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Sample records for co2 laser welded

  1. CO2 laser welding fused silica.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Scott T.; MacCallum, Danny O'Neill; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert

    2005-08-01

    The feasibility of laser welding of fused silica (aka quartz) has been demonstrated recently by others. An application requiring hermetic sealing of a thin, pressure-bearing quartz diaphragm to a thicker frame led us to explore this technique. We found that laser welding techniques normally used for metallic parts caused scorching and uneven melting. Contrary to standard practices (near focus, high travel speed, high power density), successful welds in fused silica required a broad heat source applied over a large area under a slow rotation to gradually heat the glass through the annealing, softening and finally working temperatures. Furthermore, good mechanical contact between the parts to be joined played an even more important role in this process than in typical metallic joints. A 50 W CO2 laser with 4 f.l. ZnSe2 lens and rotary head was used to weld 0.425 OD, 0.006-0.010 thick, disks to 0.500 OD tubing with 0.125 walls. Several joint geometries and beam orientations were investigated. Temperature profiles were measured and compared to an FEM thermal model. We will discuss the effects of laser power, travel speed, number of passes, joint geometry and part thicknesses on achieving hermeticity and cosmetically-acceptable joints.

  2. CO2 laser tailored blank welding: process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Giuseppe; Borello, Elena; Pallaro, Nereo

    1996-09-01

    Tailored blank welding has been a rapidly growing segment of the automotive industry over the last five years. It allows to choose the optimal thickness of the sheets for different zones taking into account different mechanical stresses, vehicle safety reinforcement. Through the elimination of extra reinforcement parts, the use of tailored blanks allows to produce lighter car bodies and to simplify the production cycle. As more laser welding systems are being installed in industry, in order to increase the productivity and maintain constant quality of the products, the demand for the development of process monitoring systems increases. In this paper a monitoring system, based on the measurement of the radiation from the plasma plume during the CO2 tailored blanks laser welding, is presented. Using an appropriate combination of optical components, detectors and a special software, a complete apparatus has been developed. The signals were found to be correlated to weld quality parameters including the defects such as holes, overlapping and open butts.

  3. A CO2 Laser Weld Shape-Predicting Neural Network

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Knorovsky, G.A.

    1998-10-05

    We describe two artificial neural networks (ANN) which predict CO2 partial penetration laser welds on grade 304 stainless steel. Given the laser irradiance and travel speed, one ANN (direct) predicts the resulting weld's depth, width, overall shape, energy transfer efficiency, melting efficiency and porosity likelihood in the weld fusion zone. Given the weld size and shape, the second ANN (inverse) predicts the irradiance and travel speed necessary to provide such a weld. The ANNs used 3 nodal layers and perception-type neurons. For the first ANN, with 2 inputs and 17 outputs (12 for shape, and 5 for size, efficiencies and porosity predictions), 12 to 17 intermediate layer neurons were necessary, while for the second, with 14 inputs and 2 outputs, 25 were necessary. Besides their description, data interpretation and weld schedule development via the ANNs will be shown.

  4. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  5. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part II: CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1989-08-01

    There has been an extensive growth within the last five years in the use of high-powered lasers in various metalworking processes. The two types of lasers used most frequently for laser welding/cutting processes are the Neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and the carbon dioxide (CO2) systems. When such lasers are operated in an open beam configuration, they are designated as a Class IV laser system. Class IV lasers are high-powered lasers that may present an eye and skin hazard under most common exposure conditions, either directly or when the beam has been diffusely scattered. Significant control measures are required for unenclosed (open beam), Class IV laser systems since workers may be exposed to scattered or reflected beams during the operation, maintenance, and service of these lasers. In addition to ocular and/or skin exposure hazards, such lasers also may present a multitude of nonlaser beam occupational concerns. Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the plasma-related plume radiations released during typical high-powered CO2 laser-target interactions. In addition, the application of the nominal hazard zone (NHZ) and other control measures also are discussed with special emphasis on Class IV industrial CO2 laser systems. PMID:2508455

  6. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-23

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 A ring . The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  7. Laser welding of nylon thin films using a pulsed CO2 waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, R.; Valenzuela, Rogelio; Camacho-Mesa, Roxana B.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we present an experimental investigation for welding Nylon: Bi-Oriented Polyamide (BOPA) thin films using a CO2 waveguide laser in a pulsed configuration. The material used in this study is Nylon 6, all set in square sheet thin films samples of 100 cm2 with 15 µm thickness. Our optical setup is based on deliver the laser beam all the way through the work piece using X-Y scanning mirrors mounted on galvo-like motors and an f-theta lens with 15 cm focal length and 50 µm focal spot sizes. The fluence (laser energy) is controlled by a pulse signal generator having the possibility to change the pulse repetition rate (PRR) and the pulse width (PW) of the laser beam. Our results show the best weld seam for scanning speeds of 20mm/s and the pulsed laser beam with 2 KHz PRR and 80 µs for the PW time. The scanning speed and trajectory for the welding process are all controlled by a computer in which one can modify the weld parameters. The irradiance at the focal point is set to 1.146 MW/cm2 while the average optical power was set to 22.5W. Our experimental parameters are previously modeled by using COMSOL Multiphysics software were the laser heat source is modeled on the selected material. This model is based on the heat transfer partial differential equation and solved by finite elements procedure. Model results show a perfect agreement with the experiments. Finally, the quality of the welded seam is studied by means of sealed tight and share force critical mechanical test.

  8. Evaluation of hazards in CO2 laser welding and related processes.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, M; Honkasalo, A; Laitinen, H; Lindroos, L; Welling, I; von Nandelstadh, P

    1992-04-01

    High-power CO2 lasers are used extensively in various industrial applications. In most cases they form part of open-beam equipment and have a power of several kilowatts, and are thus designated as Safety Class 4 systems. In addition to the invisible i.r. laser beam (10.6 microns), u.v. radiation and visible light may be emitted. In the present work a power meter controlled by microprocessor and a spectroradiometer measured the scattered or reflected laser radiation. In addition, concentration levels of welding and cutting fumes and of pyrolysis products of plastics were determined during various laser processes. Finally, a safety analysis was performed to compare the hazards of laser welding with those of conventional welding methods: this showed that the use of laser systems can eliminate many traditional risks, but the worker must be protected not only against the coherent laser beam, but also from incoherent blue light and u.v. radiation. PMID:1530233

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  11. CO2, Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG), And Argon Laser Welding Of Vascular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley R.; Kopchok, George; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    Tne feasibility of welding thin-walled microvessels by laser has been established. This report summarizes our experience using laser welding to repair thick-walled, large-diameter, 4 to 8 mm canine veins and arteries using CO2, Nd:YAG and argon lasers. Welding of venotomies is uniformly successful using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, and Nd:YAG venotomies appear to veal more rapidly than sutured controls. Arterial welding has been accomplished with the Nd:YAG and argon laser. Our preliminary experience shows promise for welding both large diameter veins and arteries using lasers. Laser welding may represent an alternative for repair of small and large diameter vessels with several advantages compared to conventional suture techniques.

  12. CO2 laser nerve welding: optimal laser parameters and the use of solders in vitro.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; van Gemert, M J

    1994-01-01

    To improve the welding strength, an in vitro study was performed to investigate the bonding strength of CO2 laser nerve welding (LNW), with and without the use of human albumin solution, dried albumin solution, egg white, fibrinogen solution, fibrin glue, and red blood cells as a solder. Fifteen different combinations of laser power (50, 100, and 150 mW) and pulse duration (0.1 to 3 s) were used with a spot size of 320 microns. The results have been compared to suture, fibrin glue, and laser-assisted nerve repair (LANR). The strongest welds (associated with whitening and caramelization of tissue) were produced at 100 mW with pulses of 1.0 s and at 50 mW with pulses of 3 s. The use of a dried albumin solution as a solder at 100 mW with pulses of 1 s increased the bonding strength 9-fold as compared to LNW (bonding strength 21.0 +/- 8.6 g and 2.4 +/- 0.9 g, respectively). However, positioning the nerves between cottons soaked in saline for 20 minutes resulted in a decrease of the bonding strength (9.8 +/- 4.5 g). The use of a 20% albumin solution and egg white, both at 50 mW with pulses of 3 s, resulted in a bonding strength of, respectively, 5.7 +/- 2.1 g and 7.7 +/- 2.4 g. Other solders did not increase the bonding strength in comparison to LNW. The substantial increase in bonding strength for some solders suggests that it is worthwhile to investigate the dehiscence rate and nerve regeneration of solder enhanced LNW in an in vivo study. PMID:8133768

  13. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  14. In-vivo CO2 laser rat urinary bladder welding with silver halide fiber optic radiometric temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Bernard; Eyal, Ophir; Belotserkovsky, Edward; Shenfeld, Ofer; Kariv, Noam; Goldwasser, Benad; Katzir, Abraham

    1995-05-01

    Laser welding has been used for connecting various tissues in the body. In urology such welding has the advantage of forming an immediate water tight seal. We have developed a fiberoptic system that makes it possible to monitor and control the temperature of the tissue during welding. In previous work we demonstrated that this system could be successfully used to weld punctures in the urinary bladder of rats. It was found that optimal welding was obtained at a temperature of 55 degree(s)C. In this work we used the same system for welding of large openings (cystotomy) in the urinary bladder of rats. In early experiments we used stay sutures and decompressing catheters. It was later found that complete closure can be obtained with CO2-laser welding alone. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using temperature controlled laser welding as an efficient surgical tool.

  15. CO2 laser oral soft tissue welding: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sattayut, Sajee; Nakkyo, Pitinuch; Phusrinuan, Puntiwa; Sangiamsak, Thanyaporn; Phiolueang, Ratchanee

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: Although there are some studies reporting the benefits of using laser to improve wound closure, there were a few studies in a model of oral mucosa. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare immediate tensile strength of the wound closure between suture alone and suture combined with CO2 laser welding. Materials and methods: The study was conducted in 40 samples of the tissue blocks from ventral sides of pig tongues. A 20 mm-length and 5 mm-depth incision was made in each sample. The samples were randomly allocated into 2 groups namely: the control group and the experimental group. The samples of the control group were sutured with 3- stitch of 4-0 black silk. The samples of the experimental group were irradiated with CO2 laser (ultrapulse mode, 800 Watt peak power, 10 Hz, 0.2 ms pulse duration and 2,262.62 J/cm2 energy density) before sutured. The immediate tensile strength of the wound was measured by using customized tensiometer under stereomicroscope. Results: The median of tensile strength of the control group and the experimental group were 30.40 g/cm2 and 40.50 g/cm2, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups (P value = 0.58). The proportions of the samples without wound dehiscence at the maximum limit of the tensiometer (120 g/cm2) were 0.15 (3/20) in the control group and 0.35 (7/20) in the experimental group. Conclusion: The CO2 laser welding used in this study failed to show a greater immediate tensile strength but had a higher proportion of the wound without dehiscence at the 120 g/cm2 tensile strength by comparison with the suture alone. PMID:24155544

  16. Fundamental study about CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Tetsuka, Masato; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-11-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is attracting attentions as heat-resistant and high-specific strength material in the next generation, especially, it is promising material in the field of aerospace components. Conventional machining process including welding, however, can be hardly applied due to its very low ductility. The objective of this study, as a first stage, is to find out paying attention to crack and hardness the fundamental good conditions of the bead-on-plate welding of TiAl intermetallic compound using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting gamma titanium aluminide contained iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding in the titanium aluminide material in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, Vickers hardness, transverse crack numbers and so on as major parameters of welding speed from 1000 to 4600 mm/min and initial temperature of specimen from R.T. to 873 K with a beam spot size of 0.5 mm and an output power of 1.5 kW. In addition, the specimens were analyzed by Electron Probe X-ray Micro Analyzer, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry. As a result of experiments, transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 K. In every condition, the value of Vickers hardness of fused zone increased compared with base. We think the reason of it is an increase of (alpha) 2(Ti3Al) phase, which is caused by rapid cooling, taking in Oxygen, fine structure and so on.

  17. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  18. Multi-response optimization of CO 2 laser-welding process of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyounis, K. Y.; Olabi, A. G.; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, laser welding of austenitic stainless steel has received great attention in industry. This is due to its widespread application in petroleum refinement stations, power plants, the pharmaceutical industry and also in households. Therefore, mechanical properties should be controlled to obtain good welded joints. The welding process should be optimized by the proper mathematical models. In this research, the tensile strength and impact strength along with the joint-operating cost of laser-welded butt joints made of AISI304 was investigated. Design-expert software was used to establish the design matrix and to analyze the experimental data. The relationships between the laser-welding parameters (laser power, welding speed and focal point position) and the three responses (tensile strength, impact strength and joint-operating cost) were established. Also, the optimization capabilities in design-expert software were used to optimize the welding process. The developed mathematical models were tested for adequacy using analysis of variance and other adequacy measures. In this investigation, the optimal welding conditions were identified in order to increase the productivity and minimize the total operating cost. Overlay graphs were plotted by superimposing the contours for the various response surfaces. The process parameters effect was determined and the optimal welding combinations were tabulated.

  19. Fabrication of a microresonator-fiber assembly maintaining a high-quality factor by CO_2 laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhiwei; Lin, Jintian; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhengming; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate fabrication of a microtoroid resonator of a high-quality (high-Q) factor using femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) micromachining. A fiber taper is reliably assembled to the microtoroid using CO2 laser welding. Specifically, we achieve a high Q-factor of 2.12*10^6 in the microresonator-fiber assembly by optimizing the contact position between the fiber taper and the microtoroid.

  20. The effect of the welding direction on the plasma and metal transfer behavior of CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-07-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, the welding direction exerts direct effects on the plasma properties, the transient behavior of the droplet, the weld pool behavior, and the temperature field. Ultimately, it will affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, the behavior of the CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding process has not been systematically studied. In this paper, the current-voltage characteristics of different welding processes were analyzed and compared. The dynamics of the droplet transfer, the plasma behavior, and the weld pool behavior were observed by using two high-speed camera systems. Moreover, an optical emission spectroscopy was applied to analyze the plasma temperature and the electron number density. The results indicated that the electrical resistance of the arc plasma reduced in the laser leading mode. For the same pulse duration, the metal transfer mode was the spray type with the laser leading arrangement. The temperature and electron density distribution showed bimodal behavior in the case of arc leading mode, while this phenomenon does not exist in the caser of laser leading mode. The double elliptic-planar distribution which conventional simulation process used was not applicable in the laser leading mode.

  1. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  2. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, Teresa; Rizzi, Domenico; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Konuk, Ali Riza; Aarts, Ronald; Veld, Bert Huis in 't; Ancona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth. PMID:23112646

  3. Microstructural Effects on the Mechanical Integrity of a TRIP-800 Steel Welded by Laser-CO2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Medina, G. Y.; López, H. F.; Zambrano, P.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a TRIP-800 steel was welded using a Laser CO2 process, and the resultant microstructures were characterized by optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) means. It was found that the microstructure of the steel in the as-received condition consisted of ferrite, bainite, and retained austenite (RA), including some martensite. In particular, TEM observations indicated that the developed martensites were high carbon twinned martensites. It was found that laser beam welding (LBW) promoted the development of up to 23% martensite in the fusion zone (FZ) and up to 30% in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In addition, determinations of RA using x-ray diffraction indicated that the amount of RA developed in the FZ was relatively small (<6%). Confirmation for the relatively large amounts of martensite in both the FZ and HAZ was indirectly made by the shape of microhardness profiles, which resembled a "top hat." Tensile testing in welded strips indicated a loss of strength and ductility. An examination of the fracture surfaces indicated that the steel fractured in a brittle fashion at the HAZ-BM interface. Apparently, the development of relatively large amounts of martensite in the HAZ reduced the steel toughness. In turn, this indicated that LBW leads to martensite embrittlement in the HAZ regions, but not at the parting line of the FZ.

  4. Characteristics of plasma plume and effect mechanism of lateral restraint during high power CO2 laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Cai, Yan; Sun, Dawei; Zhu, Junjie; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-12-01

    A novel lateral restraint method was proposed to suppress plasma plume of high power CO2 laser welding using a pair of copper blocks with cooling water. The plasma plume was observed with a high-speed camera, and its core zone and periphery zone were investigated based on the specific processing algorithm. With the specially designed shifting unit, the spectrum of plasma plume was scanned both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Based on the selected spectral lines, electron temperature and electron number density of plasma plume were calculated. The characteristics of plasma plume, as well as the restraint mechanism, were discussed both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Results showed that the cooling effect, blowing effect and the static pressure were enhanced by the lateral restraint, and the restraint effect of the near-wall low-temperature area limited the expansion of plasma plume greatly.

  5. CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Callan, R.; Constant, G.; Davies, P. H.; Foord, R.

    CO2 laser-based radars operating at 10 microns are both highly energy-efficient and eye-safe, as well as compact and rugged; they also furnish covertness-enhancing fine pointing accuracy, and are difficult to jam or otherwise confuse. Two modes of operation are generally employed: incoherent, in which the laser is simply used as a high power illumination source, and in the presently elaborated coherent or heterodyne mode. Applications encompass terrain-following and obstacle avoidance, Doppler discrimination of missile and aircraft targets, pollutant gas detection, wind measurement for weapons-aiming, and global wind field monitoring.

  6. The effect of CO2 laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Köse, Ceyhun; Kaçar, Ramazan; Zorba, Aslı Pınar; Bağırova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO2 laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and laser welded

  7. CO2 Laser Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Samuel

    1989-03-01

    It gives me a great deal of pleasure to introduce our final speaker of this morning's session for two reasons: First of all, his company has been very much in the news not only in our own community but in the pages of Wall Street Journal and in the world economic press. And, secondly, we would like to welcome him to our shores. He is a temporary resident of the United States, for a few months, forsaking his home in Germany to come here and help with the start up of a new company which we believe, probably, ranks #1 as the world supplier of CO2 lasers now, through the combination of former Spectra Physics Industrial Laser Division and Rofin-Sinar GMBH. Samuel Simonsson is the Chairman of the Board of Rofin-Sinar, Inc., here in the U.S. and managing director of Rofin-Sinar GMBH. It is a pleasure to welcome him.

  8. CO2 laser preionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  9. Laser welding of venotomies.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Abergel, R P; Klein, S R; Kopchok, G; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1986-08-01

    We investigated the histologic and biochemical effects of carbon dioxide and neodymium (Nd)-YAG laser welding on the healing of venotomies. Ten canine femoral venotomies 2 cm in length were approximated and welded with 10 600-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 20 to 25 s for CO2 laser, and 1060-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 30 to 40 s for Nd-YAG laser. On removal at one to three weeks, all veins (4/4 welded by CO2 and 6/6 by Nd-YAG) were patent without hematomas. Histologic and biochemical analyses of the venous tissues demonstrated active healing at the venotomy sites. We conclude that the CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers can be used successfully to weld venotomies and may provide an alternative to conventional suture techniques for repair of vascular lesions. PMID:3089196

  10. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  11. Nominal hazard distances for CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, J. A.; Tyrer, J.; Bandle, A. M.

    Several values of nominal hazard distances (NHD's) for CO2 lasers are reported for different industrial laser systems. For the same laser system the NHD is increased in welding as opposed to cutting applications because a longer focal length lens is used. In most systems the NHD decreases with decreasing laser power because the beam diameter remains approximately the same for a given laser. If the same series of lasers are compared, each with increasing maximum power output, the NHD generally increases, nonlinearly with increasing power. However, in the 1.5 kW and 3 kW region the hazard distance may decrease with increasing power. This decrease is attributed to the increase in laser beam diameter arising from the transition between TEM00 and a TEM01 mode at this point.

  12. Materials working with low power CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    While the application of high power (50-5000 W) lasers to materials working is well known, the use of low power (1-5w) CO2 lasers has received little attention. This paper presents methods of utilizing low power CO2 lasers in materials processing, such as cutting, drilling, and welding of small organic (e.g., plastic) parts. Laser hardware is discussed and the waveguide laser is presented as an example of low-power materials working hardware. This paper also reports some of the applications which are ideally-handled by low power CO2 lasers, and reviews the factors which contribute to the successful use of these lasers.

  13. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  14. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  15. Comparative study of skin welding in the rat using low-power CO2 laser beam: macroscopic observations and histologic and histochemical studies using Picrosirius red stain for collagen determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giler, Shamai; Weinberger, Avraham; Gal, Rivka; Halpern, Marissa

    1998-01-01

    In 50 rats, a full thickness abdominal skin incision was made with a CO2 laser (LI) (Kaplan PenduLaser 115) and in another group, an incision was made by a scalpel (SI). These groups were divided into 2 subgroups: a low power CO2 laser skin welding of 500 mw was used in LI and SI subgroups and, in the other, the wound was closed with nylon sutures. On the fourth postoperative day in the LI welding group, a complete dehiscence wound was formed in one animal and in the SI welding group, a partial dehiscence. After one week, a thin line of young (fresh) scar was observed with complete healing after 2 weeks. Histology revealed after four days, a deep cleft in the LI and SI welding groups and a superficial ulcer after one week and after two weeks, all groups showed complete healing. Histochemical studies (Picrosirius red stain) revealed in the first two weeks, greenish-yellow polarized colors and red-orange colors of a matured collagen in the well-formed scar. It appears that there was no delay in the healing process between the LI and SI groups and between welding and suture healing.

  16. Industrial Applications of High Power CO2 Lasers - System Descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukelberger, Armin

    1986-10-01

    The laser as a cutting tool for sheet metal cutting has beenl well accepted in industry for many years. Several hundreds of units are used for contour cutting of small and medium-sized series on plane metal sheets up to 6 mm thick. Within the last three years, cutting systems have been expanded in three ways: thicker material up to 12 mm can now be cut by using higher powered lasers (1500 W); with the introduction of flying optic systems which cover sheet dimensions up to 4 m x 3 m, the cutting of larger sized metal sheets is possible. In addition, the use of five or six axis systems allows cutting of three-dimensional plastic and metal material. Besides laser cutting, the acceptance of systems for laser welding applications is increa sing. Several systems have been running in production for a couple of years and laser wel ding will probably become the fastest growing market in laser material processing within the next five years. The laser technology is regarded as a beneficial tool for welding, whenever low heat input and, consequently, low heat distortion is requested. To day's main welding application areas are: components of car engines and transmissions, window spacer and stainless steel tube welding, and also car body welding with laser robots or five axis gantry type systems. The output power of CO2-lasers for welding applications is between 1 and 5 kw in most cases.

  17. Innovative optics for shaping and focusing industrial CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielewicz, Edward J.; Sherman, Glenn H.

    1989-03-01

    Applications of diamond-turned axicons for high power CO2 lasers are reviewed. The use of transmissive and reflective axicons in laser applications and the use of faceted optics for shaping and directing laser light are discussed. Diamond-turned ZnSe lenses are compared with conventional plano-convex and meniscus lenses. Results are presented from cutting and welding plastics and metals, noting the advantages of diamond-turned focusing elements.

  18. CO2 laser frequency multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

  19. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  20. CO2 laser beam propagation with ZnSe optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, K. H.; Liu, Yi; Holdridge, D. J.

    Beam propagation characteristics of ZnSe optics used in kiloWatt power CO2 laser aided material processing applications are determined using the Prometec Laser Beam Analyzer. The laser used was a Rofin Sinar RS6000 CO2 laser with mode aperturing. Beam power varied from 500W to 6300W and beam modes used were TEM(sub 00), TEM(sub 01), TEM(sub 10), and TEM(sub 20). Both transmissive and reflective optics were examined. The ZnSe lenses tested included meniscus, diffractive, and cylindrical lenses of 5 in. focal length and a 10 in. focal length integrating lens. Reflective optics included an integrator and a 5 in. focal length parabolic mirror for welding. Parameters obtained included beam propagation profiles, intensity profiles, depth of focus, spot size, and back focal length. A subset of the data obtained is presented here. Details of the work will appear in a full length paper.

  1. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. Rationale: The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. Conclusions: The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future. PMID:24771971

  2. ARTICLES: Physical laws governing the interaction of pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Pavlovich, Yu V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the efficiency of welding metals with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser beam of low duty ratio, at low velocities, can exceed that of welding with cw lasers and with electron beams. For the first time an investigation was made of the influence of the laser radiation parameters (energy and frequency) and of the welding velocity on the characteristics of the weld and on the shape of the weldpool. The influence of the laser radiation polarization on the efficiency of deep penetration was analyzed.

  3. Blackbody-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10420

  4. CO2 laser cutting of natural granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Mejías, A.; Soto, R.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Pardo, J.; Pou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial black granite boards (trade name: "Zimbabwe black granite") 10 mm thick, were successfully cut by a 3.5 kW CO2 laser source. Cutting quality, in terms of kerf width and roughness of the cut wall, was assessed by means of statistically planned experiments. No chemical modification of the material in the cutting walls was detected by the laser beam action. Costs associated to the process were calculated, and the main factors affecting them were identified. Results reported here demonstrate that cutting granite boards could be a new application of CO2 laser cutting machines provided a supersonic nozzle is used.

  5. Flash scanning the CO2 laser: a revival of the CO2 laser in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Elliot

    1994-09-01

    The CO2 laser has broad clinical application yet also presents a number of practical disadvantages. These drawbacks have limited the success and utilization of this laser in plastic surgery. Flashscanner technology has recently been used for char-free CO2 laser surgery of the oropharynx, the external female genital tract, and perirectal mucosa. A commercially available optomechanical flashscanner unit `Swiftlase,' was adapted to a CO2 laser and used for treatment in numerous plastic surgical applications. Conditions and situations that were treated in this study included generalized neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, rhinophyma, viral warts, breast reconstruction, and deepithelialization prior to microsurgery or local flap transfer and/or skin graft placement. There were no significant wound healing complications. Some patients previously sustained undue scarring from conventional CO2 laser surgery. Conservative, primarily ablative CO2 laser surgery with the Swiftlase has usefulness for treatment of patients in plastic surgery including those that were previously unsuccessfully treated.

  6. Effect of pulse duty cycle on Inconel 718 laser welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCay, M. H.; McCay, T. D.; Dahotre, N. B.; Sharp, C. M.; Sedghinasab, A.; Gopinathan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Crack sensitive Inconel 718 was laser pulse welded using a 3.0 kW CO2 laser. Weld shape, structure, and porosity were recorded as a function of the pulse duty cycle. Within the matrix studied, the welds were found to be optimized at a high (17 ms on, 7 ms off) duty cycle. These welds were superior in appearance and lack of porosity to both low duty cycle and CW welds.

  7. Laser weld jig

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  8. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  9. Nuclear-pumped CO2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M.

    1979-01-01

    The He-3 (n,p)T reaction was examined as an energy source for a CO2 laser. For this purpose He-3 was added to a functioning CO2 electrically excited laser. Initially the laser was run electrically with 12 torr total pressure. The gas mixture was 1:1:8, CO2:N2:He. At zero reactor power, the laser was tested in place next to the core of the Georgia Tech. Research Reactor. After verification of laser action He-3 was added to the system. The He-3 partial pressures of 10 torr, 50 torr, and 300 torr were added in three separate reactor runs. Reactor power ranged from zero to 5 million watts, which corresponds to a peak flux of 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. At reactor powers greater than 10 kW, gain of up to 30 percent was shown. However, indications are this may be due to gamma excitation rather than caused by the He-3 (n,p)T reaction. These results do agree with the data of past CO2 nuclear pumped laser experiments.

  10. Lasers for welding and their potential in production at GE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marshall G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser technology has been used in manufacturing in industry since the late 1960s. Industry and GE businesses have leverage laser welding for productivity gains, cost savings, and quality. The presentation will high light several laser-based welding applications, old and new. Applications will include the welding of refractory materials (e.g. Mo and Nb) for lighting products; 40 foot long fuel rods are welded with 2 kW fiber lasers for the nuclear business; head-liner welding for the diesel engine for locomotives (14 kW fiber laser replaced CO2 laser); and X-ray components are welded in a two-station 11kW fiber laser (EB welding replaced by laser). The three fiber laser applications were all transitioned into GE businesses during 2011 and it demonstrates the emergence of fiber laser welding being used in GE for manufacturing, processing.

  11. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process. PMID:18557404

  12. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  13. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  14. CO2 laser therapy of rhinophyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Peggy; Jovanovic, Sergije; Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.

    2000-06-01

    Laser treatment of skin changes has become common practice in recent years. High absorption of the CO2 laser wavelength in water is responsible for its low penetration dpt in biological tissue. Shortening the tissue exposure time minimizes thermic side effects of laser radiation such as carbonization and coagulation. This can be achieved with scanner systems that move the focused laser beam over a defined area by microprocessor-controlled rapidly rotating mirrors. This enables controlled and reliable removal of certain dermal lesions, particularly hypertrophic scars, scars after common acne, wrinkles and rhinophyma. Laser ablation of rhinophyma is a stress-minimizing procedure for the surgeon and the patient, since it is nearly bloodless and can be performed under local anaesthesia. Cosmetically favorable reepithelization of the lasered surfaces is achieved within a very short period of time.

  15. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  16. Pulpotomies with CO2 laser in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Jose A. P.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Gioso, Marco A.; Pesce, Hildeberto F.; Jatene, Adib D.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of dental pulps submitted to shallow pulpotomy followed by CO2 laser radiation at five different procedures. For this purpose, initially 66 dogs' teeth were opened and about 2 or 3 mm of coronal dental pulp was removed. Continuous irrigation with saline solution was implemented. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 11 each. After cessation of bleeding, in group I, CO2 laser (Xanar-20, USA) was irradiated for 1 second at a power of 5 watts; in group II, 2 seconds at 3 watts; in Group III, 2 seconds at 5 watts; in Group IV, 1 second at 3 watts; in Group V, a continuous mode at 3 watts; Group VI served as a control, with no laser irradiation. The results showed no clinical differences between the 3 W and 5 W powers. Time period of irradiation exposition influenced definitively the clinical appearance of the dental pulps. Groups I and IV (1 second) were unable to stop the bleeding, which persisted over 15 minutes for all teeth. This may be due to the intense heat generated by CO2 laser, causing vasodilatation. Groups II and III displayed a similar appearance, but bleeding stopped in about 10 minutes. Group V (continuous mode) had no bleeding after irradiation, but a plasma-like liquid would come out for almost 2 minutes. When comparing to the control (Group VI), all the pulps would assume a jelly-like aspect, with black granulated tissue on the surface, covering totally the pulps of Group V and partially the other groups. The histological results will be discussed in a further study. From the data obtained, it seems that CO2 laser irradiation for pulpotomies should be done in a continuous mode, for clinical convenience in terms of time taken and effective irradiation.

  17. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  18. Fire hazards and CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Wald, D; Michelow, B J; Guyuron, B; Gibb, A A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fire risk of laser resurfacing in the presence of supplemental oxygen. This study aims at defining safety parameters of variables such as laser energy level, oxygen flow rate, and "oxygen to laser target distance" when oxygen is delivered through a nasal cannula or nasopharyngeal tube. The typical operating room environment was simulated in the laboratory using the Yucatan minipig animal model. The energy source was a Coherent Ultrapulse CO2 laser. It was found that combustion did not occur at laser settings of 500 mJ, 50 W, 100 kHz, and a density of 5, used in conjunction with an oxygen flow rate of 6 liter/minute with the target area as close as 0.5 cm to the oxygen delivery. A total of 400 computer pattern generator treatments were delivered using this energy setting without observation of any combustion (p < 0.001). This provides evidence that while using even somewhat high laser settings and oxygen flow rate, laser induced fires can be avoided. We conclude that use of the laser in the presence of oxygen is safe, provided the target area is free of combustible fuels. Despite this assurance, laser mishaps are serious because they lead to both morbidity and mortality. It is our recommendation that close attention be constantly paid to all details, thus reducing the hazard potential of laser energy on local factors in an oxygen-rich environment. PMID:9427936

  19. Effects of contaminants in CO2 lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, N. S.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical model which includes the effects of contaminants is developed for the high flow electric discharge CO2-N2-He laser. The model couples the excitation and relaxation processes, CO2 dissociation, and negative ion formation with the flow processes. An analysis of the effects of CO, O2, NO, and N2O impurities on the average small signal gain is presented. CO decreases the gain by collisional depopulation of the upper laser level, and O2, NO, and N2O reduce the gain by decreasing the electron density by forming stable negative ions. In particular, N2O exhibits a strong quenching effect because of its large dissociation cross section for the formation of O(-).

  20. [Voice quality following CO2 laser cordectomy].

    PubMed

    Höfler, H; Bigenzahn, W

    1986-11-01

    The voice of patients after CO2 laser cordectomy was evaluated by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The results proved to be closely concordant, the main result being a slight or medium degree of dysphonia. Severe dysphonia or aphonia occurred in about one fifth of patients. This result is somewhat inferior to radiotherapy, but superior to standard translaryngeal cordectomy. Yanagihara's sonegraphic classification of dysphonia is recommendable for future comparative studies. PMID:3807602

  1. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  2. Atmospheric effects on CO2 laser propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.; Bilbro, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was made of the losses encountered in the propagation of CO2 laser radiation through the atmosphere, particularly as it applies to the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Pulsed Laser Doppler System. As such it addresses three major areas associated with signal loss: molecular absorption, refractive index changes in a turbulent environment, and aerosol absorption and scattering. In particular, the molecular absorption coefficients of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrous oxide are calculated for various laser lines in the region of 10.6 mu m as a function of various pressures and temperatures. The current status in the physics of low-energy laser propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is presented together with the analysis and evaluation of the associated heterodyne signal power loss. Finally, aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients are calculated for various aerosol distributions and the results incorporated into the signal-to-noise ratio equation for the Marshall Space Flight Center system.

  3. CO2 laser oscillators for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the spectral purity, frequency stability, and long-term stabilization of newly developed CO2 isotope lasers. Extremely high spectral purity, and short-term stability of less than 1.5 x 10 to the -13th have been achieved. A brief description on using CO2 isotope lasers as secondary frequency standards and in optical radar is given. The design and output characteristics of a single frequency, TEM00q mode, variable pulse width, hybrid TE CO2 laser system is also described. The frequency chirp in the output has been measured and almost completely eliminated by means of a novel technique.

  4. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  5. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  6. Ultraviolet photoionization in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1988-07-01

    The effects of gas composition and spark parameters on the UV emission in CO2 TEA laser gas mixtures were investigated together with the nature of photoionization process and the photoelectron-loss mechanism. A linear relationship was found between N2 concentration and photoionization (with no such dependence on C concentration, from CO and CO2), but the increases in photoionization that could be effected by optimizing the spark discharge circuit parameters were much higher than those produced by changes in gas composition. UV emission was directly proportional to the amount of stored electrical energy in the spark-discharge circuit and to the cube of the peak current produced in the spark by the discharge of this energy. Photoionization was also found to be proportional to the spark electrode gap. It was found that free-space sparks gave a considerably broader emission pattern than a surface-guided notched spark.

  7. CO2 laser ranging systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design and error performance of a CO2 laser ranging system are analyzed. Ranging signal and subsystem processing alternatives are identified, and their comprehensive evaluation yields preferred candidate solutions which are analyzed to derive range and range rate error contributions. The performance results are presented in the form of extensive tables and figures which identify the ranging accuracy compromises as a function of the key system design parameters and subsystem performance indexes. The ranging errors obtained are noted to be within the high accuracy requirements of existing NASA/GSFC missions with a proper system design.

  8. [Laryngomalacia treated with CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Larsen, Dalia Gustaityté; Berg, Jette Scheby; Illum, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common laryngeal anomaly which causes inspiratory stridor in newborns. The disease is usually self-limiting and resolves before the age of two years. We present a case of severe laryngomalacia with feeding disorder and airway obstruction which needed surgical management--supraglottoplasty. The shortened aryepiglottic folds were incised using CO(2) laser and jet ventilation. The patient was observed at the hospital for one week after surgery and discharged. Four weeks after treatment, the patient was free of airway obstruction and feeding problems. PMID:20594541

  9. High-speed laser welding of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, J. P.; Abreu, M. A.; Pires, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    Laser welding of plastic materials has a large field of applications in the packaging industry provided that it can compete, in quality and productivity, with currently used industrial methods. Welding of white and transparent thin films of polypropylene and polyethylene of low and high density at high speeds of 20 m s -1 using a CO 2 laser has been studied experimentally.` The weld process has been characterised by the specific energy required for each thickness, kind of plastic and the resistance of the weld seam. The influence of the dimensions of the laser beam spot on weld strength has also been analysed.

  10. Spaceborne CO2 laser communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. H.; Mcavoy, N.; Johnson, E. H.; Goodwin, F. E.; Peyton, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Projections of the growth of earth-sensing systems for the latter half of the 1980's show a data transmission requirement of 300 Mbps and above. Mission constraints and objectives lead to the conclusion that the most efficient technique to return the data from the sensing satellite to a ground station is through a geosynchronous data relay satellite. Of the two links that are involved (sensing satellite to relay satellite and relay satellite to ground), a laser system is most attractive for the space-to-space link. The development of CO2 laser systems for space-to-space applications is discussed with the completion of a 300 Mpbs data relay receiver and its modification into a transceiver. The technology and state-of-the-art of such systems are described in detail.

  11. Suture-free laser-assisted vessel repair using CO2 laser and liquid albumin solder.

    PubMed

    Wolf-de Jonge, Ingrid C D Y M; Heger, Michal; van Marle, Jan; Balm, Ron; Beek, Johan F

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the use of proteinic solders during laser-assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) and repair (LAVR) can significantly increase welding strength, but these studies combined solder-mediated LAVA/R with the use of stay sutures, thereby defeating its purpose. In an in vitro study, we examined the leaking point pressures (LPPs) and histological damage profile of porcine carotid arteries following albumin solder-mediated CO(2) LAVR without the use of sutures. Longitudinal arteriotomies (9.1+/-0.8 mm in length) were sheathed with 25% liquid bovine serum albumin solder, and LAVR was performed using a micromanipulator-controlled CO(2) laser operating at 170-mW power and 1.25-mm spot size in continuous wave mode. The welding regime consisted of a transversal zigzag pass followed by one or two longitudinal zigzag passes, producing an irradiance of 13.9 W/cm(2) and energies of 10.5 J and 11.3 J per mm weld, respectively. LPPs were measured by the fluid infusion technique, and histological analysis was performed with light, fluorescence, and polarization microscopy. The LPP of the two-pass welds was 351+/-158 mmHg versus 538+/-155 mmHg for the three-pass welds. Thermal damage was confined primarily to the adventitial layers, with limited heat diffusion into the media below the solder around the coaptation interface. PMID:19021359

  12. Auto adaptative laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Coste, F.; Fabbro, R.; Douay, D.; Sabatier, L.; Lacote, D.

    1996-12-31

    The weld preparation in a laboratory environment for laser welding concerning edge misalignments, edge or gap preparation is no longer valid for industrial configurations where these different parameters are not accurately controlled. Therefore in that case, the achievement of consistent qualities of processing, requires the use of sensors for seam tracking and gap recognition. The authors discuss here preliminary experiments involving the use of these elements in order to pilot a scanning head in view of strongly reducing the precision requirements for gap preparation. This set-up is the first step in the development of an auto-adaptative device for laser welding which will be composed of seam tracking and recognition sensors, scanning laser head and a filler wire device.

  13. Laser welding control by monitoring of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Rihakova, Lenka; Nozka, Libor

    2013-04-01

    Deep penetration welding is a typical industrial application of high power lasers, where plasma can be generated above the keyhole. Thanks to the plasma plume presence welding process can be controlled on-line by means of the plasma intensity measurements. Various on-line monitoring methods have been developed in research centers all over the world. Goal of them is to enable promptly operator action to avoid enormous economical looses if un-expected defect is detected. Our laboratory was participated in project CLET - "Closed loop control of the laser welding process through the measurement of plasma" as a responsible partner for developed system testing both in the laboratory with pulsed Nd:YAG laser and in the real welding facility with high power continual CO2 laser. Control system is based on the electron temperature computation from the relative intensities of couple of emission lines belong to certain metal ion present in plasma plume. Our experiment was realized using Ocean Optics HR2000+ spectrometer within the stainless steel tube longitudinal welding. Several couples of emission lines were tested to acquire a good signal at actual welding conditions. Then power calibration was made to obtain the electron temperature dependence on increasing power. Samples were prepared for microanalysis and measured by laser confocal scanning microscope to find optimal power range for full penetrations achieving without thermal distortion of the tube or weld humping. Numerical model of the remelted area cross section was made to display temperature distribution dependence on increasing power.

  14. Aluminum laser welding optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčková, Hana; Halenka, Viktor; Lapšanská, Hana; Havelková, Martina

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser with maximal power 150 W is used in our laboratory to cut, drill and weld metal and non-metal thin materials to thickness 2 mm. Welding is realized by fixed processing head or movable fiber one with beam diameter 0,6 mm in focus plane. Welding of stainless and low-carbon steel was tested before and results are publicized and used in practice. Now the goal of our experiment was optimization of process parameters for aluminum that has other physical properties than steels, lower density, higher heat conductivity and surface reflexivity. Pure alumina specimen 0,8 mm and Al-Mg-Si alloy 0,5 mm prepared for butt welds. Problem with surface layer of Al IIO 3 was overcome by sanding and chemical cleaning with grinding paste. Critical parameters for good weld shape are specimen position from beam focus plane, pulse length and energy, pulse frequency and the motion velocity that determines percentage of pulse overlap. Argon as protective gas was used with speed 6 liters per second. Thermal distribution in material can be modeled by numerical simulation. Software tool SYSWELD makes possible to fit laser as surface heat source, define weld geometry, and make meshing of specimen to finite elements and compute heat conduction during process. Color isotherms, vectors, mechanical deformations and others results can be study in post-processing.

  15. Anterior capsulotomy using the CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Adiel; Ma-Naim, Tova; Rosner, Mordechai; Eyal, Ophir; Belkin, Michael

    1998-06-01

    Continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) is the preferred technique for removal of the anterior capsule during cataract surgery due to this technique assuring accurate centration of the intraocular lens. During modern cataract surgery, especially with small or foldable intra ocular lenses, centration of the lens is obligatory. Radial tears at the margin of an anterior capsulotomy may be associated with the exit of at least one loop of an intraocular lens out of the capsular bag ('pea pod' effect) and its subsequent decentration. The anterior capsule is more likely to ream intact if the continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) technique is used. Although manual capsulorhexis is an ideal anterior capsulectomy technique for adults, many ophthalmologists are still uncomfortable with it and find it difficult to perform, especially in complicated cases such as these done behind small pupil, cataract extraction in children and pseudoexfoliation syndrome. We have developed a technique using a CO2 laser system for safe anterior capsulotomy and tested it in animal eyes.

  16. Plywood Inlays Thourgh CO2 Laser Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Margarida C.; Araujo, J. L.; Teixeira, M. Ribau; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-07-01

    Furniture with inlays is rather expensive. This is so on two accounts: Firstly, furniture with inlays is generally manufactured with solid wood.Secondly,wood carving and figure cutting are both time consuming and they produce a high rate of rejections. To add to it all the cutting and carving of minute figures requires an outstanding craftmanship. In fact the craftman is in most instance the artist and also the manufacturer. While desiring that the high artistic level is maintained in the industry the search for new method to produce inlays for furniture in not son expensive materials and to produce them in a repetitive and flexible way laser cutting of plywood was found to be quite suitable. This paper presents the charts for CO2 laser cutting of both positive and negatives in several types of plywood. The main problem is not so much the cutting of the positive and negatives pieces but to be able to cut the piece in a way that the fitting is done without any problems caused by the ever present charring effect, which takes palce at the edges of the cut pieces. To minimise this aspect positive and negative pieces have to be cut under stringent focusing conditions and with slight different scales. The condittions for our machine are presented.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  18. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  19. Laser welding of rat's facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Lee, Chang Hyun

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare regeneration of the severed nerves that were repaired by laser welding with those repaired by microsurgical suturing and evaluate the value in use of laser nerve welding in the head and neck area. In 12 rats the buccal branches of the facial nerves on the both sides were transected, and CO2 laser welding of the epineurium was performed on the right side and microsurgical suture technique was applied on the left side. In six rats Cholera Toxin B Subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the nerve anastomosis site at postoperative week 4. Another six rats were treated exactly in the same way in postoperative week 8. Six normal rats were used as controls. Intact facial nerve was observed after injection of CTb as well. Neurons of facial nuclei labeled positively by CTb were detected immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. CTb-positive neurons in the control group were 1311 +/- 258 (n = 6). CTb-positive neurons in the group (n = 6) with laser nerve welding were 1174 +/- 122 in postoperative week 4 and 1562 +/- 565 in postoperative week 8. CTb-positive neurons in the group (n = 6) with microsurgical suture were 1066 +/- 89 in postoperative week 4 and 1443 +/- 531 in postoperative week 8. CTb-positive neurons were seen significantly more in the group with laser welding than in the group with microsurgical suture in postoperative week (P = 0.028), but there was not much difference in postoperative week 8 (P = 0.463). None of 12 rats showed dehiscence at the nerve anastomosis done by laser welding. This study shows that nerve regeneration is more apparent in the nerve repaired by laser welding than in that repaired by microsurgical suture. PMID:16327562

  20. Blackbody pumped N2-CO2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Young, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The power and intrinsic efficiency of a small N2-CO2 fluid mixing transfer laser has been measured. Powers of 1.4 watts and intrinsic efficiencies for 0.7 percent were found for N2 oven temperatures of 1473 K. Laser output was optimized for He, CO2 and N2 partial pressures, output mirror reflectivity, nozzle diameter and oven temperature.

  1. CO 2-laser photoacoustic detection of gaseous n-pentylacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herecová, Lenka; Hejzlar, Tomáš; Pavlovský, Jiří; Míček, Dalibor; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Janečková, Radmila; Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, Petr; Střižík, Michal; Klouda, Karel; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2009-07-01

    The absorption spectra of gaseous n-pentylacetate were investigated by FT IR spectroscopy as well as CO 2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for simulation of the dispersion of a nerve agent (sarin) within a modeled atmospheric boundary layer. Three CO 2-laser emission lines were used for photoacoustic detection of n-pentylacetate with detection limit in the range of 1-3 ppm.

  2. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  3. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  4. Clinical evaluation of tumor promotion by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Robert E.; Liebow, Charles

    1991-05-01

    Cancer promotion by CO2 laser surgery is known to occur in animal models. It is not clear whether these observations are relevant to human disease. To test this, a series of 21 patients with oral lesions treated with CO2 laser surgery were followed for 2 weeks to 32 months with a mean of 10.2 months. Following laser surgery, 83% of lesions presenting as leukoplakia recurred, whereas no recurrences were observed amongst other lesions. This supports the hypothesis that growth factors released in response to CO2 laser surgery could promote cancers in patients with initiated lesions.

  5. Treatment of Bartholin gland cyst with CO2 laser

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Neila Maria de Góis; Boechat, Karol Pereira Ruela; dos Santos, Georgia Mouzinho Lima; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the results of treatment with CO2 laser for Bartholin gland cysts. Methods Thirty-one women with Bartholin gland cysts were treated with CO2 laser at an outpatient´s setting. Skin incision was performed with focused laser beam, the capsule was opened to drain mucoid content, followed by internal vaporization of impaired capsule. Results There were no complications. Five patients had recurrence of the cyst and were submitted to a second and successful session. Conclusion CO2 laser surgery was effective to treat Bartholin gland cysts with minimal or no complications, and can be performed at an outpatient´s setting. PMID:27074230

  6. Laser welding of thermoplastic materials.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, F A; Jones, I A

    2001-06-01

    The capabilities of the three main types of laser are compared and a new technique is introduced, which laser welds plastics using an infrared absorber to create a joint that is almost invisible to the human eye. PMID:11488201

  7. Clinical effects of CO2 laser on equine diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, Arne; Svensson, Ulf; Collinder, Eje

    2002-10-01

    CO2 lasers has been used for five years at Malaren Equine Hospital, as an alternative treatment of some equine diseases. The application of CO2 laser has been studied for evaluation of its appropriateness for treatment of the equine diseases sarcoids, lameness in fetlock joints or pulmonary haemorrhage. During the last five years, above 100 equine sarcoids have been removed by laser surgery (CO2 laser) and so far resulting in significantly few recurrences compared with results from usual excision surgery. In one study, acute traumatic arthritis in fetlock joints was treated three times every second day with defocalised CO2 laser. The therapeutic effectiveness of CO2 laser in this study was better than that of the customary therapy with betamethasone plus hyaluronan. During one year, chronic pulmonary bleeders, namely exercise induced pulmonary haemorrhage, has been treated with defocalised CO2 laser. Six race horses have been treated once daily during five days. Until now, three of these horses have subsequently been successfully racing and no symptoms of pulmonary haemorrhage have been observed. These studies indicate that CO2 laser might be an appropriate therapy on sarcoids and traumatic arthritis, and probably also on exercise induced pulmonary haemorrhage. Other treatments for this pulmonary disease are few.

  8. CO2 LASERS IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-12-03

    Several proof-of-principle laser accelerator experiments turned a long-wavelength of a CO{sub 2} laser to advantage. Ongoing advancement to multi-terawatt femtosecond CO{sub 2} lasers opens new venues for next-generation laser acceleration research.

  9. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  10. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  11. Thermal injuries as a result of CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A R; Majidian, A M; Grossman, P H

    1998-09-01

    CO2 laser resurfacing of the face for fine wrinkles has gained great popularity over a short period of time. The use of the CO2 laser has proven to be effective in reducing or eliminating fine wrinkles. This tool in the surgeon's armamentarium has been added to those of dermabrasion and chemical peel. The theoretical advantage of the use of the CO2 laser for resurfacing has been better accuracy and reportedly more control of the depth of penetration. The use of the CO2 laser has been welcomed by many cosmetic surgeons. Until now, there have been few reported cases of complications with the use of the CO2 laser. To many, this would sound too good to be true; unfortunately, that is the case. The CO2 laser is a high-energy machine that can indeed cause thermal injury. This thermal injury can result in deep burns to the skin and hypertrophic scarring. We feel this is more common than is currently being reported, and we share our experience as a burn and wound care referral service. During an 18-month period, 20 consecutive patients were referred to our practice who had received injuries from the CO2 laser resurfacing laser. We present here in this review a summary of those injuries. The CO2 resurfacing laser is a very effective tool for the treatment of fine wrinkles, but it is not without the potential for serious complications. We urge caution with the use of the laser and prompt recognition and treatment of thermal injury to the skin. PMID:9734452

  12. Copper Gas Diffusers For Purging Line-Focus Laser Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonteyne, Steve L.; Hosking, Timothy J.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1996-01-01

    Modified flow diffusers built for inert-gas purging of welds made with 5-kW CO(2) lasers operating with line-focus optics in conduction mode instead of with point-focus optics in customary keyhole mode. Diffusers made of copper components brazed together, robust enough to withstand strong reflections of line-focused laser energy.

  13. CO2 lasers and applications II; Proceedings of the Third European Congress on Optics, The Hague, Netherlands, Mar. 12-14, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opower, Hans (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in CO2 laser technology and its applications are examined. Topics discussed include the excitation of CO2 lasers by microwave discharge, a compact RF-excited 12-kW CO2 laser, a robotic laser for three-dimensional cutting and welding, three-dimensional CO2-laser material processing with gantry machine systems, and a comparison of hollow metallic waveguides and optical fibers for transmitting CO2-laser radiation. Consideration is given to an aerodynamic window with a pump cavity and a supersonic jet, cutting and welding Al using a high-repetition-rate pulsed CO2 laser, speckle reduction in CO2 heterodyne laser radar systems, high-power-laser float-zone crystal growth, melt dynamics in surface processing with laser radiation, laser hardfacing, surface melting of AlSi10Mg with CO2 laser radiation, material processing with Cu-vapor lasers, light-induced flow at a metal surface, and absorption measurements in high-power CW CO2-laser processing of materials.

  14. Treatment of congenital melanocytic naevi with CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Horner, Ben M; El-Muttardi, Naguib S; Mayou, Bryan J

    2005-09-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of CO2 laser in treating congenital melanocytic naevi (CMN). A retrospective review of 12 patients with CMN treated with CO2 laser was carried out. In all cases, there was minimal visible naevus after treatment. Six patients developed hypertrophic scarring; this was significantly more likely following CO2 laser treatment on the anterior torso, flanks, or arms than on the back or buttocks (P = 0.01, 1-tailed Fisher exact test). We conclude that CO2 laser is an effective treatment for reducing visible pigmentation of CMN. However, it can cause hypertrophic scarring, which has not been reported before. This risk can be reduced by limited use in areas of the body where the dermis is thinner or there is a known risk of hypertrophic scarring. In addition, the cautious use of paint mode and prophylactic use of pressure or silicon dressings may also reduce the risk of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:16106167

  15. 367 cases of CO2 laser therapy on facial acne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunqing; Liu, Songhao; Zhang, You; Liu, T. C.

    1996-09-01

    Since 1989, we have cured 367 persons of facial acne of different course by using direct irradiation of high-power CO2 laser combing with operative therapy of low-power CO2 laser. The cure rate is 100 percent. In this paper, we stated the therapeutic approach. It was shown that this therapeutic approach is simple and effective, and its recurrence rate is zero. There are no cicatrices after healing. It is easy to accept it, and is worthy of extension.

  16. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  17. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  18. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  19. Circumcision using CO2 laser: report of 860 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen B.; Chen, Zi-Fu; Zhan, Tian-qi; Gao, Xiang-Xun; Huang, Chao

    1993-03-01

    Eight-hundred-sixty cases of circumcision using CO2 laser are reported. The age of patients ranged from 9 - 65 years, with a mean age of 23.8 years. The technique was simple and can be quickly accomplished by a single operator. After local anesthesia the glans penis was protected by a protector. Then, circumcision was performed with a CO2 laser -- HeNe laser combined machine. There was an HeNe laser aiming system in this machine thus the surgeon had a three-dimensional visible indicator of the incision. The focusing CO2 laser beam was used for cutting the prepuce during the operation. There was almost no operative bleeding. All the patients needed no antibiotic postoperatively. Complications were minimal and satisfactory results were achieved.

  20. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  1. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  2. CO2 laser in revision stapes surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Sergije; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Scherer, Hans H.

    1997-05-01

    Successful restoration of audition in revision stapedotomies involves precise identification and correction of the pathological condition without traumatizing the inner ear. Conventional surgical procedures often lead to unsatisfactory audition results and inner ear damages. In revision stapedotomy, the carbon-dioxide laser provides the ear surgeon with three important advantages over the conventional technique: (1) improved diagnostic and therapeutic precision, (2) better stabilization of the new prosthesis in the oval niche, and (3) reduction of inner ear trauma through non- contact atraumatic management. The surgical procedure of revision stapedotomies with the carbon dioxide laser is discussed, and case examples are used to illustrate the diversity of pathological conditions that can be treated by carbon-dioxide laser surgery. Our experience with revision carbon-dioxide laser stapedotomy suggests an improvement of postoperative audition compared to the conventional technique and demonstrates a significant elimination of sensorineural deafness. The carbon-dioxide laser enables the ear surgeon to precisely and reliably correct conduction deafness recurring after stapedotomy.

  3. Clinical application of CO2 laser in periodontal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Yasuhiro

    1994-09-01

    CO2 lasers in particular are expected to have many dental applications because the CO2 laser beam exhibits strong tissue transpirative actions, such as instant coagulation, carbonization, and vaporization, and because its wavelength at 10.6 micrometers is fully absorbed by water so that the ability to make precise incisions with a high degree of safety is excellent, without damaging the deep tissues. However, clinical application of the CO2 laser has been slowed since a fiber which can conduct the laser beam to the oral cavity has only recently developed. This new fiber is an extremely flexible fiber with a minimum bending radius of 20 mm and utilizes pulse wave modes that have improved the handling characteristics in the mouth, and this has enabled us to apply the CO2 laser to a variety of periodontal conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 lasers for the early treatment of inflammation and pain relief of acute periodontitis, curettage of periodontal pockets, healing after excision of gingiva, and early improvement of gingivitis.

  4. High temperature corrosion of welded ferritic stainless steel in flowing CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2013-05-01

    The high temperature corrosion of welded structure of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) in flowing Ar-75%CO2 gas at 700°C has been investigated. The welded structure of FSS joint using ER 308L filler metal by GTAW. The soundness of welded joint has been clarified by X-Ray CT Scan. Prior the high temperature exposure, the welded FSS compulsory passed the standard of ASME. The welded structure of FSS was heated in flowing CO2 gas for 50 h at 1 atm. The morphology and microstructure of oxide formation on welded FSS alloy was characterized by using SEM. The result shows that the different oxide morphologies were observed on parent and fusion metal. The formation of different oxide and element properties at the interface were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction. The differences of the physical condition and morphology microstructure of welded and parent metal were observed to respond to different exposure times. This phenomenon perhaps explained due to the differences of the minor alloying elements on both parent and filler metals. The high temperature corrosion behaviour was discussed in details in this paper regarding on the physical properties, morphology and the microstructure.

  5. [Treatment of benign laryngeal diseases using a CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Betka, J; Klozar, J; Kasík, P; Taudy, M; Tichý, S

    1989-05-01

    CO2 laser surgery is becoming a part of larynx surgery. The authors inform about their experience in benign larynx tumours treatment. They present analysis of concrete therapeutic procedures in individual larynx affections. They conclude that laser surgery is an advantegous method for benign larynx tumours treatment. PMID:2772545

  6. [Effect of pulsed CO2-laser irradiation on bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Kholodnov, S E

    1985-01-01

    Different dynamic effects on biological tissue caused by pulsed laser radiation are described. It is shown that the parameters of these effects which take place on the bone tissue affected by pulsed CO2-laser radiation are directly dependent on the parameters of these pulses and may be predicted for any concrete application. PMID:3931698

  7. A blackbody radiation-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.; Deyoung, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

  8. LaRC-developed catalysts for CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Kielin, Erik J.; Miller, Irvin M.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many remote sensing applications from space, airborne, and ground platforms. The NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) system will be designed to measure wind velocities from polar earth orbit for a period of up to three years. Accordingly, this and other applications require a closed-cycle pulsed CO2 laser which necessitates the use of an efficient CO-O2 recombination catalyst for these dissociation products which otherwise would degrade the laser operation. The required catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but also must operate efficiently for long time periods. The research effort at NASA LaRC has centered around development and testing of CO oxidation catalysts for closed-cycle, pulsed, common and rare-isotope CO2 lasers. Researchers examined available commercial catalysts both in a laser and under simulated closed-cycle laser conditions with efforts aimed toward a thorough understanding of the fundamental catalytic reaction. These data were used to design and synthesize new catalyst compositions to better meet the catalyst requirements for closed-cycle pulsed CO2 lasers. Syntheses and test results for catalysts developed at Langley Research Center which have significantly better long-term decay characteristics than previously available catalysts and at the same time operate quite well under lower temperature conditions are discussed.

  9. Intracavity CdTe modulators for CO2 lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, J. E.; Nussmeier, T. A.; Goodwin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of cadmium telluride as an electrooptic material for intracavity modulation of CO2 lasers is described. Included are the predicted and measured effects of CdTe intracavity modulators on laser performance. Coupling and frequency modulation are discussed and experimental results compared with theoretically predicted performance for both techniques. Limitations on the frequency response of the two types of modulation are determined.

  10. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Farid E; Habre, Maya B; Helou, Josiane F; Tohme, Roland G; Tomb, Roland R

    2016-01-01

    Skin grafts are widely used in reconstructive and plastic surgery, leaving an inevitable scar appearance on the body, affecting the quality of life of the patients. Fractional ablative lasers have become a leading procedure for the treatment of acne and burn scars. We report a case of a skin graft showing excellent improvement in overall appearance after three sessions of fractional CO2 laser. The undamaged tissue left between the microthermal treatment zones is responsible of collagen formation and reepithelialization. Remodeling and collagen formation are observed even 6 months after a fractional CO2 laser session. PMID:26052811

  11. [The CO2 laser in stomatology. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Michael M; Suter, Valérie G A; Stauffer, Edouard; Buser, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The second part of this review presents and discusses evidence in the recent literature for the application of the CO2 laser for the therapy of stomatologic lesions. Clinical outcomes and complications for the use of the CO2 laser are presented for the following stomatological conditions: leukoplakia, lichen planus, benign soft-tissue and salivary gland tumors, reactive soft tissue changes (i.e., fibroepithelial polyps), recurrent aphthous stomatitis, drug-induced gingival hyperplasia, mucous extravasation and mucous retention cysts, herpes simplex virus-induced lesions, maxillary midline frenum, and ankyloglossia (tongue-tie). This review outlines indications in which the CO2 laser is the treatment method of choice and in which situations the laser has still to be applied with caution. PMID:12956039

  12. [Removal of tattoos by CO2 laser and acetic acid].

    PubMed

    Di Quirico, R; Pallini, G; Di Domenicantonio, G; Astolfi, A; Bindi, F; Gianfelice, F

    1992-10-31

    The Authors pay attention to small tattoo removal by means of the utilization of the CO2 laser. Moreover, the Authors emphasize the drawback of double treatment which, usually, the patient suffers in tattoo removal by CO2 laser. Then, the pressure of the Authors is small sized tattoo removal in only one sitting achieving so an excellent esthetic result. Besides, the Authors, in this medical study, explains two methods for tattoo removal. In the study's results, the Authors describes the manner and the time of the two lesion recovery by the different manners of treatment. Finally, the Authors affirms the great consequence of the surgical CO2 laser, they don't fail, however, to affirm that the laser and acetic acid combination is an excellent procedure for small tattoo removal. PMID:1480288

  13. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  14. Use of CO2 laser and AgClBr infrared transmitting fibers for tympanoplasty: experiments on animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilker, Zeev; Daykhovsky, Leon; Nageris, Ben I.; Feinmesser, R.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Ravid, Avi; Kariv, Naam; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-06-01

    One of the most common ear disease is Chronic Otitis Media that leads to a tympanic membrane perforation. The treatment of this condition is by a surgical procedure, tympanoplasty that is often done under local or general anesthesia. During this procedure an autologous fascia is applied to close the perforation. Commonly, fixation of the fascia is achieved mostly by Gel-Form. During the last several years various fascia fixation techniques were suggested. These included a welding procedure based on using an Argon laser. The disadvantages of the latter is that the visible Argon laser is not absorbed well by the relatively thin tympanic membrane and the fascia. It does not lead to strong weld and it may heat the middle of the ear, causing neural hearing loss. The CO2 laser IR radiation is much more suitable for welding of these thin tissues, because of its very high absorption in tissues. There is still a need to deliver this radiation to the weld site using a thin and flexible optical fiber. In this work we have welded fascia on the tympanic membranes of guinea pigs using a CO2 laser. Holes of diameter 2-3 mm were punctured in the membranes and apiece of fascia was placed on the holes. Laser power of the order of 0.5W was delivered to the fascia using an IR transmitting AgClBr fiber. In experiments done on 11 animals and CO2 laser welding was successfully done on in 15 years. The success of these preliminary studies in the animal models shows that CO2 laser tympanoplasty could be a very valuable surgical technique.

  15. Enhanced transmission in CO(2)-laser-aerosol interactions.

    PubMed

    Kwok, H S; Rossi, T M; Lau, W S; Shaw, D T

    1988-03-01

    The transmission characteristics of a high-power CO(2)-laser beam through a single water aerosol particle are studied. It is found that before the onset of plasma formation there is a sizable range of laser intensity where the medium becomes almost totally transparent. A plausible argument for this induced transparency is given in terms of particle disintegration. This effect may have applications in laser atmospheric propagation. PMID:19742024

  16. Endoscopic removal of PMMA in hip revision surgery with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazy, John; Kollmer, Charles; Uppal, Gurvinder S.; Lane, Gregory J.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1991-05-01

    Purpose: to compare CO2 laser to mechanical means of PMMA removal in total hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients requiring hip revision surgery were studied and compared to historical controls. Cement was removed from the femoral canal utilizing a 30 centimeter laparoscope. A CO2 laser waveguide was passed through the laparoscope into the femoral canal and a TV camera was placed over the eye piece to permit visualization of the depths of the femoral canal on a video monitor. The leg was placed in a horizontal position which avoided the pooling of blood or saline in the depths of the femur. Under direct vision the distal plug could be vaporized with a 40 centimeter CO2 laser waveguide. Power settings of 20 to 25 watts and a superpulsed mode were used. A 2 mm suction tube was welded to the outside of the laparoscope permitting aspiration of the products of vaporization. Results: Of 45 hip revisions there were no shaft perforation, fractures or undue loss of bone stock. There was no statistically different stay in hospital time, blood loss or operative time between the CO2 revision group compared to the non-laser revision group, in which cement was removed by mechanical methods. Conclusions: Mechanical methods used in removing bone cement using high speed burrs, reamers, gouges, and osteotomies is technically difficult and fraught with complications including shaft fracture, perforations, and unnecessary loss of bone stock. The authors' experience using the CO2 laser in hip revision surgery has permitted the removal of bone cement. Use of a modified laparoscope has allowed for precise, complete removal of bone cement deep within the femoral shaft without complication or additional operative time. The authors now advocate the use of a CO2 laser with modified laparoscope in hip revision surgery in which bone cement is to be removed from within the femoral shaft.

  17. Advances in CO2-Laser Drilling of Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Queisser, Marco; Gentsch, Clemens; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    The CO2 -laser drilling in Schott D263Teco thin glass having a thickness of 500 μm is intensively studied. The nearly cylindrical holes having diameters smaller 100 μm could be drilled in 0.25 seconds per hole. Reliability investigations by performing temperature cycling show cracks in 51% of the drilled holes in the glass substrate. The reason is thermally induced stress during thermal CO2 -laser ablation. Different thermal pre- and post-treatments have been successfully studied avoiding such cracks (98.4% crack-free holes) and show the high potential of CO2 -laser drilling for through glass via (TGV) processing in glass substrates for micro-system applications.

  18. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-08-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  19. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  20. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  1. Laser-induced structural modifications in glass using a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Takayuki; Nakazumi, Shinya; Nakamura, Keigo; Ono, Shunsuke

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation results on laser-induced structural modifications in a BK7 glass sample (OHARA, S-BSL7) by use of a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser system. A femtosecond fiber laser system (wavelength: 1.06 μm, pulse duration: 250 fs) generates 1 MHz ultrashort laser pulses with a pulse energy up to 2 μJ, and a CO2 laser system generates CW (continuous wave) laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 μm. Both laser beams were simultaneously irradiated on a BK7 glass substrate (30 mm × 5 mm × 0.7 mm thick). The structural modifications regions were created by translating the glass sample perpendicular to the laser axis with a distance of 1 mm and a scan speed of 0.1 mm/s. The dependence of structural modifications on the laser energy of femtosecond laser pulses and the power of CO2 laser beam were investigated. The results have demonstrated that the refractive index change region with the width of 3 μm was created with simultaneously irradiation of two laser beams although the structural modification regions, which were produced with only femtosecond laser pulses, were surface ablation. And the surface ablation regions were changed to the refractive index change regions as the energy of CO2 laser beam increase to more than 2W.

  2. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  3. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  4. Fusion welding studies using laser on Ti-SS dissimilar combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugarajan, B.; Padmanabham, G.

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding investigations were carried out on dissimilar Ti-SS combination. The study is aimed to improve the weld strength and ductility by minimizing harmful intermetallics and taking advantage of high cooling rates in laser welding. Results of continuous wave 3.5 kW CO2 laser welding of totally dissimilar combination of Titanium and stainless steel (304) have been discussed. Bead on plate welding experiments were conducted to identify the laser welding parameters using depth of penetration as criteria. The welding of dissimilar combination has been attempted both autogenously and with interlayers such as Vanadium (V) and Tantalum (Ta) in the form of laser cladding as well as strip. Autogenous welds were carried out by varying the laser power, welding speed and position of the laser beam with respect to the joint centre. The resultant welds are characterized by macrostructure analysis, SEM/EDAX and XRD and as welded tensile test in UTM. The autogenous welds have exhibited extensive cracking even when welded at high speeds or by manipulating the beam position with respect to the joint. Similarly Vandaium as interlayer could not achieve crack free joint. A joint with 40 MPa strength could be made with Ta as interlayer. Results and analysis of these variants of laser welded joints are reported and discussed.

  5. Clinical applications of CO2 lasers: clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinibaldi, Kenneth R.

    1994-09-01

    The most common surgery performed in our clinic with the CO2 laser is the cutting and vaporization of neoplasms associated with the head and neck, in particular, the squamous cell carcinoma in the cat. A majority of the tumors are malignant and 50% are metastatic at the time of presentation for surgery. Experience has taught us that early detection and removal with the CO2 laser affords the best prognosis. To date, roughly 100 cases have been treated with the CO2 laser. The success rate in the dog is not as rewarding as in the cat. Most cases were done with 5 - 10 watts of power continuous or pulsed wave, using a 125 mm or 50 mm handpiece. The laser beam was focused or defocused to adjust for cutting, vaporization, and coagulation. No post-op care of the wounds was recommended. Other small neoplasms in and around the ears, head, and neck can also be removed easily with the CO2 laser.

  6. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  7. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  8. Surface treatment of metals with excimer and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidemenopoulos, G. N.; Zervaki, A.; Papadimitriou, K.; Tsipas, D. N.; McIntosh, J.; Zergioti, G.; Manousaki, G.; Hontzopoulos, Elias I.

    1993-05-01

    The availability of a variety of lasers including the high-power cw CO2 lasers, the pulsed- mode infrared Nd-YAG, and the pulsed-mode ultraviolet excimer laser has led to the development of many interesting applications of laser technology to materials processing. Among them the surface modification of metallic alloys appears to be one of the most important and very close to implementation in various industries. Specifically the applications of excimer lasers have been discussed in a recent workshop in the framework of the Eureka EU 205 program. The major topics concerned with surface modifications that were discussed in this workshop were surface smoothing and roughening, surface cleaning of Ti and Cu, mixing and interdiffusion of predeposited layers, surface irradiation of Cu-alloys to improve the corrosion resistance, surface remelting of Al-alloys for grain refinement through rapid solidification, and surface remelting of Ni-P electroless coatings on Al alloys for the improvement of corrosion resistance. Laser alloying of Ni-base superalloys has also been discussed. Applications discussed here include the surface treatment of Ni-base superalloys with high-power CO2 laser, the surface treatment of aluminum alloys with excimer lasers, the laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of wear and corrosion resistant layers of Ti, TiC, and TiN on tool steels, and the fracture surface sulphur printing with excimer lasers.

  9. Enhanced peak power CO2 laser processing of PCB materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C. J.; Villarreal, F.; Wendland, J. J.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.; Hand, D. P.

    2005-06-01

    Laser drilling has become a common processing step in the fabrication of printed circuit boards (PCB's). For this work, a recently developed enhanced peak power CO2 laser (~2.5 kW peak power, 200W average) or ultra-super pulse (USP) laser is used to drill alumina and copper coated dielectric laminate materials. The higher peak power and faster response times (than conventional CO2 lasers) produced by the USP laser are used to produce high speed alumina laser scribing and copper coated laminate microvia drilling processes. Alumina is a common PCB material used for applications, where its resistance to mechanical and thermal stresses is required. Here we present a comprehensive study of the melt eject mechanisms and recast formation to optimise the speed and quality of alumina laser scribing. Scribe speeds of up to 320 mms-1 (1.8 times current scribe rate) have been achieved using novel temporal pulse shapes unique to the USP laser. Also presented is the microvia drilling process of copper dielectric laminates, where the multi-level configuration presents different optical and thermal properties complicating their simultaneous laser ablation. In our experiments the USP laser has been used to drill standard thickness copper films (up to 50 μm thick) in a single shot. This investigation concentrates on understanding the mechanisms that determine the dielectric undercut dimensions.

  10. Short-cavity high-repetition-rate CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopper, Wouter; Bagrova, Kalina; du Pisanie, Johan; Ronander, Einar; Meyer, Jan A.; von Bergmann, Hubertus M.

    1994-09-01

    We report on the construction and optimization of a TEA CO2 laser with a discharge volume of 15 cm3 and cavity length of 20 cm. Such a short cavity facilitates single longitudinal mode operation. A roots blower is employed to achieve the necessary gas flow rate for high-repetition-frequency operation in a compact design. Output has been obtained at 1 kHz and a stable discharge to a repetition rate of 2 kHz has been demonstrated. The laser is part of a program aimed at the development of an efficient laser system for molecular laser isotope separation. Additional applications in materials processing are envisioned.

  11. Pulsed CO2 laser ablation of graphite and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. H.; Tou, T. Y.; Low, K. S.

    1998-02-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of the emission plumes of graphite, polyimide, polyethylene terepthalate, and polymethylmethacrylate that have been ablated by using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 μm shows the presence of CN and C2, species not previously reported for CO2 laser ablation. The gross dynamics of the luminous plume, which was studied by using a streak camera, compares favorably with predictions from the snowplow model, which also accurately forecasts the time history of the plume expansion for a wide range of background gas pressures and laser fluences. Framing shadowgraphy reveals the onset of laser-supported detonation waves at approximately 50 mbar Ar, thus somewhat limiting the validity of this model.

  12. Ultrasonic vibration aided laser welding of Al alloys: Improvement of laser-welding quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Watanabe, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    1995-03-01

    Using a pulsed YAG laser, meltability of Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si alloys were investigated by a single-pass irradiation. In order to improve the quality in laser welding, the effectiveness of the Ultrasonic Vibration Laser Welding (UVLW) method proposed in this paper was investigated experimentally. The proposed method was also compared with the traditional welding methods of Normal Laser Welding (NLW) and preHeating Laser Welding (HLW). The welding methods were evaluated from the geometry in the melt zone generated by a single pulse of the laser beam. It was suggested that ultrasonic vibration suppressed welding defects and improved the melt characteristics due to cavitation effects and dispersion of particles in the molten pool during laser welding. The influence on melt characteristics of the melt zone by preheating was also investigated. In these experiments, UVLW was the most useful laser welding method from the point of view of improving the laser welding quality of Al alloys.

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  14. Mode/Medium Instability in CO2 Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, K. L.; Sung, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report discribes theoretical study of model/medium instability (MMI) in CO2 laser. Purposes of study to extend, to small Fresnel numbers, previous study of MMI restricted to large Fresnel numbers and to study methods of previous studies, to suppress MMI. Method of primary interest involves replacement of hard edge output mirror in laser resonator with mirror, local reflectivity of which decreases with radial distance from optical axis according to Gaussian profile.

  15. Low Voltage Gas Transport TE CO(2) Laser.

    PubMed

    Seguin, H J; Sedgwick, G

    1972-04-01

    The constructional and operational aspects of a low voltage transversely excited gas transport CO(2) laser are presented. This compact device incorporates a recirculating wind tunnel type geometry and possesses features of the gas dynamic, gas transport, and TEA lasers. The structure with an active length of 36 cm produced a cw power of approximately 200 W at an over-all system efficiency of 5% using a discharge potential of 1200 V. PMID:20119038

  16. Oncological and functional results of CO2 laser cordectomy.

    PubMed

    Policarpo, M; Aluffi, P; Brovelli, F; Borello, G; Pia, F

    2004-10-01

    Laser surgery represents the evolution of endoscopic surgery and, as far as concerns treatment of laryngeal tumours, CO2 laser cordectomy is considered a valid alternative to conventional surgery (laryngofissure cordectomy) and to exclusive radiotherapy for glottic carcinomas, classified as T1a, T1b and T2. The present report focuses on personal experience with CO2 laser cordectomy over the last 11 years, evaluating oncological and functional results. Between October 1990 and December 2001, micro-laryngoscopy has been performed with CO, laser, in 606 cases (benign and malignant lesions), of which 150 laser cordectomies, at the ORL Department, Eastern Piedmont University of Novara. An analysis is made of 63 patients (mean age 64.3 years) who underwent laser cordectomy for glottic carcinoma, observed at follow-up for at least 3 years. Vocal function has been studied on a sample of 20 patients. Of those who underwent CO2 laser cordectomy for T1a and T1s, 95.8% were disease free after a minimum of 3 years follow-up. Video-larynx-stroboscopic test highlighted the presence of a "satisfying" fibrous neocord in cases treated with Type III cordectomy. The speech compensation was of the "cord-neocordal" type (35%), false cordal (40%) and with arytenoideus hyperadduction (25%). The electro-acoustical analysis of the voice highlighted a "serious dysphonia" compatible with Type IV cases according to Yanagihara (70%) and moderate-severe dysphonia (30%). Mean values of vocal parameters were 5.8% for Jitter, 12.2% for Shimmer, 0.34 for NHR. CO2 laser cordectomy is first choice treatment for T1a glottic carcinoma, offering intra- and post-operative advantages: reduced traumatism, lack of tracheostomy, low bleeding, fast functional recovery (deglutition and speech), brief hospital stay, and low management costs. Dysphonia resulting from treatment, characterised by breathed voice, allows the patient to lead a normal life. PMID:15871607

  17. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  18. TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator: A software tool to predict the output pulse characteristics of TEA CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Ghani, B.

    2005-09-01

    "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" has been designed to simulate the dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO 2 laser based on the six-temperature model. The program predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse (power, energy, pulse duration, delay time, FWHM, etc.) depending on the physical and geometrical input parameters (pressure ratio of gas mixture, reflecting area of the output mirror, media length, losses, filling and decay factors, etc.). Program summaryTitle of program: TEA_CO2 Catalogue identifier: ADVW Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVW Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: P.IV DELL PC Setup: Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Scientific Services Department, Mathematics and Informatics Division Operating system: MS-Windows 9x, 2000, XP Programming language: Delphi 6.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47 315 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:7 681 109 Distribution format:tar.gz Classification: 15 Laser Physics Nature of the physical problem: "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" is a program that predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse by studying the effect of the physical and geometrical input parameters on the characteristics of the output laser pulse. The laser active medium consists of a CO 2-N 2-He gas mixture. Method of solution: Six-temperature model, for the dynamics emission of TEA CO 2 laser, has been adapted in order to predict the parameters of laser output pulses. A simulation of the laser electrical pumping was carried out using two approaches; empirical function equation (8) and differential equation (9). Typical running time: The program's running time mainly depends on both integration interval and step; for a 4 μs period of time and 0.001 μs integration step (defaults values used in the program), the running time will be about 4 seconds. Restrictions on the complexity: Using a very small integration

  19. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this effort is to develop code to enable the accurate prediction of the performance of pulsed transversely excited (TE) CO2 lasers prior to their construction. This is of particular benefit to the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) project. A benefit of the completed code is that although developed specifically for the pulsed CO2 laser much of the code can be modified to model other laser systems of interest to the lidar community. A Boltzmann equation solver has been developed which enables the electron excitation rates for the vibrational levels of CO2 and N2, together with the electron ionization and attachment coefficients to be determined for any CO2 laser gas mixture consisting of a combination of CO2, N2, CO, He and CO. The validity of the model has been verified by comparison with published material. The results from the Boltzmann equation solver have been used as input to the laser kinetics code which is currently under development. A numerical code to model the laser induced medium perturbation (LIMP) arising from the relaxation of the lower laser level has been developed and used to determine the effect of LIMP on the frequency spectrum of the LAWS laser output pulse. The enclosed figures show representative results for a laser operating at 0.5 atm. with a discharge cross-section of 4.5 cm to produce a 20 J pulse with aFWHM of 3.1 microns. The first four plots show the temporal evolution of the laser pulse power, energy evolution, LIMP frequency chirp and electric field magnitude. The electric field magnitude is taken by beating the calculated complex electric field and beating it with a local oscillator signal. The remaining two figures show the power spectrum and energy distribution in the pulse as a function of the varying pulse frequency. The LIMP theory has been compared with experimental data from the NOAA Windvan Lidar and has been found to be in good agreement.

  20. Calibrating Laser Gas Measurements by Use of Natural CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibration has been devised for instruments that utilize tunable lasers to measure the absorption spectra of atmospheric gases in order to determine the relative abundances of the gases. In this method, CO2 in the atmosphere is used as a natural calibration standard. Unlike in one prior calibration method, it is not necessary to perform calibration measurements in advance of use of the instrument and to risk deterioration of accuracy with time during use. Unlike in another prior calibration method, it is not necessary to include a calibration gas standard (and the attendant additional hardware) in the instrument and to interrupt the acquisition of atmospheric data to perform calibration measurements. In the operation of an instrument of this type, the beam from a tunable diode laser or a tunable quantum-cascade laser is directed along a path through the atmosphere, the laser is made to scan in wavelength over an infrared spectral region that contains one or two absorption spectral lines of a gas of interest, and the transmission (and, thereby, the absorption) of the beam is measured. The concentration of the gas of interest can then be calculated from the observed depth of the absorption line(s), given the temperature, pressure, and path length. CO2 is nearly ideal as a natural calibration gas for the following reasons: CO2 has numerous rotation/vibration infrared spectral lines, many of which are near absorption lines of other gases. The concentration of CO2 relative to the concentrations of the major constituents of the atmosphere is well known and varies slowly and by a small enough amount to be considered constant for calibration in the present context. Hence, absorption-spectral measurements of the concentrations of gases of interest can be normalized to the concentrations of CO2. Because at least one CO2 calibration line is present in every spectral scan of the laser during absorption measurements, the atmospheric CO2 serves

  1. Laser Submerged Arc Welding (LUPuS) with Solid State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The newly developed hybrid welding process allows the welding of plates with a thickness larger than 20 mm in a single pass and the welding of thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique. In this special hybrid process, the use of CO2-lasers causes problems when forward sliding flux of slag meets the laser beam path and forms an uncontrollable plasma plume in the beam path. This plasma then shields the work piece from the laser power and thus provokes the collapse of the laser keyhole and leads to process instability. The substitution of the CO2-laser with a modern solid-state laser significantly improves the performance and the stability of the hybrid process. This contribution will demonstrate the latest results and improvements by means of welding results gained with steel plates with a thickness of up to 40mm.

  2. Experimental CO2 laser myringotomy: a preliminary animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, Hannu J.; Poe, Dennis S.; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Lombardo, Igino; Pankratov, Michail M.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1995-05-01

    Myringotomy--a procedure in which a perforation is made in the tympanic membrane (TM) is performed to gain access to the middle ear for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. Some medical conditions, especially middle ear infections require an opening that remains patent for weeks or even months. A conventional myringotomy usually closes in a few days which is insufficient time for an underlying disease to resolve. There have been studies reporting modest closure delays of myringotomies done by CO2 laser from the beginning of 1980's and the procedure has not gained popularity in clinical practice. Many of the mechanisms affecting TM healing delays remain unknown. In an animal model we investigated the closure rates of TM perforations after different types of myringotomies. The animals formed three experimental groups: (1) both ears had a semicircular myringotomy produced either with a knife or with a CO2 laser; (2) both ears had a round laser myringotomy (1.2 mm in diameter) produced either in a single shot or by a series of small overlapping shots; (3) both ears had laser myringotomy either kidney shaped (1.2 X 2 mm) or round (1.2 mm in diameter) produced by a series of small shots. All myringotomies closed within 42 days without complications. The mean patency of knife myringotomies was significantly shorter (9.8 days) than that of similar laser myringotomies (19.5 days). The mode of laser delivery did not have an effect on the closure rate. Kidney shaped CO2 laser myringotomies stayed patent significantly longer (mean 25.8 days) than circular (mean 11.4 days). The patency of smaller semicircular laser myringotomies was significantly longer than that of larger circular. The results indicate that certain geometries as well as use of the CO2 laser delays the closure of myringotomy. When myringotomy is performed for therapeutic reasons not only the size but also the shape should be considered as a factor for extending its length of patency. In the future CO2 laser may

  3. Use of CO2 laser flexible waveguides during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Raymond J.

    1992-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has revolutionized the management of symptomatic cholelithiasis and cholecystitis. Although electrosurgery devices are used by a majority of surgeons, laser technology is a valued addition to the armamentarium of the skilled laser laparoscopist. A variety of fiberoptic capable wavelengths have been applied successfully during this procedure. Use of the CO2 laser for this purpose has lagged due to difficulties encountered with free-beam and rigid waveguide dissections via the laparoscope. Recent developments in flexible waveguide technology have the potential to expand the role of the CO2 laser for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and other procedures. Twelve laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed using Luxar (Bothell, WA) flexible microwaveguides of various configurations. In each case, dissection of the gallbladder from the gallbladder bed was accomplished with acceptable speed and hemostasis. There were no complications. Shortcomings include coupling and positioning with an articulated arm and occasional clogging of some waveguide tips with debris. Modifications of this technology are suggested. Flexible waveguides make the CO2 laser a practical alternative for surgical laparoscopy.

  4. Plasma detector for TEA CO2 laser pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Mitsuishi, A.; Fujita, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Takai, M.

    1983-10-01

    Laser-pulse evolution can be detected by measuring the emf generated by fast electrons in a laser-produced plasma when the laser radiation is focused onto a solid metal target in a vacuum. Using this phenomenon a 'plasma detector' is constructed, and its characteristics for the TEA CO2 laser radiation of intensity 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th W/sq cm are investigated experimentally. The plasma detector operates at room temperature and is strong against laser damages. For the evacuated plasma detector down to 0.1 torr, a maximum output voltage of 90 V and a rise time shorter than 1 ns are observed. The plasma detector, therefore, can be used as a power monitor for laser pulses and as a trigger voltage source.

  5. Automatic frequency control of pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency agility in remote-sensor lasers permits differential absorption and differential scattering measurements to be conducted for quantitative studies of atmospheric molecules and aerosols. High spectral purity in laser transmitter pulses allows heterodyne detection to be used for improved SNR, and renders the study of small, Doppler-induced frequency shifts due to the relative motion between target and observer possible. Attention is presently given to a high spectral purity injection-locked CO2 laser transmitter for remote sensing and target ranging.

  6. New aspects of CO2 laser ablation in skin photosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, Ioan; Nedelcu, Dana M.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Dutu, Constantin A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents the latest developments in CO2, ancillary equipment, and advanced surgical techniques used in treating a variety of different dermatologic disorders. To improve our knowledge on the laser treatment of several cutaneous lesions, we have performed a study on 871 cases, of which 690 are benign skin tumors and 181 are malignant skin tumors. Based on this large number of cases, information on post-operative course, recovery time, the quality of scars and aesthetic results, recurrences and hemostasis of blood vessels is given. This study presents indications for performing laser surgery and describes how to avoid complications and limit the potential risks associated with lasers.

  7. Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy Using a Flexible CO2 Laser Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Khalaileh, Abed; Ponomarenko, Oleg; Abu-Gazala, Mahmoud; Lewinsky, Reuven M.; Elazary, Ram; Shussman, Noam; Shalhav, Arieh; Mintz, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is a challenging surgery that requires precise tissue cutting and meticulous hemostasis under warm ischemia conditions. In this study, we tested the feasibility of performing LPN using CO2 laser energy transmitted through a specialized flexible mirror optical fiber. Methods: General anesthesia and pneumoperitoneum were induced in 7 farm pigs. Various portions of a kidney, either a pole or a midportion of the kidney, were removed using a novel flexible fiber to transmit CO2 laser energy set at a power of 45W and energy per pulse of 100mJ. The collecting system was approximated with a suture or 2, but no hemostatic measures were taken besides applying a few pulses of the laser to bleeding points. The pigs were sacrificed 3 wk later. Results: Average renal mass removed was 18% of the total kidney weight. All pigs tolerated surgery well. Sharp renal cutting was accomplished in a single continuous incision, with minimal tissue charring and minimal blood loss (<10cc) in all animals. Necropsy revealed no peritoneal or retroperitoneal abnormalities. Histologic examination of the cut surface showed a thin sector of up to 100 μm of coagulation necrosis. Conclusions: We report on the first LPN done using a CO2 laser transmitted through a flexible fiber in an animal model. This novel application of the CO2 laser produced excellent parenchymal incision and hemostasis along with minimal damage to adjacent renal tissue, thus, potentially shortening ischemia time and kidney function loss. Further studies comparing this laser to standard technique are necessary to verify its usefulness for partial nephrectomy. PMID:23484569

  8. The use of laser CO2 in salivary gland diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolfi, C.; Rocchetti, F.; Fioravanti, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Salivary gland diseases can include reactive lesions, obstructive lesions, and benign tumors. All these clinical entities are slow growing. Salivary glands reactive lesions, such as mucoceles, can result from extravasation of saliva into the surrounding soft tissue or from retention of saliva within the duct. Sialolithiasis, one of the most common obstructive lesions, is generally due to calculi, which are attributed to retention of saliva. Monomorphic adenoma is a salivary gland benign tumor, which is exclusively resulted from proliferation of epithelial cells, with no alterations interesting the connective tissue. The elective therapy of these lesions is surgical excision because sometimes they can be accompained by difficulties during chewing and phonation and can interfere with prosthesis's stability. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of CO2 laser in the treatment of patients with salivary gland diseases. Three different cases - a mucocele, a scialolithiasis and a monomorphic adenoma - were treated with CO2 laser excision (CW and 4W), under local anesthesia. Two different techniques were used: circumferential incision for the adenoma, and mucosa preservation technique for mucocele and sialolithiasis. In each case final haemostasis was obtained by thermocoagulation, but suture was applied to guarantee good healing by sewing up the flaps. The patients were checked after twenty days and the healing was good. The carbon dioxide laser (CO2 laser) was one of the earliest gas laser to be developed, and is still the highest-power continuous wave laser that is currently available. In dentistry the CO2 laser produces a beam of infrared light with the principal wavelength bands centering around 9.4 and 10.6 micrometers. Laser excision can be very useful in oral surgery. In the cases presented CO2 laser offered, differently from traditional surgery, simplified surgical technique, shorter duration of operation, minimal postoperative pain, minimal scarring

  9. TEA CO2 laser machining of CFRP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Whitehead, D.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have found wide applications in the aerospace, marine, sports and automotive industries owing to their lightweight and acceptable mechanical properties compared to the commonly used metallic materials. Machining of CFRP composites using lasers can be challenging due to inhomogeneity in the material properties and structures, which can lead to thermal damages during laser processing. In the previous studies, Nd:YAG, diode-pumped solid-state, CO2 (continuous wave), disc and fibre lasers were used in cutting CFRP composites and the control of damages such as the size of heat-affected zones (HAZs) remains a challenge. In this paper, a short-pulsed (8 μs) transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser was used, for the first time, to machine CFRP composites. The laser has high peak powers (up to 250 kW) and excellent absorption by both the carbon fibre and the epoxy binder. Design of experiment and statistical modelling, based on response surface methodology, was used to understand the interactions between the process parameters such as laser fluence, repetition rate and cutting speed and their effects on the cut quality characteristics including size of HAZ, machining depth and material removal rate (MRR). Based on this study, process parameter optimization was carried out to minimize the HAZ and maximize the MRR. A discussion is given on the potential applications and comparisons to other lasers in machining CFRP.

  10. Evaluation of the CO2 laser for porcelain laminate etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypel, T. S.; Zakariasen, Kenneth L.

    1994-09-01

    Research has shown that CO2 laser energy can both fuse and etch enamel, the effect being dependent on the exposure parameters utilized. Such energy can also fuse dental porcelains, but it is not known whether porcelain can be etched by CO2 laser. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether CO2 laser energy can be utilized to etch porcelain laminates, an effect necessary for resin bonding. Porcelain laminate disks 10 mm in diameter were prepared. The disks were each numbered and divided into quadrants with a small carbide high speed bur. Six disks were utilized, each quadrant receiving a single laser exposure for a total of 24 exposures. Each exposure was at either 10 or 15 W for .01, .05, or .10 seconds, with a focal spot of either 0.8 or 0.35 mm. This range of exposures includes those exposures which cause enamel etching. Two exposures were made at each combination of exposure parameters. Each disk was prepared for scanning electron microscopy and viewed at 75X to examine the exposure sites. All 24 exposure sites were examined and no definite etching was observed.

  11. Laser welding of plastics: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-10-01

    The process of laser welding of plastics is studied theoretically and experimentally. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene is presented as examples. A good correspondence between theoretical and experimental results is found. Some practical aspects of laser welding of plastics are given.

  12. Effects of pulsed CO2 laser in caries selective ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; David, Ion; Marinovici, Mariana

    1995-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of pulsed carbon dioxide laser in the treatment for deep carious decay. The so called `caries profonda' is still a problem for conservative dentistry. A `Valvfivre' Master 20S carbon dioxide laser was pulsed to determine the effects on dentine and for testing the properties of softened dentine in selective ablation. Laser treatment parameters were from 1 to 2 W, 50 to 150 ms, 200 to 320 Hz. Fifteen human teeth samples were exposed to irradiation: extracted third molar were exposed to CO2 pulsed laser to determine in vitro the effects on pulp morphology. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by means of scanning electron microscopy for evidence of thermal damage. Next, we have evaluated the morphologic changes in vivo on 10 cases in patients with deep carious decay. Pulsed infrared lasers are capable of inducing physical and chemical changes in dentine structure. The results showed an artificially sclerosing and micro-hardness on the remaining dentine. CO2 laser can vaporized carious dentine.

  13. Electromagnetically driven closed-circle-type CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1983-11-01

    The electromagnetic induction produced by either a permanent magnet or an electromagnet is used, in place of a mechanical blower, to drive the gas mixtures in a closed cycle CO2 laser tube. A gas flow velocity of up to 0.8 m/sec has been obtained through the application of a magnetic field of 1.67 kG externally to a discharge current of 40 mA, at a steady gas pressure of 10 Torr. For the case of a gas mixture ratio CO2:N2:He of 2:1:7, a laser output is obtained which is larger than that for the stationary gas case by a factor of 3, for up to 1 hr of continuous operation.

  14. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  15. Pulse Compression Of An FM Chirped CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. M.; Halmos, M. J.; Duvall, R. L.

    1989-12-01

    FM chirp/pulse compression has long been used in conventional radar systems [1]. The main advantages of such a technique are: 1. Efficient use of the average power available at the transmitter. 2. Increased system accuracy, both in range and velocity measurements. 3. Reduction of jamming vulnerability. We have explored the use of this technique for laser radar systems and in this paper describe an electro-optically FM modulated CO2 waveguide with post detection pulse compression by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) com-pression filter. The CO2 laser has been FM chirp modulated by a CdTe intracavity modulator. A frequency deviation of 95 MHz in 2.1 psec was attained in this fashion. Following heterodyne detection, the chirped pulse was compressed to 15 nsec using a SAW compression filter. This corresponded to a compression factor of 130. The suppression of unwanted sidelobes with a weighting filter was also demonstrated.

  16. Laryngeal Compensation for Voice Production After CO2 Laser Cordectomy

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Zakaria; Hosny, Sameh Mohammad; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser cordectomy is considered one of the modalities of choice for treatment of early glottic carcinoma. In addition to its comparable oncological results with radiotherapy and open surgical procedures, it preserves of laryngeal functions including voice production. The aim of this study was to detect how the larynx compensates for voice production after different types of CO2 laser cordectomy for early glottic carcinoma together with assessment of the vocal outcome in each compensation mechanism. Methods One hundred twelve patients treated with CO2 laser cordectomy were classified according to their main postoperative phonatory site. Perceptual analysis of voice samples using GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain) scale was done for 88 patients after exclusion of the voice samples of all female patients to make the study population homogenous and the samples of 18 male patients due to bad quality (4 patients) or unavailability (14 patients) of their voice samples and the results were compared with those obtained from control group that included 25 age-matched euphonic male subjects. Results Five types of laryngeal compensation were defined including: vocal fold to vocal fold, vocal fold to vocal neofold, vocal fold to vestibular fold, vestibular fold, to vestibular fold, and arytenoids hyper adduction. Characters changes of voice produced by each compensation type were found to be statistically significant except for breathiness, asthenia and strain changes in vocal fold to vocal fold compensation type. Conclusion The larynx can compensate for voice production after CO2 laser cordectomy by five different compensation mechanisms with none of them producing voice quality comparable with that of controls. PMID:26622962

  17. CO2 Laser Radiation Transmission Through Curved Hollow Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Jacob; Gannot, Israel; Morhaim, Orna; Mendlovic, David; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1989-07-01

    Hollow plastic fibers were produced by depositing metallic and dielectric films on the internal surface of plastic tubes. These fibers can transmit high CO2 laser energy with low atten-uation even in curved trajectories. A mathematical model was developed to describe the energy transmission. The energy distribution at the outlet of the fiber was measured and found to be influenced by the existence of whispering gallery mode. These fibers are suitable for surgical uses.

  18. Transmission laser welding of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Paul A.; Jones, I. A.; Kennish, Y.

    2003-03-01

    The use of lasers for welding plastics was demonstrated in the early 1970s. However, it was not until late in the 1990s that production applications started to be considered widely. This followed the broad realization that by selection of a suitable combination of radiation wavelength and plastics additives, to control light transmission and absorption, heat could be generated at the joint of a pre-assembled part without melting its outer surfaces. It is of added benefit that the window of transmission for an unpigmented and unfilled plastic typically covers the wavelengths delivered by small and cost effective diode lasers. Recent developments in the transmission laser welding process for plastics are discussed, including methods for the generation of welds between two clear plastics, application of similar techniques to the joining of thermoplastic textiles and new equipment, able to heat a complete joint and assist in the sealing of assemblies where the joint surfaces are not particuarly smooth. An analytical heat flow model for the welding of clear plastics is shown in use for selecting process parameters.

  19. Development of technique for laser welding of biological tissues using laser welding device and nanocomposite solder.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, A; Ichcitidze, L; Podgaetsky, V; Ryabkin, D; Pyankov, E; Saveliev, M; Selishchev, S

    2015-08-01

    The laser device for welding of biological tissues has been developed involving quality control and temperature stabilization of weld seam. Laser nanocomposite solder applied onto a wound to be weld has been used. Physicochemical properties of the nanocomposite solder have been elucidated. The nature of the tissue-organizing nanoscaffold has been analyzed at the site of biotissue welding. PMID:26738200

  20. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  1. Sensory neuron response to emission from a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, V. A.; Petukhov, V. O.; Yachnev, I. L.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Lopatina, E. V.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2010-07-01

    We have built a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser meeting the requirements for low-intensity laser therapy. At λ = 10.57 μm and 9.24 μm, we observe a physiological effect detectable from the change in the extent of neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. This makes it possible to study molecular mechanisms for interaction of low-intensity radiation with tissues in a living body. The ATP molecule is considered as the specific molecular target for the action of the radiation.

  2. CO2 laser irradiation on vertical root fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luciana X.; Aun, Carlos E.; de Campos Ferraz, Jussara

    1997-05-01

    Vertical root fracture has been requested tooth extraction or root hemisection. There is no conservative treatment. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the CO2 laser effects on root fracture, associated with other materials. Forty two extracted human canines divided into 6 groups have their root vertically fractured. In groups A and B the CO2 laser was used with power of 5 W and 7 W respectively and the fracture line was covered with glass ionomer cement. In groups C and D the laser was used with 5 and 7 W and fracture line was covered with a dual composite. Groups E and F were controls, treated with glass ionomer cement and FLC dual composite. The teeth were placed in 5 percent methylene blue dye for 48 hs. The dye penetration was lowest in groups with glass ionomer cement and laser (A and B), at about (1.06mm). The difference between groups was statistically significant at 1 percent. All experimental groups showed dye penetration. The laser seemed to favor the sealing of the fracture line.

  3. CO2 laser on apical seal of retrofilled teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Carlos E.; Gavini, Giulio; Clasen, Naya F.; Silva Kfouri, Luciana

    1997-05-01

    The CO2 laser has been suggested for occlusion of dentinal tubuli and sterilization of the beveled root surfaces, avoiding degrees of irritants from the root canal system into periapical tissues. This study has evaluated marginal leakage in 40 human single rooted teeth divided into 4 groups of 8 teeth which received retrofillings, and 2 control groups of 4 teeth each. Group A: Super EBA; group B: Super EBA and CO2 laser irradiation; group C: Glass Ionomer Cement; group D: Glass ionomer Cement and laser; group E: positive control; group F: negative control. In groups B and D the power set was 2 watts, 20 msec, with a CT3105 ceramic point. Teeth were placed in 5 percent methylene blue dye for 24 hs and the dye penetration was lower in B. The higher penetration was seen in C. Analysis of variance found statistical difference between groups. In this study the laser irradiation was able to change the amount of dye penetration. It can be assumed that Super EBA and Glass Ionomer Cement have their sealing abilities improved by laser irradiation.

  4. Passively cooled glass CO2 laser tubes for severe environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. E.; Johnson, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to design a glass CO2 laser tube that could survive the Titan 3 C launch environment and at the same time provide adequate thermal conductivity to maintain the wall of the laser tube below approximately equal to 50 C for efficient lasing. The approach that was taken to satisfy these requirements was to pot the tube in an aluminum heat sink using a space qualified polyurethane potting material. Two configurations of the laser tube successfully passed the complete Titan 3 C qualification level sine and random vibration specification and satisfied the thermal requirements. Fabrication details and test results are presented that indicate this could be a practical solution for laser tubes used in a severe environment and where flowing coolants are impractical or undesirable.

  5. Application research of CO2 laser cutting natural stone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixiu; Song, Jijiang

    2009-08-01

    Now, the processing of natural stone plates is the high performance sawing machine primarily,many researchers deeply studied the processing characters in the sawing process and the strength characters during the processing. In order to realize the profiled-processing and pattern- carving of the natural stone, It lays a solid foundation for the laser cutting and the pattern-carving technology of natural stone plate. The working principle, type and characteristics of laser cutting are briefly described. The paper selects 6 kinds stone plates of natural taken as experimental sample,the experimental sample was China Shanxi Black, Old Spain Golden Yellow, New Spain Golden Yellow, Jazz White, Maple Leaf Red, Cream White respectively. Use high power CO2 laser cutting system,the stone plates cutting experiment of 6 kinds different hardness, the best working speed are obtained,The experimental results indicate that: The laser cutting speed has no correlation with the ingredient content of stone plate.

  6. Parametric study of intersatellite CO2 laser data links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonek, E.; Lutz, H.

    The performance capability of current CO2 laser communication tecnology for intersatellite data links is evaluated. The link parameters, such as the distance, bit rate, ac signal-to-noise ratio, are related to the masses and the prime power requirements of satellite laser terminals using variables like the telescope (antenna) aperture diameter and the transmitted laser power. It is found that high data rates could be readily transmitted with telescopes of the order of only 10 cm in diameter, with the complte laser data terminals weighing between 25 kg and 70 kg and consuming prime power in the 90-300 W range. In addition, these terminals would require only about 0.1 cu m or less of volume and a very low movable antenna mass, which would alleviate constraints on satellite attitude control units in remote sensing missions.

  7. CO2 laser drives extreme ultraviolet nano-lithography — second life of mature laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K. M.; Ohta, T.; Suganuma, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Mizoguchi, H.; Sumitani, A.; Endo, A.

    2013-12-01

    It was shown both theoretically and experimentally that nanosecond order laser pulses at 10.6 micron wavelength were superior for driving the Sn plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for nano-lithography for the reasons of higher conversion efficiency, lower production of debris and higher average power levels obtainable in CO2 media without serious problems of beam distortions and nonlinear effects occurring in competing solid-state lasers at high intensities. The renewed interest in such pulse format, wavelength, repetition rates in excess of 50 kHz and average power levels in excess of 18 kiloWatt has sparked new opportunities for a matured multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser technology. The power demand of EUV source could be only satisfied by a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier system configuration, leading to a development of a new type of hybrid pulsed CO2 laser employing a whole spectrum of CO2 technology, such as fast flow systems and diffusion-cooled planar waveguide lasers, and relatively recent quantum cascade lasers. In this paper we review briefly the history of relevant pulsed CO2 laser technology and the requirements for multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser, intended for the laser-produced plasma EUV source, and present our recent advances, such as novel solid-state seeded master oscillator and efficient multi-pass amplifiers built on planar waveguide CO2 lasers.

  8. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  9. Evolution of a Laser Hybrid Welding Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexander F. H.; Frostevarg, Jan; Ilar, Torbjörn; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    Laser arc hybrid welding combines the advantages but also the complex physical mechanisms of gas metal arc welding and laser keyhole welding. From manifold mainly experimental but also theoretical research results a map with versatile functions was initiated for the first time. The purpose is to survey the overall context and to facilitate navigation to the various phenomena that are shown through case studies accompanied by theoretical explanations and guidelines for optimization. Though not complete, the map enables systematic and graphical navigation to relevant publications. Based on a fundamental structure of the map, which was decided early, it is inherently extendable in the future by adding existing and new knowledge, also from other research groups, enabling evolution. The fundament of the map structure comprises gouge thickness, joint type and metal grade, in coherence with product and weld designers' starting points. The next hierarchy level of the map offers options in the joint type as well as in hybrid welding techniques. The latter contains techniques like double-sided welding, pulse shaping management of the arc or laser, CMT arcs, tandem arcs, or remelting of undercuts. In addition to laser-arc hybrid welding, other hybrid laser techniques like multilayer hot-wire laser welding of narrow gaps or hybrid laser friction stir welding can be taken into account. At the other end of the hierarchy, the map offers via a database-like archive electronic navigation to research results like weld macrographs, high speed imaging or numerical simulation results of the welding process.

  10. CO2 laser-driven Stirling engine. [space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Perry, R. L.; Carney, B.

    1978-01-01

    A 100-W Beale free-piston Stirling engine was powered remotely by a CO2 laser for long periods of time. The engine ran on both continuous-wave and pulse laser input. The working fluid was helium doped with small quantities of sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. The CO2 radiation was absorbed by the vibrational modes of the sulfur hexafluoride, which in turn transferred the energy to the helium to drive the engine. Electrical energy was obtained from a linear alternator attached to the piston of the engine. Engine pressures, volumes, and temperatures were measured to determine engine performance. It was found that the pulse radiation mode was more efficient than the continuous-wave mode. An analysis of the engine heat consumption indicated that heat losses around the cylinder and the window used to transmit the beam into the engine accounted for nearly half the energy input. The overall efficiency, that is, electrical output to laser input, was approximately 0.75%. However, this experiment was not designed for high efficiency but only to demonstrate the concept of a laser-driven engine. Based on this experiment, the engine could be modified to achieve efficiencies of perhaps 25-30%.

  11. Effect of CO2 laser amputation on hydra regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Petrocellis, L.; Finizio, Andrea; Minei, R.; Mormile, Pasquale; Pierattini, Giovanni

    1994-08-01

    In order to investigate laser effects on biological specimens, Hydra, a coelenterate with high regeneration rate, was observed for ten days during regeneration after CO2 laser cutting. Control animals were cut with a razor blade immediately below the tentacle whorl under a dissecting microscope while they were in small glass petri dishes. They regenerated tentacles completely 8 to 10 days from the cutting. Hydra were cut in the same position with CO2 laser. As a first step, we studied the effect of the laser beam on the normal behaviour of hydra. For the cutting, we used four different power intensities: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 W. At different power intensities the animals regenerated the tentacles. However in about 20% of the animals the amputation performed with 1 and 1.5 W originated a quicker regeneration of tentacles. No effect was observed on asexual reproduction of the polyps and therefore also no change of the bud index.

  12. Use of CO2 laser in lingual and labial frenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotti, Renata C.; Bellini, Bruno S.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.; Baldin, Diva H. Z.; Nicola, Ester M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Ankiloglossia or frenum lingual alteration leads to important tongue dysfunction, which, besides discomfort and pain during function, is generally responsible for the difficulty to express specific phonemes. In other cases, a heavy muscular abnormal attachment of labial frenum can promote clinical changes. In such case, an eventual orthodontic therapy is indicated and aesthetic alteration is observed. In both cases, surgical removal is indicated. The surgery, for prevention purposes, must be done as soon as possible, but considering that the majority of patients are young (5 - 14 years old), difficulties during surgery are expected to occur. Correction of speech or orthodontic dysfunction in advanced ages is much more complex and difficult than in childhood. In the present work we demonstrate that the use of CO2 lasers in these cases are advantageous and simple. The laser energy causes the tissue of the frenum to open in the classic shape with no bleeding and no need for suture, reducing the risk of cross- contamination and of postoperative infection. Scarring and other complications are also minimized. A CO2 laser (continuous, 8 W, 10.6 micrometers) was used assisted with local anesthesia. The major advantage of laser is the possibility of its application in early ages, preventing further problems.

  13. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  14. Characteristics of laser beam welds of age-hardenable 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser beam welding is attractive for joining age-hardenable aluminum alloys, because its low over-all heat input results in a narrow weld heat affected zone (HAZ), where softening caused by dissolution of age precipitates occurs. In the present work, 1mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plates were welded using a 2.5 kW CO2 laser and it was experimentally proved that the width of the softened region in the laser beam weld was less than 1/7 that of a TIG weld. Moreover the hardness in the softened region of the laser beam weld was found to be almost fully recovered to the base metal hardness by applying a post-weld aging treatment at 443 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing unlike the TIG weld. These results characterize the advantage of laser beam welding in joining of the age-hardenable aluminum alloy as compared with the conventional arc welding. The hardness distributions in the HAZ were theoretically evaluated based on kinetic equations describing the dissolution of hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates and the precipitation of non-hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates during the weld thermal cycles to quantitatively prove above mentioned advantageous characteristics of laser beam welding.

  15. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    PubMed

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics. PMID:12789697

  16. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B C; Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2002-09-23

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were examined, and the effects that changes in incident power and various welding parameters had on weld geometry were investigated. In this report, the fusion zones of the laser welds are compared with those predicted from a laser keyhole weld simulation model for stainless steels (304L and 21-6-9), vanadium, and tantalum. The calculated keyhole depths for the vanadium and 304L stainless steel samples fit the experimental data to within acceptable error, demonstrating the predictive power of numerical simulation for welds in these two materials. Calculations for the tantalum and 21-6-9 stainless steel were a poorer match to the experimental values. Accuracy in materials properties proved extremely important in predicting weld behavior, as minor changes in certain properties had a significant effect on calculated keyhole depth. For each of the materials tested, the correlation between simulated and experimental keyhole depths deviated as the laser power was increased. Using the model as a simulation tool, we conclude that the optical absorptivity of the material is the most influential factor in determining the keyhole depth. Future work will be performed to further investigate these effects and to develop a better match between the model and the experimental results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and tantalum.

  17. Rapid-flow combined-action industrial CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, N. A.; Zimakov, V. P.; Kosynkin, V. D.; Raizer, Iu. P.; Solovev, N. G.

    1982-08-01

    A general-purpose industrial CO2 laser intended for both CW and pulse-periodic operation and emitting pulses of a duration (up to 100 microsec) suitable for industrial applications is described. The operation derives from the method of creating a highly homogeneous glow discharge of large volume in a closed-cycle system. It involves setting up a high-power longitudinal (along the direction of the gas flow) on non-self-sustained discharge whose sole function is to provide laser pumping. The relatively low-power repetitive high-voltage pulses that ionize the gas are applied capacitatively to the discharge plasma without electrodes. The laser generates an average power of 1 kW at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz, or 1.5 kW CW. The maximum output powers are, respectively, 1.5 and 2 kW.

  18. The TEA CO2-Lasers with High Output Emission Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, А. V.; Jun, Yao

    2014-03-01

    TEA CO2-lasers generating short pulse radiation and operating in a pulse-periodic mode with the repetition rate up to 10 Hz have been developed. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen up to 8% in the mixture of molecular gases СО2:H2 = 500:50 at a total pressure of P = 0.6 bar enhances the peak emission power maintaining the temporary pulse shape. An output beam intensity of 12.3 MW/cm2 was obtained for the 30 ns pulse at a laser efficiency of 2.8%. In a compact TEA СО2-laser with an active medium volume of 6 cm3, a beam with an output intensity of 24 MW/cm2 at pulse duration of 70 ns was obtained.

  19. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  20. Precise measurements of the total concentration of atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio using a lead-salt laser diode spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Croizé, Laurence; Mondelain, Didier; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Delmotte, Marc; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a tunable diode laser spectrometer, called SIMCO (spectrometer for isotopic measurements of CO(2)), for determining the concentrations of (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2) in atmospheric air, from which the total concentration of CO(2) and the isotopic composition (expressed in delta units) delta(13)CO(2) are calculated. The two concentrations are measured using a pair of lines around 2290.1 cm(-1), by fitting a line profile model, taking into account the confinement narrowing effect to achieve a better accuracy. Using the Allan variance, we have demonstrated (for an integration time of 25 s) a precision of 0.1 ppmv for the total CO(2) concentration and of 0.3[per thousand] for delta(13)CO(2). The performances on atmospheric air have been tested during a 3 days campaign by comparing the SIMCO instrument with a gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of the total CO(2) concentration and with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (MS) for the isotopic composition. The CO(2) concentration measurements of SIMCO are in very good agreement with the GC data with a mean difference of Delta(CO(2))=0.16+/-1.20 ppmv for a comparison period of 45 h and the linearity of the concentration between the two instruments is also very good (slope of correlation: 0.9996+/-0.0003) over the range between 380 and 415 ppmv. For delta(13)CO(2), the comparison with the MS data shows a larger mean difference of Delta(delta(13)CO(2))=(-1.9+/-1.2)[per thousand], which could be partly related to small residual fluctuations of the overall SIMCO instrument response. PMID:18447517

  1. Laser plant "Iguana" for transmyocardial revascularization based on kW-level waveguide CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Bockeria, L. A.; Berishvili, I. I.; Vasiltsov, Victor V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Ul'yanov, Valery A.

    2001-05-01

    For many years the Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAN has been developing a concept of high-power industrial CO2 lasers with diffusion cooling of the working medium. The paper gives a description of the laser medical system Iguana for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) as an example of various applications of high-power waveguide CO2 lasers. The clinical results of the TMLR method application in surgical treatment are presented. The methods of determination of the time, when the laser beam passes through the demarcation line between myocardium tissue and blood, are discussed.

  2. Welding of transparent polymers using femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Gian-Luca; Rung, Stefan; Hellmann, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Based on nonlinear absorption, we report on laser welding of cycloolefin copolymers without any additional absorption layer employing infrared femtosecond laser. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ultrashort laser welding of this material class, revealing a remarkable high processing speed of 20 mm/s in a single pass mode. Using a 1028 nm laser having a pulse duration of 220 fs at a repetition rate of 571 kHz leads to a welding seam width between 38 and 137 μm, depending on the applied laser average power. The welded joint is characterized by a maximum shear strength of 40 MPa. The experimental results are compared to those reported for femtosecond laser welding of PMMA and to those published for using a Thulium fiber laser.

  3. Endoscopic CO(2) Laser Horizontal Partial Laryngectomy in Larynx Carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Iannini, Valeria; Faita, Antonio; Bianchini, Enzo; Stomeo, Francesco; Pelucchi, Stefano; Pastore, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm, with both a malignant epithelial and mesenchymal component, that rarely affects the larynx. Aim. Aim of this paper is to describe the case of a patient affected by a larynx carcinosarcoma treated by endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy with CO(2) laser and particularly discuss the histogenetic hypothesis as well as the possible treatment modalities of this rare lesion. Methods. Case report and literature review. Discussion and Conclusion. Still little is known about the biology of carcinosarcoma and there is still no consensus in the literature on the treatment of these tumors. Endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy could represent another treatment option in selected cases. PMID:25126435

  4. CO2 laser induced long period gratings in optical microfibers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Haifeng; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Min

    2009-11-23

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are fabricated by use of focused high frequency CO(2) laser pulses to periodically modify the transverse dimension of silica microfibers. A 20-period LPG with a 27 dB attenuation dip is realized in a microfiber with a diameter of approximately 6.3 microm. The resonant wavelength has a negative temperature coefficient and a high sensitivity to external refractive index. The microfiber LPGs may be useful in micron scale in-fiber devices and sensors. PMID:19997432

  5. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  6. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Smithers, Martin E.; Murty, Rom

    1991-01-01

    The experimental results will enable a comparison of the numerical code output with experimental data. This will ensure verification of the validity of the code. The measurements were made on a modified commercial CO2 laser. Results are listed as following. (1) The pulse shape and energy dependence on gas pressure were measured. (2) The intrapulse frequency chirp due to plasma and laser induced medium perturbation effects were determined. A simple numerical model showed quantitative agreement with these measurements. The pulse to pulse frequency stability was also determined. (3) The dependence was measured of the laser transverse mode stability on cavity length. A simple analysis of this dependence in terms of changes to the equivalent fresnel number and the cavity magnification was performed. (4) An analysis was made of the discharge pulse shape which enabled the low efficiency of the laser to be explained in terms of poor coupling of the electrical energy into the vibrational levels. And (5) the existing laser resonator code was changed to allow it to run on the Cray XMP under the new operating system.

  7. Hailey-Hailey disease improved by fractional CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-García, Andres Eduardo; Torres-Alvarez, Bertha; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), also known as benign familial pemphigus, is an autosomal dominant skin condition that affects the adhesion of epidermal keratinocytes. Although the initial manifestation of flaccid vesicles on erythematous or normal skin in flexure sites frequently goes unnoticed, large, macerated, exudative plaques of superficial erosions with crusting are observed at the time of diagnosis. There is no specific treatment for HHD, and most cases are symptomatically supported. However, infrared laser ablation has been somewhat helpful. We present a case successfully treated with fractional CO2 laser showing a long-term favourable outcome and no adverse effects. Thus, this modality could be an alternative to full ablation for this condition. PMID:25602185

  8. Cold cathodes for sealed off CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U. E.; Sciacca, T. P.; Hurt, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results of a group of theoretically selected cold cathode materials are presented. These tests indicate Ag-CuO, Cu, and Pt-Cu as three new cold cathode materials for sealed-off CO2 lasers. The power output of a test laser with an Ag-CuO cathode and a gas volume of only 50 cu cm varied from 0.72 W to 1.1 W at 3000 hours and still yields 0.88 W after 8000 hours. Gas discharge tubes with Cu cathodes and a volume of 25 cu cm yield lifetimes in excess of 10,000 hours. Gas analysis results, obtained from a similar tube over a period of 3000 hours, look most promising. A Pt-Cu alloy cathode shows an extremely promising V-I characteristic over a period of 2800 hours.

  9. Inverse free electron lasers and laser wakefield acceleration driven by CO2 lasers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, W D; Andreev, N E; Babzien, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Cline, D B; Dilley, C E; Gottschalk, S C; Hooker, S M; Kusche, K P; Kuznetsov, S V; Pavlishin, I V; Pogorelsky, I V; Pogosova, A A; Steinhauer, L C; Ting, A; Yakimenko, V; Zigler, A; Zhou, F

    2006-03-15

    The staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA) experiment demonstrated staging between two laser-driven devices, high trapping efficiency of microbunches within the accelerating field and narrow energy spread during laser acceleration. These are important for practical laser-driven accelerators. STELLA used inverse free electron lasers, which were chosen primarily for convenience. Nevertheless, the STELLA approach can be applied to other laser acceleration methods, in particular, laser-driven plasma accelerators. STELLA is now conducting experiments on laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). Two novel LWFA approaches are being investigated. In the first one, called pseudo-resonant LWFA, a laser pulse enters a low-density plasma where nonlinear laser/plasma interactions cause the laser pulse shape to steepen, thereby creating strong wakefields. A witness e-beam pulse probes the wakefields. The second one, called seeded self-modulated LWFA, involves sending a seed e-beam pulse into the plasma to initiate wakefield formation. These wakefields are amplified by a laser pulse following shortly after the seed pulse. A second e-beam pulse (witness) follows the seed pulse to probe the wakefields. These LWFA experiments will also be the first ones driven by a CO(2) laser beam. PMID:16483952

  10. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  11. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  12. Laser spot welding of electronic micro parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Andreas; Temme, Thorsten; Zeadan, Jeihad

    2004-10-01

    This paper deals with parameter optimization and online monitoring of laser spot welding (LSW). Using Nd:YAG laser, a wide range of experiments regarding the welding process have been carried out for both successful and failed welds. The typical failures appearing during packaging of surface mounted devices (SMDs) on flexible printed circuits (FPC) include gaps, a loss of connection between the welded components, and damage of the printed circuit boards. A flip-flop device called SO16 and lead frames as two components of widely used SMDs were packaged on FPCs in the experiments. The reproducibility of the weld quality for SO16 (FeNi) is greater than for lead frames (CuFe2P); this points out the difficulties appearing during copper or copper alloy welding. However, a correlation between the weld quality and the detected emission signals recorded during the weld process has been found for both components. The detected signals of the optical process emission for successful welds depict identical characterisics which are divided into three relevant signal phases. Changes in the signal characteristics, especially in these phases, imply information about the weld quality. While monitoring the welding processes for both components are possible, the detected signals for SO16 are less sensitive to process variations compared to those for lead frames. Based on spectral analysis, the intensity of the detected emission due to SO16 welding is slightly higher than the intensity due to lead frames welding.

  13. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2 and implications for the global CO2 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in hydrothermal/volcanic environments has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potential of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted between April 2013 and March 2014 at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t d-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t d-1; La Fossa crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in the hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at the global scale.

  14. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2, and implications for the global CO2 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-08-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in volcanic-hydrothermal environment has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted (between April 2013 and March 2014) at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross-sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The so-calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t day-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t day-1; "La Fossa" crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at global scale.

  15. Laser welding--suitable for vascular anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, W; Gruber, G; Iversen, S; Oelert, H

    1994-12-01

    Carotid arteries of 21 piglets were transsected and reanastomosed either by laser welding (Neodym:YAG laser) or by conventional suture anastomosis. Histological specimens of the anastomoses obtained 2 to 32 days after the operation showed less foreign body reaction and intimal hyperplasia after laser welding than after suturing. There was, however, no significant difference when comparing occurrence of thrombosis, patency rate, or growth of the anastomosis in growing animals. Neither our study nor a review of the literature of laser-assisted vascular anastomosis in microvessels and large arteries up to 5 mm diameter could establish a definite clinical application for laser welding in vascular anastomosis. PMID:7534952

  16. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1984-01-01

    The RF excited 2 to 3W CW CO2 waveguide lasers with lifetimes of the order of 10(4) to 2.10(4) hours were produced. This was achieved with CO and N2 bearing gas mixtures and with internal as well as external discharge electrodes. It is noted that these tests were conducted with unstabilized lasers which drift around in their signatures. The average power output was reduced to about one half of the highest peak power output in the signature. One of the lasers, no. 1.1, still shows 60% of its original output power after it was cycled on and off every 10 minutes for more than 50,000 times. The starting voltage and driving point impedance of the RF excited gas discharge structure for different gas pressures and mixtures were measured. These data will serve as a basis for the matching and starting network optimization. The second laser body was frit and indium sealed. To our a vacuum leak between the bore and electrode holes was noted. The leak seems to be due to a defect or crack in the BeO body.

  17. Laser Micro Welding for Ribbon Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlmann, Benjamin; Gehlen, Elmar; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gillner, Arnold

    Laser ribbon bonding is a new field of application for laser micro welding in the electronics industry especially in the area of power electronics. Traditional ribbon bonding is conducted by using ultrasonic welding to create the bond between the aluminum or copper ribbon and a conductive surface. By adapting an ultrasonic ribbon bonder and equipping it with a fiber laser, a galvanometric scanner and a beam focusing and delivery system, a new technology for ribbon bonding is created. The presented work includes test results of the welding of copper ribbons with a thickness of 300 μm to DCB-substrates and the system design of the "laser bonder". For the laser welding of the ribbons spatial power modulation is being used and the effect of this approach on the welded ribbons is presented. The work concludes with advantages and limits of the technology especially concerning the applications compared to ultrasonic bonding.

  18. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis using laser nerve welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding to microsurgical suturing of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HFA), and a result of immediate to delayed repair, and to evaluate the effect of laser nerve welding on HFA for reanimation of facial palsy. The first group of five rats underwent immediate HFA by microsurgical suturing and the second group of five rats by CO2 laser welding. The third group of five rats underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing, and the fourth group of five rats by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of five rats served as controls, with intact hypoglossal and facial nerve. In all rats of the four different treatment groups, cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative 6th week and in the normal hypoglossal nerve in the five rats of the control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 751 +/- 247 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 888 +/- 60 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.117). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 749 +/- 54 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 590 +/- 169 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). The difference was not significant (P = 0.116). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.600), but there was significance between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.009). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1,003 +/- 52. No dehiscence in the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis was seen at the time of re-exploration for injection of CTb in all 10 rats. This study shows that the regeneration of anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by laser welding and microsurgical suturing

  19. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  20. Statistical modeling of laser welding of DP/TRIP steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Mokrov, O.; Ahmed, E.

    2012-02-01

    In this research work, a statistical analysis of the CO 2 laser beam welding of dual phase (DP600)/transformation induced plasticity (TRIP700) steel sheets was done using response surface methodology. The analysis considered the effect of laser power (2-2.2 kW), welding speed (40-50 mm/s) and focus position (-1 to 0 mm) on the heat input, the weld bead geometry, uniaxial tensile strength, formability limited dome height and welding operation cost. The experimental design was based on Box-Behnken design using linear and quadratic polynomial equations for predicting the mathematical models. The results indicate that the proposed models predict the responses adequately within the limits of welding parameters being used and the welding speed is the most significant parameter during the welding process.

  1. Fast spatial-resolved beam diagnostics for material processing by industrial CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinen, Dirk; Decker, Ingo; Wohlfahrt, Helmut

    1996-09-01

    Due to the increasing range of high-speed and high-accuracy applications in material processing, especially in laser beam welding and cutting, the temporal stability of the laser beam parameters becomes more and more important. In this paper a laser beam diagnostic device is presented, that allows the determination of the intensity-profiles of high- power CO2 lasers with high time-resolution. The detector of this device consists of two linear arrays of room- temperature HgCdTe-detectors, arranged perpendicularly to each other across the center of the beam. The data of the 70 detector elements is acquired simultaneously at rates up to 15 kS/sec for single shot events and several 100 kS/sec for repetitive laser pulses. Due to the use of a digital signal processor (DSP) and an especially adapted software, it is possible to analyze the fluctuations of the intensity distribution on-line. By help of a partially transmitting mirror in the beam delivery system, measurements can be performed during material processing. Therefore, the interaction of the laser beam source itself with the material processing due to beam reflection as well as influences of the industrial environment to the laser can be detected. The calculation of the local variance and mean values enables the dependence of the laser's short- and long-term stability to be investigated due to changes in the resonator alignment, the stability of the power supply, the gas composition etc., as well as to the influence of the processing. For the pulse-mode of a laser, its transient behavior like changes of the intensity distribution can be determined with high time-resolution. For the improvement of drilling processes, the calculation of further statistical functions by the DSP makes it possible to estimate the uniformity of the laser pulses on-line as well.

  2. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  3. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  4. Factors influencing pricking pain threshold using a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Voegelin, M R; Zoppi, M; Meucci, R; Jafrancesco, D; Bartoli, A

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the best experimental conditions in healthy subjects for the measurement of the minimal thermal energy density E1 which induced pricking pain on the volar surface of the left forearm by means of CO2 laser pulses. E1 was measured on a well-defined area, using laser pulses of different durations and constant power P. The dependence of E1 on the stimulus power P, the size A of the radiated area and the surface temperature T(e) were explored. In the first part of the study, these relations were obtained using a computer program, from the calculated spatio-temporal distribution of the skin temperature during, and following, a laser pulse which caused pricking pain. The second part studied a set of subsequent measurements carried out on a group of five healthy trained subjects and agreed only in part with the calculated data. We found that the measurement error on E(t) was less than 10% with P between 1.5 and 3 W, and A between 0.15 and 0.25 cm2, respectively. The influence of sensitization and adaptation phenomena on the measured data was also explored. We also show a rhythmic annual change of T(e) and E1. PMID:12636187

  5. Effect Of Laser CO2 Parameters In Marking Of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafi-Benghalem, Nafissa; Benghalem, Kamel; Boudoukha, Hassina

    2008-09-01

    Currently many techniques of marking are exploited in a great number of sectors, on various materials (cardboard, textile, wood, leather, plastic, metal, ceramics and glass). The printing is done on supports of great or small dimension for all geometrical forms (plane, round, conical and ovalised). We can print colour as much than we wish. The marking technology for the identification of the glass parts knows a remarkable development carried by the new needs for the industrialists using transparent materials such as the optical, chemical, pharmaceutical sectors, the luxury and drink industries or publicity and decoration (neon signs, advertising mirrors). The objective of our work consists particularly in engraving on glass the measurement scales forming a whole of ordered graduation which the goal is to carry out reading systems of measuring apparatus about 1/10 μm of precision. We used as tool for marking the laser CO2. Our choice is justified by the flexibility of the laser, the permanent lifespan of the graduations carried out and the guarantee of the facility of reading incidentally the precision and the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. The study parameters of the laser beam are the velocity (400, 600, 800, 1000 m/s.), the power (25, 75 and 80% of 25W) and the numbers pass (one, two and three pass). The optical observations results obtained suggest that the highest and the average power used remain the favourable parameters for the quality of the graduations carried out.

  6. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  7. Nonlinear transmission of CO2 laser radiation by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorochenko, V. R.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Rusakov, P. S.; Rybin, M. G.

    2012-10-01

    The nonlinear transmission of multilayer (~12 layers) graphene at the wavelength λ ~ 10 μm is measured for the first time. The absorption saturation intensity in graphene (~330 kW cm-2) and the ablation threshold of its outer layers (~1 MW cm-2, 0.11 J cm-2) under action of a CO2 laser pulse with a duration of 70 — 85 ns at λ = 10.55 μm are determined. The residual absorption of graphene at its partial saturation was 48 % of the initial value. This is significantly smaller than the value measured previously for samples with a close number of layers at λ = 1.55 μm (92.3 % — 93.8 %). It is shown that the ablation threshold of two graphene layers adjacent to the BaF2 substrate (after successive ablation of outer layers) exceeds 0.27 J cm-2.

  8. Cold cathodes for sealed off CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results of a group of theoretically selected cold cathode materials are presented. These tests indicate Ag-CuO, Cu and Pt-Cu as three new cold cathode materials for sealed off CO2 lasers. The power output of a test with an Ag-CuO cathode and a gas volume of only 50 cubic centimeters varied from 0.72 W to 1.1 W at 3000 hours and yields still 0.88 W after 8000 hours. Gas discharge tubes with Cu cathodes and a volume of 25 cubic centimeters yield life times in excess of 10,000 hours. Gas analysis results, obtained from a similar tube over a period of 3000 hours, look most promising. A Pt-Cu alloy cathode shows an extremely promising V-I characteristic over a period of 2800 hours.

  9. Laser-welded Dissimilar Steel-aluminum Seams for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimek, M.; Springer, A.; Kaierle, S.; Kracht, D.; Wesling, V.

    By reducing vehicle weight, a significant increase in fuel efficiency and consequently a reduction in CO 2 emissions can be achieved. Currently a high interest in the production of hybrid weld seams between steel and aluminum exists. Previous methods as laser brazing are possible only by using fluxes and additional materials. Laser welding can be used to join steel and aluminum without the use of additives. With a low penetration depth increases in tensile strength can be achieved. Recent results from laser welded overlap seams show that there is no compromise in strength by decreasing penetration depth in the aluminum.

  10. Laser tissue welding: a urological surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Poppas, D P; Scherr, D S

    1998-07-01

    Laser tissue welding has proven its efficacy in the laboratory setting when compared with more traditional modalities of tissue reapproximation. In the clinical environment, several areas including urethral reconstructive surgery have shown great promise. Several technological advancements including solder development, chromophore enhancement and temperature control have improved upon the welding process and have added more precision and reproducibility to the technique. The current potential applications for laser welding in urology are numerous. On a molecular level, growth factor supplementation has certain potential in improving upon weld site healing and wound strength. Laparoscopic surgery with its need for less cumbersome modes of tissue closure is a field that will greatly benefit from the technology of laser tissue welding. Surgical specialties outside of urology are also participating in developing the field of laser welding. In particular, cardiothoracic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, neurosurgery among others, have utilized the concept of laser tissue welding. There are many ares that have potential use for laser welding that have yet to be explored. Further investigation will likely reveal more applications for this valuable technology. PMID:9873775

  11. Study on CO2 laser weldability of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chaoyu; Lin, Chengxin; Liu, Linlin

    2011-11-01

    In this study, a cross-flow laser with maximum out power of 5kW was applied to the welding of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys (SMA). The optimal welding processing parameters of 1mm thick Fe-Mn-Si SMA were established by orthogonal experiment. With the optimal processing parameters, power 1600W, welding speed 2.2m/min, defocusing distance 0.6mm, the tensile strength of the welded joint can achieve 93.5% of the base material, and the weld undercut and reinforcement transfer smoothly on the surface of the welding seam and the cross-section of the welding seam morphology presents "X" shape. The fracture appears in the weld fusion zone, so this area is weak during the laser welding. By the metallographic observation, the weld center structure is small equated, and the region of fusion zone is thick cellular crystal that decreases the strength of the welded joint, and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) test proves that the laser welding promotes the grain refinement. The micro-hardness analysis shows that the hardness of the fusion zone is lower than the other area clearly which is also associated to the weld structure. By the fracture scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, it is found that the fracture of Fe-Mn-Si SMA shows many small dimples with the optimal parameters, and the result is accorded with the base material which belongs to plastic fracture.

  12. Study on CO2 laser weldability of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chaoyu; Lin, Chengxin; Liu, Linlin

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a cross-flow laser with maximum out power of 5kW was applied to the welding of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys (SMA). The optimal welding processing parameters of 1mm thick Fe-Mn-Si SMA were established by orthogonal experiment. With the optimal processing parameters, power 1600W, welding speed 2.2m/min, defocusing distance 0.6mm, the tensile strength of the welded joint can achieve 93.5% of the base material, and the weld undercut and reinforcement transfer smoothly on the surface of the welding seam and the cross-section of the welding seam morphology presents "X" shape. The fracture appears in the weld fusion zone, so this area is weak during the laser welding. By the metallographic observation, the weld center structure is small equated, and the region of fusion zone is thick cellular crystal that decreases the strength of the welded joint, and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) test proves that the laser welding promotes the grain refinement. The micro-hardness analysis shows that the hardness of the fusion zone is lower than the other area clearly which is also associated to the weld structure. By the fracture scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, it is found that the fracture of Fe-Mn-Si SMA shows many small dimples with the optimal parameters, and the result is accorded with the base material which belongs to plastic fracture.

  13. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  14. Laser Welding Dissimilar Reflective Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.; Gopinathan, S.; Kahlen, F.; Speigel, L.

    1993-01-01

    This project, jointly sponsored by Rocketdyne and CSTAR, involves the development of laser joining of materials which have heretofore been impractical to bond. Of particular interest are joints between stainless steel and copper and also aluminum 6061 to aluminum 2219. CSTAR has a unique opportunity in this area since both the process and development and diagnostics are of interest to industry. Initial results using the pulse tailored laser welding technique developed in CLA for joining crack sensitive materials have proven promising for the aluminum joints based upon metallurgical and electronic microprobe analysis. A declaration of success requires additional mechanical testing. A CW technique has been applied to the stainless-copper joining with some preliminary success. These joints are of significant interest for aeronautics and rocket propulsion applications and the project is expected to continue.

  15. Laser welding dissimilar reflective alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, M. H.; Gopinathan, S.; Kahlen, F.; Speigel, L.

    1993-01-01

    This project, jointly sponsored by Rocketdyne and CSTAR, involves the development of laser joining of materials which have heretofore been impractical to bond. Of particular interest are joints between stainless steel and copper and also aluminum 6061 to aluminum 2219. CSTAR has a unique opportunity in this area since both the process and development and diagnostics are of interest to industry. Initial results using the pulse tailored laser welding technique developed in CLA for joining crack sensitive materials have proven promising for the aluminum joints based upon metallurgical and electronic microprobe analysis. A declaration of success requires additional mechanical testing. A CW technique has been applied to the stainless-copper joining with some preliminary success. These joints are of significant interest for aeronautics and rocket propulsion applications and the project is expected to continue.

  16. [Significance of the CO2-laser angle, oral cavity endoscopes].

    PubMed

    Gáspár, L; Bakos, R; Kásler, M

    1991-10-01

    The CO2-laser ray guided at 90 degrees to the surface creates a crater of typical "v" shape. If the guide angle of the ray deviates therefrom and the smaller the angle of incidence than 90 degrees, destruction becomes the more astymmetric, the crater takes an ever more flattened eliptical shape. The lack of tissue becomes even more superficial, thus removal of a circumscribed pathological area requires the sacrifice of more ambient healthy tissue. Consterning the possible angle of incidence of the laser ray instrumental measurements were carried out. It has been ascertained that in the pharinx third of the mouth cavity behind the plain corresponding to the premolars, as a rule, only guide angles below 50 degrees, in the middle third of the mouth cavity corresponding to the area between the front teeth and the molars guide angles between 50-70 degrees, and in the front third mostly a ray guiding below 90 degrees are possible. In the middle and rear third of the mouth cavity the ideal rey-guiding at 90 degrees can be obtained but with reflection, certain areas even cannot be treated directly, are visible but in mirrors. By transforming the hand piece of the laser apparatus endoscopes with fixed mirror and rotating mirror have been constructed. By means of the endoscope with fixed mirror already all parts of the mouth cavity have been rendered accessible while the rotating mirror model became suitable even to admit the laser ray to the surfaces at the ideal angle of incidence of 90(2). PMID:1765203

  17. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries. PMID:25322246

  18. Laser weld repair of tantalum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oldani, J.J.; Westrich, C.N.

    1992-12-01

    Tantalum sheets which are used in radiographic film cassettes for high explosives studies were repaired using Nd:YAG laser welding. The tantalum sheets can receive various levels of indentations and/or scratches which can leave radiographic indications during use in subsequent studies. Laser welding using a Raytheon 400 watt Nd:YAG laser and a 0.010 inch diameter tantalum filler wire with argon cover gas was used to fill in these false indications. A successful weld repair is required to give no radiographic indications, neither high nor low density readings.

  19. Laser weld penetration estimation using temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lankalapalli, K.N.; Tu, J.F.; Leong, K.H.; Gartner, M.

    1997-10-01

    Penetration depth is an important factor critical to the quality of a laser weld. This paper examines the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the bottom surface of the work-piece to estimate weld penetration. A three-dimensional analytical model relating penetration depth, weld bead width and welding speed to temperature distribution at the bottom surface of the workpiece is developed. Temperatures on the bottom surface of the workpiece are measured using infrared thermocouples located behind the laser beam. Experimental results from bead-on-plate welds on low carbon steel plates of varying thickness at different levels of laser power and speeds validate the model and show that the temperature on the bottom surface is a sensitive indicator of penetration depth. The proposed model is computationally efficient and is suitable for on-line process monitoring application.

  20. Monitoring of catalyst performance in CO2 lasers using frequency modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle CO2 laser operation with removal of O2 and regeneration of CO2 can be achieved by catalytic CO-O2 recombination. Both parametric studies of the optimum catalyst formulation and long-term performance tests require on line monitoring of CO, O2 and CO2 concentrations. There are several existing methods for molecular oxygen detection. These methods are either intrusive (such as electrochemical method or mass spectrometry) or very expensive (such as CARS, UV laser absorption). Researchers demonstrated a high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using the two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) technique with a near infrared GaAlAs diode laser. Besides its inexpensive cost, fast response time, nonintrusive measurements and high sensitivity, this technique may also be used to differentiate between isotopes due to its high spectroscopic resolution. This frequency modulation spectroscopy technique could also be applied for the on-line monitoring of CO and CO2 using InGaAsP diode lasers operation in the 1.55 microns region and H2O in the 1.3 microns region. The existence of single mode optical fibers at the near infrared region makes it possible to combine FMS with optical fiber technology. Optical fiber FMS is particularly suitable for making point-measurements at one or more locations in the CO2 laser/catalyst system.

  1. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvani, S.; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H.; Montazerolghaem, M.; Mollabashi, M.; Naeimi, S. A.; Esmaeilpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO2 laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO2 laser with optimised composition of the CO2:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system.

  2. Laser beam welding shifts into high gear

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    1997-11-01

    Despite its high initial cost, laser beam welding is being recognized as the best method for many production lines. The automotive industry is becoming a bigger believer, with more lines being added every day for weld transmissions, mufflers and many other products. But the biggest market is tailor welded blanks. The welded blank is receiving attention from all sides. Several steelmakers have invested in tailor welded blank shops. The market for these blanks is no longer one only supported by CO{sub 2} lasers. The YAG laser is now very prominent. Only a few years ago, laser experts wondered what the market might be for 5 kW CO{sub 2} lasers. No one knew. But that has changed. Since then, lasers have become much more compact, and that means a great deal to the automotive industry in particular. The same space needed to house a 5-kW laser five years ago now can be employed for a 12-kW unit. The cost also has stabilized considerably. Dollars spent today for a kilowatt of laser power are about the same as they were five years ago. Compare that to the increase in the cost for the family automobile. It`s also a better laser. Thought also is being given to the replacement of the 3,000 spot welds per vehicle by another means of joining. Laser is a strong candidate, but it might take a total redesign of an automobile to allow that to happen. To take full advantage of laser beam welding, flanges probably would have to be eliminated. However, shorter lead time is needed between concept and production. Agile manufacturing is required to bring that about, and the laser is fast becoming a basic tool of agile manufacturing.

  3. Microstructure characterization of laser welded Ti-6Al-4V fusion zones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pei-quan; Li, Leijun Zhang, Chunbo

    2014-01-15

    The as-welded microstructure of laser-welded Ti-6Al-4V is characterized as a function of CO2 key-hole mode laser welding speed. Martensitic α′ is the predominant phase, with some α and retained β. Phase transformation is affected by the cooling rate through laser welding speed. A higher welding speed of 1.6 to 2.0 m/min produced more martensite α′ and less retained β in the welds. 1.4 m/min welding speed produced small amounts of α, besides the martensite α′. A trace of δ titanium hydride phase seems to have formed in the weld fusion zone. Moiré fringes are a common feature in the TEM microstructure, due to abundance of multi-phase interfaces. Tensile twins and clusters of dislocations indicate that plastic deformation has happened in the as-welded microstructure, indicating the local stress levels to be approaching the yield stress on-cooling during laser welding.

  4. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  5. Improvement of Weld Characteristics by Laser-Arc Double-Sided Welding Compared to Single Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenglong; Zhang, Kezhao; Hu, Xue; Yang, Yuhe; Chen, Yanbin; Wu, Yichao

    2015-11-01

    The single arc welding and laser-arc double-sided welding (LADSW) processes are investigated by virtue of test welds. The impacts of the laser beam during the LADSW process on the weld characteristics are studied from weld geometry, crystal morphology, and the mechanical properties of the joints. Compared with the single arc welding, the LADSW process improves the energy density and reduces the range of arc action, which together leads to a doubling of weld penetration depth. When penetrated by the laser beam, the liquid metal of the arc welding pool experiences severe fluctuations, leading to a finer grain size in the range of 17-26 μm in the LADSW weld, a reduction of nearly 63% compared to the grains in the single arc weld. The tensile strength and elongation-to-failure of the LADSW weld were increased by nearly 10 and 100% over the single arc welding, respectively.

  6. Polyethylene welding by pulsed visible laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2011-01-01

    Laser welding of plastics is a relatively new process that induces locally a fast polymer heating. For most applications, the process involves directing a pulsed beam of visible light at the weld joint by going through one of the two parts. This is commonly referred to as “through transmission visible laser welding”. In this technique, the monochromatic visible light source uses a power ns pulsed laser in order to irradiate the joint through one part and the light is absorbed in the vicinity of the other part. In order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of the welded joint, mass quadrupole spectrometry, surface profilometry, microscopy techniques and mechanical shear tests were employed. The welding effect was investigated as a function of the laser irradiation time, nature of the polyethylene materials and temperature.

  7. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  8. Component temperature versus laser-welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Applications have arisen in which the component temperature near a laser weld is critical because of possible damage to the explosive powder adjacent to the member being welded. To evaluate the thermal excursion experienced at the powder cavity wall, a study was conducted using assemblies that had been equipped with 0.05 mm diameter thermocouple wires. The main goal of the study was to determine how changes in the laser welding parameters owuld affect the powder cavity wall temperature. The objective lens-to-work distance, pulse rate, and beam power parameters were varied. The peak temperature varied from 117/sup 0/C to 311/sup 0/C in response to welding parameter changes. The study concluded that by utilizing a selected set of welding parameters, the design requirement of a 160/sup 0/C maximum powder cavity wall temperature could easily be satisfied.

  9. Combination of laser keyhole and conduction welding: Dissimilar laser welding of niobium and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkamany, M. J.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Poursalehi, R.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2016-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of pure niobium plate to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V sheet in butt joint is studied regarding the laser/metal interaction modes. To obtain the optimized process parameters in dissimilar welding of Ti-6Al-4V/Nb, the melting ratio of laser beam energy for each weld counterpart is evaluated experimentally. Different laser welding modes of keyhole and conduction are predicted regarding the absorbed energy from the similar laser pulses on each weld counterpart. Laser keyhole and conduction welding were observed simultaneously through direct visualization of laser interaction with dissimilar metals using High Speed Imaging (HSI) system.

  10. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  11. Laser Welding Systems For Hermetic Sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnos, Charles M.

    1986-11-01

    High-speed laser welding systems have been developed to hermetically seal electronic packages, diaphragms, etc., for commercial, medical, and military applications. An inert atmosphere chamber is incorporated when welding must be done in a moisture-free and oxygen-free gas environment. Interface of a multi-axis positioner and computer numerical control with the laser allows programmability of all weld schedule parameters. This degree of automation minimizes process deviation, decreases the risk of human error, and accommodates dimensional tolerances and dissimilarities in part configuration.

  12. Application of YAG laser welding to gas turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuho; Mega, Masahiko; Takahashi, Koji; Uemura, Yoshitaka; Hirota, Norihide; Yamaguchi, Kengo

    2003-03-01

    An investigation to apply YAG laser welding to gas turbine components was carried out. The materials of gas turbine such as Ni base alloy are difficult to weld by conventional arc welding methods because of large heat affection. But laser welding can reduce heat input compared with conventional methods and keeps the good repeatability. The welding parameter survey was carried out to satisfy the designing requirements. The YAG laser welding under appropriate conditions enables to prevent welding defects such as HAZ cracks and improves the weld joints quality and performance. Tensile test and low cycle fatigue test were carried out. Tensile strength and fatigue life of laser weld joints are same or higher than that of conventional manual TIG weld joints. The Automatic YAG laser welding system was also developed and put into practical use.

  13. Laser Peening of Alloy 22 Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D W; Hackel, L A; Lingenfelter, A C

    2002-10-03

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of near-surface Alloy 22 metal can be propagated by yield-point levels (45 ksi) of residual weld tensile stresses. This is a serious concern for welds in the Alloy 22 canister employed in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Waste Package, particularly in closure welds that cannot be stress relieved by conventional heat treating. This work shows that compressive shock waves, driven into a weldment by laser peening, replaces its detrimental tensile stresses of 30-80 ksi with compressive stresses of 2-25 ksi or better that retard SCC. This benefit occurs in the top 1.5 mm (or more) of the material without appreciable heating. It was also found that quenching after solution annealing and shot peening during production of Alloy 22 plate imparts compressive stresses of 35-105 ksi near the surface, a very large buffer against SCC. This means that if seam-welded hollow canisters likewise gain compressive stresses upon post-weld annealing and quenching, and if closure welds are laser peened, all surfaces of the canister would be under compression, thereby precluding SCC of the Alloy 22 canister. Laser peening may plastically deform as much as the top 10% of the metal (about 2 mm out of the 25-mm plate thickness), thereby changing the rate of general corrosion of waste package outer barrier. Long-term corrosion tests of laser peened Alloy 22 welds should be conducted. Present results show that laser peening, currently under development at LLNL using high-energy lasers, induces compressive residual stress on the near surface of the weld. This laser peening process is showing significant retardation of SCC and should be further characterized and assessed to preclude SCC in Alloy 22 canisters.

  14. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  15. Frequency-doubled CO2 lidar measurement and diode laser spectroscopy of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Itabe, T.; Strow, L. L.; Korb, C. L.; Gentry, B. M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A lidar instrument based on pulsed frequency-doubled carbon-dioxide lasers has been used at 4.88 microns for remote sensing of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A tunable-diode laser spectrometer provided the high-resolution spectroscopic data on carbon-dioxide line strength and line broadening needed for an accurate differential absorption measurement. Initial field measurements are presented, and instrument improvements necessary for accurate carbon dioxide measurement are discussed.

  16. Multi-physical Simulation of Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Rodrigo Gómez; Koch, Holger M.; Otto, Andreas

    Laser welding is a highly demanded technology for manufacturing of body parts in the automotive industry. Application of powerful multi-physical simulation models permits detailed investigation of the laser process avoiding intricate experimental setups and procedures. Features like the degree of power coupling, keyhole evolution or currents inside the melt pool can be analyzed easily. The implementation of complex physical phenomena, like multi-reflection absorption provides insight into process characteristics under selectable conditions and yields essential information concerning the driving mechanisms. The implementation of additional physical models e. g. for diffusion discloses new potential for investigating welding of dissimilar materials. In this paper we present a computational study of laser welding for different conditions. Applied to a real case model predictions show good agreement with experimental results. Initial tests including species diffusion during welding of dissimilar materials are also presented.

  17. Evaluation of catalyst for closed cycle operation of high energy pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Miller, I. M.; Wood, G.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Several catalyst materials have been tested for efficiency of converting CO and O2 to CO2 for use in a high energy CO2 laser. The composition of the gas mixtures was monitored by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. A copper/copper oxide catalyst and a platinum/tin oxide catalyst were used for closed cycle operation of a CO2 laser (0.7 joules/pulse), operating at 10 pulses/sec.

  18. Laser cleaning of rust on ship steel using TEA CO2 pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Linda; Zhu, Haihong; Lei, Wenjuan; Cheng, Zuhai

    2009-08-01

    Ship is easy to rust because of its special working condition. Removal of the rust from the ship surface is generally required for maintaining ship. The feasibility of removing rust using pulsed laser has been confirmed by the past researches. However, the general utilized laser, e.g., pulsed Nd: YAG laser with narrow pulse duration and high peak power, suffers very low average power and throughput. TEA CO2 laser, which also has narrow pulse duration and high peak power, is expected to obtain high throughout because it is easy to obtain high average power. This paper investigated the feasibility and the efficiency of removal of rust from the ship steel using TEA CO2 pulsed laser. The results show that TEA CO2 pulsed laser can effectively clean the rust by using suitable parameters without damage the substrate. A cleaning threshold for stripping rust of power density exists. Also, the effect of the process parameters on the efficiency and performance as well as the removal mechanism were studied in this paper.

  19. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study on the corrosion of the weld zone of 3Cr steel welded joints in CO2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-ning; Zhu, Jin-yang; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The welded joints of 3Cr pipeline steel were fabricated with commercial welding wire using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique. Potentiodynamic polarization curves, linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to investigate the corrosion resistance and the growth of a corrosion film on the weld zone (WZ). The changes in electrochemical characteristics of the film were obtained through fitting of the EIS data. The results showed that the average corrosion rate of the WZ in CO2 environments first increased, then fluctuated, and finally decreased gradually. The formation of the film on the WZ was divided into three stages: dynamic adsorption, incomplete-coverage layer formation, and integral layer formation.

  20. Comparison of Ultrasonic and CO2 Laser Pretreatment Methods on Enzyme Digestibility of Corn Stover

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuang-Qi; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Zi-Luan; Zuo, Li-Li

    2012-01-01

    To decrease the cost of bioethanol production, biomass recalcitrance needs to be overcome so that the conversion of biomass to bioethanol becomes more efficient. CO2 laser irradiation can disrupt the lignocellulosic physical structure and reduce the average size of fiber. Analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, specific surface area, and the microstructure of corn stover were used to elucidate the enhancement mechanism of the pretreatment process by CO2 laser irradiation. The present work demonstrated that the CO2 laser had potential to enhance the bioconversion efficiency of lignocellulosic waste to renewable bioethanol. The saccharification rate of the CO2 laser pretreatment was significantly higher than ultrasonic pretreatment, and reached 27.75% which was 1.34-fold of that of ultrasonic pretreatment. The results showed the impact of CO2 laser pretreatment on corn stover to be more effective than ultrasonic pretreatment. PMID:22605970

  1. Technology assessment of high pulse energy CO(2) lasers for remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Schryer, D. R.; Miller, I. M.; Bair, C. H.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments and needs for research to extend the lifetime and optimize the configuration of CO2 laser systems for satellite based on remote sensing of atmospheric wind velocities and trace gases are reviewed. The CO2 laser systems for operational satellite application will require lifetimes which exceed 1 year. Progress in the development of efficient low temperature catalysts and gas mixture modifications for extending the lifetime of high pulse energy closed cycle common and rare isotope CO2 lasers and of sealed CW CO2 lasers is reviewed. Several CO2 laser configurations are under development to meet the requirements including: unstable resonators, master oscillator power amplifiers and telescopic stable resonators, using UV or E-beam preionization. Progress in the systems is reviewed and tradeoffs in the system parameters are discussed.

  2. CO2 laser cleaning of black deposits formed during the excimer laser etching of polyimide in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, G.; Donelon, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 laser cleaning of black debris formed during the excimer laser ablation of polyimide in air is demonstrated. The 10.6 μm CO2 laser radiation is strongly absorbed in the debris but only weakly absorbed in polyimide thus enabling the clean removal of the debris without damaging the polyimide.

  3. Laser Sounder Approach for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Allan, Graham R.; Burris, John F.; Collatz, G. James; Riris, Harris; Stephen, Mark A.; Sun, Xiao-Li; Abshire, James B.

    2004-01-01

    We report on an active remote sensing approach using an erbium fiber amplifier based transmitter for atmospheric CO2 measurements in an overtone band near 1.57 microns and initial horizontal path measurements to less than 1% precision.

  4. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in pediatric transcanal endoscopic middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Landegger, Lukas D; Cohen, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    We describe 4 pediatric patients (age 6-11 years) who underwent transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (TEES) with the assistance of a flexible fiber CO2 laser over a period of 6 months. Three of these individuals suffered from densely adherent cholesteatoma, where the laser permitted one-handed dissection while preserving endoscopic visualization by limiting bleeding. In the fourth patient, TEES ossiculoplasty was performed for a congenital stapes bar, with subsequent hearing improvement. Advantages and disadvantages of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in the setting of TEES are discussed. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser was found to expand the TEES toolkit. PMID:27240515

  5. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Li, Mao-Hui; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang; Duan, Zhu-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc. are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness, static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316 L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side. However, the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density. The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density. The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  6. A fiberoptic compatible midinfrared laser with CO2 laser-like effect: application to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Andrew, J E; Nowygrod, R

    1989-12-01

    In theory, pulses of laser light in the 2-microns range should ablate tissue in a manner similar to that of the 10.6-microns CO2 laser with the added advantage of efficient transmission through flexible quartz fibers. Using 200-microseconds pulses of 2.15-microns thulium-holmium-chromium:YAG (THC:YAG) laser light, we were able to create 700-microns-diameter holes through calcific atherosclerosis in vitro. In vivo evaluation of thrombogenicity and healing was accomplished by exposing the luminal surface of rabbit aortas to the THC:YAG laser. Serial histologic examinations of laser-treated rabbit aortae revealed a time course of resolution of the lesions which was very similar to that observed with like-sized lesions created with the same amount of continuous wave CO2 energy. No significant differences in thrombogenicity nor healing response were noted. The excellent in vivo response observed is due in part to the pulsed nature of the THC:YAG laser output as well as to the efficient tissue absorption at the 2.15-microns wavelength. We feel that excellent ablative effects with minimal collateral thermal damage can be obtained through fiberoptic delivery systems by taking advantage of laser wavelengths corresponding to the infrared absorption peak of water in the 2-microns region and pulsed delivery of the laser energy. PMID:2511380

  7. Atmospheric transmission of CO2 laser radiation with application to laser Doppler systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The molecular absorption coefficients of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrous oxide are calculated at the P16, P18, P20, P22, and P24 lines of the CO2 laser for temperatures from 200 to 300 K and for pressures from 100 to 1100 mb. The temperature variation of the continuum absorption coefficient of water vapor is taken into account semi-empirically from Burch's data. The total absorption coefficient from the present calculations falls within + or - 20 percent of the results of McClatchey and Selby. The transmission loss which the CO2 pulsed laser Doppler system experiences was calculated for flight test conditions for the five P-lines. The total transmission loss is approximately 7 percent higher at the P16 line and 10 percent lower at the P24 line compared to the P20 line. Comparison of the CO2 laser with HF and DF laser transmission reveals the P2(8) line at 3.8 micrometers of the DF laser is much better from the transmission point of view for altitudes below 10 km.

  8. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  9. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  10. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse for hard tissue drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with a circular beam and a low divergence angle. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse width of 103 ns and a pulse tail length of 32.6 μs. The beam cross-section was circular and the full-angle beam divergence was 1.7 mrad. The laser was used to drill ivory samples without carbonization at fluences of 2.3-7.1 J/cm2. The drilling depth of the dry ivory increased with the fluence. The drilling mechanism of the dry ivory was attributed to absorption of the laser light by the ivory.

  11. Microstructures in laser welded high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, P.; Bellingeri, S.; Massimino, F.; Baldissin, D.; Battezzati, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the effect of laser welding on the microstructure was studied for three Advanced High Strength Steels: transformation induced plasticity steel (TRIP), dual phase steel (DP) and martensitic steel. Two sheets of the same steel were laser welded and a microstructural study was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For all samples the welded zone was constituted by martensite and the heat affected zone shows a continuous change in microstructure depending on temperatures reached and on the different cooling rates. The change in mechanical properties in the welded area was followed by Vickers micro-hardness measurements. Quasi binary phase diagrams were calculated and, according to position of T0 lines, it was deduced that austenite is the primary phase forming during rapid solidification for all steels.

  12. Laser detection of CO2 concentration in human breath at various diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, Boris G.; Nikiforova, Olga Y.

    2015-12-01

    Absorption spectra of human breath in 10 μm region were recorded by the use of intracavity laser photo-acoustic gas analyzer based on tunable waveguide CO2 laser. Healthy persons and patients with various diseases were studied. For determination of CO2 concentration in exhalation samples gas analyzer was calibrated by reference gaseous mixture CO2-N2. It was obtained that CO2 concentration values in human breath of healthy persons are greater than that of patients with various diseases.

  13. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Co2 Dissolved in Seawater for Laser Remote Sensing in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    We examined the applicability of Raman lidar technique as a laser remote sensing tool in water. The Raman technique has already been used successfully for measurements of CO2 gas dissolved in water and bubbles. Here, the effect of seawater on CO2 Raman spectra has been evaluated. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was irradiated to CO2 gas dissolved in a standard seawater. In seawater, the Raman signals at 984 and 1060-1180 cm-1 from SO42- were detected, which shows no spectral interference caused by Raman signals derived from CO2.

  14. Optimization of laser welding of DP/TRIP steel sheets using statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Mokrov, O.; Ahmed, E.

    2012-02-01

    Generally, the quality of a weld joint is directly influenced by the welding input parameter settings. Selection of proper process parameters is important to obtain the desired weld bead profile and quality. In this research work, numerical and graphical optimization techniques of the CO 2 laser beam welding of dual phase (DP600)/transformation induced plasticity (TRIP700) steel sheets were carried out using response surface methodology (RSM) based on Box-Behnken design. The procedure was established to improve the weld quality, increase the productivity and minimize the total operation cost by considering the welding parameters range of laser power (2-2.2 kW), welding speed (40-50 mm/s) and focus position (-1 to 0 mm). It was found that, RSM can be considered as a powerful tool in experimental welding optimization, even when the experimenter does not have a model for the process. Strong, efficient and low cost weld joints could be achieved using the optimum welding conditions.

  15. Laser cleaning of ablation debris from CO 2-laser-etched vias in polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupland, Kristen; Herman, Peter R.; Gu, Bo

    1998-05-01

    CO 2-laser-drilled vias in polyimide-based flex circuits generate substantial surface debris, requiring new approaches to reduce or eliminate the debris and therefore do away with wet chemical or plasma cleaning steps. A dry laser cleaning process based on a wavelength-tunable CO 2 laser is shown for the first time to effectively remove the ablation debris. Other techniques based on gas flow, pressure control, or ultraviolet lasers, were found ineffective due to the presence of both massive (>10 μm) fibrous debris and submicron (<500 nm) soot. The debris-removal process is driven by disparate mechanisms. The soot is ejected in only ˜5 laser pulses by rapid thermal expansion of the laser-heated polyimide substrate. The removal of fibrous debris develops over many more pulses and involves Fresnel diffraction, surface-rippling phenomena, and multipulse ablation of the debris fragments. The fastest debris cleaning time of 2.5 s per via was provided by the 9R12 laser line at 20 Hz and 0.6 J/cm 2 fluence.

  16. Corneal welding with the hydrogen fluoride laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John M.; Burstein, Neal L.; Nowicki, Michael J.; Jeffers, William Q.

    1994-06-01

    Our current study has looked at the use of a CW hydrogen fluoride laser to weld human cadaver corneas. The laser used was a Helios CL-II laser operating from 2.3 to 2.6 micrometers . A 6-mm full thickness linear incision was made in the center of the cornea. Two 10-0 nylon sutures were placed to hold the corneal stromal edges apposed during welding. Each specimen was mounted on a motorized micrometer stage. The beam was passed over the incision at a rate of between 0.5-2.0 mm per minute. After welding, the specimens were tested for wound strength by increasing intraocular pressure until the wound leaked. Two eyes had corneal welds performed and pressures of up to twice baseline intraocular pressure could be sustained after the stay sutures were removed. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated full thickness welds to be present. Electron micrographic sections demonstrated apparent interdigitation of collagen fibers between adjacent lamellae. Tissue welding may become an alternate means of wound closure in eye surgery.

  17. Cryogen spray cooling during laser tissue welding.

    PubMed

    Fried, N M; Walsh, J T

    2000-03-01

    Cryogen cooling during laser tissue welding was explored as a means of reducing lateral thermal damage near the tissue surface and shortening operative time. Two centimetre long full-thickness incisions were made on the epilated backs of guinea pigs, in vivo. India ink was applied to the incision edges then clamps were used to appose the edges. A 4 mm diameter beam of 16 W, continuous-wave, 1.06 microm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing approximately 100 ms pulses. There was a delay of 2 s between scans. The total irradiation time was varied from 1-2 min. Cryogen was delivered to the weld site through a solenoid valve in spurt durations of 20, 60 and 100 ms. The time between spurts was either 2 or 4 s, corresponding to one spurt every one or two laser scans. Histology and tensile strength measurements were used to evaluate laser welds. Total irradiation times were reduced from 10 min without surface cooling to under 1 min with surface cooling. The thermal denaturation profile showed less denaturation in the papillary dermis than in the mid-dermis. Welds created using optimized irradiation and cooling parameters had significantly higher tensile strengths (1.7 +/- 0.4 kg cm(-2)) than measured in the control studies without cryogen cooling (1.0 +/- 0.2 kg cm(-2)) (p < 0.05). Cryogen cooling of the tissue surface during laser welding results in increased weld strengths while reducing thermal damage and operative times. Long-term studies will be necessary to determine weld strengths and the amount of scarring during wound healing. PMID:10730969

  18. CO2 laser arthroscopy-through the arthroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick, James G.

    1990-06-01

    Orthopedists have been among the last of the specialists to utilize lasers in surgery. Even today, laser usage in orthopedics is almost exclusively limited to arthroscopy procedures. Although other types of lasers have been approved for use in orthopedics, nearly all laser-assisted arthroscopic procedures have involved the carbon dioxide laser in the knee. These techniques involve skills and problems not previously encountered. In an attempt to simplify the usage and circumvent some of the problems, we describe a means of laser energy delivery through the arthroscope.

  19. Temperature control during laser vessel welding.

    PubMed

    Springer, T A; Welch, A J

    1993-02-01

    A technique is described for the computer control of temperature during laser vessel welding. The technique is based on the use of thermal feedback from a calibrated IR sensor. The utilization of thermalfeedback makes it possible for welding to be performed at a quasiconstant temperature. An experimentalsystem based on this concept has been developed and evaluated in mock anastomoses with vasculartissue. A computer simulation of laser vessel welding with a one-dimensional heat conduction model hasbeen performed. Model parameters have been adjusted so that the relative effect of laser penetrationdepth and tissue dehydration as well as the role of thermal feedback in limiting the peak surfacetemperature can be studied. The results of the mock anastomoses are discussed in light of the computer model. PMID:20802719

  20. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  1. Catalytic Oxidation of CO for Closed-Cycle CO2 Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M., Jr.; Paulin, P. A.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1987-01-01

    Stoichiometric mixture converted completely. High-energy pulsed CO2 lasers have potential for measuring many different features of atmosphere of Earth and particularly useful on airborne or space platforms. For this application, laser must be operated in closed cycle to conserve gas, especially if rare nonradioactive isotopes of carbon and oxygen used. However, laser discharge decomposes fraction of CO2 to CO and O2, causing rapid loss in power leading to erratic behavior. To maintain operation, CO and O2 must be recombined to form CO2.

  2. Experimental Investigation for 100-Joule-class TEA CO2 Laser and Gas Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhiguo; Yao, Honglin; Wang, Jun; Wen, Ming; Wang, Peng; Yang, Jan; Li, Chong

    2006-05-01

    Impulse coupling coefficient Cm is one of the most important performance parameters in laser propulsion. Cm is the impulse increment of lightcraft that per joule laser beam energy acts on. The TEA CO2 laser, whose single pulse energy is 100-Joule-class and wavelength is 10.6μm, is adopted by experimental research. In experimental environment cabin, the parabolic lightcraft is fixed on impact pendulum. Using Air, N2, He, CO2, N2-He and N2-CO2, different Cm is obtained. Experimental results indicate that Cm of the mixed gas is improved through changing gas component ratio.

  3. Frequency determination of visible laser light by interferometric comparison with upconverted CO(2) laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Woods, P T; Shotton, K C; Rowley, W R

    1978-04-01

    A servocontrolled 1-m plane-parallel Fabry-Perot interferometer has been developed at NPL for the precise intercomparison of laser wavelengths. This instrument has been used to measure the wavelength ratio of a 679-nm radiation and that from a 633-nm iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser, achieving an accuracy of 2.9 parts in 10(11). The 679-nm light was derived from a stabilized CO(2) laser radiation by upconversion, and the wavelength of this 9.3-microm laser radiation can be calculated from the visible wavelength result. Frequency measurements on the same CO(2) laser radiation have already been made in this laboratory, so that the experiment reported here leads to a precise value for the speed of light in vacuum and to the value of 473, 612, 380.5 +/- 0.3 MHz for the absolute frequency of the visible radiation from a He-Ne laser stabilized to component d of (127)I(2). PMID:20197930

  4. Argon laser-welded arteriovenous anastomoses.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Kopchok, G; Donayre, C; White, G; Lyons, R; Fujitani, R; Klein, S R; Uitto, J

    1987-11-01

    This study compared the healing of laser-welded and sutured canine femoral arteriovenous anastomoses. Arteriovenous fistulas 2 cm in length were created bilaterally in the femoral vessels of 10 dogs and were studied at 1 (n = 2), 2 (n = 2), 4 (n = 3), and 8 (n = 3) weeks. In each animal, one anastomosis (control) was closed with running 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralateral anastomosis (experimental) was sealed with an argon laser (0.5 watt, 4 minutes of exposure, 1830 J/cm2/1 cm length of anastomosis). At removal all experimental anastomoses were patent without hematomas, aneurysms, or luminal narrowing. Histologic examination at 4 weeks revealed that laser-welded anastomoses had less inflammatory response and almost normal collagen and elastin reorientation. At 8 weeks sutured anastomoses had significant intimal hyperplasia whereas laser repairs had normal luminal architecture. Tensile strength and collagen production, measured by the synthesis of hydroxyproline and the steady-state levels of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids, at the anastomoses and in adjacent vein and artery specimens were similar in sutured and laser-welded repairs at 2, 4, and 8 weeks. We conclude that argon laser welding of anastomoses is an acceptable alternative to suture techniques, with the advantage of improved healing without foreign body response and possible diminished intimal hyperplasia at the anastomotic line. PMID:3312648

  5. Analysis of heat affected zone obtained by CO2 laser cutting of low carbon steel (S235)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaied, M.; Miraoui, I.; Boujelbene, M.; Bayraktar, E.

    2013-12-01

    Laser cutting is associated with thermal effects at the cutting surface resulting in alteration of microstructure and mechanical properties. An abrupt change on the cutting surface is caused by a structural modified zone called heat affected zone (HAZ) due to weld heat treatment introduced by a high thermal gradient in the substrate material. Heat affected zone is often associated with undesirable effects such as surface cracking, fatigue resistance, etc. Therefore, it is important to minimize the thickness of this zone (HAZ). The objective of this work is to study the effect of high-power CO2 laser cutting on the heat affected zone. The laser cutting of low carbon steel (S235) is investigated with the aim of evaluating the effect of the input laser cutting parameters: laser power and cutting speed, on heat affected zone. An overall optimization was applied to find out the optimal cutting parameters that would minimize the thickness of heat affected zone. It was found that laser cutting parameters have an effect on the heat affected zone. The HAZ can be minimized by increasing the laser cutting speed and decreasing the laser power.

  6. A Preliminary Report on the CO2 Laser for Lumbar Fusion: Safety, Efficacy and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio, Alan T; Babuska, Jason M; Nelson, Ewell L; Mason, Alexander; Rajpal, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate potential technical advantages of the CO2 laser technology in mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) surgeries and report our preliminary clinical data on the safety and clinical outcomes. There is currently no literature discussing the recently redeveloped CO2 laser technology application for lumbar fusion. Safety and clinical outcomes were compared between two groups: 24 patients that underwent CO2 laser-assisted one-level TLIF surgeries and 30 patients that underwent standard one-level TLIF surgeries without the laser. There were no neural thermal injuries or other intraoperative laser-related complications encountered in this cohort of patients. At a mean follow-up of 17.4 months, significantly reduced lower back pain scores (P=0.013) were reported in the laser-assisted patient group compared to a standard fusion patient group. Lower extremity radicular pain intensity scores were similar in both groups. Laser-assisted TLIF surgeries showed a tendency (P = 0.07) of shorter operative times that was not statistically significant. Based on this preliminary clinical report, the safety of the CO2 laser device for lumbar fusion surgeries was assessed. There were no neural thermal injuries or other intraoperative laser-related complications encountered in this cohort of patients. Further investigation of CO2 laser-assisted lumbar fusion procedures is warranted in order to evaluate its effect on clinical outcomes. PMID:26180686

  7. Conductive-cooled 2-micron laser development for wind and CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Yasui, Motoaki; Itabe, Toshikazu; Sato, Atsushi; Asai, Kazuhiro; Fukuoka, Hirotake; Ishikawa, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    We have developing two types of 2micron conductive-cooled lasers for wind and CO2 measurements. One type of lasers is side pumped Tm,Ho:YLF laser operated at 20-40Hz. The laser rod is cooled down to -80C and laser diodes are operated at normal temperature in a vacuum container. With this type of laser, we have built up a coherent lidar system which is used to measure wind and CO2 concentration. Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by Tm:fiber laser is another type oscillator which will be operated at high repetition rate of 200-300 Hz in normal temperature. The laser will have an amplifier. These lasers are conductive-cooled, solid-state, eye-safe and suitable for space applications.

  8. AOM optimization with ultra stable high power CO2 lasers for fast laser engraving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Markus

    2015-05-01

    A new ultra stable CO2 laser in carbon fibre resonator technology with an average power of more than 600W has been developed especially as basis for the use with AOMs. Stability of linear polarisation and beam pointing stability are important issues as well as appropriate shaping of the incident beam. AOMs are tested close to the laser-induced damage threshold with pulses on demand close to one megahertz. Transversal and rotational optimization of the AOMs benefits from the parallel-kinematic principle of a hexapod used for this research.

  9. Simulation of planetary entry radiative heating with a CO2 gasdynamic laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.; Howe, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    Heating encountered during entry into the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus is described, followed by a discussion of the use of a CO2 gasdynamic laser to simulate the radiative component of the heating. Operation and performance of the laser is briefly described. Finally, results of laser tests of some candidate heat-shield materials are presented.

  10. Effect of surface-breakdown plasma on metal drilling by pulsed CO2-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutiunian, P. V.; Baranov, V. Iu.; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'Shakov, L. A.; Dolgov, V. A.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of low-threshold surface breakdown produced by short (5-microsec) CO2-laser pulses on the metal drilling process is investigated. Data on the interaction of metals with laser pulses having the same duration but different shape are shown to be different. The effect of the ambient atmospheric pressure on the laser drilling process is investigated.

  11. Transendoscopic application of CO2 laser irradiation using the OmniGuide fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Lloyd P., Jr.; Elce, Yvonne A.

    2005-04-01

    Transendoscopic laser surgery has been performed in large animals since 1984. It is used to treat many upper respiratory disorders, as well as urogenital diseases. Initially, the Nd:YAG laser was the laser of choice until the early 1990's, when smaller, more compact diode lasers entered the veterinary field. In the mid 1980's, several attempts were made to transmit CO2 laser energy transendoscopically. True success was not obtained until 2004 when the OmniGuide CO2 Laser Hollow Light Guide (fiber) was fabricated. Although there is attenuation of energy, this very flexible fiber allows the CO2 laser to be used transendoscopically for incision and ablation of tissue. Both healing and recuperation time are reduced, compared to other wavelengths transmitted through solid quartz fiber. The OmniGuide fiber can be coupled to the output ports of CO2 lasers commonly used in veterinary medicine. Transendoscopic application of the CO2 laser is advantageous in that there is no endoscopic white-out, no volume heating of tissue, and it provides accurate means of performing upper respiratory surgery in the standing large animal.

  12. Shape memory effect of laser welded NiTi plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz; Schell, N.; Miranda, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    Laser welding is a suitable joining technique for shape memory alloys (SMAs). This paper reports the existence of shape memory effect (SME) on laser welded NiTi joints, subjected to bending tests, and correlates this effect with the microstructural analysis performed with X-ray diffraction (XRD). All welded samples were able to recover their initial shape after bending to 180°, which is a remarkable result for industrial applications of NiTi involving laser welding.

  13. Use of CO2 laser in pit and fissure caries prevention: clinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Rosso, Naomi; Duarte, Danilo; Guedes Pinto, Antonio C.; Genovese, Walter J.

    1997-05-01

    In this four-year follow up in vivo controlled study, 112 human permanent first molars, from children between the ages of 6 and 11 years old were used to investigate the viability of the CO2 laser in promoting carie-free occlusal surfaces in permanent molars, as an isolated form of treatment or associated with conventional fissure sealants. The findings suggest that occlusal caries prevention only by means of CO2 laser irradiation is not effective; that the utilization of photo-activated sealants, as well as its association with CO2 laser, applied over the occlusal fissures, are effective means of preventing occlusal caries and that the application of CO2 laser over occlusal fissures, prior to the application of a photo-activated fissure sealant, improves the retention of the sealant.

  14. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  15. Proposals for optimization of laser welding in prosthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Caroline; Poulon-Quintin, Angeline

    2010-01-01

    This paper points out each key parameter involved in laser welding and discusses the parameters' effects on weld microstructure and defects detected inside the weld. Solutions are proposed to adjust the parameters to provide an optimal dental assembly. Metallurgical effects as well as defects are briefly discussed. A welding procedure adapted to different compositions of dental alloys is proposed. PMID:19780906

  16. Laser welding of bone: Successful in vitro experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Anderson, G.D.; Bigio, I.J.; Johnson, T.M.

    1994-02-01

    A method for ``welding`` bones is being developed. Tensile joint strengths of chicken bones welded in vitro have exceeded one kilogram. Welding was performed with either a Nd:YAG (1064 nm) or a diode laser (820 nm). Light was delivered with an optical fiber held a few millimeters from the bone surface. A solder was developed to assist in the welding process.

  17. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2002-06-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore, this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented result concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the sue laser system the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  18. Laser welding of polymers using high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Friedrich G.; Russek, Ulrich A.

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding of polymers using high power diode lasers offers specific process advantages over conventional technologies, such as short process times while providing optically and qualitatively valuable weld seams, contactless yielding of the joining energy, absence of process induced vibrations, imposing minimal thermal stress and avoiding particle generation. Furthermore this method exhibits high integration capabilities and automatization potential. Moreover, because of the current favorable cost development within the high power diode laser market laser welding of polymers has become more and more an industrially accepted joining method. This novel technology permits both, reliable high quality joining of mechanically and electronically highly sensitive micro components and hermetic sealing of macro components. There are different welding strategies available, which are adaptable to the current application. Within the frame of this discourse scientific and also application oriented results concerning laser transmission welding of polymers using preferably diode lasers are presented. Besides the used laser systems the fundamental process strategies as well as decisive process parameters are illustrated. The importance of optical, thermal and mechanical properties is discussed. Applications at real technical components will be presented, demonstrating the industrial implementation capability and the advantages of a novel technology.

  19. A computer program for the design of optimum catalytic monoliths for CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, K.; Goldblum, S.; Noskowski, E.; Herz, R.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many applications in aeronautics, space research, weather monitoring and other areas. Full exploitation of the potential of these lasers is hampered by the dissociation of CO2 that occurs during laser operation. The development of closed-cycle CO2 lasers requires active CO-O2 recombination (CO oxidation) catalysts and design methods for implementation of catalysts inside lasers. The performance criteria and constraints involved in the design of catalyst configurations for use in a closed-cycle laser are discussed, and several design studies performed with a computerized design program that was written are presented. Trade-offs between catalyst activity and dimensions, flow channel dimensions, pressure drop, O2 conversion and other variables are discussed.

  20. 'Design of CO-O2 recombination catalysts for closed-cycle CO2 lasers'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, K.; Goldblum, S.; Noskowski, E.; Herz, R.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many applications in aeronautics, space research, weather monitoring and other areas. Full exploitation of the potential of these lasers is hampered by the dissociation of CO2 that occurs during laser operation. The development of closed-cycle CO2 lasers requires active CO-O2 recombination (CO oxidation) catalysts and design methods for implementation of catalysts inside lasers. This paper will discuss the performance criteria and constraints involved in the design of monolith catalyst configurations for use in a closed-cycle laser and will present a design study performed with a computerized design program that had been written. Trade-offs between catalyst activity and dimensions, flow channel dimensions, pressure drop, O2 conversion and other variables will be discussed.

  1. Design of a CO2 laser power control system for a Spacelab microgravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzler, Carl J.; Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    The surface tension driven convection experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment manifested to fly aboard the USML-1 Spacelab mission. A CO2 laser is used to heat a spot on the surface of silicone oil contained inside a test chamber. Several CO2 laser control systems were evaluated and the selected system will be interfaced with the balance of the experimental hardware to constitute a working engineering model. Descriptions and a discussion of these various design approaches are presented.

  2. Use of CO2 laser gingivoplasty in heart-transplant subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rysky, Carlo; Forni, Franco

    1992-08-01

    In this work we observed the result of CO2 laser surgery used to remove hyperplastic gingiva in patients who were under cyclosporine maintenance treatment after they underwent heart transplant. The objectives were to reduce, as much as possible, bleeding, to avoid any subsequent intervention to remove stitches, and to minimize the operatory and postoperatory discomfort for the patient. Our data confirm the advantages of CO2 laser surgery when used to remove overgrowing tissue in accessible areas.

  3. High repetition rate sealed CO2 TEA lasers using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. T.; Shaw, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The significant operational advantages offered by CO2 lasers, operating in the 10.6 micron region of the spectrum, over current solid state lasers, emitting in the near IR region, have prompted increased interest in the development of compact, reliable, rugged CO2 laser sources. Perhaps the most critical aspect associated with achieving a laser compatible with military use is the development of lasers which require no gas replenishment. Sealed, single shot, CO2 TEA lasers have been available for a number of years. Stark et al were first to demonstrate reliable sealed operation in single shot CO2 TEA lasers in 1975 using gas catalysis. GEC Avionics reported the compact, environmentally qualified, MKIII CO2 TEA laser with a pulse life of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses in 1980. A sealed laser lifetime of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses is acceptable for single shot cases, such as direct detection rangefinders for tank laser sights. However, in many other applications, such as tracking of fast moving targets, it is essential that a repetition rate of typically 30Hz to 100Hz is employed. In such cases, a pulse lifetime of 10 to the 6th power pulses is no longer sufficient and a minimum pulse lifetime 10 to the 7th power pulses is essential to ensure a useful service life. In 1983 Stark el al described a sealed, 100Hz CO2 TEA laser, with a life of greater than 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power, which employed heterogeneous catalysis. Following this pioneering work, GEC Avionics has been engaged in the development of sealed high repetition rate lasers with a pulse lifetime of 20 million pulses.

  4. Latest Progress in Performance and Understanding of Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Seiji; Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami

    This paper describes a variety of fundamental research results of laser welding which the authors have recently performed. The behavior and characteristics of a laser-induced plume were elucidated. Especially, in remote welding with a fiber laser, the effect of a tall plume leading to shallow weld was interpreted by considering the interaction of an incident laser beam against the zone of a low refractive index from the Mickelson interferometer results. The laser absorption in the plate was higher in the case of a smaller focused beam of fiber laser, lower welding speed and higher power, and the reason was interpreted by considering the size and location of a keyhole inlet and a beam spot. High power tandem laser beams could produce deep penetration, and laser welding in vacuum was developed for production of deeply penetrated welds. Laser direct joining was also developed for joining of metal to plastic or CFRP.

  5. Predicting laser weld reliability with stochastic reduced-order models. Predicting laser weld reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, John M.; Field, Richard V.; Foulk, James W.; Karlson, Kyle N.; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2015-05-26

    Laser welds are prevalent in complex engineering systems and they frequently govern failure. The weld process often results in partial penetration of the base metals, leaving sharp crack-like features with a high degree of variability in the geometry and material properties of the welded structure. Furthermore, accurate finite element predictions of the structural reliability of components containing laser welds requires the analysis of a large number of finite element meshes with very fine spatial resolution, where each mesh has different geometry and/or material properties in the welded region to address variability. We found that traditional modeling approaches could not be efficiently employed. Consequently, a method is presented for constructing a surrogate model, based on stochastic reduced-order models, and is proposed to represent the laser welds within the component. Here, the uncertainty in weld microstructure and geometry is captured by calibrating plasticity parameters to experimental observations of necking as, because of the ductility of the welds, necking – and thus peak load – plays the pivotal role in structural failure. The proposed method is exercised for a simplified verification problem and compared with the traditional Monte Carlo simulation with rather remarkable results.

  6. Predicting laser weld reliability with stochastic reduced-order models. Predicting laser weld reliability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Emery, John M.; Field, Richard V.; Foulk, James W.; Karlson, Kyle N.; Grigoriu, Mircea D.

    2015-05-26

    Laser welds are prevalent in complex engineering systems and they frequently govern failure. The weld process often results in partial penetration of the base metals, leaving sharp crack-like features with a high degree of variability in the geometry and material properties of the welded structure. Furthermore, accurate finite element predictions of the structural reliability of components containing laser welds requires the analysis of a large number of finite element meshes with very fine spatial resolution, where each mesh has different geometry and/or material properties in the welded region to address variability. We found that traditional modeling approaches could not bemore » efficiently employed. Consequently, a method is presented for constructing a surrogate model, based on stochastic reduced-order models, and is proposed to represent the laser welds within the component. Here, the uncertainty in weld microstructure and geometry is captured by calibrating plasticity parameters to experimental observations of necking as, because of the ductility of the welds, necking – and thus peak load – plays the pivotal role in structural failure. The proposed method is exercised for a simplified verification problem and compared with the traditional Monte Carlo simulation with rather remarkable results.« less

  7. Effect of scanned quasi-cw CO2 laser irradiation on tissue thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domankevitz, Yacov; Bua, Dominic; Chung, Jina; Hanel, Edward; Silver, Geoffrey; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1994-08-01

    Residual thermal damage produced by a scanned quasi cw CO2 laser was measured in pig skin. The effects of scan speed on thermal damage distribution for laser dwell times ranging between 1 and 150 msec were examined. Significantly larger thermal damage zones were produced along the crater wall for laser dwell times longer than 50 msec. Thermal damage along the crater base was constant independent of dwell time. The preliminary experimental results suggest that quasi cw CO2 can consistently produce less than 200 micrometers zones of thermal damage if laser parameters are carefully chosen.

  8. CO2-laser-based coating process for high power fiber application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, S.; Hirte, K.; Fabian, S.; Hupel, Ch.; Schreiber, T.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2014-03-01

    The generation of high power in active fiber application and the transmission of high laser power via fiber cables both require protection from misdirected laser light. The following paper presents a new approach to removing this unwanted part of light. The deposition of fused silica material on the fiber cladding applied with CO2 laser processes constitutes a robust cladding light stripper suitable for high power levels. The CO2 laser processes are easy to apply, obviate the need for any dangerous liquids and promise greater mechanical stability in handling and assembly.

  9. Plasma Plume Oscillations Monitoring during Laser Welding of Stainless Steel by Discrete Wavelet Transform Application

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, Teresa; Ancona, Antonio; Rizzi, Domenico; Lupo, Valentina; Tricarico, Luigi; Lugarà, Pietro Mario

    2010-01-01

    The plasma optical radiation emitted during CO2 laser welding of stainless steel samples has been detected with a Si-PIN photodiode and analyzed under different process conditions. The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has been used to decompose the optical signal into various discrete series of sequences over different frequency bands. The results show that changes of the process settings may yield different signal features in the range of frequencies between 200 Hz and 30 kHz. Potential applications of this method to monitor in real time the laser welding processes are also discussed. PMID:22319311

  10. Development of a Pulsed 2-micron Laser Transmitter for CO2 Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin; Petros, Mulugeta; Menzies, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), in collaboration with NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is engaged in the development and demonstration of a highly efficient, versatile, 2-micron pulsed laser that can be used in a pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) instrument to make precise, high-resolution CO2 measurements to investigate sources, sinks, and fluxes of CO2. This laser transmitter will feature performance characteristics needed for an ASCENDS system that will be capable of delivering the CO2 measurement precision required by the Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS).

  11. Life test results for an ensemble of CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peruso, C. J.; Degnan, J. J.; Hochuli, U. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of cathode material, cathode operating temperature, anode configuration, window materials, and hydrogen additives on laser lifetime are determined. Internally oxidized copper and silber-copper alloy cathodes were tested. The cathode operating temperature was raised in some tubes through the use of thermal insulation. Lasers incorporating thermally insulated silver copper oxide cathodes clearly yielded the longest lifetimes-typically in excess of 22,000 hours. The use of platinum sheet versus platinum pin anodes had no observable effect on laser lifetime. Similarly, the choice of germanium, cadmium telluride, or zinc selenide as the optical window material appears to have no impact on lifetime.

  12. New Technology In Laser Welding Of Thin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongzeng; Zhang, Qiu'e.; Ma, Shulin; Li, Yongda; Tian, Fenggui

    1987-01-01

    It is difficult to get a good welding spot and nearly impossible to weld a 10 micron diameter filament (e.g. NiCr) onto a foreign workpiece over 1000 times larger in size. In this paper we introduce the laser powder-covered welding technique. The first step is to laser- weld a metal powder onto a small area of interest of a larger-sized workpiece. This changes the nature of the larger-sized material. The second step is to position the thin filament in contact with the larger workpiece and to apply the pulsed laser so a round and smooth welding spot forms. This should form a good alloy combination. This welding technique has a high success rate for welding minute electrical heat source, independent of the material of the larger workpiece. This technique also solves the problems of unstable quality in tin welding, burrs in pressure welding, and eliminates the problem of welding flux corrosion. This same technique is applied to the laser-welding of a super-thin piece to a foreign workpiece, where the welding spot forms a "micro-rivet': In the paper we present specific conditions required, the analysis data of the welding quality and the specific structure of the laser-welding workstation.

  13. Designing Catalytic Monoliths For Closed-Cycle CO2 Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Keith; Herz, Richard K.; Goldblum, Seth; Noskowski, ED

    1992-01-01

    LASCAT (Design of Catalytic Monoliths for Closed-Cycle Carbon Dioxide Lasers) computer program aids in design of catalyst in monolith by simulating effects of design decisions on performance of laser. Provides opportunity for designer to explore tradeoffs among activity and dimensions of catalyst, dimensions of monolith, pressure drop caused by flow of gas through monolith, conversion of oxygen, and other variables. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. BESTIA - The next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons.

  15. BESTIA - the next generation ultra-fast CO2 laser for advanced accelerator research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Babzien, Markus; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.

    2015-12-02

    Over the last two decades, BNL’s ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. In addition, our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the mid-infrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain, including new regimes in the particlemore » acceleration of ions and electrons.« less

  16. Design of gas circulation system in the high power fast axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongyan; Wang, Youqing; Li, Qing; Jia, Xinting

    2009-08-01

    Increasing the output power of the fast axial flow CO2 laser requires a proportional growth of the mass flow with the laser power for convective cooling of the active laser medium. The previous research on high power CO2 laser was mostly focused on gas discharge. However, little attention was focused on the gas circulation system, which is also an essential technology to ensure the long time stable work of the high power fast axial flow CO2 laser. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the 7 KW fast axial flow CO2 laser, expounded the important role of the gas circulation system, and then analyzed the parameters, the structure and the design of the system. After that, this paper compared various types of blowers and heat exchangers, chose magnetic levitation radial turbine blower and rectangle finned heat exchanger, in light of the prominent performance and compact structure. Further more, this paper also supplied the methods of the blower and heat exchanger selection and design. The results indicate that the magnetic levitation radial turbine blower and rectangle finned heat exchanger which have been chosen are suitable to the 7 kW fast axial flow CO2 laser.

  17. Effects of relative positioning of energy sources on weld integrity for hybrid laser arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Li, Yanqing; Liu, Fengde; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Hongtao

    2016-06-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of laser and arc arrangement on weld integrity for the hybrid laser arc welding processes. Experiments were conducted for a high-strength steel using a 4 kW Nd: YAG laser and a metal active gas (MAG) welding facility under two configurations of arc-laser hybrid welding (ALHW) and laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW). Metallographic analysis and mechanical testing were performed to evaluate the weld integrity in terms of weld bead geometry, microstructure and mechanical properties. The morphology of the weld bead cross-section was studied and the typical macrostructure of the weld beads appeared to be cone-shaped and cocktail cup-shaped under ALHW and LAHW configurations, respectively. The weld integrity attributes of microstructure, phase constituents and microhardness were analyzed for different weld regions. The tensile and impact tests were performed and fracture surface morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. The study showed that ALHW produced joints with a better weld shape and a more uniform microstructure of lath martensite, while LAHW weld had a heterogeneous structure of lath martensite and austenite.

  18. [Effect of CO2 laser on prostheses used in middle ear surgery].

    PubMed

    Szymański, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    The use of CO2 laser is advocated in primary and revision stapes surgery. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of CO2 laser on stapes prostheses. CO2 laser was applied on several types of stapes prostheses and PORPs, with power settings suggested by the manufacturer (continuous wave, 2 W and 6 W; 0,05 s). Application of the laser on stainless steel or titanium prosthesis did not exert any effect on the structure of the prosthesis. The use of the laser on the Teflon piston caused superficial burning with power 2 W, and melting and holes in the piston with power settings at 6W. Similar plastipore prostheses were melting. Hydroxyapatite PORP shattered after application of the laser energy. Teflon and hydroxyapatite prostheses are easily damaged by the laser energy, therefore applying a laser on them should be avoided. CO2 laser can be used on stainless steel and titanium prostheses without risk of damaging them. However the possibility of transmission of heat to the vestibule has to be taken into consideration. PMID:16117386

  19. The e-beam sustained CO2 laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, M. J.; Shaw, S. R.; Evans, M. H.; Smith, I. M.; Holman, W.

    1990-01-01

    The design features of an e-beam sustained CO2 amplifier are described. The amplifier is designed specifically as a catalyst test-bed to study the performance of room temperature precious metal CO-oxidation catalysts under e-beam sustained operation. The amplifier has been designed to provide pulse durations of 30 microseconds in a discharge volume of 2 litres. With a gas flow velocity of 2 metres per second, operation at repetition rates of 10 Hz is accommodated. The system is designed for sealed-off operation and a catalyst bed is housed in the gas circulation system downstream from the discharge region. CO and oxygen monitors are used for diagnosis of gas composition in the amplifier so that catalyst performance can be monitored in situ during sealed lifetests.

  20. Progress Toward Measuring CO2 Isotopologue Fluxes in situ with the LLNL Miniature, Laser-based CO2 Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, J. L.; Bora, M.; Bond, T.

    2015-12-01

    One method to constrain photosynthesis and respiration independently at the ecosystem scale is to measure the fluxes of CO2­ isotopologues. Instrumentation is currently available to makes these measurements but they are generally costly, large, bench-top instruments. Here, we present progress toward developing a laser-based sensor that can be deployed directly to a canopy to passively measure CO2 isotopologue fluxes. In this study, we perform initial proof-of-concept and sensor characterization tests in the laboratory and in the field to demonstrate performance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) tunable diode laser flux sensor. The results shown herein demonstrate measurement of bulk CO2 as a first step toward achieving flux measurements of CO2 isotopologues. The sensor uses a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) in the 2012 nm range. The laser is mounted in a multi-pass White Cell. In order to amplify the absorption signal of CO2 in this range we employ wave modulation spectroscopy, introducing an alternating current (AC) bias component where f is the frequency of modulation on the laser drive current in addition to the direct current (DC) emission scanning component. We observed a strong linear relationship (r2 = 0.998 and r2 = 0.978 at all and low CO2 concentrations, respectively) between the 2f signal and the CO2 concentration in the cell across the range of CO2 concentrations relevant for flux measurements. We use this calibration to interpret CO2 concentration of a gas flowing through the White cell in the laboratory and deployed over a grassy field. We will discuss sensor performance in the lab and in situ as well as address steps toward achieving canopy-deployed, passive measurements of CO2 isotopologue fluxes. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675788

  1. Vascular Welding Using The Argon Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Donayre, Carlos; Kopchok, George; White, Geoffrey; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley; Dwyer, Richard; Uitto, Jouni

    1987-03-01

    This study compared the histology, biochemistry, and tensile strength of laser welded and sutured canine venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas. Bilateral femoral, carotid or jugular vessels were studied with one repair (control) closed with interrupted 6-0 polypropylene sutures, and the contralatral repair (experimental) welded with the argon laser. Specimens were examined at weekly intervals from 1 to 4 weeks for each type of repair and evaluated histologically by hematoxylineosin, elastin and trichrome stains, biochemically by the formation of [3H] hyaroxyproline as an index of collagen synthesis, ana mechanically by tensile strength determinations. At removal, all experimental closures were patent without hematomas, aneurysms or luminal dilatation. Histologic and biochemical examination and tensile strength determinations suggest that laser welaing may be an alternative to sutures for repair of large diameter venotomies, arteriotomies and arteriovenous fistulas, as they heal comparable to suture repairs up to 4 weeks postoperatively.

  2. Volcanic CO2 flux measurement at Campi Flegrei by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Valenza, M.

    2014-04-01

    Near-infrared room temperature tunable diode lasers (TDL) have recently found increased usage in atmospheric chemistry and air monitoring research, but applications in volcanology are still limited to a few examples. Here, we explored the potential of a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) for measurement of volcanic CO2 mixing ratios, and ultimately for estimating the volcanic CO2 flux. Our field tests were conducted at Campi Flegrei near Pozzuoli, Southern Italy, where the GasFinder was used during three campaigns in October 2012, January 2013 and May 2013 to repeatedly measure the path-integrated mixing ratios of CO2 along cross sections of the atmospheric plumes of two major fumarolic fields (Solfatara and Pisciarelli). By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we resolved, for each of the two fields, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the atmosphere, from the integration of which (and after multiplication by the plumes' transport speeds) the CO2 fluxes were finally obtained. We evaluate a total CO2 output from the Campi Flegrei fumaroles of ˜490 Mg/day, in line with independent estimates based on in situ (Multi-GAS) observations. We conclude that TDL technique may enable CO2 flux quantification at other volcanoes worldwide.

  3. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  4. Fractional CO2 Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light in Treating Striae Distensae

    PubMed Central

    El Taieb, Moustafa Adam; Ibrahim, Ahmed Khair

    2016-01-01

    Context: Striae distensae are linear atrophic dermal scars covered with flat atrophic epidermis. They may cause disfigurement, especially in females. Many factors may cause striae distensae such as steroids, obesity, and pregnancy. Although there is no standard treatment for striae; many topical applications, peeling, and light and laser systems have been tried. Aims: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser with intense pulse light in treating striae distensae. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients with striae distensae were recruited. Twenty of them were treated by fractional CO2 laser and 20 were treated with intense pulse light. Length and width of the largest striae were measured pre- and post-treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated and graded. Patients were photographed after each treatment session and photos were examined by a blinded physician who had no knowledge about the cases. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement after treatments (P < 0.05). Patients treated with fractional CO2 laser showed significant improvement after the fifth session compared with those treated with ten sessions of intense pulsed light (P < 0.05) in all parameters except in the length of striae (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The current study has provided supportive evidence to the effectiveness of both fractional CO2 laser and intense pulse light as treatments for striae distensae. Fractional CO2 laser was found to be more effective in the treatment of striae distensae compared with intense pulse light. PMID:27057017

  5. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of an Electromagnetic Weld Pool Control for Laser Beam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, M.; Avilov, V.; Gumenyuk, A.; Rethmeier, M.

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of externally applied magnetic fields on the weld quality in laser beam welding. The optimization of the process parameters was performed using the results of computer simulations. Welding tests were performed with up to 20 kW laser beam power. It was shown that the AC magnet with 3 kW power supply allows for a prevention of the gravity drop-out for full penetration welding of 20 mm thick stainless steel plates. For partial penetration welding it was shown that an0.5 T DC magnetic field is enough for a suppression of convective flows in the weld pool. Partial penetration welding tests with 4 kW beam power showed that the application of AC magnetic fields can reduce weld porosity by a factor of 10 compared to the reference joints. The weld surface roughness was improved by 50%.

  7. Analytical model for CO(2) laser ablation of fused quartz.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2015-10-10

    This paper reports the development of an analytical model, with supporting experimental data, which quite accurately describes the key features of CO2 laser ablation of fused silica glass. The quantitative model of nonexplosive, evaporative material removal is shown to match the experimental data very well, to the extent that it can be used as a tool for ablative measurements of absorption coefficient and vaporization energy. The experimental results indicated that a minimum of 12  MJ kg-1 is required to fully vaporize fused quartz initially held at room temperature, which is in good agreement with the prediction of the model supplied with input data available in the literature. An optimal window for the machining of fused quartz was revealed in terms of pulse duration 20-80 μs and CO2 laser wavelength optimized for maximum absorption coefficient. Material removal rates of 0.33 μm per J cm-2 allow for a high-precision depth control with modest laser stability. The model may also be used as a parameter selection guide for CO2 laser ablation of fused silica or other materials of similar thermophysical properties. PMID:26479800

  8. Effects of xenon cover gas in CO/sub 2/ laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, T.L.

    1980-07-01

    Weld spatter in CO/sub 2/ laser welding is detrimental to miniature components. The effects of using xenon gas as an inert laser welding atmosphere to reduce weld spatter are discussed. The laser plume characteristics, weld penetration, and weld spatter are evaluated.

  9. The filler powders laser welding of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shenyong; Lei, Yucheng; Zhu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Laser welding was performed on Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with the self-designed filler powders. The filler powders were added to weld metal to produce nano-particles (Y-M-O and TiC), submicron particles (Y-M-O) and dislocation rings. The generated particles were evenly distributed in the weld metal and their forming mechanism and behavior were analyzed. The results of the tests showed that the nano-particles, submicron particles and dislocation rings were able to improve the micro-hardness and tensile strength of welded joint, and the filler powders laser welding was an effective welding method of ODS ferritic steel.

  10. Microstructure of Laser-MAG Hybrid Welds of Sintered P/M Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuangyu; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Jiandong; Shi, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of iron-based powder metallurgical steels jointed by CO2 laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding were investigated. The cross-sectional morphology of hybrid weld bead consisted of arc zone and laser zone. The microstructure of arc zone consisted of columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone was composed of fine equiaxed dendrite. The MAG weld had obvious heat-affected zone (HAZ) zone, while hybrid weld had very narrow HAZ zone because of the rapid cooling rate. The phase constitutions of the joint determined by x-ray diffraction were α-Fe (ferrite) and Cu. The 2θ value of α-Fe (200) peaks of hybrid weld was smaller than that of sintering compact. Compared to MAG weld, hybrid weld had finer grain size, higher micro-hardness, and higher micro-strain, which was caused by the difference of cooling rate and crystallizing.

  11. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  12. Use of a fiber-optic probe during CO2 laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir S.; Sahin, Ahmet Z.; Ciftlikli, Cebrail

    1993-09-01

    The present study examines the effect of plasma on CO2 laser drilling of mild steel samples using oxygen assisting gas at different pressures. A fiber optic probe was used to detect the plasma on the surface of the workpiece. Mild steel samples at different thicknesses were used as workpieces. Oxygen was introduced coaxially with the laser beam.

  13. Low-Temperature CO-Oxidation Catalysts for Long-Life CO2 Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R. (Editor); Hoflund, Gar B. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Low-temperature CO-oxidation catalysts are necessary for closed-cycle pulsed CO2 lasers as well as for other applications, including air purification. The papers presented in this volume discuss several such catalysts, including information on catalyst preparation, techniques for enhancing catalyst performance, laboratory and laser test results, and mechanistic considerations.

  14. Numerical calculations of a high power CW CO2 gas-dynamic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif; Al-Mutaib, Kheir

    2008-03-01

    Numerical solution of gas-dynamic laser equations in a gas mixture CO2:N2:H2O was carried out, using five-temperature-model (one translational and four vibrational temperatures) by a computational program written in FORTRAN. The spatial distributions of population inversion, gain and temperatures of the gas flow, in addition to the laser intensity and power extraction were studied inside the cavity, for certain initial conditions like pressure (p0=20 atm), temperature (T0= 1500 K), ratio of gases in the laser mixture (CO2:N2:H2O ≡ 10:85:5).

  15. Intraoral laser welding: ultrastructural and mechanical analysis to compare laboratory laser and dental laser.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco; Manfredi, Maddalena; Nammour, Samir

    2011-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses. Recently in several clinical cases, we have suggested that the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilized in the dental office could be used to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly in the mouth. The aim of this work was to evaluate, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the quality of the weld and its mechanical strength, comparing a device normally used in dental laboratory and a device normally used in the dental office for oral surgery, the same as that described for intraoral welding. Metal plates of a Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy and steel orthodontic wires were subjected to four welding procedures: welding without filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding with filler metal using the laboratory laser, welding without filler metal using the office laser, and welding with filler metal using the office laser. The welded materials were then analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA. SEM analysis did not show significant differences between the samples although the plates welded using the office laser without filler metal showed a greater number of fissures than the other samples. EDS microanalysis of the welding zone showed a homogeneous composition of the metals. Mechanical tests showed similar elastic behaviours of the samples, with minimal differences between the samples welded with the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum force applied by the analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welds produced using the office Nd:YAG laser device and the laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, as analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and nonsignificant differences, although these findings need to be confirmed using a greater number of samples. PMID:20437262

  16. In situ testing of CO2 laser on dental pulp function: Effects on microcirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.; Liu, M.; Doerscher-Kim, J.K.; Kim, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of CO2 laser irradiation on pulpal microcirculation was studied in cat canines. The enamel surfaces of 4 teeth were exposed with energy densities of 304-1440J/cm2, using either a handpiece or a microslad, with a focal spot of 0.21mm and 0.33mm respectively. Pulpal blood flow (PBF) before and following lasing was recorded through the intact tooth surface by a laser Doppler flowmeter. CO2 laser irradiation caused an increase in PBF, which was immediate and transient. The PBF increase was higher in a large pulp than in a small pulp, and it was inversely related to the focal spot size. These findings confirm that the dental pulp is thermally affected by CO2 lasing of the tooth surface, however, without extensive pulp coagulation. It is concluded that the effects of laser irradiation on the pulpal microcirculation may be studied in situ by means of the presented methodology.

  17. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  18. Electron Density Measurements in UV-Preionized XeCl and CO2 Laser Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Sato, Saburo; Goto, Tatsumi

    1989-11-01

    A Langmuir probe technique has been used to measure electron densities and temperatures in UV-preionized XeCl excimer and CO2 laser gas mixtures in a laser tube. For this experiment, only pin electrodes (preionization sparks) were operated with no discharge between the main electrodes. The measured electron densities were about 108 cm-3 in both the excimer and CO2 laser gases, compared with 1010 cm-3 in pure He gas. The electron density was found to increase due to the proximity of the main electrodes. The coefficients of absorption for excimer and CO2 laser gas were obtained from the characteristics of the electron densities vs the distance from the UV source. Based on the absorption coefficient for XeCl, 0.9 cm-1 atm-1, we propose pin-electrode arrangements for spatially uniform preionization.

  19. Clinical applications of CO2 laser resurfacing in the treatment of various pathologic skin disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giler, Shamai

    1997-12-01

    CO2 laser skin resurfacing devices are widely used in cosmetic surgery for the treatment of facial rhytides, acne scars and aging skin. This technique is also useful in the treatment of various benign and premalignant or multiple pathological skin conditions and disorders originating in the epidermal, dermal and skin appendages, vascular lesions, epidermal nevi, infected wounds and ulcers, and keloids. Various surgical techniques have been developed in our clinic using laser resurfacing in the treatment of more than 2,000 patients with various skin pathologic disorders. We describe our experience with the various techniques used. The precise depth control and ablation properties combined with the hemostatic and sterilizing effects of the CO2 laser beam, reduction of the possibility of bleeding, infection and damage to healthy tissues, make the CO2 laser resurfacing techniques the treatment of choice for cosmetic surgery and treatment of benign, premalignant and multiple pathologic skin conditions.

  20. Operation range evaluation of TEA CO2-laser-based DIAL system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherstov, Igor V.; Ivashchenko, Maxim V.

    2000-12-01

    The outcomes of numerical simulation of echo-location and ethylene sounding ranges in the atmosphere by differential absorption lidar based on TEA CO2 lasers are submitted. Is established, that the lidar echo-location range has close to logarithmic function of energy and peak power of sounding pulses. The echo-location range of IR lidar based on TEA CO2 lasers differs insignificantly on strong and weak emission lines of the laser, that allows to produce the effective sounding of the atmosphere in all range of wavelength tuning of TEA CO2 laser radiation without correction of pulse energy on various emission lines. Is shown, that the application of narrow-band spectral filters is justified at use of low-noise detectors and receiver FOV angles more than 5 mrad. The evaluations of a relative errors of ethylene concentration measurement in the atmosphere in various modes of registration are conducted.

  1. Continued life test results for an ensemble of CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U. E.

    1981-01-01

    The life test results of five 16 low pressure CW CO2 lasers with a nominal output of 1 watt are presented. One laser quickly died while the remaining four lasers reached half power output at 38,000, 40,000, 40,000 and 40,000 hours respectively. These results show the potential for a 50,000 hour laser while the average life of the 16 tested lasers was 22,500 hours. It is further indicated that the cathode sputtering products, which settle on the glass walls of the cathode sleeve, form an increasingly heavy film as the laser ages.

  2. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Rene 77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The study of laser bead-on-plate welding of nickel based superalloy Rene 77 using single mode high power fiber laser has been undertaken to determine the effect of process parameters, such as laser power, welding speed and laser beam defocusing, on the weld geometry and quality. Non-porous and crack-free welds can be achieved for a relatively wide range of fiber laser welding parameters. The welding speed has a major effect on the weld aspect ratio. The laser beam defocusing significantly affects the weld bead geometry, the stability of the keyhole and pore formation. The transition from keyhole mode to conduction mode welding occurs between focal point position +2.0 mm and +4.0 mm. The high porosity was observed at the focal point position of +2.0 mm. The heat input higher than18 J/mm results to hot cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Moreover, it was found that the welds with the weld aspect ratio higher than 1.5 contain cracks, which propagate from the HAZ into the weld metal.

  3. Closed-Cycle, Frequency-Stable CO2 Laser Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E. (Editor); Miller, Irvin M. (Editor); Wood, George M., Jr. (Editor); Willetts, David V. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings contain a collection of papers and comments presented at a workshop on technology associated with long-duration closed-cycle operation of frequency-stable, pulsed carbon dioxide lasers. This workshop was held at the NASA Langley Research Center June 10 to 12, 1986. The workshop, jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), was attended by 63 engineers and scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom. During the 2 1/2 days of the workshop, a number of issues relating to obtaining frequency-stable operation and to the catalytic control of laser gas chemistry were discussed, and specific recommendations concerning future activities were drafted.

  4. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) destruction by a CO2-laser spark production

    SciTech Connect

    Akhvlediani, Z.G.; Barkhudarov, E.M.; Gelashvili, G.V.

    1995-12-31

    It was proposed to use a gas discharge excited (in one way or another) in the atmosphere for its cleaning from contaminations destroying the ozone layer. A gas-discharge method based on the use of a high-power pulsed microwave radiation and intense neodim laser was modeled experimentally. In the present paper a study is made of the efficiency of destruction of CFC contaminations in air by a spark excited by a pulsed CO{sub 2} - laser radiation. The schematic of the experiment is shown. Here (1) is the TEA CO{sub 2} laser, (2) is the calorimeter, (3) is the working chamber (a cylinder made of a stainless steel 1 {congruent} 20cm long and d {congruent} 4cm in diameter); (4) is a NaCl focusing lens, (5) is a glass colb with NaCl windows, (6) is a colb aimed to analyze the gas content by a SPECORD-76 spectrophotometer (7), and (8) is a plate made of NaCl. CO, laser operates with a pulse (peak duration of 1{mu}s and low-intensity tail duration of 2.5 - 3.0{mu}s) radiation with energy of order E{approx}35 - 40 J. The working chamber in which a spark is excited was pumped out up to a pressure of p{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup -2} Torr and filled with an air - CFC-12 (CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) mixture. Most of the experiments were carried out at a mixture pressure of p{sub CFC} {congruent} 30-100Torr.

  5. Transmyocardial laser revascularization with a high-power (800 W) CO2 laser: clinical report with 50 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhaoguang; Ye, Jianguang; Yu, Jianbo

    1999-09-01

    This paper reports the clinical experience in transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) with high power CO2 laser and evaluates the preliminary results of TMLR. TMLR may improve angina pectoris and myocardial perfusion significantly. To switch on the laser in proper order may be helpful to shorten duration of surgery. A gentle removal of fat on the apex may increase the successful transmyocardial penetration.

  6. In vitro NIR laser tissue welding of porcine ocular tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Richard B.; Savage, Howard E.; Halder, Rabindra K.; Kartazayeu, Uladzimir; McCormick, Steven A.; Katz, Alvin; Perry, Henry D.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2005-04-01

    In this study, 72 different combinations of laser welding parameters were compared for their effectiveness in welding ocular tissue. The laser employed in the welding system was a near infrared (NIR) erbium fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.455 μm . The laser system used a motorized translational stage and shutter to control the laser exposure of the tissue being welded. The emission wavelength of the laser in the NIR range corresponds to one of the lesser absorption bands of water. Parameters of the laser welding system that could be changed to allow a more effective distribution of the laser energy and therefore management of thermal energy included: the number and kinds of intricate offset patterns of light on or around the incision, the number of lines per pattern, the power level, the speed of the laser beam movement over the tissues, the spot size, dwell time and the focus plane of the light beam in the tissue. Histopathology was used as an endpoint indication of the effects that the various sets of welding parameters had on the welded tissues. Standard Hematoxylin and Eosin stain and Sirius Red F3B (Direct Red 80) in combination with polarization microscopy were used to stain and visualize the welded ocular tissue. Paradoxically, the best cornea welds quantified using histopathology occurred with fluence of 4,500 mJ/cm2 or less while the corneal welds exhibiting the strongest tensile strengths, but most tissue damage had a delivered fluence above 7,000 mJ/cm2. The best histological representatives of welded corneas had an average delivered fluence of 2,687 mJ/cm2 and an irradiance of 14 W/cm2. Using the properly determined parameters, the NIR erbium fiber welding system provided full thickness welds without the requirement of extrinsic dyes, chromophores, or solders. The NIR laser system with the appropriately developed parameters can be used effectively to weld ocular tissues.

  7. CO2 TEA Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Staci R.; Akpovo, Charlemagne A.; Ford, Alan; Herbert, Kenley; Johnson, Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the relative abundance of isotopes in enriched materials can be determined via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in a technique known as laser-ablation molecular isotopic spectroscopy (LAMIS). The original LAMIS work has focused on single-pulse (SP) LIBS for the excitation. However, dual-pulse (DP) LIBS reduces shot-to-shot variation and can lower detection limits of an element by about an order of magnitude or more. It also has the potential to improve the accuracy of the determination of the relative abundances of isotopes in LAMIS by minimizing the signal-to-noise ratio. In this work, a DP-LIBS technique for improving LAMIS relative-abundance information from a sample is presented. The new technique, called (TEA) Transverse-Excited breakdown in Atmosphere Laser-Enhanced Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (TELLAMIS), uses a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to increase the breakdown emission from LIBS in the LAMIS method. This technique is demonstrated on a collection of relative abundance isotopes of boron- 10 and boron-11 in varying concentrations in boric acid. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models are used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. DTRA.

  8. Energy Losses Estimation During Pulsed-Laser Seam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Chmelickova, Hana

    2014-06-01

    The finite-element tool SYSWELD (ESI Group, Paris, France) was adapted to simulate pulsed-laser seam welding. Besides temperature field distribution, one of the possible outputs of the welding simulation is the amount of absorbed power necessary to melt the required material volume including energy losses. Comparing absorbed or melting energy with applied laser energy, welding efficiencies can be calculated. This article presents achieved results of welding efficiency estimation based on the assimilation both experimental and simulation output data of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser bead on plate welding of 0.6-mm-thick AISI 304 stainless steel sheets using different beam powers.

  9. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  10. A Laser-Based Vision System for Weld Quality Inspection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2011-01-01

    Welding is a very complex process in which the final weld quality can be affected by many process parameters. In order to inspect the weld quality and detect the presence of various weld defects, different methods and systems are studied and developed. In this paper, a laser-based vision system is developed for non-destructive weld quality inspection. The vision sensor is designed based on the principle of laser triangulation. By processing the images acquired from the vision sensor, the geometrical features of the weld can be obtained. Through the visual analysis of the acquired 3D profiles of the weld, the presences as well as the positions and sizes of the weld defects can be accurately identified and therefore, the non-destructive weld quality inspection can be achieved. PMID:22344308

  11. Carbon analysis for inspecting carbonation of concrete using a TEA CO2 laser-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Idris, Nasrullah; Wada, Munehide; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Miura, Satoru

    2004-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that a spectrochemical analysis of carbon using the laser plasma method can be successfully applied to inspect the carbonation of concrete by detecting carbon produced in aged concrete by a chemical reaction of Ca(OH)2 with CO2 gas in environmental air, turning into CaCO3, which induces degradation of the quality of building concrete. A comparative study has been made using a TEA CO2 laser (500-1000 mJ) and a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (50-200 mJ) to search for the optimum conditions for carbon analysis, proving the advantage of the TEA CO2 laser for this purpose. Also, it was clarified that laser irradiation with suitable defocusing conditions is a crucial point for obtaining high sensitivity in the detection of carbon. Practical experiments on the inspection of carbonation were carried out using both a concrete sample that had been intentionally carbonated by exposure to high concentrations of CO2 gas and a naturally carbonated concrete sample. As a result, good coincidence was observed between the laser method and the ordinary method, which uses the chemical indicator phenolphthalein, implying that this laser technique is applicable as an in situ quantitative method of inspection for carbonation of concrete. PMID:18070383

  12. Aesthetic applications of scanning CO2 laser surgery: hype or state-of-the-art?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Elliot

    1995-05-01

    The clinical application of the CO2 laser for skin surgery has traditionally been plagued with a number of inherent disadvantages. These problems mainly consist of variable depth of penetration, dermal charring with thermal build-up, and a slow surgical technique. This has severely limited the success and usefulness of the laser in aesthetic plastic surgery. An optomechanical flashscanner unit-`SwiftlaseTM', was coupled to a continuous-wave CO2 laser and used during numerous plastic surgical procedures--both reconstructive and purely aesthetic. The instrument uses two rotating mirrors to cause a vaporizing laser beam to scan across target biological tissue in a somewhat sinusoidal array, thus modulating the CO2 laser. Another flashscanner unit, `SilktouchTM' was also utilized. The scanning pattern of the SilktouchTM yields a whirling spiral across the target and is typically used in a pulsed mode. Areas that were treated in this study included the face, trunk and extremities. Treatment mainly consisted of management of facial wrinkles and scars, benign lesions, and rhinophyma. Histology confirmed depth of dermal penetration as a function of fluence. There were no wound healing complications. Healing occurred in a predictable manner dependent on depth of laser penetration. Conservative, primarily ablative flashscanning CO2 laser surgery has usefulness for treatment of patients in aesthetic surgery and offers major advantages.

  13. Morphological analysis of the retrofilled apical dentin surfaces irradiated with CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Carlos E.; Lage-Marques, Jose L.; Gavini, Giulio; Clasen, Naya F.; Matsumoto, Koukichi

    1998-04-01

    Countless researches conducted in these last years have compared the sealing capacity of various materials for retrofillings. Besides, the association of laser irradiation to traditional procedures inquires to increase the success of this kind of treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface and the junction between retrofilling material and apical cavity, with different materials irradiated or not with CO2 laser, in scanning electron microscopy. The following materials were used: Group A yields Super EBA; group B yields Super EBA and CO2 laser irradiation (Luxar System); group C yields Glass Ionomer Cement; group D yields Glass Ionomer Cement and CO2 laser. In groups B and D the power set was 2 watts, 20 msec, with a CT3105 ceramic point, and the power density for the CO2 laser application was 397,93 w/cm2. The morphological analysis permitted to conclude that the dentin laser irradiation showed different and less intense superficial alteration when compared with retrofilling materials. In most cases, the alterations to the material surfaces showed cavities and craters. Group B presented more irregular and affected surfaces, creating blank spaces in the adjacent areas to the radicular dentinal surfaces after laser application, probably because of the carbonization.

  14. Generation of azimuthally polarized beams in fast axial flow CO2 laser with hybrid circular subwavelength grating mirror.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Li, Bo; Zhao, Heng; Wang, Wenjin; Hu, Yi; Liu, Sisi; Wang, Youqing

    2014-06-10

    A hybrid circular subwavelength grating mirror is proposed and fabricated as a rear mirror in a fast axial flow CO2 laser system to generate azimuthally polarized beams (APBs). This grating mirror, with particular gold-covered ridges and nanopillar-stuffed grooves, performs wideband TE wave reflectivity and high polarization selectivity. It shows that the polarization selectivity mechanism lies in the gold ridge's high reflectivity to the TE wave and the lower TM wave reflectivity, which are the result of the mode leaking into substrate through the dielectric-like nanopillar layer. Finally, a high-quality 550 W APB is obtained in subsequent experiments, which provides potential applications in drilling and welding. PMID:24921136

  15. Fiber laser welding of nickel-based superalloy inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshobe, Omudhohwo Emaruke

    Inconel 718 (IN 718) is widely used in applications, such as aircraft and power turbine components. Recently, fiber laser welding has become an attractive joining technique in industry for fabrication and repair of service-damaged components. However, a major limitation in the laser welding of IN 718 is that liquation cracking occurs. In the present work, autogenous fiber laser welding of IN 718 was used to study the effects of welding parameters and different pre-weld heat treatments on liquation cracking. Contrary to previous studies, a dual effect of heat input on cracking is observed. A rarely reported effect of heat input is attributed to process instability. Liquation cracking increases with pre-weld heat treatment temperatures that increase grain size and/or, possibly, intregranular boron segregation. The study shows that pre-weld heat treatment at 950oC can be used for repair welding of IN 718 without significant loss in cracking resistance.

  16. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  17. Enhanced cold cloud clearing by pulsed CO(2) lasers.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, A P; Radke, L F

    1989-08-01

    We report that clearing a channel in clouds consisting of ice crystals requires much lower laser energy input to the channel than that required to clear a channel in droplet clouds. This result depends on the difference in water vapor saturation concentrations over liquid water and ice. A channel cleared in ice particle clouds will be resistant to recondensation that rapidly obscures the channel in droplet clouds. We model the conditions in which recondensation will obscure the channel in liquid and ice water droplet clouds. PMID:20555649

  18. Studies on laser- and plasma-welded titanium.

    PubMed

    Roggensack, M; Walter, M H; Böning, K W

    1993-03-01

    In recent years, titanium has become a material of major interest in prosthetic dentistry. Due to its chemical properties, titanium has to be processed differently from conventional alloys. In this paper, two different methods of welding were investigated. Specimens machined from pure titanium rods were fused either by laser welding or plasma welding. Hardness profiles and light microscopy images were taken in the region of the weld. The mechanical properties were tested by alternating bending fatigue tests up to 3 million cycles. Light microscopy images and hardness profiles showed a larger heat-affected zone after plasma welding compared to laser welding. No significant differences comparing fatigue strength could be found between the two methods of welding. However, extreme loads led to earlier fatigue in the plasma-welded specimens. SEM images of the laser-welded joints showed fractures in the welding zone, while the plasma-welded specimens fractured mostly beyond the heat-affected zone. From these results, it can be assumed that both methods are suitable for welding titanium. At the moment, laser welding is the more suitable technique in dentistry because of its lower thermal alteration of the workpieces. PMID:8595837

  19. A pulsed, high repetition rate 2-micron laser transmitter for coherent CO2 DIAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Petzar, P.; Petros, M.; Chen, S.; Trieu, B.; Koch, G. J.; Kavaya, M. J.; Singh, U. N.

    2009-12-01

    A Holmium solid-state 2-µm pulsed laser, end-pumped by a Thulium fiber laser, is being developed for coherent CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). It combines the advantages of high efficient fiber laser technology with the mature high energy solid state laser technology to produce desired energy levels at a high repetition rate. To obtain high beam quality that is required by coherent detection technique, the effect of “spatial hole burning” in the laser gain medium must be prevented. This is achieved by the use of ring cavity configuration in which the laser light is forced to travel in one direction, so that no standing waves are formed. The pump beam and laser beam are mode-matched in the laser crystals to improve the laser efficiency. At the pumping power of 13.25W, optical-to-optical efficiency of 52% was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 1.25 kHz, which gives the energy per pulse of ~5.5mJ. The pulse energy can be scaled by increasing the pump power or by reducing the pulse repetition rate. The pulse length of this laser is at ~50ns. The wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are tunable over several characteristic absorption lines of CO2. The exact wavelengths of the Ho pulse laser are controlled by well-controlled continuous wave (CW) seed lasers to provide the required sequential, on-and-off line wavelength pulses for DIAL applications. Three CW lasers were used to provide the accurate on-and-off wavelengths. The first CW laser is locked to the center of a characteristic CO2 absorption line through a CO2 cell by the frequency modulation technique. The frequency of the second CW laser was shifted related to the first CW laser by a few GHz to the wing of the CO2 absorption line, and used as the on-line frequency of the CO2 DIAL. This frequency shift is necessary to obtain a better weighting function for the CO2 measurement. The standard deviation of the CW on-line frequency can be controlled within 250 KHz. The third CW laser provides the off

  20. Thermal measurements of short-duration CO2 laser resurfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Fried, Daniel; Reinisch, Lou; Bell, Thomas; Lyver, Rex

    1997-05-01

    The thermal consequences of a 100 microsecond carbon-dioxide laser used for skin resurfacing were examined with infrared radiometry. Human skin was evaluated in a cosmetic surgery clinic and extirpated rodent skin was measured in a research laboratory. Thermal relaxation following single pulses of in vivo human and ex vivo animal skin were quantitatively similar in the 30 - 1000 msec range. The thermal emission from the area of the irradiated tissue increased monotonically with increasing incident laser fluence. Extremely high peak temperatures during the 100 microsecond pulse are attributed to plume incandescence. Ejecta thermal emission may also contribute to our measurements during the first several msecs. The data are combined into a thermal relaxation model. Given known coefficients, and adjusting tissue absorption to reflect a 50% water content, and thermal conductivity of 2.3 times that of water, the measured (both animal back and human forearm) and calculated values coincide. The high thermal conductance suggests preferential thermal conduction along the protein matrix. The clinical observation of a resurfacing procedure clearly shows thermal overlap and build-up is a result of sequential, adjacent pulses. A decrease of 4 - 6 degrees Celsius in surface temperature at the treatment site that appeared immediately post-Tx and gradually diminished over several days is possibly a sign of dermal convective and/or evaporative cooling.

  1. CO2 laser ionization of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Stindt, Arne; Albrecht, Merwe; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2013-09-01

    For many analytical purposes, direct laser ionization of liquids is desirable. Several studies on supported droplets, free liquid jets, and ballistically dispensed microdroplets have been conducted, yet detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanistics in ion formation is still missing. This contribution introduces a simple combination of IR-MALDI mass spectrometry and an acoustical levitation device for contactless confinement of the liquid sample. The homebuilt ultrasonic levitator supports droplets of several millimeters in diameter. These droplets are vaporized by a carbon dioxide laser in the vicinity of the atmospheric pressure interface of a time of flight mass spectrometer. The evaporation process is studied by high repetition rate shadowgraphy experiments elucidating the ballistic evaporation of the sample and revealing strong confinement of the vapor by the ultrasonic field of the trap. Finally, typical mass spectra for pure glycerol/water matrix and lysine as an analyte are presented with and without the addition of trifluoracetic acid, and the ionization mechanism is briefly discussed. The technique is a promising candidate for a reproducible mass spectrometric detection scheme for the field of microfluidics. PMID:23132542

  2. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the application of single mode high power fiber laser (HPFL) for the welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625. Butt joints of Inconel 625 sheets 0,8 mm thick were laser welded without an additional material. The influence of laser welding parameters on weld quality and mechanical properties of test joints was studied. The quality and mechanical properties of the joints were determined by means of tensile and bending tests, and micro hardness tests, and also metallographic examinations. The results showed that a proper selection of laser welding parameters provides non-porous, fully-penetrated welds with the aspect ratio up to 2.0. The minimum heat input required to achieve full penetration butt welded joints with no defect was found to be 6 J/mm. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the joints are essentially equivalent to that for the base material.

  3. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  4. Electrical potential difference during laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, H.; Ambrosy, G.; Lackner, K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new model for the generation of thermoelectric currents during laser welding, taking into account sheath effects at both contact points as well as the potential drop within the quasi-neutral plasma generated by the laser. We show that the model is in good agreement with experimentally measured electric potential difference between the hot and the cold parts of the welded workpiece. In particular, all three elements of the model are needed to correctly reproduce the sign of the measured voltage difference. The mechanism proposed relies on the temperature dependence of the electron flux from the plasma to the workpiece and hence does not need thermoemission from the workpiece surface to explain the experimentally observed sign and magnitude of the potential drop.

  5. Deposition of nickel microstructures by CO2 laser-assisted decomposition of nickel tetracarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonneau, D.; Auvert, G.; Pauleau, Y.

    1989-07-01

    Nickel microstructures were produced from decomposition of Ni(CO)4 on quartz plates locally heated with a focused cw CO2 laser beam operating at 10.59 μm. The profile and deposition rate of Ni dots were determined as functions of irradiation time, reactant pressure, laser power, and laser-induced surface temperature. The kinetic data were found to be in good agreement with those of the visible laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ni dots and CVD of Ni films in furnace-type CVD reactors. The decomposition of Ni(CO)4 molecules irradiated with the infrared laser light occurred via a purely thermal process.

  6. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Krainak, M.; Riris, H. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Collatz, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe progress toward developing a laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate measurements of the tropospheric CO2 mixing ratio from space are challenging due to the many potential error sources. These include possible interference from other trace gas species, the effects of temperature, clouds, aerosols & turbulence in the path, changes in surface reflectivity, and variability in dry air density caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, water vapor and topographic height. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter, small transmission and sensitivity drifts in the instrument. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stability are needed for mixing ratio estimates at the few ppm level. We have been developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for a future space mission. It utilizes multiple different laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's fiber lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the strong laser echoes reflected from the Earth's land and water surfaces. During the measurement its narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on- and off- selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and an O2 absorption line near 770 nm. The receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface and any clouds and aerosols in the path with photon counting detectors. Ratioing the on- to off-line echo pulse energies for each gas permits the column extinction and column densities of CO2 and O2 to be estimated simultaneously via the

  7. Synthesis of higher diamondoids by pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Sho; Stauss, Sven; Kato, Toru; Sasaki, Takehiko; Terashima, Kazuo

    2011-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (wavelength 532 nm; fluence 18 J/cm2; pulse width 7 ns; repetition rate 10 Hz) of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was conducted in adamantane-dissolved supercritical CO2 with and without cyclohexane as a cosolvent. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of the products revealed the presence of hydrocarbons possessing sp3-hybridized carbons similar to diamond structures. The synthesis of diamantane and other possible diamondoids consisting of up to 12 cages was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Furthermore, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements of samples before and after pyrolysis treatment indicate the synthesis of the most compact decamantane, namely, superadamantane. It is thought that oxidant species originating from CO2 during pulsed laser ablation might lead to the selective dissociation of C-H bonds, enabling the synthesis of low H/C ratio molecules. Therefore, laser ablation in supercritical CO2 is proposed as a practical method for synthesizing diamondoids.

  8. Surgical management of premalignant lesions of the oral cavity with the CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Frame, J W

    1996-01-01

    The management of patients with premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity can present problems. The potentially invasive nature of premalignant lesions together with their large extent influences the treatment. The common modalities of treatment of these lesions are surgical excision, cryotherapy, electrosurgery and radiotherapy. Recently, CO2 laser surgery has become available. Less pain, little bleeding, minimal post-operative edema, reduced risk of infection, and low recurrence rates were advantages observed following CO2 laser surgery in the mouth when compared to other modalities of treatment. Healing following CO2 laser surgery progressed well with little postoperative scarring and re-epithelialization was complete after 4-6 weeks. The newly formed epithelium appeared normal and was soft on palpation. PMID:9206362

  9. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Sun, X.; Krainak, M. A.; Mao, J.; Jian, P.; Collatz, G. J.; Stephen, M.

    2006-12-01

    We report progress in developing a laser technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a practical space instrument and mission approach for active CO2 measurements at the 1 ppmv level. This would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio, both day and night, over land and ocean surfaces, under realistic atmospheric scattering conditions. Measuring the CO2 mixing ratio in the troposphere from space is quite challenging. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stabilities are needed for accurate mixing ratio estimates. Our laser sounder approach has some fundamental advantages over passive sensors which use sunlight. It always uses a common nadir/zenith measurement path and the narrow laser divergence angles produce small laser footprints. The laser source allows it to measure in sunlight and darkness over different surfaces giving full global coverage. It can measure continuously over the ocean, to cloud tops and through broken clouds. The lasers are pulsed and potential measurement errors from aerosol scattering can be greatly reduced by using time gating in the receiver. Our approach uses a dual channel laser altimeter/spectrometer, which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. It uses several tunable fiber lasers for simultaneous measurement of the absorption from CO2 and O2, and aerosol backscatter in the same path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces During the measurement its lasers are tuned on- and off- a selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and a selected O2 line near 768 nm in the Oxygen A band at kHz rates. The receiver uses a 1-m diameter

  10. Comparison of KTP, Thulium, and CO2 laser in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques: thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Kamalski, Digna M A; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Vincent, Robert; Trabelzini, Franco; Grolman, Wilko

    2014-06-01

    High-speed thermal imaging enables visualization of heating of the vestibule during laser-assisted stapedotomy, comparing KTP, CO2, and Thulium laser light. Perforation of the stapes footplate with laser bears the risk of heating of the inner ear fluids. The amount of heating depends on absorption of the laser light and subsequent tissue ablation. The ablation of the footplate is driven by strong water absorption for the CO2 and Thulium laser. For the KTP laser wavelength, ablation is driven by carbonization of the footplate and it might penetrate deep into the inner ear without absorption in water. The thermal effects were visualized in an inner ear model, using two new techniques: (1) high-speed Schlieren imaging shows relative dynamic changes of temperatures up to 2 ms resolution in the perilymph. (2) Thermo imaging provides absolute temperature measurements around the footplate up to 40 ms resolution. The high-speed Schlieren imaging showed minimal heating using the KTP laser. Both CO2 and Thulium laser showed heating below the footplate. Thulium laser wavelength generated heating up to 0.6 mm depth. This was confirmed with thermal imaging, showing a rise of temperature of 4.7 (±3.5) °C for KTP and 9.4 (±6.9) for Thulium in the area of 2 mm below the footplate. For stapedotomy, the Thulium and CO2 laser show more extended thermal effects compared to KTP. High-speed Schlieren imaging and thermal imaging are complimentary techniques to study lasers thermal effects in tissue. PMID:23880918

  11. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with tail-free short pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Dobashi, Kazuma; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a tail-free short laser pulse. In a discharge tube, two structures were researched. One is a shingle scheme that is constituted of a 45 cm-long discharge tube. Another is a tandem that is constituted of two 30 cm-long discharge tubes connected with an intermediate electrode were used. In gas media, CO2- rich mixture (CO2: N2= 20: 1) was used to reduce a laser pulse tail. The laser system did not require expensive and scarce helium. A fast discharge (<1 μs) in a low gas pressure (<1.8 kPa) produced a tail-free laser pulse with the pulse width of about 100 ns. The single scheme produced an output energy of 4.7 mJ by a charging voltage of -36.3 kV, and the tandem scheme produced an output energy of 9.3 mJ by a charging voltage of -25.2 kV. The tandem scheme produced higher spike pulse by lower voltage than the single scheme. Therefore, the tandem scheme will be effective in longitudinally excited CO2 lasers with simple and compact designs.

  12. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  13. Comparative study between conventional surgery and CO2 laser surgery in gingival hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; de Abreu, Ennes M.; Gusmao, Reinaldo J.; Coutinho, Adriana A.

    1994-09-01

    In this study we present the results of two techniques in a group of 50 patients with gingival hyperplasia that were treated in the department of buco-maxillary surgery and laser unit. The majority of those patients had no teeth and had an incorrect adaptation of dental prosthesis. The first group (30 patients, 40 to 55 years) were submitted to conventional surgery with local anesthesia. The second group (20 patients, 40 to 55 years) were submitted to CO2 laser surgery with local anesthesia. We were able to verify that the group treated with CO2 laser had much less bleeding during laser procedure, had a better tolerance, and required less anesthesia. The immediate post-operative was smoother with almost no complaint of pain since edematous and inflammatory reaction were reduced. Concerning the late post-operative, the group submitted to conventional surgery presented a high degree of recidivous hyperplasia (60%) allowing a poor or no prosthesis readaptation. In the group treated with CO2 laser the recidivous hyperplasia occurred in only 35% allowing a much better rehabilitation. This comparative study demonstrated more benefits and effective results of CO2 laser surgery over conventional techniques.

  14. Treatment of Ankyloglossia with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser in a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Chiniforush, Nasim; Ghadimi, Sara; Yarahmadi, Nazli; Kamali, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Laser surgery as an alternative for conventional surgical procedure has gained special attention. Using Carbon Dioxide (CO2) laser has some benefits like less post-operative pain, swelling and infection, decrease in risk of metastasis and edema, and less bleeding providing dry sites for surgery. Case Report: A 12 years old boy with lingual frenum with indication for excision was referred to the laser department of Tehran University of medical sciences dental school.CO2 laser was used with 10600 nm wavelength, 1.5 W output power, 100 Hz frequency and 400 μsec pulse duration in non-contact mode. Results: The result of using CO2 laser was dry and bloodless field during operation, no post operative swelling, no pain or discomfort, with normal healing process. Conclusion: We suggest and stimulate the use of CO2 laser for soft tissue surgery because of elimination of suture, convenient coagulation, time saving, patients’ comfort and easy manipulation. PMID:25606307

  15. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  16. CO2 laser experiments using nuclear reactions as the ionization source.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, H. S.; Schneider, R. T.; Allario, F.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental studies show that the output of a CO2 laser is significantly increased by products of the nuclear reaction He-3 (n,p)T. Helium-3 was used in lieu of the natural helium normally present in the 1:1:8 CO2:N2:He laser gas mixture (pressure = 6 torr). The laser assembly was then exposed to a reactor thermal neutron flux of about 100 million neutrons/sq cm/sec. Power output of the laser doubled while the electrical power input decreased; electrical efficiency was thus more than doubled. Results indicate that additional ionization by the energetic charged particles may be responsible for the improved laser performance.

  17. A Sulfur Hexafluoride Sensor Using Quantum Cascade and CO2 Laser-Based Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Mila; Sthel, Marcelo; Lima, Guilherme; da Silva, Marcelo; Schramm, Delson; Miklós, András; Vargas, Helion

    2010-01-01

    The increase in greenhouse gas emissions is a serious environmental problem and has stimulated the scientific community to pay attention to the need for detection and monitoring of gases released into the atmosphere. In this regard, the development of sensitive and selective gas sensors has been the subject of several research programs. An important greenhouse gas is sulphur hexafluoride, an almost non-reactive gas widely employed in industrial processes worldwide. Indeed it is estimated that it has a radiative forcing of 0.52 W/m2. This work compares two photoacoustic spectrometers, one coupled to a CO2 laser and another one coupled to a Quantum Cascade (QC) laser, for the detection of SF6. The laser photoacoustic spectrometers described in this work have been developed for gas detection at small concentrations. Detection limits of 20 ppbv for CO2 laser and 50 ppbv for quantum cascade laser were obtained. PMID:22163412

  18. Identification of the origins of photoionisation in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1984-01-01

    In sealed CO2 spark preionized lasers, the preionization is largely due to photoionization of NO and NO2; in seeded TEA lasers it originates from the low ionization potential additive used. Unseeded and flowing gas lasers can still be successfully preionized but the source of this preionization has remained a mystery; previous attempts to isolate and identify low I.P. gaseous impurities have failed. These have now been identified, using a combination of cryogenic impurity concentration and mass spectroscopy and found to be a complex mixture of hydrocarbons (C2-C7). Of these hydrocarbons, the alkenes are found to be predominantly responsible for the photoionization and are present in concentrations of about 0.5 ppm. Deliberate addition of one of these alkenes, propene, to a UV preionized CO2 TEA laser was found to enhance the lasers performance at high energy loadings.

  19. Identification of the origins of photoionisation in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1984-01-01

    In sealed CO2 spark preionised lasers the preionisation is largely due to photoionisation of NO and NO2, in seeded TEA lasers it originates from the low ionisation potential additive used. Unseeded and flowing gas lasers can still be successfully preionised but the source of this preionisation has remained a mystery; previous attempts to isolate and identify low I.P. gaseous impurities have failed. We have now identified these, using a combination of cryogenic impurity concentration and mass spectroscopy and found them to be a complex mixture of hydrocarbons (C2-C7). Of these hydrocarbons, the alkenes are found to be predominantly responsible for the photoionisation and are present in concentrations of ˜ 0.5 ppm. Deliberate addition of one of these alkenes, propene, to a uv preionised CO2 TEA laser was found to enhance the lasers performance at high energy loadings.

  20. Complications in CO2 Laser Transoral Microsurgery for Larynx Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa Estomba, Carlos Miguel; Reinoso, Frank Alberto Betances; Velasquez, Alejandra Osorio; Fernandez, Jose Luis Rodriguez; Conde, Jose Luis Fariña; Hidalgo, Carmelo Santidrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) has established itself as an effective option in the management of malignant tumors of the glottis, supraglottis, and hypopharynx. Nonetheless, TLM is not a harmless technique. Complications such as bleeding, dyspnea, or ignition of the air may appear in this type of surgery. Objective The aim of this study is to describe the complications that occurred in a group of patients treated for glottic and supraglottic carcinomas in all stages by TLM. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis and supraglottis for all stages (T1, T2, T3, T4), N -/ + , M -/+ treated with TLM between January 2009 and March 2012 in a tertiary hospital. Results Ninety-eight patients met the inclusion criteria, which had undergone a total of 131 interventions. Ninety-four (95.9%) patients were male and 4 (4.1%) were female. The mean age was 64.2 years (± 10.7 years = min 45; max 88). The presence of intraoperative complications was low, affecting only 2% of patients. Immediate postoperative complications occurred in 6.1%, whereas delayed complications affected 13.2% of patients, without any of them being fatal. Conclusion TLM has shown good oncologic results and low complication rate compared with traditional open surgery during intervention, in the immediate and delayed postoperative period and in the long-term with respect to radiotherapy. PMID:27096020

  1. Mechanical versus CO2 laser occlusion of the posterior semicircular canal in humans.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, P J; Lundy, L B; Kartush, J M; Burgio, D L; Graham, M D

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of mechanical and laser-assisted posterior semicircular canal occlusion (PCO) for the treatment of intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Twelve consecutive patients with intractable BPPV underwent PCO by three surgeons, six with mechanical PCO and six with CO2 laser-assisted PCO. PCO eliminated positional vertigo in all patients treated with the laser and five of six patients treated without the laser. Dysequilibrium was present in all patients immediately postoperatively. This resolved in all patients treated with the CO2 laser but in only two of six patients treated without the laser (p = 0.03). Patients were hospitalized for dysequilibrium for an average of 5.2 and 2.8 days for the mechanical and laser-assisted groups, respectively. Preoperative and postoperative hearing was not significantly different between the groups. No clinically significant postoperative hearing loss was encountered in either group. These results suggest that PCO is an effective treatment for intractable BPPV. The incidence of dysequilibrium that persists following PCO may be reduced by using the CO2 laser to seal the membranous canal prior to occluding the bony canal. PMID:8817019

  2. Multi-criteria optimization in CO2 laser ablation of multimode polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamrin, K. F.; Zakariyah, S. S.; Sheikh, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    High interconnection density associated with current electronics products poses certain challenges in designing circuit boards. Methods, including laser-assisted microvia drilling and surface mount technologies for example, are being used to minimize the impacts of the problems. However, the bottleneck is significantly pronounced at bit data rates above 10 Gbit/s where losses, especially those due to crosstalk, become high. One solution is optical interconnections (OI) based on polymer waveguides. Laser ablation of the optical waveguides is viewed as a very compatible technique with ultraviolet laser sources, such as excimer and UV Nd:YAG lasers, being used due to their photochemical nature and minimal thermal effect when they interact with optical materials. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the application of grey relational analysis to determine the optimized processing parameters concerning fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 laser micromachining offers a low cost and high speed fabrication route needed for high volume productions as the wavelength of CO2 lasers can couple well with a variety of polymer substrates. Based on the highest grey relational grade, the optimized processing parameters are determined at laser power of 3 W and scanning speed of 100 mm/s.

  3. Efficient pulse amplification using a transverse-flow CO2 laser for extreme ultraviolet light source.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Nishimae, Junichi; Fujikawa, Shuichi

    2012-08-15

    We constructed a master oscillator power amplifier CO2 laser system using a transverse-flow, RF-pumped CW CO2 laser. We carried out an amplification test at a 100% duty cycle of pumping discharge with the electrical input for the discharge up to 60 kW. An output power of 1.90 kW was achieved at the oscillator repetition rate of 100 kHz and the optical input power of 13 W. The electrical-to-optical efficiency was 3.1%. PMID:23381237

  4. Precise 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio measurements for breath diagnosis with a 2-μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Ma, Hongliang; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Gao, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. The cell has 10 cm long base length with 26.4 m optical path length in total and 330 cm3 volume. The cell pressure and temperature are controlled at 50 Torr and 28°, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06‰ was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter.

  5. Fabrication of microchannels on PMMA using a low power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Muhammad; Rahman, Rosly A.; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Akhtar, Majid N.; Usman, Arslan; Sattar, Abdul

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a cheap and quick method for the formation of microchannels on poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA). A continuous wave CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm was used to inscribe periodic ripple structures on a PMMA substrate. A direct writing technique was employed for micromachining. As PMMA is very sensitive to such laser irradiations, a slightly low power CO2 laser was effective in inscribing such periodic structures. The results show that smooth and fine ripple structures can be fabricated by controlling the input laser parameters and interaction time of the laser beam. This direct laser writing technique is promising enough to prevent us from using complex optical arrangements. Laser power was tested starting from the ablation threshold and was gradually increased, together with the variation in scanning speed of the xy-translational stage, to observe the effects on the target surface in terms of depth and width of trenches. It was observed that the depth of the trenches increases on increasing the laser power, and the bulge formation on the outer sides of the trenches was also studied. It was evident that the formation of bulges across the trenches is dependent on the scanning speed and input laser power. The results depict that a focused laser beam with optimized parameters, such as controlling the scanning speed and laser power, results in fine, regular and tidy periodic structures.

  6. Far-field beam quality evaluation of high-power unstable resonators TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruhai; Chen, Ning; Shi, Kui; Wang, Bing

    2013-05-01

    High average power pulsed TEA CO2 lasers have many important applications, such as laser manufacturing, military applications, but there rarely have reports about the theoretical and experimental studies on the virtual confocus resonator of pulsed TEA CO2 laser, especially its far field optical quality. Based on the real date of the unstable resonator modified by the stable resonator of high power TEA CO2, three common theoretical evaluations and analyzes were conducted and compared with the measured results of far field light intensity distribution with 2 kW designed unstable resonator laser with the block ratio is ɛ=0.404. The results show that the unstable resonator can obtain near diffraction limitation and high optical quality beam. The β factor is smaller than 4 times than the stable resonator. Furthermore, the smaller block factor can make higher power in bucket for the unstable resonator. The comprehensive prediction and evaluation of designed unstable resonator need to synthetically use these three theoretical methods of the evaluations. The simulation results, with considering the optical aberration, heat distortion and atmospheric effect, agree well with the real recording image by the infrared imaging system in the distance of 300m. The research of this paper has very important reference value for evaluating the tactical effectiveness and optimization design of high power TEA CO2 laser system with different unstable resonators.

  7. Application of the Flexible CO2 Laser in Minimally Invasive Laminectomies: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive laminectomy is a very effective surgical method for treating lumbar stenosis. However, this technique can be technically difficult, especially in patients suffering from severe stenosis. The contralateral decompression from a unilateral approach can result in durotomy during removal of the hypertrophied ligamentum flavum. This complication can be difficult to treat through a small working channel. Objective To detail our group’s operative experience with the CO2 laser and discuss our results and previous studies in the literature reporting results.  Methods The CO2 laser (Omniguide, Boston, MA) was investigated in the surgical ablation of the contralateral ligamentum flavum during minimally invasive laminectomies. Forty levels have been investigated thus far. The amount of voltage needed to adequately desiccate and remove the ligamentum flavum safely as well as the effectiveness of this technique were investigated. Results The contralateral ligamentum flavum could be removed effectively using the 9 to 11 watt continuous wavelength (10,600 nanometer) power setting on the CO2 laser. Shrinkage of the contralateral ligamentum flavum facilitated its removal using a number 2 Kerrison Punch. No durotomies occurred, and the use of the laser did not significantly lengthen operative times.  Conclusions The CO2 laser appears to be a useful tool in the armamentarium of instruments available to the minimally invasive spine surgeon and may help to reduce the incidence of durotomies when performing minimally invasive laminectomies. PMID:27433407

  8. Application of the Flexible CO2 Laser in Minimally Invasive Laminectomies: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive laminectomy is a very effective surgical method for treating lumbar stenosis. However, this technique can be technically difficult, especially in patients suffering from severe stenosis. The contralateral decompression from a unilateral approach can result in durotomy during removal of the hypertrophied ligamentum flavum. This complication can be difficult to treat through a small working channel. Objective To detail our group's operative experience with the CO2 laser and discuss our results and previous studies in the literature reporting results.  Methods The CO2 laser (Omniguide, Boston, MA) was investigated in the surgical ablation of the contralateral ligamentum flavum during minimally invasive laminectomies. Forty levels have been investigated thus far. The amount of voltage needed to adequately desiccate and remove the ligamentum flavum safely as well as the effectiveness of this technique were investigated. Results The contralateral ligamentum flavum could be removed effectively using the 9 to 11 watt continuous wavelength (10,600 nanometer) power setting on the CO2 laser. Shrinkage of the contralateral ligamentum flavum facilitated its removal using a number 2 Kerrison Punch. No durotomies occurred, and the use of the laser did not significantly lengthen operative times.  Conclusions The CO2 laser appears to be a useful tool in the armamentarium of instruments available to the minimally invasive spine surgeon and may help to reduce the incidence of durotomies when performing minimally invasive laminectomies. PMID:27433407

  9. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO2 laser modified polymeric material.

    PubMed

    Waugh, D G; Hussain, I; Lawrence, J; Smith, G C; Cosgrove, D; Toccaceli, C

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO2 laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO2 laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO2 laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO2 laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response. PMID:27287173

  10. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I.; Todorov, E.; Levesque, S.

    2014-02-18

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  11. Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  12. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I.; Todorov, E.; Levesque, S.

    2014-02-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  13. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition of oxide films by multi-kilowatt CO 2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultrich, B.; Lenk, A.; Witke, Th.; Borchardt, G.; Fritze, H.

    1997-02-01

    For realizing a high rate pulsed laser deposition (PLD) a pulsed 6 kW-CO2 laser conventionally used for laser machining was adapted by a suitable beam forming system. It allows intensities between 107 and 108 W/cm2 at a minimum pulse length of 100 μs. The targets consist of various compositions in the Al2O3-SiO2 system including the mullite phase. The deposition has been carried out in high vacuum. Even the average power of 200 W of the available 6 kW mostly used in these experiments due to the small sizes of the specially prepared targets yields mean deposition rates up to 100 nm/s. In-situ measurement of mass loss and momentum transfer on the target reveals that most of the material is ablated as microparticle, not as vapour. This corresponds with the cobblestone appearance of the films. Notwithstanding their rather coarse topography, they are dense without any kind of open porosity. This was also proved by mass loss investigations in oxidation experiments and by diffusion of 18O isotopes in combination with SNMS determination of the concentration profiles.

  15. Laser Sounder for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations: Progress Toward Ascends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Sun, X.; Stephen, M. A.; Wilson, E.; Burris, J. F.; Mao, J.

    2008-01-01

    The next generation of space-based, active remote sensing instruments for measurement of tropospheric CO2 promises a capability to quantify global carbon sources and sinks at regional scales. Active (laser) methods will extend CO2 measurement coverage in time, space, and perhaps precision such that the underlying mechanisms for carbon exchange at the surface can be understood with .sufficient detail to confidently project the future of carbon-climate interaction and the influence of remediative policy actions. The recent Decadal Survey for Earth Science by the US National Research Council has recommended such a mission called the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) for launch in 2013-2016. We have been developing a laser technique for measurement of tropospheric CO2 for a number of years. Our immediate goal is to develop and demonstrate the method and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance over a horizontal path and from aircraft at the few-ppmv level. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate the required capabilities of the technique, develop a space mission approach, and design the instrument for an ASCENDS-type mission. Our approach is to use a dual channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e., differential absorption in altimeter mode), which continuously measures from a near-polar circular orbit. We use several co-aligned tunable fiber laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of the absorption from a CO2 line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the oxygen A-band (near 765 nm), and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. We measure the energy of the laser echoes at nadir reflected from land and water surfaces, day and night. The lasers have spectral widths much narrower than the gas absorption lines and are turned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 lines at kHz rates. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of

  16. Study on Interactions of Continuous Low Power CO2 Laser with Malaysian Molar Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A. L.; Jaafar, M. S.; Ramzun, M. R.; Bermakai, M. Yahaya; Ismail, N. E.; Houssien, Hend A. A.

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that CO2 lasers can successfully be used at low-energy densities in dentistry. The CO2 laser is effective for a dental hard tissue since it strongly absorbs light in certain regions of the infrared spectrum because of the carbonate and hydroxyl groups in the structure. In this study, nineteen samples of molars extracted human teeth were irradiated with low power CO2 laser. Laser power of 3W, 6W, 9W, 12W, 15W and 18W, with exposure time of 5 s and 10 s, and distance between laser aperture and sample of 4 cm were used. Laser power above 18W is seen to damage the teeth. The teeth compositions were analyzed using the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). High laser power caused higher reflectance of the beam because the increased in temperature increasing the rate of chemical reaction, hence, the products after the irradiation. This situation can be explained by the Arrhenius equation [1].

  17. CO2 laser micromachining of optical waveguides for interconnection on circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariyah, Shefiu S.; Conway, Paul P.; Hutt, David A.; Wang, Kai; Selviah, David R.

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of microvia and surface mount technologies into the manufacturing process for printed circuit boards (PCBs) has significantly improved the interconnection density. However, as the speed of signals for data communication on the board approaches and begins to exceed 10 Gb/s, the loss and crosstalk of copper interconnections increase. To resolve these problems, optical interconnections (OI) have been suggested as a viable solution. Literature reports have proved the photochemical nature of excimer laser ablation with its minimal thermal effect, and other ultra-violet lasers are also being investigated for the fabrication of polymer waveguides by laser ablation. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fabrication of multimode optical polymer waveguides by using infra-red 10.6 μm CO2 laser micromachining to etch acrylate-based photopolymer (Truemode™). CO2 lasers offer a low cost and high speed fabrication route as CO2 lasers can be used to cut through various engineering materials including polymers and metals. The paper characterises the relationship between the laser ablation power, the fabrication speed and the resulting effect on the waveguide optical insertion loss for the first time.

  18. Novel use of the CO2 laser on dental hard tissues: an SEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Chomsky, Doron; Raif, Joshua

    1997-05-01

    There is great interest in dentistry to find a replacement for the dental drill which is a great source fear in dental patients. Lasers have been considered a potential replacement. Hard tissue use of lasers on dental tissues has been slow in development has had very limited acceptance by the dental community. The ultimate goal is to develop a laser which can remove both healthy and diseased dental hard tissues and dental materials. The CO2 laser surgical applications on sot tissues has been reported by many authors. It is hard tissue applications have had very few published reports. The thermal effects of this laser on hard tissues precluded its use on hard tissues. A new CO2 laser has been developed to reduce the thermal effects on dentin and enamel. Powers of 3-5 watts were used to ablate the buccal surface of extracted human molar teeth. These teeth were gold coated and evaluated under scanning electron microscopy. The results show some melting of the dentin and enamel, however patent dentinal tubules are evident and there appears to be a non-thermal cutting of the enamel at the boarder of the cut surface. In conclusion these very preliminary results appear to show that this new CO2 laser can cut dentin and enamel efficiently and with very little thermal effect as seen under SEM.

  19. In Vitro Comparison of the Effects of Diode Laser and CO2 Laser on Topical Fluoride Uptake in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Sorouri, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Fluoride therapy is important for control and prevention of dental caries. Laser irradiation can increase fluoride uptake especially when combined with topical fluoride application. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of CO2 and diode lasers on enamel fluoride uptake in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Forty human primary molars were randomly assigned to four groups (n=10). The roots were removed and the crowns were sectioned mesiodistally into buccal and lingual halves as the experimental and control groups. All samples were treated with 5% sodium fluoride (NaF) varnish. The experimental samples in the four groups were irradiated with 5 or 7W diode or 1 or 2W CO2 laser for 15 seconds and were compared with the controls in terms of fluoride uptake, which was determined using an ion selective electrode after acid dissolution of the specimens. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using ANOVA treating the control measurements as covariates. Results: The estimated amount of fluoride uptake was 59.5± 16.31 ppm, 66.5± 14.9 ppm, 78.6± 12.43 ppm and 90.4± 11.51 ppm for 5W and 7 W diode and 1W and 2 W CO2 lasers, respectively, which were significantly greater than the values in the conventional topical fluoridation group (P<0.005). There were no significant differences between 7W diode laser and 1W CO2 laser, 5W and 7W diode laser, or 1W and 2W CO2 laser in this regard. Conclusion: The results showed that enamel surface irradiation by CO2 and diode lasers increases the fluoride uptake. PMID:27123018

  20. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the rabbits using laser welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding of hypoglossal-facial nerve to microsurgical suturing and a result of immediate and delayed repair, and to evaluate the effectiveness of laser nerve welding in reanimation of facial paralysis of the rabbit models. The first group of 5 rabbits underwent immediate hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) by microsurgical suturing and the second group of 5 rabbits by CO2 laser welding. The third group of 5 rabbits underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing and the fourth group of 5 rabbits by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of 5 rabbits sustained intact hypoglossal and facial nerve as control. In all rabbits of the 4 different groups, cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative sixth week and in normal hypoglossal nerve in the 5 rabbits of control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1416 +/- 118 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1429 +/- 90 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.75). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb positive neurons were 1503 +/- 66 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 1207 +/- 68 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). Difference was significant (P = 0.009). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.208), but some significant difference was observed between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.016). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1970 +/- 165. No dehiscence was seen on the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis in all the rabbits as re-exploration was done for injection of CTb. This study shows that regeneration of the anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by either

  1. Computer-aided CO2 laser cavity-length selection for reduced line competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffner, G.

    1972-01-01

    The advantages of carbon dioxide lasers for space communications systems are considered. An attempt was made to predict the signature of CO2 lasers. It was found that this requires accurate data on the laser wavelengths (accuracy on the order of 10 MHz). The results of absolute frequency measurements of CO2 lines were utilized, and a list of accurate frequencies was calculated. A computer program was written for the signature prediction. A second program was written which searches through large ranges of cavity length and prints lists of regions where a particular line is well separated from adjacent lines in the signature. Lasers designed according to this list will have an undisturbed tuning profile for one or more lines.

  2. CO2 and Er:YAG laser interaction with grass tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehun; Ki, Hyungson

    2013-01-01

    Plant leaves are multi-component optical materials consisting of water, pigments, and dry matter, among which water is the predominant constituent. In this article, we investigate laser interaction with grass using CO2 and Er:YAG lasers theoretically and experimentally, especially targeting water in grass tissues. We have first studied the optical properties of light absorbing constituents of grass theoretically, and then have identified interaction regimes and constructed interaction maps through a systematic experiment. Using the interaction maps, we have studied how interaction regimes change as process parameters are varied. This study reveals some interesting findings concerning carbonization and ablation mechanisms, the effect of laser beam diameter, and the ablation efficiency and quality of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers.

  3. Impact of CO2 laser and stannous fluoride on primary tooth erosion.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cristiane Tomaz; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Rodrigues-Júnior, Antonio Luiz; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the effect of input power of CO2 laser, either associated or not to stannous fluoride (SnF2) gel, for the control of intrinsic erosion in primary teeth. One hundred four enamel slabs (3 × 3 × 2 mm) from human primary molars were flattened and polished. Adhesive tapes were placed on their surface leaving a window of 3 × 1 mm. Slabs were then cycled four times in 0.01 M hydrochloric acid (pH 2, 2 min) and in artificial saliva (2 h) for creation of erosive lesions. Specimens were randomly assigned into eight groups (n = 13) according to fluoride application [absent (control) or 0.4 % stannous fluoride gel (SnF2)] and input power of CO2 laser [unlased (control), 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 W]. The CO2 laser irradiation was performed in an ultra-pulse mode (100 μs of pulse duration), 4-mm working distance, for 10 s. Specimens were then submitted to further erosive episodes for 5 days and evaluated for enamel relative permeability. Fluoride did not show any protective effect for any of the laser-treated groups or control (p = 0.185). However, a significant effect was detected for input power of CO2 laser (p = 0.037). Tukey's test showed that there was a significant statistically difference between specimens irradiated with 0.5 and 1.5 W (p = 0.028). The input power of 0.5 W showed lower permeability. Variation of input power CO2 laser can influence enamel permeability, at the power of 1.5 W which promoted greater permeability. PMID:26886587

  4. Laser welding of plastics transparent to near-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Kurosaki, Yasuo; Saito, Takushi; Satoh, Isao

    2002-06-01

    This paper deals with a development of laser welding of colored plastics. Welding of thermoplastics using near-IR lasers has been seen in wide industrial application. Most of thermoplastics are transparent to near-IR laser. Particular characteristic of near-IR laser radiation has the ability to heat the interface between the transparent part and absorbent one colored with pigments. However, it is difficult to weld a pair of transparent materials by a laser beam, since there is no absorption region within them. In this paper, the influence of near-IR transparent plastics on the yield strength of their weldments has been studied: various colored plastics transparent to diode laser radiation were tested as the welding material. The heat transfer within a welding system was also analyzed and assessed the appropriate absorptivity and transmittance of overlapping colored plastic.

  5. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Kawa, S. Randy; Sun, Xiaoli; Chen, Jeffrey; Stephen, Mark A.; Collatz, G. James; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is the first space mission focused on atmospheric CO2 for measuring total column CO, and O2 by detecting the spectral absorption in reflected sunlight. The OCO mission is an essential step, and will yield important new information about atmospheric CO2 distributions. However there are unavoidable limitations imposed by its measurement approach. These include best accuracy only during daytime at moderate to high sun angles, interference by cloud and aerosol scattering, and limited signal from CO2 variability in the lower tropospheric CO2 column. We have been developing a new laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a space instrument and mission approach for active measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio at the 1-2 ppmv level. Our technique is much less sensitive to cloud and atmospheric scattering conditions and would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere from orbit over land and ocean surfaces during day and night. Our approach is to use the 1570nm CO2 band and a 3-channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e. lidar used an altimeter mode), which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. The approach directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570

  6. 13CO2/12CO2 ratio analysis in exhaled air by lead-salt tunable diode lasers for noninvasive diagnostics in gastroenterology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Miliaev, Valerii A.; Selivanov, Yurii G.; Chizhevskii, Eugene G.; Os'kina, Svetlana; Ivashkin, Vladimir T.; Nikitina, Elena I.

    1999-07-01

    An analyzer of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air based on lead-salt tunable diode lasers is presented. High accuracy of the carbon isotope ratio detection in exhaled carbon dioxide was achieved with help of very simple optical schematics. It was based on the use of MBE laser diodes operating in pulse mode and on recording the resonance CO2 absorption at 4.2 micrometers . Special fast acquisition electronics and software were applied for spectral data collection and processing. Developed laser system was tested in a clinical train aimed to assessment eradication efficiency in therapy of gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Data on the 13C-urea breath test used for P.pylori detection and obtained with tunable diode lasers in the course of the trail was compared with the results of Mass-Spectroscopy analysis and histology observations. The analyzer can be used also for 13CO2/12CO2 ratio detection in exhalation to perform gastroenterology breath test based on using other compounds labeled with stable isotopes.

  7. Treatment of changes on male sex organs with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Jakub; Rzymski, Pawel; Opala, Tomasz; Wilczak, Maciej; Sajdak, Stefan

    2003-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate treatment of changes on male sex organs with CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers. Material consisted of 34 male patients of Diagnostic and Observational Department of Gynecologic and Obstetrical University Hospital in Poznan, Poland treated between 1998 and 2002. Results of treatment with both lasers were similar when comparing therapeutic effect and side effects. No complication was noticed and the observed differences were not statistically significant.

  8. CO2 laser cutting and ablative etching for the fabrication of paper-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicar-Mihalic, P.; Toley, B.; Houghtaling, J.; Liang, T.; Yager, P.; Fu, E.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a method for fabricating paper-based microfluidic devices using a commercially available CO2 laser system. The method is versatile and allows for controlled through-cutting and ablative etching of nitrocellulose substrates. In addition, the laser system can cut a variety of components that are useful in the fabrication of paper-based devices, including cellulose wicking pads, glass fiber source pads and Mylar-based substrates for the device housing.

  9. [Treatment of trophic ulcers and non-healing wounds with CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Koshelev, V N; Glukhov, E I; Barkhatov, L N

    1985-02-01

    The authors used high and low intensity CO2 lasers for the treatment of 140 patients with trophic ulcers and continuously non-healing wounds. Choice of the method of treatment, parameters of laser radiation are based on concrete values of indices of the regeneration processes in the wounds and ulcers. In 83,6% of patients there was a complete recovery of the wounds, in 16,4% the recovery was partial. PMID:3923679

  10. Spectrally Tailored Pulsed Thulium Fiber Laser System for Broadband Lidar CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.; Georgieva, Elena M.; McComb, Timothy S.; Cheung, Eric C.; Hassell, Frank R.; Baldauf, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Thulium doped pulsed fiber lasers are capable of meeting the spectral, temporal, efficiency, size and weight demands of defense and civil applications for pulsed lasers in the eye-safe spectral regime due to inherent mechanical stability, compact "all-fiber" master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures, high beam quality and efficiency. Thulium fiber's longer operating wavelength allows use of larger fiber cores without compromising beam quality, increasing potential single aperture pulse energies. Applications of these lasers include eye-safe laser ranging, frequency conversion to longer or shorter wavelengths for IR countermeasures and sensing applications with otherwise tough to achieve wavelengths and detection of atmospheric species including CO2 and water vapor. Performance of a portable thulium fiber laser system developed for CO2 sensing via a broadband lidar technique with an etalon based sensor will be discussed. The fielded laser operates with approximately 280 J pulse energy in 90-150ns pulses over a tunable 110nm spectral range and has a uniquely tailored broadband spectral output allowing the sensing of multiple CO2 lines simultaneously, simplifying future potentially space based CO2 sensing instruments by reducing the number and complexity of lasers required to carry out high precision sensing missions. Power scaling and future "all fiber" system configurations for a number of ranging, sensing, countermeasures and other yet to be defined applications by use of flexible spectral and temporal performance master oscillators will be discussed. The compact, low mass, robust, efficient and readily power scalable nature of "all-fiber" thulium lasers makes them ideal candidates for use in future space based sensing applications.

  11. Development of tunable high pressure CO2 laser for lidar measurements of pollutants and wind velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Guerra, M.; Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of laser energy extraction at a tunable monochromatic frequency from an energetic high pressure CO2 pulsed laser plasma, for application to remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants by Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and of wind velocities by Doppler Lidar, was investigated. The energy extraction principle analyzed is based on transient injection locking (TIL) at a tunable frequency. Several critical experiments for high gain power amplification by TIL are presented.

  12. Inhibition of caries in vital teeth by CO2 laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Fried, Daniel; Le, Charles Q.; Nelson, Gerald; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia; Rechmann, Beate M. T.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2008-02-01

    In multiple well-controlled laboratory studies enhancing caries resistance of enamel has been successfully reported using short-pulsed 9.6 µm CO2 laser irradiation. The aim of this study was to prove in a short term clinical pilot trial that the use of the CO2 laser will significantly inhibit the formation of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets in vivo in comparison to a non-irradiated control area. Twelve subjects scheduled for extraction of premolars for orthodontic treatment reasons with an average age of 14.6 years were recruited for the 4-week study. Orthodontic brackets were placed on those premolars with a conventional composite resin (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, REF 712-035) and a defined area next to the bracket was irradiated with a CO2 laser, Pulse System, Inc (PSI) (Model #LPS-500, Los Alamos, New Mexico), wavelength 9.6 μm, pulse duration 20 μs, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 1,100 μm, average fluence 4.31 +/- 0.11 J/cm2, 20 laser pulses per spot. Premolars were extracted after four weeks for a quantitative assessment of demineralization by cross sectional microhardness testing. The relative mineral loss ΔZ (vol% x µm) for the laser treated enamel was 402 +/- 85 (SE) while the control area showed a significantly higher mineral loss (mean ΔZ 738 +/- 131; P=0.04, unpaired t-test). The laser treatment produced a 46% demineralization inhibition around the orthodontic brackets in comparison to the non-laser treated areas. This study showed, for the first time that a pulsed 9.6 µm CO2 laser works for the prevention of dental caries in the enamel in vital teeth in human mouths.

  13. Collisionless dissociation and isotopic enrichment of SF6 using high-powered CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gower, M. C.; Billman, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Dissociation of S-32F6 and the resultant isotopic enrichment of S-34F6 using high-powered CO2 laser radiation has been studied with higher experimental sensitivity than previously reported. Enrichment factors have been measured as a function of laser pulse number, wavelength, energy and time duration. A geometry independent dissociation cross section is introduced and measured values are presented. Threshold energy densities, below which no dissociation was observed, were also determined.

  14. Laser Amplifier Development for the Remote Sensing of CO2 from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Abshire, James B.; Storm, Mark; Betin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Accurate global measurements of tropospheric CO2 mixing ratios are needed to study CO2 emissions and CO2 exchange with the land and oceans. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing a pulsed lidar approach for an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar to allow global measurements of atmospheric CO2 column densities from space. Our group has developed, and successfully flown, an airborne pulsed lidar instrument that uses two tunable pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, absorption of an O2 line pair in the oxygen A-band (765 nm), range, and atmospheric backscatter profiles in the same path. Both lasers are pulsed at 10 kHz, and the two absorption line regions are sampled at typically a 300 Hz rate. A space-based version of this lidar must have a much larger lidar power-area product due to the approximately x40 longer range and faster along track velocity compared to airborne instrument. Initial link budget analysis indicated that for a 400 km orbit, a 1.5 m diameter telescope and a 10 second integration time, a approximately 2 mJ laser energy is required to attain the precision needed for each measurement. To meet this energy requirement, we have pursued parallel power scaling efforts to enable space-based lidar measurement of CO2 concentrations. These included a multiple aperture approach consists of multi-element large mode area fiber amplifiers and a single-aperture approach consists of a multi-pass Er:Yb:Phosphate glass based planar waveguide amplifier (PWA). In this paper we will present our laser amplifier design approaches and preliminary results.

  15. Laser Welding Of Contoured Thin-Wall Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Lyle B.; Oleksiak, Carl E.

    1991-01-01

    Superalloy parts joined with less distortion. Carbon dioxide laser beam directed by optics in numerically controlled robot arm welds shell-type turbopump housings having complicated shapes. 5-kW laser, following single programmed three-dimensional pass, produces high-quality, full-penetration weld pass in age-hardenable nickel superalloy. Operator easily programs robot by using teaching pendant to track weld joint and keeps laser focused on workpiece while following contour of shell. Shells welded in rapid succession, with minimal change in setup for each.

  16. Recurrence of gingival overgrowth in CO2 laser-treated heart-transplant subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rysky, Carlo; Forni, Franco

    1993-07-01

    In this work we update our report about CO2 laser surgery used to remove hypertrophic gingiva in patients under cyclosporine treatment after heart-transplant. The indications and basic results were confirmed, but we present two cases where a second surgery was needed to remove recurrent overgrowing gingival tissue.

  17. Study of plasma formation in CW CO2 laser beam-metal surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Vasilchenko, Zh V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Gresev, A. N.; Zabelin, Alexandre M.; Chubrik, N. I.; Shimanovich, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    An interaction of the cw CO2 laser beam and a moving metal surface has been studied. The pulsed and thermodynamical parameters of the surface plasma were investigated by optical and spectroscopical methods. The subsonic radiation wave propagation in the erosion plasma torch has been studied.

  18. Rapid prototyping of biodegradable microneedle arrays by integrating CO2 laser processing and polymer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, K. T.; Chung, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    An integrated technology of CO2 laser processing and polymer molding has been demonstrated for the rapid prototyping of biodegradable poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microneedle arrays. Rapid and low-cost CO2 laser processing was used for the fabrication of a high-aspect-ratio microneedle master mold instead of conventional time-consuming and expensive photolithography and etching processes. It is crucial to use flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to detach PLGA. However, the direct CO2 laser-ablated PDMS could generate poor surfaces with bulges, scorches, re-solidification and shrinkage. Here, we have combined the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) ablation and two-step PDMS casting process to form a PDMS female microneedle mold to eliminate the problem of direct ablation. A self-assembled monolayer polyethylene glycol was coated to prevent stiction between the two PDMS layers during the peeling-off step in the PDMS-to-PDMS replication. Then the PLGA microneedle array was successfully released by bending the second-cast PDMS mold with flexibility and hydrophobic property. The depth of the polymer microneedles can range from hundreds of micrometers to millimeters. It is linked to the PMMA pattern profile and can be adjusted by CO2 laser power and scanning speed. The proposed integration process is maskless, simple and low-cost for rapid prototyping with a reusable mold.

  19. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  20. Polarization and wavelength insensitive optical feedback control systems for stabilizing CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebali, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling of multi-kilowatt fiber lasers has been driving the development of glass and fiber processing technology. Designed for processing of large diameter fibers, this technology is used for the fabrication of fiber-based components such as end-pump and side pump combiners, large diameter endcaps, ball lenses for collimators and focusers… The use of 10.6um CO2 lasers as a heating element provides incomparable flexibility, process control and repeatability when compared to conventional heating methods. This low maintenance technology provides an accurate, adjustable and uniform heating area by absorption of fused silica of the 10.6m laser radiation. However, commercially available CO2 lasers can experience power, polarization and mode instability, which becomes important at 20W levels and higher of output power. This paper presents a polarization and wavelength insensitive optical feedback control system for stabilizing commercially available CO2 lasers. Less than 1% power fluctuation was achieved at different laser power levels, ranging from as 5 to 40W.

  1. An overview of DREV's activities on pulsed CO2 laser transmitters: Frequency stability and lifetime aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruickshank, James; Pace, Paul; Mathieu, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    After introducing the desired features in a transmitter for laser radar applications, the output characteristics of several configurations of frequency-stable TEA-CO2 lasers are reviewed. Based on work carried out at the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV), output pulses are examined from short cavity lasers, CW-TEA hybrid lasers, and amplifiers for low power pulses. It is concluded that the technique of injecting a low-power laser beam into a TEA laser resonator with Gaussian reflectivity mirrors should be investigated because it appears well adapted to producing high energy, single mode, low chirp pulses. Finally, a brief report on tests carried out on catalysts composed of stannic oxide and noble metals demonstrates the potential of these catalysts, operating at close to room temperature, to provide complete closed-cycle laser operation.

  2. Ultrashort pulsed fiber laser welding and sealing of transparent materials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Liu, Jian

    2012-05-20

    In this paper, methods of welding and sealing optically transparent materials using an ultrashort pulsed (USP) fiber laser are demonstrated which overcome the limit of small area welding of optical materials. First, the interaction of USP fiber laser radiation inside glass was studied and single line welding results with different laser parameters were investigated. Then multiline scanning was used to obtain successful area bonding. Finally, complete four-edge sealing of fused silica substrates with a USP laser was demonstrated and the hermetic seal was confirmed by water immersion test. This laser microwelding technique can be extended to various applications in the semiconductor industry and precision optic manufacturing. PMID:22614601

  3. Theoretical And Experimental Investigations On The Plasma Of A CO2 High Power Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, W.; Wallter, B.

    1984-03-01

    The CO2 high power laser is increasingly used in material processing. This application of the laser has to meet some requirements: at one hand the laser is a tool free of wastage, but at the other hand is to guarantee that the properties of that tool are constant in time. Therefore power, geometry and mode of the beam have to be stable over long intervalls, even if the laser is used in rough industrial environment. Otherwise laser material processing would not be competitive. The beam quality is affected by all components of the laser - by the CO2 plasma and its IR - amplification, by the resonator which at last generates the beam by optical feedback, and also by the electric power supply whose effects on the plasma may be measured at the laser beam. A transversal flow laser has been developed at the Technical University of Vienna in cooperation with VOest-Alpine AG, Linz (Austria). This laser produces 1 kW of beam power with unfolded resonator. It was subject to investigations presented in this paper.

  4. CO2-laser-assisted processing of glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Schares, Richard Ludwig; Stimpfl, Joffrey

    2013-02-01

    To fully exploit the potential of fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (FRTC) and to achieve a broad industrial application, automated manufacturing systems are crucial. Investigations at Fraunhofer IPT have proven that the use of laser system technology in processing FRTC allows to achieve high throughput, quality, flexibility, reproducibility and out-of-autoclave processing simultaneously. As 90% of the FRP in Europe1 are glass fiber-reinforced a high impact can be achieved by introducing laser-assisted processing with all its benefits to glass fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (GFRTC). Fraunhofer IPT has developed the diode laser-assisted tape placement (laying and winding) to process carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTC) for years. However, this technology cannot be transferred unchanged to process milky transparent GFRTC prepregs (preimpregnated fibers). Due to the short wavelength (approx. 980 nm) and therefore high transmission less than 20% of the diode laser energy is absorbed as heat into non-colored GFRTC prepregs. Hence, the use of a different wave length, e.g. CO2-laser (10.6 μm) with more than 90% laser absorption, is required to allow the full potential of laser-assisted processing of GFRTC. Also the absorption of CO2-laser radiation at the surface compared to volume absorption of diode laser radiation is beneficial for the interlaminar joining of GFRTC. Fraunhofer IPT is currently developing and investigating the CO2-laser-assisted tape placement including new system, beam guiding, process and monitoring technology to enable a resource and energy efficient mass production of GFRP composites, e.g. pipes, tanks, masts. The successful processing of non-colored glass fiber-reinforced Polypropylene (PP) and Polyphenylene Sulfide (PPS) has already been proven.

  5. Welding And Cutting A Nickel Alloy By Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Technique effective and energy-efficient. Report describes evaluation of laser welding and cutting of Inconel(R) 718. Notes that electron-beam welding processes developed for In-718, but difficult to use on large or complex structures. Cutting of In-718 by laser fast and produces only narrow kerf. Cut edge requires dressing, to endure fatigue.

  6. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Kawa, S. Randy; Sun, Xiaoli; Chen, Jeffrey; Stephen, Mark A.; Collatz, G. James; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is the first space mission focused on atmospheric CO2 for measuring total column CO, and O2 by detecting the spectral absorption in reflected sunlight. The OCO mission is an essential step, and will yield important new information about atmospheric CO2 distributions. However there are unavoidable limitations imposed by its measurement approach. These include best accuracy only during daytime at moderate to high sun angles, interference by cloud and aerosol scattering, and limited signal from CO2 variability in the lower tropospheric CO2 column. We have been developing a new laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a space instrument and mission approach for active measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio at the 1-2 ppmv level. Our technique is much less sensitive to cloud and atmospheric scattering conditions and would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere from orbit over land and ocean surfaces during day and night. Our approach is to use the 1570nm CO2 band and a 3-channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e. lidar used an altimeter mode), which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. The approach directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570

  7. Catalysts for long-life closed-cycle CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R.; Sidney, Barry D.; Miller, Irvin M.; Hess, Robert V.; Wood, George M.; Batten, Carmen E.; Burney, Lewis G.; Hoyt, Ronald F.; Paulin, Patricia A.; Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Long-life, closed-cycle operation of pulsed CO2 lasers requires catalytic CO-O2 recombination both to remove O2, which is formed by discharge-induced CO2 decomposition, and to regenerate CO2. Platinum metal on a tin (IV) oxide substrate (Pt/SnO2) has been found to be an effective catalyst for such recombination in the desired temperature range of 25 to 100 C. This paper presents a description of ongoing research at NASA-LaRC on Pt/SnO2 catalyzed CO-O2 recombination. Included are studies with rare-isotope gases since rare-isotope CO2 is desirable as a laser gas for enhanced atmospheric transmission. Results presented include: (1) achievement of 98% to 100% conversion of a stoichiometric mixture of CO and O2 to CO2 for 318 hours (greater than 1 x 10 to the 6th power seconds), continuous, at a catalyst temperature of 60 C, and (2) development of a technique verified in a 30-hour test, to prevent isotopic scrambling when CO-18 and O-18(2) are reacted in the presence of a common-isotope Pt/Sn O-16(2) catalyst.

  8. A Laser Photoacoustic Analysis of Residual CO2 and H2O in Larch Stems

    PubMed Central

    Ageev, Boris; Ponomarev, Yurii; Sapozhnikova, Valeria; Savchuk, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Every so often, the results obtained from investigations into the effects of varying environmental conditions on the tree growth rate at the same sites and on the change in the carbon balance in plants, using traditional methods, are found to differ widely. We believe that the reason for the ambiguity of the data has to do with failure to account for the role of the residual CO2 (and H2O) in the tree wood exhibiting a climate response. In our earlier work, the results of a laser photoacoustic gas analysis of CO2 and H2O vacuum-desorbed from disc tree rings of evergreen conifer trees were presented. In this paper, laser photoacoustic measurements of tree ring gases in deciduous conifer trees and CO2 carbon isotope composition determined by means of a mass spectrometer are given. Conclusions are made regarding the response of annual larch CO2 disc tree ring distributions to climatic parameters (temperatures and precipitation). The data about the CO2 disc content for different sites are compared. PMID:25808838

  9. Combined Tin-Containing Fluoride Solution and CO2 Laser Treatment Reduces Enamel Erosion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Witulski, Nadine; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Apel, Christian; Meyer-Lueckel, Hendrik; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of combined CO2 laser and tin-containing fluoride treatment on the formation and progression of enamel erosive lesions. Ninety-six human enamel samples were obtained, stored in thymol solution and, after surface polishing, randomly divided into 6 different surface treatment groups (n = 16 in each group) as follows: no treatment, control (C); one CO2 laser irradiation (L1); two CO2 laser irradiations (L2); daily application of fluoride solution (F); combined daily fluoride solution + one CO2 laser irradiation (L1F), and combined daily fluoride solution + two CO2 laser irradiations (L2F). Laser irradiation was performed at 0.3 J/cm2 (5 µs/226 Hz/10.6 µm) on day 1 (L1) and day 6 (L2). The fluoride solution contained AmF/NaF (500 ppm F), and SnCl2 (800 ppm Sn) at pH 4.5. After surface treatment the samples were submitted to an erosive cycling over 10 days, including immersion in citric acid (2 min/0.05 M/pH = 2.3) 6 times daily and storage in remineralization solution (≥1 h) between erosive attacks. At the end of each cycling day, the enamel surface loss (micrometers) was measured using a 3D laser profilometer. Data were statistically analyzed by means of a 2-level mixed effects model and linear contrasts (α = 0.05). Group F (-3.3 ± 2.0 µm) showed significantly lower enamel surface loss than groups C (-27.22 ± 4.1 µm), L1 (-18.3 ± 4.4 µm) and L2 (-16.3 ± 5.3 µm) but higher than L1F (-1.0 ± 4.4 µm) and L2F (1.4 ± 3.2 µm, p < 0.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, the tin-containing fluoride solution caused 88% reduction of enamel surface loss, while its combination with CO2 laser irradiation at 0.3 J/cm2 hampered erosive loss almost completely. PMID:26418736

  10. Spectroscopic, energetic and metallographic investigations of the laser lap welding of AISI 304 using the response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Domenico; Sibillano, Teresa; Pietro Calabrese, Paolo; Ancona, Antonio; Mario Lugarà, Pietro

    2011-07-01

    Spectroscopic signals originated by the laser-induced plasma optical emission have been simultaneously investigated together with energetic and metallographic analyses of CO 2 laser welded stainless steel lap joint, using the Response Surface Methodology. This statistical approach allowed us to study the influence of the laser beam power and the laser welding speed on the following response parameters: plasma plume electron temperature, joint penetration depth and melted area. A clear correlation has been found between all the investigated response parameters. The results have been shown to be consistent with quantitative considerations on the energy supplied to the workpiece as far as the laser power and travel speed were varied. The regression model obtained in this way could be a valuable starting point to develop a closed loop control of the weld penetration depth and the melted area in the investigated process window.

  11. Analysis and validation of laser spot weld-induced distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Knorovsky, G.A.; Kanouff, M.P.; Maccallum, D.O.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1999-12-09

    Laser spot welding is an ideal process for joining small parts with tight tolerances on weld size, location, and distortion, particularly those with near-by heat sensitive features. It is also key to understanding the overlapping laser spot seam welding process. Rather than attempting to simulate the laser beam-to-part coupling (particularly if a keyhole occurs), it was measured by calorimetry. This data was then used to calculate the thermal and structural response of a laser spot welded SS304 disk using the finite element method. Five combinations of process parameter values were studied. Calculations were compared to experimental data for temperature and distortion profiles measured by thermocouples and surface profiling. Results are discussed in terms of experimental and modeling factors. The authors then suggest appropriate parameters for laser spot welding.

  12. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  13. Color printing on plastics using a slab, RF-excited CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarazaki, Masaru; Sakurada, Noriyo; Ishii, Yoshio; Kubota, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2003-02-01

    A coloring method using a laser system has been proposed in our laboratory. This method has the features as follows. i) The processing objects are plastic materials such as acrylic, nylon, epoxy, polyester etc. ii) Heating the dye solution by the irradiation of a laser, a material can be dyed at a local area of laser irradiation. iii) The images which printed by this method have persistence for erasing such as washing or rubbing. iv) Since the absorptivity of CO2 laser to the dye solution is high, a slap, RF excited CO2 laser was used as a heating source. This method, however, could be expressed only one-color image. In order to perform expression based on the digital image, not one-color but the colors printing of the image has been required. In this study, the innovative laser coloring method has been introduced for the colors printing. This method combines the laser processing dots which are possessed different colors. For example, by combining the dots of two colors, another color printing can be created. Otherwise, by changing the combining rate of the dots of two colors, more other color printing has been possible. A color printing on plastics using the innovative laser coloring method has been successfully attempted.

  14. Waveguide CO2 laser gain: Dependence on gas kinetic and discharge properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Using a simple rate equation approach the gas kinetic and discharge properties of waveguide CO2 lasers were examined. The dependence was calculated of the population inversion and laser small signal gain on gas pressure, gas mixture, pumping rate (discharge current), tube bore diameter, and wall temperature. At higher pressures the gain is optimized by using more helium rich mixtures and smaller bore diameters. The dependence of laser tunability on the gas kinetic properties and cavity losses was determined, it was found that for loss cavities the laser tunability may substantially exceed the molecular fullwidth at half maximum. The more helium rich gas mixtures give greater tunability when cavity losses are small and less tunability when cavity losses are large. The role of the various gases in the waveguide CO2 laser is the same as that in conventional devices, by contrast with conventional lasers, the waveguide laser transition is homogeneously broadened. The dependence of gain on gas pressure and other kinetic and discharge properties differs substantially from that predicted by scaling results from conventional low pressure lasers.

  15. Development of Laser, Detector, and Receiver Systems for an Atmospheric CO2 Lidar Profiling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Koch, Grady; Abedin, Nurul; Refaat, Tamer; Rubio, Manuel; Singh, Upendra

    2008-01-01

    A ground-based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is being developed with the capability to measure range-resolved and column amounts of atmospheric CO2. This system is also capable of providing high-resolution aerosol profiles and cloud distributions. It is being developed as part of the NASA Earth Science Technology Office s Instrument Incubator Program. This three year program involves the design, development, evaluation, and fielding of a ground-based CO2 profiling system. At the end of a three-year development this instrument is expected to be capable of making measurements in the lower troposphere and boundary layer where the sources and sinks of CO2 are located. It will be a valuable tool in the validation of NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) measurements of column CO2 and suitable for deployment in the North American Carbon Program (NACP) regional intensive field campaigns. The system can also be used as a test-bed for the evaluation of lidar technologies for space-application. This DIAL system leverages 2-micron laser technology developed under a number of NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements.

  16. Cutaneous pain effects induced by Nd:YAG and CO2 laser stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Rui; Yu, Guang-Yuan; Yang, Zai-Fu; Chen, Hong-Xia; Hu, Dong-Dong; Zou, Xian-Biao

    2012-12-01

    The near infrared laser technique can activate cutaneous nociceptors with high specificity and reproducibility and be used in anti-riot equipment. This study aimed to explore cutaneous pain effect and determine the threshold induced by Nd:YAG and CO2 laser stimuli. The corresponding wavelength was 1.32μm and 10.6μm. The pain effect was assessed in three healthy subjects (1 woman and 2 men) on the skin of dorsum of both hands. The energy of each pulse and whether the subjects felt a painful sensation after each stimulus were recorded. A simplified Bliss Method was used to calculate the pain threshold which were determined under three pulse durations for Nd:YAG laser and one pulse duration for CO2 laser. As a result the pain thresholds were determined to be 5.6J/cm2, 5.4J/cm2 and 5.0J/cm2 respectively when using Nd:YAG laser, 4.0mm beam diameter, 8ms, 0.1s and 1s pulse duration. The pain threshold was 1.0J/cm2 when using CO2 laser, 4.0mm beam diameter and 0.1s pulse duration. We concluded that the threshold of cutaneous pain elicited by 1.32μm laser was independent upon the pulse duration when the exposure time ranged from 8ms to 1s. Under the same exposure condition, the threshold of cutaneous pain elicited by 1.32μm laser was higher than that elicited by 10.6μm laser.

  17. Cosmetic and aesthetic skin photosurgery using a computer-assisted CO2 laser-scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutu, Doru C. A.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Nedelcu, Ioan; Ghetie, Sergiu D.

    1997-12-01

    Since the first application of CO2 laser in skin photosurgery, various techniques such as laser pulsing, beam scanning and computer-assisted laser pulse generator have been introduced for the purpose of reducing tissue carbonization and thermal necrosis. Using a quite simple XY optical scanner equipped with two galvanometric driven mirrors and an appropriate software to process the scanning data and control the interaction time and energy density in the scanned area, we have obtained a device which can improve CO2 laser application in cosmetic and aesthetic surgery. The opto-mechanical CO2 laser scanner based on two total reflecting flat mirrors placed at 90 degree(s) in respect to the XY scanning directions and independently driven through a magnetic field provides a linear movement of the incident laser beam in the operating field. A DA converter supplied with scanning data by the software enables a scanning with linearity better than 1% for a maximum angular deviation of 20 degree(s). Because the scanning quality of the laser beam in the operating field is given not only by the displacement function of the two mirrors, but also by the beam characteristics in the focal plane and the cross distribution in the laser beam, the surgeon can control through software either the scanning field dimensions or the distance between two consecutive points of the vertically and/or horizontally sweep line. The development of computer-assisted surgical scanning techniques will help control the surgical laser, to create either a reproducible incision with a controlled depth or a controlled incision pattern with minimal incision width, a long desired facility for plastic surgery, neurosurgery, ENT and dentistry.

  18. Inspection of thick welded joints using laser-ultrasonic SAFT.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, D; Asaumi, Y; Lord, M; Bescond, C; Hatanaka, H; Tagami, M; Monchalin, J-P

    2016-07-01

    The detection of defects in thick butt joints in the early phase of multi-pass arc welding would be very valuable to reduce cost and time in the necessity of reworking. As a non-contact method, the laser-ultrasonic technique (LUT) has the potential for the automated inspection of welds, ultimately online during manufacturing. In this study, testing has been carried out using LUT combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on 25 and 50mm thick butt welded joints of steel both completed and partially welded. EDM slits of 2 or 3mm height were inserted at different depths in the multi-pass welding process to simulate a lack of fusion. Line scans transverse to the weld are performed with the generation and detection laser spots superimposed directly on the surface of the weld bead. A CCD line camera is used to simultaneously acquire the surface profile for correction in the SAFT processing. All artificial defects but also real defects are visualized in the investigated thick butt weld specimens, either completed or partially welded after a given number of passes. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the LUT with SAFT for the automated inspection of arc welds or hybrid laser-arc welds during manufacturing. PMID:27062646

  19. Controlling the temperature of bones using pulsed CO2 lasers: observations and mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Luc; Noël, Jean-Marc; Scott, Calum

    2015-01-01

    Temperature of porcine bone specimens are investigated by aiming a pulsed CO2 laser beam at the bone-air surface. This method of controlling temperature is believed to be flexible in medical applications as it avoids the uses of thermal devices, which are often cumbersome and generate rather larger temperature variations with time. The control of temperature using this method is modeled by the heat-conduction equation. In this investigation, it is assumed that the energy delivered by the CO2 laser is confined within a very thin surface layer of roughly 9 μm. It is shown that temperature can be maintained at a steady temperature using a CO2 laser and we demonstrate that the method can be adapted to be used in tandem with another laser beam. This method to control the temperature is believed to be useful in de-contamination of bone during the implantation treatment, in bone augmentation when using natural or synthetic materials and in low-level laser therapy. PMID:26713192

  20. Successful treatment of lichen amyloidosis using a CO2 surgical laser.

    PubMed

    Norisugi, Osamu; Yamakoshi, Takako; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    Lichen amyloidosis (LA) is a type of primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis characterized by multiple pruritic discrete hyperkeratotic papules with amyloid deposition in the papillary dermis. Two patients with LA had been treated with topical corticosteroids, but with no effect on the eruptions. The present authors then started treating the affected area by superficial ablation using a CO2 surgical laser (LASER 30C, Lumenis Inc., Yokneum, Israel) at a setting of 10-15 watts with a 0.12-second pulse duration, 0.36-second rest duration, and 5-mm laser spot size. The present authors treated the patients twice a month with the CO2 laser. The papules on the legs had flattened in both patients, with a great improvement in the severe itching after 6 months in Case 1 and after 10 months in Case 2. These cases indicate that the CO2 laser led to a good response in terms of the clinical manifestations, and may be useful for the treatment of LA. PMID:24703261

  1. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  2. Controlling the temperature of bones using pulsed CO2 lasers: observations and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Luc; Noël, Jean-Marc; Scott, Calum

    2015-12-01

    Temperature of porcine bone specimens are investigated by aiming a pulsed CO2 laser beam at the bone-air surface. This method of controlling temperature is believed to be flexible in medical applications as it avoids the uses of thermal devices, which are often cumbersome and generate rather larger temperature variations with time. The control of temperature using this method is modeled by the heat-conduction equation. In this investigation, it is assumed that the energy delivered by the CO2 laser is confined within a very thin surface layer of roughly 9 μm. It is shown that temperature can be maintained at a steady temperature using a CO2 laser and we demonstrate that the method can be adapted to be used in tandem with another laser beam. This method to control the temperature is believed to be useful in de-contamination of bone during the implantation treatment, in bone augmentation when using natural or synthetic materials and in low-level laser therapy. PMID:26713192

  3. Field Tests And Signature Analysis Of An Imaging CO2 Laser Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Bartholomew, B. J.; Streiff, M. L.; Starr, E. F.; Pruitt, P. A.

    1983-12-01

    A coherent, imaging CO2 laser radar has been built and tested in the field. This laser radar uses a single-waveguide CO2 laser and heterodyne detection. Two acousto-optic frequency shifters generate the IF frequency. An acousto-optic standing-wave device provides the 15 MHz intensity modulation used for ranging. The sensor includes a two-axis, dual-aperture galvonometer scanner with selectable field of view and depression angles. The optical system fits on an easily transportable 3 ft by 4 ft optical bench. Both reflectance and range images are produced. The range imagery analysis shows a range resolution of approximately one foot. Statistical analysis of the reflectance data from a military truck, the dirt ground, and an asphalt road shows that they are Rayleigh distributed. The reflectivities of these objects are determined to be around two percent through comparison with laboratory reflectometer measurements.

  4. Emission Spectrochemical Analysis of Food Material Using TEA CO2 Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Deguchi, Yoji; Ogata, Akira; Kurniawan, Hendrick; Ikeda, Noriko; Takagi, Yasuhiro

    1991-11-01

    A new method for spectrochemical analysis of food materials is presented using a Transverse Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser. Milk powders containing different amounts of Ca are mixed with KBr powder, and compressed to make pellets. The pellets are bombarded by the TEA CO2 laser (300 mJ, 100 ns) under the surrounding gas of 300 Pa. The shape of the luminous plasma is hemispherical. This plasma is excited by the shock wave induced by the laser bombardment. It is proved that the relative intensity of the Ca 422.6-nm emission line to that of the K 404.4-nm emission line is proportional to the Ca content. This method has a bright prospect as a direct analytical method of food materials.

  5. Functional dental realignment after treatment of gingival overgrowth lesions with CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Bruno S.; Nicola, Ester M. D.; Fiorotti, Renata C.; Baldin, Diva H. Z.

    2000-03-01

    Proliferative lesions of the oral cavity are very frequent and depend on various factors such as: traumatism, irritating conditions, medications, heredity and others. In this work we present the CO2 laser ablation as a very conservative method to treat these lesions. In the 5 cases discussed in this work, the gingival overgrowth lesions induced an important dental misalignment, which culminated in severe functional disorder. After previous biopsy to establish the diagnostic (Gingival Fibromatosis, 4 cases -- and Miofibroma, one adult female), the treatments were performed with a CO2 laser (Sharplan 40C) under local anesthesia with lidocaine 2% without vasoconstrictor. The patients were submitted to 3 to 6 sessions with tissue vaporization of 8 to 12 w continuous swift-focused mode, with an interval of 4 weeks between each session. The results were evaluated photographically before each laser application. The use of this technique assures a very satisfactory dental alignment associated to good functional rehabilitation.

  6. Enhancing growth of cultured human skin cells using low-energy CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Reuveni, Haim; Halevy, Sima; Lubart, Rachel

    1997-12-01

    In view of the versatility and usage of the CO2 laser as a too. in surgery and dermatology, we have studied its effect on enhancing proliferation of cultured skin cells using an attenuated CO2 laser. Exposure of cultured keratinocytes or fibroblasts to continuous wave or pulse mode irradiation enhanced thymidine incorporation by 1.4 to 1.7 folds, and cell number by 1.25 to 1.4 folds, measured 24 and 48 hours later, depending on the fluency applied. As expected, these effects were not suppressed by added antioxidants, indicating that the mechanism involved in this newly observed effect, differ from photosensitization by low energy visible and near IR lasers.

  7. Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Measurements of CO2 in the Atmospheric Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, E. L.; Mclinden, M. L.; Miller, J. H.; Allan, G. R.; Lott, L. E.; Melroy, H. R.; Clarke, G. B.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a low-cost, miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer for highly sensitive measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmospheric column. In this passive design, sunlight that has undergone absorption by CO2 in the atmosphere is collected and mixed with continuous wave laser light that is step-scanned across the absorption feature centered at 1,573.6 nm. The resulting radio frequency beat signal is collected as a function of laser wavelength, from which the total column mole fraction can be de-convolved. We are expanding this technique to include methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO), and with minor modifications, this technique can be expanded to include species such as water vapor (H2O) and nitrous oxide (N2O).

  8. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Bead-on-plate and butt welds were previously performed to depths of about 4 mm with a 6-kW CO{sub 2} laser on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys. These welds were made at a speed of 0.042 m/s using argon purging at a flow rate of 2.8 m{sup 3}/s. The purge was distributed with a diffuser nozzle aimed just behind the laser beam during the welding operation. The fusion zones of welds made under these conditions consisted of very fine, needle-shaped grains and were also harder than the bulk metal (230-270 dph, compared to {approx}180 dph for the bulk metal). A limited number of impact tests showed that the as-welded ductile-brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) was above room temperature, but heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h in vacuum reduced the DBTT to <{minus}25{degrees}C. Activities during this reporting period focused on improvements in the purging system and determination of the effect of welding speed on welds. A 2-kW continuous YAG laser at Lumonics Corp. in Livonia, MI, was used to make 34 test welds for this study.

  9. Visualization of liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation with a pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. W.; Chen, C. G.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, Z. L.; Xie, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of liquid-mediated hard tissue ablation induced by a pulsed CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm, a high speed camera was used to monitor the interaction between water, tissue and laser irradiation. The results showed that laser irradiation can directly impact on tissue through a vapor channel formed by the leading part of the laser pulse. The ablation debris plays a key role in liquid-assisted laser ablation, having the ability to keep the vapor channel open to extend actuation time. The runoff effect induced by vortex convection liquid flow can remove the tissue that obstructs the effect of the next laser pulse.

  10. Infrared radiation and inversion population of CO2 laser levels in Venusian and Martian atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordiyets, B. F.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Formation mechanisms of nonequilibrium 10 micron CO2 molecule radiation and the possible existence of a natural laser effect in the upper atmospheres of Venus and Mars are theoretically studied. An analysis is made of the excitation process of CO2 molecule vibrational-band levels (with natural isotropic content) induced by direct solar radiation in bands 10.6, 9.4, 4.3, 2.7 and 2.0 microns. The model of partial vibrational-band temperatures was used in the case. The problem of IR radiation transfer in vibrational-rotational bands was solved in the radiation escape approximation.

  11. Effect of a target on the stimulated emission of microsecond CO2-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. Iu.; Dolgov, V. A.; Maliuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Semak, V. V.

    1987-12-01

    The paper reports a change in the pulse shape of a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable cavity under the interaction between the laser radiation and a metal surface in the presence of a breakdown plasma. It is shown that a continuous change in the phase difference between the wave reflected in the cavity and the principal cavity wave gives rise to changes in the pulse shape and the appearance of power fluctuations. The possible effect of these phenomena on the laser treatment of materials is considered.

  12. Experimental Investigations on Fusion Cutting Stainless Steel with Fiber and CO2 Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, S.; Mahrle, A.; Wetzig, A.; Beyer, E.

    First results of an experimental study on inert-gas fusion cutting stainless steel with different types of laser are presented. In particular, the cutting capabilities of a fiber and a CO2 laser beam with similar Rayleigh length have been compared as a function of material thickness with respect to achievable maximum cutting speed, cut edge surface roughness and cut kerf geometry. The most interesting finding achieved so far concerns the observation that the cut kerfs are nearly identical in size but differ qualitatively in shape for both laser teypes.

  13. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  14. Picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials.

    PubMed

    Carter, Richard M; Chen, Jianyong; Shephard, Jonathan D; Thomson, Robert R; Hand, Duncan P

    2014-07-01

    We report picosecond laser welding of similar and dissimilar materials based on plasma formation induced by a tightly focused beam from a 1030 nm, 10 ps, 400 kHz laser system. Specifically, we demonstrate the welding of fused silica, borosilicate, and sapphire to a range of materials including borosilicate, fused silica, silicon, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Dissimilar material welding of glass to aluminum and stainless steel has not been previously reported. Analysis of the borosilicate-to-borosilicate weld strength compares well to those obtained using similar welding systems based on femtosecond lasers. There is, however, a strong requirement to prepare surfaces to a high (10-60 nm Ra) flatness to ensure a successful weld. PMID:25089985

  15. Intraoral Laser Welding (ILW): ultrastructural and mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca; Villa, Elena; Nammour, Samir

    2010-05-01

    Nd:YAG, currently used since 1970 in dental laboratories to weld metals on dental prostheses has some limits such great dimensions, high costs and fixed delivery system. Recently it was proposed the possibility to use the Nd:YAG laser device commonly utilised in dental office, to repair broken fixed, removable and orthodontic prostheses and to weld metals directly into the mouth. The aim of this work is to value, through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) and DMA (Dynamic Mechanical Analysis), quality and mechanical strength of the welding process comparing a device normally used in dental lab and a device normally used in dental office for oral surgery. Sixteen CoCrMo metal plates and twenty steel orthodontic wires were divided in four groups: one was welded without metal apposition by laboratory laser, one was welded with metal apposition by laboratory laser, one was welded without metal apposition by office laser and one was welded with metal apposition by office laser. The welding process was analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA to compare the differences between the different samples. By SEM analysis it was seen that the plates welded by office laser without apposition metal showed a greater number of fissurations compared with the other samples. By EDS analysis it was seen a homogeneous composition of the metals in all the samples. The mechanical tests showed a similar elastic behaviour of the samples, with minimal differences between the two devices. No wire broke even under the maximum strength by the Analyser. This study seems to demonstrate that the welding process by office Nd:YAG laser device and the welding process by laboratory Nd:YAG laser device, analysed by SEM, EDS and DMA, showed minimal and not significant differences even if these data will be confirmed by a greater number of samples.

  16. Carbon dioxide laser tissue welding: an alternative technique for tubal anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Wallwiener, D; Meyer, A; Bastert, G

    1997-01-01

    Microsurgical tubal anastomosis is the gold standard for treatment of tubal occlusion. The present study was performed to establish the feasibility of tubal anastomosis by welding tissue with a defocused CO2-laser beam during laparotomy and with an endoscope. In an animal experiment, 70 white New Zealand rabbits were randomized in 2 study groups (E1, E2) and 3 control groups (C1, C2, C3) as follows: C1, 10 animals, no operation, as controls for the efficiency of the insemination technique; C2, 5 animals, spontaneous healing after tubal segment resection, to quantify spontaneous recanalization of the tube; C3, 15 animals, microsurgical end-to-end adaption after tubal segment resection; E1, 20 animals, laser welded anastomosis after segment resection via laparotomy; E2, 20 animals, laparoscopic laser welded anastomosis after segment resection. The pregnancy rate in C1 was 80%. None of the animals in C2 but 60% of the rabbits in C3 conceived. After sutureless anastomosis by laser welding 50% of the laparotomized, and 40% of the laparoscopically operated group became pregnant. Morphological examination of the oviducts after relaparotomy showed comparable patency rates of 70% in C3, 70% in E1, and 65% in E2. Whereas no dehiscence of anastomoses was observed in C3, 20% of the welded tubes in E1 and 22.5% in E2 were dehiscent. Tubal anastomosis took approximately three times as long laparoscopically as during laparotomy. Thus, laser welding as a sutureless alternative technique of tubal anastomosis should be viewed critically. A reduction of sutures through laser-assisted anastomosis might, however, be considered. PMID:9612164

  17. Hybrid CO2 laser/waterjet (CO2-LWJ) cutting of Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) blanks with phase transformation induced fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhuoru; Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2015-07-01

    The present paper investigates a transformation induced fracture mechanism for the cutting of Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) sample by a hybrid CO2 laser/waterjet (CO2-LWJ) manufacturing process. In CO2-LWJ machining, a laser was used for local heating followed by waterjet quenching leading to fracture propagation along the sample surface. Cutting results indicate that as line energy of the laser was increased the sample response transitioned from scribing to through cutting. Raman spectroscopy analysis of the cut surface indicates that laser heated PCBN undergoes chemical phase transformation from sp3-bonded cubic Boron Nitride (cBN) into hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) and other sp2-bonded phases. The sp2-bonded structure occupies more volume than sp3-bonded structure such that the transformed material has a tendency to expand the original material and leads to surface deformation around the cutting path. Surface profile of the cut samples was experimentally measured using profilometry and compared with numerical predictions in order to estimate the expansion strain and dimensions of transformation region. Based on the obtained expansion strain and transformation zone, stress fields and crack driving forces were computed for channeling cracks that result in material separation. Comparison of the crack driving forces with fracture toughness of PCBN shows that transformation induced crack propagation is the feasible mechanism for cutting during CO2-LWJ machining.

  18. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  19. Possibilities of a metal surface radioactive decontamination using a pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milijanic, Scepan S.; Stjepanovic, Natasa N.; Trtica, Milan S.

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the laser radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces. It offers advantages over conventional methods: improved safety, reduction of secondary waste, reduced waste volume, acceptable cost. A main mechanism of cleaning in by lasers is ablation. In this work a pulsed TEA CO2 laser was used for surface cleaning, primarily in order to demonstrate that the ablation from metal surfaces with this laser is possible even with relatively low pulse energies, and secondary, that it could be competitive with other lasers because of much higher energy efficiencies. The laser pulse contains two parts, one strong and shot peak at the beginning, followed with a tail. The beam was focused onto a contaminated surface with a KBr lens. The surface was contaminated with 137Cs. Three different metals were used: stainless steel, copper and aluminum. The evaporated material was pumped out in air atmosphere and transferred to a filter. Presence of the activity on the filter was proved by a germanium detector-multichannel analyzer. Activity levels were measured by a GM counter. Calculated decontamination factors as well as collection factors have shown that ablation takes place with relatively high efficiency of decontamination. This investigation suggests that decontamination using the CO2 laser should be seriously considered.

  20. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-06-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications.

  1. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications. PMID:27320197

  2. The threshold of vapor channel formation in water induced by pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenqing; Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Water plays an important role in laser ablation. There are two main interpretations of laser-water interaction: hydrokinetic effect and vapor phenomenon. The two explanations are reasonable in some way, but they can't explain the mechanism of laser-water interaction completely. In this study, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation induced by pulsed CO2 laser in static water layer was monitored by high-speed camera. The wavelength of pulsed CO2 laser is 10.64 um, and pulse repetition rate is 60 Hz. The laser power ranged from 1 to 7 W with a step of 0.5 W. The frame rate of high-speed camera used in the experiment was 80025 fps. Based on high-speed camera pictures, the dynamic process of vapor channel formation was examined, and the threshold of vapor channel formation, pulsation period, the volume, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel were determined. The results showed that the threshold of vapor channel formation was about 2.5 W. Moreover, pulsation period, the maximum depth and corresponding width of vapor channel increased with the increasing of the laser power.

  3. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide.

    PubMed

    Yi, Longqing; Pukhov, Alexander; Shen, Baifei

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO2 laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energy greater than 1 GeV with narrow slice energy spread (~1%) and high overall efficiency. The acceleration gradient is 26 GV/m for a 1.3 TW CO2 laser system. The micro-bunching of a long electron beam leads to the generation of a chain of ultrashort electron bunches with the duration roughly equal to half-laser-cycle. These results open a way for developing a compact and economic electron source for diverse applications. PMID:27320197

  4. Modeling the Losses of Dissolved CO2 from Laser-Etched Champagne Glasses.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard

    2016-04-21

    Under standard champagne tasting conditions, the complex interplay between the level of dissolved CO2 found in champagne, its temperature, the glass shape, and the bubbling rate definitely impacts champagne tasting by modifying the neuro-physicochemical mechanisms responsible for aroma release and flavor perception. On the basis of theoretical principles combining heterogeneous bubble nucleation, ascending bubble dynamics, and mass transfer equations, a global model is proposed, depending on various parameters of both the wine and the glass itself, which quantitatively provides the progressive losses of dissolved CO2 from laser-etched champagne glasses. The question of champagne temperature was closely examined, and its role on the modeled losses of dissolved CO2 was corroborated by a set of experimental data. PMID:27031022

  5. Decomposition experiment of hydro-fluorocarbon gas by pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Kazuo; Udagawa, Shinsuke; Toyada, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with a trial experiment of decomposition of environmental gas R-12 by the pulsed TEA CO2 laser. Nowadays refrigerant R-12 and other hydro-chlorofluorocarbon gases are strongly prohibited to produce, as these gases have both strong ozone-depleting effects and green-house effects. The gases of already produced by huge amount should be decomposed as fast as possible by suitable technical methods. Along with the conventional kiln furnace of cement, arc discharge and the HG discharge are good methods for the freon decomposition. Both methods, however, have the weakness of electrode damages (arcing) or low-pressure operation (HF discharge). High power CO2 laser seems to have good properties for such decomposition with favorable wavelength for the absorption. In our small-scale experiment of gas decomposition a pulsed TEA CO2 laser of several joules is utilized to produce the plasma in R-12 flow channel of glass tube. The withdrawal of decomposed gases is performed by Ca alkalized water. The deposit mass is measured, and powder X-ray diffraction measurement is carried out on the deposit powder. The possibility of our laser gas decomposition is discussed.

  6. Benefits of CO2 laser heating for high reliability fiber splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Douglas M.; Nasir, Usman; Saravanos, Elli

    2016-03-01

    The use of a CO2 laser as a heat source became commercially available for optical fiber splicing and component fabrication only in recent years. In addition to long-term trouble-free and low-maintenance heat source operation, laser fusion splicing offers unique benefits for fabricating high-power optical components, as well as for splice reliability. When used as the heating method for fiber splicing, the energy of the CO2 laser beam is efficiently absorbed by the outer layer of the glass, and is then conducted inwards. This heating method is well controlled, and results in a smooth and contamination-free glass surface. Other heating methods, such as arc fusion or resistive heating, may leave tungsten, graphite, or metal oxide deposits on the spliced fiber surface. By contrast, with CO2 laser splicing, the lack of surface irregularities and contamination enables remarkable spliced-fiber strength results, with some strength results nearly within the range of coated fiber breaking strength.

  7. 3D Polymer Weld Seam Characterization Based on Optical Coherence Tomography for Laser Transmission Welding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Mallmann, Guilherme; Devrient, Martin; Schmidt, Michael

    Laser transmission welding is an established single-stage plastic joining process, which enables hermetically sealed joints under the workpiece surface. The process requires joining partners with proper degrees of transmission and absorption to the processing wavelength. For reaching a stable process an in-process quality assurance is very valuable. Current monitoring systems have a limited usage, as no quantitative information of the weld itself is obtained without its destruction. In medical and pharmaceutical applications a weld with leakage is e.g. unacceptable. The main objective of this paper is the presentation of the optical coherence tomography as a tool for the quality assurance in laser transmission welding. This approach enables the measurement of any residual gap, weld geometry, internal pores and leaks. The presented results show that this technique allows even the characterization of welds using joining partners with thicknesses of 2 mm or with glass fiber reinforcement levels of 30% per weight.

  8. Laser welding of aeronautical and automobile aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukha, Z.; Sánchez-Amaya, J. M.; Amaya-Vázquez, M. R.; González-Rovira, L.; Botana, F. J.

    2012-04-01

    Laser beam welding (LBW) show clear advantages compared with other techniques, as the low heat input, the high localization ability, the high welding speed, the high flexibility, the high weld quality and the high production rate. However, its applicability to aluminum alloys is limited, as they generally have high reflectivity, high thermal conductivity and low viscosity. In the present study, it is analyzed the laser weldability of four aluminum alloys (2024, 5083, 6082 and 7075). High penetration butt welds could be obtained with a high power diode laser under conduction regime. The properties of the weld beads such as the microstructure and microhardness were analyzed. A linear function between the input laser fluence and the volume of melted material was obtained for the four alloys.

  9. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOEpatents

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  10. Exoscope Update: Automated Laser Welding Of Circumferential Tissue Anastomoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jude S.; McGuire, Kevin P.; Hinshaw, J. Raymond

    1989-09-01

    The speed, accuracy and efficiency of using laser energy to fuse together or weld living tissue makes laser tissue welding one of the most exciting areas of medical research today. Numerous investigators using animal models and several surgeons conducting clinical studies have demonstrated many promising potential applications of laser tissue welding. Accurate tissue positioning and well controlled delivery of laser energy during laser welding are essential for consistently successful laser tissue repairs. Many surgical procedures involve the creation of functional anastomoses, which are patent connections between hollow, tubular tissue structures, like bowel, blood vessels or fallopian tubes. We are developing the Exoscope SystemTM to automate and simplify the production of laser welded end-to-end and end-to-side anastomoses. Any laser light that can be passed through an optical fiber can be used in this system. The Exoscope SystemTM employs a fiber optic Exoscope Device,TM which provides for the precise placement of laser energy onto the abutted tissue seam, and a biocompatible, dissolvable intraluminal PolySurgeTM stent, which holds the tissue in circumferential apposition during lasing. The feasibility of employing the Exoscope SystemTM technique for the construction of rabbit small bowel anastomoses was successfully demonstrated in a Phase I study comparing 30 Exoscope SystemTM laser welded anastomoses to 30 conventional sutured anastomoses.

  11. Quantity change in collagen following 830-nm diode laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; O'Callaghan, David; Rouy, Simone; Godlewski, Guilhem; Prudhomme, Michel

    1996-12-01

    The actual mechanism for production of laser welding of tissue is presently unknown, but collagen plays an important role is tissue welded after laser irradiance. The quantity change in collagen extracted from the abdominal aorta of Wistar rats after tissue welding using an 830 nm diode laser was investigated. The collagen contents following repeated pepsin digestion after acetic acid extraction were determined with Sircol collagen assay. Compared with untreated aorta, the collagen content of the treated vessel was obvious decreased immediately after laser irradiation and following an initial increase on day 3, there was a peak at day 10. The results suggest that a part of collagen molecules is denatured by the heat of laser. There is an effect of stimulating collagen synthesis after laser welding with parameters used in this study.

  12. Process and quality control for automotive laser welding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Toenshoff, H.K.; Overmeyer, L.; Schumacher, J.

    1996-12-31

    Laser welding applications using CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG-Lasers are of growing importance for the production of car bodies. Especially for parts influencing the safety of the product, it would be advantageous to control the welding result which is, in practical applications, influenced by many process parameters. In this paper, an innovative process monitoring and quality control system with a closed loop control of the laser output power will be described, which is based on monitoring and evaluating the light emission from the welding process. In contrast to systems which have been developed in the past, the sensors which detect the light emission were integrated into the beam guidance system for CO{sub 2} lasers, and into the laser source for Nd:YAG lasers. The optical set-up of this system, together with the automatic detection of welding failures, will be described, and the results of the system for industrial applications will be evaluated.

  13. Microsecond enamel ablation with 10.6μm CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; McDonald, A.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Lasers have been previously been used for dental applications, however there remain issues with thermally-induced cracking. In this paper we investigate the impact of pulse length on CO2 laser ablation of human dental enamel. Experiments were carried in vitro on molar teeth without any modification to the enamel surface, such as grinding or polishing. In addition to varying the pulse length, we also varied pulse energy and focal position, to determine the most efficient ablation of dental hard tissue and more importantly to minimize or eradicate cracking. The maximum temperature rise during the multi pulse ablation process was monitored using a set of thermocouples embedded into the pulpal chamber. The application of a laser device in dental surgery allows removal of tissue with higher precision, which results in minimal loss of healthy dental tissue. In this study we use an RF discharge excited CO2 laser operating at 10.6μm. The wavelength of 10.6 μm overlaps with a phosphate band (PO3-4) absorption in dental hard tissue hence the CO2 laser radiation has been selected as a potential source for modification of the tissue. This research describes an in-depth analysis of single pulse laser ablation. To determine the parameters that are best suited for the ablation of hard dental tissue without thermal cracking, a range of pulse lengths (10-200 μs), and fluences (0-100 J/cm2) are tested. In addition, different laser focusing approaches are investigated to select the most beneficial way of delivering laser radiation to the surface (divergent/convergent beam). To ensure that these processes do not increase the temperature above the critical threshold and cause the necrosis of the tissue a set of thermocouples was placed into the pulpal chambers. Intermittent laser radiation was investigated with and without application of a water spray to cool down the ablation site and the adjacent area. Results show that the temperature can be kept below the critical threshold

  14. Volcanic CO2 mapping and flux measurements at Campi Flegrei by Tunable Diode Laser absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, Maria; Aiuppa, Alessandro; Giudice, Gaetano; Grassa, Fausto; Chiodini, Giovanni; Valenza, Mariano

    2014-05-01

    Near-infrared room-temperature Tunable Diode Lasers (TDL) have recently found increased usage in atmospheric chemistry and air monitoring research, but applications in Volcanology are still limited to a few examples. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) to measurement of volcanic CO2 flux emissions. Our field tests were conducted at Campi Flegrei (near Pozzuoli, Southern Italy), where the GasFinder was used (during three campaigns in October 2012, January 2013 and May 2013) to repeatedly measure the path-integrated concentrations of CO2 along cross-sections of the atmospheric plumes of the two main fumarolic fields in the area (Solfatara and Pisciarelli). By using ad-hoc designed field-set-up and a tomographic post-processing routine, we resolved, for each of the 2 manifestations, the contour maps of CO2 concentrations in their atmospheric plumes, from the integration of which (and after multiplication by the plumes' transport speeds) the CO2 fluxes were finally obtained [1]. The so-calculated fluxes average of 490 tons/day, which agrees well with independent evaluations of Aiuppa et al. (2013) [2] (460 tons/day on average), and support a significant contribution of fumaroles to the total CO2 budget. The cumulative (fumarole [this study] +soil [2]) CO2 output from Campi Flegrei is finally evaluated at 1600 tons/day. The application of lasers to volcanic gas studies is still an emerging (though intriguing) research field, and requires more testing and validation experiments. We conclude that TDL technique may valuably assist CO2 flux quantification at a number of volcanic targets worldwide. [1] Pedone M. et al. (2013) Gold2013:abs:5563, Goldschmidt Conference, session 11a. [2] Aiuppa A. et al. (2013) Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. doi: 10.1002/ggge.20261. [3] Chiodini G. et al. (2010) Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 115, B03205. doi:10.1029/2008JB006258.

  15. 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio analysis in human breath using a 2 μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong; Yinbo, Huang; Ruizhong, Rao

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium H. pylori is believed to cause peptic ulcer. H. pylori infection in the human stomach can be diagnosed through a CO2 isotope ratio measure in exhaled breath. A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. A new type multi-passes cell with 12 cm long base length , 29 m optical path length in total and 280 cm3 volume is used in this work. The temperature and pressure are well controlled at 301.15 K and 6.66 kPa with fluctuation amplitude of 25 mK and 6.7 Pa, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06o was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter. The application of denoising and Kalman filter not only improved the signal to noise ratio, but also shorten the system response time.

  16. Characterization and use of a CO2 infrared laser for ignition of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Jeremy; Tersine, Edward; Morgan, Brent; Ostrowski, Peter

    2007-06-01

    This abstract reports on the characterization and use of a 200W, 10.6 μm CO2 laser for nonresonant ignition of explosives. To characterize the laser, we measured its risetime with a detector whose response time is approximately 125 ns. We also measured the beam's spatial profile with a scanning pinhole setup. Next, we used the laser for testing of explosives for fundamental research and CAD/PAD (cartridge-actuated devices/propellant actuated devices) applications. Specifically, we determined energy-to-ignition values for TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) and the novel primary KDNP (4,6-dinitro-7-hydroxybenzofuroxan). Ignition was judged to begin at first light, which occurs when the laser-induced reaction first emits light as detected by a visible photodiode. To determine the energy to ignition accurately, we corrected the laser power for reflections. We used a high-speed camera to monitor the reaction progress from ignition to explosive consumption.

  17. Minimal invasive method to treat hemangiomas of the oral cavity with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Nicola, Jorge H.; Gusmao, Reinaldo J.; Coutinho, Adriana A.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.

    1997-05-01

    During the last six years we have developed a new CO2 laser technique for the treatment of symptomatic oral cavity hemangioma. Our new technique, named 'laser encircling technique', has especially succeeded during hemangioma buccal maxillary surgeries. The treatment consisted in the application of a line of points of CO2 laser circling the lesion. Depending on the position and size of the lesion, we used from 0.4 to 4.0 Joules/mm2 laser energy density per pulse, causing reduction in the size of the lesion throughout the sclerosis of nutritional vessels which led to reduction in size, volume and color of the hemangiomas with no significant bleeding or inflammatory reaction. In this work forty male and female patients, twelve to fifty years old, presenting medium to small size hemangiomas situated in different sites of the oral cavity such as the tongue, mouth vestibule, pharynx, tonsil area and lips were treated by the procedure described above. The number of laser applications was defined by the peculiarities of each case, varying form 3 to 6 sessions at 4 week intervals, always under local or topic anesthesia. The patients complained about minimal posit operative discomfort and had good cicatrix evolution. The good results achieved by this technique lead to the conclusion that CO2 laser for these types of hemangioma is an efficient and very secure method of treatment. An important aspect of our technique is the fact that using relatively low laser power we do not perform real surgery but a less aggressive alternative of treatment.

  18. Caries inhibition in vital teeth using 9.6-μm CO2-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Fried, Daniel; Le, Charles Q.; Nelson, Gerald; Rapozo-Hilo, Marcia; Rechmann, Beate M. T.; Featherstone, John D. B.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that in a short-term clinical pilot trial short-pulsed 9.6 μm CO2-laser irradiation significantly inhibits demineralization in vivo. Twenty-four subjects scheduled for extraction of bicuspids for orthodontic reasons (age 14.9 +/- 2.2 years) were recruited. Orthodontic brackets were placed on bicuspids (Transbond XT, 3M). An area next to the bracket was irradiated with a CO2-laser (Pulse System Inc, Los Alamos, New Mexico), wavelength 9.6 μm, pulse duration 20 μs, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 1100 μm, average fluence 4.1 +/- 0.3J/cm2, 20 laser pulses per spot. An adjacent nonirradiated area served as control. Bicuspids were extracted after four and twelve weeks, respectively, for a quantitative assessment of demineralization by cross-sectional microhardness testing. For the 4-week arm the mean relative mineral loss ΔZ (vol% × μm) for the laser treated enamel was 402 +/- 85 (mean +/- SE), while the control showed significantly higher mineral loss (ΔZ 738 +/- 131; P = 0.04, t-test). The difference was even larger after twelve weeks (laser arm ΔZ 135 +/- 98; control 1067 +/- 254; P = 0.002). The laser treatment produced 46% demineralization inhibition for the 4-week and a marked 87% inhibition for the 12-week arm. This study shows, for the first time in vivo, that the short-pulsed 9.6 μm CO2-laser irradiation successfully inhibits demineralization of tooth enamel in humans.

  19. Fabrication of a microresonator-fiber assembly maintaining a high-quality factor by CO₂ laser welding.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhiwei; Lin, Jintian; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhengming; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-19

    We demonstrate fabrication of a microtoroid resonator of a high-quality (high-Q) factor using femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) micromachining. A fiber taper is reliably assembled to the microtoroid using CO2 laser welding. Specifically, we achieve a high-Q-factor of 2.12 × 10(6) in the microresonator-fiber assembly by optimizing the contact position between the fiber taper and the microtoroid. PMID:26480452

  20. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, J.; Sun, X.

    2011-12-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be >~20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (<~0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels. An assessment of the technique, discussions of measurement precision and error sources as well as preliminary data will be presented.

  1. Treatment of laryngeotracheal papillomatosis with the CO2 and Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.; Jovanovic, Sergije

    2000-06-01

    Papillomas are the most common benign neoplasms of the larynx and trachea. There are two types with different biological behavior, both caused by the human papilloma virus: the form that usually manifest itself in adults as a solitary, rarely recurring lesion, whereas one form that manifests in children and adults. It involves multiple lesions with a tendency to spread and recur. There is still no alternative to repeated surgical removal of the papillomas. In a retrospective study the results of laser surgery are compared with the results of instrumental removal of papillomas. The larynges were treated with the CO2 laser applied via high-precision micromanipulators combined with different scanner systems. In cases where the disease has spread into the cervical trachea, the papilloma foci were exposed by special subglottoscopes prior to transglottic removal with the CO2 laser via the operating microscope. The Nd:YAG laser applied through a jet ventilation tracheoscope via optical fibers has proven useful for involvement of the intrathoracic trachea. The use of the laser has not reduce the recurrency rate but the rate of late complications such as anterior synechia. Furthermore in extensive disease laser therapy enables a controlled bloodless removal even in the thoracic trachea and bronchi.

  2. An audit of the use of the CO2 laser in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Santos de Almeida, Darcy

    2004-09-01

    The use of the Carbon dioxide Laser to perform surgical procedures in the oral cavity has been described as a successful method for the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial region. Several benefits of the use of the CO2 Laser have been reported and includes reduction of postoperative pain and edema, local hemosthasis, reduction of scaring and wound contraction and infection. The aim of this work is to present our clinical experience in performing several surgical procedures using the CO2 Laser to treat soft tissue pathologies of both benign and malign origin as well as on performing pre-prosthetic surgery, apical surgery and on the treatment of pre-malignancies. Our experience demonstrate that the use of the Carbon dioxide Laser in treating oral soft-tissue pathology presents advantages over conventional techniques and local discomfort and pain are the most common complaints after Laser surgery. The Carbon dioxide Laser does not offer any enhanced cure-rate for oral pathology, but rather it is a precise means of removing soft tissue lesions with little upset afterwards.

  3. CO2 surgical laser in the treatment of some types of pathology of pets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Christian; Pinna, Stefania; Venturini, Antonio; Rossi, Giacomo; Fortuna, Damiano

    2002-10-01

    We have treated with CO2 laser surgery 40 cases which contemplated: stomatitis and other oral pathologies, anorectal, cutaneous, subcutaneous lesions, and other ophthalmic ones. The parameters employed to evaluate surgical treatment success were: histological analyses, time of healing process and incidence (per cent) of relapses. During the T/3 period (45 days) all cases of feline stomatitis relapsed. The 83% of pets that suffered of anorectal pathologies healed up to 21 days and no relapse was observed in T/4 period (180 days). The cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules vaporization caused lesions that healed during 7 days (T/1) and no relapse was observed after laser treatment. In cutaneous chronic ulcers and in reptilian abscesses we had the lesions reparation by second intention healing in T/3. A case of feline oral squamocellular carcinoma relapsed in T/3 after laser treatment. The results showed three different level of utility: indispensable, useful but unnecessary, inefficacious. The CO2 laser application resulted the best treatment for anorectal pathologies, cutaneous ulcerations and reptilian abscesses. The laser surgery was only useful but unnecessary in treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous neoformations and also in oral and peri-ophthalmic pathologies. Finally, the laser application appeared inefficacious in squamocellular carcinoma and in chronic phlogosis of feline oral cavity.

  4. Range Resolved CO2 Atmospheric Backscattering Measurements Using Fiber Lasers and RZPN Code Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John

    2011-01-01

    We report the use of a return-to- zero (RZPN) pseudo noise modulation technique for making range resolved measurements of CO2 within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using commercial, off-the-shelf, components. Conventional, range resolved, DIAL measurements require laser pulse widths that are significantly shorter than the desired spatial resolution and necessitate using pulses whose temporal spacing is such that scattered returns from only a single pulse are observed by the receiver at any one time (for the PBL pulse separations must be greater than approximately 20 microseconds). This imposes significant operational limitations when using currently available fiber lasers because of the resulting low duty cycle (less than approximately 0.0005) and consequent low average laser output power. The RZPN modulation technique enables a fiber laser to operate at much higher duty cycles (approaching 0.04) thereby more effectively utilizing the amplifier's output. This increases the counts received by approximately two orders of magnitude. Our approach involves employing two distributed feedback lasers (DFB), each modulated by a different RPZN code, whose outputs are then amplified by a CW fiber amplifier. One laser is tuned to a CO2 absorption line; the other operates offline thereby permitting the simultaneous acquisition of both on and offline signals using independent RZPN codes. This minimizes the impact of atmospheric turbulence on the measurement. The on and offline signals are retrieved by deconvolving the return signal using the appropriate kernels.

  5. Development of Underwater Laser Cladding and Underwater Laser Seal Welding Techniques for Reactor Components (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Masataka Tamura; Shohei Kawano; Wataru Kouno; Yasushi Kanazawa

    2006-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the major reasons to reduce the reliability of aged reactor components. Toshiba has been developing underwater laser welding onto surface of the aged components as maintenance and repair techniques. Because most of the reactor internal components to apply this underwater laser welding technique have 3-dimensional shape, effect of welding positions and welded shapes are examined and presented in this report. (authors)

  6. CO2 Laser Surgery and Prosthetic Management for the Treatment of Epulis Fissuratum

    PubMed Central

    de Arruda Paes-Junior, Tarcisio José; Cavalcanti, Sâmia Carolina Mota; Nascimento, Daniela Fernandes Figueira; Saavedra, Guilherme de Siqueira Ferreira Anzaloni; Kimpara, Estevão Tomomitsu; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Niccoli-Filho, Walter; Komori, Paula Carolina de Paiva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a case report of the surgical removal of hyperplasia in the oral cavity, using carbon dioxide (CO2) laser radiation and rehabilitation with a complete denture. Epulis fissuratum occurs in complete denture patients, because a constant irritative action induces the mucosa to grow under poorly fitting dentures. These lesions must be removed, and to avoid a relapse, new complete dentures should be made to maintain healthy surgical tissues. The clinical sequence presented in this case shows a completely edentulous patient with epulis fissuratum on the lower alveolar ridge extending to the vestibular sulcus of the anterior region of mandible. Immediate complete dentures were made prior to the lesion removal with CO2 laser radiation, providing satisfactory results in oral function and tissue health. PMID:21991461

  7. Repairing method of fixed partial prostheses in dentistry: laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Cozarov, Dalibor; Culea, Laurentiu; Rominu, Mihai; Pop, Daniela M.

    2008-02-01

    Laser Welding is an advantageous method of connecting or repairing metal prosthetic frameworks because there are fewer effects of heating on the area surrounding the spot to be welded, and no further procedures, such as those used for conventional soldering, are necessary. Laser welding has been increasingly applied for fabricating the metal frameworks of prostheses and for other procedures, such as recovering the metal ridge and cusp, blocking holes on the occlusal surfaces after excess occlusal adjustment, thickening the metal framework, or adding contact points after excess grinding and adjusting of the crown margins. The objective of this study are represented by investigation and evaluation of three types of soldering compare to laser welding. The method is represented by the laser welding with a pulsed Nd-Yag Laser equipment. Other joints were produced, using three different soldering techniques. These joining areas were investigated for their quality and their corrosion properties. Corrosion attack was confirmed by electron microscopy. The investigations confirm the quality of laser welding. The investigated different laser welding methods revealed minimal corrosion and offers clear-cut advantages compared to the other soldering methods. Dental alloys are subjected to functional influences in the oral cavity and interact with the intraoral enviroment.

  8. Quality improvement of polymer parts by laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puetz, Heidrun; Treusch, Hans-Georg; Welz, M.; Petring, Dirk; Beyer, Eckhard; Herziger, Gerd

    1994-09-01

    The growing significance of laser technology in industrial manufacturing is also observed in case of plastic industry. Laser cutting and marking are established processes. Laser beam welding is successfully practiced in processes like joining foils or winding reinforced prepregs. Laser radiation and its significant advantages of contactless and local heating could even be an alternative to conventional welding processes using heating elements, vibration or ultrasonic waves as energy sources. Developments in the field of laser diodes increase the interest in laser technology for material processing because in the near future they will represent an inexpensive energy source.

  9. Influence of Laser Wavelength on Melt Bath Dynamics and Resulting Seam Quality at Welding of Thick Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, P.; Rominger, V.; Speker, N.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Weigl, M.; Schmidt, M.

    CO2- and solid-state lasers are the most widely used beam sources. Owing to their different physical beam characteristics, these two types of laser differ fundamentally not only in how the beam is guided but also in their process behavior during deep penetration welding. Almost all industrial applications in thick material > 8 mm have to be full penetration welds to increase fatigue strength, for example in ship building, pipeline construction, train and rail construction or power-train, Holzer et al., 2011. Therefore process behavior and limits at full penetration will be analyzed in detail for both beam sources.

  10. Laser welding of dissimilar materials for lightweight construction and special applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimek, Mitja; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    Against the background of climate objectives and the desired reduction of CO2-emissions, optimization of existing industrial products is needed. To counter rising raw material costs, currently used materials are substituted. This will places new requirements on joining technologies for dissimilar material classes. The main difficulty lies in joining these materials cohesively without changing the properties of the base materials. Current research work at the LZH on joining dissimilar materials is being carried out for the automotive sector and for solar absorbers. For the automotive industry, a laser welding process for joining steel and aluminum without using additives is being investigated, equipped with a spectroscopic welding depth control to increase tensile strength. With a specially constructed laser processing head, it is possible to regulate welding penetration depth in the aluminum sheet, reducing the formation of intermetallic phases. Flat plate solar collectors are favorable devices for generating heat from solar energy. The solar absorber is the central part of a collector, consisting of an aluminum sheet and a copper tube which is attached to the aluminum sheet. Research on new laser welding processes aims at reducing the amount of energy required for production of these solar absorbers. In the field of joining dissimilar materials, laser joining processes, especially for special applications, will complement established joining techniques.

  11. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Experiment in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Hong, Sean; Evans, Russell

    2012-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics and fusion energy research. It is even more advantageous if the wave penetration is independent of the electron acceleration process. Plasma current can be generated through beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves (φ>>φpe) into plasma. The beat wave formation process can be efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves is matched to a local resonant frequency of the medium, i.e. in this case the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves.footnotetextRogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992). The CO2 lasers provide the high tunability for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of plasma densities with plasma frequency in THz range. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified to serve as the two pump wave sources with peak power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers, a high-density plasma target source and diagnostics system will be presented. The initial results of unbalanced beat-wave experiment using one high-power pulsed and one low-power CW CO2 lasers will be presented and discussed using the independent plasma source to control the φpe of the interaction region. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  12. Effect of CO2 laser on root caries inhibition around composite restorations: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Jociana Bandeira; Hanashiro, Fernando Seishim; Steagall, Washington; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle; Nobre-dos-Santos, Marinês; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; de Souza-Zaroni, Wanessa Christine

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effect of CO2 laser on the inhibition of root surface demineralization around composite resin restorations. For this purpose, 30 blocks obtained from human molar roots were divided into three groups: group 1 (negative control), cavity prepared with cylindrical diamond bur + acid etching + adhesive + composite resin restoration; group 2, cavity prepared with cylindrical diamond bur + CO2 laser (5.0 J/cm(2)) + acid etching + adhesive + composite resin; and group 3, cavity prepared with cylindrical diamond bur + CO2 laser (6.0 J/cm(2)) + acid etching + adhesive + composite resin. After this procedure, the blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Root surface demineralization around the restorations was measured by microhardness analysis. The hardness results of the longitudinally sectioned root surface were converted into percentage of mineral volume, which was used to calculate the mineral loss delta Z (ΔZ). The percentage of mineral volume, ΔZ, and the percentage of demineralization inhibition of the groups were statistically analyzed by using analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer test. The percentage of mineral volume was higher in the irradiated groups up to 80 μm deep. The ΔZ was significantly lower in the irradiated groups than in the control group. The percentage of reduction in demineralization ranged from 19.73 to 29.21 in position 1 (50 μm), and from 24.76 to 26.73 in position 2 (100 μm), when using 6 and 5 J/cm(2), respectively. The CO2 laser was effective in inhibiting root demineralization around composite resin restorations. PMID:23291879

  13. Mechanical strength of laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Watanabe, I; Liu, J; Atsuta, M

    2004-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the output energy of laser welding and welding methods on the joint strength of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. Two types of cast Co-Cr plates were prepared, and transverse sections were made at the center of the plate. The cut surfaces were butted against one another, and the joints welded with a laser-welding machine at several levels of output energy with the use of two methods. The fracture force required to break specimens was determined by means of tensile testing. For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens, the force required to break the 0.5-mm laser-welded specimens at currents of 270 and 300 A was not statistically different (p > 0.05) from the results for the nonwelded control specimens. The force required to break the 1.0-mm specimens double-welded at a current of 270 A was the highest value among the 1.0-mm laser-welded specimens. The results suggested that laser welding under the appropriate conditions improved the joint strength of cobalt- chromium alloy. PMID:15116400

  14. Electrochemistry Corrosion Properties of Pulsed Laser Welding Hastelloy C-276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G.; Niu, F.; Wu, D.; Qu, Y.

    Based on the welding quality requirement of Hastelloy C276 in the extreme environment, the electrochemistry corrosion property of laser welding Hastelloy C276 was evaluated in the neutral, acid and alkaline solutions, and the corroded surface was observed by the co-focal laser scanning microscope to confirm the corrosion mechanism. The results indicated, the corrosion trend of the weld was weaker than that of base metal in the neutral and acid solutions, but in the alkaline solutions, the corrosion trend of the base metal was weaker. However, the corrosion rate of the weld was much slower than that of base metal in all solutions. At the point of corrosion mechanism, in the acid and alkaline solutions, the base metal and weld showed the uniform corrosion. However, in the neutral solution, the selective corrosion and intergranular corrosion occurred in the base metal and the weld, respectively.

  15. Experiments of second harmonic generation output in pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruhai; Li, Dianjun

    2010-11-01

    It is always the hot subject to realize the output of high-power laser in the range of 3-5μm wavelength. This rang of wave band has greatly important applications in military because it located in the atmosphere window. Generally there are two ways to obtain this range of laser wavelength. One way is through optical parameter oscillation (OPO) from shorter laser wavelength and the other is through second harmonic generation (SHG) from longer laser wavelength. Firstly, the comparison between tow nonlinear crystals ZnGeP2 and AgGaSe2 is conducted for their nonlinear coefficient and damaging threshold in theory. The theoretical results show that the crystal AgGaSe2 is more suitable for the SHG of pulsed TEA CO2 laser. When using pulsed TEA CO2 laser with wavelength of 9.3μm to pumping AgGaSe2 SHG crystal, the wavelength of 4.65μm is obtained. In the condition of repetition rate 100Hz, the upmost output power of single pulse is up to level of 1W, which corresponding efficiency of SHG is about 6%. The experimental results show that the polarization of laser beam has greatly influence on the SHG output of the crystal. Under the radiation of 3MW/cm2 from fundamental wave and the right position for maximal SHG output in the crystal, when polarization of laser beam rotates +/-4.5°, the SHG output of energy decrease about 30%. The research of this paper will make a foundation for further development of mid-infrared laser.

  16. Fractional CO2 Laser Resurfacing as Monotherapy in the Treatment of Atrophic Facial Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2014-01-01

    Background: While laser resurfacing remains the most effective treatment option for atrophic acne scars, the high incidence of post-treatment adverse effects limits its use. Fractional laser photothermolysis attempts to overcome these limitations of laser resurfacing by creating microscopic zones of injury to the dermis with skip areas in between. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing in atrophic facial acne scars. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe atrophic facial acne scars were treated with 3-4 sessions of fractional CO2 laser resurfacing at 6-week intervals. The therapeutic response to treatment was assessed at each follow up visit and then finally 6 months after the last laser session using a quartile grading scale. Response to treatment was labelled as ‘excellent’ if there was >50% improvement in scar appearance and texture of skin on the grading scale while 25-50% response and <25% improvement were labelled as ‘good’ and ‘poor’ response, respectively. The overall satisfaction of the patients and any adverse reactions to the treatment were also noted. Results: Most of the patients showed a combination of different morphological types of acne scars. At the time of final assessment 6 months after the last laser session, an excellent response was observed in 26 patients (43.3%) while 15 (25%) and 19 patients (31.7%) demonstrated a good and poor response respectively. Rolling and superficial boxcar scars responded the best while pitted scars responded the least to fractional laser monotherapy. The commonest reported adverse effect was transient erythema and crusting lasting for an average of 3-4 and 4-6 days, respectively while three patients developed post-inflammatory pigmentation lasting for 8-12 weeks. Conclusions: Fractional laser resurfacing as monotherapy is effective in treating acne scars especially rolling and superficial boxcar scars with minimal

  17. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  18. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Current Drive in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Evans, Russell; Huang, Zhuo Fan; Hong, Sean

    2011-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics. Plasma current can be generated through nonlinear beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves into an unmagnetized plasma. The beat wave formation process is efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves corresponds to the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in low-density plasma using micro-waves. The high tunability of the CO2 lasers provides many options for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of CTIX plasma densities. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified at power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers and diagnostics system will be described. A high-density plasma test source and density diagnostics system will also be presented. This line of research will impact experiment such as the PLX facility under initial operation at Los Alamos National Lab. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  19. Intracavity absorption of CO 2 laser radiation by chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sh.

    2008-05-01

    Intracavity absorption method was applied to determine the absorption coefficients of trichlorofluorocarbon CCl 3F (CFC-11), dichlorodifluorocarbon CF 2Cl 2 (CFC-12) and chlorodifluorocarbon CHClF 2 (CFC-22) vs. the pressure in the cell inside the cavity of a tunable CO 2 laser at different spectral lines on branches 9R and 10P. The laser output power was measured vs. the gas pressure at different spectral lines on branches 9R, 9P, 10R and 10P of CO 2 molecule transitions. A strong absorption was observed for lines of 9R and 10P branches, whereas a weak absorption was noticed for lines of 9P and 10R branches. The calculation of absorption coefficients was restricted for 9R and 10P due to the oscillating variation of the output power of CO 2 laser vs. the CFC pressure, which was occurred for the lines of 9P and 10R. On the basis of absorption coefficients, the absorption cross-sections for CFC-12 were calculated and compared with the absorption cross-sections found from the previous experiment (where the cell was located outside the cavity), NIST and HITRAN databases, respectively. The obtained data could be useful for CFC gases detection as pollutants in the atmosphere.

  20. Rapid Constructions of Microstructures for Optical Fiber Sensors Using a Commercial CO2 Laser System

    PubMed Central

    Irawan, Rudi; Chuan, Tjin Swee; Meng, Tay Chia; Ming, Tan Khay

    2008-01-01

    Exposing an optical fiber core to the measurand surrounding the fiber is often used to enhance the sensitivity of an optical fiber sensor. This paper reports on the rapid fabrication of microstructures in an optical fiber using a CO2 laser system which help exposing the optical fiber core to the measurand. The direct-write CO2 laser system used is originally designed for engraving the polymeric material. Fabrications of microstructures such as in-fiber microhole, D-shaped fiber, in-fiber microchannel, side-sliced fiber and tapered fiber were attempted. The microstructures in the fibers were examined using a SEM and an optical microscope. Quality of microstructures shown by the SEM images and promising results from fluorescence sensor tests using in-fiber microchannels of 100μm width, 210μm depth and 10mm length show the prospect of this method for use in optical fiber sensor development. The direct-write CO2 laser system is a flexible and fast machining tool for fabricating microstructures in an optical fiber, and can possibly be a replacement of the time consuming chemical etching and polishing methods used for microstructure fabrications of optical the fiber sensors reported in other literatures. PMID:19662114

  1. Efficient extreme ultraviolet plasma source generated by a CO2 laser and a liquid xenon microjet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Soumagne, George; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kubodera, Shoichi; Pogorelsky, Igor; Pavlishin, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrated efficacy of a CO2-laser-produced xenon plasma in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region at 13.5nm at variable laser pulse widths between 200ps and 25ns. The plasma target was a 30μm liquid xenon microjet. To ensure the optimum coupling of CO2 laser energy with the plasma, they applied a prepulse yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The authors measured the conversion efficiency (CE) of the 13.5nm EUV emission for different pulse widths of the CO2 laser. A maximum CE of 0.6% was obtained for a CO2 laser pulse width of 25ns at an intensity of 5×1010W/cm2.

  2. Optical Probing of CO2 Laser-Plasma Interactions at Near Critical Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chao

    The interaction of a high-power laser beam with plasma has been explored extensively in the context of laser-driven fusion, plasma-based acceleration of ions and electrons and high energy-density physics. One of the fundamental processes common to all these studies is the penetration of intense light into a dense matter through the hole boring effect and self-induced transparency. Light with a given wavelength lambda will be reflected once the electron density equals the critical electron plasma density nc = 1.1x 1021cm -3 /[lambda(mum)]2. The radiation pressure exerted on the critical density layer is characterized by the ponderomotive force of a focused laser pulse which scales with a laser intensity, I as Ilambda2 Wmum2/cm 2. At Ilambda2 ˜1017 Wmum2/cm2 and above, it becomes possible for the laser pulse not only to steepen the plasma profile but to push the overcritical plasma with ne > nc creating a cavity or a hole in the target. The phenomenon of hole boring, whereby a laser pulse propagates through a reduced density cavity to reach and push the critical density layer, is of importance in fast-ignition fusion because it may allow the laser pulse to deliver its energy closer to the compressed fuel where it can be converted into fast electrons that are needed to ignite a small portion of the fuel. The layer of plasma pushed by the radiation pressure can reflect and accelerate ions via the so called Hole Boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration mechanism. Also the density pile- up in combination with the strong electron heating at the critical density layer can facilitate the formation of a collisionless shock. This shock wave acceleration can produce high energy ion beams with a narrow energy spread. Numerous experiments have been carried out to study dynamics of laser plasma interaction indirectly using solid state targets that are opaque for 1?m laser. However, by using a longer wavelength CO2 laser, lambda = 10.6mum, the critical plasma density is decreased

  3. [Validation of the use of the CO2 laser in operations on the brain].

    PubMed

    Babichenko, E I; Kolesov, V N; Zhikharev, A P; Grigor'ev, S N; Tsukanov, V A

    1989-01-01

    It is reported that the CO2-laser can be used in operations on the brain. Information is given on the response of the brain structures to irradiation with a wave length of 10.6 microns. The optimal regimens of the device operation were elaborated depending on the concrete object of the various stages of the surgical intervention. The medical laser device Skal'pel'-1 was used in the clinic in 109 operations. The low traumatization of such operations and the favourable course of the postoperative period are pointed out. PMID:2629442

  4. Pulsed CO2 laser interaction with a metal surface at oblique incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, J. A.; Schriempf, J. T.; Cronburg, T. L.; Eninger, J. E.; Woodroffe, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal fluence deposition and surface pressure generation produced by a CO2 laser pulse have been measured as a function of angle of incidence theta on sheet aluminum in air. The paper finds that air plasma ignition depends on the laser beam intensity I sub 0 only, not on the surface-normal flux (I sub 0)(cos theta). Conversely, the fluence deposition and surface pressure depend only on the product (I sub 0)(cos theta), and obey the square-root and two-thirds-power dependences observed with simple I sub 0 variation at normal incidence.

  5. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  6. Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Candan, L.; Demir, A.; Akman, E.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed.

  7. Simulations of an airborne laser absorption spectrometer for atmospheric CO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Refaat, T.; Kooi, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric column amount of carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas of the atmosphere, has significantly increased from a preindustrial value of about 280 parts per million (ppm) to more than 390 ppm at present. Our knowledge about the spatiotemporal change and variability of the greenhouse gas, however, is limited. Thus, a near-term space mission of the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) is crucial to increase our understanding of global sources and sinks of CO2. Currently, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and ITT Exelis are jointly developing and testing an airborne laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a prototype instrument for the mission. To assess the space capability of accurate atmospheric CO2 measurements, accurate modeling of the instrument and practical evaluation of space applications are the keys for the success of the ASCENDS mission. This study discusses the simulations of the performance of the airborne instrument and its CO2 measurements. The LAS is a multi-wavelength spectrometer operating on a 1.57 um CO2 absorption line. The Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) approach is implemented in the instrument. To reach accurate CO2 measurements, transmitted signals are monitored internally as reference channels. A model of this kind of instrument includes all major components of the spectrometer, such as modulation generator, fiber amplifier, telescope, detector, transimpedance amplifier, matched filter, and other signal processors. The characteristics of these components are based on actual laboratory tests, product specifications, and general understanding of the functionality of the components. For simulations of atmospheric CO2 measurements, environmental conditions related to surface reflection, atmospheric CO2 and H2O profiles, thin clouds, and aerosol layers, are introduced into the model. Furthermore, all major noise sources such as those from detectors, background radiation, speckle, and

  8. Long-pulse high-repetition-rate transversely excited CO2 laser for material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Yuji; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Akira; Tamagawa, Tohru

    1994-05-01

    Using a TE-CO2 laser, we could obtain a long-pulsed laser beam of low initial spike by controlling the discharge current by a pulse forming network and optimizing the gas composition, discharge length to resonator length ratio, and output mirror reflectivity. The maximum laser output was 1.1 J; the initial spike energy, 100 kW; the tail output, 56 kW; and the 16 (mu) sec (FWHM). The maximum repetition rate was 500 Hz. A new type of circuit with small pre-ionization current made it possible to operate the laser at a high repetition rate so as to prolong the laser life. When a 5-inch lens was used, the laser power density at the focal point was 1*108 W/cm2, making it possible to use the laser with an unusually high energy density without causing the breakdown of air insulation. In fact, we succeeded in fine- cutting a 0.5 mm thick alumina ceramic with the laser. It was found that unlike other working methods, the newly developed laser does not cause cracks in ceramic work pieces.

  9. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  10. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  11. The stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, given locally, improves CO2 laser healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Bilic, M; Bumber, Z; Blagaic, A Boban; Batelja, L; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2005-05-01

    The stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV; mol. wt. 1419), which is at present in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, has been shown to counteract healing impairment by systemic corticosteroids in burned mice, both in vivo and in vitro, in the absence of carrier or protease inhibitor. Because of the particular healing problems associated with laser use, we have now studied the effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on CO(2) laser injuries (Sharplan 1075 laser: 20 W, distance 12.5 cm, spot size 0.8 mm and exposure time 1s) created on the dorsal skin of anaesthetised male NMRI-Hannover mice. The injury was either not treated or treated by topical application of a thin layer of neutral cream containing pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (1 microg, 1 ng or 1 pg (dissolved in saline)/g) or vehicle only, once daily, with the first application 60 min after injury and the last 24 h before killing (1, 7 and 21 days after the laser application). BPC 157 consistently improved healing after the CO(2) laser injury, both macroscopically and microscopically. The effect was produced with a simple method of application and favourable peptide stability (no carrier), and confirms the effectiveness of an ointment containing 1 microg BPC 157 (dissolved in saline)/g neutral cream. PMID:15774286

  12. Combined pulsed dye and CO2 lasers in the treatment of angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Lior; Halachmi, Shlomit; Levi, Assi; Amitai, Dan Ben; Enk, Claes D; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2016-08-01

    Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) is an uncommon dermatosis of unknown etiology that manifests as characteristic red nodules and papules with a predilection for the scalp and periauricular region. Treatment is required for both esthetic and functional reasons, as lesions may ulcerate and bleed. Many treatment approaches have been reported, including excision, systemic medical approaches, topical or intralesional therapies, and non-invasive modalities including cryotherapy, electrosurgery, and laser. Treatments have exhibited variable efficacy, and the recurrence rate is 100 %. We report the combination of pulsed dye laser and CO2 laser in the treatment of ALHE in 14 patients. All patients exhibited clinical response after a mean of 2.4 ± 0.4 treatment sessions. The clinical efficacy of the combined treatment, together with its well-tolerated nature, render the use of pulsed dye laser in combination with CO2 laser, a viable treatment for debulking ALHE lesions. Ongoing maintenance treatments are needed to due to the high degree of relapse. PMID:27184154

  13. Thermo-mechanical simulations of CO2 laser-fused silica interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doualle, T.; Gallais, L.; Cormont, P.; Hébert, D.; Combis, P.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser heating of silica glass is used in many scientific and industrial applications. Particularly, localized CO2 laser heating of silica glass has demonstrated its ability to mitigate surface damage on optics used for high power laser applications. To develop such applications, the control of temperature, heat affected area, and resulting mechanical stresses are critical. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the silica transformation, the material ejection, and the thermo-mechanical stresses induced by the laser heating and subsequent cooling. In this paper, we detail the development of comprehensive thermo-mechanical numerical simulations of these physical processes, based on finite-element method. The approach is developed for 2D or 3D cases to tackle the case of a moving beam at the surface of the sample, and we particularly discuss the choice of the different parameters based on bibliographic inputs. The thermal and mechanical numerical results have been compared to different dedicated experimental studies: infrared thermography measurements at the surface of the irradiated area, optical profilometry measurements of the laser-processed sites, and photo-elastic measurements. Very consistent results are obtained between numerical and experimental results for the description of the temperature gradients, the material ejection, and the residual stresses.

  14. Assessment of thermal damage in precooled CO2 laser wounds using biological markers.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Browne, R M; Frame, J W; Matthews, J B

    1993-08-01

    Precooling of the tissues was investigated as a possible means of reducing the thermal damage during CO2 laser surgery of the oral mucosa. Standard wounds 5 mm long were created with the CO2 laser, with and without precooling, or the scalpel on the dorsum of tongues. Tissue damage was evaluated by studying changes in mast cells and in the activity of lactate (LDH) and succinate (SDH) dehydrogenase. Cooled unoperated tongues acted as controls. The area of thermal damage, indicated by loss of SDH activity, was significantly smaller in precooled tissues (p < 0.001). Although a similar pattern was detected using LDH, the difference was not significant. At both 0 and 6 h normal mast cell numbers were significantly different between groups (p < 0.02). Furthermore, at 0 time, there were significant differences in the numbers of degranulated mast cells between surgical treatment groups (p = 0.001), although not at 6 h. Total numbers of mast cells (normal and degranulated) did not differ between treatment groups or between 0 and 6 h sampling times. Positive significant correlations were observed between the cross-sectional areas and widths of non-reactive succinate and lactate dehydrogenase and the number of degranulated mast cells around the laser wounds. Analysis of the data demonstrated that (i) uncooled laser wounds but not precooled laser wounds were associated significantly with greater levels of immediate mast cell degranulation than scalpel wounds (p = 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8399041

  15. Comprehensive process monitoring for laser welding process optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritt, P.; Boley, M.; Heider, A.; Fetzer, F.; Jarwitz, M.; Weller, D.; Weber, R.; Berger, P.; Graf, T.

    2016-03-01

    Fundamental process monitoring is very helpful to detect defects formed during the complex interactions of capillary laser welding process. Beside the monitoring and diagnostics of laser welding process enlarges the process knowledge which is essential to prevent weld defects. Various studies on monitoring of laser welding processes of aluminum, copper and steel were performed. Coaxial analyses in real-time with inline coherent imaging and photodiode based measurements have been applied as well as off-axis thermography, spectroscopy, online X-Ray observation and highspeed imaging with 808 nm illumination wavelength. The presented diagnostics and monitoring methods were appropriate to study typical weld defects like pores, spatters and cracks. Using these diagnostics allows understanding the formation of such defects and developing strategies to prevent them.

  16. Laser Beam Oscillation Strategies for Fillet Welds in Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Alexander; Goecke, Sven-F.; Sievi, Pravin; Albert, Florian; Rethmeier, Michael

    Laser beam oscillation opens up new possibilities of influencing the welding process in terms of compensation of tolerances and reduction of process emissions that occur in industrial applications, such as in body-in-white manufacturing. The approaches are to adapt the melt pool width in order to generate sufficient melt volume or to influence melt pool dynamics, e.g. for a better degassing. Welding results are highly dependent on the natural frequency of the melt pool, the used spot diameter and the oscillation speed of the laser beam. The conducted investigations with an oscillated 300 μm laser spot show that oscillation strategies, which are adjusted to the joining situation improve welding result for zero-gap welding as well as for bridging gaps to approximately 0.8 mm. However, a complex set of parameters has to be considered in order to generate proper welding results. This work puts emphasize on introducing them.

  17. Experimental Research on Plasma Induced by TEA CO2 Laser Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong; Cheng, Zuhai; Zuo, Duluo; Zhai, Bingjie; Yu, Liangying; Zhu, Haihong

    2008-04-01

    Results in the air-breathing propulsion experiments with a parabolic light craft and a self-made UV-preionized 100 J TEA CO2 laser device are presented. Air disturbance and the spectrum of the plasma after the interaction of pulsed laser radiation with the light craft were studied. It was found that the focal length of the parabolic light craft had a significant effect on the air-disturbance. Two shock waves were detected for the longer focal length, while only one shock wave detected for the short focal length. The spectrum of the laser-induced plasma, the distribution of the characteristic lines, and the temporal behaviors of the air plasma were studied in detail. The results showed that, the evolution of the laser-induced plasma lasted 20 μs, and the plasma spectrum would reach the maximum intensity at 7 μs.

  18. Rb-stabilized laser at 1572 nm for CO2 monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, R.; Moreno, W.; Gruet, F.; Brochard, P.; Schilt, S.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a compact rubidium-stabilized laser system to serve as optical frequency reference in the 1.55-μm wavelength region, in particular for CO2 monitoring at 1572 nm. The light of a fiber-pigtailed distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at 1560 nm is frequency-doubled and locked to a sub-Doppler rubidium transition at 780 nm using a 2-cm long vapor glass cell. Part of the DFB laser light is modulated with an electro-optical modulator enclosed in a Fabry-Perot cavity, generating an optical frequency comb with spectral coverage extending from 1540 nm to 1580 nm. A second slave DFB laser emitting at 1572 nm and offset-locked to one line of the frequency comb shows a relative frequency stability of 1.10-11 at 1 s averaging time and <4.10-12 from 1 hour up to 3 days.

  19. Factors That Determine The Specification Of A CO2 Laser Machining System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellyn, Steven A.

    1986-11-01

    This paper will outline the basic information that determines the approach that a prospective CO2 laser cutting user will take to the purchase of a system. The ability of this type of machine to cut a wide range of materials will be reviewed along with speed and edge-quality parameters. A discussion of the choices available in the marketplace for each of the basic components in a laser maching system will be presented. Three commercially available laser machining systems will be described and compared and the widely different approach taken by each of the design engineering groups involved will be detailed. The effect of upcoming innovations in CAD-CAM and Robotics on the laser cutting systems of the future will also be discussed.

  20. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.