and S. gordonii as well as species such as S. tigurinus, S. oligofermentans and S. australis that have only recently been classified and are poorly understood at present. We present StreptoBase, which provides a specialized free resource focusing on the genomic analyses of oral species from the mitis group. It currently hosts 104 S. mitis group genomes including 27 novel mitis group strains that we sequenced using the high throughput Illumina HiSeq technology platform, and provides a comprehensive set of genome sequences for analyses, particularly comparative analyses and visualization of both cross-species and cross-strain characteristics of S. mitis group bacteria. StreptoBase incorporates sophisticated in-house designed bioinformatics web tools such as Pairwise Genome Comparison (PGC) tool and Pathogenomic Profiling Tool (PathoProT), which facilitate comparative pathogenomics analysis of Streptococcus strains. Examples are provided to demonstrate how StreptoBase can be employed to compare genome structure of different S. mitis group bacteria and putative virulence genes profile across multiple streptococcal strains. In conclusion, StreptoBase offers access to a range of streptococci genomic resources as well as analysis tools and will be an invaluable platform to accelerate research in streptococci. Database URL: http://streptococcus.um.edu.my. PMID:27138013

  9. Complete genome of the uncultured Termite Group 1 bacteria in a single host protist cell.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Yuichi; Sharma, Vineet K; Prakash, Tulika; Noda, Satoko; Taylor, Todd D; Kudo, Toshiaki; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Hattori, Masahira; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2008-04-01

    Termites harbor a symbiotic gut microbial community that is responsible for their ability to thrive on recalcitrant plant matter. The community comprises diverse microorganisms, most of which are as yet uncultivable; the detailed symbiotic mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present the first complete genome sequence of a termite gut symbiont-an uncultured bacterium named Rs-D17 belonging to the candidate phylum Termite Group 1 (TG1). TG1 is a dominant group in termite guts, found as intracellular symbionts of various cellulolytic protists, without any physiological information. To acquire the complete genome sequence, we collected Rs-D17 cells from only a single host protist cell to minimize their genomic variation and performed isothermal whole-genome amplification. This strategy enabled us to reconstruct a circular chromosome (1,125,857 bp) encoding 761 putative protein-coding genes. The genome additionally contains 121 pseudogenes assigned to categories, such as cell wall biosynthesis, regulators, transporters, and defense mechanisms. Despite its apparent reductive evolution, the ability to synthesize 15 amino acids and various cofactors is retained, some of these genes having been duplicated. Considering that diverse termite-gut protists harbor TG1 bacteria, we suggest that this bacterial group plays a key role in the gut symbiotic system by stably supplying essential nitrogenous compounds deficient in lignocelluloses to their host protists and the termites. Our results provide a breakthrough to clarify the functions of and the interactions among the individual members of this multilayered symbiotic complex. PMID:18391199

  10. Genome Editing via Mobile Group-II Introns and Cre/lox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyeart, P. E.; Perutka, J.; Dao, M.; Ellington, A. E.

    2010-04-01

    Mobile group-II introns and the Cre/lox systems are combined to allow large segments of DNA to be removed or transferred within/between bacterial genomes. Planned applications include metabolic optimization and development of novel dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria.

  11. Genome Sequence of Borrelia chilensis VA1, a South American Member of the Lyme Borreliosis Group

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weihua; Ojaimi, Caroline; Fallon, John T.; Travisany, Dante; Maass, Alejandro; Ivanova, Larisa; Tomova, Alexandra; González-Acuña, Daniel; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia chilensis strain VA1 is a recently described South American member of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex from Chile. Whole-genome sequencing analysis determined its linear chromosome and plasmids lp54 and cp26, confirmed its membership in the Lyme borreliosis group, and will open new research avenues regarding its pathogenic potential. PMID:25676758

  12. Complete genome sequence of the bioleaching bacterium Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Alonso; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Valdés, Natalia; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Orellana, Omar; Levicán, Gloria

    2016-03-20

    We describe the complete genome sequence of Leptospirillum sp. group II strain CF-1, an acidophilic bioleaching bacterium isolated from an acid mine drainage (AMD). This work provides data to gain insights about adaptive response of Leptospirillum spp. to the extreme conditions of bioleaching environments. PMID:26853478

  13. Genome Sequencing and Analysis of Catopsilia pomona nucleopolyhedrovirus: A Distinct Species in Group I Alphabaculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Lei; Hou, Dianhai; Wang, Manli; Arif, Basil; Kou, Zheng; Wang, Hualin; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequence of Catopsilia pomona nucleopolyhedrovirus (CapoNPV) was determined by the Roche 454 sequencing system. The genome consisted of 128,058 bp and had an overall G+C content of 40%. There were 130 hypothetical open reading frames (ORFs) potentially encoding proteins of more than 50 amino acids and covering 92% of the genome. Among all the hypothetical ORFs, 37 baculovirus core genes, 23 lepidopteran baculovirus conserved genes and 10 genes conserved in Group I alphabaculoviruses were identified. In addition, the genome included regions of 8 typical baculoviral homologous repeat sequences (hrs). Phylogenic analysis showed that CapoNPV was in a distinct branch of clade “a” in Group I alphabaculoviruses. Gene parity plot analysis and overall similarity of ORFs indicated that CapoNPV is more closely related to the Group I alphabaculoviruses than to other baculoviruses. Interesting, CapoNPV lacks the genes encoding the fibroblast growth factor (fgf) and ac30, which are conserved in most lepidopteran and Group I baculoviruses, respectively. Sequence analysis of the F-like protein of CapoNPV showed that some amino acids were inserted into the fusion peptide region and the pre-transmembrane region of the protein. All these unique features imply that CapoNPV represents a member of a new baculovirus species. PMID:27166956

  14. "Is It Worth Knowing?" Focus Group Participants' Perceived Utility of Genomic Preconception Carrier Screening.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jennifer L; Goddard, Katrina A B; Davis, James; Wilfond, Benjamin; Kauffman, Tia L; Reiss, Jacob A; Gilmore, Marian; Himes, Patricia; Lynch, Frances L; Leo, Michael C; McMullen, Carmit

    2016-02-01

    As genome sequencing technology advances, research is needed to guide decision-making about what results can or should be offered to patients in different clinical settings. We conducted three focus groups with individuals who had prior preconception genetic testing experience to explore perceived advantages and disadvantages of genome sequencing for preconception carrier screening, compared to usual care. Using a discussion guide, a trained qualitative moderator facilitated the audio-recorded focus groups. Sixteen individuals participated. Thematic analysis of transcripts started with a grounded approach and subsequently focused on participants' perceptions of the value of genetic information. Analysis uncovered two orientations toward genomic preconception carrier screening: "certain" individuals desiring all possible screening information; and "hesitant" individuals who were more cautious about its value. Participants revealed valuable information about barriers to screening: fear/anxiety about results; concerns about the method of returning results; concerns about screening necessity; and concerns about partner participation. All participants recommended offering choice to patients to enhance the value of screening and reduce barriers. Overall, two groups of likely users of genome sequencing for preconception carrier screening demonstrated different perceptions of the advantages or disadvantages of screening, suggesting tailored approaches to education, consent, and counseling may be warranted with each group. PMID:26093606

  15. Generalized bacterial genome editing using mobile group II introns and Cre-lox

    PubMed Central

    Enyeart, Peter J; Chirieleison, Steven M; Dao, Mai N; Perutka, Jiri; Quandt, Erik M; Yao, Jun; Whitt, Jacob T; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T; Lambowitz, Alan M; Ellington, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Efficient bacterial genetic engineering approaches with broad-host applicability are rare. We combine two systems, mobile group II introns (‘targetrons') and Cre/lox, which function efficiently in many different organisms, into a versatile platform we call GETR (Genome Editing via Targetrons and Recombinases). The introns deliver lox sites to specific genomic loci, enabling genomic manipulations. Efficiency is enhanced by adding flexibility to the RNA hairpins formed by the lox sites. We use the system for insertions, deletions, inversions, and one-step cut-and-paste operations. We demonstrate insertion of a 12-kb polyketide synthase operon into the lacZ gene of Escherichia coli, multiple simultaneous and sequential deletions of up to 120 kb in E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, inversions of up to 1.2 Mb in E. coli and Bacillus subtilis, and one-step cut-and-pastes for translocating 120 kb of genomic sequence to a site 1.5 Mb away. We also demonstrate the simultaneous delivery of lox sites into multiple loci in the Shewanella oneidensis genome. No selectable markers need to be placed in the genome, and the efficiency of Cre-mediated manipulations typically approaches 100%. PMID:24002656

  16. Genomic definition of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clonal groups.

    PubMed

    Bialek-Davenet, Suzanne; Criscuolo, Alexis; Ailloud, Florent; Passet, Virginie; Jones, Louis; Delannoy-Vieillard, Anne-Sophie; Garin, Benoit; Le Hello, Simon; Arlet, Guillaume; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Decré, Dominique; Brisse, Sylvain

    2014-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant and highly virulent Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates are emerging, but the clonal groups (CGs) corresponding to these high-risk strains have remained imprecisely defined. We aimed to identify K. pneumoniae CGs on the basis of genome-wide sequence variation and to provide a simple bioinformatics tool to extract virulence and resistance gene data from genomic data. We sequenced 48 K. pneumoniae isolates, mostly of serotypes K1 and K2, and compared the genomes with 119 publicly available genomes. A total of 694 highly conserved genes were included in a core-genome multilocus sequence typing scheme, and cluster analysis of the data enabled precise definition of globally distributed hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant CGs. In addition, we created a freely accessible database, BIGSdb-Kp, to enable rapid extraction of medically and epidemiologically relevant information from genomic sequences of K. pneumoniae. Although drug-resistant and virulent K. pneumoniae populations were largely nonoverlapping, isolates with combined virulence and resistance features were detected. PMID:25341126

  17. Genomic and Metabolic Diversity of Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota in the Mesopelagic of Two Subtropical Gyres

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Brandon K.; Chaffin, Mark D.; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel; Morrison, Hilary G.; Field, Erin K.; Poulton, Nicole J.; Masland, E. Dashiell P.; Harris, Christopher C.; Sczyrba, Alexander; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Koren, Sergey; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2014-01-01

    Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota are one of the most abundant and cosmopolitan chemoautotrophs within the global dark ocean. To date, no representatives of this archaeal group retrieved from the dark ocean have been successfully cultured. We used single cell genomics to investigate the genomic and metabolic diversity of thaumarchaea within the mesopelagic of the subtropical North Pacific and South Atlantic Ocean. Phylogenetic and metagenomic recruitment analysis revealed that MGI single amplified genomes (SAGs) are genetically and biogeographically distinct from existing thaumarchaea cultures obtained from surface waters. Confirming prior studies, we found genes encoding proteins for aerobic ammonia oxidation and the hydrolysis of urea, which may be used for energy production, as well as genes involved in 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate and oxidative tricarboxylic acid pathways. A large proportion of protein sequences identified in MGI SAGs were absent in the marine cultures Cenarchaeum symbiosum and Nitrosopumilus maritimus, thus expanding the predicted protein space for this archaeal group. Identifiable genes located on genomic islands with low metagenome recruitment capacity were enriched in cellular defense functions, likely in response to viral infections or grazing. We show that MGI Thaumarchaeota in the dark ocean may have more flexibility in potential energy sources and adaptations to biotic interactions than the existing, surface-ocean cultures. PMID:24743558

  18. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  19. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    PubMed

    Zhalnina, Kateryna V; Dias, Raquel; Leonard, Michael T; Dorr de Quadros, Patricia; Camargo, Flavio A O; Drew, Jennifer C; Farmerie, William G; Daroub, Samira H; Triplett, Eric W

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group. PMID:24999826

  20. Genome Sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from Group I.1b Enriched from Everglades Soil Reveals Novel Genomic Features of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhalnina, Kateryna V.; Dias, Raquel; Leonard, Michael T.; Dorr de Quadros, Patricia; Camargo, Flavio A. O.; Drew, Jennifer C.; Farmerie, William G.; Daroub, Samira H.; Triplett, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group. PMID:24999826

  1. Genome size in Hieracium subgenus Hieracium (Asteraceae) is strongly correlated with major phylogenetic groups

    PubMed Central

    Chrtek, Jindřich; Zahradníček, Jaroslav; Krak, Karol; Fehrer, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Hieracium subgenus Hieracium is one of the taxonomically most intricate groups of vascular plants, due to polyploidy and a diversity of breeeding systems (sexuality vs. apomixis). The aim of the present study was to analyse nuclear genome size in a phylogenetic framework and to assess relationships between genome size and ploidy, breeding system and selected ecogeographic features. Methods Holoploid and monoploid genome sizes (C- and Cx-values) of 215 cultivated plants from 89 field populations of 42 so-called ‘basic’ Hieracium species were determined using propidium iodide flow cytometry. Chromosome counts were available for all analysed plants, and all plants were tested experimentally for their mode of reproduction (sexuality vs. apomixis). For constructing molecular phylogenetic trees, the external transcribed spacer region of nuclear ribosomal DNA was used. Key Results The mean 2C values differed up to 2·37-fold among different species (from 7·03 pg in diploid to 16·67 in tetraploid accessions). The 1Cx values varied 1·22-fold (between 3·51 and 4·34 pg). Variation in 1Cx values between conspecific (species in a broad sense) accessions ranged from 0·24% to 7·2%. Little variation (not exceeding the approximate measurement inaccurracy threshold of 3·5%) was found in 33 species, whereas variation higher than 3·5% was detected in seven species. Most of the latter may have a polytopic origin. Mean 1Cx values of the three cytotypes (2n, 3n and 4n) differed significantly (average of 3·93 pg in diploids, 3·82 pg in triploids and 3·78 pg in tetraploids) indicating downsizing of genomes in polyploids. The pattern of genome size variation correlated well with two major phylogenetic clades which were composed of species with western or eastern European origin. The monoploid genome size in the ‘western’ species was significantly lower than in the ‘eastern’ ones. Correlation of genome size with latitude, altitude and selected

  2. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of 17 French Clostridium botulinum Group III Strains

    PubMed Central

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Animal botulism is mainly associated with Clostridium botulinum group III strains producing neurotoxin types C, C/D, D, and D/C. In this report, we present the draft genome sequences of fourteen strains of Clostridium botulinum producing type C/D and two strains producing type D/C isolated in France, and one strain producing type D/C that originated from New Caledonia. PMID:26430029

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of 17 French Clostridium botulinum Group III Strains.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Animal botulism is mainly associated with Clostridium botulinum group III strains producing neurotoxin types C, C/D, D, and D/C. In this report, we present the draft genome sequences of fourteen strains of Clostridium botulinum producing type C/D and two strains producing type D/C isolated in France, and one strain producing type D/C that originated from New Caledonia. PMID:26430029

  5. Genomic insights into the taxonomic status of the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lai, Qiliang; Göker, Markus; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Wang, Meng; Sun, Yamin; Wang, Lei; Shao, Zongze

    2015-01-01

    The identification and phylogenetic relationships of bacteria within the Bacillus cereus group are controversial. This study aimed at determining the taxonomic affiliations of these strains using the whole-genome sequence-based Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) approach. The GBDP analysis clearly separated 224 strains into 30 clusters, representing eleven known, partially merged species and accordingly 19–20 putative novel species. Additionally, 16S rRNA gene analysis, a novel variant of multi-locus sequence analysis (nMLSA) and screening of virulence genes were performed. The 16S rRNA gene sequence was not sufficient to differentiate the bacteria within this group due to its high conservation. The nMLSA results were consistent with GBDP. Moreover, a fast typing method was proposed using the pycA gene, and where necessary, the ccpA gene. The pXO plasmids and cry genes were widely distributed, suggesting little correlation with the phylogenetic positions of the host bacteria. This might explain why classifications based on virulence characteristics proved unsatisfactory in the past. In summary, this is the first large-scale and systematic study of the taxonomic status of the bacteria within the B. cereus group using whole-genome sequences, and is likely to contribute to further insights into their pathogenicity, phylogeny and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:26373441

  6. Genome drafts of four phytoplasma strains of the ribosomal group 16SrIII.

    PubMed

    Saccardo, Federica; Martini, Marta; Palmano, Sabrina; Ermacora, Paolo; Scortichini, Marco; Loi, Nazia; Firrao, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    By applying a coverage-based read selection and filtration through a healthy plant dataset, and a post-assembly contig selection based on homology and linkage, genome sequence drafts were obtained for four phytoplasma strains belonging to the 16SrIII group (X disease clade), namely Vaccinium Witches' Broom phytoplasma (647 754 nt in 272 contigs), Italian Clover Phyllody phytoplasma strain MA (597 245 nt in 197 contigs), Poinsettia branch-inducing phytoplasma strain JR1 (631 440 nt in 185 contigs) and Milkweed Yellows phytoplasma (583 806 nt in 158 contigs). Despite assignment to different 16SrIII subgroups, the genomes of the four strains were similar, comprising a highly conserved core (92-98 % similar in their nucleotide sequence among each other over alignments about 500 kb in length) and a minor strain-specific component. As far as their protein complement was concerned, they did not differ significantly in their basic metabolism potential from the genomes of other wide-host-range phytoplasmas sequenced previously, but were distinct from strains of other species, as well as among each other, in genes encoding functions conceivably related to interactions with the host, such as membrane trafficking components, proteases, DNA methylases, effectors and several hypothetical proteins of unknown function, some of which are likely secreted through the Sec-dependent secretion system. The four genomes displayed a group of genes encoding hypothetical proteins with high similarity to a central domain of IcmE/DotG, a core component of the type IVB secretion system of Gram-negative Legionella spp. Conversely, genes encoding functional GroES/GroEL chaperones were not detected in any of the four drafts. The results also indicated the significant role of horizontal gene transfer among different 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species in shaping phytoplasma genomes and promoting their diversity. PMID:22936033

  7. Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food-bornepathogens of different toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla; Goltsman, Eugene; Auger, Sandrine; Galleron,Nathalie; Segurens, Beatrice; Dossat, Carole; Land, Miriam L.; Broussole,Veronique; Brillard, Julien; Guinebretiere, Marie-Helene; Sanchis,Vincent; Nguen-the, Christophe; Lereclus, Didier; Richardson, Paul; Winker, Patrick; Weissenbach, Jean; Ehrlich, S.Dusko; Sorokin, Alexei

    2006-08-24

    The cereus group represents sporulating soil bacteriacontaining pathogenic strains which may cause diarrheic or emetic foodpoisoning outbreaks. Multiple locus sequence typing revealed a presencein natural samples of these bacteria of about thirty clonal complexes.Application of genomic methods to this group was however biased due tothe major interest for representatives closely related to B. anthracis.Albeit the most important food-borne pathogens were not yet defined,existing dataindicate that they are scattered all over the phylogenetictree. The preliminary analysis of the sequences of three genomesdiscussed in this paper narrows down the gaps in our knowledge of thecereus group. The strain NVH391-98 is a rare but particularly severefood-borne pathogen. Sequencing revealed that the strain must be arepresentative of a novel bacterial species, for which the name Bacilluscytotoxis is proposed. This strain has a reduced genome size compared toother cereus group strains. Genome analysis revealed absence of sigma Bfactor and the presence of genes encoding diarrheic Nhe toxin, notdetected earlier. The strain B. cereus F837/76 represents a clonalcomplex close to that of B. anthracis. Including F837/76, three such B.cereus strains had been sequenced. Alignment of genomes suggests that B.anthracis is their common ancestor. Since such strains often emerge fromclinical cases, they merit a special attention. The third strain, KBAB4,is a typical psychrotrophe characteristic to unbiased soil communities.Phylogenic studies show that in nature it is the most active group interms of gene exchange. Genomic sequence revealed high presence ofextra-chromosomal genetic material (about 530 kb) that may account forthis phenomenon. Genes coding Nhe-like toxin were found on a big plasmidin this strain. This may indicate a potential mechanism of toxicityspread from the psychrotrophic strain community. The results of thisgenomic work and ecological compartments of different strains incite

  8. Whole-Genome Comparison Uncovers Genomic Mutations between Group B Streptococci Sampled from Infected Newborns and Their Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Villain, Adrien; Joubrel, Caroline; Touak, Gérald; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Rosinski-Chupin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS), a commensal of the human gut and genitourinary tract, is a leading cause of neonatal infections, in which vertical transmission from mother to child remains the most frequent route of contamination. Here, we investigated whether the progression of GBS from carriage to disease is associated with genomic adaptation. Whole-genome comparison of 47 GBS samples from 19 mother-child pairs uncovered 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and seven insertions/deletions. Of the SNPs detected, 16 appear to have been fixed in the population sampled whereas five mutations were found to be polymorphic. In the infant strains, 14 mutations were detected, including two independently fixed variants affecting the covRS locus, which is known to encode a major regulatory system of virulence. A one-nucleotide insertion was also identified in the promoter region of the highly immunogenic surface protein Rib gene. Gene expression analysis after incubation in human blood showed that these mutations influenced the expression of virulence-associated genes. Additional identification of three mutated strains in the mothers' milk raised the possibility of the newborns also being a source of contamination for their mothers. Overall, our work showed that GBS strains in carriage and disease scenarios might undergo adaptive changes following colonization. The types and locations of the mutations found, together with the experimental results showing their phenotypic impact, suggest that those in a context of infection were positively selected during the transition of GBS from commensal to pathogen, contributing to an increased capacity to cause disease. IMPORTANCE Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen responsible for neonatal infections. Considering that its colonization of healthy adults is mostly asymptomatic, the mechanisms behind its switch from a commensal to an invasive state are largely unknown. In this work, we

  9. Group-theoretic models of the inversion process in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Gebhardt, Volker; Tanaka, Mark M; Francis, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    The variation in genome arrangements among bacterial taxa is largely due to the process of inversion. Recent studies indicate that not all inversions are equally probable, suggesting, for instance, that shorter inversions are more frequent than longer, and those that move the terminus of replication are less probable than those that do not. Current methods for establishing the inversion distance between two bacterial genomes are unable to incorporate such information. In this paper we suggest a group-theoretic framework that in principle can take these constraints into account. In particular, we show that by lifting the problem from circular permutations to the affine symmetric group, the inversion distance can be found in polynomial time for a model in which inversions are restricted to acting on two regions. This requires the proof of new results in group theory, and suggests a vein of new combinatorial problems concerning permutation groups on which group theorists will be needed to collaborate with biologists. We apply the new method to inferring distances and phylogenies for published Yersinia pestis data. PMID:23793228

  10. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the "Ctenophora-sister" hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  11. Genomic data do not support comb jellies as the sister group to all other animals

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Davide; Pett, Walker; Dohrmann, Martin; Feuda, Roberto; Rota-Stabelli, Omar; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas; Wörheide, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how complex traits, such as epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, or guts, originated depends on a well-supported hypothesis about the phylogenetic relationships among major animal lineages. Traditionally, sponges (Porifera) have been interpreted as the sister group to the remaining animals, a hypothesis consistent with the conventional view that the last common animal ancestor was relatively simple and more complex body plans arose later in evolution. However, this premise has recently been challenged by analyses of the genomes of comb jellies (Ctenophora), which, instead, found ctenophores as the sister group to the remaining animals (the “Ctenophora-sister” hypothesis). Because ctenophores are morphologically complex predators with true epithelia, nervous systems, muscles, and guts, this scenario implies these traits were either present in the last common ancestor of all animals and were lost secondarily in sponges and placozoans (Trichoplax) or, alternatively, evolved convergently in comb jellies. Here, we analyze representative datasets from recent studies supporting Ctenophora-sister, including genome-scale alignments of concatenated protein sequences, as well as a genomic gene content dataset. We found no support for Ctenophora-sister and conclude it is an artifact resulting from inadequate methodology, especially the use of simplistic evolutionary models and inappropriate choice of species to root the metazoan tree. Our results reinforce a traditional scenario for the evolution of complexity in animals, and indicate that inferences about the evolution of Metazoa based on the Ctenophora-sister hypothesis are not supported by the currently available data. PMID:26621703

  12. Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the sister group to primates

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Victor C.; Li, Gang; Minx, Patrick; Schmitz, Jürgen; Churakov, Gennady; Doronina, Liliya; Melin, Amanda D.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.; Lim, Norman T-L.; Springer, Mark S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Warren, Wesley C.; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Colugos are among the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculoskeletal-related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal and gliding adaptations. Phylogenomic analysis and catalogs of rare genomic changes overwhelmingly support the contested hypothesis that colugos are the sister group to primates (Primatomorpha), to the exclusion of treeshrews. We captured ~140 kb of orthologous sequence data from colugo museum specimens sampled across their range and identified large genetic differences between many geographically isolated populations that may result in a >300% increase in the number of recognized colugo species. Our results identify conservation units to mitigate future losses of this enigmatic mammalian order. PMID:27532052

  13. Genomic analysis reveals hidden biodiversity within colugos, the sister group to primates.

    PubMed

    Mason, Victor C; Li, Gang; Minx, Patrick; Schmitz, Jürgen; Churakov, Gennady; Doronina, Liliya; Melin, Amanda D; Dominy, Nathaniel J; Lim, Norman T-L; Springer, Mark S; Wilson, Richard K; Warren, Wesley C; Helgen, Kristofer M; Murphy, William J

    2016-08-01

    Colugos are among the most poorly studied mammals despite their centrality to resolving supraordinal primate relationships. Two described species of these gliding mammals are the sole living members of the order Dermoptera, distributed throughout Southeast Asia. We generated a draft genome sequence for a Sunda colugo and a Philippine colugo reference alignment, and used these to identify colugo-specific genetic changes that were enriched in sensory and musculoskeletal-related genes that likely underlie their nocturnal and gliding adaptations. Phylogenomic analysis and catalogs of rare genomic changes overwhelmingly support the contested hypothesis that colugos are the sister group to primates (Primatomorpha), to the exclusion of treeshrews. We captured ~140 kb of orthologous sequence data from colugo museum specimens sampled across their range and identified large genetic differences between many geographically isolated populations that may result in a >300% increase in the number of recognized colugo species. Our results identify conservation units to mitigate future losses of this enigmatic mammalian order. PMID:27532052

  14. New Insights into the Genetic Diversity of Clostridium botulinum Group III through Extensive Genome Exploration.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Animal botulism is caused by group III Clostridium botulinum strains producing type C and D toxins, or their chimeric forms C/D and D/C. Animal botulism is considered an emerging disease in Europe, notably in poultry production. Before our study, 14 genomes from different countries were available in the public database, but none were from France. In order to investigate the genetic relationship of French strains with different geographical areas and find new potential typing targets, 17 strains of C. botulinum group III were sequenced (16 from France and one from New Caledonia). Fourteen were type C/D strains isolated from chickens, ducks, guinea fowl and turkeys and three were type D/C strains isolated from cattle. The New Caledonian strain was a type D/C strain. Whole genome sequence analysis showed the French strains to be closely related to European strains from C. botulinum group III lineages Ia and Ib. The investigation of CRISPR sequences as genetic targets for differentiating strains in group III proved to be irrelevant for type C/D due to a deficient CRISPR/Cas mechanism, but not for type D/C. Conversely, the extrachromosomal elements of type C/D strains could be used to generate a genetic ID card. The highest level of discrimination was achieved with SNP core phylogeny, which allowed differentiation up to strain level and provide the most relevant information for genetic epidemiology studies and discrimination. PMID:27242769

  15. New Insights into the Genetic Diversity of Clostridium botulinum Group III through Extensive Genome Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Mermoud, Isabelle; Desoutter, Denise; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Animal botulism is caused by group III Clostridium botulinum strains producing type C and D toxins, or their chimeric forms C/D and D/C. Animal botulism is considered an emerging disease in Europe, notably in poultry production. Before our study, 14 genomes from different countries were available in the public database, but none were from France. In order to investigate the genetic relationship of French strains with different geographical areas and find new potential typing targets, 17 strains of C. botulinum group III were sequenced (16 from France and one from New Caledonia). Fourteen were type C/D strains isolated from chickens, ducks, guinea fowl and turkeys and three were type D/C strains isolated from cattle. The New Caledonian strain was a type D/C strain. Whole genome sequence analysis showed the French strains to be closely related to European strains from C. botulinum group III lineages Ia and Ib. The investigation of CRISPR sequences as genetic targets for differentiating strains in group III proved to be irrelevant for type C/D due to a deficient CRISPR/Cas mechanism, but not for type D/C. Conversely, the extrachromosomal elements of type C/D strains could be used to generate a genetic ID card. The highest level of discrimination was achieved with SNP core phylogeny, which allowed differentiation up to strain level and provide the most relevant information for genetic epidemiology studies and discrimination. PMID:27242769

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the RmInt1 Group II Intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain RMO17

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of the RmInt1 group II intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMO17 isolated from Medicago orbicularis nodules from Spanish soil. The genome consists of 6.73 Mb distributed between a single chromosome and two megaplasmids (the chromid pSymB and pSymA). PMID:25301650

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the RmInt1 Group II Intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti Strain RMO17.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of the RmInt1 group II intronless Sinorhizobium meliloti strain RMO17 isolated from Medicago orbicularis nodules from Spanish soil. The genome consists of 6.73 Mb distributed between a single chromosome and two megaplasmids (the chromid pSymB and pSymA). PMID:25301650

  18. Genomic Characterization of Group C Orthobunyavirus Reference Strains and Recent South American Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Solórzano, Víctor Fiestas; Kuschner, Robert A.; Halsey, Eric S.; Jarman, Richard G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus), discovered in the 1950s, are vector-borne human pathogens in the Americas. Currently there is a gap in genomic information for group C viruses. In this study, we obtained complete coding region sequences of reference strains of Caraparu (CARV), Oriboca (ORIV), Marituba (MTBV) and Madrid (MADV) viruses, and five clinical isolates from Peru and Bolivia, using an unbiased de novo approach consisting of random reverse transcription, random anchored PCR amplification, and high throughput pyrosequencing. The small, medium, and large segments encode for a 235 amino acid nucleocapsid protein, an approximately 1430 amino acid surface glycoprotein polyprotein precursor, and a 2248 amino acid RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. Additionally, the S segment encodes for an 83 amino acid non-structural protein, although this protein is truncated or silenced in some isolates. Phylogenetically, three clinical isolates clustered with CARV, one clustered with MTBV, and one isolate appeared to be a reassortant or a genetic drift resulted from the high variability of the medium segment which was also seen in a few other orthobunyaviruses. These data represent the first complete coding region sequences for this serocomplex of pathogenic orthobunyaviruses. The genome-wide phylogeny of reference strains is consistent with the antigenic properties of the viruses reported in the original serological studies conducted in the 1960s. Comparative analysis of conserved protein regions across group C virus strains and the other orthobunyavirus groups revealed that these group C viruses contain characteristic domains of potential structural and functional significance. Our results provide the basis for the developments of diagnostics, further genetic analyses, and future epidemiologic studies of group C viruses. PMID:24633174

  19. Genome Evolution of Wolbachia Strain wPip from the Culex pipiens Group

    PubMed Central

    Klasson, Lisa; Walker, Thomas; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Sanders, Mandy J.; Quail, Michael A.; Lord, Angela; Sanders, Susanne; Earl, Julie; O'Neill, Scott L.; Thomson, Nicholas; Sinkins, Steven P.; Parkhill, Julian

    2008-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis strain wPip induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), patterns of crossing sterility, in the Culex pipiens group of mosquitoes. The complete sequence is presented of the 1.48-Mbp genome of wPip which encodes 1386 coding sequences (CDSs), representing the first genome sequence of a B-supergroup Wolbachia. Comparisons were made with the smaller genomes of Wolbachia strains wMel of Drosophila melanogaster, an A-supergroup Wolbachia that is also a CI inducer, and wBm, a mutualist of Brugia malayi nematodes that belongs to the D-supergroup of Wolbachia. Despite extensive gene order rearrangement, a core set of Wolbachia genes shared between the 3 genomes can be identified and contrasts with a flexible gene pool where rapid evolution has taken place. There are much more extensive prophage and ankyrin repeat encoding (ANK) gene components of the wPip genome compared with wMel and wBm, and both are likely to be of considerable importance in wPip biology. Five WO-B–like prophage regions are present and contain some genes that are identical or highly similar in multiple prophage copies, whereas other genes are unique, and it is likely that extensive recombination, duplication, and insertion have occurred between copies. A much larger number of genes encode ankyrin repeat (ANK) proteins in wPip, with 60 present compared with 23 in wMel, many of which are within or close to the prophage regions. It is likely that this pattern is partly a result of expansions in the wPip lineage, due for example to gene duplication, but their presence is in some cases more ancient. The wPip genome underlines the considerable evolutionary flexibility of Wolbachia, providing clear evidence for the rapid evolution of ANK-encoding genes and of prophage regions. This host–Wolbachia system, with its complex patterns of sterility induced between populations, now provides an excellent model for unraveling the molecular systems underlying host

  20. Developing improved durum wheat germplasm by altering the cytoplasmic genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotic organisms, nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes interact to drive cellular functions. These genomes have co-evolved to form specific nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions that are essential to the origin, success, and evolution of diploid and polyploid species. Hundreds of genetic diseases in h...

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the SET DOMAIN GROUP family in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Aquea, Felipe; Vega, Andrea; Timmermann, Tania; Poupin, María Josefina; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2011-06-01

    The SET DOMAIN GROUP (SDG) proteins represent an evolutionarily-conserved family of epigenetic regulators present in eukaryotes and are putative candidates for the catalysis of lysine methylation in histones. Plant genomes analyses of this family have been performed in arabidopsis, maize, and rice and functional studies have shown that SDG genes are involved in the control of plant development. In this work, we describe the identification and structural characterization of SDG genes in the Vitis vinifera genome. This analysis revealed the presence of 33 putative SDG genes that can be grouped into different classes, as it has been previously described for plants. In addition to the SET domain, the proteins identified possessed other domains in the different classes. As part of our study regarding the growth and development of grapevine, we selected eight genes and their expression levels were analyzed in representative vegetative and reproductive organs of this species. The selected genes showed different patterns of expression during inflorescence and fruit development, suggesting that they participate in these processes. Furthermore, we showed that the expression of selected SDGs changes during viral infection, using as a model Grapevine Leafroll Associated Virus 3-infected symptomatic grapevine leaves and fruits. Our results suggest that developmental changes caused by this virus could be the result of alterations in SDG expression. PMID:21293861

  2. Unique Mitochondrial Genome Structure in Diplonemids, the Sister Group of Kinetoplastids

    PubMed Central

    Marande, William; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    Kinetoplastid flagellates are characterized by uniquely massed mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs), the kinetoplasts. Kinetoplastids of the trypanosomatid group possess two types of mtDNA molecules: maxicircles bearing protein and mitoribosomal genes and minicircles specifying guide RNAs, which mediate uridine insertion/deletion RNA editing. These circles are interlocked with one another to form dense networks. Whether these peculiar mtDNA features are restricted to kinetoplastids or prevail throughout Euglenozoa (euglenids, diplonemids, and kinetoplastids) is unknown. Here, we describe the mitochondrial genome and the mitochondrial ultrastructure of Diplonema papillatum, a member of the diplonemid flagellates, the sister group of kinetoplastids. Fluorescence and electron microscopy show a single mitochondrion per cell with an ultrastructure atypical for Euglenozoa. In addition, DNA is evenly distributed throughout the organelle rather than compacted. Molecular and electron microscopy studies distinguish numerous 6- and 7-kbp-sized mitochondrial chromosomes of monomeric circular topology and relaxed conformation in vivo. Remarkably, the cox1 gene (and probably other mitochondrial genes) is fragmented, with separate gene pieces encoded on different chromosomes. Generation of the contiguous cox1 mRNA requires trans-splicing, the precise mechanism of which remains to be determined. Taken together, the mitochondrial gene/genome structure of Diplonema is not only different from that of kinetoplastids but unique among eukaryotes as a whole. PMID:15947205

  3. Differentiation of strains from the Bacillus cereus group by RFLP-PFGE genomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Otlewska, Anna; Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus weihenstephanensis, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus belong to the B. cereus group. The last three species are characterized by different phenotype features and pathogenicity spectrum, but it has been shown that these species are genetically closely related. The macrorestriction analysis of the genomic DNA with the NotI enzyme was used to generate polymorphism of restriction profiles for 39 food-borne isolates (B. cereus, B. mycoides) and seven reference strains (B. mycoides, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. cereus). The PFGE method was applied to differentiate the examined strains of the B. cereus group. On the basis of the unweighted pair group method with the arithmetic mean method and Dice coefficient, the strains were divided into five clusters (types A-E), and the most numerous group was group A (25 strains). A total of 21 distinct pulsotypes were observed. The RFLP-PFGE analysis was successfully used for the differentiation and characterization of B. cereus and B. mycoides strains isolated from different food products. PMID:23893780

  4. Human promoter genomic composition demonstrates non-random groupings that reflect general cellular function

    PubMed Central

    McNutt, Markey C; Tongbai, Ron; Cui, Wenwu; Collins, Irene; Freebern, Wendy J; Montano, Idalia; Haggerty, Cynthia M; Chandramouli, GVR; Gardner, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not there exists nonrandom grouping of cis-regulatory elements within gene promoters that can be perceived independent of gene expression data and whether or not there is any correlation between this grouping and the biological function of the gene. Results Using ProSpector, a web-based promoter search and annotation tool, we have applied an unbiased approach to analyze the transcription factor binding site frequencies of 1400 base pair genomic segments positioned at 1200 base pairs upstream and 200 base pairs downstream of the transcriptional start site of 7298 commonly studied human genes. Partitional clustering of the transcription factor binding site composition within these promoter segments reveals a small number of gene groups that are selectively enriched for gene ontology terms consistent with distinct aspects of cellular function. Significance ranking of the class-determining transcription factor binding sites within these clusters show substantial overlap between the gene ontology terms of the transcriptions factors associated with the binding sites and the gene ontology terms of the regulated genes within each group. Conclusion Thus, gene sorting by promoter composition alone produces partitions in which the "regulated" and the "regulators" cosegregate into similar functional classes. These findings demonstrate that the transcription factor binding site composition is non-randomly distributed between gene promoters in a manner that reflects and partially defines general gene class function. PMID:16232321

  5. Assembly-Driven Community Genomics of a Hypersaline Microbial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Podell, Sheila; Ugalde, Juan A.; Narasingarao, Priya; Banfield, Jillian F.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Allen, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial populations inhabiting a natural hypersaline lake ecosystem in Lake Tyrrell, Victoria, Australia, have been characterized using deep metagenomic sampling, iterative de novo assembly, and multidimensional phylogenetic binning. Composite genomes representing habitat-specific microbial populations were reconstructed for eleven different archaea and one bacterium, comprising between 0.6 and 14.1% of the planktonic community. Eight of the eleven archaeal genomes were from microbial species without previously cultured representatives. These new genomes provide habitat-specific reference sequences enabling detailed, lineage-specific compartmentalization of predicted functional capabilities and cellular properties associated with both dominant and less abundant community members, including organisms previously known only by their 16S rRNA sequences. Together, these data provide a comprehensive, culture-independent genomic blueprint for ecosystem-wide analysis of protein functions, population structure, and lifestyles of co-existing, co-evolving microbial groups within the same natural habitat. The “assembly-driven” community genomic approach demonstrated in this study advances our ability to push beyond single gene investigations, and promotes genome-scale reconstructions as a tangible goal in the quest to define the metabolic, ecological, and evolutionary dynamics that underpin environmental microbial diversity. PMID:23637883

  6. Molecular and genomic characterization of pathogenic traits of group A Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    HAMADA, Shigeyuki; KAWABATA, Shigetada; NAKAGAWA, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) or Streptococcus pyogenes causes various diseases ranging from self-limiting sore throat to deadly invasive diseases. The genome size of GAS is 1.85–1.9 Mb, and genomic rearrangement has been demonstrated. GAS possesses various surface-associated substances such as hyaluronic capsule, M proteins, and fibronectin/laminin/immunoglobulin-binding proteins. These are related to the virulence and play multifaceted and mutually reflected roles in the pathogenesis of GAS infections. Invasion of GAS into epithelial cells and deeper tissues provokes immune and non-immune defense or inflammatory responses including the recruitment of neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells in hosts. GAS frequently evades host defense mechanisms by using its virulence factors. Extracellular products of GAS may perturb cellular and subcellular functions and degrade tissues enzymatically, which leads to the aggravation of local and/or systemic disorders in the host. In this review, we summarize some important cellular and extracellular substances that may affect pathogenic processes during GAS infections, and the host responses to these. PMID:26666305

  7. Genomic Analysis Reveals the Molecular Basis for Capsule Loss in the Group B Streptococcus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B. Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl trasferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  8. Genomic analysis reveals the molecular basis for capsule loss in the group B Streptococcus population.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Roberto; Campisi, Edmondo; De Chiara, Matteo; Tettelin, Hervé; Rinaudo, Daniela; Toniolo, Chiara; Metruccio, Matteo; Guidotti, Silvia; Sørensen, Uffe B Skov; Kilian, Mogens; Ramirez, Mario; Janulczyk, Robert; Donati, Claudio; Grandi, Guido; Margarit, Immaculada

    2015-01-01

    The human and bovine bacterial pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) expresses a thick polysaccharide capsule that constitutes a major virulence factor and vaccine target. GBS can be classified into ten distinct serotypes differing in the chemical composition of their capsular polysaccharide. However, non-typeable strains that do not react with anti-capsular sera are frequently isolated from colonized and infected humans and cattle. To gain a comprehensive insight into the molecular basis for the loss of capsule expression in GBS, a collection of well-characterized non-typeable strains was investigated by genome sequencing. Genome based phylogenetic analysis extended to a wide population of sequenced strains confirmed the recently observed high clonality among GBS lineages mainly containing human strains, and revealed a much higher degree of diversity in the bovine population. Remarkably, non-typeable strains were equally distributed in all lineages. A number of distinct mutations in the cps operon were identified that were apparently responsible for inactivation of capsule synthesis. The most frequent genetic alterations were point mutations leading to stop codons in the cps genes, and the main target was found to be cpsE encoding the portal glycosyl transferase of capsule biosynthesis. Complementation of strains carrying missense mutations in cpsE with a wild-type gene restored capsule expression allowing the identification of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity. PMID:25946017

  9. Comparative genomic hybridisation divides retinoblastomas into a high and a low level chromosomal instability group

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, J E; Hermsen, M A J A; Gille, H J P; Schouten-Van Meeteren, N Y N; Moll, A C; Imhof, S M; Meijer, G A; Baak, J P A; van der Valk, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in childhood and is responsible for approximately 1% of all deaths caused by childhood cancer. Aims/methods: Comparative genomic hybridisation was performed on 13 consecutive, histologically confirmed retinoblastomas to analyse patterns of chromosomal changes and correlate these to clinicopathological variables. Six cases were hereditary and seven cases were sporadic. Results: In 11 of the 13 tumours chromosomal abnormalities were detected, most frequently gains. Frequent chromosomal gains concerned 6p (46%), 1q (38%), 2p, 9q (30%), 5p, 7q, 10q, 17q, and 20q (23%). Frequent losses occurred at Xq (46%), 13q14, 16q, and 4q (23%). High level copy number gains were found at 5p15 and 6p11–12. A loss at 13q14 occurred in three cases only. Relatively few events occurred in the hereditary cases (27) compared with the non-hereditary cases (70 events). The number of chromosomal aberrations in these 13 retinoblastomas showed a bimodal distribution. Seven tumours showed less than four chromosomal aberrations, falling into a low level chromosomal instability (CIN) group, and six tumours showed at least eight aberrations, falling into a high level CIN group. In the low level CIN group the mean age was half that seen in the high level CIN group, there were less male patients, and there were more hereditary and bilateral cases. Microsatellite instability was not detected in either of the two groups. Conclusion: Despite the complex pattern of genetic changes in retinoblastomas, certain chromosomal regions appear to be affected preferentially. On the basis of the number of genetic events, retinoblastomas can be divided in low and a high level chromosomal instability groups, which have striking differences in clinical presentation. PMID:12499428

  10. Assignment of simian rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive mutant groups B and E to genome segments

    SciTech Connect

    Gombold, J.L.; Estes, M.K.; Ramig, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    Recombinant (reassortant) viruses were selected from crosses between temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of simian rotavirus SA11 and wild-type human rotavirus Wa. The double-stranded genome RNAs of the reassortants were examined by electrophoresis in Tris-glycine-buffered polyacrylamide gels and by dot hybridization with a cloned DNA probe for genome segment 2. Analysis of replacements of genome segments in the reassortants allowed construction of a map correlating genome segments providing functions interchangeable between SA11 and Wa. The reassortants revealed a functional correspondence in order of increasing electrophoretic mobility of genome segments. Analysis of the parental origin of genome segments in ts+ SA11/Wa reassortants derived from the crosses SA11 tsB(339) X Wa and SA11 tsE(1400) X Wa revealed that the group B lesion of tsB(339) was located on genome segment 3 and the group E lesion of tsE(1400) was on segment 8.

  11. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  12. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  13. Whole genome sequencing reveals extensive community-level transmission of group A Streptococcus in remote communities.

    PubMed

    Bowen, A C; Harris, T; Holt, D C; Giffard, P M; Carapetis, J R; Campbell, P T; McVERNON, J; Tong, S Y C

    2016-07-01

    Impetigo is common in remote Indigenous children of northern Australia, with the primary driver in this context being Streptococcus pyogenes [or group A Streptococcus (GAS)]. To reduce the high burden of impetigo, the transmission dynamics of GAS must be more clearly elucidated. We performed whole genome sequencing on 31 GAS isolates collected in a single community from children in 11 households with ⩾2 GAS-infected children. We aimed to determine whether transmission was occurring principally within households or across the community. The 31 isolates were represented by nine multilocus sequence types and isolates within each sequence type differed from one another by only 0-3 single nucleotide polymorphisms. There was evidence of extensive transmission both within households and across the community. Our findings suggest that strategies to reduce the burden of impetigo in this setting will need to extend beyond individual households, and incorporate multi-faceted, community-wide approaches. PMID:26833141

  14. Tetrahymena macronuclear genome mapping: colinearity Of macronuclear coassortment groups and the micronuclear map on chromosome 1l.

    PubMed Central

    Wickert, S; Nangle, L; Shevel, S; Orias, E

    2000-01-01

    The genetics of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila are richer than for most other eukaryotic cells, because Tetrahymena possesses two genomes: a germline (micronuclear) genome that follows a Mendelian model of genetic transmission and a somatic (macronuclear) genome, derived from the micronuclear genome by fragmentation, which follows a different genetic transmission model called phenotypic assortment. While genetic markers in the micronucleus fall into classical linkage groups under meiotic recombination and segregation, the same markers in the macronucleus fall into coassortment groups (CAGs) under phenotypic assortment by the random distribution of MAC chromosome pieces. We set out to determine whether genomic mapping in the macronucleus by genetic means is feasible. To investigate the relationship between the micronuclear map and coassortment groups, we systematically placed into CAGs all of the markers lying on chromosome 1L that are also found in the macronucleus. Sixteen CAGs were identified, 7 of which contain at least two loci. We have concluded that CAGs represent a fundamental genetic feature of the MAC. The MIC and MAC maps on 1L are colinear; that is, CAGs consist exclusively of markers that map to a continuous segment in a given region of the micronuclear map, with no intervening markers from other CAGs. These findings provide a solid foundation for exploiting the MAC chromosome pieces to build a physical map of the Tetrahymena genome. PMID:10757760

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas ureae Strain Nm10, an Oligotrophic Group 6a Nitrosomonad

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Jessica A.; Kits, K. Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Nitrosomonas ureae strain Nm10, a mesophilic betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizer isolated from Mediterranean soils in Sardinia, Italy, is reported here. This genome represents a cluster 6a nitrosomonad. PMID:26966201

  16. In Silico Genomic Fingerprints of the Bacillus anthracis Group Obtained by Virtual Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Díaz, Hueman; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Lloret-Sánchez, Teresa; Olguín-Ruiz, Gabriela; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos; Carreño-Durán, Luis; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Rogelio; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the capacity of Virtual Hybridization to identify between highly related bacterial strains. Eight genomic fingerprints were obtained by virtual hybridization for the Bacillus anthracis genome set, and a set of 15,264 13-nucleotide short probes designed to produce genomic fingerprints unique for each organism. The data obtained from each genomic fingerprint were used to obtain hybridization patterns simulating a DNA microarray. Two virtual hybridization methods were used: the Direct and the Extended method to identify the number of potential hybridization sites and thus determine the minimum sensitivity value to discriminate between genomes with 99.9% similarity. Genomic fingerprints were compared using both methods and phylogenomic trees were constructed to verify that the minimum detection value is 0.000017. Results obtained from the genomic fingerprints suggest that the distribution in the trees is correct, as compared to other taxonomic methods. Specific virtual hybridization sites for each of the genomes studied were also identified.

  17. Genome Sequences of Two Bacillus cereus Group Bacteriophages, Eyuki and AvesoBmore

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages isolated on Bacillus thuringiensis show similarity to previously sequenced phages and provide evidence of the mosaicism of phage genomes. PMID:26472840

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis 167 Carrying Lancefield Group C Antigen and Comparative Genomics of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is an emerging human pathogen that causes life-threatening invasive infections such as streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Recent epidemiological studies reveal that invasive SDSE infections have been increasing in Asia, Europe, and the United States. Almost all SDSE carry Lancefield group G or C antigen. We have determined the complete genome sequence of a human group C SDSE 167 strain. A comparison of its sequence with that of four SDSE strains, three in Lancefield group G and one in Lancefield group A, showed approximately 90% coverage. Most regions showing little or no homology were located in the prophages. There was no evidence of massive rearrangement in the genome of SDSE 167. Bayesian phylogeny using entire genome sequences showed that the most recent common ancestor of the five SDSE strains appeared 446 years ago. Interestingly, we found that SDSE 167 harbors sugar metabolizing enzymes in a unique region and streptodornase in the phage region, which presumably contribute to the degradation of host tissues and the prompted covRS mutation, respectively. A comparison of these five SDSE strains, which differ in Lancefield group antigens, revealed a gene cluster presumably responsible for the synthesis of the antigenic determinant. These results may provide the basis for molecular epidemiological research of SDSE. PMID:23918808

  19. Big Data: the challenge for small research groups in the era of cancer genomics

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Aisyah Mohd; Holmberg, Lars; Gillett, Cheryl; Grigoriadis, Anita

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, cancer research has seen an increasing trend towards high-throughput techniques and translational approaches. The increasing availability of assays that utilise smaller quantities of source material and produce higher volumes of data output have resulted in the necessity for data storage solutions beyond those previously used. Multifactorial data, both large in sample size and heterogeneous in context, needs to be integrated in a standardised, cost-effective and secure manner. This requires technical solutions and administrative support not normally financially accounted for in small- to moderate-sized research groups. In this review, we highlight the Big Data challenges faced by translational research groups in the precision medicine era; an era in which the genomes of over 75 000 patients will be sequenced by the National Health Service over the next 3 years to advance healthcare. In particular, we have looked at three main themes of data management in relation to cancer research, namely (1) cancer ontology management, (2) IT infrastructures that have been developed to support data management and (3) the unique ethical challenges introduced by utilising Big Data in research. PMID:26492224

  20. Big Data: the challenge for small research groups in the era of cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Noor, Aisyah Mohd; Holmberg, Lars; Gillett, Cheryl; Grigoriadis, Anita

    2015-11-17

    In the past decade, cancer research has seen an increasing trend towards high-throughput techniques and translational approaches. The increasing availability of assays that utilise smaller quantities of source material and produce higher volumes of data output have resulted in the necessity for data storage solutions beyond those previously used. Multifactorial data, both large in sample size and heterogeneous in context, needs to be integrated in a standardised, cost-effective and secure manner. This requires technical solutions and administrative support not normally financially accounted for in small- to moderate-sized research groups. In this review, we highlight the Big Data challenges faced by translational research groups in the precision medicine era; an era in which the genomes of over 75,000 patients will be sequenced by the National Health Service over the next 3 years to advance healthcare. In particular, we have looked at three main themes of data management in relation to cancer research, namely (1) cancer ontology management, (2) IT infrastructures that have been developed to support data management and (3) the unique ethical challenges introduced by utilising Big Data in research. PMID:26492224

  1. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Required for Fitness of Group A Streptococcus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M.; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  2. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Suppresses Mutagenesis Caused by Clustered Oxidative DNA Adducts in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Akira; Kamoshita, Nagisa; Kanemaru, Yuki; Honma, Masamitsu; Yasui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is defined as multiple sites of DNA damage within one or two helical turns of the duplex DNA. This complex damage is often formed by exposure of the genome to ionizing radiation and is difficult to repair. The mutagenic potential and repair mechanisms of clustered DNA damage in human cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the involvement of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in clustered oxidative DNA adducts. To identify the in vivo protective roles of NER, we established a human cell line lacking the NER gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). XPA knockout (KO) cells were generated from TSCER122 cells derived from the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line. To analyze the mutagenic events in DNA adducts in vivo, we previously employed a system of tracing DNA adducts in the targeted mutagenesis (TATAM), in which DNA adducts were site-specifically introduced into intron 4 of thymidine kinase genes. Using the TATAM system, one or two tandem 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts were introduced into the genomes of TSCER122 or XPA KO cells. In XPA KO cells, the proportion of mutants induced by a single 8-oxoG (7.6%) was comparable with that in TSCER122 cells (8.1%). In contrast, the lack of XPA significantly enhanced the mutant proportion of tandem 8-oxoG in the transcribed strand (12%) compared with that in TSCER122 cells (7.4%) but not in the non-transcribed strand (12% and 11% in XPA KO and TSCER122 cells, respectively). By sequencing the tandem 8-oxoG-integrated loci in the transcribed strand, we found that the proportion of tandem mutations was markedly increased in XPA KO cells. These results indicate that NER is involved in repairing clustered DNA adducts in the transcribed strand in vivo. PMID:26559182

  3. Genome-wide identification of genes required for fitness of group A Streptococcus in human blood.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; Mistry, Pragnesh; Valdes, Kayla M; Quigley, Jeffrey; Kumar, Nikhil; Tettelin, Hervé; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-03-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is a strict human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. Although GAS genome sequences are available, functional genomic analyses have been limited. We developed a mariner-based transposon, osKaR, designed to perform Transposon-Site Hybridization (TraSH) in GAS and successfully tested its use in several invasive serotypes. A complex osKaR mutant library in M1T1 GAS strain 5448 was subjected to negative selection in human blood to identify genes important for GAS fitness in this clinically relevant environment. Mutants underrepresented after growth in blood (output pool) compared to growth in rich media (input pool) were identified using DNA microarray hybridization of transposon-specific tags en masse. Using blood from three different donors, we identified 81 genes that met our criteria for reduced fitness in blood from at least two individuals. Genes known to play a role in survival of GAS in blood were found, including those encoding the virulence regulator Mga (mga), the peroxide response regulator PerR (perR), and the RofA-like regulator Ralp-3 (ralp3). We also identified genes previously reported for their contribution to sepsis in other pathogens, such as de novo nucleotide synthesis (purD, purA, pyrB, carA, carB, guaB), sugar metabolism (scrB, fruA), zinc uptake (adcC), and transcriptional regulation (cpsY). To validate our findings, independent mutants with mutations in 10 different genes identified in our screen were confirmed to be defective for survival in blood bactericidal assays. Overall, this work represents the first use of TraSH in GAS to identify potential virulence genes. PMID:23297387

  4. Reconciliation of rotavirus temperature-sensitive mutant collections and assignment of reassortment groups D, J, and K to genome segments.

    PubMed

    Criglar, Jeanette; Greenberg, Harry B; Estes, Mary K; Ramig, Robert F

    2011-05-01

    Four rotavirus SA11 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants and seven rotavirus RRV ts mutants, isolated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and not genetically characterized, were assigned to reassortment groups by pairwise crosses with the SA11 mutant group prototypes isolated and characterized at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM). Among the NIH mutants, three of the RRV mutants and all four SA11 mutants contained mutations in single reassortment groups, and four RRV mutants contained mutations in multiple groups. One NIH mutant [RRVtsK(2)] identified the previously undefined 11th reassortment group (K) expected for rotavirus. Three NIH single mutant RRV viruses, RRVtsD(7), RRVtsJ(5), and RRVtsK(2), were in reassortment groups not previously mapped to genome segments. These mutants were mapped using classical genetic methods, including backcrosses to demonstrate reversion or suppression in reassortants with incongruent genotype and temperature phenotype. Once located to specific genome segments by genetic means, the mutations responsible for the ts phenotype were identified by sequencing. The reassortment group K mutant RRVtsK(2) maps to genome segment 9 and has a Thr280Ileu mutation in the capsid surface glycoprotein VP7. The group D mutant RRVtsD(7) maps to segment 5 and has a Leu140Val mutation in the nonstructural interferon (IFN) antagonist protein NSP1. The group J mutant RRVtsJ(5) maps to segment 11 and has an Ala182Gly mutation affecting only the NSP5 open reading frame. Rotavirus ts mutation groups are now mapped to 9 of the 11 rotavirus genome segments. Possible segment locations of the two remaining unmapped ts mutant groups are discussed. PMID:21367894

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J; Kalia, Awdhesh; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitisfrequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence ofS. mitisstrain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clostridium botulinum Group II (Nonproteolytic) Type B Strains (DB-2 and KAPB-3).

    PubMed

    Petronella, Nicholas; Kenwell, Robyn; Pagotto, Franco; Pightling, Arthur W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is important for food safety and studies of neurotoxins associated with human botulism. We present the draft genome sequences of two strains belonging to group II type B: one collected from Pacific Ocean sediments (DB-2) and another obtained during a botulism outbreak (KAPB-3). PMID:25377702

  7. Draft genome sequence of Streptomyces vitaminophilus ATCC 31673, a producer of pyrrolomycin antibiotics, some of which contain a nitro group

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahan, Kristina M.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Robert L. Hettich; Parry, Ronald J.; Graham, David E.

    2016-01-21

    Streptomyces vitaminophilus produces pyrrolomycins, which are halogenated polyketide antibiotics. Some of the pyrrolomycins contain a rare nitro group located on the pyrrole ring. In addition, the 6.5-Mbp genome encodes 5,941 predicted protein-coding sequences in 39 contigs with a 71.9% G+C content.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus mitis Strain SVGS_061 Isolated from a Neutropenic Patient with Viridans Group Streptococcal Shock Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Holder, Michael; Ajami, Nadim J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Thompson, Erika J.; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mitis frequently causes invasive infections in neutropenic cancer patients, with a subset of patients developing viridans group streptococcal (VGS) shock syndrome. We report here the first complete genome sequence of S. mitis strain SVGS_061, which caused VGS shock syndrome, to help elucidate the pathogenesis of severe VGS infection. PMID:27056234

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces vitaminophilus ATCC 31673, a Producer of Pyrrolomycin Antibiotics, Some of Which Contain a Nitro Group

    PubMed Central

    Klingeman, Dawn M.; Hettich, Robert L.; Parry, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces vitaminophilus produces pyrrolomycins, which are halogenated polyketide antibiotics. Some of the pyrrolomycins contain a rare nitro group located on the pyrrole ring. The 6.5-Mbp genome encodes 5,941 predicted protein-coding sequences in 39 contigs with a 71.9% G+C content. PMID:26798098

  10. Effects of racial and ethnic group and health literacy on responses to genomic risk information in a medically underserved population

    PubMed Central

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; Stafford, Jewel D.; McGowan, Lucy D’Agostino; Seo, Joann; Lachance, Christina R.; Goodman, Melody S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies have examined how individuals respond to genomic risk information for common, chronic diseases. This randomized study examined differences in responses by type of genomic information [genetic test/family history] and disease condition [diabetes/heart disease] and by race/ethnicity in a medically underserved population. Methods 1057 English-speaking adults completed a survey containing one of four vignettes (two-by-two randomized design). Differences in dependent variables (i.e., interest in receiving genomic assessment, discussing with doctor or family, changing health habits) by experimental condition and race/ethnicity were examined using chi-squared tests and multivariable regression analysis. Results No significant differences were found in dependent variables by type of genomic information or disease condition. In multivariable models, Hispanics were more interested in receiving a genomic assessment than Whites (OR=1.93; p<0.0001); respondents with marginal (OR=1.54; p=0.005) or limited (OR=1.85; p=0.009) health literacy had greater interest than those with adequate health literacy. Blacks (OR=1.78; p=0.001) and Hispanics (OR=1.85; p=0.001) had greater interest in discussing information with family than Whites. Non-Hispanic Blacks (OR=1.45; p=0.04) had greater interest in discussing genomic information with a doctor than Whites. Blacks (β= −0.41; p<0.001) and Hispanics (β= −0.25; p=0.033) intended to change fewer health habits than Whites; health literacy was negatively associated with number of health habits participants intended to change. Conclusions Findings suggest that race/ethnicity may affect responses to genomic risk information. Additional research could examine how cognitive representations of this information differ across racial/ethnic groups. Health literacy is also critical to consider in developing approaches to communicating genomic information. PMID:25622080

  11. How the indirect reciprocity with co-evolving norm and strategy for 2 × 2 prisoner's dilemma game works for emerging cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Jun; Sagara, Hirokji

    2015-11-01

    We built a new indirect reciprocity model based on binary image scores, where an agent's strategy and norm co-evolve. The norm, meaning what behavior is evaluated as "good" or "bad," stipulates how image scores of two agents playing a game is altered, which has been presumed to be a fixed value in most previous studies. Also, unlike former studies, our model allows an agent to play with an agent who has a different norm. This point of relaxing the freedom of the model pulls down cooperation level vis-à-vis the case where an agent always plays with another one having same norm. However, it is observed that a rather larger dilemma shows robust cooperation establishing compared with a smaller dilemma, since a norm that punishes a so-called second-order free-rider is prompted. To encourage the evolution of norms to be able to punish second-order free-riders, a society needs a small number of defectors. This is elucidated by the fact that cases with action error are more cooperative than those without action error.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum LZ95, a potential probiotic strain producing bacteriocins and B-group vitamin riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Gu, Qing

    2016-07-10

    Lactobacillus plantarum LZ95 is a potential probiotic isolated from newborn infant fecal and it is identified to produce riboflavin with great antimicrobial activity. The complete genome sequence of this strain was reported in the present study. The genome contains a 3,261,418-bp chromosome and two plasmids. Genes, related to the biosynthesis of bacteriocins and riboflavin, were identified. This work will facilitate to reveal the biosynthetic mechanism of bacteriocins and B-group vitamins in lactic acid bacteria and provide evidence for its potential application in food industry. PMID:27140869

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Xanthomonas sacchari and Two Banana-Associated Xanthomonads Reveal Insights into the Xanthomonas Group 1 Clade

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, David J.; Wasukira, Arthur; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Aritua, Valente; Thwaites, Richard; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray

    2011-01-01

    We present draft genome sequences for three strains of Xanthomonas species, each of which was associated with banana plants (Musa species) but is not closely related to the previously sequenced banana-pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum. Strain NCPPB4393 had been deposited as Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum but in fact falls within the species Xanthomonas sacchari. Strain NCPPB1132 is more distantly related to Xanthomonas sacchari whilst strain NCPPB 1131 grouped in a distinct species-level clade related to X. sacchari, along with strains from ginger, rice, cotton and sugarcane. These three newly sequenced strains share many genomic features with the previously sequenced Xanthomonas albilineans, for example possessing an unsual metE allele and lacking the Hrp type III secretion system. However, they are distinct from Xanthomonas albilineans in many respects, for example showing little evidence of genome reduction. They also lack the SPI-1 type III secretion system found in Xanthomonas albilineans. Unlike X. albilineans, all three strains possess a gum gene cluster. The data reported here provide the first genome-wide survey of non-Hrp Xanthomonas species other than Xanthomonas albilineans, which is an atypical member of this group. We hope that the availability of complete sequence data for this group of organisms is the first step towards understanding their interactions with plants and identifying potential virulence factors. PMID:24710305

  14. Genomic properties of Marine Group A bacteria indicate a role in the marine sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jody J; Mewis, Keith; Hanson, Niels W; Konwar, Kishori M; Maas, Kendra R; Hallam, Steven J

    2014-02-01

    Marine Group A (MGA) is a deeply branching and uncultivated phylum of bacteria. Although their functional roles remain elusive, MGA subgroups are particularly abundant and diverse in oxygen minimum zones and permanent or seasonally stratified anoxic basins, suggesting metabolic adaptation to oxygen-deficiency. Here, we expand a previous survey of MGA diversity in O2-deficient waters of the Northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean (NESAP) to include Saanich Inlet (SI), an anoxic fjord with seasonal O2 gradients and periodic sulfide accumulation. Phylogenetic analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene clone libraries recovered five previously described MGA subgroups and defined three novel subgroups (SHBH1141, SHBH391, and SHAN400) in SI. To discern the functional properties of MGA residing along gradients of O2 in the NESAP and SI, we identified and sequenced to completion 14 fosmids harboring MGA-associated 16S RNA genes from a collection of 46 fosmid libraries sourced from NESAP and SI waters. Comparative analysis of these fosmids, in addition to four publicly available MGA-associated large-insert DNA fragments from Hawaii Ocean Time-series and Monterey Bay, revealed widespread genomic differentiation proximal to the ribosomal RNA operon that did not consistently reflect subgroup partitioning patterns observed in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Predicted protein-coding genes associated with adaptation to O2-deficiency and sulfur-based energy metabolism were detected on multiple fosmids, including polysulfide reductase (psrABC), implicated in dissimilatory polysulfide reduction to hydrogen sulfide and dissimilatory sulfur oxidation. These results posit a potential role for specific MGA subgroups in the marine sulfur cycle. PMID:24030600

  15. Community Genomic and Proteomic Analyses of Chemoautotrophic Iron-Oxidizing "Leptospirillum rubarum" (Group II) and "Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum" (Group III) Bacteria in Acid Mine Drainage Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Denef, Vincent; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G; Mueller, Ryan; Dick, Gregory J.; Sun, Christine; Wheeler, Korin; Zelma, Adam; Baker, Brett J.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Shah, Manesh B; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed near-complete population (composite) genomic sequences for coexisting acidophilic iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum group II and III bacteria (phylum Nitrospirae) and an extrachromosomal plasmid from a Richmond Mine, Iron Mountain, CA, acid mine drainage biofilm. Community proteomic analysis of the genomically characterized sample and two other biofilms identified 64.6% and 44.9% of the predicted proteins of Leptospirillum groups II and III, respectively, and 20% of the predicted plasmid proteins. The bacteria share 92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and >60% of their genes, including integrated plasmid-like regions. The extrachromosomal plasmid carries conjugation genes with detectable sequence similarity to genes in the integrated conjugative plasmid, but only those on the extrachromosomal element were identified by proteomics. Both bacterial groups have genes for community-essential functions, including carbon fixation and biosynthesis of vitamins, fatty acids, and biopolymers (including cellulose); proteomic analyses reveal these activities. Both Leptospirillum types have multiple pathways for osmotic protection. Although both are motile, signal transduction and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are more abundant in Leptospirillum group III, consistent with its distribution in gradients within biofilms. Interestingly, Leptospirillum group II uses a methyl-dependent and Leptospirillum group III a methyl-independent response pathway. Although only Leptospirillum group III can fix nitrogen, these proteins were not identified by proteomics. The abundances of core proteins are similar in all communities, but the abundance levels of unique and shared proteins of unknown function vary. Some proteins unique to one organism were highly expressed and may be key to the functional and ecological differentiation of Leptospirillum groups II and III.

  16. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-04-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the 'Thaumarchaeota' and 'Korarchaeota'. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus 'Caldiarchaeum subterraneum' that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  17. Dispersion of the RmInt1 group II intron in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugative transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I.; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Muñoz-Adelantado, Estefanía; Toro, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    RmInt1 is a self-splicing and mobile group II intron initially identified in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, which encodes a reverse transcriptase–maturase (Intron Encoded Protein, IEP) lacking the C-terminal DNA binding (D) and DNA endonuclease domains (En). RmInt1 invades cognate intronless homing sites (ISRm2011-2) by a mechanism known as retrohoming. This work describes how the RmInt1 intron spreads in the S.meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugation. This process was revealed by using the wild-type intron RmInt1 and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme coding sequence (ΔORF)-derivatives with higher homing efficiency than the wild-type intron. The data demonstrate that RmInt1 propagates into the S.meliloti genome primarily by retrohoming with a strand bias related to replication of the chromosome and symbiotic megaplasmids. Moreover, we show that when expressed in trans from a separate plasmid, the IEP is able to mobilize genomic ΔORF ribozymes that afterward displayed wild-type levels of retrohoming. Our results contribute to get further understanding of how group II introns spread into bacterial genomes in nature. PMID:17158161

  18. Dispersion of the RmInt1 group II intron in the Sinorhizobium meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugative transfer.

    PubMed

    Nisa-Martínez, Rafael; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I; Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Muñoz-Adelantado, Estefanía; Toro, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    RmInt1 is a self-splicing and mobile group II intron initially identified in the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, which encodes a reverse transcriptase-maturase (Intron Encoded Protein, IEP) lacking the C-terminal DNA binding (D) and DNA endonuclease domains (En). RmInt1 invades cognate intronless homing sites (ISRm2011-2) by a mechanism known as retrohoming. This work describes how the RmInt1 intron spreads in the S.meliloti genome upon acquisition by conjugation. This process was revealed by using the wild-type intron RmInt1 and engineered intron-donor constructs based on ribozyme coding sequence (DeltaORF)-derivatives with higher homing efficiency than the wild-type intron. The data demonstrate that RmInt1 propagates into the S.meliloti genome primarily by retrohoming with a strand bias related to replication of the chromosome and symbiotic megaplasmids. Moreover, we show that when expressed in trans from a separate plasmid, the IEP is able to mobilize genomic DeltaORF ribozymes that afterward displayed wild-type levels of retrohoming. Our results contribute to get further understanding of how group II introns spread into bacterial genomes in nature. PMID:17158161

  19. Genomic Analysis of Melioribacter roseus, Facultatively Anaerobic Organotrophic Bacterium Representing a Novel Deep Lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi Group

    PubMed Central

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V.; Mardanov, Andrey V.; Podosokorskaya, Olga A.; Gavrilov, Sergey N.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Beletsky, Alexey V.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Ravin, Nikolai V.

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi. PMID:23301019

  20. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum LZ227, a potential probiotic strain producing B-group vitamins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Qingqing; Gu, Qing

    2016-09-20

    B-group vitamins play an important role in human metabolism, whose deficiencies are associated with a variety of disorders and diseases. Certain microorganisms such as Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to have capacities for B-group vitamin production and thus could potentially replace chemically synthesized vitamins for food fortification. A potential probiotic strain named Lactobacillus plantarum LZ227, which was isolated from raw cow milk in this study, exhibits the ability to produce B-group vitamins. Complete genome sequencing of LZ227 was performed to gain insights into the genetic elements involved in B-group vitamin production. The genome of LZ227 contains a circular 3,131,750-bp chromosome, three circular plasmids and two predicted linear plasmids. LZ227 also contains gene clusters for biosynthesis of both riboflavin and folate. This genome sequence provides a basis for further elucidation of its molecular genetics and probiotic functions, and will facilitate its applications as starter cultures in food industry. PMID:27480344

  1. Allopolyploidy-induced rapid genome evolution in the wheat (Aegilops-Triticum) group.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Levy, A A; Feldman, M

    2001-08-01

    To better understand genetic events that accompany allopolyploid formation, we studied the rate and time of elimination of eight DNA sequences in F1 hybrids and newly formed allopolyploids of Aegilops and TRITICUM: In total, 35 interspecific and intergeneric F1 hybrids and 22 derived allopolyploids were analyzed and compared with their direct parental plants. The studied sequences exist in all the diploid species of the Triticeae but occur in only one genome, either in one homologous pair (chromosome-specific sequences [CSSs]) or in several pairs of the same genome (genome-specific sequences [GSSs]), in the polyploid wheats. It was found that rapid elimination of CSSs and GSSs is a general phenomenon in newly synthesized allopolyploids. Elimination of GSSs was already initiated in F1 plants and was completed in the second or third allopolyploid generation, whereas elimination of CSSs started in the first allopolyploid generation and was completed in the second or third generation. Sequence elimination started earlier in allopolyploids whose genome constitution was analogous to natural polyploids compared with allopolyploids that do not occur in nature. Elimination is a nonrandom and reproducible event whose direction was determined by the genomic combination of the hybrid or the allopolyploid. It was not affected by the genotype of the parental plants, by their cytoplasm, or by the ploidy level, and it did not result from intergenomic recombination. Allopolyploidy-induced sequence elimination occurred in a sizable fraction of the genome and in sequences that were apparently noncoding. This finding suggests a role in augmenting the differentiation of homoeologous chromosomes at the polyploid level, thereby providing the physical basis for the diploid-like meiotic behavior of newly formed allopolyploids. In our view, this rapid genome adjustment may have contributed to the successful establishment of newly formed allopolyploids as new species. PMID:11487689

  2. Community genomic and proteomic analysis of chemoautotrophic, iron-oxidizing "Leptospirillum rubarum" (Group II) and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (Group III) in acid mine drainage biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Denef, Vincent; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G; Mueller, Ryan; Dick, Gregory J.; Sun, Christine; Wheeler, Korin; Zelma, Adam; Baker, Brett J.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Shah, Manesh B; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed near-complete population (composite) genomic sequences for coexisting acidophilic iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum Groups II and III bacteria (phylum Nitrospirae) and an extrachromosomal plasmid from a Richmond Mine, CA acid mine drainage (AMD) biofilm. Community proteomic analysis of the genomically characterized sample and two other biofilms identified 64.6% and 44.9% of the predicted proteins of Leptospirillum Groups II and III, respectively and 20% of the predicted plasmid proteins. The bacteria share 92% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity and > 60% of their genes, including integrated plasmid-like regions. The extrachromosomal plasmid encodes conjugation genes with detectable sequence similarity to genes in the integrated conjugative plasmid, but only those on the extrachromosomal element were identified by proteomics. Both bacteria have genes for community-essential functions, including carbon fixation, biosynthesis of vitamins, fatty acids and biopolymers (including cellulose); proteomic analyses reveal these activities. Both Leptospirillum types have multiple pathways for osmotic protection. Although both are motile, signal transduction and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins are more abundant in Leptospirillum Group III, consistent with its distribution in gradients within biofilms. Interestingly, Leptospirillum Group II uses a methyl-dependent and Leptospirillum Group III a methyl-independent response pathway. Although only Leptospirillum Group III can fix nitrogen, these proteins were not identified by proteomics. Abundances of core proteins are similar in all communities, but abundance levels of unique and shared proteins of unknown function vary. Some proteins unique to one organism were highly expressed and may be key to the functional and ecological differentiation of Leptospirillum Groups II and III.

  3. Fundamental molecules of life are pigments which arose and co-evolved as a response to the thermodynamic imperative of dissipating the prevailing solar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelian, K.; Simeonov, A.

    2015-08-01

    The driving force behind the origin and evolution of life has been the thermodynamic imperative of increasing the entropy production of the biosphere through increasing the global solar photon dissipation rate. In the upper atmosphere of today, oxygen and ozone derived from life processes are performing the short-wavelength UV-C and UV-B dissipation. On Earth's surface, water and organic pigments in water facilitate the near-UV and visible photon dissipation. The first organic pigments probably formed, absorbed, and dissipated at those photochemically active wavelengths in the UV-C and UV-B that could have reached Earth's surface during the Archean. Proliferation of these pigments can be understood as an autocatalytic photochemical process obeying non-equilibrium thermodynamic directives related to increasing solar photon dissipation rate. Under these directives, organic pigments would have evolved over time to increase the global photon dissipation rate by (1) increasing the ratio of their effective photon cross sections to their physical size, (2) decreasing their electronic excited state lifetimes, (3) quenching radiative de-excitation channels (e.g., fluorescence), (4) covering ever more completely the prevailing solar spectrum, and (5) proliferating and dispersing to cover an ever greater surface area of Earth. From knowledge of the evolution of the spectrum of G-type stars, and considering the most probable history of the transparency of Earth's atmosphere, we construct the most probable Earth surface solar spectrum as a function of time and compare this with the history of molecular absorption maxima obtained from the available data in the literature. This comparison supports the conjecture that many fundamental molecules of life are pigments which arose, proliferated, and co-evolved as a response to dissipating the solar spectrum, supports the thermodynamic dissipation theory for the origin of life, constrains models for Earth's early atmosphere, and sheds

  4. Novel Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Efflux System AdeDE in Acinetobacter Genomic DNA Group 3

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Sze-Lok; Chu, Yiu-Wai; Houang, Elizabeth T. S.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance-nodulation-cell division type efflux pump AdeDE was identified in acinetobacters belonging to genomic DNA group 3. Inactivation of adeE showed that it may be responsible for reduced susceptibility to amikacin, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, ethidium bromide, meropenem, rifampin, and tetracycline. However, unlike what was found for other similar efflux systems, the open reading frame for the outer membrane component was not found downstream of the adeDE gene cluster. PMID:15388479

  5. Survey of chimeric IStron elements in bacterial genomes: multiple molecular symbioses between group I intron ribozymes and DNA transposons

    PubMed Central

    Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Stabell, Fredrik B.; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

    2014-01-01

    IStrons are chimeric genetic elements composed of a group I intron associated with an insertion sequence (IS). The group I intron is a catalytic RNA providing the IStron with self-splicing ability, which renders IStron insertions harmless to the host genome. The IS element is a DNA transposon conferring mobility, and thus allowing the IStron to spread in genomes. IStrons are therefore a striking example of a molecular symbiosis between unrelated genetic elements endowed with different functions. In this study, we have conducted the first comprehensive survey of IStrons in sequenced genomes that provides insights into the distribution, diversity, origin and evolution of IStrons. We show that IStrons have a restricted phylogenetic distribution limited to two bacterial phyla, the Firmicutes and the Fusobacteria. Nevertheless, diverse IStrons representing two major groups targeting different insertion site motifs were identified. This taken with the finding that while the intron components of all IStrons belong to the same structural class, they are fused to different IS families, indicates that multiple intron–IS symbioses have occurred during evolution. In addition, introns and IS elements related to those that were at the origin of IStrons were also identified. PMID:25324310

  6. The first detection and whole genome characterization of the G6P[15] group A rotavirus strain from roe deer.

    PubMed

    Jamnikar-Ciglenecki, Urska; Kuhar, Urska; Sturm, Sabina; Kirbis, Andrej; Racki, Nejc; Steyer, Andrej

    2016-08-15

    Although rotaviruses have been detected in a variety of host species, there are only limited records of their occurrence in deer, where their role is unknown. In this study, group A rotavirus was identified in roe deer during a study of enteric viruses in game animals. 102 samples of intestinal content were collected from roe deer (56), wild boars (29), chamois (10), red deer (6) and mouflon (1), but only one sample from roe deer was positive. Following whole genome sequence analysis, the rotavirus strain D38/14 was characterized by next generation sequencing. The genotype constellation, comprising 11 genome segments, was G6-P[15]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A3-N2-T6-E2-H3. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 genome segment showed that the D38/14 rotavirus strain is closely related to the various G6 zoonotic rotavirus strains of bovine-like origin frequently detected in humans. In the VP4 segment, this strain showed high variation compared to that in the P[15] strain found in sheep and in a goat. This finding suggests that rotaviruses from deer are similar to those in other DS-1 rotavirus groups and could constitute a source of zoonotically transmitted rotaviruses. The epidemiological status of group A rotaviruses in deer should be further investigated. PMID:27374907

  7. A novel virus genome discovered in an extreme environment suggests recombination between unrelated groups of RNA and DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viruses are known to be the most abundant organisms on earth, yet little is known about their collective origin and evolutionary history. With exceptionally high rates of genetic mutation and mosaicism, it is not currently possible to resolve deep evolutionary histories of the known major virus groups. Metagenomics offers a potential means of establishing a more comprehensive view of viral evolution as vast amounts of new sequence data becomes available for comparative analysis. Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence and circular configuration of the complete virus genome was confirmed by inverse PCR amplification from native DNA extracted from lake sediment. The virus genome appears to be the result of a RNA-DNA recombination event between two ostensibly unrelated virus groups. Environmental sequence databases were examined for homologous genes arranged in similar configurations and three similar putative virus genomes from marine environments were identified. This result indicates the existence of a widespread but previously undetected group of viruses. Conclusions This unique viral genome carries implications for theories of virus emergence and evolution, as no mechanism for interviral RNA-DNA recombination has yet been identified, and only scant evidence exists that genetic exchange occurs between such distinct virus lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by EK, MK (nominated by PF) and AM. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:22515485

  8. Evolution and dynamics of megaplasmids with genome sizes larger than 100 kb in the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmids play a crucial role in the evolution of bacterial genomes by mediating horizontal gene transfer. However, the origin and evolution of most plasmids remains unclear, especially for megaplasmids. Strains of the Bacillus cereus group contain up to 13 plasmids with genome sizes ranging from 2 kb to 600 kb, and thus can be used to study plasmid dynamics and evolution. Results This work studied the origin and evolution of 31 B. cereus group megaplasmids (>100 kb) focusing on the most conserved regions on plasmids, minireplicons. Sixty-five putative minireplicons were identified and classified to six types on the basis of proteins that are essential for replication. Twenty-nine of the 31 megaplasmids contained two or more minireplicons. Phylogenetic analysis of the protein sequences showed that different minireplicons on the same megaplasmid have different evolutionary histories. Therefore, we speculated that these megaplasmids are the results of fusion of smaller plasmids. All plasmids of a bacterial strain must be compatible. In megaplasmids of the B. cereus group, individual minireplicons of different megaplasmids in the same strain belong to different types or subtypes. Thus, the subtypes of each minireplicon they contain may determine the incompatibilities of megaplasmids. A broader analysis of all 1285 bacterial plasmids with putative known minireplicons whose complete genome sequences were available from GenBank revealed that 34% (443 plasmids) of the plasmids have two or more minireplicons. This indicates that plasmid fusion events are general among bacterial plasmids. Conclusions Megaplasmids of B. cereus group are fusion of smaller plasmids, and the fusion of plasmids likely occurs frequently in the B. cereus group and in other bacterial taxa. Plasmid fusion may be one of the major mechanisms for formation of novel megaplasmids in the evolution of bacteria. PMID:24295128

  9. Including different groups of genotyped females for genomic prediction in a Nordic Jersey population.

    PubMed

    Gao, H; Madsen, P; Nielsen, U S; Aamand, G P; Su, G; Byskov, K; Jensen, J

    2015-12-01

    Including genotyped females in a reference population (RP) is an obvious way to increase the RP in genomic selection, especially for dairy breeds of limited population size. However, the incorporation of these females must be conducted cautiously because of the potential preferential treatment of the genotyped cows and lower reliabilities of phenotypes compared with the proven pseudo-phenotypes of bulls. Breeding organizations in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden have implemented a female-genotyping project with the possibility of genotyping entire herds using the low-density (LD) chip. In the present study, 5 scenarios for building an RP were investigated in the Nordic Jersey population: (1) bulls only, (2) bulls with females from the LD project, (3) bulls with females from the LD project plus non-LD project females genotyped before their first calving, (4) bulls with females from the LD project plus non-LD project females genotyped after their first calving, and (5) bulls with all genotyped females. The genomically enhanced breeding value (GEBV) was predicted for 8 traits in the Nordic total merit index through a genomic BLUP model using deregressed proof (DRP) as the response variable in all scenarios. In addition, (daughter) yield deviation and raw phenotypic data were studied as response variables for comparison with the DRP, using stature as a model trait. The validation population was formed using a cut-off birth year of 2005 based on the genotyped Nordic Jersey bulls with DRP. The average increment in reliability of the GEBV across the 8 traits investigated was 1.9 to 4.5 percentage points compared with using only bulls in the RP (scenario 1). The addition of all the genotyped females to the RP resulted in the highest gain in reliability (scenario 5), followed by scenario 3, scenario 2, and scenario 4. All scenarios led to inflated GEBV because the regression coefficients are less than 1. However, scenario 2 and scenario 3 led to less bias of genomic predictions

  10. Genome sequence and comparative microarray analysis of serotype M18 group A Streptococcus strains associated with acute rheumatic fever outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, James C.; Barbian, Kent D.; Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Smoot, Laura M.; Chaussee, Michael S.; Sylva, Gail L.; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Parkins, Larye D.; Beres, Stephen B.; Campbell, David S.; Smith, Todd M.; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Daly, Judy A.; Veasy, L. George; Musser, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection, is the most common cause of preventable childhood heart disease worldwide. The molecular basis of ARF and the subsequent rheumatic heart disease are poorly understood. Serotype M18 GAS strains have been associated for decades with ARF outbreaks in the U.S. As a first step toward gaining new insight into ARF pathogenesis, we sequenced the genome of strain MGAS8232, a serotype M18 organism isolated from a patient with ARF. The genome is a circular chromosome of 1,895,017 bp, and it shares 1.7 Mb of closely related genetic material with strain SF370 (a sequenced serotype M1 strain). Strain MGAS8232 has 178 ORFs absent in SF370. Phages, phage-like elements, and insertion sequences are the major sources of variation between the genomes. The genomes of strain MGAS8232 and SF370 encode many of the same proven or putative virulence factors. Importantly, strain MGAS8232 has genes encoding many additional secreted proteins involved in human–GAS interactions, including streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (scarlet fever toxin) and two uncharacterized pyrogenic exotoxin homologues, all phage-associated. DNA microarray analysis of 36 serotype M18 strains from diverse localities showed that most regions of variation were phages or phage-like elements. Two epidemics of ARF occurring 12 years apart in Salt Lake City, UT, were caused by serotype M18 strains that were genetically identical, or nearly so. Our analysis provides a critical foundation for accelerated research into ARF pathogenesis and a molecular framework to study the plasticity of GAS genomes. PMID:11917108

  11. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Mycobacterium massiliense JCM 15300 in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group Reveal a Conserved Genomic Island MmGI-1 Related to Putative Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nakanaga, Kazue; Nakata, Noboru; Kazumi, Yuko; Maeda, Shinji; Makino, Masahiko; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus group subsp., such as M. massiliense, M. abscessus sensu stricto and M. bolletii, are an environmental organism found in soil, water and other ecological niches, and have been isolated from respiratory tract infection, skin and soft tissue infection, postoperative infection of cosmetic surgery. To determine the unique genetic feature of M. massiliense, we sequenced the complete genome of M. massiliense type strain JCM 15300 (corresponding to CCUG 48898). Comparative genomic analysis was performed among Mycobacterium spp. and among M. abscessus group subspp., showing that additional ß-oxidation-related genes and, notably, the mammalian cell entry (mce) operon were located on a genomic island, M. massiliense Genomic Island 1 (MmGI-1), in M. massiliense. In addition, putative anaerobic respiration system-related genes and additional mycolic acid cyclopropane synthetase-related genes were found uniquely in M. massiliense. Japanese isolates of M. massiliense also frequently possess the MmGI-1 (14/44, approximately 32%) and three unique conserved regions (26/44; approximately 60%, 34/44; approximately 77% and 40/44; approximately 91%), as well as isolates of other countries (Malaysia, France, United Kingdom and United States). The well-conserved genomic island MmGI-1 may play an important role in high growth potential with additional lipid metabolism, extra factors for survival in the environment or synthesis of complex membrane-associated lipids. ORFs on MmGI-1 showed similarities to ORFs of phylogenetically distant M. avium complex (MAC), suggesting that horizontal gene transfer or genetic recombination events might have occurred within MmGI-1 among M. massiliense and MAC. PMID:25503461

  12. Social evolution. Genomic signatures of evolutionary transitions from solitary to group living.

    PubMed

    Kapheim, Karen M; Pan, Hailin; Li, Cai; Salzberg, Steven L; Puiu, Daniela; Magoc, Tanja; Robertson, Hugh M; Hudson, Matthew E; Venkat, Aarti; Fischman, Brielle J; Hernandez, Alvaro; Yandell, Mark; Ence, Daniel; Holt, Carson; Yocum, George D; Kemp, William P; Bosch, Jordi; Waterhouse, Robert M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Stolle, Eckart; Kraus, F Bernhard; Helbing, Sophie; Moritz, Robin F A; Glastad, Karl M; Hunt, Brendan G; Goodisman, Michael A D; Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Pinheiro, Daniel Guariz; Nunes, Francis Morais Franco; Soares, Michelle Prioli Miranda; Tanaka, Érica Donato; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino; Hartfelder, Klaus; Evans, Jay D; Barribeau, Seth M; Johnson, Reed M; Massey, Jonathan H; Southey, Bruce R; Hasselmann, Martin; Hamacher, Daniel; Biewer, Matthias; Kent, Clement F; Zayed, Amro; Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh; Johnston, J Spencer; Hanrahan, Shawn J; Kocher, Sarah D; Wang, Jun; Robinson, Gene E; Zhang, Guojie

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of eusociality is one of the major transitions in evolution, but the underlying genomic changes are unknown. We compared the genomes of 10 bee species that vary in social complexity, representing multiple independent transitions in social evolution, and report three major findings. First, many important genes show evidence of neutral evolution as a consequence of relaxed selection with increasing social complexity. Second, there is no single road map to eusociality; independent evolutionary transitions in sociality have independent genetic underpinnings. Third, though clearly independent in detail, these transitions do have similar general features, including an increase in constrained protein evolution accompanied by increases in the potential for gene regulation and decreases in diversity and abundance of transposable elements. Eusociality may arise through different mechanisms each time, but would likely always involve an increase in the complexity of gene networks. PMID:25977371

  13. Effect of cow reference group on validation reliability of genomic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koivula, M; Strandén, I; Aamand, G P; Mäntysaari, E A

    2016-06-01

    We studied the effect of including genomic data for cows in the reference population of single-step evaluations. Deregressed individual cow genetic evaluations (DRP) from milk production evaluations of Nordic Red Dairy cattle were used to estimate the single-step breeding values. Validation reliability and bias of the evaluations were calculated with four data sets including different amount of DRP record information from genotyped cows in the reference population. The gain in reliability was from 2% to 4% units for the production traits, depending on the used DRP data and the amount of genomic data. Moreover, inclusion of genotyped bull dams and their genotyped daughters seemed to create some bias in the single-step evaluation. Still, genotyping cows and their inclusion in the reference population is advantageous and should be encouraged. PMID:27075712

  14. Genome Sequence of Enterobacter cloacae Strain SENG-6, a Bacterium Producing Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances That Can Bind with Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Yang, Peiyi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. strain SENG-6, isolated from healthy human feces, produces histo-blood group antigen (HBGA)-like substances that can bind with human noroviruses. Based on the genome sequence analysis, strain SENG-6 belongs to the species Enterobacter cloacae. The genome sequence of this strain should help identify genes associated with the production of HBGA-like substances. PMID:27563051

  15. The Genomes, Proteomes, and Structures of Three Novel Phages That Infect the Bacillus cereus Group and Carry Putative Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Belnap, David M.; Jensen, Jordan D.; Mathis, Andrew D.; Prince, John T.; Merrill, Bryan D.; Burnett, Sandra H.; Breakwell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article reports the results of studying three novel bacteriophages, JL, Shanette, and Basilisk, which infect the pathogen Bacillus cereus and carry genes that may contribute to its pathogenesis. We analyzed host range and superinfection ability, mapped their genomes, and characterized phage structure by mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The JL and Shanette genomes were 96% similar and contained 217 open reading frames (ORFs) and 220 ORFs, respectively, while Basilisk has an unrelated genome containing 138 ORFs. Mass spectrometry revealed 23 phage particle proteins for JL and 15 for Basilisk, while only 11 and 4, respectively, were predicted to be present by sequence analysis. Structural protein homology to well-characterized phages suggested that JL and Shanette were members of the family Myoviridae, which was confirmed by TEM. The third phage, Basilisk, was similar only to uncharacterized phages and is an unrelated siphovirus. Cryogenic electron microscopy of this novel phage revealed a T=9 icosahedral capsid structure with the major capsid protein (MCP) likely having the same fold as bacteriophage HK97 MCP despite the lack of sequence similarity. Several putative virulence factors were encoded by these phage genomes, including TerC and TerD involved in tellurium resistance. Host range analysis of all three phages supports genetic transfer of such factors within the B. cereus group, including B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis. This study provides a basis for understanding these three phages and other related phages as well as their contributions to the pathogenicity of B. cereus group bacteria. IMPORTANCE The Bacillus cereus group of bacteria contains several human and plant pathogens, including B. cereus, B. anthracis, and B. thuringiensis. Phages are intimately linked to the evolution of their bacterial hosts and often provide virulence factors, making the study of B. cereus phages important to understanding

  16. Random forest estimation of genomic breeding values for disease susceptibility over different disease incidences and genomic architectures in simulated cow calibration groups.

    PubMed

    Naderi, S; Yin, T; König, S

    2016-09-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate the performance of random forest (RF) and genomic BLUP (GBLUP) for genomic predictions of binary disease traits based on cow calibration groups. Training and testing sets were modified in different scenarios according to disease incidence, the quantitative-genetic background of the trait (h(2)=0.30 and h(2)=0.10), and the genomic architecture [725 quantitative trait loci (QTL) and 290 QTL, populations with high and low levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD)]. For all scenarios, 10,005 SNP (depicting a low-density 10K SNP chip) and 50,025 SNP (depicting a 50K SNP chip) were evenly spaced along 29 chromosomes. Training and testing sets included 20,000 cows (4,000 sick, 16,000 healthy, disease incidence 20%) from the last 2 generations. Initially, 4,000 sick cows were assigned to the testing set, and the remaining 16,000 healthy cows represented the training set. In the ongoing allocation schemes, the number of sick cows in the training set increased stepwise by moving 10% of the sick animals from the testing set to the training set, and vice versa. The size of the training and testing sets was kept constant. Evaluation criteria for both GBLUP and RF were the correlations between genomic breeding values and true breeding values (prediction accuracy), and the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Prediction accuracy and AUROC increased for both methods and all scenarios as increasing percentages of sick cows were allocated to the training set. Highest prediction accuracies were observed for disease incidences in training sets that reflected the population disease incidence of 0.20. For this allocation scheme, the largest prediction accuracies of 0.53 for RF and of 0.51 for GBLUP, and the largest AUROC of 0.66 for RF and of 0.64 for GBLUP, were achieved using 50,025 SNP, a heritability of 0.30, and 725 QTL. Heritability decreases from 0.30 to 0.10 and QTL reduction from 725 to 290 were associated

  17. Variable Tick Protein in Two Genomic Groups of the Relapsing Fever Spirochete Borrelia hermsii in Western North America

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Anderson, Donald E.; Gilk, Stacey D.; Bono, James L.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2005-01-01

    Borrelia hermsii is the primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in North America. When its tick vector, Ornithodoros hermsi, acquires these spirochetes from the blood of an infected mammal, the bacteria switch their outer surface from one of many bloodstream variable major proteins (Vmps) to a unique protein, Vtp (Vsp33). Vtp may be critical for successful tick transmission of B. hermsii; however, the gene encoding this protein has been described previously in only one isolate. Here we identified and sequenced the vtp gene in 31 isolates of B. hermsii collected over 40 years from localities throughout much of its known geographic distribution. Seven major Vtp types were found. Little or no sequence variation existed within types, but between them significant variation was observed, similar to the pattern of diversity described for the outer surface protein C (OspC) gene in Lyme disease spirochetes. The pattern of sequence relatedness among the Vtp types was incongruent in two branches compared to two genomic groups identified among the isolates by multilocus sequence typing of the 16S rRNA, flaB, gyrB, and glpQ genes. Therefore, both horizontal transfer and recombination within and between the two genomic groups were responsible for some of the variation observed in the vtp gene. O. hermsi ticks were capable of transmitting spirochetes in the newly identified genomic group. Therefore, given the longevity of the tick vector and persistent infection of spirochetes in ticks, these arthropods rather than mammals may be the likely host where the exchange of spirochetal DNA occurs. PMID:16177341

  18. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D; Altınışık, N Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Konovalova, Olga P; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V; Travinsky, Igor V; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2016-01-01

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal'ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal'ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed. PMID:26865217

  19. Admixture patterns and genetic differentiation in negrito groups from West Malaysia estimated from genome-wide SNP data.

    PubMed

    Jinam, Timothy A; Phipps, Maude E; Saitou, Naruya

    2013-01-01

    Southeast Asia houses various culturally and linguistically diverse ethnic groups. In Malaysia, where the Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups form the majority, there exist minority groups such as the "negritos" who are believed to be descendants of the earliest settlers of Southeast Asia. Here we report patterns of genetic substructure and admixture in two Malaysian negrito populations (Jehai and Kensiu), using ~50,000 genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We found traces of recent admixture in both the negrito populations, particularly in the Jehai, with the Malay through principal component analysis and STRUCTURE analysis software, which suggested that the admixture was as recent as one generation ago. We also identified significantly differentiated nonsynonymous SNPs and haplotype blocks related to intracellular transport, metabolic processes, and detection of stimulus. These results highlight the different levels of admixture experienced by the two Malaysian negritos. Delineating admixture and differentiated genomic regions should be of importance in designing and interpretation of molecular anthropology and disease association studies. PMID:24297225

  20. Genomic study of the Ket: a Paleo-Eskimo-related ethnic group with significant ancient North Eurasian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Flegontov, Pavel; Changmai, Piya; Zidkova, Anastassiya; Logacheva, Maria D.; Altınışık, N. Ezgi; Flegontova, Olga; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Konovalova, Olga P.; Neretina, Tatiana; Nikolsky, Yuri V.; Starostin, George; Stepanova, Vita V.; Travinsky, Igor V.; Tříska, Martin; Tříska, Petr; Tatarinova, Tatiana V.

    2016-01-01

    The Kets, an ethnic group in the Yenisei River basin, Russia, are considered the last nomadic hunter-gatherers of Siberia, and Ket language has no transparent affiliation with any language family. We investigated connections between the Kets and Siberian and North American populations, with emphasis on the Mal’ta and Paleo-Eskimo ancient genomes, using original data from 46 unrelated samples of Kets and 42 samples of their neighboring ethnic groups (Uralic-speaking Nganasans, Enets, and Selkups). We genotyped over 130,000 autosomal SNPs, identified mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal haplogroups, and performed high-coverage genome sequencing of two Ket individuals. We established that Nganasans, Kets, Selkups, and Yukaghirs form a cluster of populations most closely related to Paleo-Eskimos in Siberia (not considering indigenous populations of Chukotka and Kamchatka). Kets are closely related to modern Selkups and to some Bronze and Iron Age populations of the Altai region, with all these groups sharing a high degree of Mal’ta ancestry. Implications of these findings for the linguistic hypothesis uniting Ket and Na-Dene languages into a language macrofamily are discussed. PMID:26865217

  1. Genomic Analysis of the Emergence and Rapid Global Dissemination of the Clonal Group 258 Klebsiella pneumoniae Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Driebe, Elizabeth M.; MacCannell, Duncan R.; Roe, Chandler; Lemmer, Darrin; de Man, Tom; Rasheed, J. Kamile; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul; Limbago, Brandi M.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the KPC carbapenemase have rapidly spread throughout the world, causing severe healthcare-associated infections with limited antimicrobial treatment options. Dissemination of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae is largely attributed to expansion of a single dominant strain, ST258. In this study, we explore phylogenetic relationships and evolution within ST258 and its clonal group, CG258, using whole genome sequence analysis of 167 isolates from 20 countries collected over 17 years. Our results show a common ST258 ancestor emerged from its diverse parental clonal group around 1995 and likely acquired blaKPC prior to dissemination. Over the past two decades, ST258 has remained highly clonal despite diversity in accessory elements and divergence in the capsule polysaccharide synthesis locus. Apart from the large recombination event that gave rise to ST258, few mutations set it apart from its clonal group. However, one mutation occurs in a global transcription regulator. Characterization of outer membrane protein sequences revealed a profile in ST258 that includes a truncated OmpK35 and modified OmpK37. Our work illuminates potential genomic contributors to the pathogenic success of ST258, helps us better understand the global dissemination of this strain, and identifies genetic markers unique to ST258. PMID:26196384

  2. The mitochondrial genome of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita reveals two unsuspected trans-splicing events of group I introns.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Adrian; Pombert, Jean-François; Salvioli, Alessandra; Bonen, Linda; Bonfante, Paola; Corradi, Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    • Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are ubiquitous organisms that benefit ecosystems through the establishment of an association with the roots of most plants: the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Despite their ecological importance, however, these fungi have been poorly studied at the genome level. • In this study, total DNA from the AMF Gigaspora margarita was subjected to a combination of 454 and Illumina sequencing, and the resulting reads were used to assemble its mitochondrial genome de novo. This genome was annotated and compared with those of other relatives to better comprehend the evolution of the AMF lineage. • The mitochondrial genome of G. margarita is unique in many ways, exhibiting a large size (97 kbp) and elevated GC content (45%). This genome also harbors molecular events that were previously unknown to occur in fungal mitochondrial genomes, including trans-splicing of group I introns from two different genes coding for the first subunit of the cytochrome oxidase and for the small subunit of the rRNA. • This study reports the second published genome from an AMF organelle, resulting in relevant DNA sequence information from this poorly studied fungal group, and providing new insights into the frequency, origin and evolution of trans-spliced group I introns found across the mitochondrial genomes of distantly related organisms. PMID:22320438

  3. Genomic profiling of lower-grade gliomas uncovers cohesive disease groups: implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang-Ming; Brat, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Lower-grade gliomas (including low- and intermediate-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) are diffusely infiltrative neoplasms that arise most often in the cerebral hemispheres of adults and have traditionally been classified based on their presumed histogenesis as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, or oligoastrocytomas. Although the histopathologic classification of lower-grade glioma has been the accepted standard for nearly a century, it suffers from high intra- and inter-observer variability and does not adequately predict clinical outcomes. Based on integrated analysis of multiplatform genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, lower-grade gliomas have been found to segregate into three cohesive, clinically relevant molecular classes. Molecular classes were closely aligned with the status of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, tumor protein 53 mutations and the co-deletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q, but were not closely aligned with histologic classes. These findings emphasize the potential for improved definition of clinically relevant disease subsets using integrated molecular approaches and highlight the importance of biomarkers for brain tumor classification. PMID:26758195

  4. Sequence variants from whole genome sequencing a large group of Icelanders.

    PubMed

    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sulem, Patrick; Helgason, Hannes; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Zink, Florian; Oddson, Asmundur; Magnusson, Gisli; Halldorsson, Bjarni V; Hjartarson, Eirikur; Sigurdsson, Gunnar Th; Kong, Augustine; Helgason, Agnar; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    We have accumulated considerable data on the genetic makeup of the Icelandic population by sequencing the whole genomes of 2,636 Icelanders to depth of at least 10X and by chip genotyping 101,584 more. The sequencing was done with Illumina technology. The median sequencing depth was 20X and 909 individuals were sequenced to a depth of at least 30X. We found 20 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1.5 million insertions/deletions (indels) that passed stringent quality control. Almost all the common SNPs (derived allele frequency (DAF) over 2%) that we identified in Iceland have been observed by either dbSNP (build 137) or the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) while only 60 and 20% of rare (DAF<0.5%) SNPs and indels in coding regions, the most heavily studied parts of the genome, have been observed in the public databases. Features of our variant data, such as the transition/transversion ratio and the length distribution of indels, are similar to published reports. PMID:25977816

  5. Implications of Genome-Based Discrimination between Clostridium botulinum Group I and Clostridium sporogenes Strains for Bacterial Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Michael R.; Pena-Gonzalez, Angela; Shirey, Timothy B.; Broeker, Robin G.; Ishaq, Maliha K.; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2015-01-01

    Taxonomic classification of Clostridium botulinum is based on the production of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), while closely related, nontoxic organisms are classified as Clostridium sporogenes. However, this taxonomic organization does not accurately mirror phylogenetic relationships between these species. A phylogenetic reconstruction using 2,016 orthologous genes shared among strains of C. botulinum group I and C. sporogenes clearly separated these two species into discrete clades which showed ∼93% average nucleotide identity (ANI) between them. Clustering of strains based on the presence of variable orthologs revealed 143 C. sporogenes clade-specific genetic signatures, a subset of which were further evaluated for their ability to correctly classify a panel of presumptive C. sporogenes strains by PCR. Genome sequencing of several C. sporogenes strains lacking these signatures confirmed that they clustered with C. botulinum strains in a core genome phylogenetic tree. Our analysis also identified C. botulinum strains that contained C. sporogenes clade-specific signatures and phylogenetically clustered with C. sporogenes strains. The genome sequences of two bont/B2-containing strains belonging to the C. sporogenes clade contained regions with similarity to a bont-bearing plasmid (pCLD), while two different strains belonging to the C. botulinum clade carried bont/B2 on the chromosome. These results indicate that bont/B2 was likely acquired by C. sporogenes strains through horizontal gene transfer. The genome-based classification of these species used to identify candidate genes for the development of rapid assays for molecular identification may be applicable to additional bacterial species that are challenging with respect to their classification. PMID:26048939

  6. Genome sequence of Shimia str. SK013, a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from marine sediment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; Vandieken, Verona; Petersen, Jörn; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans -Peter; et al

    2016-03-12

    Shimia strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the Roseobacter group within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of Shimia str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (mttB) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that Shimia str. SK013 is able to switchmore » from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (fla1) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated Shimia str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of Shimia str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of Roseobacter-affiliated bacteria to the benthic environment.« less

  7. Genomic Characterisation of Three Mapputta Group Viruses, a Serogroup of Australian and Papua New Guinean Bunyaviruses Associated with Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Penelope J.; McAllister, Jane; Mitchell, Ian R.; Boyle, David B.; Bulach, Dieter M.; Weir, Richard P.; Melville, Lorna F.; Gubala, Aneta J.

    2015-01-01

    The Mapputta serogroup tentatively contains the mosquito-associated viruses Mapputta, Maprik, Trubanaman and Gan Gan. Interestingly, this serogroup has previously been associated with an acute epidemic polyarthritis-like illness in humans; however, there has been no ensuing genetic characterisation. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Mapputta and Maprik viruses, and a new Mapputta group candidate, Buffalo Creek virus, previously isolated from mosquitoes and detected by serology in a hospitalised patient. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the group is one of the earliest diverged groups within the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. Analyses show that these three viruses are related to the recently sequenced Australian bunyaviruses from mosquitoes, Salt Ash and Murrumbidgee. A notable feature of the Mapputta group viruses is the absence of the NSs (non-structural) ORF commonly found on the S segment of other orthobunyaviruses. Viruses of the Mapputta group have been isolated from geographically diverse regions ranging from tropical Papua New Guinea to the semi-arid climate of south-eastern Australia. The relevance of this group to human health in the region merits further investigation. PMID:25588016

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Group Phage TsarBomba

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus cereus group bacteriophage TsarBomba, a double-stranded DNA Myoviridae, was isolated from soil collected in Saratov, Russia. TsarBomba was found to be similar to Bacillus phages BCP78 and BCU4, and to have a wide host range among Bacillus cereus group species. PMID:26472830

  9. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes. PMID:26975939

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Keeled box turtle Pyxidea mouhotii and phylogenetic analysis of major turtle groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Nie, Liuwang; Cao, Chenghe; Zhan, Ying

    2008-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (16,837 bp) from the Keeled box turtle (Pyxidea mouhotii) was determined. The genome content, gene order, and base composition conformed to the consensus vertebrate type mtDNA. However, a remarkable feature was found in this molecule: a large number of (ATTATATC) (n) direct tandem repeats followed by (TA) (n) microsatellite at the 3' end of the control region (D-loop), which might be useful as molecular markers for studying population genetics and helpful for species identification and conservation. Besides, to review phylogenetic relationships among major turtle lineages, maximum-likelihood (ML) and Bayesian (BI) analyses were conducted based on concatenated sequences of 13 protein-coding genes from 16 taxa. The resultant ML and BI analyses showed homological topologies, which only differed on the exact placement of Platysternon. Nevertheless, the results strongly supported that 1) Pyxidea mouhotii and Cuora aurocapitata formed a monophyletic clade, whereas Cyclemys atripons was not closer to the Pyxidea-Cuora than to Chinemys reevesii, suggesting that Cyclemys and the Cuora group (containing Pyxidea) may have originated from two ancestors; 2) the Geoemydidae with Testudinidae was a sister group rather than with the Emydidae. PMID:18222407

  11. Genomic identification of WRKY transcription factors in carrot (Daucus carota) and analysis of evolution and homologous groups for plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Yao; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tian, Chang; Huang, Ying; Wang, Feng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to one of the largest transcription factor families. These factors possess functions in plant growth and development, signal transduction, and stress response. Here, we identified 95 DcWRKY genes in carrot based on the carrot genomic and transcriptomic data, and divided them into three groups. Phylogenetic analysis of WRKY proteins from carrot and Arabidopsis divided these proteins into seven subgroups. To elucidate the evolution and distribution of WRKY transcription factors in different species, we constructed a schematic of the phylogenetic tree and compared the WRKY family factors among 22 species, which including plants, slime mold and protozoan. An in-depth study was performed to clarify the homologous factor groups of nine divergent taxa in lower and higher plants. Based on the orthologous factors between carrot and Arabidopsis, 38 DcWRKY proteins were calculated to interact with other proteins in the carrot genome. Yeast two-hybrid assay showed that DcWRKY20 can interact with DcMAPK1 and DcMAPK4. The expression patterns of the selected DcWRKY genes based on transcriptome data and qRT-PCR suggested that those selected DcWRKY genes are involved in root development, biotic and abiotic stress response. This comprehensive analysis provides a basis for investigating the evolution and function of WRKY genes. PMID:26975939

  12. Comparative genomics of a plant-parasitic nematode endosymbiont suggest a role in nutritional symbiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial mutualists can increase the biochemical capacity of animals. Highly co-evolved nutritional mutualists do this by synthesizing nutrients missing from the host's diet. Genomics tools have recently advanced the study of these partnerships. Here we examined the endosymbiont Xiphinematobacter (...

  13. Genomic identification of group A bZIP transcription factors and their responses to abiotic stress in carrot.

    PubMed

    Que, F; Wang, G L; Huang, Y; Xu, Z S; Wang, F; Xiong, A S

    2015-01-01

    The basic-region/leucine-zipper (bZIP) family is one of the major transcription factor (TF) families associated with responses to abiotic stresses. Many members of group A in this family have been extensively examined and are reported to perform significant functions in ABA signaling as well as in responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 10 bZIP factors in carrot were classified into group A based on their DNA-binding domains. The cis-acting regulatory elements and folding states of these 10 factors were analyzed. Evolutionary analysis of the group A members suggested their importance during the course of evolution in plants. In addition, cis-acting elements and the folding state of proteins were important for DNA binding and could affect gene expression. Quantitative RT-PCR was conducted to investigate the stress response of 10 genes encoding the group A factors. Six genes showed responses to abiotic stresses, while four genes showed other special phenomenon. The current analysis on group A bZIP family TFs in carrot is the first to investigate the TFs of Apiaceae via genome analysis. These results provide new information for future studies on carrot. PMID:26535641

  14. Insights from the Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli M6, a Group I Strain of the Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Shkedy, Dafna; Gershovits, Michael; Da Silva, Gustavo M; Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Walcott, Ron; Pupko, Tal; Burdman, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is a seedborne bacterium that causes bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbit plants including watermelon and melon. A. citrulli strains can be divided into two major groups based on DNA fingerprint analyses and biochemical properties. Group I strains have been generally isolated from non-watermelon cucurbits, while group II strains are closely associated with watermelon. In the present study, we report the genome sequence of M6, a group I model A. citrulli strain, isolated from melon. We used comparative genome analysis to investigate differences between the genome of strain M6 and the genome of the group II model strain AAC00-1. The draft genome sequence of A. citrulli M6 harbors 139 contigs, with an overall approximate size of 4.85 Mb. The genome of M6 is ∼500 Kb shorter than that of strain AAC00-1. Comparative analysis revealed that this size difference is mainly explained by eight fragments, ranging from ∼35-120 Kb and distributed throughout the AAC00-1 genome, which are absent in the M6 genome. In agreement with this finding, while AAC00-1 was found to possess 532 open reading frames (ORFs) that are absent in strain M6, only 123 ORFs in M6 were absent in AAC00-1. Most of these M6 ORFs are hypothetical proteins and most of them were also detected in two group I strains that were recently sequenced, tw6 and pslb65. Further analyses by PCR assays and coverage analyses with other A. citrulli strains support the notion that some of these fragments or significant portions of them are discriminative between groups I and II strains of A. citrulli. Moreover, GC content, effective number of codon values and cluster of orthologs' analyses indicate that these fragments were introduced into group II strains by horizontal gene transfer events. Our study reports the genome sequence of a model group I strain of A. citrulli, one of the most important pathogens of cucurbits. It also provides the first comprehensive comparison at the genomic level between the

  15. Insights from the Genome Sequence of Acidovorax citrulli M6, a Group I Strain of the Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch of Cucurbits

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Noam; Shkedy, Dafna; Gershovits, Michael; Da Silva, Gustavo M.; Tamir-Ariel, Dafna; Walcott, Ron; Pupko, Tal; Burdman, Saul

    2016-01-01

    Acidovorax citrulli is a seedborne bacterium that causes bacterial fruit blotch of cucurbit plants including watermelon and melon. A. citrulli strains can be divided into two major groups based on DNA fingerprint analyses and biochemical properties. Group I strains have been generally isolated from non-watermelon cucurbits, while group II strains are closely associated with watermelon. In the present study, we report the genome sequence of M6, a group I model A. citrulli strain, isolated from melon. We used comparative genome analysis to investigate differences between the genome of strain M6 and the genome of the group II model strain AAC00-1. The draft genome sequence of A. citrulli M6 harbors 139 contigs, with an overall approximate size of 4.85 Mb. The genome of M6 is ∼500 Kb shorter than that of strain AAC00-1. Comparative analysis revealed that this size difference is mainly explained by eight fragments, ranging from ∼35–120 Kb and distributed throughout the AAC00-1 genome, which are absent in the M6 genome. In agreement with this finding, while AAC00-1 was found to possess 532 open reading frames (ORFs) that are absent in strain M6, only 123 ORFs in M6 were absent in AAC00-1. Most of these M6 ORFs are hypothetical proteins and most of them were also detected in two group I strains that were recently sequenced, tw6 and pslb65. Further analyses by PCR assays and coverage analyses with other A. citrulli strains support the notion that some of these fragments or significant portions of them are discriminative between groups I and II strains of A. citrulli. Moreover, GC content, effective number of codon values and cluster of orthologs’ analyses indicate that these fragments were introduced into group II strains by horizontal gene transfer events. Our study reports the genome sequence of a model group I strain of A. citrulli, one of the most important pathogens of cucurbits. It also provides the first comprehensive comparison at the genomic level between

  16. The genomic organization of the Fanconi anemia group A (FAA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianzano, L.; Centra, M.; Savino, M.

    1997-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disease involving at least five genes on the basis of complementation analysis (FAA to FAE). The FAA gene has been recently isolated by two independent approaches, positional and functional cloning. In the present study we describe the genomic structure of the FAA gene. The gene contains 43 exons spanning approximately 80 kb as determined by the alignment of four cosmids and the fine localization of the first and the last exons in restriction fragments of these clones. Exons range from 34 to 188 bp. All but three of the splice sites were consistent with the ag-gt rule. We also describe three alternative splicing events in cDNA clones that result in the loss of exon 37, a 23-bp deletion at the 5{prime} end of exon 41. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} region upstream of the putative transcription start site showed no obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, but did show a GC-rich region, typical of housekeeping genes. Knowledge of the structure of the FAA gene will provide an invaluable resource for the discovery of mutations in the gene that accounts for about 60-66% of FA patients. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Perspective: maternal kin groups and the origins of asymmetric genetic systems-genomic imprinting, haplodiploidy, and parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Normark, Benjamin B

    2006-04-01

    The genetic systems of animals and plants are typically eumendelian. That is, an equal complement of autosomes is inherited from each of two parents, and at each locus, each parent's allele is equally likely to be expressed and equally likely to be transmitted. Genetic systems that violate any of these eumendelian symmetries are termed asymmetric and include parent-specific gene expression (PSGE), haplodiploidy, thelytoky, and related systems. Asymmetric genetic systems typically arise in lineages with close associations between kin (gregarious siblings, brooding, or viviparity). To date, different explanatory frameworks have been proposed to account for each of the different asymmetric genetic systems. Haig's kinship theory of genomic imprinting argues that PSGE arises when kinship asymmetries between interacting kin create conflicts between maternally and paternally derived alleles. Greater maternal than paternal relatedness within groups selects for more "abstemious" expression of maternally derived alleles and more "greedy" expression of paternally derived alleles. Here, I argue that this process may also underlie origins of haplodiploidy and many origins of thelytoky. The tendency for paternal alleles to be more "greedy" in maternal kin groups means that maternal-paternal conflict is not a zero-sum game: the maternal optimum will more closely correspond to the optimum for family groups and demes and for associated entities such as symbionts. Often in these circumstances, partial or complete suppression of paternal gene expression will evolve (haplodiploidy, thelytoky), or other features of the life cycle will evolve to minimize the conflict (monogamy, inbreeding). Maternally transmitted cytoplasmic elements and maternally imprinted nuclear alleles have a shared interest in minimizing agonistic interactions between female siblings and may cooperate to exclude the paternal genome. Eusociality is the most dramatic expression of the conflict-reducing effects of

  18. Use of longitudinal data in genetic studies in the genome-wide association studies era: summary of Group 14.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Berit; North, Kari E; Fallin, M Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Participants analyzed actual and simulated longitudinal data from the Framingham Heart Study for various metabolic and cardiovascular traits. The genetic information incorporated into these investigations ranged from selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms to genome-wide association arrays. Genotypes were incorporated using a broad range of methodological approaches including conditional logistic regression, linear mixed models, generalized estimating equations, linear growth curve estimation, growth modeling, growth mixture modeling, population attributable risk fraction based on survival functions under the proportional hazards models, and multivariate adaptive splines for the analysis of longitudinal data. The specific scientific questions addressed by these different approaches also varied, ranging from a more precise definition of the phenotype, bias reduction in control selection, estimation of effect sizes and genotype associated risk, to direct incorporation of genetic data into longitudinal modeling approaches and the exploration of population heterogeneity with regard to longitudinal trajectories. The group reached several overall conclusions: (1) The additional information provided by longitudinal data may be useful in genetic analyses. (2) The precision of the phenotype definition as well as control selection in nested designs may be improved, especially if traits demonstrate a trend over time or have strong age-of-onset effects. (3) Analyzing genetic data stratified for high-risk subgroups defined by a unique development over time could be useful for the detection of rare mutations in common multifactorial diseases. (4) Estimation of the population impact of genomic risk variants could be more precise. The challenges and computational complexity demanded by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data were also discussed. PMID:19924713

  19. Use of Longitudinal Data in Genetic Studies in the Genome-wide Association Studies Era: Summary of Group 14

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Berit; North, Kari E; Fallin, M Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Participants analyzed actual and simulated longitudinal data from the Framingham Heart Study for various metabolic and cardiovascular traits. The genetic information incorporated into these investigations ranged from selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms to genome-wide association arrays. Genotypes were incorporated using a broad range of methodological approaches including conditional logistic regression, linear mixed models, generalized estimating equations, linear growth curve estimation, growth modeling, growth mixture modeling, population attributable risk fraction based on survival functions under the proportional hazards models, and multivariate adaptive splines for the analysis of longitudinal data. The specific scientific questions addressed by these different approaches also varied, ranging from a more precise definition of the phenotype, bias reduction in control selection, estimation of effect sizes and genotype associated risk, to direct incorporation of genetic data into longitudinal modeling approaches and the exploration of population heterogeneity with regard to longitudinal trajectories. The group reached several overall conclusions: 1) The additional information provided by longitudinal data may be useful in genetic analyses. 2) The precision of the phenotype definition as well as control selection in nested designs may be improved, especially if traits demonstrate a trend over time or have strong age-of-onset effects. 3) Analyzing genetic data stratified for high-risk subgroups defined by a unique development over time could be useful for the detection of rare mutations in common multi-factorial diseases. 4) Estimation of the population impact of genomic risk variants could be more precise. The challenges and computational complexity demanded by genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data were also discussed. PMID:19924713

  20. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.; Turell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  1. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M; Bergman, Nicholas H; Turell, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  2. Group-specific structural features of the 5'-proximal sequences of coronavirus genomic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Cheng; Olsthoorn, René C L

    2010-05-25

    Global predictions of the secondary structure of coronavirus (CoV) 5' untranslated regions and adjacent coding sequences revealed the presence of conserved structural elements. Stem loops (SL) 1, 2, 4, and 5 were predicted in all CoVs, while the core leader transcription-regulating sequence (L-TRS) forms SL3 in only some CoVs. SL5 in group I and II CoVs, with the exception of group IIa CoVs, is characterized by the presence of a large sequence insertion capable of forming hairpins with the conserved 5'-UUYCGU-3' loop sequence. Structure probing confirmed the existence of these hairpins in the group I Human coronavirus-229E and the group II Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In general, the pattern of the 5' cis-acting elements is highly related to the lineage of CoVs, including features of the conserved hairpins in SL5. The function of these conserved hairpins as a putative packaging signal is discussed. PMID:20202661

  3. Expanded MLST genotyping and comparative genomic hybridization evidence for host preferred groups in Campylobacter coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of previous work on campylobacteriosis has centered on the species Campylobacter jejuni, however, Campylobacter coli, the sister group to C. jejuni, is also a significant problem, but remains a much less studied organism. The purpose of this work was to develop and apply an expanded 16 ...

  4. Framework for development of physician competencies in genomic medicine: report of the Competencies Working Group of the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics.

    PubMed

    Korf, Bruce R; Berry, Anna B; Limson, Melvin; Marian, Ali J; Murray, Michael F; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Passamani, Eugene R; Relling, Mary V; Tooker, John; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rodriguez, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Completion of the Human Genome Project, in conjunction with dramatic reductions in the cost of DNA sequencing and advances in translational research, is gradually ushering genomic discoveries and technologies into the practice of medicine. The rapid pace of these advances is opening up a gap between the knowledge available about the clinical relevance of genomic information and the ability of clinicians to include such information in their medical practices. This educational gap threatens to be rate limiting to the clinical adoption of genomics in medicine. Solutions will require not only a better understanding of the clinical implications of genetic discoveries but also training in genomics at all levels of professional development, including for individuals in formal training and others who long ago completed such training. The National Human Genome Research Institute has convened the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics (ISCC) to develop and share best practices in the use of genomics in medicine. The ISCC has developed a framework for development of genomics practice competencies that may serve as a starting point for formulation of competencies for physicians in various medical disciplines. PMID:24763287

  5. Chemical rescue, multiple ionizable groups, and general acid-base catalysis in the HDV genomic ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Anne T; Wadkins, Timothy S; Been, Michael D

    2006-07-01

    In the ribozyme from the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) genomic strand RNA, a cytosine side chain is proposed to facilitate proton transfer in the transition state of the reaction and, thus, act as a general acid-base catalyst. Mutation of this active-site cytosine (C75) reduced RNA cleavage rates by as much as one million-fold, but addition of exogenous cytosine and certain nucleobase or imidazole analogs can partially rescue activity in these mutants. However, pH-rate profiles for the rescued reactions were bell shaped, and only one leg of the pH-rate curve could be attributed to ionization of the exogenous nucleobase or buffer. When a second potential ionizable nucleobase (C41) was removed, one leg of the bell-shaped curve was eliminated in the chemical-rescue reaction. With this construct, the apparent pK(a) determined from the pH-rate profile correlated with the solution pK(a) of the buffer, and the contribution of the buffer to the rate enhancement could be directly evaluated in a free-energy or Brønsted plot. The free-energy relationship between the acid dissociation constant of the buffer and the rate constant for cleavage (Brønsted value, beta, = approximately 0.5) was consistent with a mechanism in which the buffer acted as a general acid-base catalyst. These data support the hypothesis that cytosine 75, in the intact ribozyme, acts as a general acid-base catalyst. PMID:16690998

  6. Genomic Recombination Leading to Decreased Virulence of Group B Streptococcus in a Mouse Model of Adult Invasive Disease.

    PubMed

    Teatero, Sarah; Lemire, Paul; Dewar, Ken; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Calzas, Cynthia; Mallo, Gustavo V; Li, Aimin; Athey, Taryn B T; Segura, Mariela; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Adult invasive disease caused by Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasing worldwide. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) now permits rapid identification of recombination events, a phenomenon that occurs frequently in GBS. Using WGS, we described that strain NGBS375, a capsular serotype V GBS isolate of sequence type (ST)297, has an ST1 genomic background but has acquired approximately 300 kbp of genetic material likely from an ST17 strain. Here, we examined the virulence of this strain in an in vivo model of GBS adult invasive infection. The mosaic ST297 strain showed intermediate virulence, causing significantly less systemic infection and reduced mortality than a more virulent, serotype V ST1 isolate. Bacteremia induced by the ST297 strain was similar to that induced by a serotype III ST17 strain, which was the least virulent under the conditions tested. Yet, under normalized bacteremia levels, the in vivo intrinsic capacity to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar between the ST297 strain and the virulent ST1 strain. Thus, the diminished virulence of the mosaic strain may be due to reduced capacity to disseminate or multiply in blood during a systemic infection which could be mediated by regulatory factors contained in the recombined region. PMID:27527222

  7. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  8. The Transcriptome of the Reference Potato Genome Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja Clone DM1-3 516R44

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Alicia N.; Childs, Kevin L.; Lin, Haining; Bryan, Glenn J.; Giuliano, Giovanni; Buell, C. Robin

    2011-01-01

    Advances in molecular breeding in potato have been limited by its complex biological system, which includes vegetative propagation, autotetraploidy, and extreme heterozygosity. The availability of the potato genome and accompanying gene complement with corresponding gene structure, location, and functional annotation are powerful resources for understanding this complex plant and advancing molecular breeding efforts. Here, we report a reference for the potato transcriptome using 32 tissues and growth conditions from the doubled monoploid Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja clone DM1-3 516R44 for which a genome sequence is available. Analysis of greater than 550 million RNA-Seq reads permitted the detection and quantification of expression levels of over 22,000 genes. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses captured the biological variability that accounts for gene expression differences among tissues suggesting tissue-specific gene expression, and genes with tissue or condition restricted expression. Using gene co-expression network analysis, we identified 18 gene modules that represent tissue-specific transcriptional networks of major potato organs and developmental stages. This information provides a powerful resource for potato research as well as studies on other members of the Solanaceae family. PMID:22046362

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of Group A Streptococci Reveals a Mutation That Modulates Global Phenotype and Disease Specificity

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Many human pathogens produce phenotypic variants as a means to circumvent the host immune system and enhance survival and, as a potential consequence, exhibit increased virulence. For example, it has been known for almost 90 y that clinical isolates of the human bacterial pathogen group A streptococci (GAS) have extensive phenotypic heterogeneity linked to variation in virulence. However, the complete underlying molecular mechanism(s) have not been defined. Expression microarray analysis of nine clinical isolates identified two fundamentally different transcriptomes, designated pharyngeal transcriptome profile (PTP) and invasive transcriptome profile (ITP). PTP and ITP GAS differed in approximately 10% of the transcriptome, including at least 23 proven or putative virulence factor genes. ITP organisms were recovered from skin lesions of mice infected subcutaneously with PTP GAS and were significantly more able to survive phagocytosis and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Complete genome resequencing of a mouse-derived ITP GAS revealed that the organism differed from its precursor by only a 7-bp frameshift mutation in the gene (covS) encoding the sensor kinase component of a two-component signal transduction system implicated in virulence. Genetic complementation, and sequence analysis of covR/S in 42 GAS isolates confirmed the central role of covR/S in transcriptome, exoproteome, and virulence modulation. Genome-wide analysis provides a heretofore unattained understanding of phenotypic variation and disease specificity in microbial pathogens, resulting in new avenues for vaccine and therapeutics research. PMID:16446783

  10. Increased UV resistance in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells after transformation with a human genomic DNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldy, A; Bellew, T; Egli, E; Lloyd, R S

    1990-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is an autosomal recessive disease in which the major clinical manifestation is a 2,000-fold enhanced probability of developing sunlight-induced skin tumors, and the molecular basis for the disease is a defective DNA excision repair system. To clone the gene defective in XP complementation group A (XP-A), cDNA clones were isolated by a competition hybridization strategy in which the corresponding mRNAs were more abundant in cells of the obligately heterozygous parents relative to cells of the homozygous proband affected with the disease. In this report, a human genomic DNA clone that contains this cDNA was transformed into two independent homozygous XP-A cell lines, and these transformants displayed partial restoration of resistance to the killing effects of UV irradiation. The abundance of mRNA corresponding to this cDNA appears to correlate well with the observed UV cell survival. The results of unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV exposure indicate that the transformed cells are repair proficient relative to that of the control XP-A cells. However, using this same genomic DNA, transformation of an XP-F cell line did not confer any enhancement of UV survival or promote unscheduled DNA synthesis after UV exposure. Images PMID:2168562

  11. Phylogenetic relationships among sandfly fever group viruses (Phlebovirus: Bunyaviridae) based on the small genome segment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangling; Chen, Hongli; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Tesh, Robert B; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    The phleboviruses are more diverse in terms of arthropod vectors and antigenic relationships than most other genera of arthropod-borne viruses. In this study, 30 sandfly fever group viruses from the Naples, Sicilian, Punta Toro, Icoaraci and Frijoles serocomplexes were sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were performed based on the sequence of the open reading frame for the nucleoprotein (N) and non-structural (NSs) protein genes of the small (S) segment. The five resultant genotypic lineages correlated with the serological grouping and were similar to analysis of M segment sequences. The sequence identity for N and NSs genes within the Sicilian, Naples, Punta Toro, Icoaraci and Frijoles serocomplexes was determined. The results indicated that genetic divergence for the S segment is lower than that for the M segment, suggesting that the S segment is more stable during evolution. PMID:17622637

  12. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes. PMID:25790500

  13. Genomic Analysis Identifies a Transcription Factor Binding Motif Regulating Expression of the Alpha C Protein in Group B Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Klinzing, David C.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Puopolo, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    The virulence-associated alpha C protein (ACP) of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) facilitates the bacterial interaction with host epithelial cells. We previously demonstrated that phase-variable expression of ACP is controlled by variation in short-sequence repeat sequences present upstream of the promoter of bca, the gene encoding ACP. To determine if trans-acting transcriptional control also influences ACP expression, we developed an in silico prediction algorithm that identified a potential transcription-factor binding motif (TTT-N6-ATAT) in the bca upstream region. In vitro reporter gene expression studies confirmed that this motif is required for full ACP expression, and DNA-binding assays with a GBS protein extract demonstrated that the predicted site is bound by a protein. This approach demonstrates the utility of in silico genomic predictive methods in the study of GBS regulatory mechanisms. PMID:19328843

  14. Phylogeny of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group inferred from morphological comparisons, genomic fingerprinting, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Siering, P L; Ghiorse, W C

    1996-01-01

    Phase-contrast light microscopy revealed that only one of eight cultivated strains belonging to the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group of sheathed bacteria actually produced a sheath in standard growth media. Two Sphaerotilus natans strains produced branched cells, but other morphological characteristics that were used to identify these bacteria were consistent with previously published descriptions. Genomic fingerprints, which were obtained by performing PCR amplification with primers corresponding to enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences, were useful for distinguishing between the genera Sphaerotilus and Leptothrix, as well as among individual strains. The complete 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of two strains of "Leptothrix discophora" (strains SP-6 and SS-1) were determined. In addition, partial sequences (approximately 300 nucleotides) of one strain of Leptothrix cholodnii (strain LMG 7171), an unidentified Leptothrix strain (strain NC-1), and four strains of Sphaerotilus natans (strains ATCC 13338T [T = type strain], ATCC 15291, ATCC 29329, and ATCC 29330) were determined. We found that two of the S. natans strains (ATCC 15291 and ATCC 13338T), which differed in morphology and in their genomic fingerprints, had identical sequences in the 300-nucleotide region sequenced. Both parsimony and distance matrix methods were used to infer the evolutionary relationships of the eight strains in a comparison of the 16S rDNA sequences of these organisms with 16S rDNA sequences obtained from ribosomal sequence databases. All of the strains clustered in the Rubrivivax subdivision of the beta subclass of the Proteobacteria, which confirmed previously published conclusions concerning selected individual strains. Additional analyses revealed that all of the S. natans strains clustered in one closely related group, while the Leptothrix strains clustered in two separate lineages that were approximately equidistant from the S. natans cluster. This finding

  15. The Genome and Linkage Map of the Northern Pike (Esox lucius): Conserved Synteny Revealed between the Salmonid Sister Group and the Neoteleostei

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, Eric B.; Minkley, David R.; Leong, Jong S.; Messmer, Amber M.; Jantzen, Johanna R.; von Schalburg, Kristian R.; Lemon, Craig; Bird, Nathan H.; Koop, Ben F.

    2014-01-01

    The northern pike is the most frequently studied member of the Esociformes, the closest order to the diverse and economically important Salmoniformes. The ancestor of all salmonids purportedly experienced a whole-genome duplication (WGD) event, making salmonid species ideal for studying the early impacts of genome duplication while complicating their use in wider analyses of teleost evolution. Studies suggest that the Esociformes diverged from the salmonid lineage prior to the WGD, supporting the use of northern pike as a pre-duplication outgroup. Here we present the first genome assembly, reference transcriptome and linkage map for northern pike, and evaluate the suitability of this species to provide a representative pre-duplication genome for future studies of salmonid and teleost evolution. The northern pike genome sequence is composed of 94,267 contigs (N50 = 16,909 bp) contained in 5,688 scaffolds (N50 = 700,535 bp); the total scaffolded genome size is 878 million bases. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that over 96% of the protein-coding genome is present in the genome assembly. The reference transcriptome was constructed from 13 tissues and contains 38,696 transcripts, which are accompanied by normalized expression data in all tissues. Gene-prediction analysis produced a total of 19,601 northern pike-specific gene models. The first-generation linkage map identifies 25 linkage groups, in agreement with northern pike's diploid karyotype of 2N = 50, and facilitates the placement of 46% of assembled bases onto linkage groups. Analyses reveal a high degree of conserved synteny between northern pike and other model teleost genomes. While conservation of gene order is limited to smaller syntenic blocks, the wider conservation of genome organization implies the northern pike exhibits a suitable approximation of a non-duplicated Protacanthopterygiian genome. This dataset will facilitate future studies of esocid biology and empower ongoing examinations

  16. The Genomics Education Partnership: Successful Integration of Research into Laboratory Classes at a Diverse Group of Undergraduate Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeff L.; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L.; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R.; Kuleck, Gary A.; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L.; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E. Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P.; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A.; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington…

  17. Population-ethnic group specific genome variation allele frequency data: a querying and visualization journey.

    PubMed

    Viennas, Emmanouil; Gkantouna, Vassiliki; Ioannou, Marina; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Rigou, Maria; Poulas, Konstantinos; Patrinos, George P; Tzimas, Giannis

    2012-08-01

    National/ethnic mutation databases aim to document the genetic heterogeneity in various populations and ethnic groups worldwide. We have previously reported the development and upgrade of FINDbase (www.findbase.org), a database recording causative mutations and pharmacogenomic marker allele frequencies in various populations around the globe. Although this database has recently been upgraded, we continuously try to enhance its functionality by providing more advanced visualization tools that would further assist effective data querying and comparisons. We are currently experimenting in various visualization techniques on the existing FINDbase causative mutation data collection aiming to provide a dynamic research tool for the worldwide scientific community. We have developed an interactive web-based application for population-based mutation data retrieval. It supports sophisticated data exploration allowing users to apply advanced filtering criteria upon a set of multiple views of the underlying data collection and enables browsing the relationships between individual datasets in a novel and meaningful way. PMID:22659238

  18. Toward a marker-dense meiotic map of the potato genome: lessons from linkage group I.

    PubMed Central

    Isidore, Edwige; van Os, Hans; Andrzejewski, Sandra; Bakker, Jaap; Barrena, Imanol; Bryan, Glenn J; Caromel, Bernard; van Eck, Herman; Ghareeb, Bilal; de Jong, Walter; van Koert, Paul; Lefebvre, Véronique; Milbourne, Dan; Ritter, Enrique; van der Voort, Jeroen Rouppe; Rousselle-Bourgeois, Françoise; van Vliet, Joke; Waugh, Robbie

    2003-01-01

    Segregation data were obtained for 1260 potato linkage group I-specific AFLP loci from a heterozygous diploid potato population. Analytical tools that identified potential typing errors and/or inconsistencies in the data and that assembled cosegregating markers into bins were applied. Bins contain multiple-marker data sets with an identical segregation pattern, which is defined as the bin signature. The bin signatures were used to construct a skeleton bin map that was based solely on observed recombination events. Markers that did not match any of the bin signatures exactly (and that were excluded from the calculation of the skeleton bin map) were placed on the map by maximum likelihood. The resulting maternal and paternal maps consisted of 95 and 101 bins, respectively. Markers derived from EcoRI/MseI, PstI/MseI, and SacI/MseI primer combinations showed different genetic distributions. Approximately three-fourths of the markers placed into a bin were considered to fit well on the basis of an estimated residual "error rate" of 0-3%. However, twice as many PstI-based markers fit badly, suggesting that parental PstI-site methylation patterns had changed in the population. Recombination frequencies were highly variable across the map. Inert, presumably centromeric, regions caused extensive marker clustering while recombination hotspots (or regions identical by descent) resulted in empty bins, despite the level of marker saturation. PMID:14704190

  19. Group II Intron-Mediated Trans-Splicing in the Gene-Rich Mitochondrial Genome of an Enigmatic Eukaryote, Diphylleia rotans.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Miyashita, Hideaki; Roger, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    Although mitochondria have evolved from a single endosymbiotic event, present day mitochondria of diverse eukaryotes display a great range of genome structures, content and features. Group I and group II introns are two features that are distributed broadly but patchily in mitochondrial genomes across branches of the tree of eukaryotes. While group I intron-mediated trans-splicing has been reported from some lineages distantly related to each other, findings of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing has been restricted to members of the Chloroplastida. In this study, we found the mitochondrial genome of the unicellular eukaryote Diphylleia rotans possesses currently the second largest gene repertoire. On the basis of a probable phylogenetic position of Diphylleia, which is located within Amorphea, current mosaic gene distribution in Amorphea must invoke parallel gene losses from mitochondrial genomes during evolution. Most notably, although the cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox) 1 gene was split into four pieces which located at a distance to each other, we confirmed that a single mature mRNA that covered the entire coding region could be generated by group II intron-mediated trans-splicing. This is the first example of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing outside Chloroplastida. Similar trans-splicing mechanisms likely work for bipartitely split cox2 and nad3 genes to generate single mature mRNAs. We finally discuss origin and evolution of this type of trans-splicing in D. rotans as well as in eukaryotes. PMID:26833505

  20. Group II Intron-Mediated Trans-Splicing in the Gene-Rich Mitochondrial Genome of an Enigmatic Eukaryote, Diphylleia rotans

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro; Miyashita, Hideaki; Roger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondria have evolved from a single endosymbiotic event, present day mitochondria of diverse eukaryotes display a great range of genome structures, content and features. Group I and group II introns are two features that are distributed broadly but patchily in mitochondrial genomes across branches of the tree of eukaryotes. While group I intron-mediated trans-splicing has been reported from some lineages distantly related to each other, findings of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing has been restricted to members of the Chloroplastida. In this study, we found the mitochondrial genome of the unicellular eukaryote Diphylleia rotans possesses currently the second largest gene repertoire. On the basis of a probable phylogenetic position of Diphylleia, which is located within Amorphea, current mosaic gene distribution in Amorphea must invoke parallel gene losses from mitochondrial genomes during evolution. Most notably, although the cytochrome c oxidase subunit (cox) 1 gene was split into four pieces which located at a distance to each other, we confirmed that a single mature mRNA that covered the entire coding region could be generated by group II intron-mediated trans-splicing. This is the first example of group II intron-mediated trans-splicing outside Chloroplastida. Similar trans-splicing mechanisms likely work for bipartitely split cox2 and nad3 genes to generate single mature mRNAs. We finally discuss origin and evolution of this type of trans-splicing in D. rotans as well as in eukaryotes. PMID:26833505

  1. Evolutionary pathway to increased virulence and epidemic group A Streptococcus disease derived from 3,615 genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B; Olsen, Randall J; Dean, Melissa A; Rice, Kelsey A; Long, S Wesley; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Vuopio, Jaana; Raisanen, Kati; Caugant, Dominique A; Steinbakk, Martin; Low, Donald E; McGeer, Allison; Darenberg, Jessica; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Van Beneden, Chris A; Hoffmann, Steen; Musser, James M

    2014-04-29

    We sequenced the genomes of 3,615 strains of serotype Emm protein 1 (M1) group A Streptococcus to unravel the nature and timing of molecular events contributing to the emergence, dissemination, and genetic diversification of an unusually virulent clone that now causes epidemic human infections worldwide. We discovered that the contemporary epidemic clone emerged in stepwise fashion from a precursor cell that first contained the phage encoding an extracellular DNase virulence factor (streptococcal DNase D2, SdaD2) and subsequently acquired the phage encoding the SpeA1 variant of the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A superantigen. The SpeA2 toxin variant evolved from SpeA1 by a single-nucleotide change in the M1 progenitor strain before acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large chromosomal region encoding secreted toxins NAD(+)-glycohydrolase and streptolysin O. Acquisition of this 36-kb region in the early 1980s into just one cell containing the phage-encoded sdaD2 and speA2 genes was the final major molecular event preceding the emergence and rapid intercontinental spread of the contemporary epidemic clone. Thus, we resolve a decades-old controversy about the type and sequence of genomic alterations that produced this explosive epidemic. Analysis of comprehensive, population-based contemporary invasive strains from seven countries identified strong patterns of temporal population structure. Compared with a preepidemic reference strain, the contemporary clone is significantly more virulent in nonhuman primate models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. A key finding is that the molecular evolutionary events transpiring in just one bacterial cell ultimately have produced millions of human infections worldwide. PMID:24733896

  2. Evolutionary pathway to increased virulence and epidemic group A Streptococcus disease derived from 3,615 genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Waleed; Beres, Stephen B.; Olsen, Randall J.; Dean, Melissa A.; Rice, Kelsey A.; Long, S. Wesley; Kristinsson, Karl G.; Gottfredsson, Magnus; Vuopio, Jaana; Raisanen, Kati; Caugant, Dominique A.; Steinbakk, Martin; Low, Donald E.; McGeer, Allison; Darenberg, Jessica; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Van Beneden, Chris A.; Hoffmann, Steen; Musser, James M.

    2014-01-01

    We sequenced the genomes of 3,615 strains of serotype Emm protein 1 (M1) group A Streptococcus to unravel the nature and timing of molecular events contributing to the emergence, dissemination, and genetic diversification of an unusually virulent clone that now causes epidemic human infections worldwide. We discovered that the contemporary epidemic clone emerged in stepwise fashion from a precursor cell that first contained the phage encoding an extracellular DNase virulence factor (streptococcal DNase D2, SdaD2) and subsequently acquired the phage encoding the SpeA1 variant of the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A superantigen. The SpeA2 toxin variant evolved from SpeA1 by a single-nucleotide change in the M1 progenitor strain before acquisition by horizontal gene transfer of a large chromosomal region encoding secreted toxins NAD+-glycohydrolase and streptolysin O. Acquisition of this 36-kb region in the early 1980s into just one cell containing the phage-encoded sdaD2 and speA2 genes was the final major molecular event preceding the emergence and rapid intercontinental spread of the contemporary epidemic clone. Thus, we resolve a decades-old controversy about the type and sequence of genomic alterations that produced this explosive epidemic. Analysis of comprehensive, population-based contemporary invasive strains from seven countries identified strong patterns of temporal population structure. Compared with a preepidemic reference strain, the contemporary clone is significantly more virulent in nonhuman primate models of pharyngitis and necrotizing fasciitis. A key finding is that the molecular evolutionary events transpiring in just one bacterial cell ultimately have produced millions of human infections worldwide. PMID:24733896

  3. Challenges of flow-cytometric estimation of nuclear genome size in orchids, a plant group with both whole-genome and progressively partial endoreplication.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Pavel; Ponert, Jan; Urfus, Tomáš; Jersáková, Jana; Vrána, Jan; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Suda, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear genome size is an inherited quantitative trait of eukaryotic organisms with both practical and biological consequences. A detailed analysis of major families is a promising approach to fully understand the biological meaning of the extensive variation in genome size in plants. Although Orchidaceae accounts for ∼10% of the angiosperm diversity, the knowledge of patterns and dynamics of their genome size is limited, in part due to difficulties in flow cytometric analyses. Cells in various somatic tissues of orchids undergo extensive endoreplication, either whole-genome or partial, and the G1-phase nuclei with 2C DNA amounts may be lacking, resulting in overestimated genome size values. Interpretation of DNA content histograms is particularly challenging in species with progressively partial endoreplication, in which the ratios between the positions of two neighboring DNA peaks are lower than two. In order to assess distributions of nuclear DNA amounts and identify tissue suitable for reliable estimation of nuclear DNA content, we analyzed six different tissue types in 48 orchid species belonging to all recognized subfamilies. Although traditionally used leaves may provide incorrect C-values, particularly in species with progressively partial endoreplication, young ovaries and pollinaria consistently yield 2C and 1C peaks of their G1-phase nuclei, respectively, and are, therefore, the most suitable parts for genome size studies in orchids. We also provide new DNA C-values for 22 orchid genera and 42 species. Adhering to the proposed methodology would allow for reliable genome size estimates in this largest plant family. Although our research was limited to orchids, the need to find a suitable tissue with dominant 2C peak of G1-phase nuclei applies to all endopolyploid species. PMID:25929591

  4. Phylogenetic relationship and virulence inference of Streptococcus Anginosus Group: curated annotation and whole-genome comparative analysis support distinct species designation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Streptococcus Anginosus Group (SAG) represents three closely related species of the viridans group streptococci recognized as commensal bacteria of the oral, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts. The SAG also cause severe invasive infections, and are pathogens during cystic fibrosis (CF) pulmonary exacerbation. Little genomic information or description of virulence mechanisms is currently available for SAG. We conducted intra and inter species whole-genome comparative analyses with 59 publically available Streptococcus genomes and seven in-house closed high quality finished SAG genomes; S. constellatus (3), S. intermedius (2), and S. anginosus (2). For each SAG species, we sequenced at least one numerically dominant strain from CF airways recovered during acute exacerbation and an invasive, non-lung isolate. We also evaluated microevolution that occurred within two isolates that were cultured from one individual one year apart. Results The SAG genomes were most closely related to S. gordonii and S. sanguinis, based on shared orthologs and harbor a similar number of proteins within each COG category as other Streptococcus species. Numerous characterized streptococcus virulence factor homologs were identified within the SAG genomes including; adherence, invasion, spreading factors, LPxTG cell wall proteins, and two component histidine kinases known to be involved in virulence gene regulation. Mobile elements, primarily integrative conjugative elements and bacteriophage, account for greater than 10% of the SAG genomes. S. anginosus was the most variable species sequenced in this study, yielding both the smallest and the largest SAG genomes containing multiple genomic rearrangements, insertions and deletions. In contrast, within the S. constellatus and S. intermedius species, there was extensive continuous synteny, with only slight differences in genome size between strains. Within S. constellatus we were able to determine important SNPs and changes in

  5. Complete mtDNA genomes of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups: a melting pot of recent and ancient lineages in the Asia-Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Delfin, Frederick; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Li, Mingkun; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Tabbada, Kristina A; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Sagum, Minerva S; Datar, Francisco A; Padilla, Sabino G; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Philippines is a strategic point in the Asia-Pacific region for the study of human diversity, history and origins, as it is a cross-road for human migrations and consequently exhibits enormous ethnolinguistic diversity. Following on a previous in-depth study of Y-chromosome variation, here we provide new insights into the maternal genetic history of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups by surveying complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from a total of 14 groups (11 groups in this study and 3 groups previously published) including previously published mtDNA hypervariable segment (HVS) data from Filipino regional center groups. Comparison of HVS data indicate genetic differences between ethnolinguistic and regional center groups. The complete mtDNA genomes of 14 ethnolinguistic groups reveal genetic aspects consistent with the Y-chromosome, namely: diversity and heterogeneity of groups, no support for a simple dichotomy between Negrito and non-Negrito groups, and different genetic affinities with Asia-Pacific groups that are both ancient and recent. Although some mtDNA haplogroups can be associated with the Austronesian expansion, there are others that associate with South Asia, Near Oceania and Australia that are consistent with a southern migration route for ethnolinguistic group ancestors into the Asia-Pacific, with a timeline that overlaps with the initial colonization of the Asia-Pacific region, the initial colonization of the Philippines and a possible separate post-colonization migration into the Philippine archipelago. PMID:23756438

  6. Complete mtDNA genomes of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups: a melting pot of recent and ancient lineages in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Delfin, Frederick; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Li, Mingkun; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Tabbada, Kristina A; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Sagum, Minerva S; Datar, Francisco A; Padilla, Sabino G; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-02-01

    The Philippines is a strategic point in the Asia-Pacific region for the study of human diversity, history and origins, as it is a cross-road for human migrations and consequently exhibits enormous ethnolinguistic diversity. Following on a previous in-depth study of Y-chromosome variation, here we provide new insights into the maternal genetic history of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups by surveying complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from a total of 14 groups (11 groups in this study and 3 groups previously published) including previously published mtDNA hypervariable segment (HVS) data from Filipino regional center groups. Comparison of HVS data indicate genetic differences between ethnolinguistic and regional center groups. The complete mtDNA genomes of 14 ethnolinguistic groups reveal genetic aspects consistent with the Y-chromosome, namely: diversity and heterogeneity of groups, no support for a simple dichotomy between Negrito and non-Negrito groups, and different genetic affinities with Asia-Pacific groups that are both ancient and recent. Although some mtDNA haplogroups can be associated with the Austronesian expansion, there are others that associate with South Asia, Near Oceania and Australia that are consistent with a southern migration route for ethnolinguistic group ancestors into the Asia-Pacific, with a timeline that overlaps with the initial colonization of the Asia-Pacific region, the initial colonization of the Philippines and a possible separate post-colonization migration into the Philippine archipelago. PMID:23756438

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Wild-Type Commensal Escherichia coli Strain SE15, Belonging to Phylogenetic Group B2▿

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Toyoda, Atsushi; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Ooka, Tadasuke; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Park, Sang-Hee; Iyoda, Sunao; Kurokawa, Ken; Morita, Hidetoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Taylor, Todd D.; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Hattori, Masahira

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli SE15 (O150:H5) is a human commensal bacterium recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B2, which includes the majority of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Here, we report the finished and annotated genome sequence of this organism. PMID:20008064

  8. Whole-Genome Sequences of Four Strains Closely Related to Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae Group, Isolated from Biofilms in a Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report the draft genome sequences of four Mycobacterium chelonae group strains from biofilms obtained after a ‘chlorine burn’ in a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator. These opportunistic pathogens have been detected in drinking and hospital water distr...

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Ureide Concentration in Diverse Maturity Group IV Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Jeffery D.; Dhanapal, Arun Prabhu; Singh, Shardendu K.; Hoyos-Villegas, Valerio; Smith, James R.; Purcell, Larry C.; King, C. Andy; Boykin, Debbie; Cregan, Perry B.; Song, Qijian; Fritschi, Felix B.

    2015-01-01

    Ureides are the N-rich products of N-fixation that are transported from soybean nodules to the shoot. Ureides are known to accumulate in leaves in response to water-deficit stress, and this has been used to identify genotypes with reduced N-fixation sensitivity to drought. Our objectives in this research were to determine shoot ureide concentrations in 374 Maturity Group IV soybean accessions and to identify genomic regions associated with shoot ureide concentration. The accessions were grown at two locations (Columbia, MO, and Stuttgart, AR) in 2 yr (2009 and 2010) and characterized for ureide concentration at beginning flowering to full bloom. Average shoot ureide concentrations across all four environments (two locations and two years) and 374 accessions ranged from 12.4 to 33.1 µmol g−1 and were comparable to previously reported values. SNP–ureide associations within and across the four environments were assessed using 33,957 SNPs with a MAF ≥0.03. In total, 53 putative loci on 18 chromosomes were identified as associated with ureide concentration. Two of the putative loci were located near previously reported QTL associated with ureide concentration and 30 loci were located near genes associated with ureide metabolism. The remaining putative loci were not near chromosomal regions previously associated with shoot ureide concentration and may mark new genes involved in ureide metabolism. Ultimately, confirmation of these putative loci will provide new sources of variation for use in soybean breeding programs. PMID:26374596

  10. Molecular classification of diffuse cerebral WHO grade II/III gliomas using genome- and transcriptome-wide profiling improves stratification of prognostically distinct patient groups.

    PubMed

    Weller, Michael; Weber, Ruthild G; Willscher, Edith; Riehmer, Vera; Hentschel, Bettina; Kreuz, Markus; Felsberg, Jörg; Beyer, Ulrike; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Kaulich, Kerstin; Steinbach, Joachim P; Hartmann, Christian; Gramatzki, Dorothee; Schramm, Johannes; Westphal, Manfred; Schackert, Gabriele; Simon, Matthias; Martens, Tobias; Boström, Jan; Hagel, Christian; Sabel, Michael; Krex, Dietmar; Tonn, Jörg C; Wick, Wolfgang; Noell, Susan; Schlegel, Uwe; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Pietsch, Torsten; Loeffler, Markus; von Deimling, Andreas; Binder, Hans; Reifenberger, Guido

    2015-05-01

    Cerebral gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and III represent a major challenge in terms of histological classification and clinical management. Here, we asked whether large-scale genomic and transcriptomic profiling improves the definition of prognostically distinct entities. We performed microarray-based genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses of primary tumor samples from a prospective German Glioma Network cohort of 137 patients with cerebral gliomas, including 61 WHO grade II and 76 WHO grade III tumors. Integrative bioinformatic analyses were employed to define molecular subgroups, which were then related to histology, molecular biomarkers, including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations, and patient outcome. Genomic profiling identified five distinct glioma groups, including three IDH1/2 mutant and two IDH1/2 wild-type groups. Expression profiling revealed evidence for eight transcriptionally different groups (five IDH1/2 mutant, three IDH1/2 wild type), which were only partially linked to the genomic groups. Correlation of DNA-based molecular stratification with clinical outcome allowed to define three major prognostic groups with characteristic genomic aberrations. The best prognosis was found in patients with IDH1/2 mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted tumors. Patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas and glioblastoma-like genomic alterations, including gain on chromosome arm 7q (+7q), loss on chromosome arm 10q (-10q), TERT promoter mutation and oncogene amplification, displayed the worst outcome. Intermediate survival was seen in patients with IDH1/2 mutant, but 1p/19q intact, mostly astrocytic gliomas, and in patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas lacking the +7q/-10q genotype and TERT promoter mutation. This molecular subgrouping stratified patients into prognostically distinct groups better than histological classification. Addition of gene expression

  11. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine 'Roseobacter group' were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  12. Phylogenomic network and comparative genomics reveal a diverged member of the ΦKZ-related group, marine vibrio phage ΦJM-2012.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Bin; Fagutao, Fernand F; Nho, Seong Won; Park, Seong Bin; Cha, In Seok; Yu, Jong Earn; Lee, Jung Seok; Im, Se Pyeong; Aoki, Takashi; Jung, Tae Sung

    2013-12-01

    Bacteriophages are the largest reservoir of genetic diversity. Here we describe the novel phage ΦJM-2012. This natural isolate from marine Vibrio cyclitrophicus possesses very few gene contents relevant to other well-studied marine Vibrio phages. To better understand its evolutionary history, we built a mathematical model of pairwise relationships among 1,221 phage genomes, in which the genomes (nodes) are linked by edges representing the normalized number of shared orthologous protein families. This weighted network revealed that ΦJM-2012 was connected to only five members of the Pseudomonas ΦKZ-like phage family in an isolated network, strongly indicating that it belongs to this phage group. However, comparative genomic analyses highlighted an almost complete loss of colinearity with the ΦKZ-related genomes and little conservation of gene order, probably reflecting the action of distinct evolutionary forces on the genome of ΦJM-2012. In this phage, typical conserved core genes, including six RNA polymerase genes, were frequently displaced and the hyperplastic regions were rich in both unique genes and predicted unidirectional promoters with highly correlated orientations. Further, analysis of the ΦJM-2012 genome showed that segments of the conserved N-terminal parts of ΦKZ tail fiber paralogs exhibited evidence of combinatorial assortment, having switched transcriptional orientation, and there was recruitment and/or structural changes among phage endolysins and tail spike protein. Thus, this naturally occurring phage appears to have branched from a common ancestor of the ΦKZ-related groups, showing a distinct genomic architecture and unique genes that most likely reflect adaptation to its chosen host and environment. PMID:24067958

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Dietzia maris DSM 43672, a Gram-Positive Bacterium of the Mycolata Group

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Sonalli; Jimenez-Galisteo, Guadalupe; Pletzer, Daniel; Winterhalter, Mathias; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Dietzia maris, known previously as Rhodococcus maris. It is 3,505,372 bp in size with a G+C content of 73%. The draft genome sequence will improve our understanding of Dietzia maris related to other mycolata species and constitutes a basic tool for exploring the cell wall proteins. PMID:27284155

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Dietzia maris DSM 43672, a Gram-Positive Bacterium of the Mycolata Group.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sonalli; Jimenez-Galisteo, Guadalupe; Pletzer, Daniel; Winterhalter, Mathias; Benz, Roland; Viñas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Dietzia maris, known previously as Rhodococcus maris It is 3,505,372 bp in size with a G+C content of 73%. The draft genome sequence will improve our understanding of Dietzia maris related to other mycolata species and constitutes a basic tool for exploring the cell wall proteins. PMID:27284155

  15. The Genomics Education Partnership: Successful Integration of Research into Laboratory Classes at a Diverse Group of Undergraduate Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeff L.; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L.; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L.M.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R.; Kuleck, Gary A.; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L.; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E. Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P.; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A.; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Lopatto, David

    2010-01-01

    Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington University in St. Louis, is to provide such research opportunities. Using a versatile curriculum that has been adapted to many different class settings, GEP undergraduates undertake projects to bring draft-quality genomic sequence up to high quality and/or participate in the annotation of these sequences. GEP undergraduates have improved more than 2 million bases of draft genomic sequence from several species of Drosophila and have produced hundreds of gene models using evidence-based manual annotation. Students appreciate their ability to make a contribution to ongoing research, and report increased independence and a more active learning approach after participation in GEP projects. They show knowledge gains on pre- and postcourse quizzes about genes and genomes and in bioinformatic analysis. Participating faculty also report professional gains, increased access to genomics-related technology, and an overall positive experience. We have found that using a genomics research project as the core of a laboratory course is rewarding for both faculty and students. PMID:20194808

  16. Three groups of transposable elements with contrasting copy number dynamics and host responses in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) genome.

    PubMed

    Diez, Concepcion M; Meca, Esteban; Tenaillon, Maud I; Gaut, Brandon S

    2014-04-01

    Most angiosperm nuclear DNA is repetitive and derived from silenced transposable elements (TEs). TE silencing requires substantial resources from the plant host, including the production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Thus, the interaction between TEs and siRNAs is a critical aspect of both the function and the evolution of plant genomes. Yet the co-evolutionary dynamics between these two entities remain poorly characterized. Here we studied the organization of TEs within the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) genome, documenting that TEs fall within three groups based on the class and copy numbers. These groups included DNA elements, low copy RNA elements and higher copy RNA elements. The three groups varied statistically in characteristics that included length, location, age, siRNA expression and 24:22 nucleotide (nt) siRNA targeting ratios. In addition, the low copy retroelements encompassed a set of TEs that had previously been shown to decrease expression within a 24 nt siRNA biogenesis mutant (mop1). To investigate the evolutionary dynamics of the three groups, we estimated their abundance in two landraces, one with a genome similar in size to that of the maize reference and the other with a 30% larger genome. For all three accessions, we assessed TE abundance as well as 22 nt and 24 nt siRNA content within leaves. The high copy number retroelements are under targeted similarly by siRNAs among accessions, appear to be born of a rapid bust of activity, and may be currently transpositionally dead or limited. In contrast, the lower copy number group of retrolements are targeted more dynamically and have had a long and ongoing history of transposition in the maize genome. PMID:24743518

  17. Genomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Group Independent Web site Informing the effective integration of genomics into health practice—Lynch syndrome ACCE Model for Evaluating Genetic Tests Recommendations by the EGAPP Working Group Top of ... ...

  18. Insights into the history of a bacterial group II intron remnant from the genomes of the nitrogen-fixing symbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae

    PubMed Central

    Toro, N; Martínez-Rodríguez, L; Martínez-Abarca, F

    2014-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that act as mobile retroelements. In bacteria, they are thought to be tolerated to some extent because they self-splice and home preferentially to sites outside of functional genes, generally within intergenic regions or in other mobile genetic elements, by mechanisms including the divergence of DNA target specificity to prevent target site saturation. RmInt1 is a mobile group II intron that is widespread in natural populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti and was first described in the GR4 strain. Like other bacterial group II introns, RmInt1 tends to evolve toward an inactive form by fragmentation, with loss of the 3′ terminus. We identified genomic evidence of a fragmented intron closely related to RmInt1 buried in the genome of the extant S. meliloti/S. medicae species. By studying this intron, we obtained evidence for the occurrence of intron insertion before the divergence of ancient rhizobial species. This fragmented group II intron has thus existed for a long time and has provided sequence variation, on which selection can act, contributing to diverse genetic rearrangements, and to generate pan-genome divergence after strain differentiation. The data presented here suggest that fragmented group II introns within intergenic regions closed to functionally important neighboring genes may have been microevolutionary forces driving adaptive evolution of these rhizobial species. PMID:24736785

  19. Insights into the history of a bacterial group II intron remnant from the genomes of the nitrogen-fixing symbionts Sinorhizobium meliloti and Sinorhizobium medicae.

    PubMed

    Toro, N; Martínez-Rodríguez, L; Martínez-Abarca, F

    2014-10-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing catalytic RNAs that act as mobile retroelements. In bacteria, they are thought to be tolerated to some extent because they self-splice and home preferentially to sites outside of functional genes, generally within intergenic regions or in other mobile genetic elements, by mechanisms including the divergence of DNA target specificity to prevent target site saturation. RmInt1 is a mobile group II intron that is widespread in natural populations of Sinorhizobium meliloti and was first described in the GR4 strain. Like other bacterial group II introns, RmInt1 tends to evolve toward an inactive form by fragmentation, with loss of the 3' terminus. We identified genomic evidence of a fragmented intron closely related to RmInt1 buried in the genome of the extant S. meliloti/S. medicae species. By studying this intron, we obtained evidence for the occurrence of intron insertion before the divergence of ancient rhizobial species. This fragmented group II intron has thus existed for a long time and has provided sequence variation, on which selection can act, contributing to diverse genetic rearrangements, and to generate pan-genome divergence after strain differentiation. The data presented here suggest that fragmented group II introns within intergenic regions closed to functionally important neighboring genes may have been microevolutionary forces driving adaptive evolution of these rhizobial species. PMID:24736785

  20. Mitotic index, microvascular proliferation, and necrosis define 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas associated with different genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokhtari, Karima; Dehais, Caroline; Jouvet, Anne; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Colin, Carole; Carpentier, Catherine; Forest, Fabien; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Polivka, Marc; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Eimer, Sandrine; Viennet, Gabriel; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Loussouarn, Delphine; Lacroix, Catherine; Rigau, Valérie; Laquerrière, Annie; Vandenbos, Fanny; Michalak, Sophie; Sevestre, Henri; Peoch, Michel; Labrousse, François; Christov, Christo; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Chiforeanu, Danchristian; Ducray, François; Idbaih, Ahmed; Desenclos, Christine; Menei, Philippe; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie; Carpentier, Antoine; Loiseau, Hugues; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Guillamo, Jean Sebastien; Emery, Evelyne; Verelle, Pierre; Durando, Xavier; Faillot, Thierry; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Ghiringhelli, François; Parker, Fabrice; Adam, Clovis; Dubois, François; Ramirez, Carole; Gueye, Edouard Marcel; Honnorat, Jerome; Chinot, Olivier; Bauchet, Luc; Beauchesne, Patrick; Campone, Mario; Frenel, Jean Sébastien; Fontaine, Denys; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Heitzmann, Anne; Fesneau, Mélanie; Delattre, Jean Yves; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Ricard, Damien; Colin, Philippe; Vauléon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Cohen-Moyal, Elisabeth; Lubrano, Vincent; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate histological features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The histological characteristics of 203 AO patients, enrolled in the French national network POLA, were analyzed. The genomic profiles of 191 cases were studied using genomic arrays. IDH mutational status was assessed by immunohistochemistry and direct sequencing. Results 1p/19q codeletion was present in 79% of cases and was associated with alpha-internexin expression (P < 10−4), IDH1/2 mutation (P < 10−4), chromosome 4 loss (P < 10−3), and better overall survival (P < 10−4). Based on mitotic index, microvascular proliferation (MVP), and necrosis, 3 groups of 1p/19q codeleted AOs were identified: (group 1) AO with more than 5 mitoses per 10-HPF, no MVP, and no necrosis; (group 2) AO with MVP and no necrosis; and (group 3) AO with MVP and necrosis. Compared with group 1, groups 2 and 3 AOs had a higher mean Ki-67 proliferation index and a higher rate of 9p and 9q losses. Compared with group 2, group 3 AOs had a higher number of chromosomal alterations including chromosome 4 loss. In the subgroup of 157 1p/19q codeleted AOs, chromosomal instability was associated with shorter progression-free survival (P = .024) and shorter overall survival (P = .023). Conclusions The present study shows that oligodendrogliomas with classic histological features remain a molecularly heterogeneous entity and should be stratified according to 1p/19q status because of its major prognostic relevance. Moreover, 1p/19q codeleted AOs are also heterogeneous. Interestingly, mitotic index, MVP, and necrosis help to classify them into 3 groups associated with distinct genomic alterations. PMID:24723566

  1. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine ‘Roseobacter group’ were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  2. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34T together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838T and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197468

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant-Pathogenic Soil Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 Strain Rhs1AP

    PubMed Central

    Cubeta, Marc A.; Dean, Ralph A.; Jabaji, Suha; Neate, Stephen M.; Tavantzis, Stellos; Toda, Takeshi; Vilgalys, Rytas; Bharathan, Narayanaswamy; Fedorova-Abrams, Natalie; Pakala, Suman B.; Pakala, Suchitra M.; Zafar, Nikhat; Joardar, Vinita; Losada, Liliana; Nierman, William C.

    2014-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of agricultural crops. Here, we report on the 51,705,945 bp draft consensus genome sequence of R. solani strain Rhs1AP. A comprehensive understanding of the heterokaryotic genome complexity and organization of R. solani may provide insight into the plant disease ecology and adaptive behavior of the fungus. PMID:25359908

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant-Pathogenic Soil Fungus Rhizoctonia solani Anastomosis Group 3 Strain Rhs1AP.

    PubMed

    Cubeta, Marc A; Thomas, Elizabeth; Dean, Ralph A; Jabaji, Suha; Neate, Stephen M; Tavantzis, Stellos; Toda, Takeshi; Vilgalys, Rytas; Bharathan, Narayanaswamy; Fedorova-Abrams, Natalie; Pakala, Suman B; Pakala, Suchitra M; Zafar, Nikhat; Joardar, Vinita; Losada, Liliana; Nierman, William C

    2014-01-01

    The soil fungus Rhizoctonia solani is a pathogen of agricultural crops. Here, we report on the 51,705,945 bp draft consensus genome sequence of R. solani strain Rhs1AP. A comprehensive understanding of the heterokaryotic genome complexity and organization of R. solani may provide insight into the plant disease ecology and adaptive behavior of the fungus. PMID:25359908

  5. Genome sequence of the Roseovarius mucosus type strain (DSM 17069T), a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing representative of the marine Roseobacter group isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Roseovarius mucosus Biebl et al. 2005 is a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the marine Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, which was isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The marine Roseobacter group was found to be abundant in the ocean and plays an important role for global and biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the features of the R. mucosus strain DFL-24T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 17069T. The 4,247,724 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,194 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. In addition to the presence of four plasmids, genome analysis revealed the presence of genes associated with host colonization, DMSP utilization, cytotoxins, and quorum sensing that could play a role in the interrelationship of R. mucosus with the dinoflagellate A. ostenfeldii and other marine organisms. Furthermore, the genome encodes genes associated with mixotrophic growth, where both reduced inorganic compounds for lithotrophic growth and a photoheterotrophic lifestyle using light as additional energy source could be used. PMID:26203330

  6. The Complete Genome Phylogeny of Geographically Distinct Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Isolates (1944-2013) Supports Further Groupings within the Cosmopolitan Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhtar; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) isolates have been implicated in deadly outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in several regions of the world. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-2 isolates collected from particular countries has been performed using partial or individual genes but only a few studies have examined complete whole-genome sequences collected worldwide. Herein, 50 complete genome sequences of DENV-2 isolates, reported over the past 70 years from 19 different countries, were downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted and evolutionary distances of the 50 DENV-2 isolates were determined using maximum likelihood (ML) trees or Bayesian phylogenetic analysis created from complete genome nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequences or individual gene sequences. The results showed that all DENV-2 isolates fell into seven main groups containing five previously defined genotypes. A Cosmopolitan genotype showed further division into three groups (C-I, C-II, and C-III) with the C-I group containing two subgroups (C-IA and C-IB). Comparison of the aa sequences showed specific mutations among the various groups of DENV-2 isolates. A maximum number of aa mutations was observed in the NS5 gene, followed by the NS2A, NS3 and NS1 genes, while the smallest number of aa substitutions was recorded in the capsid gene, followed by the PrM/M, NS4A, and NS4B genes. Maximum evolutionary distances were found in the NS2A gene, followed by the NS4A and NS4B genes. Based on these results, we propose that genotyping of DENV-2 isolates in future studies should be performed on entire genome sequences in order to gain a complete understanding of the evolution of various isolates reported from different geographical locations around the world. PMID:26414178

  7. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Genome in the Evaniomorpha (Hymenoptera)—A Group with an Intermediate Rate of Gene Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng; Gibson, Tracey; Dowton, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes of three evaniomorph species, Ceraphron sp. (Ceraphronoidea), Gasteruption sp. (Evanioidea), and Orthogonalys pulchella (Trigonalyoidea) as well as the nearly complete mt genome from another evaniomorph species, Megalyra sp. (Megalyroidea). Each of them possesses dramatic gene rearrangements, including protein-coding or rRNA genes. Gene inversions were identified in all of these mt genomes; for example, the two rRNA genes have inverted and moved into the nad2-cox1 junction in the Megalyra sp. mt genome. In addition, we found two copies of a 10-bp complementary repeat at the beginning of rrnS and at the end of trnL2 in the Gasteruption sp. mt genome, consistent with recombination as the possible mechanism for gene inversion and long-range movement. Although each of the genomes contains a number of repeats of varying size, there was no consistent association of the size or number of repeats with the extent or type of gene rearrangement. The breakpoint distance analysis showed the Evaniomorpha has an intermediate rate of gene rearrangement. Sequence-based phylogenetic analyses of 13 protein-coding and 2 rRNA genes in 22 hymenopteran taxa recovered a paraphyletic Evaniomorpha with the Aculeata nested within it. Within the Evaniomorpha, our analyses confirmed the Trigonalyoidea + Megalyroidea as the sister group to the Aculeata and recovered a novel clade, Ceraphronoidea + Evanioidea. In contrast to previous hymenopteran phylogenetic studies, the internal relationships of the Evaniomorpha were highly supported and robust to the variation of alignment approach and phylogenetic inference approach. PMID:25115010

  8. Comparative analysis of three Magnaporthaceae mitochondrial genomes reveals group I introns in the soil-inhabiting pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A comparison of the mitochrondrial genomes of two soilborne grass pathogens, M. poae of turfgrass and Gaemannomyces graminis var. triciti (Ggt) of wheat, was made to the foliar rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae. We sought to extend observations from nuclear-coded genes that the soilborne patho...

  9. First Genome Sequence of Wild Onion Symptomless Virus, a Novel Member of Potyvirus in the Turnip Mosaic Virus Phylogenetic Group.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Kazusato; Korkmaz, Savas; Mitoma, Shinichiro; Nomiyama, Rei; Honda, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The nearly complete genome sequence of a new species of potyvirus was obtained from the symptomless wild onion (Allium sp.) in Turkey. This virus has less than 67% nucleotide sequence identities over the polyprotein to other known potyviruses. We propose the name wild onion symptomless virus for this novel potyvirus. PMID:27540073

  10. First Genome Sequence of Wild Onion Symptomless Virus, a Novel Member of Potyvirus in the Turnip Mosaic Virus Phylogenetic Group

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Savas; Mitoma, Shinichiro; Nomiyama, Rei; Honda, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    The nearly complete genome sequence of a new species of potyvirus was obtained from the symptomless wild onion (Allium sp.) in Turkey. This virus has less than 67% nucleotide sequence identities over the polyprotein to other known potyviruses. We propose the name wild onion symptomless virus for this novel potyvirus. PMID:27540073

  11. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  12. The Finding of a Group IIE Phospholipase A2 Gene in a Specified Segment of Protobothrops flavoviridis Genome and Its Possible Evolutionary Relationship to Group IIA Phospholipase A2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chijiwa, Takahito; Ikeda, Naoki; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The genes encoding group IIE phospholipase A2, abbreviated as IIE PLA2, and its 5' and 3' flanking regions of Crotalinae snakes such as Protobothrops flavoviridis, P. tokarensis, P. elegans, and Ovophis okinavensis, were found and sequenced. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns and coded for 22 or 24 amino acid residues of the signal peptides and 134 amino acid residues of the mature proteins. These IIE PLA2s show high similarity to those from mammals and Colubridae snakes. The high expression level of IIE PLA2s in Crotalinae venom glands suggests that they should work as venomous proteins. The blast analysis indicated that the gene encoding OTUD3, which is ovarian tumor domain-containing protein 3, is located in the 3' downstream of IIE PLA2 gene. Moreover, a group IIA PLA2 gene was found in the 5' upstream of IIE PLA2 gene linked to the OTUD3 gene (OTUD3) in the P. flavoviridis genome. It became evident that the specified arrangement of IIA PLA2 gene, IIE PLA2 gene, and OTUD3 in this order is common in the genomes of humans to snakes. The present finding that the genes encoding various secretory PLA2s form a cluster in the genomes of humans to birds is closely related to the previous finding that six venom PLA2 isozyme genes are densely clustered in the so-called NIS-1 fragment of the P. flavoviridis genome. It is also suggested that venom IIA PLA2 genes may be evolutionarily derived from the IIE PLA2 gene. PMID:25529307

  13. The finding of a group IIE phospholipase A2 gene in a specified segment of Protobothrops flavoviridis genome and its possible evolutionary relationship to group IIA phospholipase A2 genes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazuaki; Chijiwa, Takahito; Ikeda, Naoki; Shibata, Hiroki; Fukumaki, Yasuyuki; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Hattori, Shosaku; Ohno, Motonori

    2014-01-01

    The genes encoding group IIE phospholipase A2, abbreviated as IIE PLA2, and its 5' and 3' flanking regions of Crotalinae snakes such as Protobothrops flavoviridis, P. tokarensis, P. elegans, and Ovophis okinavensis, were found and sequenced. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns and coded for 22 or 24 amino acid residues of the signal peptides and 134 amino acid residues of the mature proteins. These IIE PLA2s show high similarity to those from mammals and Colubridae snakes. The high expression level of IIE PLA2s in Crotalinae venom glands suggests that they should work as venomous proteins. The blast analysis indicated that the gene encoding OTUD3, which is ovarian tumor domain-containing protein 3, is located in the 3' downstream of IIE PLA2 gene. Moreover, a group IIA PLA2 gene was found in the 5' upstream of IIE PLA2 gene linked to the OTUD3 gene (OTUD3) in the P. flavoviridis genome. It became evident that the specified arrangement of IIA PLA2 gene, IIE PLA2 gene, and OTUD3 in this order is common in the genomes of humans to snakes. The present finding that the genes encoding various secretory PLA2s form a cluster in the genomes of humans to birds is closely related to the previous finding that six venom PLA2 isozyme genes are densely clustered in the so-called NIS-1 fragment of the P. flavoviridis genome. It is also suggested that venom IIA PLA2 genes may be evolutionarily derived from the IIE PLA2 gene. PMID:25529307

  14. Metagenomic identification of novel enteric viruses in urban wild rats and genome characterization of a group A rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sachsenröder, Jana; Braun, Anne; Machnowska, Patrycja; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Deng, Xutao; Guenther, Sebastian; Bernstein, Samuel; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Delwart, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Rats are known as reservoirs and vectors for several zoonotic pathogens. However, information on the viruses shed by urban wild rats that could pose a zoonotic risk to human health is scare. Here, intestinal contents from 20 wild Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) collected in the city of Berlin, Germany, were subjected to metagenomic analysis of viral nucleic acids. The determined faecal viromes of rats consisted of a variety of known and unknown viruses, and were highly variable among the individuals. Members of the families Parvoviridae and Picobirnaviridae represented the most abundant species. Novel picornaviruses, bocaviruses, sapoviruses and stool-associated circular ssDNA viruses were identified, which showed only low sequence identity to known representatives of the corresponding taxa. In addition, noroviruses and rotaviruses were detected as potential zoonotic gastroenteritis viruses. However, partial-genome sequence analyses indicated that the norovirus was closely related to the recently identified rat norovirus and the rotavirus B was closely related to the rat rotavirus strain IDIR; both viruses clustered separately from respective human virus strains in phylogenetic trees. In contrast, the rotavirus A sequences showed high identity to human and animal strains. Analysis of the nearly complete genome of this virus revealed the known genotypes G3, P[3] and N2 for three of the genome segments, whereas the remaining eight genome segments represented the novel genotypes I20–R11–C11–M10–A22–T14–E18–H13. Our results indicated a high heterogeneity of enteric viruses present in urban wild rats; their ability to be transmitted to humans remains to be assessed in the future. PMID:25121550

  15. NIH working group report—using genomic information to guide weight management: From universal to precision treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Molly S; Loos, Ruth JF; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Ling, Charlotte; Franks, Paul W; Weinstock, George M; Snyder, Michael P; Vassy, Jason L; Agurs-Collins, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    Objective Precision medicine utilizes genomic and other data to optimize and personalize treatment. Although more than 2,500 genetic tests are currently available, largely for extreme and/or rare phenotypes, the question remains whether this approach can be used for the treatment of common, complex conditions like obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance, which underlie a host of metabolic diseases. Methods This review, developed from a Trans-NIH Conference titled “Genes, Behaviors, and Response to Weight Loss Interventions,” provides an overview of the state of genetic and genomic research in the area of weight change and identifies key areas for future research. Results Although many loci have been identified that are associated with cross-sectional measures of obesity/body size, relatively little is known regarding the genes/loci that influence dynamic measures of weight change over time. Although successful short-term weight loss has been achieved using many different strategies, sustainable weight loss has proven elusive for many, and there are important gaps in our understanding of energy balance regulation. Conclusions Elucidating the molecular basis of variability in weight change has the potential to improve treatment outcomes and inform innovative approaches that can simultaneously take into account information from genomic and other sources in devising individualized treatment plans. PMID:26692578

  16. New Group in the Leptospirillum Clade: Cultivation-Independent Community Genomics, Proteomics, and Transcriptomics of the New Species “Leptospirillum Group IV UBA BS”

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Mauna; Thomas, Brian C.; Shah, Manesh B.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirillum spp. are widespread members of acidophilic microbial communities that catalyze ferrous iron oxidation, thereby increasing sulfide mineral dissolution rates. These bacteria play important roles in environmental acidification and are harnessed for bioleaching-based metal recovery. Known members of the Leptospirillum clade of the Nitrospira phylum are Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (group I), Leptospirillum ferriphilum and “Leptospirillum rubarum” (group II), and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (group III). In the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system, biofilm formation is initiated by L. rubarum; L. ferrodiazotrophum appears in later developmental stages. Here we used community metagenomic data from unusual, thick floating biofilms to identify distinguishing metabolic traits in a rare and uncultivated community member, the new species “Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS.” These biofilms typically also contain a variety of Archaea, Actinobacteria, and a few other Leptospirillum spp. The Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species shares 98% 16S rRNA sequence identity and 70% average amino acid identity between orthologs with its closest relative, L. ferrodiazotrophum. The presence of nitrogen fixation and reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins suggest an autotrophic metabolism similar to that of L. ferrodiazotrophum, while hydrogenase proteins suggest anaerobic metabolism. Community transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrate expression of a multicopper oxidase unique to this species, as well as hydrogenases and core metabolic genes. Results suggest that the Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species might play important roles in carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, and iron oxidation in some acidic environments. PMID:23645189

  17. A new group in the Leptospirillum clade: cultivation-independent community genomics, proteomics and transcriptomics of the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS.

    SciTech Connect

    Goltsman, Daniela; Dasari, Mauna; Thomas, BC; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirillum spp. are widespread members of acidophilic microbial communities that catalyze ferrous iron oxidation, thereby increasing sulfide mineral dissolution rates. These bacteria play important roles in environmental acidification and are harnessed for bioleaching-based metal recovery. Known members of the Leptospirillum clade of the Nitrospira phylum are Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (group I), Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Leptospirillum rubarum (group II), and Leptospirillum ferrodiazotrophum (group III). In the Richmond Mine acid mine drainage (AMD) system, biofilm formation is initiated by L. rubarum; L. ferrodiazotrophum appears in later developmental stages. Here we used community metagenomic data from unusual, thick floating biofilms to identify distinguishing metabolic traits in a rare and uncultivated community member, the new species Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS. These biofilms typically also contain a variety of Archaea, Actinobacteria, and a few other Leptospirillum spp. The Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species shares 98% 16S rRNA sequence identity and 70% average amino acid identity between orthologs with its closest relative, L. ferrodiazotrophum. The presence of nitrogen fixation and reverse tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle proteins suggest an autotrophic metabolism similar to that of L. ferrodiazotrophum, while hydrogenase proteins suggest anaerobic metabolism. Community transcriptomic and proteomic analyses demonstrate expression of a multicopper oxidase unique to this species, as well as hydrogenases and core metabolic genes. Results suggest that the Leptospirillum group IV UBA BS species might play important roles in carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, and iron oxidation in some acidic environments.

  18. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Prasinophyte Prasinoderma coloniale Reveals Two Trans-Spliced Group I Introns in the Large Subunit rRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pombert, Jean-François; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique; Lemieux, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Organelle genes are often interrupted by group I and or group II introns. Splicing of these mobile genetic occurs at the RNA level via serial transesterification steps catalyzed by the introns'own tertiary structures and, sometimes, with the help of external factors. These catalytic ribozymes can be found in cis or trans configuration, and although trans-arrayed group II introns have been known for decades, trans-spliced group I introns have been reported only recently. In the course of sequencing the complete mitochondrial genome of the prasinophyte picoplanktonic green alga Prasinoderma coloniale CCMP 1220 (Prasinococcales, clade VI), we uncovered two additional cases of trans-spliced group I introns. Here, we describe these introns and compare the 54,546 bp-long mitochondrial genome of Prasinoderma with those of four other prasinophytes (clades II, III and V). This comparison underscores the highly variable mitochondrial genome architecture in these ancient chlorophyte lineages. Both Prasinoderma trans-spliced introns reside within the large subunit rRNA gene (rnl) at positions where cis-spliced relatives, often containing homing endonuclease genes, have been found in other organelles. In contrast, all previously reported trans-spliced group I introns occur in different mitochondrial genes (rns or coxI). Each Prasinoderma intron is fragmented into two pieces, forming at the RNA level a secondary structure that resembles those of its cis-spliced counterparts. As observed for other trans-spliced group I introns, the breakpoint of the first intron maps to the variable loop L8, whereas that of the second is uniquely located downstream of P9.1. The breakpoint In each Prasinoderma intron corresponds to the same region where the open reading frame (ORF) occurs when present in cis-spliced orthologs. This correlation between the intron breakpoint and the ORF location in cis-spliced orthologs also holds for other trans-spliced introns; we discuss the possible implications

  19. Two distinct groups of porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains of serogroup O45 are revealed by comparative genomic hybridization and virulence gene microarray

    PubMed Central

    Bruant, Guillaume; Zhang, Yongxiang; Garneau, Philippe; Wong, Justin; Laing, Chad; Fairbrother, John M; Gannon, Victor PJ; Harel, Josée

    2009-01-01

    Background Porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (PEPEC) strains of serogroup O45 cause post-weaning diarrhea and produce characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions. Most O45 PEPEC strains possess the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), encoding the virulence factors required for production of A/E lesions, and often possess the paa gene, which is thought to contribute to the early stages of PEPEC pathogenicity. In this study, nine O45 PEPEC strains and a rabbit enteropathogenic (REPEC) strain, known to produce A/E lesions in vivo, were characterized using an E. coli O157-E. coli K12 whole genome microarray and a virulence gene-specific microarray, and by PCR experiments. Results Based on their virulence gene profiles, the 10 strains were considered to be atypical EPEC. The differences in their genomes pointed to the identification of two distinct evolutionary groups of O45 PEPEC, Groups I and II, and provided evidence for a contribution of these genetic differences to their virulence in pigs. Group I included the REPEC strain and four O45 PEPEC strains known to induce severe A/E lesions in challenged pigs whereas Group II was composed of the five other O45 PEPEC strains, which induced less severe or no A/E lesions in challenged pigs. Significant differences between Groups I and II were found with respect to the presence or absence of 50 O-Islands (OIs) or S-loops and 13 K-islands (KIs) or K-loops, including the virulence-associated islands OI#1 (S-loop#1), OI#47 (S-loop#71), OI#57 (S-loop#85), OI#71 (S-loop#108), OI#115, OI#122, and OI#154 (S-loop#253). Conclusion We have genetically characterized a collection of O45 PEPEC strains and classified them into two distinct groups. The differences in their virulence gene and genomic island content may influence the pathogenicity of O45 PEPEC strains, and explain why Group I O45 PEPEC strains induced more severe A/E lesions in explants and challenged pigs than Group II strains. PMID:19709428

  20. Description of Bacillus toyonensis sp. nov., a novel species of the Bacillus cereus group, and pairwise genome comparisons of the species of the group by means of ANI calculations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Guillermo; Urdiain, Mercedes; Cifuentes, Ana; López-López, Aránzazu; Blanch, Anicet R; Tamames, Javier; Kämpfer, Peter; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Ramón, Daniel; Martínez, Juan F; Codoñer, Francisco M; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2013-09-01

    Strain BCT-7112(T) was isolated in 1966 in Japan from a survey designed to obtain naturally occurring microorganisms as pure cultures in the laboratory for use as probiotics in animal nutrition. This strain, which was primarily identified as Bacillus cereus var toyoi, has been in use for more than 30 years as the active ingredient of the preparation TOYOCERIN(®), an additive for use in animal nutrition (e.g. swine, poultry, cattle, rabbits and aquaculture). Despite the fact that the strain was initially classified as B. cereus, it showed significant genomic differences from the type strains of the B. cereus group that were large enough (ANI values below 92%) to allow it to be considered as a different species within the group. The polyphasic taxonomic study presented here provides sufficient discriminative parameters to classify BCT-7112(T) as a new species for which the name Bacillus toyonensis sp. nov. is proposed, with BCT-7112(T) (=CECT 876(T); =NCIMB 14858(T)) being designated as the type strain. In addition, a pairwise comparison between the available genomes of the whole B. cereus group by means of average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations indicated that besides the eight classified species (including B. toyonensis), additional genomospecies could be detected, and most of them also had ANI values below 94%. ANI values were on the borderline of a species definition only in the cases of representatives of B. cereus versus B. thuringiensis, and B. mycoides and B. weihenstephanensis. PMID:23791203

  1. Genome sequence and analysis of a broad-host range lytic bacteriophage that infects the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparatively little information is available on members of the Myoviridae infecting low G+C content, Gram-positive host bacteria of the family Firmicutes. While numerous Bacillus phages have been isolated up till now only very few Bacillus cereus phages have been characterized in detail. Results Here we present data on the large, virulent, broad-host-range B. cereus phage vB_BceM_Bc431v3 (Bc431v3). Bc431v3 features a 158,618 bp dsDNA genome, encompassing 239 putative open reading frames (ORFs) and, 20 tRNA genes encoding 17 different amino acids. Since pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the genome of this phage has a mass of 155-158 kb Bc431v3 DNA appears not to contain long terminal repeats that are found in the genome of Bacillus phage SPO1. Conclusions Bc431v3 displays significant sequence similarity, at the protein level, to B. cereus phage BCP78, Listeria phage A511 and Enterococcus phage ØEF24C and other morphologically related phages infecting Firmicutes such as Staphylococcus phage K and Lactobacillus phage LP65. Based on these data we suggest that Bc431v3 should be included as a member of the Spounavirinae; however, because of all the diverse taxonomical information has been addressed recently, it is difficult to determine the genus. The Bc431v3 phage contains some highly unusual genes such as gp143 encoding putative tRNAHis guanylyltransferase. In addition, it carries some genes that appear to be related to the host sporulation regulators. These are: gp098, which encodes a putative segregation protein related to FstK/SpoIIIE DNA transporters; gp105, a putative segregation protein; gp108, RNA polymerase sigma factor F/B; and, gp109 encoding RNA polymerase sigma factor G. PMID:23388049

  2. Whole genomic analysis of human G1P[8] rotavirus strains from different age groups in China.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Tsuzumi; Ghosh, Souvik; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Zhou, Xuan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2012-08-01

    G1P[8] rotaviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in humans in China. To date, there are no reports on the whole genomic analysis of the Chinese G1P[8] rotaviruses. To determine the origin and overall genetic makeup of the recent Chinese G1P[8] strains, the whole genomes of three strains, RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E1911/2009/G1P[8], RVA/Human-tc/CHN/R588/2005/G1P[8] and RVA/Human-tc/CHN/Y128/2004/G1P[8], detected in an infant, a child and an adult, respectively, were analyzed. Strains E1911, R588 and Y128 exhibited a typical Wa-like genotype constellation. Except for the NSP3 gene of E1911, the whole genomes of strains E1911, R588 and Y128 were found to be more closely related to those of the recent Wa-like common human strains from different countries than those of the prototype G1P[8] strain, or other old strains. On the other hand, the NSP3 gene of E1911 was genetically distinct from those of Y128, R588, or other Wa-like common human strains, and appeared to share a common origin with those of the porcine-like human G9 strains, providing evidence for intergenotype reassortment events. Comparisons of the amino acid residues defining the VP7 and VP4 antigenic domains revealed several mismatches between these Chinese G1P[8] strains and the G1 and P[8] strains contained in the currently licensed rotavirus vaccines Rotarix(TM )and RotaTeq(TM). PMID:23012626

  3. Genome sequence and virulence factors of a group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis strain with a new element carrying erm(B)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    A Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) strain WCHSDSE-1, which caused an outbreak of tonsillopharyngitis among healthcare workers in China, was subjected to genome sequencing and analysis. WCHSDSE-1 belongs to the Lancefield group G, emm type stG211.1 and sequence type 44. WCHSDSE-1 has virulence factors for adherence, impairing the recruitment of neutrophils to infection sites and toxins including streptolysins O and S and exotoxin G. WCHSDSE-1 has a 45.4-kb element resembling a conjugative transposon. This element is absent from other known SDSE genomes and contains the macrolide-resistant gene erm(B). Conjugative transfer of erm(B) was not successful in mating experiments, suggesting that the element might have lost its ability of conjugation. An almost identical element, which contains the tetracycline-resistant gene tet(M) instead of erm(B), is present on the genome of Filifactor alocis ATCC 35896. The boundaries and insertion sites of the two elements were identified and both were flanked by a 3-bp direct repeat, which is characteristic of transposition. In conclusion, the spectrum of virulence factors of WCHSDSE-1 is similar to other SDSE strains causing invasive diseases. WCHSDSE-1 possesses a new transposable element encoding macrolide resistance, which could pick up different resistance genes and could be transferred across species in oral microflora. PMID:26843282

  4. Novel Association of ABO Histo-Blood Group Antigen with Soluble ICAM-1: Results of a Genome-Wide Association Study of 6,578 Women

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Guillaume; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kellogg, Mark; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Rifai, Nader; Badola, Sunita; Miletich, Joseph P.; Ridker, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    While circulating levels of soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (sICAM-1) have been associated with diverse conditions including myocardial infarction, stroke, malaria, and diabetes, comprehensive analysis of the common genetic determinants of sICAM-1 is not available. In a genome-wide association study conducted among 6,578 participants in the Women's Genome Health Study, we find that three SNPs at the ICAM1 (19p13.2) locus (rs1799969, rs5498 and rs281437) are non-redundantly associated with plasma sICAM-1 concentrations at a genome-wide significance level (P<5×10−8), thus extending prior results from linkage and candidate gene studies. We also find that a single SNP (rs507666, P = 5.1×10−29) at the ABO (9q34.2) locus is highly correlated with sICAM-1 concentrations. The novel association at the ABO locus provides evidence for a previously unknown regulatory role of histo-blood group antigens in inflammatory adhesion processes. PMID:18604267

  5. Prophage Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Canchaya, Carlos; Proux, Caroline; Fournous, Ghislain; Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2003-01-01

    The majority of the bacterial genome sequences deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database contain prophage sequences. Analysis of the prophages suggested that after being integrated into bacterial genomes, they undergo a complex decay process consisting of inactivating point mutations, genome rearrangements, modular exchanges, invasion by further mobile DNA elements, and massive DNA deletion. We review the technical difficulties in defining such altered prophage sequences in bacterial genomes and discuss theoretical frameworks for the phage-bacterium interaction at the genomic level. The published genome sequences from three groups of eubacteria (low- and high-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria) were screened for prophage sequences. The prophages from Streptococcus pyogenes served as test case for theoretical predictions of the role of prophages in the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. The genomes from further human, animal, and plant pathogens, as well as commensal and free-living bacteria, were included in the analysis to see whether the same principles of prophage genomics apply for bacteria living in different ecological niches and coming from distinct phylogenetical affinities. The effect of selection pressure on the host bacterium is apparently an important force shaping the prophage genomes in low-G+C gram-positive bacteria and γ-proteobacteria. PMID:12794192

  6. Kelp Fly Virus: a Novel Group of Insect Picorna-Like Viruses as Defined by Genome Sequence Analysis and a Distinctive Virion Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, C. J.; Greenwood, D. R.; Gilbert, R. J. C.; Masoumi, A.; Gordon, K. H. J.; Hanzlik, T. N.; Fry, E. E.; Stuart, D. I.; Scotti, P. D.

    2005-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of kelp fly virus (KFV), originally isolated from the kelp fly, Chaetocoelopa sydneyensis, has been determined. Analyses of its genomic and structural organization and phylogeny show that it belongs to a hitherto undescribed group within the picorna-like virus superfamily. The single-stranded genomic RNA of KFV is 11,035 nucleotides in length and contains a single large open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 3,436 amino acids with 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of 384 and 343 nucleotides, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of the polypeptide shows that it has three regions. The N-terminal region contains sequences homologous to the baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis repeat domain, an inhibitor of apoptosis commonly found in animals and in viruses with double-stranded DNA genomes. The second region contains at least two capsid proteins. The third region has three sequence motifs characteristic of replicase proteins of many plant and animal viruses, including a helicase, a 3C chymotrypsin-like protease, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Phylogenetic analysis of the replicase motifs shows that KFV forms a distinct and distant taxon within the picorna-like virus superfamily. Cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction of KFV to a resolution of 15 Å reveals an icosahedral structure, with each of its 12 fivefold vertices forming a turret from the otherwise smooth surface of the 20-Å-thick capsid. The architecture of the KFV capsid is unique among the members of the picornavirus superfamily for which structures have previously been determined. PMID:16227260

  7. Complete genome analyses of the first porcine rotavirus group H identified from a South African pig does not provide evidence for recent interspecies transmission events.

    PubMed

    Nyaga, Martin M; Peenze, Ina; Potgieter, Christiaan A; Seheri, L Mapaseka; Page, Nicola A; Yinda, Claude K; Steele, A Duncan; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are classified into eight species/groups (RVA-RVH) according to the migration patterns of their 11 genome segments, as well as by serological and molecular properties of Viral Protein 6 (VP6). In 1997 a new unclassified RV was reported infecting adults in Bangladesh and China. This virus was initially named novel adult diarrhoea rotavirus (ADRV-N), but later renamed as RVH. Since then, RVH has been detected in humans only very sporadically. However, RVH is increasingly being detected in pig populations in the USA, Brazil and Japan, but not yet in Africa. Unfortunately, whole genome sequence data of porcine RVH strains in GenBank is currently restricted to a single strain (SKA-1) from Japan. Porcine diarrhoeic samples were collected in South Africa and analysed for rotavirus using an RVA ELISA and electropherotyping by PAGE. One sample displayed a 4:2:1:1:1:1:1 migration pattern, typical for RVH. In order to further investigate this strain, sequence-independent amplification followed by random sequencing using the 454/Roche GS FLX Sequencer was performed, resulting in the second complete porcine RVH strain (MRC-DPRU1575) available in databases. Phylogenetically, all segments of MRC-DPRU1575 clustered closely with the SKA-1 strain and in some segments with known porcine RVH strains from Brazil and the USA. In contrast, the porcine RVH strains were only distantly related to human RVH strains from Asia and a partial RVH-like strain recently detected in bats from Cameroon. Overall, strain MRC-DPRU1575 is the first complete genome of a porcine RVH from Africa and allows for the development of improved RVH screening methods. Our analyses indicate that RVH strains cluster according to their host species, not suggesting any evidence of recent interspecies transmission events. However, more RVH genomes from a wider host range are needed to better understand their evolutionary pathways and zoonotic potential. PMID:26658066

  8. Whole-genome phylogenies of the family Bacillaceae and expansion of the sigma factor gene family in the Bacillus cereus species-group

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group consists of six species (B. anthracis, B. cereus, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, B. thuringiensis, and B. weihenstephanensis). While classical microbial taxonomy proposed these organisms as distinct species, newer molecular phylogenies and comparative genome sequencing suggests that these organisms should be classified as a single species (thus, we will refer to these organisms collectively as the Bc species-group). How do we account for the underlying similarity of these phenotypically diverse microbes? It has been established for some time that the most rapidly evolving and evolutionarily flexible portions of the bacterial genome are regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks. Other studies have suggested that the sigma factor gene family of these organisms has diverged and expanded significantly relative to their ancestors; sigma factors are those portions of the bacterial transcriptional apparatus that control RNA polymerase recognition for promoter selection. Thus, examining sigma factor divergence in these organisms would concurrently examine both regulatory sequences and transcriptional networks important for divergence. We began this examination by comparison to the sigma factor gene set of B. subtilis. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the Bc species-group utilizing 157 single-copy genes of the family Bacillaceae suggests that several taxonomic revisions of the genus Bacillus should be considered. Within the Bc species-group there is little indication that the currently recognized species form related sub-groupings, suggesting that they are members of the same species. The sigma factor gene family encoded by the Bc species-group appears to be the result of a dynamic gene-duplication and gene-loss process that in previous analyses underestimated the true heterogeneity of the sigma factor content in the Bc species-group. Conclusions Expansion of the sigma factor gene family appears to have preferentially

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of catfish linkage group 8 reveals two homologous chromosomes in zebrafish and other teleosts with extensive inter-chromosomal rearrangements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Comparative genomics is a powerful tool to transfer genomic information from model species to related non-model species. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the primary aquaculture species in the United States. Its existing genome resources such as genomic sequences generated from n...

  10. Genome-Wide SNP Analysis of Southern African Populations Provides New Insights into the Dispersal of Bantu-Speaking Groups

    PubMed Central

    González-Santos, Miguel; Montinaro, Francesco; Oosthuizen, Ockie; Oosthuizen, Erica; Busby, George B.J.; Anagnostou, Paolo; Destro-Bisol, Giovanni; Pascali, Vincenzo; Capelli, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of Bantu-speaking agropastoralist populations had a great impact on the genetic, linguistic, and cultural variation of sub-Saharan Africa. It is generally accepted that Bantu languages originated in an area around the present border between Cameroon and Nigeria approximately 5,000 years ago, from where they spread South and East becoming the largest African linguistic branch. The demic consequences of this event are reflected in the relatively high genetic homogeneity observed across most of sub-Saharan Africa populations. In this work, we explored genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data from 28 populations to characterize the genetic components present in sub-Saharan African populations. Combining novel data from four Southern African populations with previously published results, we reject the hypothesis that the “non-Bantu” genetic component reported in South-Eastern Africa (Mozambique) reflects extensive gene flow between incoming agriculturalist and resident hunter-gatherer communities. We alternatively suggest that this novel component is the result of demographic dynamics associated with the Bantu dispersal. PMID:26363465

  11. Seed colour loci, homoeology and linkage groups of the C genome chromosomes revealed in Brassica rapa–B. oleracea monosomic alien addition lines

    PubMed Central

    Heneen, Waheeb K.; Geleta, Mulatu; Brismar, Kerstin; Xiong, Zhiyong; Pires, J. Chris; Hasterok, Robert; Stoute, Andrew I.; Scott, Roderick J.; King, Graham J.; Kurup, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Brassica rapa and B. oleracea are the progenitors of oilseed rape B. napus. The addition of each chromosome of B. oleracea to the chromosome complement of B. rapa results in a series of monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs). Analysis of MAALs determines which B. oleracea chromosomes carry genes controlling specific phenotypic traits, such as seed colour. Yellow-seeded oilseed rape is a desirable breeding goal both for food and livestock feed end-uses that relate to oil, protein and fibre contents. The aims of this study included developing a missing MAAL to complement an available series, for studies on seed colour control, chromosome homoeology and assignment of linkage groups to B. oleracea chromosomes. Methods A new batch of B. rapa–B. oleracea aneuploids was produced to generate the missing MAAL. Seed colour and other plant morphological features relevant to differentiation of MAALs were recorded. For chromosome characterization, Snow's carmine, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) were used. Key Results The final MAAL was developed. Morphological traits that differentiated the MAALs comprised cotyledon number, leaf morphology, flower colour and seed colour. Seed colour was controlled by major genes on two B. oleracea chromosomes and minor genes on five other chromosomes of this species. Homoeologous pairing was largely between chromosomes with similar centromeric positions. FISH, GISH and a parallel microsatellite marker analysis defined the chromosomes in terms of their linkage groups. Conclusions A complete set of MAALs is now available for genetic, genomic, evolutionary and breeding perspectives. Defining chromosomes that carry specific genes, physical localization of DNA markers and access to established genetic linkage maps contribute to the integration of these approaches, manifested in the confirmed correspondence of linkage groups with specific chromosomes. Applications include marker

  12. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  13. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread of

  14. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  15. The mitochondrial genome of Paraspadella gotoi is highly reduced and reveals that chaetognaths are a sister group to protostomes.

    PubMed

    Helfenbein, Kevin G; Fourcade, H Matthew; Vanjani, Rohit G; Boore, Jeffrey L

    2004-07-20

    We report the complete mtDNA sequence from a member of the phylum Chaetognatha (arrow worms). The Paraspadella gotoi mtDNA is highly unusual, missing 23 of the genes commonly found in animal mtDNAs, including atp6, which has otherwise been found universally to be present. Its 14 genes are unusually arranged into two groups, one on each strand. One group is punctuated by numerous noncoding intergenic nucleotides although the other group is tightly packed, having no noncoding nucleotides, leading to speculation that there are two transcription units with differing modes of expression. The phylogenetic position of the Chaetognatha within the Metazoa has long been uncertain, with conflicting or equivocal results from various morphological analyses and rRNA sequence comparisons. Comparisons here of amino acid sequences from mitochondrially encoded proteins give a single most parsimonious tree that supports a position of Chaetognatha as sister to the protostomes studied here. From this analysis, one can more clearly interpret the patterns of evolution of various developmental features, especially regarding the embryological fate of the blastopore. PMID:15249679

  16. Genome-wide RNA-Seq analysis of breast muscles of two broiler chicken groups differing in shear force.

    PubMed

    Piórkowska, K; Żukowski, K; Nowak, J; Połtowicz, K; Ropka-Molik, K; Gurgul, A

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a whole transcriptome analysis of breast muscles was conducted in broiler chicken groups differing in shear force. Shear force is a determinant of tenderness, which in turn is one of the most important parameters of meat quality in chickens. In our analysis, a total of 11,560 transcripts and 9824 genes per sample were identified. In chickens with more tender meat, up-regulation of 19 genes and down-regulation of 49 genes was observed. The up-regulated gene group included the ASB2 gene, which is probably involved in the meat conversion process, as its product results in the degradation of filamins, proteins which form muscle fibres. In the down-regulated gene group, genes which play a role in lipogenesis (THRSP, PLIN1) and in collagen synthesis (P4HA3, LEPREL4, PCOLCE2, COL16A1, COL20A1, VWA1) were detected. Their presence suggests the involvement of the extracellular matrix in the determination of meat tenderness. Thus, our study identified a pool of genes that may participate in the tenderisation process in broiler chickens. PMID:26592359

  17. The mitochondrial genome of Paraspadella gotoi is highly reduced and reveals that chaetognaths are a sister-group to protostomes

    SciTech Connect

    Helfenbein, Kevin G.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Vanjani, Rohit G.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-01

    We report the first complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence from a member of the phylum Chaetognatha (arrow worms). The Paraspadella gotoi mtDNA is highly unusual, missing 23 of the genes commonly found in animal mtDNAs, including atp6, which has otherwise been found universally to be present. Its 14 genes are unusually arranged into two groups, one on each strand. One group is punctuated by numerous non-coding intergenic nucleotides, while the other group is tightly packed, having no non-coding nucleotides, leading to speculation that there are two transcription units with differing modes of expression. The phylogenetic position of the Chaetognatha within the Metazoa has long been uncertain, with conflicting or equivocal results from various morphological analyses and rRNA sequence comparisons. Comparisons here of amino acid sequences from mitochondrially encoded proteins gives a single most parsimonious tree that supports a position of Chaetognatha as sister to the protostomes studied here. From this, one can more clearly interpret the patterns of evolution of various developmental features, especially regarding the embryological fate of the blastopore.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of Blue-crowned Parakeet (Aratinga acuticaudata)--phylogenetic position of the species among parrots group called Conures.

    PubMed

    Urantowka, Adam Dawid; Grabowski, Krzysztof Aleksander; Strzała, Tomasz

    2013-08-01

    Blue-crowned Parakeet (Aratinga acuticaudata) is a South American parrot species with a taxonomic position not confirmed by molecular studies. We sequenced full mitochondrial genome and constructed phylogenetic tree using sequences of mitochondrial ND2 gene from A. acuticaudata and some other representatives of Conures group. Our results confirmed previously described distribution of Aratinga species into three clades, but surprisingly did not classify Blue-crowned Parakeet to any of them. We found that A. acuticaudata shares the closest relationship with Diopsittaca nobilis and forms a separate clade together with Guaruba guarouba and Leptosittaca branickii species with a significant node. Our results confirm lack of monophyly of the genus Aratinga and underline the need of its taxonomic revision. PMID:23351080

  19. Evidence of Bacillus thuringiensis intra-serovar diversity revealed by Bacillus cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR genomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Sauka, Diego H; Basile, Juan I; Benintende, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is classified into serovars on the basis of H-flagellar antigens. Several alternative typing methods have been described. Among them, a B. cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (Rep)-PCR fingerprinting technique was shown to be discriminative and able to identify B. thuringiensis serovars. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic diversity and relationship among B. thuringiensis strains collected from different Argentinean ecosystems. Thirty-seven B. thuringiensis reference strains and 131 Argentinean isolates were analyzed using a B. cereus group-specific Rep-PCR. Fourteen different patterns were identified among the Argentinean isolates. Eight could not be associated to any pattern obtained from a reference strain. The pattern identical to the serovar kurstaki HD-1 strain was the most frequently identified in 68 native isolates. The profiles allowed tracing a single dendrogram with two groups and eight main lineages. Some strains showed distinctive patterns despite belonging to the same serovar. An intraspecific diversity resulted from this analysis that was highlighted by this technique since strains from a given serovar showed distinct profiles. This study may help to establish a system of B. thuringiensis classification with a higher discrimination level than established by the H antigen serotyping. PMID:22286045

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, a Member of a Remarkably Competitive Group of Negativicutes in the Firmicutes Phylum

    PubMed Central

    De León, Kara B.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Camilleri, Laura B.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Arkin, Adam P.; Fields, Matthew W.; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, isolated from a chromium-contaminated site in Hanford, Washington, USA, has been completed with PacBio sequencing. Nine copies of the rRNA gene operon and multiple transposase genes with identical sequences resulted in breaks in the original draft genome and may suggest genomic instability of JBW45. PMID:26404608

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, a Member of a Remarkably Competitive Group of Negativicutes in the Firmicutes Phylum

    SciTech Connect

    De León, Kara B.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Camilleri, Laura B.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Arkin, Adam P.; Fields, Matthew W.; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-09-24

    The genome of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, isolated from a chromium-contaminated site in Hanford, Washington, USA, has been completed with PacBio sequencing. Finally, nine copies of the rRNA gene operon and multiple transposase genes with identical sequences resulted in breaks in the original draft genome and may suggest genomic instability of JBW45.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, a Member of a Remarkably Competitive Group of Negativicutes in the Firmicutes Phylum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De León, Kara B.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Camilleri, Laura B.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Arkin, Adam P.; Fields, Matthew W.; Brown, Steven D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Pelosinus fermentans JBW45, isolated from a chromium-contaminated site in Hanford, Washington, USA, has been completed with PacBio sequencing. Finally, nine copies of the rRNA gene operon and multiple transposase genes with identical sequences resulted in breaks in the original draft genome and may suggest genomic instability of JBW45.

  3. Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, Betty Kay; Martin, Sheryl A

    2006-02-01

    Welcome to the 2006 joint meeting of the fourth Genomics:GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop and the six Metabolic Engineering Working Group Inter-Agency Conference. The vision and scope of the Genomics:GTL program continue to expand and encompass research and technology issues from diverse scientific disciplines, attracting broad interest and support from researchers at universities, DOE national laboratories, and industry. Metabolic engineering's vision is the targeted and purposeful alteration of metabolic pathways to improve the understanding and use of cellular pathways for chemical transformation, energy transduction, and supramolecular assembly. These two programs have much complementarity in both vision and technological approaches, as reflected in this joint workshop. GLT's challenge to the scientific community remains the further development and use of a broad array of innovative technologies and computational tools to systematically leverage the knowledge and capabilities brought to us by DNA sequencing projects. The goal is to seek a broad and predictive understanding of the functioning and control of complex systems--individual microbes, microbial communities, and plants. GTL's prominent position at the interface of the physical, computational, and biological sciences is both a strength and challenge. Microbes remain GTL's principal biological focus. In the complex 'simplicity' of microbes, they find capabilities needed by DOE and the nation for clean and secure energy, cleanup of environmental contamination, and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. An ongoing challenge for the entire GTL community is to demonstrate that the fundamental science conducted in each of your research projects brings us a step closer to biology-based solutions for these important national energy and environmental needs.

  4. A taxonomic framework for emerging groups of ecologically important marine gammaproteobacteria based on the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships using genome-scale data

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a large number of isolates were obtained from saline environments that are phylogenetically related to distinct clades of oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria, which were originally identified in seawater samples using cultivation independent methods and are characterized by high seasonal abundances in coastal environments. To date a sound taxonomic framework for the classification of these ecologically important isolates and related species in accordance with their evolutionary relationships is missing. In this study we demonstrate that a reliable allocation of members of the oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria (OMG) group and related species to higher taxonomic ranks is possible by phylogenetic analyses of whole proteomes but also of the RNA polymerase beta subunit, whereas phylogenetic reconstructions based on 16S rRNA genes alone resulted in unstable tree topologies with only insignificant bootstrap support. The identified clades could be correlated with distinct phenotypic traits illustrating an adaptation to common environmental factors in their evolutionary history. Genome wide gene-content analyses revealed the existence of two distinct ecological guilds within the analyzed lineage of marine gammaproteobacteria which can be distinguished by their trophic strategies. Based on our results a novel order within the class Gammaproteobacteria is proposed, which is designated Cellvibrionales ord. nov. and comprises the five novel families Cellvibrionaceae fam. nov., Halieaceae fam. nov., Microbulbiferaceae fam. nov., Porticoccaceae fam. nov., and Spongiibacteraceae fam. nov. PMID:25914684

  5. A taxonomic framework for emerging groups of ecologically important marine gammaproteobacteria based on the reconstruction of evolutionary relationships using genome-scale data.

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Scheuner, Carmen; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a large number of isolates were obtained from saline environments that are phylogenetically related to distinct clades of oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria, which were originally identified in seawater samples using cultivation independent methods and are characterized by high seasonal abundances in coastal environments. To date a sound taxonomic framework for the classification of these ecologically important isolates and related species in accordance with their evolutionary relationships is missing. In this study we demonstrate that a reliable allocation of members of the oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria (OMG) group and related species to higher taxonomic ranks is possible by phylogenetic analyses of whole proteomes but also of the RNA polymerase beta subunit, whereas phylogenetic reconstructions based on 16S rRNA genes alone resulted in unstable tree topologies with only insignificant bootstrap support. The identified clades could be correlated with distinct phenotypic traits illustrating an adaptation to common environmental factors in their evolutionary history. Genome wide gene-content analyses revealed the existence of two distinct ecological guilds within the analyzed lineage of marine gammaproteobacteria which can be distinguished by their trophic strategies. Based on our results a novel order within the class Gammaproteobacteria is proposed, which is designated Cellvibrionales ord. nov. and comprises the five novel families Cellvibrionaceae fam. nov., Halieaceae fam. nov., Microbulbiferaceae fam. nov., Porticoccaceae fam. nov., and Spongiibacteraceae fam. nov. PMID:25914684

  6. Whole-genomic analysis of 12 porcine group A rotaviruses isolated from symptomatic piglets in Brazil during the years of 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernanda D F; Espinoza, Luis R L; Tonietti, Paloma O; Barbosa, Bruna R P; Gregori, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are leading causes of viral diarrhea in children and in the young of many animal species, particularly swine. In the current study, porcine RVAs were found in fecal specimens from symptomatic piglets on 4 farms in Brazil during the years of 2012-2013. Using RT-PCR, Sanger nucleotide sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses, the whole genomes of 12 Brazilian porcine RVA strains were analyzed. Specifically, the full-length open reading frame (ORF) sequences were determined for the NSP2-, NSP3-, and VP6-coding genes, and partial ORF sequences were determined for the VP1-, VP2-, VP3-, VP4-, VP7-, NSP1-, NSP4-, and NSP5/6-coding genes. The results indicate that all 12 strains had an overall porcine-RVA-like backbone with most segments being designated as genotype 1, with the exception of the VP6- and NSP1-coding genes, which were genotypes I5 and A8, respectively. These results add to our growing understanding of porcine RVA genetic diversity and will provide a platform for monitoring the role of animals as genetic reservoirs of emerging human RVAs strains. PMID:25796358

  7. Microbial genomic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Chimetto, Luciane; Edwards, Robert A; Swings, Jean; Stackebrandt, Erko; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2013-01-01

    A need for a genomic species definition is emerging from several independent studies worldwide. In this commentary paper, we discuss recent studies on the genomic taxonomy of diverse microbial groups and a unified species definition based on genomics. Accordingly, strains from the same microbial species share >95% Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI), >95% identity based on multiple alignment genes, <10 in Karlin genomic signature, and > 70% in silico Genome-to-Genome Hybridization similarity (GGDH). Species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and supertree analysis. In addition to the established requirements for species descriptions, we propose that new taxa descriptions should also include at least a draft genome sequence of the type strain in order to obtain a clear outlook on the genomic landscape of the novel microbe. The application of the new genomic species definition put forward here will allow researchers to use genome sequences to define simultaneously coherent phenotypic and genomic groups. PMID:24365132

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies That the ABO Blood Group System Influences Interleukin-10 Levels and the Risk of Clinical Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Åsa; Alfredsson, Jenny; Eriksson, Niclas; Wallentin, Lars; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. We have previously shown that increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels are associated with poor outcome in ACS patients. Method We performed a genome-wide association study in 2864 ACS patients and 408 healthy controls, to identify genetic variants associated with IL-10 levels. Then haplotype analyses of the identified loci were done and comparisons to levels of IL-10 and other known ACS related biomarkers. Results Genetic variants at the ABO blood group locus associated with IL-10 levels (top SNP: rs676457, P = 4.4 × 10−10) were identified in the ACS patients. Haplotype analysis, using SNPs tagging the four main ABO antigens (A1, A2, B and O), showed that O and A2 homozygous individuals, or O/A2 heterozygotes have much higher levels of IL-10 compared to individuals with other antigen combinations. In the ACS patients, associations between ABO antigens and von Willebrand factor (VWF, P = 9.2 × 10−13), and soluble tissue factor (sTF, P = 8.6 × 10−4) were also found. In the healthy control cohort, the associations with VWF and sTF were similar to those in ACS patients (P = 1.2 × 10−15 and P = 1.0 × 10−5 respectively), but the healthy cohort showed no association with IL-10 levels (P>0.05). In the ACS patients, the O antigen was also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, all causes of death, and recurrent myocardial infarction (odds ratio [OR] = 1.24–1.29, P = 0.029–0.00067). Conclusion Our results suggest that the ABO antigens play important roles, not only for the immunological response in ACS patients, but also for the outcome of the disease. PMID:26600159

  9. Genome sequence of the pink to light reddish-pigmented Rubellimicrobium mesophilum type strain (DSM 19309T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from soil, and emended description of the species

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Spring, Stefan; Fiebig, Anne; Petersen, Jörn; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Rubellimicrobium mesophilum Dastager et al. 2008 is a mesophilic and light reddish-pigmented representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the Roseobacter group play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles and were found in a broad variety of marine environments associated with algal blooms, different kinds of sediments, and surfaces of invertebrates and vertebrates. Roseobacters were shown to be widely distributed, especially within the total bacterial community found in coastal waters, as well as in mixed water layers of the open ocean. Here we describe the features of R. mesophilum strain MSL-20T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 19309T. The 4,927,676 bp genome sequence consists of one chromosome and probably one extrachromosomal element. It contains 5,082 protein-coding genes and 56 RNA genes. As previously reported, the G+C content is significantly different from the actual genome sequence-based G+C content and as the type strain tests positively for oxidase, the species description is emended accordingly. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197472

  10. Complete Genome Characterization of Recent and Ancient Belgian Pig Group A Rotaviruses and Assessment of Their Evolutionary Relationship with Human Rotaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Van Ranst, Marc; Nauwynck, Hans J.; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are an important cause of diarrhea in young pigs and children. An evolutionary relationship has been suggested to exist between pig and human RVAs. This hypothesis was further investigated by phylogenetic analysis of the complete genomes of six recent (G2P[27], G3P[6], G4P[7], G5P[7], G9P[13], and G9P[23]) and one historic (G1P[7]) Belgian pig RVA strains and of all completely characterized pig RVAs from around the globe. In contrast to the large diversity of genotypes found for the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7, a relatively conserved genotype constellation (I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1) was found for the other 9 genes in most pig RVA strains. VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP2, NSP4, and NSP5 genes of porcine RVAs belonged to genotype 1, which is shared with human Wa-like RVAs. However, for most of these gene segments, pig strains clustered distantly from human Wa-like RVAs, indicating that viruses from both species have entered different evolutionary paths. However, VP1, VP2, and NSP3 genes of some archival human strains were moderately related to pig strains. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP6, NSP1, and NSP3 genes, as well as amino acid analysis of the antigenic regions of VP7, further confirmed this evolutionary segregation. The present results also indicate that the species barrier is less strict for pig P[6] strains but that chances for successful spread of these strains in the human population are hampered by the better adaptation of pig RVAs to pig enterocytes. However, future surveillance of pig and human RVA strains is warranted. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses are an important cause of diarrhea in many species, including pigs and humans. Our understanding of the evolutionary relationship between rotaviruses from both species is limited by the lack of genomic data on pig strains. In this study, recent and ancient Belgian pig rotavirus isolates were sequenced, and their evolutionary relationship with human Wa-like strains was investigated