Science.gov

Sample records for co2 laser welded

  1. CO2 laser welding fused silica.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Scott T.; MacCallum, Danny O'Neill; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert

    2005-08-01

    The feasibility of laser welding of fused silica (aka quartz) has been demonstrated recently by others. An application requiring hermetic sealing of a thin, pressure-bearing quartz diaphragm to a thicker frame led us to explore this technique. We found that laser welding techniques normally used for metallic parts caused scorching and uneven melting. Contrary to standard practices (near focus, high travel speed, high power density), successful welds in fused silica required a broad heat source applied over a large area under a slow rotation to gradually heat the glass through the annealing, softening and finally working temperatures. Furthermore, good mechanical contact between the parts to be joined played an even more important role in this process than in typical metallic joints. A 50 W CO2 laser with 4 f.l. ZnSe2 lens and rotary head was used to weld 0.425 OD, 0.006-0.010 thick, disks to 0.500 OD tubing with 0.125 walls. Several joint geometries and beam orientations were investigated. Temperature profiles were measured and compared to an FEM thermal model. We will discuss the effects of laser power, travel speed, number of passes, joint geometry and part thicknesses on achieving hermeticity and cosmetically-acceptable joints.

  2. CO2 laser tailored blank welding: process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Giuseppe; Borello, Elena; Pallaro, Nereo

    1996-09-01

    Tailored blank welding has been a rapidly growing segment of the automotive industry over the last five years. It allows to choose the optimal thickness of the sheets for different zones taking into account different mechanical stresses, vehicle safety reinforcement. Through the elimination of extra reinforcement parts, the use of tailored blanks allows to produce lighter car bodies and to simplify the production cycle. As more laser welding systems are being installed in industry, in order to increase the productivity and maintain constant quality of the products, the demand for the development of process monitoring systems increases. In this paper a monitoring system, based on the measurement of the radiation from the plasma plume during the CO2 tailored blanks laser welding, is presented. Using an appropriate combination of optical components, detectors and a special software, a complete apparatus has been developed. The signals were found to be correlated to weld quality parameters including the defects such as holes, overlapping and open butts.

  3. A CO2 Laser Weld Shape-Predicting Neural Network

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.; Knorovsky, G.A.

    1998-10-05

    We describe two artificial neural networks (ANN) which predict CO2 partial penetration laser welds on grade 304 stainless steel. Given the laser irradiance and travel speed, one ANN (direct) predicts the resulting weld's depth, width, overall shape, energy transfer efficiency, melting efficiency and porosity likelihood in the weld fusion zone. Given the weld size and shape, the second ANN (inverse) predicts the irradiance and travel speed necessary to provide such a weld. The ANNs used 3 nodal layers and perception-type neurons. For the first ANN, with 2 inputs and 17 outputs (12 for shape, and 5 for size, efficiencies and porosity predictions), 12 to 17 intermediate layer neurons were necessary, while for the second, with 14 inputs and 2 outputs, 25 were necessary. Besides their description, data interpretation and weld schedule development via the ANNs will be shown.

  4. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  5. Optical radiation hazards of laser welding processes. Part II: CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, R J; Moss, C E

    1989-08-01

    There has been an extensive growth within the last five years in the use of high-powered lasers in various metalworking processes. The two types of lasers used most frequently for laser welding/cutting processes are the Neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and the carbon dioxide (CO2) systems. When such lasers are operated in an open beam configuration, they are designated as a Class IV laser system. Class IV lasers are high-powered lasers that may present an eye and skin hazard under most common exposure conditions, either directly or when the beam has been diffusely scattered. Significant control measures are required for unenclosed (open beam), Class IV laser systems since workers may be exposed to scattered or reflected beams during the operation, maintenance, and service of these lasers. In addition to ocular and/or skin exposure hazards, such lasers also may present a multitude of nonlaser beam occupational concerns. Radiant energy measurements are reported for both the scattered laser radiation and the plasma-related plume radiations released during typical high-powered CO2 laser-target interactions. In addition, the application of the nominal hazard zone (NHZ) and other control measures also are discussed with special emphasis on Class IV industrial CO2 laser systems. PMID:2508455

  6. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-23

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 A ring . The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  7. Laser welding of nylon thin films using a pulsed CO2 waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez, R.; Valenzuela, Rogelio; Camacho-Mesa, Roxana B.

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we present an experimental investigation for welding Nylon: Bi-Oriented Polyamide (BOPA) thin films using a CO2 waveguide laser in a pulsed configuration. The material used in this study is Nylon 6, all set in square sheet thin films samples of 100 cm2 with 15 µm thickness. Our optical setup is based on deliver the laser beam all the way through the work piece using X-Y scanning mirrors mounted on galvo-like motors and an f-theta lens with 15 cm focal length and 50 µm focal spot sizes. The fluence (laser energy) is controlled by a pulse signal generator having the possibility to change the pulse repetition rate (PRR) and the pulse width (PW) of the laser beam. Our results show the best weld seam for scanning speeds of 20mm/s and the pulsed laser beam with 2 KHz PRR and 80 µs for the PW time. The scanning speed and trajectory for the welding process are all controlled by a computer in which one can modify the weld parameters. The irradiance at the focal point is set to 1.146 MW/cm2 while the average optical power was set to 22.5W. Our experimental parameters are previously modeled by using COMSOL Multiphysics software were the laser heat source is modeled on the selected material. This model is based on the heat transfer partial differential equation and solved by finite elements procedure. Model results show a perfect agreement with the experiments. Finally, the quality of the welded seam is studied by means of sealed tight and share force critical mechanical test.

  8. Evaluation of hazards in CO2 laser welding and related processes.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, M; Honkasalo, A; Laitinen, H; Lindroos, L; Welling, I; von Nandelstadh, P

    1992-04-01

    High-power CO2 lasers are used extensively in various industrial applications. In most cases they form part of open-beam equipment and have a power of several kilowatts, and are thus designated as Safety Class 4 systems. In addition to the invisible i.r. laser beam (10.6 microns), u.v. radiation and visible light may be emitted. In the present work a power meter controlled by microprocessor and a spectroradiometer measured the scattered or reflected laser radiation. In addition, concentration levels of welding and cutting fumes and of pyrolysis products of plastics were determined during various laser processes. Finally, a safety analysis was performed to compare the hazards of laser welding with those of conventional welding methods: this showed that the use of laser systems can eliminate many traditional risks, but the worker must be protected not only against the coherent laser beam, but also from incoherent blue light and u.v. radiation. PMID:1530233

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  11. CO2, Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG), And Argon Laser Welding Of Vascular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Rodney A.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Lyons, Richard; Klein, Stanley R.; Kopchok, George; Dwyer, Richard M.; Uitto, Jouni

    1986-08-01

    Tne feasibility of welding thin-walled microvessels by laser has been established. This report summarizes our experience using laser welding to repair thick-walled, large-diameter, 4 to 8 mm canine veins and arteries using CO2, Nd:YAG and argon lasers. Welding of venotomies is uniformly successful using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, and Nd:YAG venotomies appear to veal more rapidly than sutured controls. Arterial welding has been accomplished with the Nd:YAG and argon laser. Our preliminary experience shows promise for welding both large diameter veins and arteries using lasers. Laser welding may represent an alternative for repair of small and large diameter vessels with several advantages compared to conventional suture techniques.

  12. CO2 laser nerve welding: optimal laser parameters and the use of solders in vitro.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; van Gemert, M J

    1994-01-01

    To improve the welding strength, an in vitro study was performed to investigate the bonding strength of CO2 laser nerve welding (LNW), with and without the use of human albumin solution, dried albumin solution, egg white, fibrinogen solution, fibrin glue, and red blood cells as a solder. Fifteen different combinations of laser power (50, 100, and 150 mW) and pulse duration (0.1 to 3 s) were used with a spot size of 320 microns. The results have been compared to suture, fibrin glue, and laser-assisted nerve repair (LANR). The strongest welds (associated with whitening and caramelization of tissue) were produced at 100 mW with pulses of 1.0 s and at 50 mW with pulses of 3 s. The use of a dried albumin solution as a solder at 100 mW with pulses of 1 s increased the bonding strength 9-fold as compared to LNW (bonding strength 21.0 +/- 8.6 g and 2.4 +/- 0.9 g, respectively). However, positioning the nerves between cottons soaked in saline for 20 minutes resulted in a decrease of the bonding strength (9.8 +/- 4.5 g). The use of a 20% albumin solution and egg white, both at 50 mW with pulses of 3 s, resulted in a bonding strength of, respectively, 5.7 +/- 2.1 g and 7.7 +/- 2.4 g. Other solders did not increase the bonding strength in comparison to LNW. The substantial increase in bonding strength for some solders suggests that it is worthwhile to investigate the dehiscence rate and nerve regeneration of solder enhanced LNW in an in vivo study. PMID:8133768

  13. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  14. In-vivo CO2 laser rat urinary bladder welding with silver halide fiber optic radiometric temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, Bernard; Eyal, Ophir; Belotserkovsky, Edward; Shenfeld, Ofer; Kariv, Noam; Goldwasser, Benad; Katzir, Abraham

    1995-05-01

    Laser welding has been used for connecting various tissues in the body. In urology such welding has the advantage of forming an immediate water tight seal. We have developed a fiberoptic system that makes it possible to monitor and control the temperature of the tissue during welding. In previous work we demonstrated that this system could be successfully used to weld punctures in the urinary bladder of rats. It was found that optimal welding was obtained at a temperature of 55 degree(s)C. In this work we used the same system for welding of large openings (cystotomy) in the urinary bladder of rats. In early experiments we used stay sutures and decompressing catheters. It was later found that complete closure can be obtained with CO2-laser welding alone. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using temperature controlled laser welding as an efficient surgical tool.

  15. CO2 laser oral soft tissue welding: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sattayut, Sajee; Nakkyo, Pitinuch; Phusrinuan, Puntiwa; Sangiamsak, Thanyaporn; Phiolueang, Ratchanee

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: Although there are some studies reporting the benefits of using laser to improve wound closure, there were a few studies in a model of oral mucosa. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare immediate tensile strength of the wound closure between suture alone and suture combined with CO2 laser welding. Materials and methods: The study was conducted in 40 samples of the tissue blocks from ventral sides of pig tongues. A 20 mm-length and 5 mm-depth incision was made in each sample. The samples were randomly allocated into 2 groups namely: the control group and the experimental group. The samples of the control group were sutured with 3- stitch of 4-0 black silk. The samples of the experimental group were irradiated with CO2 laser (ultrapulse mode, 800 Watt peak power, 10 Hz, 0.2 ms pulse duration and 2,262.62 J/cm2 energy density) before sutured. The immediate tensile strength of the wound was measured by using customized tensiometer under stereomicroscope. Results: The median of tensile strength of the control group and the experimental group were 30.40 g/cm2 and 40.50 g/cm2, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups (P value = 0.58). The proportions of the samples without wound dehiscence at the maximum limit of the tensiometer (120 g/cm2) were 0.15 (3/20) in the control group and 0.35 (7/20) in the experimental group. Conclusion: The CO2 laser welding used in this study failed to show a greater immediate tensile strength but had a higher proportion of the wound without dehiscence at the 120 g/cm2 tensile strength by comparison with the suture alone. PMID:24155544

  16. Fundamental study about CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Tetsuka, Masato; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-11-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is attracting attentions as heat-resistant and high-specific strength material in the next generation, especially, it is promising material in the field of aerospace components. Conventional machining process including welding, however, can be hardly applied due to its very low ductility. The objective of this study, as a first stage, is to find out paying attention to crack and hardness the fundamental good conditions of the bead-on-plate welding of TiAl intermetallic compound using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting gamma titanium aluminide contained iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding in the titanium aluminide material in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, Vickers hardness, transverse crack numbers and so on as major parameters of welding speed from 1000 to 4600 mm/min and initial temperature of specimen from R.T. to 873 K with a beam spot size of 0.5 mm and an output power of 1.5 kW. In addition, the specimens were analyzed by Electron Probe X-ray Micro Analyzer, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry. As a result of experiments, transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 K. In every condition, the value of Vickers hardness of fused zone increased compared with base. We think the reason of it is an increase of (alpha) 2(Ti3Al) phase, which is caused by rapid cooling, taking in Oxygen, fine structure and so on.

  17. Study of metal transfer in CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding using argon-helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-03-01

    The metal transfer in CO2 Laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding by using argon-helium mixtures was investigated and the effect of the laser on the mental transfer is discussed. A 650 nm laser, in conjunction with the shadow graph technique, is used to observe the metal transfer process. In order to analyze the heat input to the droplet and the droplet internal current line distribution. An optical emission spectroscopy system was employed to estimate default parameter and optimized plasma temperature, electron number densities distribution. The results indicate that the CO2 plasma plume have a significant impact to the electrode melting, droplet formation, detachment, impingement onto the workpiece and weld morphology. Since the current distribution direction flow changes to the keyhole, to obtain a metal transfer mode of one droplet per pulse, the welding parameters should be adjusted to a higher pulse time (TP) and a lower voltage.

  18. Multi-response optimization of CO 2 laser-welding process of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyounis, K. Y.; Olabi, A. G.; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, laser welding of austenitic stainless steel has received great attention in industry. This is due to its widespread application in petroleum refinement stations, power plants, the pharmaceutical industry and also in households. Therefore, mechanical properties should be controlled to obtain good welded joints. The welding process should be optimized by the proper mathematical models. In this research, the tensile strength and impact strength along with the joint-operating cost of laser-welded butt joints made of AISI304 was investigated. Design-expert software was used to establish the design matrix and to analyze the experimental data. The relationships between the laser-welding parameters (laser power, welding speed and focal point position) and the three responses (tensile strength, impact strength and joint-operating cost) were established. Also, the optimization capabilities in design-expert software were used to optimize the welding process. The developed mathematical models were tested for adequacy using analysis of variance and other adequacy measures. In this investigation, the optimal welding conditions were identified in order to increase the productivity and minimize the total operating cost. Overlay graphs were plotted by superimposing the contours for the various response surfaces. The process parameters effect was determined and the optimal welding combinations were tabulated.

  19. Fabrication of a microresonator-fiber assembly maintaining a high-quality factor by CO_2 laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhiwei; Lin, Jintian; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhengming; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate fabrication of a microtoroid resonator of a high-quality (high-Q) factor using femtosecond laser three-dimensional (3D) micromachining. A fiber taper is reliably assembled to the microtoroid using CO2 laser welding. Specifically, we achieve a high Q-factor of 2.12*10^6 in the microresonator-fiber assembly by optimizing the contact position between the fiber taper and the microtoroid.

  20. The effect of the welding direction on the plasma and metal transfer behavior of CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wang; Hua, Xueming; Liao, Wei; Li, Fang; Wang, Min

    2014-07-01

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, the welding direction exerts direct effects on the plasma properties, the transient behavior of the droplet, the weld pool behavior, and the temperature field. Ultimately, it will affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, the behavior of the CO2 laser+GMAW-P hybrid welding process has not been systematically studied. In this paper, the current-voltage characteristics of different welding processes were analyzed and compared. The dynamics of the droplet transfer, the plasma behavior, and the weld pool behavior were observed by using two high-speed camera systems. Moreover, an optical emission spectroscopy was applied to analyze the plasma temperature and the electron number density. The results indicated that the electrical resistance of the arc plasma reduced in the laser leading mode. For the same pulse duration, the metal transfer mode was the spray type with the laser leading arrangement. The temperature and electron density distribution showed bimodal behavior in the case of arc leading mode, while this phenomenon does not exist in the caser of laser leading mode. The double elliptic-planar distribution which conventional simulation process used was not applicable in the laser leading mode.

  1. CO2 laser modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) CO2 laser kinetics modeling; (2) gas lifetimes in pulsed CO2 lasers; (3) frequency chirp and laser pulse spectral analysis; (4) LAWS A' Design Study; and (5) discharge circuit components for LAWS. The appendices include LAWS Memos, computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications, discharge circuit considerations for pulsed CO2 lidars, and presentation made at the Code RC Review.

  2. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, Teresa; Rizzi, Domenico; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Konuk, Ali Riza; Aarts, Ronald; Veld, Bert Huis in 't; Ancona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth. PMID:23112646

  3. Microstructural Effects on the Mechanical Integrity of a TRIP-800 Steel Welded by Laser-CO2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Medina, G. Y.; López, H. F.; Zambrano, P.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a TRIP-800 steel was welded using a Laser CO2 process, and the resultant microstructures were characterized by optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) means. It was found that the microstructure of the steel in the as-received condition consisted of ferrite, bainite, and retained austenite (RA), including some martensite. In particular, TEM observations indicated that the developed martensites were high carbon twinned martensites. It was found that laser beam welding (LBW) promoted the development of up to 23% martensite in the fusion zone (FZ) and up to 30% in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In addition, determinations of RA using x-ray diffraction indicated that the amount of RA developed in the FZ was relatively small (<6%). Confirmation for the relatively large amounts of martensite in both the FZ and HAZ was indirectly made by the shape of microhardness profiles, which resembled a "top hat." Tensile testing in welded strips indicated a loss of strength and ductility. An examination of the fracture surfaces indicated that the steel fractured in a brittle fashion at the HAZ-BM interface. Apparently, the development of relatively large amounts of martensite in the HAZ reduced the steel toughness. In turn, this indicated that LBW leads to martensite embrittlement in the HAZ regions, but not at the parting line of the FZ.

  4. Characteristics of plasma plume and effect mechanism of lateral restraint during high power CO2 laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Cai, Yan; Sun, Dawei; Zhu, Junjie; Wu, Yixiong

    2014-12-01

    A novel lateral restraint method was proposed to suppress plasma plume of high power CO2 laser welding using a pair of copper blocks with cooling water. The plasma plume was observed with a high-speed camera, and its core zone and periphery zone were investigated based on the specific processing algorithm. With the specially designed shifting unit, the spectrum of plasma plume was scanned both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Based on the selected spectral lines, electron temperature and electron number density of plasma plume were calculated. The characteristics of plasma plume, as well as the restraint mechanism, were discussed both in 1-D and 2-D mode. Results showed that the cooling effect, blowing effect and the static pressure were enhanced by the lateral restraint, and the restraint effect of the near-wall low-temperature area limited the expansion of plasma plume greatly.

  5. CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Callan, R.; Constant, G.; Davies, P. H.; Foord, R.

    CO2 laser-based radars operating at 10 microns are both highly energy-efficient and eye-safe, as well as compact and rugged; they also furnish covertness-enhancing fine pointing accuracy, and are difficult to jam or otherwise confuse. Two modes of operation are generally employed: incoherent, in which the laser is simply used as a high power illumination source, and in the presently elaborated coherent or heterodyne mode. Applications encompass terrain-following and obstacle avoidance, Doppler discrimination of missile and aircraft targets, pollutant gas detection, wind measurement for weapons-aiming, and global wind field monitoring.

  6. The effect of CO2 laser beam welded AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel on the viability of fibroblast cells, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Köse, Ceyhun; Kaçar, Ramazan; Zorba, Aslı Pınar; Bağırova, Melahat; Allahverdiyev, Adil M

    2016-03-01

    It has been determined by the literature research that there is no clinical study on the in vivo and in vitro interaction of the cells with the laser beam welded joints of AISI 316L biomaterial. It is used as a prosthesis and implant material and that has adequate mechanical properties and corrosion resistance characteristics. Therefore, the interaction of the CO2 laser beam welded samples and samples of the base metal of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel with L929 fibroblast cells as an element of connective tissue under in vitro conditions has been studied. To study the effect of the base metal and the laser welded test specimens on the viability of the fibroblast cells that act as an element of connective tissues in the body, they were kept in DMEMF-12 medium for 7, 14, 28 days and 18 months. The viability study was experimentally studied using the MTT method for 7, 14, 28 days. In addition, the direct interaction of the fibroblast cells seeded on 6 different plates with the samples was examined with an inverted microscope. The MTT cell viability experiment was repeated on the cells that were in contact with the samples. The statistical relationship was analyzed using a Tukey test for the variance with the GraphPad statistics software. The data regarding metallic ion release were identified with the ICP-MS method after the laser welded and main material samples were kept in cell culture medium for 18 months. The cell viability of the laser welded sample has been detected to be higher than that of the base metal and the control based on 7th day data. However, the laser welded sample's viability of the fibroblast cells has diminished by time during the test period of 14 and 28 days and base metal shows better viability when compared to the laser welded samples. On the other hand, the base metal and the laser welded sample show better cell viability effect when compared to the control group. According to the ICP-MS results of the main material and laser welded

  7. CO2 Laser Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsson, Samuel

    1989-03-01

    It gives me a great deal of pleasure to introduce our final speaker of this morning's session for two reasons: First of all, his company has been very much in the news not only in our own community but in the pages of Wall Street Journal and in the world economic press. And, secondly, we would like to welcome him to our shores. He is a temporary resident of the United States, for a few months, forsaking his home in Germany to come here and help with the start up of a new company which we believe, probably, ranks #1 as the world supplier of CO2 lasers now, through the combination of former Spectra Physics Industrial Laser Division and Rofin-Sinar GMBH. Samuel Simonsson is the Chairman of the Board of Rofin-Sinar, Inc., here in the U.S. and managing director of Rofin-Sinar GMBH. It is a pleasure to welcome him.

  8. CO2 laser preionisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1991-01-01

    The final report for work done during the reporting period of January 25, 1990 to January 24, 1991 is presented. A literature survey was conducted to identify the required parameters for effective preionization in TEA CO2 lasers and the methods and techniques for characterizing preionizers are reviewed. A numerical model of the LP-140 cavity was used to determine the cause of the transverse mode stability improvement obtained when the cavity was lengthened. The measurement of the voltage and current discharge pulses on the LP-140 were obtained and their subsequent analysis resulted in an explanation for the low efficiency of the laser. An assortment of items relating to the development of high-voltage power supplies is also provided. A program for analyzing the frequency chirp data files obtained with the HP time and frequency analyzer is included. A program to calculate the theoretical LIMP chirp is also included and a comparison between experiment and theory is made. A program for calculating the CO2 linewidth and its dependence on gas composition and pressure is presented. The program also calculates the number of axial modes under the FWHM of the line for a given resonator length. A graphical plot of the results is plotted.

  9. Laser welding of venotomies.

    PubMed

    White, R A; Abergel, R P; Klein, S R; Kopchok, G; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J

    1986-08-01

    We investigated the histologic and biochemical effects of carbon dioxide and neodymium (Nd)-YAG laser welding on the healing of venotomies. Ten canine femoral venotomies 2 cm in length were approximated and welded with 10 600-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 20 to 25 s for CO2 laser, and 1060-nm wavelength, 1-W power over 30 to 40 s for Nd-YAG laser. On removal at one to three weeks, all veins (4/4 welded by CO2 and 6/6 by Nd-YAG) were patent without hematomas. Histologic and biochemical analyses of the venous tissues demonstrated active healing at the venotomy sites. We conclude that the CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers can be used successfully to weld venotomies and may provide an alternative to conventional suture techniques for repair of vascular lesions. PMID:3089196

  10. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  11. Nominal hazard distances for CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkes, J. A.; Tyrer, J.; Bandle, A. M.

    Several values of nominal hazard distances (NHD's) for CO2 lasers are reported for different industrial laser systems. For the same laser system the NHD is increased in welding as opposed to cutting applications because a longer focal length lens is used. In most systems the NHD decreases with decreasing laser power because the beam diameter remains approximately the same for a given laser. If the same series of lasers are compared, each with increasing maximum power output, the NHD generally increases, nonlinearly with increasing power. However, in the 1.5 kW and 3 kW region the hazard distance may decrease with increasing power. This decrease is attributed to the increase in laser beam diameter arising from the transition between TEM00 and a TEM01 mode at this point.

  12. Materials working with low power CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    While the application of high power (50-5000 W) lasers to materials working is well known, the use of low power (1-5w) CO2 lasers has received little attention. This paper presents methods of utilizing low power CO2 lasers in materials processing, such as cutting, drilling, and welding of small organic (e.g., plastic) parts. Laser hardware is discussed and the waveguide laser is presented as an example of low-power materials working hardware. This paper also reports some of the applications which are ideally-handled by low power CO2 lasers, and reviews the factors which contribute to the successful use of these lasers.

  13. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  14. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  15. Comparative study of skin welding in the rat using low-power CO2 laser beam: macroscopic observations and histologic and histochemical studies using Picrosirius red stain for collagen determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giler, Shamai; Weinberger, Avraham; Gal, Rivka; Halpern, Marissa

    1998-01-01

    In 50 rats, a full thickness abdominal skin incision was made with a CO2 laser (LI) (Kaplan PenduLaser 115) and in another group, an incision was made by a scalpel (SI). These groups were divided into 2 subgroups: a low power CO2 laser skin welding of 500 mw was used in LI and SI subgroups and, in the other, the wound was closed with nylon sutures. On the fourth postoperative day in the LI welding group, a complete dehiscence wound was formed in one animal and in the SI welding group, a partial dehiscence. After one week, a thin line of young (fresh) scar was observed with complete healing after 2 weeks. Histology revealed after four days, a deep cleft in the LI and SI welding groups and a superficial ulcer after one week and after two weeks, all groups showed complete healing. Histochemical studies (Picrosirius red stain) revealed in the first two weeks, greenish-yellow polarized colors and red-orange colors of a matured collagen in the well-formed scar. It appears that there was no delay in the healing process between the LI and SI groups and between welding and suture healing.

  16. Industrial Applications of High Power CO2 Lasers - System Descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukelberger, Armin

    1986-10-01

    The laser as a cutting tool for sheet metal cutting has beenl well accepted in industry for many years. Several hundreds of units are used for contour cutting of small and medium-sized series on plane metal sheets up to 6 mm thick. Within the last three years, cutting systems have been expanded in three ways: thicker material up to 12 mm can now be cut by using higher powered lasers (1500 W); with the introduction of flying optic systems which cover sheet dimensions up to 4 m x 3 m, the cutting of larger sized metal sheets is possible. In addition, the use of five or six axis systems allows cutting of three-dimensional plastic and metal material. Besides laser cutting, the acceptance of systems for laser welding applications is increa sing. Several systems have been running in production for a couple of years and laser wel ding will probably become the fastest growing market in laser material processing within the next five years. The laser technology is regarded as a beneficial tool for welding, whenever low heat input and, consequently, low heat distortion is requested. To day's main welding application areas are: components of car engines and transmissions, window spacer and stainless steel tube welding, and also car body welding with laser robots or five axis gantry type systems. The output power of CO2-lasers for welding applications is between 1 and 5 kw in most cases.

  17. Innovative optics for shaping and focusing industrial CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielewicz, Edward J.; Sherman, Glenn H.

    1989-03-01

    Applications of diamond-turned axicons for high power CO2 lasers are reviewed. The use of transmissive and reflective axicons in laser applications and the use of faceted optics for shaping and directing laser light are discussed. Diamond-turned ZnSe lenses are compared with conventional plano-convex and meniscus lenses. Results are presented from cutting and welding plastics and metals, noting the advantages of diamond-turned focusing elements.

  18. CO2 laser frequency multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

  19. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  20. CO2 laser beam propagation with ZnSe optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, K. H.; Liu, Yi; Holdridge, D. J.

    Beam propagation characteristics of ZnSe optics used in kiloWatt power CO2 laser aided material processing applications are determined using the Prometec Laser Beam Analyzer. The laser used was a Rofin Sinar RS6000 CO2 laser with mode aperturing. Beam power varied from 500W to 6300W and beam modes used were TEM(sub 00), TEM(sub 01), TEM(sub 10), and TEM(sub 20). Both transmissive and reflective optics were examined. The ZnSe lenses tested included meniscus, diffractive, and cylindrical lenses of 5 in. focal length and a 10 in. focal length integrating lens. Reflective optics included an integrator and a 5 in. focal length parabolic mirror for welding. Parameters obtained included beam propagation profiles, intensity profiles, depth of focus, spot size, and back focal length. A subset of the data obtained is presented here. Details of the work will appear in a full length paper.

  1. The Role of the CO2 Laser and Fractional CO2 Laser in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Omi, Tokuya; Numano, Kayoko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tremendous advances have been made in the medical application of the laser in the past few decades. Many diseases in the dermatological field are now indications for laser treatment that qualify for reimbursement by many national health insurance systems. Among laser types, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser remains an important system for the dermatologist. Rationale: The lasers used in photosurgery have wavelengths that differ according to their intended use and are of various types, but the CO2 laser is one of the most widely used lasers in the dermatology field. With its wavelength in the mid-infrared at 10,600 nm, CO2 laser energy is wellabsorbed in water. As skin contains a very high water percentage, this makes the CO2 laser ideal for precise, safe ablation with good hemostasis. In addition to its efficacy in ablating benign raised lesions, the CO2 laser has been reported to be effective in the field of esthetic dermatology in the revision of acne scars as well as in photorejuvenation. With the addition of fractionation of the beam of energy into myriad microbeams, the fractional CO2 laser has offered a bridge between the frankly full ablative indications and the nonablative skin rejuvenation systems of the 2000s in the rejuvenation of photoaged skin on and off the face. Conclusions: The CO2 laser remains an efficient, precise and safe system for the dermatologist. Technological advances in CO2 laser construction have meant smaller spot sizes and greater precision for laser surgery, and more flexibility in tip sizes and protocols for fractional CO2 laser treatment. The range of dermatological applications of the CO2 laser is expected to continue to increase in the future. PMID:24771971

  2. ARTICLES: Physical laws governing the interaction of pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation with metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobyazko, S. V.; Pavlovich, Yu V.; Senatorov, Yu M.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the efficiency of welding metals with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser beam of low duty ratio, at low velocities, can exceed that of welding with cw lasers and with electron beams. For the first time an investigation was made of the influence of the laser radiation parameters (energy and frequency) and of the welding velocity on the characteristics of the weld and on the shape of the weldpool. The influence of the laser radiation polarization on the efficiency of deep penetration was analyzed.

  3. Blackbody-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10420

  4. CO2 laser cutting of natural granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Mejías, A.; Soto, R.; Quintero, F.; del Val, J.; Boutinguiza, M.; Lusquiños, F.; Pardo, J.; Pou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial black granite boards (trade name: "Zimbabwe black granite") 10 mm thick, were successfully cut by a 3.5 kW CO2 laser source. Cutting quality, in terms of kerf width and roughness of the cut wall, was assessed by means of statistically planned experiments. No chemical modification of the material in the cutting walls was detected by the laser beam action. Costs associated to the process were calculated, and the main factors affecting them were identified. Results reported here demonstrate that cutting granite boards could be a new application of CO2 laser cutting machines provided a supersonic nozzle is used.

  5. Flash scanning the CO2 laser: a revival of the CO2 laser in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Elliot

    1994-09-01

    The CO2 laser has broad clinical application yet also presents a number of practical disadvantages. These drawbacks have limited the success and utilization of this laser in plastic surgery. Flashscanner technology has recently been used for char-free CO2 laser surgery of the oropharynx, the external female genital tract, and perirectal mucosa. A commercially available optomechanical flashscanner unit `Swiftlase,' was adapted to a CO2 laser and used for treatment in numerous plastic surgical applications. Conditions and situations that were treated in this study included generalized neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, rhinophyma, viral warts, breast reconstruction, and deepithelialization prior to microsurgery or local flap transfer and/or skin graft placement. There were no significant wound healing complications. Some patients previously sustained undue scarring from conventional CO2 laser surgery. Conservative, primarily ablative CO2 laser surgery with the Swiftlase has usefulness for treatment of patients in plastic surgery including those that were previously unsuccessfully treated.

  6. Effect of pulse duty cycle on Inconel 718 laser welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCay, M. H.; McCay, T. D.; Dahotre, N. B.; Sharp, C. M.; Sedghinasab, A.; Gopinathan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Crack sensitive Inconel 718 was laser pulse welded using a 3.0 kW CO2 laser. Weld shape, structure, and porosity were recorded as a function of the pulse duty cycle. Within the matrix studied, the welds were found to be optimized at a high (17 ms on, 7 ms off) duty cycle. These welds were superior in appearance and lack of porosity to both low duty cycle and CW welds.

  7. Laser weld jig

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  8. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  9. Nuclear-pumped CO2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, M.

    1979-01-01

    The He-3 (n,p)T reaction was examined as an energy source for a CO2 laser. For this purpose He-3 was added to a functioning CO2 electrically excited laser. Initially the laser was run electrically with 12 torr total pressure. The gas mixture was 1:1:8, CO2:N2:He. At zero reactor power, the laser was tested in place next to the core of the Georgia Tech. Research Reactor. After verification of laser action He-3 was added to the system. The He-3 partial pressures of 10 torr, 50 torr, and 300 torr were added in three separate reactor runs. Reactor power ranged from zero to 5 million watts, which corresponds to a peak flux of 10 to the 14th power/sq cm. At reactor powers greater than 10 kW, gain of up to 30 percent was shown. However, indications are this may be due to gamma excitation rather than caused by the He-3 (n,p)T reaction. These results do agree with the data of past CO2 nuclear pumped laser experiments.

  10. Lasers for welding and their potential in production at GE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marshall G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser technology has been used in manufacturing in industry since the late 1960s. Industry and GE businesses have leverage laser welding for productivity gains, cost savings, and quality. The presentation will high light several laser-based welding applications, old and new. Applications will include the welding of refractory materials (e.g. Mo and Nb) for lighting products; 40 foot long fuel rods are welded with 2 kW fiber lasers for the nuclear business; head-liner welding for the diesel engine for locomotives (14 kW fiber laser replaced CO2 laser); and X-ray components are welded in a two-station 11kW fiber laser (EB welding replaced by laser). The three fiber laser applications were all transitioned into GE businesses during 2011 and it demonstrates the emergence of fiber laser welding being used in GE for manufacturing, processing.

  11. Fine welding with lasers.

    PubMed

    MacLellan, D

    2008-01-01

    The need for micro joining metallic alloys for surgical instruments, implants and advanced medical devices is driving a rapid increase in the implementation of laser welding technology in research, development and volume production. This article discusses the advantages of this welding method and the types of lasers used in the process. PMID:18557404

  12. CO2 laser cold cathode research results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    The construction and processing of four test lasers are discussed, and the test results are assessed. Tests show that the best performance was obtained from cathodes made from internally oxidized Ag-Cu alloys or pure Cu. Due to the cold cathode technology developments, sealed-off 1 w CO2 lasers with gas volumes of only 50 cu cm were duplicated, and have performed satisfactorily for more than 6000 hours.

  13. CO2 laser used in cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chenglie

    1993-03-01

    Cases of various kinds of warts, nevi, papillomas, skin angiomas, ephilises, skin vegetation, scars and brandy noses were vaporized and solidified with a 2.5 - 8 W low power CO2 laser with an overall satisfaction rate up to 99.8% and the satisfaction rate for one time 92%.

  14. CO2 laser therapy of rhinophyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Peggy; Jovanovic, Sergije; Sedlmaier, Benedikt W.

    2000-06-01

    Laser treatment of skin changes has become common practice in recent years. High absorption of the CO2 laser wavelength in water is responsible for its low penetration dpt in biological tissue. Shortening the tissue exposure time minimizes thermic side effects of laser radiation such as carbonization and coagulation. This can be achieved with scanner systems that move the focused laser beam over a defined area by microprocessor-controlled rapidly rotating mirrors. This enables controlled and reliable removal of certain dermal lesions, particularly hypertrophic scars, scars after common acne, wrinkles and rhinophyma. Laser ablation of rhinophyma is a stress-minimizing procedure for the surgeon and the patient, since it is nearly bloodless and can be performed under local anaesthesia. Cosmetically favorable reepithelization of the lasered surfaces is achieved within a very short period of time.

  15. Validation of Airborne CO2 Laser Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J. T.; Kooi, S.; Fenn, M. A.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Moore, B.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the flight test validation of a unique, multi-frequency, intensity-modulated, single-beam laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) that operates near 1.57 μm for remote column CO2 measurements. This laser system is under development for a future space-based mission to determine the global distribution of regional-scale CO2 sources and sinks, which is the objective of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions during Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A prototype of this LAS system, called the Multi-frequency Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), was developed by ITT, and it has been flight tested in nine airborne campaigns since May 2005. This paper focuses on the most recent results obtained over the last two years of flight-testing where the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against airborne in situ CO2 profile measurements traceable to World Meteorological Organization standards. A comprehensive multiple-aircraft flight test program was conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia in July-August 2009. The MFLL obtained surface reflectance and average CO2 column variations along the 50-km flight legs over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility (CF) in Lamont, Oklahoma; over rural Virginia and North Carolina; and over the Chesapeake Bay. For a flight altitude of 4.6 km, the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) for a 1-s CO2 column measurement was found to be 760, which is the equivalent of a CO2 mixing ratio precision of 0.60 ppmv, and for a 10-s average the SNR was found to be 2002 or 0.20 ppmv. Absolute comparisons of MFLL-derived and in situ-derived CO2 column measurements were made for all daytime flights conducted over Oklahoma and Virginia with an average agreement to within 0.32 ppmv. A major ASCENDS flight test campaign was conducted using the NASA DC-8 during 6-18 July 2010. The MFLL system and associated in situ CO2 instrumentation were operated on DC-8 flights over the Central Valley

  16. Pulpotomies with CO2 laser in dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Jose A. P.; Chavantes, Maria C.; Gioso, Marco A.; Pesce, Hildeberto F.; Jatene, Adib D.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of dental pulps submitted to shallow pulpotomy followed by CO2 laser radiation at five different procedures. For this purpose, initially 66 dogs' teeth were opened and about 2 or 3 mm of coronal dental pulp was removed. Continuous irrigation with saline solution was implemented. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 11 each. After cessation of bleeding, in group I, CO2 laser (Xanar-20, USA) was irradiated for 1 second at a power of 5 watts; in group II, 2 seconds at 3 watts; in Group III, 2 seconds at 5 watts; in Group IV, 1 second at 3 watts; in Group V, a continuous mode at 3 watts; Group VI served as a control, with no laser irradiation. The results showed no clinical differences between the 3 W and 5 W powers. Time period of irradiation exposition influenced definitively the clinical appearance of the dental pulps. Groups I and IV (1 second) were unable to stop the bleeding, which persisted over 15 minutes for all teeth. This may be due to the intense heat generated by CO2 laser, causing vasodilatation. Groups II and III displayed a similar appearance, but bleeding stopped in about 10 minutes. Group V (continuous mode) had no bleeding after irradiation, but a plasma-like liquid would come out for almost 2 minutes. When comparing to the control (Group VI), all the pulps would assume a jelly-like aspect, with black granulated tissue on the surface, covering totally the pulps of Group V and partially the other groups. The histological results will be discussed in a further study. From the data obtained, it seems that CO2 laser irradiation for pulpotomies should be done in a continuous mode, for clinical convenience in terms of time taken and effective irradiation.

  17. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  18. Fire hazards and CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Wald, D; Michelow, B J; Guyuron, B; Gibb, A A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fire risk of laser resurfacing in the presence of supplemental oxygen. This study aims at defining safety parameters of variables such as laser energy level, oxygen flow rate, and "oxygen to laser target distance" when oxygen is delivered through a nasal cannula or nasopharyngeal tube. The typical operating room environment was simulated in the laboratory using the Yucatan minipig animal model. The energy source was a Coherent Ultrapulse CO2 laser. It was found that combustion did not occur at laser settings of 500 mJ, 50 W, 100 kHz, and a density of 5, used in conjunction with an oxygen flow rate of 6 liter/minute with the target area as close as 0.5 cm to the oxygen delivery. A total of 400 computer pattern generator treatments were delivered using this energy setting without observation of any combustion (p < 0.001). This provides evidence that while using even somewhat high laser settings and oxygen flow rate, laser induced fires can be avoided. We conclude that use of the laser in the presence of oxygen is safe, provided the target area is free of combustible fuels. Despite this assurance, laser mishaps are serious because they lead to both morbidity and mortality. It is our recommendation that close attention be constantly paid to all details, thus reducing the hazard potential of laser energy on local factors in an oxygen-rich environment. PMID:9427936

  19. Effects of contaminants in CO2 lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, N. S.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical model which includes the effects of contaminants is developed for the high flow electric discharge CO2-N2-He laser. The model couples the excitation and relaxation processes, CO2 dissociation, and negative ion formation with the flow processes. An analysis of the effects of CO, O2, NO, and N2O impurities on the average small signal gain is presented. CO decreases the gain by collisional depopulation of the upper laser level, and O2, NO, and N2O reduce the gain by decreasing the electron density by forming stable negative ions. In particular, N2O exhibits a strong quenching effect because of its large dissociation cross section for the formation of O(-).

  20. [Voice quality following CO2 laser cordectomy].

    PubMed

    Höfler, H; Bigenzahn, W

    1986-11-01

    The voice of patients after CO2 laser cordectomy was evaluated by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The results proved to be closely concordant, the main result being a slight or medium degree of dysphonia. Severe dysphonia or aphonia occurred in about one fifth of patients. This result is somewhat inferior to radiotherapy, but superior to standard translaryngeal cordectomy. Yanagihara's sonegraphic classification of dysphonia is recommendable for future comparative studies. PMID:3807602

  1. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  2. Atmospheric effects on CO2 laser propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.; Bilbro, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was made of the losses encountered in the propagation of CO2 laser radiation through the atmosphere, particularly as it applies to the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Pulsed Laser Doppler System. As such it addresses three major areas associated with signal loss: molecular absorption, refractive index changes in a turbulent environment, and aerosol absorption and scattering. In particular, the molecular absorption coefficients of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrous oxide are calculated for various laser lines in the region of 10.6 mu m as a function of various pressures and temperatures. The current status in the physics of low-energy laser propagation through a turbulent atmosphere is presented together with the analysis and evaluation of the associated heterodyne signal power loss. Finally, aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients are calculated for various aerosol distributions and the results incorporated into the signal-to-noise ratio equation for the Marshall Space Flight Center system.

  3. CO2 laser oscillators for laser radar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the spectral purity, frequency stability, and long-term stabilization of newly developed CO2 isotope lasers. Extremely high spectral purity, and short-term stability of less than 1.5 x 10 to the -13th have been achieved. A brief description on using CO2 isotope lasers as secondary frequency standards and in optical radar is given. The design and output characteristics of a single frequency, TEM00q mode, variable pulse width, hybrid TE CO2 laser system is also described. The frequency chirp in the output has been measured and almost completely eliminated by means of a novel technique.

  4. Vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuo

    2015-02-01

    High power CO2 laser is widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. Vibration is a common phenomenon during laser working process, it will affect the working performance of high power CO2 laser, vibration must be strictly controlled in the condition where the laser pointing is required. This paper proposed a method to investigate the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser. An experiment device with vibration acceleration sensor was established to measure vibration signal of CO2 laser, the measured vibration signal was mathematically treated using space-frequency conversion, and then the vibration characteristic of high power CO2 laser can be obtained.

  5. CO2 laser milling of hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Martin; Ivanenko, Mikhail; Harbecke, Daniela; Klasing, Manfred; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Hering, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Drilling of bone and tooth tissue belongs to recurrent medical procedures (screw- and pin-bores, bores for implant inserting, trepanation etc.). Small round bores can be in general quickly produced with mechanical drills. Problems arise however by angled drilling, by the necessity to fulfill the drilling without damaging of sensitive soft tissue beneath the bone, or by the attempt to mill precisely noncircular small cavities. We present investigations on laser hard tissue "milling", which can be advantageous for solving these problems. The "milling" is done with a CO2 laser (10.6 μm) with pulse duration of 50 - 100 μs, combined with a PC-controlled galvanic beam scanner and with a fine water-spray, which helps to avoid thermal side-effects. The damaging of underlying soft tissue can be prevented through control of the optical or acoustical ablation signal. The ablation of hard tissue is accompanied with a strong glowing, which is absent during the laser beam action on soft tissue. The acoustic signals from the diverse tissue types exhibit distinct differences in the spectral composition. Also computer image analysis could be a useful tool to control the operation. Laser "milling" of noncircular cavities with 1 - 4 mm width and about 10 mm depth is particularly interesting for dental implantology. In ex-vivo investigations we found conditions for fast laser "milling" of the cavities without thermal damage and with minimal tapering. It included exploration of different filling patterns (concentric rings, crosshatch, parallel lines and their combinations), definition of maximal pulse duration, repetition rate and laser power, optimal position of the spray. The optimized results give evidences for the applicability of the CO2 laser for biologically tolerable "milling" of deep cavities in the hard tissue.

  6. Ultraviolet photoionization in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1988-07-01

    The effects of gas composition and spark parameters on the UV emission in CO2 TEA laser gas mixtures were investigated together with the nature of photoionization process and the photoelectron-loss mechanism. A linear relationship was found between N2 concentration and photoionization (with no such dependence on C concentration, from CO and CO2), but the increases in photoionization that could be effected by optimizing the spark discharge circuit parameters were much higher than those produced by changes in gas composition. UV emission was directly proportional to the amount of stored electrical energy in the spark-discharge circuit and to the cube of the peak current produced in the spark by the discharge of this energy. Photoionization was also found to be proportional to the spark electrode gap. It was found that free-space sparks gave a considerably broader emission pattern than a surface-guided notched spark.

  7. [Laryngomalacia treated with CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Larsen, Dalia Gustaityté; Berg, Jette Scheby; Illum, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common laryngeal anomaly which causes inspiratory stridor in newborns. The disease is usually self-limiting and resolves before the age of two years. We present a case of severe laryngomalacia with feeding disorder and airway obstruction which needed surgical management--supraglottoplasty. The shortened aryepiglottic folds were incised using CO(2) laser and jet ventilation. The patient was observed at the hospital for one week after surgery and discharged. Four weeks after treatment, the patient was free of airway obstruction and feeding problems. PMID:20594541

  8. CO2 laser ranging systems study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design and error performance of a CO2 laser ranging system are analyzed. Ranging signal and subsystem processing alternatives are identified, and their comprehensive evaluation yields preferred candidate solutions which are analyzed to derive range and range rate error contributions. The performance results are presented in the form of extensive tables and figures which identify the ranging accuracy compromises as a function of the key system design parameters and subsystem performance indexes. The ranging errors obtained are noted to be within the high accuracy requirements of existing NASA/GSFC missions with a proper system design.

  9. High-speed laser welding of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, J. P.; Abreu, M. A.; Pires, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    Laser welding of plastic materials has a large field of applications in the packaging industry provided that it can compete, in quality and productivity, with currently used industrial methods. Welding of white and transparent thin films of polypropylene and polyethylene of low and high density at high speeds of 20 m s -1 using a CO 2 laser has been studied experimentally.` The weld process has been characterised by the specific energy required for each thickness, kind of plastic and the resistance of the weld seam. The influence of the dimensions of the laser beam spot on weld strength has also been analysed.

  10. Spaceborne CO2 laser communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, J. H.; Mcavoy, N.; Johnson, E. H.; Goodwin, F. E.; Peyton, B. J.

    1975-01-01

    Projections of the growth of earth-sensing systems for the latter half of the 1980's show a data transmission requirement of 300 Mbps and above. Mission constraints and objectives lead to the conclusion that the most efficient technique to return the data from the sensing satellite to a ground station is through a geosynchronous data relay satellite. Of the two links that are involved (sensing satellite to relay satellite and relay satellite to ground), a laser system is most attractive for the space-to-space link. The development of CO2 laser systems for space-to-space applications is discussed with the completion of a 300 Mpbs data relay receiver and its modification into a transceiver. The technology and state-of-the-art of such systems are described in detail.

  11. Suture-free laser-assisted vessel repair using CO2 laser and liquid albumin solder.

    PubMed

    Wolf-de Jonge, Ingrid C D Y M; Heger, Michal; van Marle, Jan; Balm, Ron; Beek, Johan F

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that the use of proteinic solders during laser-assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA) and repair (LAVR) can significantly increase welding strength, but these studies combined solder-mediated LAVA/R with the use of stay sutures, thereby defeating its purpose. In an in vitro study, we examined the leaking point pressures (LPPs) and histological damage profile of porcine carotid arteries following albumin solder-mediated CO(2) LAVR without the use of sutures. Longitudinal arteriotomies (9.1+/-0.8 mm in length) were sheathed with 25% liquid bovine serum albumin solder, and LAVR was performed using a micromanipulator-controlled CO(2) laser operating at 170-mW power and 1.25-mm spot size in continuous wave mode. The welding regime consisted of a transversal zigzag pass followed by one or two longitudinal zigzag passes, producing an irradiance of 13.9 W/cm(2) and energies of 10.5 J and 11.3 J per mm weld, respectively. LPPs were measured by the fluid infusion technique, and histological analysis was performed with light, fluorescence, and polarization microscopy. The LPP of the two-pass welds was 351+/-158 mmHg versus 538+/-155 mmHg for the three-pass welds. Thermal damage was confined primarily to the adventitial layers, with limited heat diffusion into the media below the solder around the coaptation interface. PMID:19021359

  12. Auto adaptative laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Coste, F.; Fabbro, R.; Douay, D.; Sabatier, L.; Lacote, D.

    1996-12-31

    The weld preparation in a laboratory environment for laser welding concerning edge misalignments, edge or gap preparation is no longer valid for industrial configurations where these different parameters are not accurately controlled. Therefore in that case, the achievement of consistent qualities of processing, requires the use of sensors for seam tracking and gap recognition. The authors discuss here preliminary experiments involving the use of these elements in order to pilot a scanning head in view of strongly reducing the precision requirements for gap preparation. This set-up is the first step in the development of an auto-adaptative device for laser welding which will be composed of seam tracking and recognition sensors, scanning laser head and a filler wire device.

  13. Laser welding control by monitoring of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Rihakova, Lenka; Nozka, Libor

    2013-04-01

    Deep penetration welding is a typical industrial application of high power lasers, where plasma can be generated above the keyhole. Thanks to the plasma plume presence welding process can be controlled on-line by means of the plasma intensity measurements. Various on-line monitoring methods have been developed in research centers all over the world. Goal of them is to enable promptly operator action to avoid enormous economical looses if un-expected defect is detected. Our laboratory was participated in project CLET - "Closed loop control of the laser welding process through the measurement of plasma" as a responsible partner for developed system testing both in the laboratory with pulsed Nd:YAG laser and in the real welding facility with high power continual CO2 laser. Control system is based on the electron temperature computation from the relative intensities of couple of emission lines belong to certain metal ion present in plasma plume. Our experiment was realized using Ocean Optics HR2000+ spectrometer within the stainless steel tube longitudinal welding. Several couples of emission lines were tested to acquire a good signal at actual welding conditions. Then power calibration was made to obtain the electron temperature dependence on increasing power. Samples were prepared for microanalysis and measured by laser confocal scanning microscope to find optimal power range for full penetrations achieving without thermal distortion of the tube or weld humping. Numerical model of the remelted area cross section was made to display temperature distribution dependence on increasing power.

  14. Aluminum laser welding optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčková, Hana; Halenka, Viktor; Lapšanská, Hana; Havelková, Martina

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser with maximal power 150 W is used in our laboratory to cut, drill and weld metal and non-metal thin materials to thickness 2 mm. Welding is realized by fixed processing head or movable fiber one with beam diameter 0,6 mm in focus plane. Welding of stainless and low-carbon steel was tested before and results are publicized and used in practice. Now the goal of our experiment was optimization of process parameters for aluminum that has other physical properties than steels, lower density, higher heat conductivity and surface reflexivity. Pure alumina specimen 0,8 mm and Al-Mg-Si alloy 0,5 mm prepared for butt welds. Problem with surface layer of Al IIO 3 was overcome by sanding and chemical cleaning with grinding paste. Critical parameters for good weld shape are specimen position from beam focus plane, pulse length and energy, pulse frequency and the motion velocity that determines percentage of pulse overlap. Argon as protective gas was used with speed 6 liters per second. Thermal distribution in material can be modeled by numerical simulation. Software tool SYSWELD makes possible to fit laser as surface heat source, define weld geometry, and make meshing of specimen to finite elements and compute heat conduction during process. Color isotherms, vectors, mechanical deformations and others results can be study in post-processing.

  15. Anterior capsulotomy using the CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Adiel; Ma-Naim, Tova; Rosner, Mordechai; Eyal, Ophir; Belkin, Michael

    1998-06-01

    Continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) is the preferred technique for removal of the anterior capsule during cataract surgery due to this technique assuring accurate centration of the intraocular lens. During modern cataract surgery, especially with small or foldable intra ocular lenses, centration of the lens is obligatory. Radial tears at the margin of an anterior capsulotomy may be associated with the exit of at least one loop of an intraocular lens out of the capsular bag ('pea pod' effect) and its subsequent decentration. The anterior capsule is more likely to ream intact if the continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) technique is used. Although manual capsulorhexis is an ideal anterior capsulectomy technique for adults, many ophthalmologists are still uncomfortable with it and find it difficult to perform, especially in complicated cases such as these done behind small pupil, cataract extraction in children and pseudoexfoliation syndrome. We have developed a technique using a CO2 laser system for safe anterior capsulotomy and tested it in animal eyes.

  16. Plywood Inlays Thourgh CO2 Laser Cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Margarida C.; Araujo, J. L.; Teixeira, M. Ribau; Rodrigues, F. Carvalho

    1989-07-01

    Furniture with inlays is rather expensive. This is so on two accounts: Firstly, furniture with inlays is generally manufactured with solid wood.Secondly,wood carving and figure cutting are both time consuming and they produce a high rate of rejections. To add to it all the cutting and carving of minute figures requires an outstanding craftmanship. In fact the craftman is in most instance the artist and also the manufacturer. While desiring that the high artistic level is maintained in the industry the search for new method to produce inlays for furniture in not son expensive materials and to produce them in a repetitive and flexible way laser cutting of plywood was found to be quite suitable. This paper presents the charts for CO2 laser cutting of both positive and negatives in several types of plywood. The main problem is not so much the cutting of the positive and negatives pieces but to be able to cut the piece in a way that the fitting is done without any problems caused by the ever present charring effect, which takes palce at the edges of the cut pieces. To minimise this aspect positive and negative pieces have to be cut under stringent focusing conditions and with slight different scales. The condittions for our machine are presented.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  18. Laser welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Sabo, K.R.; Sanders, P.G.; Spawr, W.J.

    1997-03-01

    Recent interest in reducing the weight of automobiles to increase fuel mileage has focused attention on the use of aluminum and associated joining technologies. Laser beam welding is one of the more promising methods for high speed welding of aluminum. Consequently, substantial effort has been expended in attempting to develop a robust laser beam welding process. Early results have not been very consistent in the process requirements but more definitive data has been produced recently. This paper reviews the process parameters needed to obtain consistent laser welds on 5,000 series aluminum alloys and discusses the research necessary to make laser processing of aluminum a reality for automotive applications.

  19. Laser welding of rat's facial nerve.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong; Lee, Chang Hyun

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare regeneration of the severed nerves that were repaired by laser welding with those repaired by microsurgical suturing and evaluate the value in use of laser nerve welding in the head and neck area. In 12 rats the buccal branches of the facial nerves on the both sides were transected, and CO2 laser welding of the epineurium was performed on the right side and microsurgical suture technique was applied on the left side. In six rats Cholera Toxin B Subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the nerve anastomosis site at postoperative week 4. Another six rats were treated exactly in the same way in postoperative week 8. Six normal rats were used as controls. Intact facial nerve was observed after injection of CTb as well. Neurons of facial nuclei labeled positively by CTb were detected immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. CTb-positive neurons in the control group were 1311 +/- 258 (n = 6). CTb-positive neurons in the group (n = 6) with laser nerve welding were 1174 +/- 122 in postoperative week 4 and 1562 +/- 565 in postoperative week 8. CTb-positive neurons in the group (n = 6) with microsurgical suture were 1066 +/- 89 in postoperative week 4 and 1443 +/- 531 in postoperative week 8. CTb-positive neurons were seen significantly more in the group with laser welding than in the group with microsurgical suture in postoperative week (P = 0.028), but there was not much difference in postoperative week 8 (P = 0.463). None of 12 rats showed dehiscence at the nerve anastomosis done by laser welding. This study shows that nerve regeneration is more apparent in the nerve repaired by laser welding than in that repaired by microsurgical suture. PMID:16327562

  20. Blackbody pumped N2-CO2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Young, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The power and intrinsic efficiency of a small N2-CO2 fluid mixing transfer laser has been measured. Powers of 1.4 watts and intrinsic efficiencies for 0.7 percent were found for N2 oven temperatures of 1473 K. Laser output was optimized for He, CO2 and N2 partial pressures, output mirror reflectivity, nozzle diameter and oven temperature.

  1. CO 2-laser photoacoustic detection of gaseous n-pentylacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herecová, Lenka; Hejzlar, Tomáš; Pavlovský, Jiří; Míček, Dalibor; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Janečková, Radmila; Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, Petr; Střižík, Michal; Klouda, Karel; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2009-07-01

    The absorption spectra of gaseous n-pentylacetate were investigated by FT IR spectroscopy as well as CO 2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for simulation of the dispersion of a nerve agent (sarin) within a modeled atmospheric boundary layer. Three CO 2-laser emission lines were used for photoacoustic detection of n-pentylacetate with detection limit in the range of 1-3 ppm.

  2. Laser weld jig. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, P.; Haupt, D.L.

    1980-12-05

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece along a predetermined weld line that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members. Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reusable jig forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  3. Industrial laser welding evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hella, R.; Locke, E.; Ream, S.

    1974-01-01

    High power laser welding was evaluated for fabricating space vehicle boosters. This evaluation was made for 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. aluminum (2219) and 1/4 in. and 1/2 in. D6AC steel. The Avco HPL 10 kW industrial laser was used to perform the evaluation. The objective has been achieved through the completion of the following technical tasks: (1) parameter study to optimize welding and material parameters; (2) preparation of welded panels for MSFC evaluation; and (3) demonstration of the repeatability of laser welding equipment. In addition, the design concept for a laser welding system capable of welding large space vehicle boosters has been developed.

  4. Treatment of Bartholin gland cyst with CO2 laser

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Neila Maria de Góis; Boechat, Karol Pereira Ruela; dos Santos, Georgia Mouzinho Lima; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the results of treatment with CO2 laser for Bartholin gland cysts. Methods Thirty-one women with Bartholin gland cysts were treated with CO2 laser at an outpatient´s setting. Skin incision was performed with focused laser beam, the capsule was opened to drain mucoid content, followed by internal vaporization of impaired capsule. Results There were no complications. Five patients had recurrence of the cyst and were submitted to a second and successful session. Conclusion CO2 laser surgery was effective to treat Bartholin gland cysts with minimal or no complications, and can be performed at an outpatient´s setting. PMID:27074230

  5. Clinical evaluation of tumor promotion by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Robert E.; Liebow, Charles

    1991-05-01

    Cancer promotion by CO2 laser surgery is known to occur in animal models. It is not clear whether these observations are relevant to human disease. To test this, a series of 21 patients with oral lesions treated with CO2 laser surgery were followed for 2 weeks to 32 months with a mean of 10.2 months. Following laser surgery, 83% of lesions presenting as leukoplakia recurred, whereas no recurrences were observed amongst other lesions. This supports the hypothesis that growth factors released in response to CO2 laser surgery could promote cancers in patients with initiated lesions.

  6. Laser welding of thermoplastic materials.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, F A; Jones, I A

    2001-06-01

    The capabilities of the three main types of laser are compared and a new technique is introduced, which laser welds plastics using an infrared absorber to create a joint that is almost invisible to the human eye. PMID:11488201

  7. Clinical effects of CO2 laser on equine diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, Arne; Svensson, Ulf; Collinder, Eje

    2002-10-01

    CO2 lasers has been used for five years at Malaren Equine Hospital, as an alternative treatment of some equine diseases. The application of CO2 laser has been studied for evaluation of its appropriateness for treatment of the equine diseases sarcoids, lameness in fetlock joints or pulmonary haemorrhage. During the last five years, above 100 equine sarcoids have been removed by laser surgery (CO2 laser) and so far resulting in significantly few recurrences compared with results from usual excision surgery. In one study, acute traumatic arthritis in fetlock joints was treated three times every second day with defocalised CO2 laser. The therapeutic effectiveness of CO2 laser in this study was better than that of the customary therapy with betamethasone plus hyaluronan. During one year, chronic pulmonary bleeders, namely exercise induced pulmonary haemorrhage, has been treated with defocalised CO2 laser. Six race horses have been treated once daily during five days. Until now, three of these horses have subsequently been successfully racing and no symptoms of pulmonary haemorrhage have been observed. These studies indicate that CO2 laser might be an appropriate therapy on sarcoids and traumatic arthritis, and probably also on exercise induced pulmonary haemorrhage. Other treatments for this pulmonary disease are few.

  8. CO2 LASERS IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-12-03

    Several proof-of-principle laser accelerator experiments turned a long-wavelength of a CO{sub 2} laser to advantage. Ongoing advancement to multi-terawatt femtosecond CO{sub 2} lasers opens new venues for next-generation laser acceleration research.

  9. Laser Beam Welding of Nitride Steel Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongping; Yin, Guobin; Shulkin, Boris

    Laser beam welding is a joining technique that has many advantages over conventional GMAW welding, such as low heat input, short cycle time as well as good cosmetic welds. Laser beam welding has been widely used for welding powertrain components in automotive industry. When welding nitride steel components, however, laser beam welding faces a great challenge. The difficulty lies in the fact that the nitride layer in the joint releases the nitrogen into the weld pool, resulting in a porous weld. This research presents an industrial ready solution to prevent the nitrogen from forming gas bubbles in the weld.

  10. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  11. Thermal injuries as a result of CO2 laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Grossman, A R; Majidian, A M; Grossman, P H

    1998-09-01

    CO2 laser resurfacing of the face for fine wrinkles has gained great popularity over a short period of time. The use of the CO2 laser has proven to be effective in reducing or eliminating fine wrinkles. This tool in the surgeon's armamentarium has been added to those of dermabrasion and chemical peel. The theoretical advantage of the use of the CO2 laser for resurfacing has been better accuracy and reportedly more control of the depth of penetration. The use of the CO2 laser has been welcomed by many cosmetic surgeons. Until now, there have been few reported cases of complications with the use of the CO2 laser. To many, this would sound too good to be true; unfortunately, that is the case. The CO2 laser is a high-energy machine that can indeed cause thermal injury. This thermal injury can result in deep burns to the skin and hypertrophic scarring. We feel this is more common than is currently being reported, and we share our experience as a burn and wound care referral service. During an 18-month period, 20 consecutive patients were referred to our practice who had received injuries from the CO2 laser resurfacing laser. We present here in this review a summary of those injuries. The CO2 resurfacing laser is a very effective tool for the treatment of fine wrinkles, but it is not without the potential for serious complications. We urge caution with the use of the laser and prompt recognition and treatment of thermal injury to the skin. PMID:9734452

  12. Copper Gas Diffusers For Purging Line-Focus Laser Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonteyne, Steve L.; Hosking, Timothy J.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1996-01-01

    Modified flow diffusers built for inert-gas purging of welds made with 5-kW CO(2) lasers operating with line-focus optics in conduction mode instead of with point-focus optics in customary keyhole mode. Diffusers made of copper components brazed together, robust enough to withstand strong reflections of line-focused laser energy.

  13. CO2 lasers and applications II; Proceedings of the Third European Congress on Optics, The Hague, Netherlands, Mar. 12-14, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opower, Hans (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in CO2 laser technology and its applications are examined. Topics discussed include the excitation of CO2 lasers by microwave discharge, a compact RF-excited 12-kW CO2 laser, a robotic laser for three-dimensional cutting and welding, three-dimensional CO2-laser material processing with gantry machine systems, and a comparison of hollow metallic waveguides and optical fibers for transmitting CO2-laser radiation. Consideration is given to an aerodynamic window with a pump cavity and a supersonic jet, cutting and welding Al using a high-repetition-rate pulsed CO2 laser, speckle reduction in CO2 heterodyne laser radar systems, high-power-laser float-zone crystal growth, melt dynamics in surface processing with laser radiation, laser hardfacing, surface melting of AlSi10Mg with CO2 laser radiation, material processing with Cu-vapor lasers, light-induced flow at a metal surface, and absorption measurements in high-power CW CO2-laser processing of materials.

  14. Treatment of congenital melanocytic naevi with CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Horner, Ben M; El-Muttardi, Naguib S; Mayou, Bryan J

    2005-09-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of CO2 laser in treating congenital melanocytic naevi (CMN). A retrospective review of 12 patients with CMN treated with CO2 laser was carried out. In all cases, there was minimal visible naevus after treatment. Six patients developed hypertrophic scarring; this was significantly more likely following CO2 laser treatment on the anterior torso, flanks, or arms than on the back or buttocks (P = 0.01, 1-tailed Fisher exact test). We conclude that CO2 laser is an effective treatment for reducing visible pigmentation of CMN. However, it can cause hypertrophic scarring, which has not been reported before. This risk can be reduced by limited use in areas of the body where the dermis is thinner or there is a known risk of hypertrophic scarring. In addition, the cautious use of paint mode and prophylactic use of pressure or silicon dressings may also reduce the risk of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:16106167

  15. 367 cases of CO2 laser therapy on facial acne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunqing; Liu, Songhao; Zhang, You; Liu, T. C.

    1996-09-01

    Since 1989, we have cured 367 persons of facial acne of different course by using direct irradiation of high-power CO2 laser combing with operative therapy of low-power CO2 laser. The cure rate is 100 percent. In this paper, we stated the therapeutic approach. It was shown that this therapeutic approach is simple and effective, and its recurrence rate is zero. There are no cicatrices after healing. It is easy to accept it, and is worthy of extension.

  16. Laser Welding in Electronic Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The laser has proven its worth in numerous high reliability electronic packaging applications ranging from medical to missile electronics. In particular, the pulsed YAG laser is an extremely flexible and versatile too] capable of hermetically sealing microelectronics packages containing sensitive components without damaging them. This paper presents an overview of details that must be considered for successful use of laser welding when addressing electronic package sealing. These include; metallurgical considerations such as alloy and plating selection, weld joint configuration, design of optics, use of protective gases and control of thermal distortions. The primary limitations on use of laser welding electronic for packaging applications are economic ones. The laser itself is a relatively costly device when compared to competing welding equipment. Further, the cost of consumables and repairs can be significant. These facts have relegated laser welding to use only where it presents a distinct quality or reliability advantages over other techniques of electronic package sealing. Because of the unique noncontact and low heat inputs characteristics of laser welding, it is an ideal candidate for sealing electronic packages containing MEMS devices (microelectromechanical systems). This paper addresses how the unique advantages of the pulsed YAG laser can be used to simplify MEMS packaging and deliver a product of improved quality.

  17. Heating power feedback control for CO2 laser fusion splicers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenxin; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Toshirou; Klimowych, William

    2013-02-01

    A novel feedback control method has been developed for an automated splicer using a CO2 laser as the heating element. The feedback method employs a sensor for laser beam power and CMOS cameras as sensors for fiber luminescence which is directly related to glass temperature. The CO2 laser splicer with this type of feedback system provides a consistent platform for the fiber laser and bio-medical industry for fabrication of fused glass components such as tapers, couplers, combiners, mode-field adaptors, and fusion splices. With such a closed loop feedback system, both splice loss and peak-to-peak taper ripple are greatly reduced.

  18. CO2-Laser Cutting Fiber Reinforced Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R.; Nuss, Rudolf; Geiger, Manfred

    1989-10-01

    Guided by experimental investigations laser cutting of glass fiber reinforced reactive injection moulded (RRIM)-polyurethanes which are used e.g. in car industry for bumpers, spoilers, and further components is described. A Comparison with other cutting techniques as there are water jet cutting, milling, punching, sawing, cutting with conventional knife and with ultrasonic excited knife is given. Parameters which mainly influence cutting results e.g. laser power, cutting speed, gas nature and pressure will be discussed. The problematic nature in characterising micro and macro geometry of laser cut edges of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) is explained. The topography of cut edges is described and several characteristic values are introduced to specify the obtained working quality. The surface roughness of laser cut edges is measured by both, an optical and a mechanical sensor and their reliabilities are compared.

  19. Circumcision using CO2 laser: report of 860 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen B.; Chen, Zi-Fu; Zhan, Tian-qi; Gao, Xiang-Xun; Huang, Chao

    1993-03-01

    Eight-hundred-sixty cases of circumcision using CO2 laser are reported. The age of patients ranged from 9 - 65 years, with a mean age of 23.8 years. The technique was simple and can be quickly accomplished by a single operator. After local anesthesia the glans penis was protected by a protector. Then, circumcision was performed with a CO2 laser -- HeNe laser combined machine. There was an HeNe laser aiming system in this machine thus the surgeon had a three-dimensional visible indicator of the incision. The focusing CO2 laser beam was used for cutting the prepuce during the operation. There was almost no operative bleeding. All the patients needed no antibiotic postoperatively. Complications were minimal and satisfactory results were achieved.

  20. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  1. 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been recognized as one of the most important greenhouse gases. It is essential for the study of global warming to accurately measure the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and continuously record its variation. A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed in NASA Langley Research Center. This laser system is capable of making a vertical profiling of CO2 from ground and column measurement of CO2 from air and space-borne platform. The transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. A Ho:YLF laser operating in the range of 2.05 micrometers can be tuned over several characteristic lines of CO2 absorption. Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of CO2 with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ. For coherent detection, high repetition rate is required for speckle averaging to obtain highly precise measurements. However, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser can not operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. A Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can operate in high repetition rate. A theoretical model has been established to simulate the performance of Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF lasers. For continuous wave (CW) operation, high pump intensity with small beam

  2. CO2 laser in revision stapes surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Sergije; Schoenfeld, Uwe; Scherer, Hans H.

    1997-05-01

    Successful restoration of audition in revision stapedotomies involves precise identification and correction of the pathological condition without traumatizing the inner ear. Conventional surgical procedures often lead to unsatisfactory audition results and inner ear damages. In revision stapedotomy, the carbon-dioxide laser provides the ear surgeon with three important advantages over the conventional technique: (1) improved diagnostic and therapeutic precision, (2) better stabilization of the new prosthesis in the oval niche, and (3) reduction of inner ear trauma through non- contact atraumatic management. The surgical procedure of revision stapedotomies with the carbon dioxide laser is discussed, and case examples are used to illustrate the diversity of pathological conditions that can be treated by carbon-dioxide laser surgery. Our experience with revision carbon-dioxide laser stapedotomy suggests an improvement of postoperative audition compared to the conventional technique and demonstrates a significant elimination of sensorineural deafness. The carbon-dioxide laser enables the ear surgeon to precisely and reliably correct conduction deafness recurring after stapedotomy.

  3. Clinical application of CO2 laser in periodontal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayase, Yasuhiro

    1994-09-01

    CO2 lasers in particular are expected to have many dental applications because the CO2 laser beam exhibits strong tissue transpirative actions, such as instant coagulation, carbonization, and vaporization, and because its wavelength at 10.6 micrometers is fully absorbed by water so that the ability to make precise incisions with a high degree of safety is excellent, without damaging the deep tissues. However, clinical application of the CO2 laser has been slowed since a fiber which can conduct the laser beam to the oral cavity has only recently developed. This new fiber is an extremely flexible fiber with a minimum bending radius of 20 mm and utilizes pulse wave modes that have improved the handling characteristics in the mouth, and this has enabled us to apply the CO2 laser to a variety of periodontal conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 lasers for the early treatment of inflammation and pain relief of acute periodontitis, curettage of periodontal pockets, healing after excision of gingiva, and early improvement of gingivitis.

  4. High temperature corrosion of welded ferritic stainless steel in flowing CO2 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Jalar, Azman; Hamid, Muhammad Azmi Abdul; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2013-05-01

    The high temperature corrosion of welded structure of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) in flowing Ar-75%CO2 gas at 700°C has been investigated. The welded structure of FSS joint using ER 308L filler metal by GTAW. The soundness of welded joint has been clarified by X-Ray CT Scan. Prior the high temperature exposure, the welded FSS compulsory passed the standard of ASME. The welded structure of FSS was heated in flowing CO2 gas for 50 h at 1 atm. The morphology and microstructure of oxide formation on welded FSS alloy was characterized by using SEM. The result shows that the different oxide morphologies were observed on parent and fusion metal. The formation of different oxide and element properties at the interface were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction. The differences of the physical condition and morphology microstructure of welded and parent metal were observed to respond to different exposure times. This phenomenon perhaps explained due to the differences of the minor alloying elements on both parent and filler metals. The high temperature corrosion behaviour was discussed in details in this paper regarding on the physical properties, morphology and the microstructure.

  5. [Treatment of benign laryngeal diseases using a CO2 laser].

    PubMed

    Betka, J; Klozar, J; Kasík, P; Taudy, M; Tichý, S

    1989-05-01

    CO2 laser surgery is becoming a part of larynx surgery. The authors inform about their experience in benign larynx tumours treatment. They present analysis of concrete therapeutic procedures in individual larynx affections. They conclude that laser surgery is an advantegous method for benign larynx tumours treatment. PMID:2772545

  6. [Effect of pulsed CO2-laser irradiation on bone tissue].

    PubMed

    Kholodnov, S E

    1985-01-01

    Different dynamic effects on biological tissue caused by pulsed laser radiation are described. It is shown that the parameters of these effects which take place on the bone tissue affected by pulsed CO2-laser radiation are directly dependent on the parameters of these pulses and may be predicted for any concrete application. PMID:3931698

  7. A blackbody radiation-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.; Deyoung, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

  8. LaRC-developed catalysts for CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Kielin, Erik J.; Miller, Irvin M.

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many remote sensing applications from space, airborne, and ground platforms. The NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) system will be designed to measure wind velocities from polar earth orbit for a period of up to three years. Accordingly, this and other applications require a closed-cycle pulsed CO2 laser which necessitates the use of an efficient CO-O2 recombination catalyst for these dissociation products which otherwise would degrade the laser operation. The required catalyst must not only operate at low temperatures but also must operate efficiently for long time periods. The research effort at NASA LaRC has centered around development and testing of CO oxidation catalysts for closed-cycle, pulsed, common and rare-isotope CO2 lasers. Researchers examined available commercial catalysts both in a laser and under simulated closed-cycle laser conditions with efforts aimed toward a thorough understanding of the fundamental catalytic reaction. These data were used to design and synthesize new catalyst compositions to better meet the catalyst requirements for closed-cycle pulsed CO2 lasers. Syntheses and test results for catalysts developed at Langley Research Center which have significantly better long-term decay characteristics than previously available catalysts and at the same time operate quite well under lower temperature conditions are discussed.

  9. Intracavity CdTe modulators for CO2 lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, J. E.; Nussmeier, T. A.; Goodwin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    The use of cadmium telluride as an electrooptic material for intracavity modulation of CO2 lasers is described. Included are the predicted and measured effects of CdTe intracavity modulators on laser performance. Coupling and frequency modulation are discussed and experimental results compared with theoretically predicted performance for both techniques. Limitations on the frequency response of the two types of modulation are determined.

  10. Fractional CO2 laser treatment for a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Farid E; Habre, Maya B; Helou, Josiane F; Tohme, Roland G; Tomb, Roland R

    2016-01-01

    Skin grafts are widely used in reconstructive and plastic surgery, leaving an inevitable scar appearance on the body, affecting the quality of life of the patients. Fractional ablative lasers have become a leading procedure for the treatment of acne and burn scars. We report a case of a skin graft showing excellent improvement in overall appearance after three sessions of fractional CO2 laser. The undamaged tissue left between the microthermal treatment zones is responsible of collagen formation and reepithelialization. Remodeling and collagen formation are observed even 6 months after a fractional CO2 laser session. PMID:26052811

  11. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  12. [The CO2 laser in stomatology. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Michael M; Suter, Valérie G A; Stauffer, Edouard; Buser, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The second part of this review presents and discusses evidence in the recent literature for the application of the CO2 laser for the therapy of stomatologic lesions. Clinical outcomes and complications for the use of the CO2 laser are presented for the following stomatological conditions: leukoplakia, lichen planus, benign soft-tissue and salivary gland tumors, reactive soft tissue changes (i.e., fibroepithelial polyps), recurrent aphthous stomatitis, drug-induced gingival hyperplasia, mucous extravasation and mucous retention cysts, herpes simplex virus-induced lesions, maxillary midline frenum, and ankyloglossia (tongue-tie). This review outlines indications in which the CO2 laser is the treatment method of choice and in which situations the laser has still to be applied with caution. PMID:12956039

  13. [Removal of tattoos by CO2 laser and acetic acid].

    PubMed

    Di Quirico, R; Pallini, G; Di Domenicantonio, G; Astolfi, A; Bindi, F; Gianfelice, F

    1992-10-31

    The Authors pay attention to small tattoo removal by means of the utilization of the CO2 laser. Moreover, the Authors emphasize the drawback of double treatment which, usually, the patient suffers in tattoo removal by CO2 laser. Then, the pressure of the Authors is small sized tattoo removal in only one sitting achieving so an excellent esthetic result. Besides, the Authors, in this medical study, explains two methods for tattoo removal. In the study's results, the Authors describes the manner and the time of the two lesion recovery by the different manners of treatment. Finally, the Authors affirms the great consequence of the surgical CO2 laser, they don't fail, however, to affirm that the laser and acetic acid combination is an excellent procedure for small tattoo removal. PMID:1480288

  14. Use of CO2 laser and AgClBr infrared transmitting fibers for tympanoplasty: experiments on animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilker, Zeev; Daykhovsky, Leon; Nageris, Ben I.; Feinmesser, R.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Ravid, Avi; Kariv, Naam; Katzir, Abraham

    1999-06-01

    One of the most common ear disease is Chronic Otitis Media that leads to a tympanic membrane perforation. The treatment of this condition is by a surgical procedure, tympanoplasty that is often done under local or general anesthesia. During this procedure an autologous fascia is applied to close the perforation. Commonly, fixation of the fascia is achieved mostly by Gel-Form. During the last several years various fascia fixation techniques were suggested. These included a welding procedure based on using an Argon laser. The disadvantages of the latter is that the visible Argon laser is not absorbed well by the relatively thin tympanic membrane and the fascia. It does not lead to strong weld and it may heat the middle of the ear, causing neural hearing loss. The CO2 laser IR radiation is much more suitable for welding of these thin tissues, because of its very high absorption in tissues. There is still a need to deliver this radiation to the weld site using a thin and flexible optical fiber. In this work we have welded fascia on the tympanic membranes of guinea pigs using a CO2 laser. Holes of diameter 2-3 mm were punctured in the membranes and apiece of fascia was placed on the holes. Laser power of the order of 0.5W was delivered to the fascia using an IR transmitting AgClBr fiber. In experiments done on 11 animals and CO2 laser welding was successfully done on in 15 years. The success of these preliminary studies in the animal models shows that CO2 laser tympanoplasty could be a very valuable surgical technique.

  15. Enhanced transmission in CO(2)-laser-aerosol interactions.

    PubMed

    Kwok, H S; Rossi, T M; Lau, W S; Shaw, D T

    1988-03-01

    The transmission characteristics of a high-power CO(2)-laser beam through a single water aerosol particle are studied. It is found that before the onset of plasma formation there is a sizable range of laser intensity where the medium becomes almost totally transparent. A plausible argument for this induced transparency is given in terms of particle disintegration. This effect may have applications in laser atmospheric propagation. PMID:19742024

  16. Endoscopic removal of PMMA in hip revision surgery with a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazy, John; Kollmer, Charles; Uppal, Gurvinder S.; Lane, Gregory J.; Sherk, Henry H.

    1991-05-01

    Purpose: to compare CO2 laser to mechanical means of PMMA removal in total hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients requiring hip revision surgery were studied and compared to historical controls. Cement was removed from the femoral canal utilizing a 30 centimeter laparoscope. A CO2 laser waveguide was passed through the laparoscope into the femoral canal and a TV camera was placed over the eye piece to permit visualization of the depths of the femoral canal on a video monitor. The leg was placed in a horizontal position which avoided the pooling of blood or saline in the depths of the femur. Under direct vision the distal plug could be vaporized with a 40 centimeter CO2 laser waveguide. Power settings of 20 to 25 watts and a superpulsed mode were used. A 2 mm suction tube was welded to the outside of the laparoscope permitting aspiration of the products of vaporization. Results: Of 45 hip revisions there were no shaft perforation, fractures or undue loss of bone stock. There was no statistically different stay in hospital time, blood loss or operative time between the CO2 revision group compared to the non-laser revision group, in which cement was removed by mechanical methods. Conclusions: Mechanical methods used in removing bone cement using high speed burrs, reamers, gouges, and osteotomies is technically difficult and fraught with complications including shaft fracture, perforations, and unnecessary loss of bone stock. The authors' experience using the CO2 laser in hip revision surgery has permitted the removal of bone cement. Use of a modified laparoscope has allowed for precise, complete removal of bone cement deep within the femoral shaft without complication or additional operative time. The authors now advocate the use of a CO2 laser with modified laparoscope in hip revision surgery in which bone cement is to be removed from within the femoral shaft.

  17. Advances in CO2-Laser Drilling of Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusberg, Lars; Queisser, Marco; Gentsch, Clemens; Schröder, Henning; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    The CO2 -laser drilling in Schott D263Teco thin glass having a thickness of 500 μm is intensively studied. The nearly cylindrical holes having diameters smaller 100 μm could be drilled in 0.25 seconds per hole. Reliability investigations by performing temperature cycling show cracks in 51% of the drilled holes in the glass substrate. The reason is thermally induced stress during thermal CO2 -laser ablation. Different thermal pre- and post-treatments have been successfully studied avoiding such cracks (98.4% crack-free holes) and show the high potential of CO2 -laser drilling for through glass via (TGV) processing in glass substrates for micro-system applications.

  18. The influence of shielding gas in hybrid LASER MIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Giovanni; Campana, Giampaolo; Fortunato, Alessandro; Ascari, Alessandro

    2007-07-01

    Hybrid LASER-GMAW welding technique has been recently studied and developed in order to meet the needs of modern welding industries. The two sources involved in this process play, in fact, a complementary role: fast welding speed, deep bead penetration and high energy concentration can be achieved through the LASER beam, while gap bridgeability and cost-effectiveness are typical of the GMAW process. Particularly interesting, in this context, is the CO 2 LASER-MIG welding which differs from the Nd:YAG LASER-MIG technique for the high powers that can be exploited and for the good power/cost ratio of the process. This paper is a part of a wide study on the hybrid CO 2 LASER-MIG welding and investigates the influence of the shielding gas both on the stability of the process and on the dimensional characteristics of the weld bead. Two different parameters have been taken into consideration in order to develop this analysis: the shielding gas composition and the shielding gas flow. The experiment, performed on AISI 304 stainless steel plates, has been planned exploiting design of experiment techniques. The results have been analyzed through a statistical approach in order to determine the real influence of each parameter on the overall process.

  19. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-01-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  20. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-08-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  1. Laser-induced structural modifications in glass using a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Takayuki; Nakazumi, Shinya; Nakamura, Keigo; Ono, Shunsuke

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation results on laser-induced structural modifications in a BK7 glass sample (OHARA, S-BSL7) by use of a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser system. A femtosecond fiber laser system (wavelength: 1.06 μm, pulse duration: 250 fs) generates 1 MHz ultrashort laser pulses with a pulse energy up to 2 μJ, and a CO2 laser system generates CW (continuous wave) laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 μm. Both laser beams were simultaneously irradiated on a BK7 glass substrate (30 mm × 5 mm × 0.7 mm thick). The structural modifications regions were created by translating the glass sample perpendicular to the laser axis with a distance of 1 mm and a scan speed of 0.1 mm/s. The dependence of structural modifications on the laser energy of femtosecond laser pulses and the power of CO2 laser beam were investigated. The results have demonstrated that the refractive index change region with the width of 3 μm was created with simultaneously irradiation of two laser beams although the structural modification regions, which were produced with only femtosecond laser pulses, were surface ablation. And the surface ablation regions were changed to the refractive index change regions as the energy of CO2 laser beam increase to more than 2W.

  2. Investigation of Laser Parameters in Silicon Pulsed Laser Conduction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Khoshnoud, Afsaneh

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser welding of silicon in conduction mode is investigated numerically. In this study, the effects of laser beam characteristics on the welding have been studied. In order to model the welding process, heat conduction equation is solved numerically and laser beam energy is considered as a boundary condition. Time depended heat conduction equation is used in our calculations to model pulsed laser welding. Thermo-physical and optical properties of the material are considered to be temperature dependent in our calculations. Effects of spatial and temporal laser beam parameters such as laser beam spot size, laser beam quality, laser beam polarization, laser incident angle, laser pulse energy, laser pulse width, pulse repetition frequency and welding speed on the welding characteristics are assessed. The results show that how the temperature dependent thermo-physical and optical parameters of the material are important in laser welding modeling. Also the results show how the parameters of the laser beam influence the welding characteristics.

  3. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  4. Fusion welding studies using laser on Ti-SS dissimilar combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugarajan, B.; Padmanabham, G.

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding investigations were carried out on dissimilar Ti-SS combination. The study is aimed to improve the weld strength and ductility by minimizing harmful intermetallics and taking advantage of high cooling rates in laser welding. Results of continuous wave 3.5 kW CO2 laser welding of totally dissimilar combination of Titanium and stainless steel (304) have been discussed. Bead on plate welding experiments were conducted to identify the laser welding parameters using depth of penetration as criteria. The welding of dissimilar combination has been attempted both autogenously and with interlayers such as Vanadium (V) and Tantalum (Ta) in the form of laser cladding as well as strip. Autogenous welds were carried out by varying the laser power, welding speed and position of the laser beam with respect to the joint centre. The resultant welds are characterized by macrostructure analysis, SEM/EDAX and XRD and as welded tensile test in UTM. The autogenous welds have exhibited extensive cracking even when welded at high speeds or by manipulating the beam position with respect to the joint. Similarly Vandaium as interlayer could not achieve crack free joint. A joint with 40 MPa strength could be made with Ta as interlayer. Results and analysis of these variants of laser welded joints are reported and discussed.

  5. Clinical applications of CO2 lasers: clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinibaldi, Kenneth R.

    1994-09-01

    The most common surgery performed in our clinic with the CO2 laser is the cutting and vaporization of neoplasms associated with the head and neck, in particular, the squamous cell carcinoma in the cat. A majority of the tumors are malignant and 50% are metastatic at the time of presentation for surgery. Experience has taught us that early detection and removal with the CO2 laser affords the best prognosis. To date, roughly 100 cases have been treated with the CO2 laser. The success rate in the dog is not as rewarding as in the cat. Most cases were done with 5 - 10 watts of power continuous or pulsed wave, using a 125 mm or 50 mm handpiece. The laser beam was focused or defocused to adjust for cutting, vaporization, and coagulation. No post-op care of the wounds was recommended. Other small neoplasms in and around the ears, head, and neck can also be removed easily with the CO2 laser.

  6. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  7. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  8. Surface treatment of metals with excimer and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidemenopoulos, G. N.; Zervaki, A.; Papadimitriou, K.; Tsipas, D. N.; McIntosh, J.; Zergioti, G.; Manousaki, G.; Hontzopoulos, Elias I.

    1993-05-01

    The availability of a variety of lasers including the high-power cw CO2 lasers, the pulsed- mode infrared Nd-YAG, and the pulsed-mode ultraviolet excimer laser has led to the development of many interesting applications of laser technology to materials processing. Among them the surface modification of metallic alloys appears to be one of the most important and very close to implementation in various industries. Specifically the applications of excimer lasers have been discussed in a recent workshop in the framework of the Eureka EU 205 program. The major topics concerned with surface modifications that were discussed in this workshop were surface smoothing and roughening, surface cleaning of Ti and Cu, mixing and interdiffusion of predeposited layers, surface irradiation of Cu-alloys to improve the corrosion resistance, surface remelting of Al-alloys for grain refinement through rapid solidification, and surface remelting of Ni-P electroless coatings on Al alloys for the improvement of corrosion resistance. Laser alloying of Ni-base superalloys has also been discussed. Applications discussed here include the surface treatment of Ni-base superalloys with high-power CO2 laser, the surface treatment of aluminum alloys with excimer lasers, the laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of wear and corrosion resistant layers of Ti, TiC, and TiN on tool steels, and the fracture surface sulphur printing with excimer lasers.

  9. Enhanced peak power CO2 laser processing of PCB materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C. J.; Villarreal, F.; Wendland, J. J.; Baker, H. J.; Hall, D. R.; Hand, D. P.

    2005-06-01

    Laser drilling has become a common processing step in the fabrication of printed circuit boards (PCB's). For this work, a recently developed enhanced peak power CO2 laser (~2.5 kW peak power, 200W average) or ultra-super pulse (USP) laser is used to drill alumina and copper coated dielectric laminate materials. The higher peak power and faster response times (than conventional CO2 lasers) produced by the USP laser are used to produce high speed alumina laser scribing and copper coated laminate microvia drilling processes. Alumina is a common PCB material used for applications, where its resistance to mechanical and thermal stresses is required. Here we present a comprehensive study of the melt eject mechanisms and recast formation to optimise the speed and quality of alumina laser scribing. Scribe speeds of up to 320 mms-1 (1.8 times current scribe rate) have been achieved using novel temporal pulse shapes unique to the USP laser. Also presented is the microvia drilling process of copper dielectric laminates, where the multi-level configuration presents different optical and thermal properties complicating their simultaneous laser ablation. In our experiments the USP laser has been used to drill standard thickness copper films (up to 50 μm thick) in a single shot. This investigation concentrates on understanding the mechanisms that determine the dielectric undercut dimensions.

  10. Short-cavity high-repetition-rate CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopper, Wouter; Bagrova, Kalina; du Pisanie, Johan; Ronander, Einar; Meyer, Jan A.; von Bergmann, Hubertus M.

    1994-09-01

    We report on the construction and optimization of a TEA CO2 laser with a discharge volume of 15 cm3 and cavity length of 20 cm. Such a short cavity facilitates single longitudinal mode operation. A roots blower is employed to achieve the necessary gas flow rate for high-repetition-frequency operation in a compact design. Output has been obtained at 1 kHz and a stable discharge to a repetition rate of 2 kHz has been demonstrated. The laser is part of a program aimed at the development of an efficient laser system for molecular laser isotope separation. Additional applications in materials processing are envisioned.

  11. Pulsed CO2 laser ablation of graphite and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. H.; Tou, T. Y.; Low, K. S.

    1998-02-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of the emission plumes of graphite, polyimide, polyethylene terepthalate, and polymethylmethacrylate that have been ablated by using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 μm shows the presence of CN and C2, species not previously reported for CO2 laser ablation. The gross dynamics of the luminous plume, which was studied by using a streak camera, compares favorably with predictions from the snowplow model, which also accurately forecasts the time history of the plume expansion for a wide range of background gas pressures and laser fluences. Framing shadowgraphy reveals the onset of laser-supported detonation waves at approximately 50 mbar Ar, thus somewhat limiting the validity of this model.

  12. Ultrasonic vibration aided laser welding of Al alloys: Improvement of laser-welding quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Watanabe, T.; Yoshida, Y.

    1995-03-01

    Using a pulsed YAG laser, meltability of Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si alloys were investigated by a single-pass irradiation. In order to improve the quality in laser welding, the effectiveness of the Ultrasonic Vibration Laser Welding (UVLW) method proposed in this paper was investigated experimentally. The proposed method was also compared with the traditional welding methods of Normal Laser Welding (NLW) and preHeating Laser Welding (HLW). The welding methods were evaluated from the geometry in the melt zone generated by a single pulse of the laser beam. It was suggested that ultrasonic vibration suppressed welding defects and improved the melt characteristics due to cavitation effects and dispersion of particles in the molten pool during laser welding. The influence on melt characteristics of the melt zone by preheating was also investigated. In these experiments, UVLW was the most useful laser welding method from the point of view of improving the laser welding quality of Al alloys.

  13. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  14. Mode/Medium Instability in CO2 Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, K. L.; Sung, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Report discribes theoretical study of model/medium instability (MMI) in CO2 laser. Purposes of study to extend, to small Fresnel numbers, previous study of MMI restricted to large Fresnel numbers and to study methods of previous studies, to suppress MMI. Method of primary interest involves replacement of hard edge output mirror in laser resonator with mirror, local reflectivity of which decreases with radial distance from optical axis according to Gaussian profile.

  15. Low Voltage Gas Transport TE CO(2) Laser.

    PubMed

    Seguin, H J; Sedgwick, G

    1972-04-01

    The constructional and operational aspects of a low voltage transversely excited gas transport CO(2) laser are presented. This compact device incorporates a recirculating wind tunnel type geometry and possesses features of the gas dynamic, gas transport, and TEA lasers. The structure with an active length of 36 cm produced a cw power of approximately 200 W at an over-all system efficiency of 5% using a discharge potential of 1200 V. PMID:20119038

  16. Oncological and functional results of CO2 laser cordectomy.

    PubMed

    Policarpo, M; Aluffi, P; Brovelli, F; Borello, G; Pia, F

    2004-10-01

    Laser surgery represents the evolution of endoscopic surgery and, as far as concerns treatment of laryngeal tumours, CO2 laser cordectomy is considered a valid alternative to conventional surgery (laryngofissure cordectomy) and to exclusive radiotherapy for glottic carcinomas, classified as T1a, T1b and T2. The present report focuses on personal experience with CO2 laser cordectomy over the last 11 years, evaluating oncological and functional results. Between October 1990 and December 2001, micro-laryngoscopy has been performed with CO, laser, in 606 cases (benign and malignant lesions), of which 150 laser cordectomies, at the ORL Department, Eastern Piedmont University of Novara. An analysis is made of 63 patients (mean age 64.3 years) who underwent laser cordectomy for glottic carcinoma, observed at follow-up for at least 3 years. Vocal function has been studied on a sample of 20 patients. Of those who underwent CO2 laser cordectomy for T1a and T1s, 95.8% were disease free after a minimum of 3 years follow-up. Video-larynx-stroboscopic test highlighted the presence of a "satisfying" fibrous neocord in cases treated with Type III cordectomy. The speech compensation was of the "cord-neocordal" type (35%), false cordal (40%) and with arytenoideus hyperadduction (25%). The electro-acoustical analysis of the voice highlighted a "serious dysphonia" compatible with Type IV cases according to Yanagihara (70%) and moderate-severe dysphonia (30%). Mean values of vocal parameters were 5.8% for Jitter, 12.2% for Shimmer, 0.34 for NHR. CO2 laser cordectomy is first choice treatment for T1a glottic carcinoma, offering intra- and post-operative advantages: reduced traumatism, lack of tracheostomy, low bleeding, fast functional recovery (deglutition and speech), brief hospital stay, and low management costs. Dysphonia resulting from treatment, characterised by breathed voice, allows the patient to lead a normal life. PMID:15871607

  17. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  18. TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator: A software tool to predict the output pulse characteristics of TEA CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Ghani, B.

    2005-09-01

    "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" has been designed to simulate the dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO 2 laser based on the six-temperature model. The program predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse (power, energy, pulse duration, delay time, FWHM, etc.) depending on the physical and geometrical input parameters (pressure ratio of gas mixture, reflecting area of the output mirror, media length, losses, filling and decay factors, etc.). Program summaryTitle of program: TEA_CO2 Catalogue identifier: ADVW Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVW Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: P.IV DELL PC Setup: Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Scientific Services Department, Mathematics and Informatics Division Operating system: MS-Windows 9x, 2000, XP Programming language: Delphi 6.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47 315 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:7 681 109 Distribution format:tar.gz Classification: 15 Laser Physics Nature of the physical problem: "TEA CO 2 Laser Simulator" is a program that predicts the behavior of the laser output pulse by studying the effect of the physical and geometrical input parameters on the characteristics of the output laser pulse. The laser active medium consists of a CO 2-N 2-He gas mixture. Method of solution: Six-temperature model, for the dynamics emission of TEA CO 2 laser, has been adapted in order to predict the parameters of laser output pulses. A simulation of the laser electrical pumping was carried out using two approaches; empirical function equation (8) and differential equation (9). Typical running time: The program's running time mainly depends on both integration interval and step; for a 4 μs period of time and 0.001 μs integration step (defaults values used in the program), the running time will be about 4 seconds. Restrictions on the complexity: Using a very small integration

  19. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    The object of this effort is to develop code to enable the accurate prediction of the performance of pulsed transversely excited (TE) CO2 lasers prior to their construction. This is of particular benefit to the NASA Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) project. A benefit of the completed code is that although developed specifically for the pulsed CO2 laser much of the code can be modified to model other laser systems of interest to the lidar community. A Boltzmann equation solver has been developed which enables the electron excitation rates for the vibrational levels of CO2 and N2, together with the electron ionization and attachment coefficients to be determined for any CO2 laser gas mixture consisting of a combination of CO2, N2, CO, He and CO. The validity of the model has been verified by comparison with published material. The results from the Boltzmann equation solver have been used as input to the laser kinetics code which is currently under development. A numerical code to model the laser induced medium perturbation (LIMP) arising from the relaxation of the lower laser level has been developed and used to determine the effect of LIMP on the frequency spectrum of the LAWS laser output pulse. The enclosed figures show representative results for a laser operating at 0.5 atm. with a discharge cross-section of 4.5 cm to produce a 20 J pulse with aFWHM of 3.1 microns. The first four plots show the temporal evolution of the laser pulse power, energy evolution, LIMP frequency chirp and electric field magnitude. The electric field magnitude is taken by beating the calculated complex electric field and beating it with a local oscillator signal. The remaining two figures show the power spectrum and energy distribution in the pulse as a function of the varying pulse frequency. The LIMP theory has been compared with experimental data from the NOAA Windvan Lidar and has been found to be in good agreement.

  20. Calibrating Laser Gas Measurements by Use of Natural CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Chris

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of calibration has been devised for instruments that utilize tunable lasers to measure the absorption spectra of atmospheric gases in order to determine the relative abundances of the gases. In this method, CO2 in the atmosphere is used as a natural calibration standard. Unlike in one prior calibration method, it is not necessary to perform calibration measurements in advance of use of the instrument and to risk deterioration of accuracy with time during use. Unlike in another prior calibration method, it is not necessary to include a calibration gas standard (and the attendant additional hardware) in the instrument and to interrupt the acquisition of atmospheric data to perform calibration measurements. In the operation of an instrument of this type, the beam from a tunable diode laser or a tunable quantum-cascade laser is directed along a path through the atmosphere, the laser is made to scan in wavelength over an infrared spectral region that contains one or two absorption spectral lines of a gas of interest, and the transmission (and, thereby, the absorption) of the beam is measured. The concentration of the gas of interest can then be calculated from the observed depth of the absorption line(s), given the temperature, pressure, and path length. CO2 is nearly ideal as a natural calibration gas for the following reasons: CO2 has numerous rotation/vibration infrared spectral lines, many of which are near absorption lines of other gases. The concentration of CO2 relative to the concentrations of the major constituents of the atmosphere is well known and varies slowly and by a small enough amount to be considered constant for calibration in the present context. Hence, absorption-spectral measurements of the concentrations of gases of interest can be normalized to the concentrations of CO2. Because at least one CO2 calibration line is present in every spectral scan of the laser during absorption measurements, the atmospheric CO2 serves

  1. Laser Submerged Arc Welding (LUPuS) with Solid State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The newly developed hybrid welding process allows the welding of plates with a thickness larger than 20 mm in a single pass and the welding of thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique. In this special hybrid process, the use of CO2-lasers causes problems when forward sliding flux of slag meets the laser beam path and forms an uncontrollable plasma plume in the beam path. This plasma then shields the work piece from the laser power and thus provokes the collapse of the laser keyhole and leads to process instability. The substitution of the CO2-laser with a modern solid-state laser significantly improves the performance and the stability of the hybrid process. This contribution will demonstrate the latest results and improvements by means of welding results gained with steel plates with a thickness of up to 40mm.

  2. Experimental CO2 laser myringotomy: a preliminary animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, Hannu J.; Poe, Dennis S.; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Lombardo, Igino; Pankratov, Michail M.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1995-05-01

    Myringotomy--a procedure in which a perforation is made in the tympanic membrane (TM) is performed to gain access to the middle ear for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. Some medical conditions, especially middle ear infections require an opening that remains patent for weeks or even months. A conventional myringotomy usually closes in a few days which is insufficient time for an underlying disease to resolve. There have been studies reporting modest closure delays of myringotomies done by CO2 laser from the beginning of 1980's and the procedure has not gained popularity in clinical practice. Many of the mechanisms affecting TM healing delays remain unknown. In an animal model we investigated the closure rates of TM perforations after different types of myringotomies. The animals formed three experimental groups: (1) both ears had a semicircular myringotomy produced either with a knife or with a CO2 laser; (2) both ears had a round laser myringotomy (1.2 mm in diameter) produced either in a single shot or by a series of small overlapping shots; (3) both ears had laser myringotomy either kidney shaped (1.2 X 2 mm) or round (1.2 mm in diameter) produced by a series of small shots. All myringotomies closed within 42 days without complications. The mean patency of knife myringotomies was significantly shorter (9.8 days) than that of similar laser myringotomies (19.5 days). The mode of laser delivery did not have an effect on the closure rate. Kidney shaped CO2 laser myringotomies stayed patent significantly longer (mean 25.8 days) than circular (mean 11.4 days). The patency of smaller semicircular laser myringotomies was significantly longer than that of larger circular. The results indicate that certain geometries as well as use of the CO2 laser delays the closure of myringotomy. When myringotomy is performed for therapeutic reasons not only the size but also the shape should be considered as a factor for extending its length of patency. In the future CO2 laser may

  3. Use of CO2 laser flexible waveguides during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Raymond J.

    1992-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has revolutionized the management of symptomatic cholelithiasis and cholecystitis. Although electrosurgery devices are used by a majority of surgeons, laser technology is a valued addition to the armamentarium of the skilled laser laparoscopist. A variety of fiberoptic capable wavelengths have been applied successfully during this procedure. Use of the CO2 laser for this purpose has lagged due to difficulties encountered with free-beam and rigid waveguide dissections via the laparoscope. Recent developments in flexible waveguide technology have the potential to expand the role of the CO2 laser for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and other procedures. Twelve laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed using Luxar (Bothell, WA) flexible microwaveguides of various configurations. In each case, dissection of the gallbladder from the gallbladder bed was accomplished with acceptable speed and hemostasis. There were no complications. Shortcomings include coupling and positioning with an articulated arm and occasional clogging of some waveguide tips with debris. Modifications of this technology are suggested. Flexible waveguides make the CO2 laser a practical alternative for surgical laparoscopy.

  4. Plasma detector for TEA CO2 laser pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Mitsuishi, A.; Fujita, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Takai, M.

    1983-10-01

    Laser-pulse evolution can be detected by measuring the emf generated by fast electrons in a laser-produced plasma when the laser radiation is focused onto a solid metal target in a vacuum. Using this phenomenon a 'plasma detector' is constructed, and its characteristics for the TEA CO2 laser radiation of intensity 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th W/sq cm are investigated experimentally. The plasma detector operates at room temperature and is strong against laser damages. For the evacuated plasma detector down to 0.1 torr, a maximum output voltage of 90 V and a rise time shorter than 1 ns are observed. The plasma detector, therefore, can be used as a power monitor for laser pulses and as a trigger voltage source.

  5. Automatic frequency control of pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency agility in remote-sensor lasers permits differential absorption and differential scattering measurements to be conducted for quantitative studies of atmospheric molecules and aerosols. High spectral purity in laser transmitter pulses allows heterodyne detection to be used for improved SNR, and renders the study of small, Doppler-induced frequency shifts due to the relative motion between target and observer possible. Attention is presently given to a high spectral purity injection-locked CO2 laser transmitter for remote sensing and target ranging.

  6. New aspects of CO2 laser ablation in skin photosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, Ioan; Nedelcu, Dana M.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Dutu, Constantin A.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents the latest developments in CO2, ancillary equipment, and advanced surgical techniques used in treating a variety of different dermatologic disorders. To improve our knowledge on the laser treatment of several cutaneous lesions, we have performed a study on 871 cases, of which 690 are benign skin tumors and 181 are malignant skin tumors. Based on this large number of cases, information on post-operative course, recovery time, the quality of scars and aesthetic results, recurrences and hemostasis of blood vessels is given. This study presents indications for performing laser surgery and describes how to avoid complications and limit the potential risks associated with lasers.

  7. Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy Using a Flexible CO2 Laser Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Khalaileh, Abed; Ponomarenko, Oleg; Abu-Gazala, Mahmoud; Lewinsky, Reuven M.; Elazary, Ram; Shussman, Noam; Shalhav, Arieh; Mintz, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) is a challenging surgery that requires precise tissue cutting and meticulous hemostasis under warm ischemia conditions. In this study, we tested the feasibility of performing LPN using CO2 laser energy transmitted through a specialized flexible mirror optical fiber. Methods: General anesthesia and pneumoperitoneum were induced in 7 farm pigs. Various portions of a kidney, either a pole or a midportion of the kidney, were removed using a novel flexible fiber to transmit CO2 laser energy set at a power of 45W and energy per pulse of 100mJ. The collecting system was approximated with a suture or 2, but no hemostatic measures were taken besides applying a few pulses of the laser to bleeding points. The pigs were sacrificed 3 wk later. Results: Average renal mass removed was 18% of the total kidney weight. All pigs tolerated surgery well. Sharp renal cutting was accomplished in a single continuous incision, with minimal tissue charring and minimal blood loss (<10cc) in all animals. Necropsy revealed no peritoneal or retroperitoneal abnormalities. Histologic examination of the cut surface showed a thin sector of up to 100 μm of coagulation necrosis. Conclusions: We report on the first LPN done using a CO2 laser transmitted through a flexible fiber in an animal model. This novel application of the CO2 laser produced excellent parenchymal incision and hemostasis along with minimal damage to adjacent renal tissue, thus, potentially shortening ischemia time and kidney function loss. Further studies comparing this laser to standard technique are necessary to verify its usefulness for partial nephrectomy. PMID:23484569

  8. The use of laser CO2 in salivary gland diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolfi, C.; Rocchetti, F.; Fioravanti, M.; Tenore, G.; Palaia, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Salivary gland diseases can include reactive lesions, obstructive lesions, and benign tumors. All these clinical entities are slow growing. Salivary glands reactive lesions, such as mucoceles, can result from extravasation of saliva into the surrounding soft tissue or from retention of saliva within the duct. Sialolithiasis, one of the most common obstructive lesions, is generally due to calculi, which are attributed to retention of saliva. Monomorphic adenoma is a salivary gland benign tumor, which is exclusively resulted from proliferation of epithelial cells, with no alterations interesting the connective tissue. The elective therapy of these lesions is surgical excision because sometimes they can be accompained by difficulties during chewing and phonation and can interfere with prosthesis's stability. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of CO2 laser in the treatment of patients with salivary gland diseases. Three different cases - a mucocele, a scialolithiasis and a monomorphic adenoma - were treated with CO2 laser excision (CW and 4W), under local anesthesia. Two different techniques were used: circumferential incision for the adenoma, and mucosa preservation technique for mucocele and sialolithiasis. In each case final haemostasis was obtained by thermocoagulation, but suture was applied to guarantee good healing by sewing up the flaps. The patients were checked after twenty days and the healing was good. The carbon dioxide laser (CO2 laser) was one of the earliest gas laser to be developed, and is still the highest-power continuous wave laser that is currently available. In dentistry the CO2 laser produces a beam of infrared light with the principal wavelength bands centering around 9.4 and 10.6 micrometers. Laser excision can be very useful in oral surgery. In the cases presented CO2 laser offered, differently from traditional surgery, simplified surgical technique, shorter duration of operation, minimal postoperative pain, minimal scarring

  9. TEA CO2 laser machining of CFRP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Whitehead, D.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have found wide applications in the aerospace, marine, sports and automotive industries owing to their lightweight and acceptable mechanical properties compared to the commonly used metallic materials. Machining of CFRP composites using lasers can be challenging due to inhomogeneity in the material properties and structures, which can lead to thermal damages during laser processing. In the previous studies, Nd:YAG, diode-pumped solid-state, CO2 (continuous wave), disc and fibre lasers were used in cutting CFRP composites and the control of damages such as the size of heat-affected zones (HAZs) remains a challenge. In this paper, a short-pulsed (8 μs) transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser was used, for the first time, to machine CFRP composites. The laser has high peak powers (up to 250 kW) and excellent absorption by both the carbon fibre and the epoxy binder. Design of experiment and statistical modelling, based on response surface methodology, was used to understand the interactions between the process parameters such as laser fluence, repetition rate and cutting speed and their effects on the cut quality characteristics including size of HAZ, machining depth and material removal rate (MRR). Based on this study, process parameter optimization was carried out to minimize the HAZ and maximize the MRR. A discussion is given on the potential applications and comparisons to other lasers in machining CFRP.

  10. Evaluation of the CO2 laser for porcelain laminate etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypel, T. S.; Zakariasen, Kenneth L.

    1994-09-01

    Research has shown that CO2 laser energy can both fuse and etch enamel, the effect being dependent on the exposure parameters utilized. Such energy can also fuse dental porcelains, but it is not known whether porcelain can be etched by CO2 laser. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether CO2 laser energy can be utilized to etch porcelain laminates, an effect necessary for resin bonding. Porcelain laminate disks 10 mm in diameter were prepared. The disks were each numbered and divided into quadrants with a small carbide high speed bur. Six disks were utilized, each quadrant receiving a single laser exposure for a total of 24 exposures. Each exposure was at either 10 or 15 W for .01, .05, or .10 seconds, with a focal spot of either 0.8 or 0.35 mm. This range of exposures includes those exposures which cause enamel etching. Two exposures were made at each combination of exposure parameters. Each disk was prepared for scanning electron microscopy and viewed at 75X to examine the exposure sites. All 24 exposure sites were examined and no definite etching was observed.

  11. Laser welding of plastics: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Peter A.

    1995-10-01

    The process of laser welding of plastics is studied theoretically and experimentally. Welding of cylindrical parts made from polycarbonate and polypropylene is presented as examples. A good correspondence between theoretical and experimental results is found. Some practical aspects of laser welding of plastics are given.

  12. Effects of pulsed CO2 laser in caries selective ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colojoara, Carmen; David, Ion; Marinovici, Mariana

    1995-03-01

    We have evaluated the effect of pulsed carbon dioxide laser in the treatment for deep carious decay. The so called `caries profonda' is still a problem for conservative dentistry. A `Valvfivre' Master 20S carbon dioxide laser was pulsed to determine the effects on dentine and for testing the properties of softened dentine in selective ablation. Laser treatment parameters were from 1 to 2 W, 50 to 150 ms, 200 to 320 Hz. Fifteen human teeth samples were exposed to irradiation: extracted third molar were exposed to CO2 pulsed laser to determine in vitro the effects on pulp morphology. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by means of scanning electron microscopy for evidence of thermal damage. Next, we have evaluated the morphologic changes in vivo on 10 cases in patients with deep carious decay. Pulsed infrared lasers are capable of inducing physical and chemical changes in dentine structure. The results showed an artificially sclerosing and micro-hardness on the remaining dentine. CO2 laser can vaporized carious dentine.

  13. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  14. Electromagnetically driven closed-circle-type CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1983-11-01

    The electromagnetic induction produced by either a permanent magnet or an electromagnet is used, in place of a mechanical blower, to drive the gas mixtures in a closed cycle CO2 laser tube. A gas flow velocity of up to 0.8 m/sec has been obtained through the application of a magnetic field of 1.67 kG externally to a discharge current of 40 mA, at a steady gas pressure of 10 Torr. For the case of a gas mixture ratio CO2:N2:He of 2:1:7, a laser output is obtained which is larger than that for the stationary gas case by a factor of 3, for up to 1 hr of continuous operation.

  15. Pulse Compression Of An FM Chirped CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, D. M.; Halmos, M. J.; Duvall, R. L.

    1989-12-01

    FM chirp/pulse compression has long been used in conventional radar systems [1]. The main advantages of such a technique are: 1. Efficient use of the average power available at the transmitter. 2. Increased system accuracy, both in range and velocity measurements. 3. Reduction of jamming vulnerability. We have explored the use of this technique for laser radar systems and in this paper describe an electro-optically FM modulated CO2 waveguide with post detection pulse compression by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) com-pression filter. The CO2 laser has been FM chirp modulated by a CdTe intracavity modulator. A frequency deviation of 95 MHz in 2.1 psec was attained in this fashion. Following heterodyne detection, the chirped pulse was compressed to 15 nsec using a SAW compression filter. This corresponded to a compression factor of 130. The suppression of unwanted sidelobes with a weighting filter was also demonstrated.

  16. Laryngeal Compensation for Voice Production After CO2 Laser Cordectomy

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Zakaria; Hosny, Sameh Mohammad; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser cordectomy is considered one of the modalities of choice for treatment of early glottic carcinoma. In addition to its comparable oncological results with radiotherapy and open surgical procedures, it preserves of laryngeal functions including voice production. The aim of this study was to detect how the larynx compensates for voice production after different types of CO2 laser cordectomy for early glottic carcinoma together with assessment of the vocal outcome in each compensation mechanism. Methods One hundred twelve patients treated with CO2 laser cordectomy were classified according to their main postoperative phonatory site. Perceptual analysis of voice samples using GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain) scale was done for 88 patients after exclusion of the voice samples of all female patients to make the study population homogenous and the samples of 18 male patients due to bad quality (4 patients) or unavailability (14 patients) of their voice samples and the results were compared with those obtained from control group that included 25 age-matched euphonic male subjects. Results Five types of laryngeal compensation were defined including: vocal fold to vocal fold, vocal fold to vocal neofold, vocal fold to vestibular fold, vestibular fold, to vestibular fold, and arytenoids hyper adduction. Characters changes of voice produced by each compensation type were found to be statistically significant except for breathiness, asthenia and strain changes in vocal fold to vocal fold compensation type. Conclusion The larynx can compensate for voice production after CO2 laser cordectomy by five different compensation mechanisms with none of them producing voice quality comparable with that of controls. PMID:26622962

  17. CO2 Laser Radiation Transmission Through Curved Hollow Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Jacob; Gannot, Israel; Morhaim, Orna; Mendlovic, David; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1989-07-01

    Hollow plastic fibers were produced by depositing metallic and dielectric films on the internal surface of plastic tubes. These fibers can transmit high CO2 laser energy with low atten-uation even in curved trajectories. A mathematical model was developed to describe the energy transmission. The energy distribution at the outlet of the fiber was measured and found to be influenced by the existence of whispering gallery mode. These fibers are suitable for surgical uses.

  18. Transmission laser welding of plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Paul A.; Jones, I. A.; Kennish, Y.

    2003-03-01

    The use of lasers for welding plastics was demonstrated in the early 1970s. However, it was not until late in the 1990s that production applications started to be considered widely. This followed the broad realization that by selection of a suitable combination of radiation wavelength and plastics additives, to control light transmission and absorption, heat could be generated at the joint of a pre-assembled part without melting its outer surfaces. It is of added benefit that the window of transmission for an unpigmented and unfilled plastic typically covers the wavelengths delivered by small and cost effective diode lasers. Recent developments in the transmission laser welding process for plastics are discussed, including methods for the generation of welds between two clear plastics, application of similar techniques to the joining of thermoplastic textiles and new equipment, able to heat a complete joint and assist in the sealing of assemblies where the joint surfaces are not particuarly smooth. An analytical heat flow model for the welding of clear plastics is shown in use for selecting process parameters.

  19. Development of technique for laser welding of biological tissues using laser welding device and nanocomposite solder.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, A; Ichcitidze, L; Podgaetsky, V; Ryabkin, D; Pyankov, E; Saveliev, M; Selishchev, S

    2015-08-01

    The laser device for welding of biological tissues has been developed involving quality control and temperature stabilization of weld seam. Laser nanocomposite solder applied onto a wound to be weld has been used. Physicochemical properties of the nanocomposite solder have been elucidated. The nature of the tissue-organizing nanoscaffold has been analyzed at the site of biotissue welding. PMID:26738200

  20. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  1. Sensory neuron response to emission from a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorobets, V. A.; Petukhov, V. O.; Yachnev, I. L.; Penniyainen, V. A.; Lopatina, E. V.; Podzorova, S. A.; Krylov, B. V.

    2010-07-01

    We have built a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser meeting the requirements for low-intensity laser therapy. At λ = 10.57 μm and 9.24 μm, we observe a physiological effect detectable from the change in the extent of neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. This makes it possible to study molecular mechanisms for interaction of low-intensity radiation with tissues in a living body. The ATP molecule is considered as the specific molecular target for the action of the radiation.

  2. CO2 laser irradiation on vertical root fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luciana X.; Aun, Carlos E.; de Campos Ferraz, Jussara

    1997-05-01

    Vertical root fracture has been requested tooth extraction or root hemisection. There is no conservative treatment. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the CO2 laser effects on root fracture, associated with other materials. Forty two extracted human canines divided into 6 groups have their root vertically fractured. In groups A and B the CO2 laser was used with power of 5 W and 7 W respectively and the fracture line was covered with glass ionomer cement. In groups C and D the laser was used with 5 and 7 W and fracture line was covered with a dual composite. Groups E and F were controls, treated with glass ionomer cement and FLC dual composite. The teeth were placed in 5 percent methylene blue dye for 48 hs. The dye penetration was lowest in groups with glass ionomer cement and laser (A and B), at about (1.06mm). The difference between groups was statistically significant at 1 percent. All experimental groups showed dye penetration. The laser seemed to favor the sealing of the fracture line.

  3. CO2 laser on apical seal of retrofilled teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Carlos E.; Gavini, Giulio; Clasen, Naya F.; Silva Kfouri, Luciana

    1997-05-01

    The CO2 laser has been suggested for occlusion of dentinal tubuli and sterilization of the beveled root surfaces, avoiding degrees of irritants from the root canal system into periapical tissues. This study has evaluated marginal leakage in 40 human single rooted teeth divided into 4 groups of 8 teeth which received retrofillings, and 2 control groups of 4 teeth each. Group A: Super EBA; group B: Super EBA and CO2 laser irradiation; group C: Glass Ionomer Cement; group D: Glass ionomer Cement and laser; group E: positive control; group F: negative control. In groups B and D the power set was 2 watts, 20 msec, with a CT3105 ceramic point. Teeth were placed in 5 percent methylene blue dye for 24 hs and the dye penetration was lower in B. The higher penetration was seen in C. Analysis of variance found statistical difference between groups. In this study the laser irradiation was able to change the amount of dye penetration. It can be assumed that Super EBA and Glass Ionomer Cement have their sealing abilities improved by laser irradiation.

  4. Application research of CO2 laser cutting natural stone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixiu; Song, Jijiang

    2009-08-01

    Now, the processing of natural stone plates is the high performance sawing machine primarily,many researchers deeply studied the processing characters in the sawing process and the strength characters during the processing. In order to realize the profiled-processing and pattern- carving of the natural stone, It lays a solid foundation for the laser cutting and the pattern-carving technology of natural stone plate. The working principle, type and characteristics of laser cutting are briefly described. The paper selects 6 kinds stone plates of natural taken as experimental sample,the experimental sample was China Shanxi Black, Old Spain Golden Yellow, New Spain Golden Yellow, Jazz White, Maple Leaf Red, Cream White respectively. Use high power CO2 laser cutting system,the stone plates cutting experiment of 6 kinds different hardness, the best working speed are obtained,The experimental results indicate that: The laser cutting speed has no correlation with the ingredient content of stone plate.

  5. Parametric study of intersatellite CO2 laser data links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonek, E.; Lutz, H.

    The performance capability of current CO2 laser communication tecnology for intersatellite data links is evaluated. The link parameters, such as the distance, bit rate, ac signal-to-noise ratio, are related to the masses and the prime power requirements of satellite laser terminals using variables like the telescope (antenna) aperture diameter and the transmitted laser power. It is found that high data rates could be readily transmitted with telescopes of the order of only 10 cm in diameter, with the complte laser data terminals weighing between 25 kg and 70 kg and consuming prime power in the 90-300 W range. In addition, these terminals would require only about 0.1 cu m or less of volume and a very low movable antenna mass, which would alleviate constraints on satellite attitude control units in remote sensing missions.

  6. Passively cooled glass CO2 laser tubes for severe environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. E.; Johnson, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to design a glass CO2 laser tube that could survive the Titan 3 C launch environment and at the same time provide adequate thermal conductivity to maintain the wall of the laser tube below approximately equal to 50 C for efficient lasing. The approach that was taken to satisfy these requirements was to pot the tube in an aluminum heat sink using a space qualified polyurethane potting material. Two configurations of the laser tube successfully passed the complete Titan 3 C qualification level sine and random vibration specification and satisfied the thermal requirements. Fabrication details and test results are presented that indicate this could be a practical solution for laser tubes used in a severe environment and where flowing coolants are impractical or undesirable.

  7. CO2 laser drives extreme ultraviolet nano-lithography — second life of mature laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K. M.; Ohta, T.; Suganuma, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Mizoguchi, H.; Sumitani, A.; Endo, A.

    2013-12-01

    It was shown both theoretically and experimentally that nanosecond order laser pulses at 10.6 micron wavelength were superior for driving the Sn plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source for nano-lithography for the reasons of higher conversion efficiency, lower production of debris and higher average power levels obtainable in CO2 media without serious problems of beam distortions and nonlinear effects occurring in competing solid-state lasers at high intensities. The renewed interest in such pulse format, wavelength, repetition rates in excess of 50 kHz and average power levels in excess of 18 kiloWatt has sparked new opportunities for a matured multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser technology. The power demand of EUV source could be only satisfied by a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier system configuration, leading to a development of a new type of hybrid pulsed CO2 laser employing a whole spectrum of CO2 technology, such as fast flow systems and diffusion-cooled planar waveguide lasers, and relatively recent quantum cascade lasers. In this paper we review briefly the history of relevant pulsed CO2 laser technology and the requirements for multi-kiloWatt CO2 laser, intended for the laser-produced plasma EUV source, and present our recent advances, such as novel solid-state seeded master oscillator and efficient multi-pass amplifiers built on planar waveguide CO2 lasers.

  8. Evolution of a Laser Hybrid Welding Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexander F. H.; Frostevarg, Jan; Ilar, Torbjörn; Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur

    Laser arc hybrid welding combines the advantages but also the complex physical mechanisms of gas metal arc welding and laser keyhole welding. From manifold mainly experimental but also theoretical research results a map with versatile functions was initiated for the first time. The purpose is to survey the overall context and to facilitate navigation to the various phenomena that are shown through case studies accompanied by theoretical explanations and guidelines for optimization. Though not complete, the map enables systematic and graphical navigation to relevant publications. Based on a fundamental structure of the map, which was decided early, it is inherently extendable in the future by adding existing and new knowledge, also from other research groups, enabling evolution. The fundament of the map structure comprises gouge thickness, joint type and metal grade, in coherence with product and weld designers' starting points. The next hierarchy level of the map offers options in the joint type as well as in hybrid welding techniques. The latter contains techniques like double-sided welding, pulse shaping management of the arc or laser, CMT arcs, tandem arcs, or remelting of undercuts. In addition to laser-arc hybrid welding, other hybrid laser techniques like multilayer hot-wire laser welding of narrow gaps or hybrid laser friction stir welding can be taken into account. At the other end of the hierarchy, the map offers via a database-like archive electronic navigation to research results like weld macrographs, high speed imaging or numerical simulation results of the welding process.

  9. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  10. CO2 laser-driven Stirling engine. [space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.; Perry, R. L.; Carney, B.

    1978-01-01

    A 100-W Beale free-piston Stirling engine was powered remotely by a CO2 laser for long periods of time. The engine ran on both continuous-wave and pulse laser input. The working fluid was helium doped with small quantities of sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. The CO2 radiation was absorbed by the vibrational modes of the sulfur hexafluoride, which in turn transferred the energy to the helium to drive the engine. Electrical energy was obtained from a linear alternator attached to the piston of the engine. Engine pressures, volumes, and temperatures were measured to determine engine performance. It was found that the pulse radiation mode was more efficient than the continuous-wave mode. An analysis of the engine heat consumption indicated that heat losses around the cylinder and the window used to transmit the beam into the engine accounted for nearly half the energy input. The overall efficiency, that is, electrical output to laser input, was approximately 0.75%. However, this experiment was not designed for high efficiency but only to demonstrate the concept of a laser-driven engine. Based on this experiment, the engine could be modified to achieve efficiencies of perhaps 25-30%.

  11. Effect of CO2 laser amputation on hydra regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Petrocellis, L.; Finizio, Andrea; Minei, R.; Mormile, Pasquale; Pierattini, Giovanni

    1994-08-01

    In order to investigate laser effects on biological specimens, Hydra, a coelenterate with high regeneration rate, was observed for ten days during regeneration after CO2 laser cutting. Control animals were cut with a razor blade immediately below the tentacle whorl under a dissecting microscope while they were in small glass petri dishes. They regenerated tentacles completely 8 to 10 days from the cutting. Hydra were cut in the same position with CO2 laser. As a first step, we studied the effect of the laser beam on the normal behaviour of hydra. For the cutting, we used four different power intensities: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 W. At different power intensities the animals regenerated the tentacles. However in about 20% of the animals the amputation performed with 1 and 1.5 W originated a quicker regeneration of tentacles. No effect was observed on asexual reproduction of the polyps and therefore also no change of the bud index.

  12. Subsurface plasma in beam of continuous CO2-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danytsikov, Y. V.; Dymshakov, V. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Pismennyy, V. D.; Ryazanov, A. V.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments performed at the Institute of Atomic Energy established the conditions for formation of subsurface plasma in substances by laser radiation and its characteristics. A quasi-continuous CO2 laser emitting square pulses of 0.1 to 1.0 ms duration and 1 to 10 kW power as well as a continuous CO2 laser served as radiation sources. Radiation was focused on spots 0.1 to 0.5 mm in diameter and maintained at levels ensuring constant power density during the interaction time, while the temperature of the target surface was measured continuously. Metals, graphite and dielectric materials were tested with laser action taking place in air N2 + O2 mixtures, Ar or He atmosphere under pressures of 0.01 to 1.0 atm. Data on radiation intensity thresholds for evaporation and plasma formation were obtained. On the basis of these thresholds, combined with data on energy balance and the temperature profile in plasma layers, a universal state diagram was constructed for subsurface plasma with nonquantified surface temperature and radiation intensity coordinates.

  13. Use of CO2 laser in lingual and labial frenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotti, Renata C.; Bellini, Bruno S.; Cassitas, Nilceu P.; Baldin, Diva H. Z.; Nicola, Ester M. D.

    2000-03-01

    Ankiloglossia or frenum lingual alteration leads to important tongue dysfunction, which, besides discomfort and pain during function, is generally responsible for the difficulty to express specific phonemes. In other cases, a heavy muscular abnormal attachment of labial frenum can promote clinical changes. In such case, an eventual orthodontic therapy is indicated and aesthetic alteration is observed. In both cases, surgical removal is indicated. The surgery, for prevention purposes, must be done as soon as possible, but considering that the majority of patients are young (5 - 14 years old), difficulties during surgery are expected to occur. Correction of speech or orthodontic dysfunction in advanced ages is much more complex and difficult than in childhood. In the present work we demonstrate that the use of CO2 lasers in these cases are advantageous and simple. The laser energy causes the tissue of the frenum to open in the classic shape with no bleeding and no need for suture, reducing the risk of cross- contamination and of postoperative infection. Scarring and other complications are also minimized. A CO2 laser (continuous, 8 W, 10.6 micrometers) was used assisted with local anesthesia. The major advantage of laser is the possibility of its application in early ages, preventing further problems.

  14. Characteristics of laser beam welds of age-hardenable 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser beam welding is attractive for joining age-hardenable aluminum alloys, because its low over-all heat input results in a narrow weld heat affected zone (HAZ), where softening caused by dissolution of age precipitates occurs. In the present work, 1mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plates were welded using a 2.5 kW CO2 laser and it was experimentally proved that the width of the softened region in the laser beam weld was less than 1/7 that of a TIG weld. Moreover the hardness in the softened region of the laser beam weld was found to be almost fully recovered to the base metal hardness by applying a post-weld aging treatment at 443 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing unlike the TIG weld. These results characterize the advantage of laser beam welding in joining of the age-hardenable aluminum alloy as compared with the conventional arc welding. The hardness distributions in the HAZ were theoretically evaluated based on kinetic equations describing the dissolution of hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates and the precipitation of non-hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates during the weld thermal cycles to quantitatively prove above mentioned advantageous characteristics of laser beam welding.

  15. Techniques for laser welding polymeric devices.

    PubMed

    Jones, I A

    2003-04-01

    Recent advances in laser techniques mean that lasers are now being considered as an alternative to vibration, ultrasonic, dielectric, hot plate or hot bar welding, and adhesive bonding of plastics. The techniques required to put laser welding methods into practice are described for medical devices, tubular systems, films and synthetic fabrics. PMID:12789697

  16. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B C; Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2002-09-23

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were examined, and the effects that changes in incident power and various welding parameters had on weld geometry were investigated. In this report, the fusion zones of the laser welds are compared with those predicted from a laser keyhole weld simulation model for stainless steels (304L and 21-6-9), vanadium, and tantalum. The calculated keyhole depths for the vanadium and 304L stainless steel samples fit the experimental data to within acceptable error, demonstrating the predictive power of numerical simulation for welds in these two materials. Calculations for the tantalum and 21-6-9 stainless steel were a poorer match to the experimental values. Accuracy in materials properties proved extremely important in predicting weld behavior, as minor changes in certain properties had a significant effect on calculated keyhole depth. For each of the materials tested, the correlation between simulated and experimental keyhole depths deviated as the laser power was increased. Using the model as a simulation tool, we conclude that the optical absorptivity of the material is the most influential factor in determining the keyhole depth. Future work will be performed to further investigate these effects and to develop a better match between the model and the experimental results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and tantalum.

  17. Laser welding in a reduced gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results on the effects of reduced gravity on laser welding of stainless steel and other materials are reported. Laser welding experiments using a low power (10-18 watts) Nd-YAG laser have been performed on the NASA KC-135, which flies parabolic maneuvers to simulate reduced gravity conditions. Experiments on 0.005-0.010 inch thick stainless steel samples displayed a pronounced change in weld bead width, depth of penetration and surface ripple with changes in gravity level.

  18. The TEA CO2-Lasers with High Output Emission Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, А. V.; Jun, Yao

    2014-03-01

    TEA CO2-lasers generating short pulse radiation and operating in a pulse-periodic mode with the repetition rate up to 10 Hz have been developed. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen up to 8% in the mixture of molecular gases СО2:H2 = 500:50 at a total pressure of P = 0.6 bar enhances the peak emission power maintaining the temporary pulse shape. An output beam intensity of 12.3 MW/cm2 was obtained for the 30 ns pulse at a laser efficiency of 2.8%. In a compact TEA СО2-laser with an active medium volume of 6 cm3, a beam with an output intensity of 24 MW/cm2 at pulse duration of 70 ns was obtained.

  19. Rapid-flow combined-action industrial CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, N. A.; Zimakov, V. P.; Kosynkin, V. D.; Raizer, Iu. P.; Solovev, N. G.

    1982-08-01

    A general-purpose industrial CO2 laser intended for both CW and pulse-periodic operation and emitting pulses of a duration (up to 100 microsec) suitable for industrial applications is described. The operation derives from the method of creating a highly homogeneous glow discharge of large volume in a closed-cycle system. It involves setting up a high-power longitudinal (along the direction of the gas flow) on non-self-sustained discharge whose sole function is to provide laser pumping. The relatively low-power repetitive high-voltage pulses that ionize the gas are applied capacitatively to the discharge plasma without electrodes. The laser generates an average power of 1 kW at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz, or 1.5 kW CW. The maximum output powers are, respectively, 1.5 and 2 kW.

  20. Precise measurements of the total concentration of atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2/12CO2 isotopic ratio using a lead-salt laser diode spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Croizé, Laurence; Mondelain, Didier; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Delmotte, Marc; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a tunable diode laser spectrometer, called SIMCO (spectrometer for isotopic measurements of CO(2)), for determining the concentrations of (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2) in atmospheric air, from which the total concentration of CO(2) and the isotopic composition (expressed in delta units) delta(13)CO(2) are calculated. The two concentrations are measured using a pair of lines around 2290.1 cm(-1), by fitting a line profile model, taking into account the confinement narrowing effect to achieve a better accuracy. Using the Allan variance, we have demonstrated (for an integration time of 25 s) a precision of 0.1 ppmv for the total CO(2) concentration and of 0.3[per thousand] for delta(13)CO(2). The performances on atmospheric air have been tested during a 3 days campaign by comparing the SIMCO instrument with a gas chromatograph (GC) for the measurement of the total CO(2) concentration and with an isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (MS) for the isotopic composition. The CO(2) concentration measurements of SIMCO are in very good agreement with the GC data with a mean difference of Delta(CO(2))=0.16+/-1.20 ppmv for a comparison period of 45 h and the linearity of the concentration between the two instruments is also very good (slope of correlation: 0.9996+/-0.0003) over the range between 380 and 415 ppmv. For delta(13)CO(2), the comparison with the MS data shows a larger mean difference of Delta(delta(13)CO(2))=(-1.9+/-1.2)[per thousand], which could be partly related to small residual fluctuations of the overall SIMCO instrument response. PMID:18447517

  1. Laser plant "Iguana" for transmyocardial revascularization based on kW-level waveguide CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Vladislav Y.; Bockeria, L. A.; Berishvili, I. I.; Vasiltsov, Victor V.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Ul'yanov, Valery A.

    2001-05-01

    For many years the Institute on Laser and Information Technologies RAN has been developing a concept of high-power industrial CO2 lasers with diffusion cooling of the working medium. The paper gives a description of the laser medical system Iguana for transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMLR) as an example of various applications of high-power waveguide CO2 lasers. The clinical results of the TMLR method application in surgical treatment are presented. The methods of determination of the time, when the laser beam passes through the demarcation line between myocardium tissue and blood, are discussed.

  2. Welding of transparent polymers using femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Gian-Luca; Rung, Stefan; Hellmann, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Based on nonlinear absorption, we report on laser welding of cycloolefin copolymers without any additional absorption layer employing infrared femtosecond laser. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ultrashort laser welding of this material class, revealing a remarkable high processing speed of 20 mm/s in a single pass mode. Using a 1028 nm laser having a pulse duration of 220 fs at a repetition rate of 571 kHz leads to a welding seam width between 38 and 137 μm, depending on the applied laser average power. The welded joint is characterized by a maximum shear strength of 40 MPa. The experimental results are compared to those reported for femtosecond laser welding of PMMA and to those published for using a Thulium fiber laser.

  3. Endoscopic CO(2) Laser Horizontal Partial Laryngectomy in Larynx Carcinosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Bianchini, Chiara; Iannini, Valeria; Faita, Antonio; Bianchini, Enzo; Stomeo, Francesco; Pelucchi, Stefano; Pastore, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Carcinosarcoma is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm, with both a malignant epithelial and mesenchymal component, that rarely affects the larynx. Aim. Aim of this paper is to describe the case of a patient affected by a larynx carcinosarcoma treated by endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy with CO(2) laser and particularly discuss the histogenetic hypothesis as well as the possible treatment modalities of this rare lesion. Methods. Case report and literature review. Discussion and Conclusion. Still little is known about the biology of carcinosarcoma and there is still no consensus in the literature on the treatment of these tumors. Endoscopic horizontal partial laryngectomy could represent another treatment option in selected cases. PMID:25126435

  4. CO2 laser induced long period gratings in optical microfibers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Haifeng; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Min

    2009-11-23

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are fabricated by use of focused high frequency CO(2) laser pulses to periodically modify the transverse dimension of silica microfibers. A 20-period LPG with a 27 dB attenuation dip is realized in a microfiber with a diameter of approximately 6.3 microm. The resonant wavelength has a negative temperature coefficient and a high sensitivity to external refractive index. The microfiber LPGs may be useful in micron scale in-fiber devices and sensors. PMID:19997432

  5. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  6. Computer modeling of pulsed CO2 lasers for lidar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Smithers, Martin E.; Murty, Rom

    1991-01-01

    The experimental results will enable a comparison of the numerical code output with experimental data. This will ensure verification of the validity of the code. The measurements were made on a modified commercial CO2 laser. Results are listed as following. (1) The pulse shape and energy dependence on gas pressure were measured. (2) The intrapulse frequency chirp due to plasma and laser induced medium perturbation effects were determined. A simple numerical model showed quantitative agreement with these measurements. The pulse to pulse frequency stability was also determined. (3) The dependence was measured of the laser transverse mode stability on cavity length. A simple analysis of this dependence in terms of changes to the equivalent fresnel number and the cavity magnification was performed. (4) An analysis was made of the discharge pulse shape which enabled the low efficiency of the laser to be explained in terms of poor coupling of the electrical energy into the vibrational levels. And (5) the existing laser resonator code was changed to allow it to run on the Cray XMP under the new operating system.

  7. Hailey-Hailey disease improved by fractional CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Campuzano-García, Andres Eduardo; Torres-Alvarez, Bertha; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), also known as benign familial pemphigus, is an autosomal dominant skin condition that affects the adhesion of epidermal keratinocytes. Although the initial manifestation of flaccid vesicles on erythematous or normal skin in flexure sites frequently goes unnoticed, large, macerated, exudative plaques of superficial erosions with crusting are observed at the time of diagnosis. There is no specific treatment for HHD, and most cases are symptomatically supported. However, infrared laser ablation has been somewhat helpful. We present a case successfully treated with fractional CO2 laser showing a long-term favourable outcome and no adverse effects. Thus, this modality could be an alternative to full ablation for this condition. PMID:25602185

  8. Cold cathodes for sealed off CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U. E.; Sciacca, T. P.; Hurt, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results of a group of theoretically selected cold cathode materials are presented. These tests indicate Ag-CuO, Cu, and Pt-Cu as three new cold cathode materials for sealed-off CO2 lasers. The power output of a test laser with an Ag-CuO cathode and a gas volume of only 50 cu cm varied from 0.72 W to 1.1 W at 3000 hours and still yields 0.88 W after 8000 hours. Gas discharge tubes with Cu cathodes and a volume of 25 cu cm yield lifetimes in excess of 10,000 hours. Gas analysis results, obtained from a similar tube over a period of 3000 hours, look most promising. A Pt-Cu alloy cathode shows an extremely promising V-I characteristic over a period of 2800 hours.

  9. Inverse free electron lasers and laser wakefield acceleration driven by CO2 lasers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, W D; Andreev, N E; Babzien, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Cline, D B; Dilley, C E; Gottschalk, S C; Hooker, S M; Kusche, K P; Kuznetsov, S V; Pavlishin, I V; Pogorelsky, I V; Pogosova, A A; Steinhauer, L C; Ting, A; Yakimenko, V; Zigler, A; Zhou, F

    2006-03-15

    The staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA) experiment demonstrated staging between two laser-driven devices, high trapping efficiency of microbunches within the accelerating field and narrow energy spread during laser acceleration. These are important for practical laser-driven accelerators. STELLA used inverse free electron lasers, which were chosen primarily for convenience. Nevertheless, the STELLA approach can be applied to other laser acceleration methods, in particular, laser-driven plasma accelerators. STELLA is now conducting experiments on laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). Two novel LWFA approaches are being investigated. In the first one, called pseudo-resonant LWFA, a laser pulse enters a low-density plasma where nonlinear laser/plasma interactions cause the laser pulse shape to steepen, thereby creating strong wakefields. A witness e-beam pulse probes the wakefields. The second one, called seeded self-modulated LWFA, involves sending a seed e-beam pulse into the plasma to initiate wakefield formation. These wakefields are amplified by a laser pulse following shortly after the seed pulse. A second e-beam pulse (witness) follows the seed pulse to probe the wakefields. These LWFA experiments will also be the first ones driven by a CO(2) laser beam. PMID:16483952

  10. Laser welding and collagen crosslinks

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.; Small, W. IV; Maitland, D.J.; Heredia, N.J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.

    1997-02-20

    Strength and stability of laser-welded tissue may be influenced, in part, by effects of laser exposure on collagen crosslinking. We therefore studied effects of diode laser exposure (805 nm, 1-8 watts, 30 seconds) + indocyanine green dye (ICG) on calf tail tendon collagen crosslinks. Effect of ICG dye alone on crosslink content prior to laser exposure was investigated; unexpectedly, we found that ICG-treated tissue had significantly increased DHLNL and OHP, but not HLNL. Laser exposure after ICG application reduced elevated DHLNL and OHP crosslink content down to their native levels. The monohydroxylated crosslink HLNL was inversely correlated with laser output (p<0.01 by linear regression analysis). DHLNL content was highly correlated with content of its maturational product, OHP, suggesting that precursor-product relations are maintained. We conclude that: (1)ICG alone induces DHLNL and OHP crosslink formation; (2)subsequent laser exposure reduces the ICG-induced crosslinks down to native levels; (3)excessive diode laser exposure destroys normally occurring HLNL crosslinks.

  11. Laser welding of micro plastic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstroh, E.; Hoffmann, W.-M.

    2007-02-01

    Most welding processes for plastics do not meet the demands of micro technology and thus cannot be applied in this innovative industrial sector. One of the few techniques which are applicable in this sector is the laser transmission welding, which has distinctive advantages like low mechanical and thermal load of the joining parts. This makes the laser particularly suitable for the welding of micro plastics parts. Thereby, contour welding is a process variant of laser transmission welding enabling the welding of complex and even three-dimensional weld contours. But so far it has not yet been applied for welding plastics parts of micro scale in the industrial practice. Recent research at the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV) at the RWTH Aachen University shows the feasibility of this process to weld small and complex micro parts. Good mechanical properties can be achieved. However, it is necessary to apply measures to reduce the formation of flash. Moreover, it can be shown that there is a strong influence of some material parameters on the laser welding process so that some plastics are more suitable than others for the contour welding in micro technology.

  12. Laser spot welding of electronic micro parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, Andreas; Temme, Thorsten; Zeadan, Jeihad

    2004-10-01

    This paper deals with parameter optimization and online monitoring of laser spot welding (LSW). Using Nd:YAG laser, a wide range of experiments regarding the welding process have been carried out for both successful and failed welds. The typical failures appearing during packaging of surface mounted devices (SMDs) on flexible printed circuits (FPC) include gaps, a loss of connection between the welded components, and damage of the printed circuit boards. A flip-flop device called SO16 and lead frames as two components of widely used SMDs were packaged on FPCs in the experiments. The reproducibility of the weld quality for SO16 (FeNi) is greater than for lead frames (CuFe2P); this points out the difficulties appearing during copper or copper alloy welding. However, a correlation between the weld quality and the detected emission signals recorded during the weld process has been found for both components. The detected signals of the optical process emission for successful welds depict identical characterisics which are divided into three relevant signal phases. Changes in the signal characteristics, especially in these phases, imply information about the weld quality. While monitoring the welding processes for both components are possible, the detected signals for SO16 are less sensitive to process variations compared to those for lead frames. Based on spectral analysis, the intensity of the detected emission due to SO16 welding is slightly higher than the intensity due to lead frames welding.

  13. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2 and implications for the global CO2 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in hydrothermal/volcanic environments has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potential of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted between April 2013 and March 2014 at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t d-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t d-1; La Fossa crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in the hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at the global scale.

  14. Tunable diode laser measurements of hydrothermal/volcanic CO2, and implications for the global CO2 budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, M.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Grassa, F.; Francofonte, V.; Bergsson, B.; Ilyinskaya, E.

    2014-08-01

    Quantifying the CO2 flux sustained by low-temperature fumarolic fields in volcanic-hydrothermal environment has remained a challenge, to date. Here, we explored the potentiality of a commercial infrared tunable laser unit for quantifying such fumarolic volcanic/hydrothermal CO2 fluxes. Our field tests were conducted (between April 2013 and March 2014) at Nea Kameni (Santorini, Greece), Hekla and Krýsuvík (Iceland) and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy). At these sites, the tunable laser was used to measure the path-integrated CO2 mixing ratios along cross-sections of the fumaroles' atmospheric plumes. By using a tomographic post-processing routine, we then obtained, for each manifestation, the contour maps of CO2 mixing ratios in the plumes and, from their integration, the CO2 fluxes. The so-calculated CO2 fluxes range from low (5.7 ± 0.9 t day-1; Krýsuvík) to moderate (524 ± 108 t day-1; "La Fossa" crater, Vulcano). Overall, we suggest that the cumulative CO2 contribution from weakly degassing volcanoes in hydrothermal stage of activity may be significant at global scale.

  15. Laser welding--suitable for vascular anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, W; Gruber, G; Iversen, S; Oelert, H

    1994-12-01

    Carotid arteries of 21 piglets were transsected and reanastomosed either by laser welding (Neodym:YAG laser) or by conventional suture anastomosis. Histological specimens of the anastomoses obtained 2 to 32 days after the operation showed less foreign body reaction and intimal hyperplasia after laser welding than after suturing. There was, however, no significant difference when comparing occurrence of thrombosis, patency rate, or growth of the anastomosis in growing animals. Neither our study nor a review of the literature of laser-assisted vascular anastomosis in microvessels and large arteries up to 5 mm diameter could establish a definite clinical application for laser welding in vascular anastomosis. PMID:7534952

  16. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1984-01-01

    The RF excited 2 to 3W CW CO2 waveguide lasers with lifetimes of the order of 10(4) to 2.10(4) hours were produced. This was achieved with CO and N2 bearing gas mixtures and with internal as well as external discharge electrodes. It is noted that these tests were conducted with unstabilized lasers which drift around in their signatures. The average power output was reduced to about one half of the highest peak power output in the signature. One of the lasers, no. 1.1, still shows 60% of its original output power after it was cycled on and off every 10 minutes for more than 50,000 times. The starting voltage and driving point impedance of the RF excited gas discharge structure for different gas pressures and mixtures were measured. These data will serve as a basis for the matching and starting network optimization. The second laser body was frit and indium sealed. To our a vacuum leak between the bore and electrode holes was noted. The leak seems to be due to a defect or crack in the BeO body.

  17. Laser Micro Welding for Ribbon Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlmann, Benjamin; Gehlen, Elmar; Olowinsky, Alexander; Gillner, Arnold

    Laser ribbon bonding is a new field of application for laser micro welding in the electronics industry especially in the area of power electronics. Traditional ribbon bonding is conducted by using ultrasonic welding to create the bond between the aluminum or copper ribbon and a conductive surface. By adapting an ultrasonic ribbon bonder and equipping it with a fiber laser, a galvanometric scanner and a beam focusing and delivery system, a new technology for ribbon bonding is created. The presented work includes test results of the welding of copper ribbons with a thickness of 300 μm to DCB-substrates and the system design of the "laser bonder". For the laser welding of the ribbons spatial power modulation is being used and the effect of this approach on the welded ribbons is presented. The work concludes with advantages and limits of the technology especially concerning the applications compared to ultrasonic bonding.

  18. Facial-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis using laser nerve welding.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Sun Goo; Kim, Dae Joong

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to compare laser nerve welding to microsurgical suturing of hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HFA), and a result of immediate to delayed repair, and to evaluate the effect of laser nerve welding on HFA for reanimation of facial palsy. The first group of five rats underwent immediate HFA by microsurgical suturing and the second group of five rats by CO2 laser welding. The third group of five rats underwent delayed HFA by microsurgical suturing, and the fourth group of five rats by laser nerve welding. The fifth group of five rats served as controls, with intact hypoglossal and facial nerve. In all rats of the four different treatment groups, cholera toxin B subunit (CTb) was injected in the epineurium distal to the anastomosis site on the postoperative 6th week and in the normal hypoglossal nerve in the five rats of the control group. Neurons labeled CTb of hypoglossal nuclei were positive immunohistochemically, and the numbers were counted. In the immediate HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 751 +/- 247 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 888 +/- 60 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). There was no significant difference (P = 0.117). In the delayed HFA groups, CTb-positive neurons were 749 +/- 54 in the laser welding group (n = 5) and 590 +/- 169 in the microsurgical suturing group (n = 5). The difference was not significant (P = 0.116). There was no significant difference between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the laser welding group (P = 0.600), but there was significance between immediate and delayed anastomosis in the microsurgical suturing group (P = 0.009). Injected CTb in intact hypoglossal neurons (n = 5) were labeled 1,003 +/- 52. No dehiscence in the laser welding site of nerve anastomosis was seen at the time of re-exploration for injection of CTb in all 10 rats. This study shows that the regeneration of anastomosed hypoglossal-facial nerve was affected similarly by laser welding and microsurgical suturing

  19. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  20. Statistical modeling of laser welding of DP/TRIP steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, U.; Schleser, M.; Mokrov, O.; Ahmed, E.

    2012-02-01

    In this research work, a statistical analysis of the CO 2 laser beam welding of dual phase (DP600)/transformation induced plasticity (TRIP700) steel sheets was done using response surface methodology. The analysis considered the effect of laser power (2-2.2 kW), welding speed (40-50 mm/s) and focus position (-1 to 0 mm) on the heat input, the weld bead geometry, uniaxial tensile strength, formability limited dome height and welding operation cost. The experimental design was based on Box-Behnken design using linear and quadratic polynomial equations for predicting the mathematical models. The results indicate that the proposed models predict the responses adequately within the limits of welding parameters being used and the welding speed is the most significant parameter during the welding process.

  1. Fast spatial-resolved beam diagnostics for material processing by industrial CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinen, Dirk; Decker, Ingo; Wohlfahrt, Helmut

    1996-09-01

    Due to the increasing range of high-speed and high-accuracy applications in material processing, especially in laser beam welding and cutting, the temporal stability of the laser beam parameters becomes more and more important. In this paper a laser beam diagnostic device is presented, that allows the determination of the intensity-profiles of high- power CO2 lasers with high time-resolution. The detector of this device consists of two linear arrays of room- temperature HgCdTe-detectors, arranged perpendicularly to each other across the center of the beam. The data of the 70 detector elements is acquired simultaneously at rates up to 15 kS/sec for single shot events and several 100 kS/sec for repetitive laser pulses. Due to the use of a digital signal processor (DSP) and an especially adapted software, it is possible to analyze the fluctuations of the intensity distribution on-line. By help of a partially transmitting mirror in the beam delivery system, measurements can be performed during material processing. Therefore, the interaction of the laser beam source itself with the material processing due to beam reflection as well as influences of the industrial environment to the laser can be detected. The calculation of the local variance and mean values enables the dependence of the laser's short- and long-term stability to be investigated due to changes in the resonator alignment, the stability of the power supply, the gas composition etc., as well as to the influence of the processing. For the pulse-mode of a laser, its transient behavior like changes of the intensity distribution can be determined with high time-resolution. For the improvement of drilling processes, the calculation of further statistical functions by the DSP makes it possible to estimate the uniformity of the laser pulses on-line as well.

  2. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  3. Laser Peening Effects on Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a welding technique that uses frictional heating combined with forging pressure to produce high strength bonds. It is attractive for aerospace applications. Although residual stresses in FSW are generally lower when compared to conventional fusion welds, recent work has shown that significant tensile residual stresses can be present in the weld after fabrication. Therefore, laser shock peening was investigated as a means of moderating the tensile residual stresses produced during welding. This slide presentation reviews the effect of Laser Peening on the weld, in tensile strength, strain, surface roughness, microhardness, surface wear/friction, and fatigue crack growth rates. The study concluded that the laser peening process can result in considerable improvement to crack initiaion, propagation and mechanical properties in FSW.

  4. Factors influencing pricking pain threshold using a CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Voegelin, M R; Zoppi, M; Meucci, R; Jafrancesco, D; Bartoli, A

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the best experimental conditions in healthy subjects for the measurement of the minimal thermal energy density E1 which induced pricking pain on the volar surface of the left forearm by means of CO2 laser pulses. E1 was measured on a well-defined area, using laser pulses of different durations and constant power P. The dependence of E1 on the stimulus power P, the size A of the radiated area and the surface temperature T(e) were explored. In the first part of the study, these relations were obtained using a computer program, from the calculated spatio-temporal distribution of the skin temperature during, and following, a laser pulse which caused pricking pain. The second part studied a set of subsequent measurements carried out on a group of five healthy trained subjects and agreed only in part with the calculated data. We found that the measurement error on E(t) was less than 10% with P between 1.5 and 3 W, and A between 0.15 and 0.25 cm2, respectively. The influence of sensitization and adaptation phenomena on the measured data was also explored. We also show a rhythmic annual change of T(e) and E1. PMID:12636187

  5. Effect Of Laser CO2 Parameters In Marking Of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanafi-Benghalem, Nafissa; Benghalem, Kamel; Boudoukha, Hassina

    2008-09-01

    Currently many techniques of marking are exploited in a great number of sectors, on various materials (cardboard, textile, wood, leather, plastic, metal, ceramics and glass). The printing is done on supports of great or small dimension for all geometrical forms (plane, round, conical and ovalised). We can print colour as much than we wish. The marking technology for the identification of the glass parts knows a remarkable development carried by the new needs for the industrialists using transparent materials such as the optical, chemical, pharmaceutical sectors, the luxury and drink industries or publicity and decoration (neon signs, advertising mirrors). The objective of our work consists particularly in engraving on glass the measurement scales forming a whole of ordered graduation which the goal is to carry out reading systems of measuring apparatus about 1/10 μm of precision. We used as tool for marking the laser CO2. Our choice is justified by the flexibility of the laser, the permanent lifespan of the graduations carried out and the guarantee of the facility of reading incidentally the precision and the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. The study parameters of the laser beam are the velocity (400, 600, 800, 1000 m/s.), the power (25, 75 and 80% of 25W) and the numbers pass (one, two and three pass). The optical observations results obtained suggest that the highest and the average power used remain the favourable parameters for the quality of the graduations carried out.

  6. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  7. Nonlinear transmission of CO2 laser radiation by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorochenko, V. R.; Obraztsova, Elena D.; Rusakov, P. S.; Rybin, M. G.

    2012-10-01

    The nonlinear transmission of multilayer (~12 layers) graphene at the wavelength λ ~ 10 μm is measured for the first time. The absorption saturation intensity in graphene (~330 kW cm-2) and the ablation threshold of its outer layers (~1 MW cm-2, 0.11 J cm-2) under action of a CO2 laser pulse with a duration of 70 — 85 ns at λ = 10.55 μm are determined. The residual absorption of graphene at its partial saturation was 48 % of the initial value. This is significantly smaller than the value measured previously for samples with a close number of layers at λ = 1.55 μm (92.3 % — 93.8 %). It is shown that the ablation threshold of two graphene layers adjacent to the BaF2 substrate (after successive ablation of outer layers) exceeds 0.27 J cm-2.

  8. Cold cathodes for sealed off CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results of a group of theoretically selected cold cathode materials are presented. These tests indicate Ag-CuO, Cu and Pt-Cu as three new cold cathode materials for sealed off CO2 lasers. The power output of a test with an Ag-CuO cathode and a gas volume of only 50 cubic centimeters varied from 0.72 W to 1.1 W at 3000 hours and yields still 0.88 W after 8000 hours. Gas discharge tubes with Cu cathodes and a volume of 25 cubic centimeters yield life times in excess of 10,000 hours. Gas analysis results, obtained from a similar tube over a period of 3000 hours, look most promising. A Pt-Cu alloy cathode shows an extremely promising V-I characteristic over a period of 2800 hours.

  9. Laser-welded Dissimilar Steel-aluminum Seams for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimek, M.; Springer, A.; Kaierle, S.; Kracht, D.; Wesling, V.

    By reducing vehicle weight, a significant increase in fuel efficiency and consequently a reduction in CO 2 emissions can be achieved. Currently a high interest in the production of hybrid weld seams between steel and aluminum exists. Previous methods as laser brazing are possible only by using fluxes and additional materials. Laser welding can be used to join steel and aluminum without the use of additives. With a low penetration depth increases in tensile strength can be achieved. Recent results from laser welded overlap seams show that there is no compromise in strength by decreasing penetration depth in the aluminum.

  10. Laser tissue welding: a urological surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Poppas, D P; Scherr, D S

    1998-07-01

    Laser tissue welding has proven its efficacy in the laboratory setting when compared with more traditional modalities of tissue reapproximation. In the clinical environment, several areas including urethral reconstructive surgery have shown great promise. Several technological advancements including solder development, chromophore enhancement and temperature control have improved upon the welding process and have added more precision and reproducibility to the technique. The current potential applications for laser welding in urology are numerous. On a molecular level, growth factor supplementation has certain potential in improving upon weld site healing and wound strength. Laparoscopic surgery with its need for less cumbersome modes of tissue closure is a field that will greatly benefit from the technology of laser tissue welding. Surgical specialties outside of urology are also participating in developing the field of laser welding. In particular, cardiothoracic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, neurosurgery among others, have utilized the concept of laser tissue welding. There are many ares that have potential use for laser welding that have yet to be explored. Further investigation will likely reveal more applications for this valuable technology. PMID:9873775

  11. Study on CO2 laser weldability of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chaoyu; Lin, Chengxin; Liu, Linlin

    2011-11-01

    In this study, a cross-flow laser with maximum out power of 5kW was applied to the welding of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys (SMA). The optimal welding processing parameters of 1mm thick Fe-Mn-Si SMA were established by orthogonal experiment. With the optimal processing parameters, power 1600W, welding speed 2.2m/min, defocusing distance 0.6mm, the tensile strength of the welded joint can achieve 93.5% of the base material, and the weld undercut and reinforcement transfer smoothly on the surface of the welding seam and the cross-section of the welding seam morphology presents "X" shape. The fracture appears in the weld fusion zone, so this area is weak during the laser welding. By the metallographic observation, the weld center structure is small equated, and the region of fusion zone is thick cellular crystal that decreases the strength of the welded joint, and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) test proves that the laser welding promotes the grain refinement. The micro-hardness analysis shows that the hardness of the fusion zone is lower than the other area clearly which is also associated to the weld structure. By the fracture scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, it is found that the fracture of Fe-Mn-Si SMA shows many small dimples with the optimal parameters, and the result is accorded with the base material which belongs to plastic fracture.

  12. Study on CO2 laser weldability of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chaoyu; Lin, Chengxin; Liu, Linlin

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a cross-flow laser with maximum out power of 5kW was applied to the welding of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys (SMA). The optimal welding processing parameters of 1mm thick Fe-Mn-Si SMA were established by orthogonal experiment. With the optimal processing parameters, power 1600W, welding speed 2.2m/min, defocusing distance 0.6mm, the tensile strength of the welded joint can achieve 93.5% of the base material, and the weld undercut and reinforcement transfer smoothly on the surface of the welding seam and the cross-section of the welding seam morphology presents "X" shape. The fracture appears in the weld fusion zone, so this area is weak during the laser welding. By the metallographic observation, the weld center structure is small equated, and the region of fusion zone is thick cellular crystal that decreases the strength of the welded joint, and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) test proves that the laser welding promotes the grain refinement. The micro-hardness analysis shows that the hardness of the fusion zone is lower than the other area clearly which is also associated to the weld structure. By the fracture scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis, it is found that the fracture of Fe-Mn-Si SMA shows many small dimples with the optimal parameters, and the result is accorded with the base material which belongs to plastic fracture.

  13. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  14. Laser Welding Dissimilar Reflective Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.; Gopinathan, S.; Kahlen, F.; Speigel, L.

    1993-01-01

    This project, jointly sponsored by Rocketdyne and CSTAR, involves the development of laser joining of materials which have heretofore been impractical to bond. Of particular interest are joints between stainless steel and copper and also aluminum 6061 to aluminum 2219. CSTAR has a unique opportunity in this area since both the process and development and diagnostics are of interest to industry. Initial results using the pulse tailored laser welding technique developed in CLA for joining crack sensitive materials have proven promising for the aluminum joints based upon metallurgical and electronic microprobe analysis. A declaration of success requires additional mechanical testing. A CW technique has been applied to the stainless-copper joining with some preliminary success. These joints are of significant interest for aeronautics and rocket propulsion applications and the project is expected to continue.

  15. Laser welding dissimilar reflective alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCay, M. H.; Gopinathan, S.; Kahlen, F.; Speigel, L.

    1993-01-01

    This project, jointly sponsored by Rocketdyne and CSTAR, involves the development of laser joining of materials which have heretofore been impractical to bond. Of particular interest are joints between stainless steel and copper and also aluminum 6061 to aluminum 2219. CSTAR has a unique opportunity in this area since both the process and development and diagnostics are of interest to industry. Initial results using the pulse tailored laser welding technique developed in CLA for joining crack sensitive materials have proven promising for the aluminum joints based upon metallurgical and electronic microprobe analysis. A declaration of success requires additional mechanical testing. A CW technique has been applied to the stainless-copper joining with some preliminary success. These joints are of significant interest for aeronautics and rocket propulsion applications and the project is expected to continue.

  16. [Significance of the CO2-laser angle, oral cavity endoscopes].

    PubMed

    Gáspár, L; Bakos, R; Kásler, M

    1991-10-01

    The CO2-laser ray guided at 90 degrees to the surface creates a crater of typical "v" shape. If the guide angle of the ray deviates therefrom and the smaller the angle of incidence than 90 degrees, destruction becomes the more astymmetric, the crater takes an ever more flattened eliptical shape. The lack of tissue becomes even more superficial, thus removal of a circumscribed pathological area requires the sacrifice of more ambient healthy tissue. Consterning the possible angle of incidence of the laser ray instrumental measurements were carried out. It has been ascertained that in the pharinx third of the mouth cavity behind the plain corresponding to the premolars, as a rule, only guide angles below 50 degrees, in the middle third of the mouth cavity corresponding to the area between the front teeth and the molars guide angles between 50-70 degrees, and in the front third mostly a ray guiding below 90 degrees are possible. In the middle and rear third of the mouth cavity the ideal rey-guiding at 90 degrees can be obtained but with reflection, certain areas even cannot be treated directly, are visible but in mirrors. By transforming the hand piece of the laser apparatus endoscopes with fixed mirror and rotating mirror have been constructed. By means of the endoscope with fixed mirror already all parts of the mouth cavity have been rendered accessible while the rotating mirror model became suitable even to admit the laser ray to the surfaces at the ideal angle of incidence of 90(2). PMID:1765203

  17. Femtosecond fiber laser welding of dissimilar metals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, welding of dissimilar metals was demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, by using a high-energy high-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser. Metallurgical and mechanical properties were investigated and analyzed under various processing parameters (pulse energy, repetition rate, and welding speed). Results showed that the formation of intermetallic brittle phases and welding defects could be effectively reduced. Strong welding quality with more than 210 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-aluminum and 175 MPa tensile strength for stainless steel-magnesium has been demonstrated. A minimal heat affected zone and uniform and homogenous phase transformation in the welding region have been demonstrated. This laser-welding technique can be extended for various applications in semiconductor, automobile, aerospace, and biomedical industries. PMID:25322246

  18. Laser weld repair of tantalum sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oldani, J.J.; Westrich, C.N.

    1992-12-01

    Tantalum sheets which are used in radiographic film cassettes for high explosives studies were repaired using Nd:YAG laser welding. The tantalum sheets can receive various levels of indentations and/or scratches which can leave radiographic indications during use in subsequent studies. Laser welding using a Raytheon 400 watt Nd:YAG laser and a 0.010 inch diameter tantalum filler wire with argon cover gas was used to fill in these false indications. A successful weld repair is required to give no radiographic indications, neither high nor low density readings.

  19. Laser weld penetration estimation using temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lankalapalli, K.N.; Tu, J.F.; Leong, K.H.; Gartner, M.

    1997-10-01

    Penetration depth is an important factor critical to the quality of a laser weld. This paper examines the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the bottom surface of the work-piece to estimate weld penetration. A three-dimensional analytical model relating penetration depth, weld bead width and welding speed to temperature distribution at the bottom surface of the workpiece is developed. Temperatures on the bottom surface of the workpiece are measured using infrared thermocouples located behind the laser beam. Experimental results from bead-on-plate welds on low carbon steel plates of varying thickness at different levels of laser power and speeds validate the model and show that the temperature on the bottom surface is a sensitive indicator of penetration depth. The proposed model is computationally efficient and is suitable for on-line process monitoring application.

  20. Monitoring of catalyst performance in CO2 lasers using frequency modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Liang-Guo; Sachse, Glen

    1990-01-01

    Closed-cycle CO2 laser operation with removal of O2 and regeneration of CO2 can be achieved by catalytic CO-O2 recombination. Both parametric studies of the optimum catalyst formulation and long-term performance tests require on line monitoring of CO, O2 and CO2 concentrations. There are several existing methods for molecular oxygen detection. These methods are either intrusive (such as electrochemical method or mass spectrometry) or very expensive (such as CARS, UV laser absorption). Researchers demonstrated a high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of O2 using the two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) technique with a near infrared GaAlAs diode laser. Besides its inexpensive cost, fast response time, nonintrusive measurements and high sensitivity, this technique may also be used to differentiate between isotopes due to its high spectroscopic resolution. This frequency modulation spectroscopy technique could also be applied for the on-line monitoring of CO and CO2 using InGaAsP diode lasers operation in the 1.55 microns region and H2O in the 1.3 microns region. The existence of single mode optical fibers at the near infrared region makes it possible to combine FMS with optical fiber technology. Optical fiber FMS is particularly suitable for making point-measurements at one or more locations in the CO2 laser/catalyst system.

  1. Effect of argon on the performance of a fast-axial flow CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvani, S.; Amiri, Kh; Pazokian, H.; Montazerolghaem, M.; Mollabashi, M.; Naeimi, S. A.; Esmaeilpour, D.

    2011-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a fast-axial flow (FAF) cw CO2 laser are described. The dependences of the output power, efficiency, and discharge voltage on the discharge current of a FAF cw CO2 laser with optimised composition of the CO2:N2:He=1:4.4:7.6 gas mixture with a small amount of argon are studied experimentally at two pressures of 50 and 60 mbar in open and closed cycle regimes of the laser system.

  2. Laser beam welding shifts into high gear

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    1997-11-01

    Despite its high initial cost, laser beam welding is being recognized as the best method for many production lines. The automotive industry is becoming a bigger believer, with more lines being added every day for weld transmissions, mufflers and many other products. But the biggest market is tailor welded blanks. The welded blank is receiving attention from all sides. Several steelmakers have invested in tailor welded blank shops. The market for these blanks is no longer one only supported by CO{sub 2} lasers. The YAG laser is now very prominent. Only a few years ago, laser experts wondered what the market might be for 5 kW CO{sub 2} lasers. No one knew. But that has changed. Since then, lasers have become much more compact, and that means a great deal to the automotive industry in particular. The same space needed to house a 5-kW laser five years ago now can be employed for a 12-kW unit. The cost also has stabilized considerably. Dollars spent today for a kilowatt of laser power are about the same as they were five years ago. Compare that to the increase in the cost for the family automobile. It`s also a better laser. Thought also is being given to the replacement of the 3,000 spot welds per vehicle by another means of joining. Laser is a strong candidate, but it might take a total redesign of an automobile to allow that to happen. To take full advantage of laser beam welding, flanges probably would have to be eliminated. However, shorter lead time is needed between concept and production. Agile manufacturing is required to bring that about, and the laser is fast becoming a basic tool of agile manufacturing.

  3. Microstructure characterization of laser welded Ti-6Al-4V fusion zones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pei-quan; Li, Leijun Zhang, Chunbo

    2014-01-15

    The as-welded microstructure of laser-welded Ti-6Al-4V is characterized as a function of CO2 key-hole mode laser welding speed. Martensitic α′ is the predominant phase, with some α and retained β. Phase transformation is affected by the cooling rate through laser welding speed. A higher welding speed of 1.6 to 2.0 m/min produced more martensite α′ and less retained β in the welds. 1.4 m/min welding speed produced small amounts of α, besides the martensite α′. A trace of δ titanium hydride phase seems to have formed in the weld fusion zone. Moiré fringes are a common feature in the TEM microstructure, due to abundance of multi-phase interfaces. Tensile twins and clusters of dislocations indicate that plastic deformation has happened in the as-welded microstructure, indicating the local stress levels to be approaching the yield stress on-cooling during laser welding.

  4. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  5. Improvement of Weld Characteristics by Laser-Arc Double-Sided Welding Compared to Single Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenglong; Zhang, Kezhao; Hu, Xue; Yang, Yuhe; Chen, Yanbin; Wu, Yichao

    2015-11-01

    The single arc welding and laser-arc double-sided welding (LADSW) processes are investigated by virtue of test welds. The impacts of the laser beam during the LADSW process on the weld characteristics are studied from weld geometry, crystal morphology, and the mechanical properties of the joints. Compared with the single arc welding, the LADSW process improves the energy density and reduces the range of arc action, which together leads to a doubling of weld penetration depth. When penetrated by the laser beam, the liquid metal of the arc welding pool experiences severe fluctuations, leading to a finer grain size in the range of 17-26 μm in the LADSW weld, a reduction of nearly 63% compared to the grains in the single arc weld. The tensile strength and elongation-to-failure of the LADSW weld were increased by nearly 10 and 100% over the single arc welding, respectively.

  6. Polyethylene welding by pulsed visible laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Caridi, F.; Visco, A. M.; Campo, N.

    2011-01-01

    Laser welding of plastics is a relatively new process that induces locally a fast polymer heating. For most applications, the process involves directing a pulsed beam of visible light at the weld joint by going through one of the two parts. This is commonly referred to as “through transmission visible laser welding”. In this technique, the monochromatic visible light source uses a power ns pulsed laser in order to irradiate the joint through one part and the light is absorbed in the vicinity of the other part. In order to evaluate the mechanical resistance of the welded joint, mass quadrupole spectrometry, surface profilometry, microscopy techniques and mechanical shear tests were employed. The welding effect was investigated as a function of the laser irradiation time, nature of the polyethylene materials and temperature.

  7. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  8. Component temperature versus laser-welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Applications have arisen in which the component temperature near a laser weld is critical because of possible damage to the explosive powder adjacent to the member being welded. To evaluate the thermal excursion experienced at the powder cavity wall, a study was conducted using assemblies that had been equipped with 0.05 mm diameter thermocouple wires. The main goal of the study was to determine how changes in the laser welding parameters owuld affect the powder cavity wall temperature. The objective lens-to-work distance, pulse rate, and beam power parameters were varied. The peak temperature varied from 117/sup 0/C to 311/sup 0/C in response to welding parameter changes. The study concluded that by utilizing a selected set of welding parameters, the design requirement of a 160/sup 0/C maximum powder cavity wall temperature could easily be satisfied.

  9. Combination of laser keyhole and conduction welding: Dissimilar laser welding of niobium and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkamany, M. J.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Poursalehi, R.; Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2016-04-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of pure niobium plate to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V sheet in butt joint is studied regarding the laser/metal interaction modes. To obtain the optimized process parameters in dissimilar welding of Ti-6Al-4V/Nb, the melting ratio of laser beam energy for each weld counterpart is evaluated experimentally. Different laser welding modes of keyhole and conduction are predicted regarding the absorbed energy from the similar laser pulses on each weld counterpart. Laser keyhole and conduction welding were observed simultaneously through direct visualization of laser interaction with dissimilar metals using High Speed Imaging (HSI) system.

  10. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  11. Laser Welding Systems For Hermetic Sealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosnos, Charles M.

    1986-11-01

    High-speed laser welding systems have been developed to hermetically seal electronic packages, diaphragms, etc., for commercial, medical, and military applications. An inert atmosphere chamber is incorporated when welding must be done in a moisture-free and oxygen-free gas environment. Interface of a multi-axis positioner and computer numerical control with the laser allows programmability of all weld schedule parameters. This degree of automation minimizes process deviation, decreases the risk of human error, and accommodates dimensional tolerances and dissimilarities in part configuration.

  12. Application of YAG laser welding to gas turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuho; Mega, Masahiko; Takahashi, Koji; Uemura, Yoshitaka; Hirota, Norihide; Yamaguchi, Kengo

    2003-03-01

    An investigation to apply YAG laser welding to gas turbine components was carried out. The materials of gas turbine such as Ni base alloy are difficult to weld by conventional arc welding methods because of large heat affection. But laser welding can reduce heat input compared with conventional methods and keeps the good repeatability. The welding parameter survey was carried out to satisfy the designing requirements. The YAG laser welding under appropriate conditions enables to prevent welding defects such as HAZ cracks and improves the weld joints quality and performance. Tensile test and low cycle fatigue test were carried out. Tensile strength and fatigue life of laser weld joints are same or higher than that of conventional manual TIG weld joints. The Automatic YAG laser welding system was also developed and put into practical use.

  13. Laser Peening of Alloy 22 Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D W; Hackel, L A; Lingenfelter, A C

    2002-10-03

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of near-surface Alloy 22 metal can be propagated by yield-point levels (45 ksi) of residual weld tensile stresses. This is a serious concern for welds in the Alloy 22 canister employed in the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Waste Package, particularly in closure welds that cannot be stress relieved by conventional heat treating. This work shows that compressive shock waves, driven into a weldment by laser peening, replaces its detrimental tensile stresses of 30-80 ksi with compressive stresses of 2-25 ksi or better that retard SCC. This benefit occurs in the top 1.5 mm (or more) of the material without appreciable heating. It was also found that quenching after solution annealing and shot peening during production of Alloy 22 plate imparts compressive stresses of 35-105 ksi near the surface, a very large buffer against SCC. This means that if seam-welded hollow canisters likewise gain compressive stresses upon post-weld annealing and quenching, and if closure welds are laser peened, all surfaces of the canister would be under compression, thereby precluding SCC of the Alloy 22 canister. Laser peening may plastically deform as much as the top 10% of the metal (about 2 mm out of the 25-mm plate thickness), thereby changing the rate of general corrosion of waste package outer barrier. Long-term corrosion tests of laser peened Alloy 22 welds should be conducted. Present results show that laser peening, currently under development at LLNL using high-energy lasers, induces compressive residual stress on the near surface of the weld. This laser peening process is showing significant retardation of SCC and should be further characterized and assessed to preclude SCC in Alloy 22 canisters.

  14. Glass drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2015-03-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse and a pulse tail. The energy of the pulse tail was controlled by adjusting medium gas. Using three types of CO2 laser pulse with the same spike-pulse energy and the different pulse-tail energy, the characteristics of the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass was investigated. Higher pulse-tail energy gave deeper ablation depth. In the short laser pulse with the spike-pulse energy of 1.2 mJ, the spike pulse width of 162 ns, the pulse-tail energy of 24.6 mJ, and the pulse-tail length of 29.6 μs, 1000 shots irradiation produced the ablation depth of 988 μm. In the hole drilling of synthetic silica glass by the CO2 laser, a crack-free process was realized.

  15. Frequency-doubled CO2 lidar measurement and diode laser spectroscopy of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Itabe, T.; Strow, L. L.; Korb, C. L.; Gentry, B. M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A lidar instrument based on pulsed frequency-doubled carbon-dioxide lasers has been used at 4.88 microns for remote sensing of atmospheric carbon dioxide. A tunable-diode laser spectrometer provided the high-resolution spectroscopic data on carbon-dioxide line strength and line broadening needed for an accurate differential absorption measurement. Initial field measurements are presented, and instrument improvements necessary for accurate carbon dioxide measurement are discussed.

  16. Multi-physical Simulation of Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Rodrigo Gómez; Koch, Holger M.; Otto, Andreas

    Laser welding is a highly demanded technology for manufacturing of body parts in the automotive industry. Application of powerful multi-physical simulation models permits detailed investigation of the laser process avoiding intricate experimental setups and procedures. Features like the degree of power coupling, keyhole evolution or currents inside the melt pool can be analyzed easily. The implementation of complex physical phenomena, like multi-reflection absorption provides insight into process characteristics under selectable conditions and yields essential information concerning the driving mechanisms. The implementation of additional physical models e. g. for diffusion discloses new potential for investigating welding of dissimilar materials. In this paper we present a computational study of laser welding for different conditions. Applied to a real case model predictions show good agreement with experimental results. Initial tests including species diffusion during welding of dissimilar materials are also presented.

  17. Evaluation of catalyst for closed cycle operation of high energy pulsed CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Miller, I. M.; Wood, G.; Schryer, D. R.; Hess, R. V.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    Several catalyst materials have been tested for efficiency of converting CO and O2 to CO2 for use in a high energy CO2 laser. The composition of the gas mixtures was monitored by mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. A copper/copper oxide catalyst and a platinum/tin oxide catalyst were used for closed cycle operation of a CO2 laser (0.7 joules/pulse), operating at 10 pulses/sec.

  18. Laser cleaning of rust on ship steel using TEA CO2 pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Linda; Zhu, Haihong; Lei, Wenjuan; Cheng, Zuhai

    2009-08-01

    Ship is easy to rust because of its special working condition. Removal of the rust from the ship surface is generally required for maintaining ship. The feasibility of removing rust using pulsed laser has been confirmed by the past researches. However, the general utilized laser, e.g., pulsed Nd: YAG laser with narrow pulse duration and high peak power, suffers very low average power and throughput. TEA CO2 laser, which also has narrow pulse duration and high peak power, is expected to obtain high throughout because it is easy to obtain high average power. This paper investigated the feasibility and the efficiency of removal of rust from the ship steel using TEA CO2 pulsed laser. The results show that TEA CO2 pulsed laser can effectively clean the rust by using suitable parameters without damage the substrate. A cleaning threshold for stripping rust of power density exists. Also, the effect of the process parameters on the efficiency and performance as well as the removal mechanism were studied in this paper.

  19. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study on the corrosion of the weld zone of 3Cr steel welded joints in CO2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-ning; Zhu, Jin-yang; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The welded joints of 3Cr pipeline steel were fabricated with commercial welding wire using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique. Potentiodynamic polarization curves, linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to investigate the corrosion resistance and the growth of a corrosion film on the weld zone (WZ). The changes in electrochemical characteristics of the film were obtained through fitting of the EIS data. The results showed that the average corrosion rate of the WZ in CO2 environments first increased, then fluctuated, and finally decreased gradually. The formation of the film on the WZ was divided into three stages: dynamic adsorption, incomplete-coverage layer formation, and integral layer formation.

  20. Technology assessment of high pulse energy CO(2) lasers for remote sensing from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.; Brockman, P.; Schryer, D. R.; Miller, I. M.; Bair, C. H.; Sidney, B. D.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments and needs for research to extend the lifetime and optimize the configuration of CO2 laser systems for satellite based on remote sensing of atmospheric wind velocities and trace gases are reviewed. The CO2 laser systems for operational satellite application will require lifetimes which exceed 1 year. Progress in the development of efficient low temperature catalysts and gas mixture modifications for extending the lifetime of high pulse energy closed cycle common and rare isotope CO2 lasers and of sealed CW CO2 lasers is reviewed. Several CO2 laser configurations are under development to meet the requirements including: unstable resonators, master oscillator power amplifiers and telescopic stable resonators, using UV or E-beam preionization. Progress in the systems is reviewed and tradeoffs in the system parameters are discussed.

  1. Comparison of Ultrasonic and CO2 Laser Pretreatment Methods on Enzyme Digestibility of Corn Stover

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shuang-Qi; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Fan, Zi-Luan; Zuo, Li-Li

    2012-01-01

    To decrease the cost of bioethanol production, biomass recalcitrance needs to be overcome so that the conversion of biomass to bioethanol becomes more efficient. CO2 laser irradiation can disrupt the lignocellulosic physical structure and reduce the average size of fiber. Analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, specific surface area, and the microstructure of corn stover were used to elucidate the enhancement mechanism of the pretreatment process by CO2 laser irradiation. The present work demonstrated that the CO2 laser had potential to enhance the bioconversion efficiency of lignocellulosic waste to renewable bioethanol. The saccharification rate of the CO2 laser pretreatment was significantly higher than ultrasonic pretreatment, and reached 27.75% which was 1.34-fold of that of ultrasonic pretreatment. The results showed the impact of CO2 laser pretreatment on corn stover to be more effective than ultrasonic pretreatment. PMID:22605970

  2. CO2 laser cleaning of black deposits formed during the excimer laser etching of polyimide in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, G.; Donelon, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 laser cleaning of black debris formed during the excimer laser ablation of polyimide in air is demonstrated. The 10.6 μm CO2 laser radiation is strongly absorbed in the debris but only weakly absorbed in polyimide thus enabling the clean removal of the debris without damaging the polyimide.

  3. Laser Sounder Approach for Measuring Atmospheric CO2 from Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Allan, Graham R.; Burris, John F.; Collatz, G. James; Riris, Harris; Stephen, Mark A.; Sun, Xiao-Li; Abshire, James B.

    2004-01-01

    We report on an active remote sensing approach using an erbium fiber amplifier based transmitter for atmospheric CO2 measurements in an overtone band near 1.57 microns and initial horizontal path measurements to less than 1% precision.

  4. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in pediatric transcanal endoscopic middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Landegger, Lukas D; Cohen, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    We describe 4 pediatric patients (age 6-11 years) who underwent transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (TEES) with the assistance of a flexible fiber CO2 laser over a period of 6 months. Three of these individuals suffered from densely adherent cholesteatoma, where the laser permitted one-handed dissection while preserving endoscopic visualization by limiting bleeding. In the fourth patient, TEES ossiculoplasty was performed for a congenital stapes bar, with subsequent hearing improvement. Advantages and disadvantages of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in the setting of TEES are discussed. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser was found to expand the TEES toolkit. PMID:27240515

  5. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Li, Mao-Hui; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang; Duan, Zhu-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc. are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness, static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316 L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side. However, the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density. The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density. The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  6. A fiberoptic compatible midinfrared laser with CO2 laser-like effect: application to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Treat, M R; Trokel, S L; Andrew, J E; Nowygrod, R

    1989-12-01

    In theory, pulses of laser light in the 2-microns range should ablate tissue in a manner similar to that of the 10.6-microns CO2 laser with the added advantage of efficient transmission through flexible quartz fibers. Using 200-microseconds pulses of 2.15-microns thulium-holmium-chromium:YAG (THC:YAG) laser light, we were able to create 700-microns-diameter holes through calcific atherosclerosis in vitro. In vivo evaluation of thrombogenicity and healing was accomplished by exposing the luminal surface of rabbit aortas to the THC:YAG laser. Serial histologic examinations of laser-treated rabbit aortae revealed a time course of resolution of the lesions which was very similar to that observed with like-sized lesions created with the same amount of continuous wave CO2 energy. No significant differences in thrombogenicity nor healing response were noted. The excellent in vivo response observed is due in part to the pulsed nature of the THC:YAG laser output as well as to the efficient tissue absorption at the 2.15-microns wavelength. We feel that excellent ablative effects with minimal collateral thermal damage can be obtained through fiberoptic delivery systems by taking advantage of laser wavelengths corresponding to the infrared absorption peak of water in the 2-microns region and pulsed delivery of the laser energy. PMID:2511380

  7. Atmospheric transmission of CO2 laser radiation with application to laser Doppler systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The molecular absorption coefficients of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrous oxide are calculated at the P16, P18, P20, P22, and P24 lines of the CO2 laser for temperatures from 200 to 300 K and for pressures from 100 to 1100 mb. The temperature variation of the continuum absorption coefficient of water vapor is taken into account semi-empirically from Burch's data. The total absorption coefficient from the present calculations falls within + or - 20 percent of the results of McClatchey and Selby. The transmission loss which the CO2 pulsed laser Doppler system experiences was calculated for flight test conditions for the five P-lines. The total transmission loss is approximately 7 percent higher at the P16 line and 10 percent lower at the P24 line compared to the P20 line. Comparison of the CO2 laser with HF and DF laser transmission reveals the P2(8) line at 3.8 micrometers of the DF laser is much better from the transmission point of view for altitudes below 10 km.

  8. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  9. Advances in CO2 laser fabrication for high power fibre laser devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Keiron; Rees, Simon; Simakov, Nikita; Daniel, Jae M. O.; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. A.; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    CO2 laser processing facilitates contamination free, rapid, precise and reproducible fabrication of devices for high power fibre laser applications. We present recent progress in fibre end-face preparation and cladding surface modification techniques. We demonstrate a fine feature CO2 laser process that yields topography significantly smaller than that achieved with typical mechanical cleaving processes. We also investigate the side processing of optical fibres for the fabrication of all-glass cladding light strippers and demonstrate extremely efficient cladding mode removal. We apply both techniques to fibres with complex designs containing multiple layers of doped and un-doped silica as well as shaped and circularly symmetric structures. Finally, we discuss the challenges and approaches to working with various fibre and glass-types.

  10. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse for hard tissue drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2014-02-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that produces a short laser pulse with a circular beam and a low divergence angle. The laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 9 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, and a spark-gap switch. The laser pulse had a spike pulse width of 103 ns and a pulse tail length of 32.6 μs. The beam cross-section was circular and the full-angle beam divergence was 1.7 mrad. The laser was used to drill ivory samples without carbonization at fluences of 2.3-7.1 J/cm2. The drilling depth of the dry ivory increased with the fluence. The drilling mechanism of the dry ivory was attributed to absorption of the laser light by the ivory.