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Sample records for coal naphthas quarterly

  1. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Shuh Jeng; Keogh, R.A.; Davis, B.H.

    1992-12-31

    The amount of individual nitrogen and sulfur presented in the feed and hydrotreated Illinois {number_sign}6 naphtha were determined. The major nitrogen class in the naphtha are anilines. The major sulfur components identified are thiophenes and benzothiophenes. The aniline and quinoline is harder to remove than pyridine. The aniline and pyridine, without any carbon substituted, is the easiest one to remove in their class. The quinoline, without any carbon substituted, is approximately as hard as one carbon substituted quinoline to remove. Both Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts follow the similar pattern of the nitrogen removal at different temperatures. The sulfur compounds of the Ill. {number_sign}6 naphtha was separated to three classes, i.e. sulfides and thiols, thiophenes and benzothiophenes, for comparisons. The thiophenes was the major component of the hydrotreated naphtha at most temperatures; however, the sulfides and thiols class becomes the major component at temperatures greater than 300{degree}C.

  2. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOEpatents

    Ryan, Daniel F.

    1986-01-01

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  3. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1992-12-31

    The removal of heteroatoms from naphtha using first row unsupported metal sulfide catalysts were completed. The maxima HDS activity, normalizing to the same weight of metal, is obtained for manganese sulfide while the minimum HDS activity is obtained for nickel sulfide. Chianelli et al. (1) reported that, for the first row transition metal sulfides, chromium sulfide has the highest activity for HDS of dibenzothiophene and manganese sulfide is the least active. The catalyst activity pattern of the first row transition metal sulfide for hydrodesulfurization of naphtha and dibenzothiophene is different. The maxima HDN activity, normalizing to the same weight of metal, is obtained for chromium sulfide and the minimum HDN activity is obtained for cobalt sulfide. The effect of substituents on the conversion of nitrogen compounds from the naphtha was also determined. The HDN conversion of alkyl-substituted pyridines and anilines are dominated by electronic effects rather than substituent effects. The effect of alkyl-substitution on the conversion of quinolines is relatively insignificant.

  4. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Shuh Jeng; Keogh, R.A.; Davis, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of individual nitrogen and sulfur presented in the feed and hydrotreated Illinois [number sign]6 naphtha were determined. The major nitrogen class in the naphtha are anilines. The major sulfur components identified are thiophenes and benzothiophenes. The aniline and quinoline is harder to remove than pyridine. The aniline and pyridine, without any carbon substituted, is the easiest one to remove in their class. The quinoline, without any carbon substituted, is approximately as hard as one carbon substituted quinoline to remove. Both Co-Mo and Ni-W catalysts follow the similar pattern of the nitrogen removal at different temperatures. The sulfur compounds of the Ill. [number sign]6 naphtha was separated to three classes, i.e. sulfides and thiols, thiophenes and benzothiophenes, for comparisons. The thiophenes was the major component of the hydrotreated naphtha at most temperatures; however, the sulfides and thiols class becomes the major component at temperatures greater than 300[degree]C.

  5. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    The removal of heteroatoms from naphtha using first row unsupported metal sulfide catalysts were completed. The maxima HDS activity, normalizing to the same weight of metal, is obtained for manganese sulfide while the minimum HDS activity is obtained for nickel sulfide. Chianelli et al. (1) reported that, for the first row transition metal sulfides, chromium sulfide has the highest activity for HDS of dibenzothiophene and manganese sulfide is the least active. The catalyst activity pattern of the first row transition metal sulfide for hydrodesulfurization of naphtha and dibenzothiophene is different. The maxima HDN activity, normalizing to the same weight of metal, is obtained for chromium sulfide and the minimum HDN activity is obtained for cobalt sulfide. The effect of substituents on the conversion of nitrogen compounds from the naphtha was also determined. The HDN conversion of alkyl-substituted pyridines and anilines are dominated by electronic effects rather than substituent effects. The effect of alkyl-substitution on the conversion of quinolines is relatively insignificant.

  6. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, D.F.

    1986-08-12

    A process is described for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials comprising the steps of: (a) forming a slurry of finely divided solid carbonaceous material and a suitable solvent of diluent; (b) subjecting the slurry from step (a) to liquefaction at an elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of molecular hydrogen to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid bottoms product; (c) separating the product from step (b) into a gas phase, a liquid phase and a normally solid phase and further separating the liquid portion of the product into a naphtha boiling range product; (d) combining from about 5 wt% to about 20 wt% of the solvent boiling range product with from about 50 wt% to about 100 wt% of the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product and passing the mixture first to a hydrotreater and then to a catalytic cracker; (e) separating the product from the catalytic cracker into a naphtha boiling range product and a solvent boiling range product; (f) combining the solvent boiling range product from the catalytic cracker with the solvent boiling range materials separated from the liquid product; and (g) hydrotreating the combined solvent boiling range streams.

  7. Quarterly coal report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.

    1996-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the third quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  8. Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Final of final technical progress report, July 1991--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this project is to remove sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen from naphtha derived from coal liquefaction. The project is concerned with the development of hydrotreating catalysts. This period, a ruthenium sulfide catalyst has been studied.

  9. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks. Coke production consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the second quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 72 tabs.

  10. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the first quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  11. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.

    1998-08-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the fourth quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information has been integrated in this report. 58 tabs.

  12. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  13. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the second quarter of 1998. 58 tabs.

  14. Quarterly coal report, April--June, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for April through June 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the first quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  15. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1998 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1992 through the third quarter of 1998. Appendix A displays, from 1992 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 58 tabs.

  16. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-02

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about US coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. This issue presents detailed quarterly data for April 1990 through June 1990, aggregated quarterly historical data for 1982 through the second quarter of 1990, and aggregated annual historical data for 1960 through 1989 and projected data for selected years from 1995 through 2010. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the United States, historical information and forecasts have been integrated in this report. 7 figs., 37 tabs.

  17. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities. This report presents detailed quarterly data for october through December 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the third quarter of 1997. Appendix A displays, from 1991 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 73 tabs.

  18. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-20

    The United States produced 242 million short tons of coal in the first quarter of 1993, a decrease of 6 percent (14 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first quarter of 1992. The decrease was due to a decline in production east of the Mississippi River. All major coal-producing States in this region had lower coal production levels led by West Virginia, which produced 5 million short tons less coal. The principal reasons for the overall drop in coal output compared to a year earlier were: A decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets; a slower rate of producer/distributor stock build-up; and a drawn-down of electric utility coal stocks. Distribution of US coal in the first quarter of 1993 was 10 million short tons lower than in the first quarter of 1992, with 5 million short tons less distributed to both electric utilities and overseas markets. The average price of coal delivered to electric utilities during the first quarter of 1993 was $28.65 per short ton, the lowest value since the first quarter of 1980. Coal consumption in the first quarter of 1993 was 230 million short tons, 4 percent higher than in the first quarter of 1992, due primarily to a 5-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Total consumer stocks, at 153 million short tons, and electric utility stocks, at 144 million short tons, were at their lowest quarterly level since the end of 1989. US. coal exports totaled 19 million short tons, 6 million short tons less than in the first quarter of 1992, and the lowest quarterly level since 1988. The decline was primarily due to a 1-million-short-ton drop in exports to each of the following destinations: Italy, France, Belgium and Luxembourg, and Canada.

  19. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the fourth quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  20. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the fourth quarter of 1993. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  1. Quarterly coal report, January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience,including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for January through March 1997 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1991 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  2. Quarterly coal report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-23

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1994 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1986 through the third quarter of 1994. Appendix A displays, from 1986 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  3. Quarterly Coal Report, April-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-18

    The Quarterly Coal Report provides comprehensive information about coal production, exports, imports, receipts, consumption, and stocks in the United States. The data presented in this report were collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (P.L. 93-275) as amended. This issue shows detailed quarterly data for April-June 1985, aggregated quarterly historical and projected data for 1980 through 1986, and aggregated annual historical and projected data for 1960 through 1995. All data for 1984 and previous years are final. All 1985 data are preliminary and subject to revision. During the first and second quarters of 1985, the US coal industry continued to return to normal operations after the threat of a strike by US coal miners in 1984. For the first 6 months of 1985 the industry showed the following developments: Coal production was only 2.4% less than in the same period of 1984, when it reached a record January-June total. Coal exports were 10.0% higher than their 1984 level for the same time period. The United States imported 52.3% more coal than it did in the first 6 months of 1984, chiefly from Colombia. Domestic coal consumption reached a record-setting level for January-June, 3.6% greater than the previous record in 1984.

  4. Review of a Proposed Quarterly Coal Publication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This Review of a Proposed Quartery Coal Publication contains findings and recommendations regarding the content of a new summary Energy Information Administration (EIA) coal and coke publication entitled The Quarterly Coal Review (QCR). It is divided into five sections: results of interviews with selected EIA data users; identification of major functions of the coal and coke industries; analysis of coal and coke data collection activities; evaluation of issues conerning data presentation including recommendations for the content of the proposed QCR; and comparison of the proposed QCR with other EIA publications. Major findings and recommendations are as follows: (1) User interviews indicate a definite need for a compehensive publication that would support analyses and examine economic, supply and demand trends in the coal industry; (2) the organization of the publication should reflect the natural order of activities of the coal and coke industries. Based on an analysis of the industries, these functions are: production, stocks, imports, exports, distribution, and consumption; (3) current EIA coal and coke surveys collect sufficient data to provide a summary of the coal and coke industries on a quarterly basis; (4) coal and coke data should be presented separately. Coke data could be presented as an appendix; (5) three geographic aggregations are recommended in the QCR. These are: US total, coal producing districts, and state; (6) coal consumption data should be consolidated into four major consumer categories: electric utilities, coke plants, other industrial, and residential commercial; (7) several EIA publications could be eliminated by the proposed QCR.

  5. Quarterly coal report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document provides comprehensive information about U.S. coal production, distribution, imports, exports, prices, and consumption. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports are also provided. This report presents compiled data for April thru June, and historical data for 1987 thru the first quarter of 1995.

  6. Quarterly coal report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-18

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended.

  7. Quarterly coal report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    In the second quarter of 1993, the United States produced 235 million short tons of coal. This brought the total for the first half of 1993 to 477 million short tons, a decrease of 4 percent (21 million short tons) from the amount produced during the first half of 1992. The decrease was due to a 26-million-short-ton decline in production east of the Mississippi River, which was partially offset by a 5-million-short-ton increase in coal production west of the Mississippi River. Compared with the first 6 months of 1992, all States east of the Mississippi River had lower coal production levels, led by West Virginia and Illinois, which produced 9 million short tons and 7 million short tons less coal, respectively. The principal reasons for the drop in coal output for the first 6 months of 1993 compared to a year earlier were: a decrease in demand for US coal in foreign markets, particularly the steam coal markets; a draw-down of electric utility coal stocks to meet the increase in demand for coal-fired electricity generation; and a lower producer/distributor stock build-up. Distribution of US coal in the first half of 1993 was 15 million short tons lower than in the first half of 1992, with 13 million short tons less distributed to overseas markets and 2 million short tons less distributed to domestic markets.

  8. Quarterly coal report July--September 1996, February 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the second quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

  9. Review of the Proposed Quarterly Coal Review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Review of the Proposed Quarterly Coal Review is the second of two reports and contains the results of our analysis of issues regarding the publication of a new summary publication, the Quarterly Coal Review. The first report on the QCR was submitted to the Office of Energy Data Operations (OEDO) in January 1981 and included results of our analysis and recommendations concerning data availability and content organization. This report concentrates on data presentation and publication format for the proposed QCR. Comprised of two sections, the report addresses chapter and table formats and presents a detailed analysis of chapter content. The first section of this report, Chapter, Table and Graph Formats, consists of findings and recommendations on the ordering, titling, end notes and cosmetics of the tables proposed for the QCR. The next section, Detailed Analysis of Chapter Content, is the result of a more in-depth analysis of chapters in the QCR.

  10. Coal Combustion Science quarterly progress report, April--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Baxter, L.L.; Fletcher, T.H.; Mitchell, R.E.

    1990-11-01

    This document provides a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Program that is being conducted at the Combustion, Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California. Coal devolatilization, coal char combustion, and fate of mineral matter during coal combustion. 56 refs., 25 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal: Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K.; Kitchell, J.P.

    1989-03-14

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ''model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix. In this quarter we obtained important results both with the development of our understanding of the enzyme reaction systems and also with the microbial work at Woods Hole. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Quarterly coal report July--September 1995, February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-16

    The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. The data presented in the QCR are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275), as amended. This report presents detailed quarterly data for July through September 1995 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1987 through the second quarter of 1995. Appendix A displays, from 1987 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data, as specified in Section 202 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Amendments Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-58). Appendix B gives selected quarterly tables converted to metric tons.

  13. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The status of coal liquefaction pilot plants supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, history and progress during the July-September 1979 quarter. Supporting projects such as test facilities, refining and upgrading coal liquids, catalyst development, and gasification of residues from coal gasification plants are discussed similarly. (LTN)

  14. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  15. Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

    1980-03-01

    This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

  16. EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-07-01

    This report is the twenty-first Quarterly Technical Progress Report for US Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-77ET10069 for EDS Coal Liquefaction Process Development Phase V. A detailed comparison of RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields has been initiated. This study builds off previous yield modeling results, which found that RCLU, CLPP, and ECLP yields were generally consistent given the scatter of the data, although some differences were noted. These pilot unit yield differences have now been quantified, and operating/configurational differences which account for some of them have been identified. Preliminary yield comparison results after correcting for these known process differences between the pilot plants indicate that: RCLU and CLPP yields are generally consistent; ECLP's conversion is about 5 lb/100 lb DAF coal lower than RCLU/CLPP at comparable operating conditions; and work has been initiated to define the EDS slurry preheater feed system design (based on slurry distributor manifold guidelines and coking correlation predictions, which influence furnace pass control issues such as slurry flow measurement). EDS hydrotreated naphtha showed a low level of systemic toxicity to rats exposed to the vapor six hours per day, five days per week for thirteen weeks.

  17. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The status of two coal liquefaction demonstration plants and of four coal gasification demonstration plants is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, contract number, funding, process name, process description, flowsheet, schedule, history and progress during the July-September quarter, 1979. Supporting projects in coal feeding systems, valves, grinding equipment, instrumentation, process control and water treatment are discussed in a similar way. Conceptual design work on commercial plants for coal to methanol and for a HYGAS high BTU gas plant were continued. (LTN)

  18. Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Baxter, L.L.; Davis, K.A.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1995-09-01

    This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California. The information reported is for the period July-September 1994. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Combustion Science Project.

  19. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, July-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    The status of 18 coal gasification pilot plants or supporting projects supported by US DOE is reviewed under the following headings: company involved, location, contract number, funding, gasification process, history, process description, flowsheet and progress in the July-September 1979 quarter. (LTN)

  20. Quarterly coal report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This report provides information about U.S. coal production, distribution; exports, imports, prices, consumption, and stocks. Data on coke production is also provided. This report presents data for April 1996 thru June 1996.

  1. Coal combustion science. Quarterly progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.

    1994-05-01

    This document is a quarterly status report of the Coal Combustion Science Project that is being conducted at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories. The information reported is for Apr-Jun 1993. The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the PETC Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. The objective of the kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion task is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. This data base on the high temperature reactivities of chars from strategic US coals will permit identification of important fuel-specific trends and development of predictive capabilities for advanced coal combustion systems. The objective of the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion task is the establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of inorganic material during coal combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of inorganic species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition. In addition, optical diagnostic capabilities are being developed for in situ, real-time detection of inorganic vapor species and surface species during ash deposition. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    DOE's program for the conversion of coal to liquid fuels was begun by two of DOE's predecessor agencies: Office of Coal Research (OCR) in 1962, and Bureau of Mines, US Department of the Interior, in the 1930's. Current work is aimed at improved process configurations for both catalytic and non-catalytic processes to provide more attractive processing economics and lower capital investment. The advantage of coal liquefaction is that the entire range of liquid products, especially boiler fuel, distillate fuel oil, and gasoline, can be produced from coal by varying the type of process and operating conditions used in the process. Furthermore, coal-derived liquids have the potential for use as chemical feedstocks. To provide efficient and practical means of utilizing coal resources, DOE is supporting the development of several conversion processes that are currently in the pilot plant stage. DOE, together with the Electric Power Research Institue, has contracted with fourteen projects are described brieflly: funding, description, status, history, and progress in the current quarter. (LTN)

  3. Naphtha upgrading process

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Guiness, M.P.; Mitchell, K.M.; Ware, R.A.

    1987-03-03

    A method is described for upgrading a paraffinic naphtha including major amounts of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ components to produce gasoline boiling range products of improved octane number, which comprises (i) hydrocracking the naphtha over a hydrocracking catalyst comprising zeolite beta and a hydrogenation-dehydrogenation component under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure and in the presence of hydrogen and at a conversion of not more than 25 volume percent to C/sub 5-/ products. This is done to effect a partial, preferential hydrocracking of the paraffins of relatively longer chain length in the naphtha and a concurrent isomerization of n-paraffins, to form a hydrocracking effluent comprising isobutane and higher boiling materials; (ii) fractionating the hydrocracked effluent to form (i) an isobutane stream, (ii) a relatively low boiling stream having a boiling range of approximately C/sub 5/ to 200/sup 0/F. and comprising C/sub 5/ to C/sub 7/ iso-paraffins, and (iii) a relatively higher boiling stream having an initial boiling point of approximately 200/sup 0/F., and (iii) reforming the relatively high boiling point stream to form a gasoline boiling range product of improved octane rating.

  4. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE-supported

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress in US DOE-supported demonstration plants for the gasification and liquefaction of coal is reported: company, contract number, process description and flowsheet, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects involve coal feeders, lock hoppers, values, etc. for feeding coal into high pressure systems, coal grinding equipment and measuring and process control instrumentation. (LTN)

  5. Sixteenth Quarterly Report Regulation of Coal Polymer Degradation by Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Bumpus

    1998-07-31

    Three phenomena which concern coal solubilization and depolymerization were studied during this reporting period. Previous investigations have shown that lignin peroxidases mediate the oxidation of soluble coal macromolecule. Because it appears to be a substrate, soluble coal macromolecule is also an inhibitor of veratryl alcohol oxidation, a reaction that is mediated by these enzymes. The mechanism of inhibition is complex in that oxidation (as assayed by decolorization) of soluble coal macromolecule requires the presence of veratryl alcohol and veratryl alcohol oxidation occurs only after a substantial lag period during which the soluble coal macromolecule is oxidized. In a previous quarterly report we proposed a reaction mechanism by which this may occur. During the present reporting period we showed that our proposed reaction mechanism is consistent with classical enzyme kinetic theory describing enzyme activity in the presence of a potent inhibitor (i.e., an inhibitor with a very low KI ). The oxidative decolorization and depolymerization of soluble coal macromolecule was also studied. Because wood rotting fungi produce hydrogen peroxide via a variety of reactions, we studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide on soluble coal macromolecule decolorization and depolymerization. Results showed that substantial decolorization occurred only at hydrogen peroxide concentrations that are clearly non-physiological (i.e., 50 mM or greater). It was noted, however, that when grown on solid lignocellulosic substrates, wood rotting fungi, overtime, cumulatively could produce amounts of hydrogen peroxide that might cause significant oxidative degradation of soluble coal macromolecule. Thirdly, we have shown that during oxalate mediated solubilization of low rank coal, a pH increase is observed. During this reporting period we have shown that the pH of solutions containing only sodium oxalate also undergo an increase in pH, but to a lesser extent than that observed in mixtures

  6. Novel analytical approaches to coal beneficiation. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, P.R.

    1984-12-13

    In the final quarter of the second year of this grant, we have concentrated our efforts in two areas. The first involved determining the feasibility of obtaining detailed information on the functional groups present in coal extracts by NMR and ir spectrometry, and the susceptibility of the extractable molecules to air oxidation at low temperature (150/sup 0/C). The second area of study involved a detailed characterization of the absorption of carbon monoxide onto alumina-supported rhodium. This is a fairly complex model system which is being used to test the apparatus we have constructed to study Fischer-Tropsch catalysis.

  7. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion: Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1994-09-30

    Research work has concentrated on the two general tasks that were described in the original proposal. The first task concerns the development of molecular organometallic homogeneous catalysts that can be used in the hydrogenation of coal liquids. The second task concerns non-metallic organic bases which can activate dihydrogen for arene hydrogenation, and that can be used in the conversion of coal liquids. In this Quarter, the great bulk of the efforts were expended on investigating the organic base-activated reactions of dihydrogen. The authors have proven that the reagents can effect the hydrogenation of two ring and other polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons. Various strong organic bases were employed as the catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene. Several effective catalyst systems have been found for this purpose. The dependence of the reaction rates on the various factors such as temperature, hydrogen pressure, reaction time, solvents, etc. were thoroughly investigated. The substitution of dideuterium gas for dihydrogen gas in the catalytic reduction of naphthalene and anthracene has been found to provide important information concerning the simultaneous D-H exchange reactions that occur during the course of the reduction reactions. In addition, work on the development of molecular organometallic homogeneous catalysts was also done. The authors have prepared two organometallic compounds: naphthalenemolybdenum tricarbonyl and 1-methylnaphthalenemolybdenum tricarbonyl to extend the work that was begun on organometallic compounds in the last Quarter.

  8. Coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal liquefaction pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Related projects discussed are: coking and gasification of liquefaction plant residues, filtration of coal liquids and refining of coal liquids by hydrogenation. (LTN)

  9. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1992-01-30

    The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives of this quarter were: (1) continuation of microbial consortia development, (2) evaluation of the isolated organisms for decarboxylation, (3) selection of best performing culture (known cultures vs. new isolates), and (4) coal decarboxylation using activated carbon as blanks. The project began on September 12, 1990.

  10. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. [Quarterly] technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1993-06-30

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eleventh quarter, dry thermal oxidation tests were done on coal samples from the Pennsylvania State Coal Bank. As-received and oxidized coal samples were studied by ion-exchange methods to determine the carboxylate and phenolic group concentrations. Film flotation tests were done to characterize the flotability of as-received and oxidized coals. In addition, electrokinetic tests were done on different coals, to obtain information pertinent to the selection of flotation reagents. DRIFT analysis was done to characterize the structure of coals.

  11. Anaerobic processing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1992-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low-rank coals and to assess the properties of the modified coal towards coal liquefaction. The main objectives for this quarter were: (i) continuation of microbial consortia maintenance and completion of coal decarboxylation using batch reactor system, (ii) decarboxylation of model polymer, (iii) characterization of biotreated coals, and (iv) microautoclave liquefaction of the botreated coal. Progress is reported on the thermogravimetric analysis of coal biotreated in the absence of methanogens and under 5% hydrogen gas exhibits increased volatile carbon to fixed carbon ratio; that the microbial consortia developed on coal are being adapted to two different model polymers containing free carboxylic groups to examine decarboxylation ability of consortium; completion of experiments to decarboxylate two model polymers, polyacrylic acid and polymethyl methacrylate, have been completed; that the biotreated coal showed increase in THF-solubles.

  12. Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

  13. Upgrading naphthas from thermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, G.A.; Telyashev, G.G.; Kirillov, T.S.; Kalincheva, L.A.

    1987-05-01

    Designs have been developed for two types of units: for hydrogenation of secondary naphthas alone, or in a 1:3 mixture with the hydrogenated product. When processing the straight cracked naphtha, the flow plan includes a stage of preliminary hydrogenation of the most unstable hydrocarbons at 180-220/sup 0/C in order to reduce the tar formation in the first reactor. For removal of the heat of reaction, excess cold hydrogen-rich gas is fed into the reactor between the layers of catalyst.

  14. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi, Second quarterly report, [October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, J.A.

    1995-01-26

    Since our last quarterly report our research activities have focused on characterization of coal macromolecule by P. chrysosporium in vivo in ;two different culture media and by sodium oxalate in vitro. Wood rotting fungi mediate solubilization of low rank coal by secreting oxalic acid which chelates metal ions whose chelating metal ions oxalic acid breaks these ionic bridges rendering the coal macromolecules water soluble. Thus solubization by sodium oxalate in vitro represents a biomimetic process.

  15. Multi-parameter on-line coal bulk analysis. Quarterly report, March 16--June 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vourvopoulos, G.

    1997-12-31

    An on-line coal analyzer is being developed as a joint venture between the French company SODERN which specializes in the manufacturing of neutron generators and associated electronics and the John B. Long Company which specializes in coal sampling equipment. Progress this quarter is summarized under the following topical headings: Measurement layout; Detector temperature stabilization; Raw coal library; and Determination of Btu content from elemental concentrations.

  16. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun

    1994-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that EBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During this first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer has been eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal has been confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions revealed. These reactions between the oxygen, oil, hydroperoxides, and coal are hydroperoxide formation, which is catalyzed by the coal surface and by heat, an unknown coal-hydroperoxide reaction, and oil polymerization. Additionally, diffusion phenomena must be playing a role because oil polymerization occurs, but the importance of diffusion is difficult to assess because less polymerization occurs when coal is present. The first task has been completed and we are now ready to determine the ability of linseed oil hydroperoxides to oxidize organic sulfur in EBC 108 coal.

  17. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Ninth quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johnson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.

    1995-06-01

    This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period October 1 - December 31, 1994, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

  18. Energy Information Administration quarterly coal report, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-21

    The United States produced just over 1 billion short tons of coal in 1992, 0.4 percent more than in 1991. Most of the 4-million-short-ton increase in coal production occurred west of the Mississippi River, where a record level of 408 million short tons of coal was produced. The amount of coal received by domestic consumers in 1992 totaled 887 million short tons. This was 7 million short tons more than in 1991, primarily due to increased coal demand from electric utilities. The average price of delivered coal to each sector declined by about 2 percent. Coal consumption in 1992 was 893 million short tons, only 1 percent higher than in 1991, due primarily to a 1-percent increase in consumption at electric utility plants. Consumer coal stocks at the end of 1992 were 163 million short tons, a decrease of 3 percent from the level at the end of 1991, and the lowest year-end level since 1989. US coal exports fell 6 percent from the 1991 level to 103 million short tons in 1992. Less coal was exported to markets in Europe, Asia, and South America, but coal exports to Canada increased 4 million short tons.

  19. Development of phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization. Quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dooher, J.

    1996-10-01

    Atomization tests on simulated fluids are being performed. For each sample tested, {Delta}P{sub c} is being determined as described in the last quarterly report. The results will be reported when the coal slurry testing is completed for comparative purposes. The viscoelastic properties on the simulated fluids and coal water slurries are being determined using the Adelphi Stresstech Viscometer. A discussion of viscoelastic properties and their relationship to atomization is presented.

  20. Coal precursors for carbon molecular seives. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, O.C.

    1995-09-29

    Shortly after our Quarterly Report for the period April 1, 1995 - June 30, 1995 was submitted, we completed the last two thermogravimetric-mass spectrographic (TG/MS) analyses of our samples. The results of these analyses will be included in the Final Report with the TG/MS data accumulated for the other coal samples. We then turned our attention to activating each of the coals using air activation. The results of the activation study are reported below.

  1. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Nineth quarterly report, [July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-30

    Laboratory scale studies examining biogasification of Texas lignite at various coal solids loadings have been completed. Bench scale bioreactors are currently being used to scale up the biogasification process to higher coal solids loadings (5% and 10%) Specific observations reported this quarter are that methane production was not curtailed when B-vitamin solution was not added to the biogasification medium and that aeration of Mic-1 did not sufficiently oxidize the medium to eliminate strict anaerobic bacteria including methanogens.

  2. Coal-transformation chemistry. Fourth quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Leon M.; Blain, D. A.; Handy, C. I.; Heimann, P.; Huang, C. B.; King, H. -H.; Landschulz, W.; Willis, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Pyrene, perylene, anthracene, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, naphthalene and biphenyl have been employed as electron transfer agents in the reduction of Illinois No. 6 coal with potassium in tetrahydrofuran. These electron transfer agents are about equally effective for the reduction of this coal at short reaction times (3 hours). We conclude that the anions of biphenyl and naphthalene achieve a greater degree of electron transfer to the coal molecules and that the use of these anions enhances the fragmentation reactions of the coal. Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal and Colorado subbituminous coal were reacted with potassium dissolved in a mixture of monoglyme and triglyme at -50/sup 0/C. The reduction reaction proceeded via solvated electrons rather than by an electron transfer reaction. The coals were then alkylated with methyl iodide and their solubilities in tetrahydrofuran were determined. The Illinois coal reductively alkylated via solvated electrons was considerably less soluble in tetrahydrofuran than the same coal reductively alkylated with potassium and naphthalene in tetrahydrofuran. A sample of Illinois No. 6 coal which had been reductively butylated with n-butyl-1-/sup 13/C iodide was hydrolyzed. Carbon nmr spectroscopy of the hydrolyzed coal revealed that the resonances previously assigned either to the presence of n-butyl carboxylates or to n-butyl tertiary ethers were removed. This observation provides definite evidence that only carboxylates were present in the original alkylated product. Selective alkylation of the acidic hydroxyl groups in Illinois No. 6 coal was carried out using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide as a phase transfer catalyst and iodomethane or 1-iodobutane as alkylating agent as described by Liotta. The tetrahydrofuran solubility of the product was significantly improved in a reaction where reductively butylated coal was subsequently coal was subsequently methylated using Liotta's procedure.

  3. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. 1. quarterly report for 1996, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This project consists of the following nine tasks: Machine design for coal log fabrication; Very rapid compaction of coal logs; Rapid compaction of coal logs; Fast-track experiments on coal log compaction; Coal log fabrication using hydrophobic binders; Drag reduction in large diameter hydraulic capsule pipeline; Automatic control of coal log pipeline system; Hydraulics of CLP (Coal Log Pipeline); and Coal heating system research. The purpose of the task, the work accomplished during this report period, and work proposed for the next quarter are described for each task.

  4. Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This fifth quarterly report covers the period of October through December of 1996. Results are presented of pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Kentucky No. 9 coal in shake flasks and from Indiana No. 5 coal in columns. With Kentucky coal, rates of pyrite oxidation were about 6% per day, and significant As, Co, Cd, Mn, and Ni were removed from the coal. These same five HAP precursors also were significantly removed from Indiana No. 5 coal. Additionally, test results are presented of pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Indiana No. 5 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal using high initial concentrations of ferric ions. These tests showed faster depyritization of coal than in previous tests done with low initial ferric ion concentrations. In addition, faster and more extensive removal of Cd, Co, Mn, and Ni from Indiana No. 5 coal occurred under high ferric conditions. High solution ferric ion concentration are expected in any biodepyritization process due to progressive biooxidation of pyrite to ferric sulfate. Ferric ions are probably the primary oxidant of pyrite and many of the HAP precursors in coal. Analysis of HAP precursors in Stockton Coal, used by PETC in HAP precursor combustion-mass balance test, was done and compared to PETC analytical data. The INEL slurry column reactor was operated in several shake down runs to prepare for complete HAP precursor removal-mass balance tests. Good separation of coal from ash-forming minerals was observed in these tests.

  5. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  6. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, January-March 1979. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Progress in DOE-supported coal gasification pilot plant projects is reported: company, location, contract number, funding, process description, history and progress in the current quarter. Two support projects are discussed: preparation of a technical data book and mathematical modeling of gasification reactors. (LTN)

  7. Application of the reference intensity method to coal analysis. Quarterly report, 1 January-31 March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The objective is to develop a methodology for quantitative multicomponent analysis of crystalline and amorphous components in coal using the reference intensity procedure. During this quarter reference intensity constants completed on pyrite, marcasite, mackinawite and bassanite. The asher has operated perfectly since it was installed and the first real run has proved successful. Whole coal and ashed coal materials were analyzed by x-ray diffraction and x-ray transmission. Data obtained were in good agreement with the Penn State data. 2 tabs.

  8. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction. Sixth quarterly report, 1 January 1992--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

    1992-06-28

    Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. Conversion of the autoclave apparatus to rapid heating liquefaction was carried out this quarter following redesign of the coal slurry injection system. The modified equipment and procedure was tested in a simulated liquefaction run without coal. Initial tests of slurried {minus}20 mesh coal showed too rapid settling for successful operation. Coal ground to pass 200 mesh proved suitable, and a impact grinder was put into operation to grind the material under an inert atmosphere. A batch of Illinois No. 6 coal for the, first rapid heating liquefaction tests has been prepared and stored under inert gas. The steam pretreatment of {alpha}-benzylnaphthyl ether was carried out using stainless steel and glass lined reactors. A preparative scale procedure for product separation was developed. The major components were identified and the average product distribution determined for both types of reactors. Pretreatment of {alpha}-naphthylmethyl phenyl ether was also carried out using stainless steel and glass-lined reactors. Separation and analysis of the products has been started. The major components have been identified. Analyses and identification of the components will be continued next quarter.

  9. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, H.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives. Much of the previous quarterly report was concerned mainly in the retrograde reactions occurring during the liquefaction process. This report is largely devoted to the kinetics and mechanisms of the liquefaction process itself and the influence of the liquefaction solvents.

  10. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NOx combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). During the past quarter the final program coal, from the Wyodak seam in the Powder River Basin, was acquired and distributed. Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work is underway to develop and test new sub-models. Coal characterization in the past quarter included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of the bituminous coals continued and additional data were obtained on trace element vaporization in the combustion zone. Studies of post-combustion trace element transformations, such as mercury speciation in the flue gas, were also begun in the last quarter.

  11. Catalytic effects in coal gasification. Quarterly report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Padrick, T D

    1980-11-01

    This quarterly report, for the period April through June 1980, summarizes the activities of Sandia National Laboratories' program on mineral matter effects in coal gasification. The objective is to determine the effects of mineral matter on the devolatilization of coal and on the subsequent char gasification. We have selected a basis set of Eastern bituminous coals whose mineral matter content, as determined by x-ray analysis of low-temperature ash, ranged from less than 5% to more than 20%. Chemical and physical characterization revealed that these coals had similar rank and petrographic content. Baseline thermal gravimetric experiments, in which the coals were heated from ambient to 1000/sup 0/C at 5/sup 0/C/min under nitrogen or hydrogen, have been completed. Work has been initiated to measure the composition of the gas evolved during both the devolatilization regime and the subsequent period of slower char gasification.

  12. Coal Combustion Science. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Baxter, L.L.; Davis, K.A.; Hurt, R.H.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this work is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This project consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency (IEA) Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks include: Task 1--Kinetics and mechanisms of pulverized coal char combustion; and Task 2--deposit growth and property development in coal-fired furnaces. The objective of task 1 is to characterize the combustion behavior of selected US coals under conditions relevant to industrial pulverized coal-fired furnaces. Work is being done in four areas: (a) kinetics of heterogeneous fuel particle populations; (b) char combustion kinetics at high carbon conversion; (c) the role of particle structure and the char formation process in combustion and; (d) unification of the Sandia char combustion data base. The objectives of Task 2 are to provide a self-consistent database of simultaneously measured, time-resolved, ash deposit properties in well-controlled and well-defined environments and to provide analytical expressions that relate deposit composition and structure to deposit properties of immediate relevance to PETC`s Combustion 2000 program. The task include the development and use of diagnostics to monitor, in situ and in real time, deposit properties, including information on both the structure and composition of the deposits.

  13. Coal gasification. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    In DOE's program for the conversion of coal to gaseous fuels both high-and low-Btu gasification processes are being developed. High-Btu gas can be distributed economically to consumers in the same pipeline systems now used to carry natural gas. Low-Btu gas, the cheapest of the gaseous fuels produced from coal, can be used economically only on site, either for electric power generation or by industrial and petrochemical plants. High-Btu natural gas has a heating value of 950 to 1000 Btu per standard cubic foot, is composed essentially of methane, and contains virtually no sulfur, carbon monoxide, or free hydrogen. The conversion of coal to High-Btu gas requires a chemical and physical transformation of solid coal. Coals have widely differing chemical and physical properties, depending on where they are mined, and are difficult to process. Therefore, to develop the most suitable techniques for gasifying coal, DOE, together with the American Gas Association (AGA), is sponsoring the development of several advanced conversion processes. Although the basic coal-gasification chemical reactions are the same for each process, each of the processes under development have unique characteristics. A number of the processes for converting coal to high-Btu gas have reached the pilot plant Low-Btu gas, with a heating value of up to 350 Btu per standard cubic foot, is an economical fuel for industrial use as well as for power generation in combined gas-steam turbine power cycles. Because different low-Btu gasification processes are optimum for converting different types of coal, and because of the need to provide commercially acceptable processes at the earliest possible date, DOE is sponsoring the concurrent development of several basic types of gasifiers (fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and entrained-flow).

  14. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this part of the study is to investigate the oxidation-reduction (redox) environment that favor the release of selenium from coal mine spoils. It is anticipated that the study will help answer critical questions as to the form, solubility, and mobility of selenium from the spoil site to the surrounding environment. This investigation will evaluate the conditions which favor the speciation of selenium from coal mine spoils as affected by changes in the oxidation states of selenium.

  15. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies will be conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model is developed by West Virginia University. The research to be performed by the University of Kentucky has recently been determined to be: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Acoomplishments to date are reported.

  16. Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies. Quarterly report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-16

    Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies performed at Davy McKee Corporation supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program is on schedule through the Second Quarter. It is anticipated that work will continue on schedule for the remainder of the program. During the Second Quarter, efforts were concentrated on evaluations, laboratory studies and design activities. In Task I, information on how coals perform in and around fixed-bed gasifiers was reviewed and standards and tests to evaluate the expected performance of agglomerates were developed. The economics of coal agglomeration, the preferred size of agglomerates, and possible coal upgrading methods to enhance agglomerates were examined. Two topical reports describing the findings were prepared and were issued. Approximately 200 separate wafer briquetting runs and 29 double-roll briquetting runs were performed during the period to evaluate potential binders and to investigate different briquetting variables. In Task II, the design of a Winkler coal gasification plant to replace a two-stage gasifier plant in the original Erie Mining facility design was completed, and work on the design of a Combustion Engineering entrained-flow gasification plant replacement was initiated. 24 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Coal-gasification basic research and cost studies. Quarterly report No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-16

    Two major activities or tasks are being performed. The first activity (Task I) is the development of a process or processes to produce agglomerates from coal fines suitable for use as a feed to fixed-bed gasifiers. Seven US coals are being investigated. The second activity (Task II) is a design and cost study to examine the effects of gasifier selection on overall plant costs for a commercial-scale coal gasification facility. Task I work during the Third Quarter involved laboratory experimentation and some limited cost studies. Twenty-four different materials and many material combinations were evaluated as potential binders for coal briquettes. Potential binder materials were initially prescreened in wafer briquette tests. Of the materials tested,approximately a dozen showed good promise as a suitable binder. The most promising candidates were then used to produce larger briquetts on a double-roll press. Binderless briquetting was also investigated. In addition, work was initiated during the period in developing suitable pelletizing processes for coal fines and a tour was made of commercial briquetting plants in Europe. The results to date indicate that there is a good probability that a suitable process that will result in agglomerates that will stand up in a fixed-bed gasifier will be techincally possible for each of the seven coals being studied. The econonics of these processes, however, are uncertain at this time and are being studied. Task II work during the Third Quarter centered on (1) completing the capital and operating cost estimates for a large coal gasification plant based on Winkler gasifiers and (2) initiating the design of a similar plant based on Molten Salt gasifiers. Capital and operating costs for the Molten Salt gasification plant and for a fixed-bed gasification plant incorporating agglomeration facilities will be developed during the next Quarter.

  18. Aliphatic components of coal. Quarterly report, March-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Deno, N.C.; Cannon, C.; Curry, K.; Jones, A.D.; Potter, T.C.; Rakitsky, W.G.; Wagner, K.; Yevak, R.

    1980-06-01

    Liquefaction of coal involves thermolysis of benzyl-oxygen and/or benzyl-benzyl bonds as the first step in the depolymerization. This view derives from NMR studies, studies with model compounds, and oxidative degradations with Na/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and CF/sub 3/CO/sub 3/H/sub 2/. The best method for determining the amount of arylmethyl groups in coals is from the yield of acetic acid formed in oxidative degradation with CF/sub 3/CO/sub 3/H-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The following observations and interpretations are made: a sharp increase in arylmethyl accompanies liquefaction in all five coals and in two coals studied earlier. This increase is the result of thermal cleavage to benzyl radicals and abstraction of hydrogen atoms by the benzyl radicals to form arylmethyl. All five coals give about the same percentage increase in arylmethyl after 90 mins of solvent refining, but not after 3 mins. This indicates that benzyl radicals form from more than one type of structure. Based on studies of model compounds, it is attractive to ascribe arylmethyl formation in 3 mins to cleavage of benzyl ethers and slower cleavage to bibenzyl structures. It might have been expected that the more arylmethyl, the more cleavage, and the more SRC. In fact the opposite is found. The conflict would be resolved if coal liquefaction depended more on certain critical cleavages and the conversion of a 3-dimensional polymer to a 1-dimensional polymer than on the total amount of cleavage and the extent of depolymerization. The amount of arylmethyl in the residue (3 min) is about the same as in the original coal. This indicates that arylmethyls do not play any role in liquefaction as expected. No higher homologs of acetic acid were observed indicating the absence of arylalkyls above methyl.

  19. Mild acidic pretreatment to enhance low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1996-03-01

    Research continued on low severity coal liquefaction. Research using high temperature infrared of cyclic olefins progressed well during this quarter. Several fluorinated solvents were found that provide a high temperature medium for isotetralin and its aromatic and aliphatic analogues.

  20. Advanced coal liquefaction. Quarterly Final report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This quarterly report summarizes the comprehensive characterization of the silica-modified membrane system designed for studying the conversion of model compound {number_sign}9, 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, at 400 {degrees}C. The conversion of compound {number_sign}9 through the tubular and porous surface of the membrane was determined. No reaction was observed for compound {number_sign}9 through the tubular surface at 400 {degrees}C and 200 psi. About 60-70% of compound {number_sign}9 was converted through the porous surface of the silica-modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Majority of the conversion (approximately 30-45%) was resulted from the breaking of bond ``d and/or e`` to form 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)ethylbenzene (or 4-(1- naphthylmethyl)methylbenzene). Minor reactions products (10-20%) were obtained via breaking of bonds a and b to form bibenzyl and methyl bibenzyl. The silica-modified Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane surface appears more reactive but less specific than the carbon surface (as a catalyst) reported in the literature. The result obtained from this quarter provided the background about the reactivity of the membrane surface without packed catalysts. In the next quarter, we will concentrate on the incorporation of the catalyst to evaluate the selective removal of the reaction products by the membrane.

  1. Development program to support industrial coal gasification. Quarterly report 1

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-15

    The Development Program to Support Industrial Coal Gasification is on schedule. The efforts have centered on collecting background information and data, planning, and getting the experimental program underway. The three principal objectives in Task I-A were accomplished. The technical literature was reviewed, the coals and binders to be employed were selected, and tests and testing equipment to be used in evaluating agglomerates were developed. The entire Erie Mining facility design was reviewed and a large portion of the fluidized-bed coal gasification plant design was completed. Much of the work in Task I will be experimental. Wafer-briquette and roll-briquette screening tests will be performed. In Task II, work on the fluidized-bed gasification plant design will be completed and work on a plant design involving entrained-flow gasifiers will be initiated.

  2. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned the investigation of the desulfurization of the selectively oxidized coals using aqueous or alcoholic base mixtures. Model compound studies were initiated. Results were: Levels of desulfurization obtained in this study are at, or very close to, the 90% removal levels required for these coals to be in compliance with the Clean Air Act legislation; Up to 89.4% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal and 88.9% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and alcoholic/base reactions; Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product than the untreated sample; Substantial enhancement in the reactivity of the sulfur in the coal has been achieved by the selective oxidation pretreatment; The highest levels of desulfurization obtained so far all involve bases as additives; The water/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} combination, was superior than any of the aqueous hydroxide bases. Possible synergistic interactions between the alcohol and the base are suspected. Over 70% of the sulfur in the IBC 101 coal can be removed by performing vacuum pyrolysis on the selectively oxidized coal. Lower sulfur contents are obtained by lowing the pyrolysis pressure.

  3. Hydrothermally treated coals for pulverized coal injection. [Quarterly] technical progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.E.; Rao, P.D.; Ogunsola, O.; Lin, H.K.

    1995-04-01

    This project is investigating the suitability of hydrothermally dried low-rank coals for pulverized fuel injection into blast furnaces in order to reduce coke consumption. Coal samples from the Beluga coal field and the Usibelli Coal Mine, Alaska, are being used for the study. Crushed coal samples were hydrothermally treated at three temperatures, 275, 300 and 325{degrees}C, for residence times ranging from 10 to 120 minutes. Products are being characterized to determine their suitability for pulverized coal injection. Characterization includes proximate and ultimate analyses, vitrinite reflectance and TGA reactivity. A literature survey is being conducted.

  4. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    The catalysis of hydrogen transfer from tetralin to coal has been investigated in a tubing bomb and in an autoclave, in the absence of added hydrogen gas. On the basis of naphthalene production in tubing bomb experiments, many metals apparently increase hydrogen transfer from tetralin. Blank experiments with powdered catalyst but no coal indicate that only stannous chloride and ammonium heptamolybdate have a large effect. In the case of the molybdenum catalyst, even this effect is suspect, because blank runs with molybdate dispersed on an alumina carrier (itself non-catalytic) result in greatly increased dissociation of tetralin to naphthalene and gaseous hydrogen. Coal acts as a high-area carrier for impregnated catalyst. Thermodynamic considerations of tetralin dissociation are helpful in understanding significant differences between tubing bomb and autoclave results. When the gas:liquid volume ratio is relatively high, as in a tubing bomb, tetralin dissociation will be relatively small and equilibrium hydrogen pressure relatively high. The reverse may be true in an autoclave. Both factors lead to the expectation of higher coal conversion in a tubing bomb, in agreement with experiment.

  5. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 12, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1992-08-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed editing of the fifth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office; and prepared two technical papers for conferences.

  6. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 10, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1991-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport fuels; completed editing of the first three quarterly reports and sent them to the publishing office; presented the project results at the Annual Contractors` Conference.

  7. Research needs and data acquisition to apply US technology to foreign coals: Quarterly report, November 1987-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Viking Systems International (VSI) has been providing technical assistance to the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) in the development of an international database on coal resources, coal characteristics and coal conversion technologies in the countries of Asia and the Pacific Basin. In Phase I of the project, databases were developed on coal characteristics, coal resources and electric utilities. During this quarter, US coals were compared with coals from countries of Asia and Pacific Basin. The purpose of this comparison is to highlight similarities or differences between US and foreign coals, which will enable one to determine the applicability of foreign coals to US developed coal technologies and identification of potential areas for technology transfer and US products and services for export. 2 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. [Basic properties of coals and other solids]. Ninth quarterly report, [February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This quarter, research was performed included: (1) Heats of Reaction of Demineralized Wyodak Coal with Seven Strong Acids; and (2) Heats of Immersion of North Dakota Lignite in Eleven Acids. Data are tabulated for: (1) Heats of immersion of untreated and demineralized Argonne Wyodak Coal and PVP in Various Strong Acids at 25{degrees}C; and (2) Heats of Immersion of N. Dakota Lignite in Strong Acid Solutions in Acetonitrile at 25{degrees}C. Correlations are given for the Comparison of Heats of Immersion of North Dakota Lignite and Wyodak in Some Strong Acids. (VC)

  9. Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the HP roll mill grinding of coal. Quarterly technical report No. 7, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this research is the development of improved technology for the preparation of coal-water slurries that have potential for replacing fuel oil in direct combustion. This should be of major importance to the United States in its efforts to reduce dependence on imported oil and to rely more on its enormous low-cost coal resources. According to this objective, Quarterly Report No. 1 presented preliminary results on the rheological behavior of coal-water slurries prepared from Pittsburgh No. 8 coal that had been ground in a ball mill under various conditions. Quarterly Report No. 2 summarized the results of studies on the effects of solids content and water immobilization on the rheological behavior of coal-water slurries, including the role of different viscometers, such as the Haake Rotovisco RV-12 and Brookfield Synchro-Lectric LVT on the measured results. In Quarterly Report No. 3, the authors compared the rheological behavior of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal-water slurries using different sensor system. In Quarterly Report No. 4, studies on the role of the initial mixing procedure in the preparation of coal-water slurries were summarized. In Quarterly Report No. 5, the evaluation of the effect of a cationic surfactant (TMAE) and an anionic surfactant (2-TEPA) on the rheological behavior and the aggregative stability of Pittsburgh No. 8 coal-water slurries was presented. In Quarterly Report No. 6, the effect of nonionic surfactants (Triton X series) on the aggregative stability of coal-water slurries was studied by measuring the relative sedimentation volume and floc size distribution.

  10. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 17, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1993-08-01

    Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Completed modeling calculations of coal mineral matter transformations, deposition behavior, and heat transfer impacts of six test fuels; and ran pilot-scale tests of Upper Freeport feed coal, microagglomerate product, and mulled product.

  11. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1992-08-28

    The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) and its demineralized derivative with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Catalyst loading will be conducted under well-controlled conditions of solution pH and ionic strength. In the last quarter, the surface charge properties of the coal was determined as a function of acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sup 3}{sup {minus}}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})concentration using the respective potassium salts of these anions. In general, low anion concentrations (10{sup {minus}3} or 10{sup {minus}2} mol/L) had little effect on the zeta potentials of the coals. However, the surface charge densities of the coal become less negative at 10-1 mol/L of the nitrate, carbonate or sulfate anions. These trends suggest that the surface charge density of the coal is controlled by the adsorption of potassium ions (K{sup +}) onto the coal particles. The net negative charge on the coal panicles creates a repulsive force between the anions and the coal surface and prevents the anions from exerting any significant effect on the coal`s electrokinetic properties.

  12. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). Accomplishments during the quarter are described on the following tasks and subtasks: Development of near-term applications (engineering development and dewatering studies); Engineering development of selective agglomeration (bench-scale testing and process scale-up); PDU and advanced column flotation module (coal selection and procurement and advanced flotation topical report); Selective agglomeration module (module operation and clean coal production with Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana 7 coals); Disposition of the PDU; and Project final report. Plans for next quarter are discussed and agglomeration results of the three tested coals are presented.

  13. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Seventh quarter report, May--July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Bielaga, B.A.

    1990-07-01

    The overall objective of this project is to sue molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. The work planned for the current quarter (May 1990 to July 1990) includes the following activities: (1) Construct a cloning vector that can be used in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 from the small cryptic plasmid found in Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 190607; (2) Develop techniques for the genetic analysis of IGTS8; (3) Continue biochemical experiments, particularly those that may allow the identification of desulfurization-related enzymes; (4) Continue experiments with coal to determine the kinetics of organic sulfur removal.

  14. Effects of surface chemistry on the porous structure of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.A.; Radovic, L.R.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    Objective is to use {sup 129}Xe NMR to study the microporous structure of coals. During this quarter, we have: performed a presaturation experiment on Wyodak subbituminous coal, monitored the progress of Xe adsorption in an anthracite, focusing on the changes observed in the external-surface adsorbed gas signal, used an echo sequence to obtain {sup 129}Xe NMR spectra of Blind Canyon hvAb coal, and improved and repeated the successive oxygen adsorption and desorption experiment on a microporous carbon.

  15. Mechanisms governing fine particulate emissions from coal flames. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1989--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.H.; Schieber, C.; Socha, R.G.; Clark, W.D.; Kramlich, J.C.

    1989-10-01

    During this reporting period the global experiments were concluded. The final activities under these experiments involved measuring mineral content of coals as a function of coal particle size. The principal activities during this quarter involved the mechanistic experiments. Three baseline coals were cleaned and two of these sized. The ash from these various cuts were sampled from a bench scale reactor. The ash size distributions were compared to distributions predicted by the breakup model.

  16. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. Fourteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1992-03-01

    The work this quarter focused on the W-band EPR of Illinois Basin Coal (IBC) samples 101 through 109, and several very high organic sulfur coals. The variation observed between the VHF-EPR spectra of different types of coal is enough to justify calling the method a fingerprint technique. When integrated EPR signals believed to be from radical thiophenic forms of sulfur are taken as a rough measure of these formsof sulfur, the thiophene-type organic sulfur appears roughly to parallel the total organic sulfur content, as expected. Careful studies of preparation techniques show that while X-band spectra are only slightlyaffected by evacuation, the W-band spectra of several coals show irreversible modification in the VHF-EPR spectra. W-band spectra of some coals show distinct dependence of lineshape on microwave power, with some spectral components saturating prior to others. It may be possible to exploit these variations to pick out subtly different thiophenic species, or distinguish different environments. Work is in progress to better investigate these effects. More radicals were prepared from organic sulfur compounds in various glasses, at catalytic surfaces, and in solution; 2,3-benzodiphenylene (DBF) oxide has been added to the growing number of new compounds, which are themselves often commercially derived from coal extracts. DBF radical has been prepared both on a catalytic surface, and in a BAG matrix. Its W-band spectra show quite different features than the thiophenic compounds studied so far.

  17. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 9, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1991-08-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the second quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: completed drop tube furnace devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; completed writing a summary topical report including all results to date on he nine fuels tested; and presented three technical papers on the project results at the 16th International Conference on Coal & Slurry Technologies.

  18. Heavy-liquid beneficiation of fine coal. First quarterly report, September 18, 1980-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jr, Douglas V.; Simmons, Frederick J.

    1980-01-01

    The Heavy Liquid Beneficiation of Fine Coal is a fundamental research program directed towards developing a basic understanding of the rheology of fine coal-heavy liquid slurries, and the application of this understanding to the development of a pilot test facility. The tasks scheduled and accomplished in the first quarter were: the selection and characterization of the coal to be used; the design, construction and testing of a dynamic viscosity cell for solid-liquid slurry systems; the selection and evaluation of candidate organic liquids and the determination whether or not one candidate liquid can be taken as representative of the class of liquids; and the ongoing evaluation of the three-dimensional slurry viscosity matrix as generated by coal size fraction, coal density fraction and slurry volume percent solid. The Canterbury Coal is acceptable for the slurry evaluation phase of this program. Freon-113 can be taken as representative of this class of organic liquid and used in the three-dimensional slurry matrix evaluation. The choice of Freon-113 over Freon-11 is a matter of experimental convenience based on the higher boiling point of Freon-113. The dynamic flow viscosity cell as currently designed is capable of generating accurate viscosity data.

  19. Characterization of available coals from Illinois mines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, I.; Harvey, R.D.; Ruch, R.R.; Chaven, C.; Damberger, H.H.; Steele, J.D.; Frankie, W.T.

    1993-09-01

    The goal of this project is to characterize marketed coals from Illinois mines. The characterization parameters that are being determined include the concentration of all trace and minor elements that are of environmental concern, proximate and ultimate compositions, the pyrite size distribution and maceral association, preliminary froth flotation cleanability, slagging and fouling characteristics relevant to the coal`s behavior in utility boilers, chlorine forms and distribution, and certain gasification and rheology parameters. During the third quarter, the trace element data base on Illinois coals was fully checked and edited. The determinations of the trace and minor element contents and proximate and ultimate compositions of the 34 project samples were largely completed. The pyritic S content, still high in some of the marketed samples, could be reduced further in the samples by advanced physical cleaning techniques. Results from the analysis of all 34 samples for Ba, Hg, Mn, and Zr indicate that these elements are primarily or partly associated with mineral matter and, therefore, their concentrations could also be reduced further in the product coals by advanced physical cleaning techniques. A sequential extraction of Cl from two of the samples revealed that regardless of the initial chlorine concentration of the two coals, the total combined amount of chlorine extracted by water, ammonia, and sodium hydroxide is about the same.

  20. LLNL Underground-Coal-Gasification Project. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.; Clements, W.

    1981-11-09

    We have continued our laboratory studies of forward gasification in small blocks of coal mounted in 55-gal drums. A steam/oxygen mixture is fed into a small hole drilled longitudinally through the center of the block, the coal is ignited near the inlet and burns toward the outlet, and the product gases come off at the outlet. Various diagnostic measurements are made during the course of the burn, and afterward the coal block is split open so that the cavity can be examined. Development work continues on our mathematical model for the small coal block experiments. Preparations for the large block experiments at a coal outcrop in the Tono Basin of Washington State have required steadily increasing effort with the approach of the scheduled starting time for the experiments (Fall 1981). Also in preparation is the deep gasification experiment, Tono 1, planned for another site in the Tono Basin after the large block experiments have been completed. Wrap-up work continues on our previous gasification experiments in Wyoming. Results of the postburn core-drilling program Hoe Creek 3 are presented here. Since 1976 the Soviets have been granted four US patents on various aspects of the underground coal gasification process. These patents are described here, and techniques of special interest are noted. Finally, we include ten abstracts of pertinent LLNL reports and papers completed during the quarter.

  1. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 11, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of three Freeport Pittsburgh 8 fuels; conducted pilot-scale combustion and ash deposition tests of a fresh batch of Upper Freeport parent coal in the CE fireside Performance Test Facility; and completed editing of the fourth quarterly report and sent it to the publishing office.

  2. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  3. Coal demonstration plants. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The objective of the US DOE demonstration program is to demonstrate and verify second-generation technologies and validate the economic, environmental and productive capacity of a near commercial-size plant by integrating and operating a modular unit using commercial size equipment. These facilities are the final stage in the RD and D process aimed at accelerating and reducing the risks of industrial process implementation. Under the DOE program, contracts for the design, construction, and operation of the demonstration plants are awarded through competitive procedures and are cost shared with the industrial partner. The conceptual design phase is funded by the government, with the detailed design, procurement, construction, and operation phases being co-funded between industry and the government. The government share of the cost involved for a demonstration plant depends on the plant size, location, and the desirability and risk of the process to be demonstrated. The various plants and programs are discussed: Description and status, funding, history, flowsheet and progress during the current quarter. (LTN)

  4. Short Contact Time Direct Coal Liquefactionn Using a Novel Batch Reactor. Quarterly Report. May 16 - August 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    He Huang; Michael T. Klein; William H. Calkins

    1996-08-30

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) for studying direct coal liquefaction at short contact times (.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times and to investigate the role of organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during coal liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved. This quarterly report discusses further kinetic studies of the liquefaction of Illinois #6 bituminous coal, Wyodak-Anderson subbituminous coal, and Pittsburgh #8 bituminous coal. The thermodynamic characteristics of the extraction stage at the start of the liquefaction process in the liquefaction of Illinois #6 coal is also discussed. Further work has also been done to attempt to clarify the role of the liquefaction solvent in the direct liquefaction process.

  5. High dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly report No. 7, February 23, 1993--May 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.

    1993-08-19

    The objectives of this project are to study the effect of pretreatment methods on the two-stage liquefaction process. In particular, the effects of dispersed catalysts and carbon monoxide atmospheres on a coal liquefaction process. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Task 1 involves the analyses of the liquefaction products derived from liquefaction experiments using the catalysts Fe(CO){sub 5} and the sulfated iron catalyst, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}SO{sub 4}. We also analyzed the products derived from treating the recycle vehicle under coal liquefaction conditions with no coal or catalyst present, and found that the toluene and THF fractions had low H/C ratios. No CO or CO{sub 2} gases were detected after reaction, although considerable amount of methane gas was produced, suggesting that during the liquefaction runs the carbon oxides are produced only from the coal, as expected, but that methane gas is produced both from the recycle solvent and the coal. We now have more information about the recycle solvent from Wilsonville, who report that the residue was 63%, composed of 45% resid and 18% insoluble inorganic (CI), and a distilable portion of 37% (1050{degrees}F). During this quarter we compared coal conversions using Fe(CO){sub 5} with CO and H{sub 2}/CO atmospheres and determined the effect of using sulfated iron (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}SO{sub 4}) as a conversion catalyst. Also, the coal liquefaction recycle vehicle was subjected to coal product distribution. We found that the Fe(CO){sub 5} under a pure hydrogen atmosphere gave better conversions than under a CO/H{sub 2} atmosphere in terms of oils and asphaltenes but was equal in terms of overall conversion into soluble fractions.

  6. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1993-10-01

    The Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. is conducted a program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects sponsored by the Department of Energy. In this program, CONSOL obtains samples from current process development activities in coal liquefaction and coal-oil coprocessing, and characterizes them using established analytical techniques. In addition, selected samples are characterized by other analytical techniques to evaluate their potential for aiding process development. These analyses and interpretation of the results in relation to process operations are provided by the subcontractor. Major topics reported in this thirteenth quarterly report are the following: (1) Analyses were performed on three coals and eleven process oils from HRI, Inc. process development unit Run 260--03, which was the first process development unit test of Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal, significant operating problems were encountered, and sample properties are discussed in context to the operational problems; (2) a summary of the status of the Participants Program is given; (3) summaries of the final reports produced by the University of Chicago, the University of Utah, Iowa State University, and the University of Kentucky under the Participants Program, are presented.

  7. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    It was reported last quarter that attempts to reduce the ash content of the Hydrocarbon Technology, Inc. (HTI) bottoms material following N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) extraction and centrifugation produced a coal-derived pitch with an ash content of 0.7 wt%. Additional processing by pressure filtration through a 0.2 {micro}m Teflon filter produced a coal-derived pitch with an ash content of 0.5 wt%. The latter result indicates that the ash-forming constituents are sub-micron in dimensions. Because the ash exhibited the color of an iron oxide, the assumption was made that the ash-forming matter is primarily iron based. Thus, a portion of the inorganics may be soluble in a dilute solution of HCI acid. To test this assumption, 200 g of the coal liquid were redissolved in 1.5 L of NMP. Table 1 compares some data of the properties of the acid-washed coal liquid with those from centrifugation alone. It is evident that the acid treatment was effective in reducing the quantity of ash significantly. In addition, because some of the lighter coal components were discarded with the supernatant liquid, the coke yield, real density, and softening point temperature all increased.

  8. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1991-07-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. During the third quarter of 1991, the following technical progress was made: Calculated the kinetic characteristics of chars from the combustion of spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued drop tube devolatilization tests of the spherical oil agglomeration beneficiated products; continued analyses of the data and samples from the CE pilot-scale tests of nine fuels; and started writing a summary topical report to include all results on the nine fuels tested.

  9. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    Six runs on the bench unit were successfully completed this quarter. The runs covered twenty five different operating conditions and yield periods, and involved 336 hours of operation. In the bench unit, increased temperature of first stage operation (410{degree}C) and direct addition of the powdered solid sodium aluminate to the feed as first stage catalyst improved both coal and carbon monoxide conversion. To achieve 90%+ overall coal conversion, temperatures of 430{degree}C+ were required in the second stage. Oil yields (pentane soluble liquid product) in excess of 65 wt % based on MAF Black Thunder coal, were achieved both with iron oxide/dimethyl disulfide and ammonium molybdate/carbon disulfide second stage catalysts. C{sub l}-C{sub 3} hydrogen gas yields were modest, generally 7-8 wt % on MAF coal, and overall hydrogen consumption (including first stage shift hydrogen) was in the order of 7-8 wt % on MAF coal. The ammonium molybdate catalyst system appeared to give slightly higher oil yields and hydrogen consumption, as was expected, but the differences may not be significant.

  10. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 14, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1993-02-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

  11. Healy clean coal project. Technical quarterly progress report no. 6, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New source Performance standards. During this past quarter, engineering and design continued on the boiler, combustion flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and turbine/generator systems. Balance of plant equipment procurement specifications continue to be prepared. Construction activities commenced as the access road construction got under way. Temporary ash pond construction and drilling of the supply well will be completed during the next quarter.

  12. Desulfurization of coal with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. [Quarterly progress report], December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, Ruozhi; Cheng, Jianjun; Shi, Feng; Gholson, K.L.; Ho, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    This project proposes a new method for removing organic sulfur from Illinois coals using readily available farm products. It proposes to use air and vegetable oils to disrupt the coal matrix, oxidize sulfur forms, increase volatiles, and desulfurize coal. This will be accomplished by impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. Moreover, the oils are environmentally safe; they will produce no noxious products and will improve burning qualities of the solid products. Preliminary experiments showed that IBC 104 coal catalyzes the formation of hydroperoxides in safflower oil and that more sulfur is extracted from the treated than untreated coal. During the first quarter the requirement of an added photosensitizer was eliminated, the catalytic effect of coal was confirmed, and the existence of a complex set of reactions was revealed. During this second quarter working with IBC-108 coal (2.3% organic S. 0.4% pyrite S), the effects of different ratios of oil:coal, different extraction solvents, and different temperatures were examined. A new pretreatment which combines alkali with linseed oil was discovered. Best organic sulfur removal is approximately 26% using alkali pretreatment combined with linseed oil at 1OO{degree}C. BTU loses can be kept to a minimum of 3% with proper use of solvents.

  13. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1993-12-31

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. During this quarter the promoter probe vectors that were constructed last quarter were found to be unstable in E. coli. Fragments of R. rhodochrous IGTS8 chromosomal DNA were cloned into pRCAT3 and pRCM1 (previously described in final ICCI report 1993). Many derivatives of pRCM1 and pRCAT3 receiving inserts that regulated the expression of chloramphenicol resistance in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 proved to be unstable in E. coli frequently yielding plasmids containing deletions. Stable inserts have been observed ranging from 100 bp to 2.0 kb that regulated expression in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. Subtractive hybridization studies continue, several candidates have been isolated and are being confirmed for inducible promoters. Primer extension analysis of the Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 16S RNA promoter region was initiated this quarter.

  14. Characterization of oxidized coal surfaces: Quarterly report, February 1988-April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hercules, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Work has progressed in the area of applying derivatization and analytical procedures developed for model compounds to oxidized coal samples. Both SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) analysis have been pursued. Data obtained with TAB (4-triethylammonium-1-chloro-2-butene) derivatization is particularly encouraging. Coal samples have been oxidized in the reactor described in previous quarterly reports. The progress of the oxidation was monitored using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. DRIFT results confirmed that changes in oxygen functionality were occurring under the conditions and in the time frame of the reactor experiments. The potential of 2-fluoro-1-methyl pyridinium (FMP) as a derivatizing reagent for alcohols was also explored. Preliminary results show it to be useful. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Advanced coal liquefaction. Final quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Coal liquid upgrading using compound No. 9, 4-(1-naphthymethyl) bibenzyl, as a model was performed in a catalytic membrane reactor in this quarter. Membrane packed with granular catalyst synthesized from Si-CVD coatedy-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used as a reactor. A control was also performed using the same reactor under a packed-bed operation mode. About 52% conversion of compound No. 9 was obtained in a packed-bed at 400{degrees}C and 200 psi. Under a similar operating condition, compound No. 9 was completely decomposed in the catalytic membrane reactor. The results offer the experimental evidence of enhanced upgrading efficiency of upgrading coal liquid using a membrane reactor. A similar study will be duplicated before the end of the contract.

  16. Co-firing high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels. Quarterly report, October - December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.-P.; Riley, J.T.; Lloyd, W.G.

    1996-12-01

    The objectives of this quarter of study on the co-firing of high sulfur coal with refuse derived fuels project were two-fold. First, the effect of S0{sub 2} on the formation of chlorine during combustion processes was examined. To simulate the conditions used in the AFBC system, experiments were conducted in a quartz tube in an electrically heated furnace. The principle analytical technique used for identification of the products from this study was GC/MS. The evolved gas was trapped by an absorbent and analyzed with a GC/MS system. The preliminary results indicate an inhibiting effect of S0{sub 2} on the Deacon Reaction. Secondly, information on the evolution of chlorine, sulfur and organic compounds from coals 95031 and 95011 were studied with the AFBC system. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Catalytic reforming of heart cut fcc naphthas

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsen, L.A.

    1985-03-01

    The anticipated lead phasedown in the USA and the growing demand for unleaded gasoline will require a higher gasoline pool octane number. One of the possibilities to achieve this increase of pool octane will be catalytic reforming of FCC naphtha. In this paper we evaluate the effects of FCC naphtha reforming on the reformer operation and gasoline pool volume for various lead phasedown scenarios. High-stability reforming catalysts, like TPR-8/CK-522 TRILOBE catalyst, will be required to maintain acceptable cycle lengths at the more severe reformer operating conditions. The properties and octane distribution of FCC naphtha are discussed, as well as its hydrotreating with high-active NiMo catalysts.

  18. Two-stage, close coupled catalytic liquefaction of coal. Fourteenth quarterly report, 1 January 1992--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, T.L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1992-04-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of the Two-Stage, Close- Coupled Catalytic Liquefaction of Coal program during the period January 1,--March 31,1992, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1988 to September 30, 1992. The overall purpose of the program is to achieve higher yields of better quality transportation and turbine fuels and to lower the capital and production costs in order to make the products from direct coal liquefaction competitive with other fossil fuel products. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Testing, PDU Activities and Administration.

  19. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal. Seventh quarterly report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-10-25

    During the seventh quarter, water pretreatment experiments were done at lower pressures (1000 psig), with early H{sub 2}O injection or continuous H{sub 2}O injection, and with demineralized coals. In addition, a set of blank experiments was done with all four coals in helium at the following conditions: 350{degrees}C; 4000 psig; 20 minutes. An additional experiment was done with the Zap lignite at atmospheric pressure. Helium was used instead of nitrogen since it can be obtained in highly pure grades. The purpose of the blank experiments is to determine how much of the water pretreatment process is a thermal and/or pressure effort. The residues from the standard water pretreatment experiments with Illinois and Pittsburgh coals were subjected to analysis by TG-FTIR, solvent extraction, solvent swelling, oxygen reactivity index and donor solvent liquefaction. The pyridine extractables were analyzed. With regard to liquefaction behavior, improvements in the yields of oils and toluene solubles are observed for selected Illinois and Pittsburgh coals at longer pretreatment times ({ge} 60 minutes).

  20. Mild pyrolysis of selectively oxidized coals. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hippo, E.J.; Palmer, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the removal organic sulfur from selectively oxidized Illinois coals using mild thermal/chemical processes. Work completed this quarter primarily concerned establishing the level of selective oxidation required for successful desulfurization in subsequent treatments. Many desulfurization reactions were performed on pretreated as well as unoxidized coal. The results obtained support the following new conclusions: (1) The extent of selective oxidation in the pretreatment step does not effect the level of desulfurization obtained by pyrolysis alone. However this factor was important in the desulfurization obtained with supercritical methanol (SCM)/base. (2) Up to 84% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal and 86% of the sulfur in the IBC 106 coal has been removed by combining selective oxidation and SCM/base reactions. (3) Most desulfurizations at 250{degree}C did not produce significant levels of desulfurization. However as the temperature was increased levels of desulfurization increased considerably. (4) Although aqueous base was successful in removing sulfur from both pretreated and untreated samples, the most pronounced desulfurizations were obtained for the untreated samples. This is explained primarily by the dissolution of pyrite in the untreated samples. (5) The best desulfurizations involved SCM and base. Possible synergistic interactions between the methanol and the base are suspected. (6) Overall, selective oxidation pretreatment always led to a lower sulfur product. The severity of desulfurization is reduced by selective oxidation pretreatment.

  1. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1995-06-30

    In this Quarter, the research was focused continually on the two general tasks: Task 1, molecular organometallic catalysts for hydrogenation and Task 2, organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. With regards to Task 1, the [1,5-HDRhCl]{sub 2}/buffer catalyst system was investigated to improve its performance, especially catalyst`s stability. Although the addition of a phase transfer agent will usually reduce the catalyst`s activity as described in the last report, a small amount of some surfactant molecules can improve the catalyst`s stability without apparently affecting the catalytic activity. Task 2 was continually focused on the hydrotreating of coal liquid (VSOH) catalyzed by Catalyst 2 and Catalyst 5. The dependence of temperature and hydrogenation pressure on the hydrotreating of VSOH was investigated systematically. The coal liquid hydrotreated at 300{degrees}C has an H/C ratio of 1.53 while that treated at 100{degrees}C has an H/C ratio of only 1.43. We found that 1000 psig of hydrogen pressure was needed for the reaction to proceed completely. Other catalytic alkali metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amides were also investigated to hydrotreat the same coal liquid. Potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide was more active than lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide and sodium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide.

  2. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-08-01

    It is the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Under the reaction conditions employed, the behavior of other trace elements of concern will also be evaluated. The recovery of the chlorine removed from the coal as a marketable by-product, calcium chloride suitable for use as a road deicer, is also being investigated using a novel absorption/crystallization device. We have previously reported on equipment modifications required to attain the necessary data. A tube furnace system employs a flow of nitrogen across the coal sample to carry the HCl released to an absorber, where a chloride specific electrode measures the concentration of the chloride in solution. The data is analyzed by a least squares technique to provide values of the three kinetic constants in a modified first order rate equation used to model the system. During the past quarter, several runs were performed, and kinetic constants determined. After 20 minutes at 385{degree}C, 90% of the chlorine was removed from IBC-109 {minus}200 mesh coal. The data are encouraging, in terms of being able to provide a basis for design of a precombustion chlorine removal process based on thermal treatment.

  3. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-07-27

    Low severity coal liquefaction allows for solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. These lower severity conditions may result in some selective bond rupture. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin, which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene. These compounds are hydroaromatics without aromatic rings and have been shown to be highly effective donors. The objective of the work performed in this study during this quarter was to evaluate reaction parameters for low severity liquefaction reactions using the cyclic olefin, hexahydroanthracene, and the aromatic, anthracene. These model compounds were reacted under a variety of conditions to evaluate their reactivity without coal. The reactions were performed under both thermal and catalytic conditions. Finely divided catalysts from different molybdenum precursors were used to determine their activity in promoting hydrogenation and hydrogen transfer at low severity conditions. The catalysts used were Molyvan L, sulfurized oxymolybdenum dithiocarbamate, molybdenum naphthenate, and Molyvan 822, organo molybdenum dithiocarbamate.

  4. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 16, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1993-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the first quarter of 1993, the following technical progress was made: Reported results of drop tube furnace data analyses to determine devolatilization kinetics; reported the results from the re-analyzed pilot-scale ash deposits from the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

  5. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 13, April--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1992-09-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; completed analyses of the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of unweathered Upper Freeport feed coal; published two technical papers at conferences; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

  6. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Twelfth quarterly report, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    During the previous quarter, a new approach for the deploymerization of the coal macromolecule was tried. This was aimed towards carbon-carbon bond cleavage in presence of strong bases. Such bond cleavage reactions are well known with the alkali metals. Electron transfer reactions take place from the metals to the aromatic nuclei resulting in the formation ofanion-radicals (or dianions) which subsequently undergo carbon-carbon bond cleavage. In our work instead of using the alkali metals, we have used strong bases to cleave the carbon-carbon bonds in hydrocarbons, and have suggested that hydrocarbon elimination reactions occur. Such anionic fragmentation reactions involving strong bases are not very well established. However, we have obtained circumstantial evidence that such bond cleavage reactions do take place in some coal systems. For example, when the high rank Lower Kittaming coal, PSOC 1197, was treated with Lochmann`s base (equimolar mixture of n-butyllithiun and potassium tert-butoxide) in refluxing heptane and quenched with ammonium chloride and reethanol, the pyridine solubility of the product increased from 5% (raw coal) to 39%. A similar increase in solubility due to base treatment was also observed in a separate study for another high rank coal, Pocahontas No. 3 from the Argonne National Laboratory Premium Sample Program. The solubility of the coal increased frcm 5% to 32% after the base treatment. These results, together with the absence of literature studies on base promoted fragmentation reactions prompted us to perfom reactions on some pure compounds to assess this concept in more detail.

  7. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 15, October--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1993-03-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a five-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are run at pilot-scale cleaning facilities to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CWF) or a dry microfine pulverized coa1 (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. During the third quarter of 1992, the following technical progress was made: Continued analyses of drop tube furnace samples to determine devolatilization kinetics; re-analyzed the samples from the pilot-scale ash deposition tests of the first nine feed coals and BCFs using a modified CCSEM technique; updated the topical summary report; and prepared for upcoming tests of new BCFs being produced.

  8. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Eleventh quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.

    1995-10-01

    This quarterly report covers the activities of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction of Coal during the Period April 1 - June 30, 1995, at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. This DOE Contract Period was from December 8, 1992 to December 7, 1994 and has been extended to September 30, 1995. The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

  9. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOEpatents

    Kowalczyk, Dennis C.; Bricklemyer, Bruce A.; Svoboda, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone (24) and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment.

  10. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOEpatents

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  11. Effects of minerals on coal-benefication processes. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1-December 31, 1979. [Fate of minerals; different coals

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. G.; Muter, R. B.; Buttermore, W. H.; Grady, W. C.; Alderman, J. K.; Durham, D.

    1980-09-15

    Unit operation pilot scale tests have been completed for froth flotation, tabling and jigging cleaning operations. An assessment and chemical/mineralogical data for these tests are reported herein. Tests for the heavy media cyclone and WEMCO HMS unit are on-going and will be reported in the next quarter. Also completed during the report period was an in-depth petrographic analysis of the Pocahontas No. 3 coal. Coal macerals by size and gravity were determined as volume percent of the whole coal and are contained in this report. This leaves only the Illinois No. 6 samples for detailed maceral analysis vs. screen/gravity fractions. Accumulation of XRPD data for coal minerals with Pocahontas No. 3 was continued based on the methodology presented in Quarterly Report No. 8. Standardization equations were developed for the Pocahontas No. 3 and Illinois No. 6 samples and mineralogical trends for these coals and the Pittsburgh seam samples were determined. Some generalizations are possible which should aid in interpreting the preparation plant and pilot plant cleaning of these coals. Illite and quartz constitute the majority of all LTA's whether of cleaned coals or refuse. Some minerals display the proprty of being highly separated into either the cleaned coal or the refuse, especially when fine coal sizes are cleaned. Calcite and kaolinite are prime examples in that kaolinite is greatest in the LTA's of the cleaned coal, and calcite is greatest in the LTA's of the refuse. Minerals such as apatite and siderite are most effectively separated into the cleaned coal and refuse only when large coal sizes are cleaned.

  12. Synthesis of methyl methacrylate from coal-derived syngas: Quarterly report,, October 1-December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of three steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Over the last quarter, Eastman developed two new processes which have resulted in two new invention reports. One process deals with carbonylation of benzyl ether which represents a model for coal liquefaction and the second focuses on the acceleration of carbonylation rates for propionic acid synthesis, via use of polar aprotic solvents. These two inventions are major improvements in the novel Mo-catalyzed homogeneous process for propionic acid synthesis technology, developed by Eastman. Over the last quarter, RTI completed three reaction cycles and two regeneration cycles as a part of long-term reaction regeneration cycle study on a 10% Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Si0{sub 2} catalyst, for vapor phase condensation reaction of formaldehyde with propionic acid.

  13. Photochemical coal dissolution. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Examination of the photochemical extractions of the four Argonne Premium Coal Residues has been under way in a routine manner during this last quarter. An unexpectedly great effort last quarter had been necessary to find extraction solvents and photochemical reagents that were photochemically stable and inert. While it is a rather poor thermal extraction solvent, acetonitrile has proven to be the best solvent the authors have examined. In addition to runs with only the acetonitrile solvent present, experiments were performed with the photochemical reagents, benzophenone and pyridine. Both ketone and pyridine triplet states are well-known for their hydrogen abstraction and electron transfer capabilities. The photochemical reagents were used at concentrations resulting in 50% transmission of the light across the reactor pathlength at 320 nm. Experiments with the quartz cutoff filter remain to be completed at concentrations resulting in 50% transmittance at lower wavelengths. Changes in the transmission of light by the column effluent were monitored continuously and the extraction yield by weight was measured by evaporation of the solvent and subtraction of reagent weight. Thermal extraction yields without light under otherwise identical conditions were measured for comparison. As a check on undesirable effects, such as solvent photochemical degradation, otherwise identical light and dark experiments were also done without the coal on the column.

  14. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    The research performed during the quarter, January to March 1995, focused on two areas. The first area involved completing the writing of a manuscript based on research performed on this project concerning the mild acidic pretreatment of low rank coals and their liquefaction behavior in the presence of hydrogen donors with different reactivities. The manuscript was submitted for review to Energy and Fuels. A second manuscript was begun which discussed the research involving the hydrogen donation at low severity condition by hexahydroanthracene. The catalytic enhancement of hydrogen transfer by cyclic olefins was also examined. The data from this research was reexamined; it was decided that before writing the paper than the data should be reanalyzed. Therefore, this quarter was spent taking the raw data and reanalyzing the data, putting the solvent fractionation data on a solvent-free basis. The recalculated data and the calculational method is given as Part 1 in this report. The second area that was worked on this quarter was the high temperature infrared analysis of cyclic olefins. The work is ongoing and is currently involving a considerable amount of equipment and technique development. Part 2 is the discussion on the high temperature infrared analysis of cyclic olefins.

  15. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.

    1992-04-07

    The main objectives of this proposed research work are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate flotability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Coals such as Pittsburgh seam coal, Illinois No. 6 coal, Wyodak coal are chosen as representatives of high-rank bituminous coal, high volatile bituminous coal and subbituminous coal, respectively. Coal minerals such as pyrite and dolomite are chosen as representative coal minerals.

  16. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 10, December 18, 1994--March 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1995-09-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. Throughout the experimental runs we will utilize a high pressure, high temperature diffusion of cell system. This diffusion system has been tested through the measurement of the diffusivity of a number of model coal liquids. The following were accomplished this quarter: During this quarter, we have initiated a series of transport investigations under high temperature (360{degrees}) high pressure (500 psi, H{sub 2}) reactive conditions. We have also continued our studies of formation and precipitation of fractal molecular aggregates in porous media. Small-angle scattering as well as precipitation data are analyzed to delineate the structure of the molecular colloidal aggregates that are formed, when a fluid is injected into the pore space of a porous medium to react with, or displace the in-place fluid. The results suggest that these colloidal structures are diffusion-limited particle and cluster aggregates. This is the first conclusive evidence for fractality of such molecular aggregates, which has important implications for their stability and molecular weight distribution, as well as modelling their flow and precipitation in a porous medium.

  17. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  18. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Bechtel, with South west research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. To enhance management of the study, the work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to: characterize the coal liquids; develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids; and develop a LP refinery model with Process Industry Modeling System software. The objective of Option 1 are to: confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program; produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks; conduct engine emission tests; and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major effort conducted during the fourth quarter of 1995 were in the areas of: IL catalytic cracking--microactivity tests were conducted on various wax blends; IL wax hydrocracking--a pilot plant run was conducted on a wax/petroleum blend; and DL2 characterization and fractionation.

  19. Analysis shows revamp route to naphtha feed

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, E.; Ortiz, C.H.; Arzate, E. )

    1988-11-21

    An existing ethylene plant was studied, using a computer-simulated flexibility analysis, to determine the changes required to convert one of the cracking furnaces from ethane feed to naphtha feed. The simulation determined the changes in flow rate, operating temperature, and steam/hydrocarbon ratio that would result from the liquid feed.

  20. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    A study of the high-temperature soaking started in this quarter, following the installation of reactors in the previous quarter. Two high-volatile bituminous coals and three coal liquids, which were identified in the previous report, were used. A cross-linked, three-dimensional macromolecular model has been widely accepted f or the structure of coal, but there is no direct evidence to prove this model. The conventional coal structure model has been recently re-examined by this investigator because of the importance of relatively strong intra- and intermolecular interactions in bituminous coals. It was reasonable to deduce that significant portions were physically associated after a study of multistep extractions, associative equilibria, the irreversibility and the dependence of coal concentration on solvent swelling, and consideration of the monophase concept. Physical dissociation which may be significant above 300{degree}C should be utilized for the treatment before liquefaction. The high-temperature soaking in a recycle oil was proposed to dissociate coal complexes.

  1. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method is being investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. During the first quarter the selection of base fro pretreatment and extraction was completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. During the second quarter the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC-108 coal was further tested by pretreating the coal with two base concentrations at four different times followed by treatment with linseed oil at 125{degrees}C for three different times and finally washing with 5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and methanol. During this third quarter more experimental parameters were systematically varied in order to study the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC- 108 coal.

  2. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Tenth quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  3. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1994-06-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strain`s of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore wall permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, mare complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal biodesulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. Several possible strong promoters have been isolated and are in the process of being analyzed. When these promoters have been characterized for inducibility, strength, transcriptional start sites and other physical properties, they will be placed in front of the desulfurization genes and expression will be monitored. Improved promoter probe vectors have been constructed, allowing a conclusive screen of all putative Rhodococcus promoters. With the improved methodologies in the handling of Rhodococcus RNA, we have begun to gauge promoter expression using Northern blots. During this quarter we have constructed and successfully used a promoter probe vector using the {beta}-galactosidane gene from E. coli. A chromosomal promoter library was constructed upstream from the {beta}-galactosidase gene. Over 200 colonies were isolated that yielded {beta}-galactosidase activity.

  4. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this work is to design benign solvent/cosolvent systems for reactions which will achieve optimum desulfurization and/or denitrogenation in the pre-treatment of coal or coal liquids. Supercritical fluids present excellent opportunities for the pre- treatment of coal, hence we shall utilize supercritical fluids (SCF) as a reaction medium. The specific objectives of this work are three fold. The first objective is the quantification of the intermolecular interactions affecting reaction transition states in SCF`s via kinetic measurements using well characterized Diels-Alder reactions. The second objective is the characterization of the thermodynamics of the reacting systems. From the thermodynamics of the reacting species detailed information about the transition state may be determined. The third objective is the development of molecular level mathematical models using the results from the first two objectives. The models shall be developed using both an equation of state approach and linear solvation energy relationships with solvatochromic parameters. During this quarter, the solubility of the nitrogen bearing dienophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) has been measured as a function of pressure at 40 C, with the exception of points at 2500 psig and 3000 psig. When collection of these last points has been accomplished, the collection of all preliminary data needed to begin kinetic studies of the Diels-Alder reaction between PTAD and anthracene at 40 C in supercritical CO{sub 2} will be complete.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-08-01

    This is the tenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Process oils from Wilsonville Run 262 were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run 262 was operated from July 10 through September 30, 1991, in the thermal/catalytic Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) configuration with ash recycle. The feed coal was Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal. The high/low temperature sequence was used. Each reactor was operated at 50% of the available reactor volume. The interstage separator was in use throughout the run. The second-stage reactor was charged with aged Criterion 324 catalyst (Ni/Mo on 1/16 inch alumina extrudate support). Slurry catalysts and sulfiding agent were fed to the first-stage reactor. Molyvan L is an organometallic compound which contains 8.1% Mo, and is commercially available as an oil-soluble lubricant additive. It was used in Run 262 as a dispersed hydrogenation catalyst precursor, primarily to alleviate deposition problems which plagued past runs with Black Thunder coal. One test was made with little supported catalyst in the second stage. The role of phenolic groups in donor solvent properties was examined. In this study, four samples from direct liquefaction process oils were subjected to O-methylation of the phenolic groups, followed by chemical analysis and solvent quality testing.

  6. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal twelth quarterly report for the period 1 July 1995--30 September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1995-12-01

    The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench- scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

  7. Two-stage, closed coupled catalytic liquefaction of coal. Sixteenth quarterly report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of the Two-Stage, Close-Coupled Catalytic Liquefaction of Coal Program during the period of July 1--September 30, 1992, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1998 to December 31, 1992. The overall purpose of the program is to achieve higher yields of better quality transportation and turbine fuels and to lower the capital and production costs in order to make the products from direct coal liquefaction competitive with other fossil fuel products. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory testing, Bench Scale Studies and PDU Activities focusing on scale-up of the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) processing of sub-bituminous Black Thunder Coal.

  8. Photochemical coal dissolution. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    As mentioned in the report on the previous quarter, the authors have turned their attention to studies of photochemically-induced-charge-transfer phenomena involving aromatic electron donors. Coal is a porous material and it has been demonstrated that there are ground-state charge-transfer-interactions between imbibed TCNE or TCNQ and the automatic systems in bituminous coals. The authors aim to develop a preliminary understanding of the ground and excited state donor-acceptor interactions and the charge-transfer phenomena in porous materials that are better-defined than coals. They are performing background examinations of a set of donors and acceptors in solution by cyclic voltammetry and uv-visible spectroscopy. These preliminary experiments are being followed by systematic studies of the adsorption of the donors and acceptors, individually and together into adjacent supercages of a series of cation-exchanged X- and Y-type faujasite zeolites. Ultraviolet-irradiation of these systems are being performed and electron paramagnetic resonance examination of the samples is being made for the presence of paramagnetic, one-electron, charge-transfer products. In related work performed by students supported by this contract, the authors have reached a good understanding of the interactions and molecular motions of free radical {pi} electron systems in the X- and Y-type faujasite zeolites. Luminescence spectroscopy may also be used to examine the doped zeolite samples in future experiments. The authors have begun to examine the donor-acceptor pairs: diphenylamine-benzophenone, nitroxyl and substituted nitroxyl radical-benzophenone, and aromatic hydrocarbon-unsaturated tetracyano hydrocarbon. The oxidation and reduction potentials and excitation energies of these systems are given. The aromatic hydrocarbon donors span the range of typical aromatic ring sizes found in bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coals.

  9. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: Summaries of the final reports produced by Lehigh University, West Virginia University, and Vander Sande Associates under the Participants Program are presented. Analytical data produced by CONSOL are provided in Appendix I for all samples employed in the Participants Program and issued with the samples to research groups in the Participants Program. A paper was presented at the 1992 US Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Liquefaction Contractors` Review Conference, held in Pittsburgh September 23--24, 1992, entitled ``The Chemical Nature of Coal Liquid Resids and the Implications for Process Development``. It appears as Appendix 2 in this report.

  10. Molecular biology of coal bio-desulfurization; Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.; Gallagher, J.R.

    1991-01-25

    The aim of this project is to use the techniques of molecular genetics to identify, clone, sequence, and enhance the expression of proteins which remove sulfur covalently bound to coal. This includes the movement and expression of these proteins into bacterial species which may be more useful in the industrial application of a biological desulfurization process. This quarter we finalized the initial cloning and sequencing of the dibenzothiophene (DBT) metabolic (``dox``) genes from strain C18. In addition, we constructed several mutations in single dox genes and have begun to dissect the contribution of each gene product in the DBT degradation pathway. Using a probe derived from DNA adjacent to a transposon which inactivated DBT metabolism, the DBT active genes from A15 have been cloned and identified on cosmids. We have also electroporated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans with a plasmid containing a chloramphenicol resistant transposon. Colonies of T. ferrooxidans resistant to chloramphenicol were obtained.

  11. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1992-06-01

    Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  12. Mass spectral study of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, L.

    1993-09-01

    This report reviews the seventh quarter progress of a two year project to examine the chemical environment of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of Illinois coal by laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry. This project is attempting to develop new laser desorption-ionization schemes for coal which preserve the polymeric matrix. From work this quarter, we have concluded that ultraviolet matrix assisted laser desorption is not an appropriate method to volatilize high molecular weight material extracted from coal. However, we have found that direct 355 nm laser desorption of neat samples of pyridine extracts from Illinois No. 6 coal gives what appears to be intact molecular ions. Direct laser desorption of the extract using both IR and UV wavelengths produces a distribution of ions between 150 and 1500 amu, with a peak near 500 amu. Work is continuing into the final quarter of this project to obtain such spectra from separated coal macerals and from various other coals.

  13. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection. [Quarterly] technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. Steel Company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals for such use. During this quarter a sample of the feed coal that is being used for injection into the No. 7 Blast Furnace of Inland Steel has been analyzed petrographically and compared to both the Herrin No. 6 coal and Armco feed coal. Additional characterization is underway and an advanced program of pyrolysis and reactivity testing has been initiated.

  14. Advanced physical coal cleaning to comply with potential air toxic regulations. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C.; Mohanty, M.K.; Wang, D.

    1995-12-31

    Studies have indicated that the potentially hazardous trace elements found in coal have a strong affinity for coal pyrite. Thus, by maximizing the rejection of pyrite, one can minimize the trace element content of a given coal while also reducing sulfur emissions. The pyrite in most Illinois Basin coals, however, is finely disseminated within the coal matrix. Therefore, to remove the pyrite using physical coal cleaning techniques, the pyrite must be liberated by grinding the coal to ultrafine particle sizes. Fortunately, the coals being fed to pulverized coal boilers (PCB) are already ground to a very fine size, i.e., 70% passing 200 mesh. Therefore, this research project will investigate the use of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies for cleaning PCB feed as a compliance strategy. Work in this quarter has focused on the processing of a run-of-mine coal sample collected from Amax Coal Company`s Delta Coal mine using column flotation and an enhanced gravity separator as separate units and in circuitry arrangements. The {minus}60 mesh run-of-mine sample having an ash content of about 22% was cleaned to 6% while achieving a very high energy recovery of about 87% and a sulfur rejection value of 53% in a single stage column flotation operation. Enhanced gravity treatment is believed to be providing excellent total sulfur rejection values, although with inferior ash rejection for the {minus}400 mesh size fraction. The circuitry arrangement with the Falcon concentrator as the primary cleaner followed by the Packed-Column resulted in an excellent ash rejection performance, which out performed the release analysis. Trace element analyses of the samples collected from these tests will be conducted during the next report period.

  15. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Quarterly technical report No. 14, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zygourakis, K.

    1995-09-01

    The project will quantify the effect of the following pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure and on the subsequent reactivity of chars: (a) pyrolysis heating rate; (b) final heat treatment temperature; (c) duration of heat treatment at HTT (or soak time); (d) pyrolysis atmosphere (N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures); (e) coal particle size (100--1,000 {mu}m in diameter); (f) sulfur-capturing additives (limestone); and (g) coal rank. Pyrolysis experiments will be carried out for three coals from the Argonne collection: (1) a high-volatile bituminous coal with high ash content (Illinois No. 6), (2) a bituminous coal with low ash content (Utah Blind Canyon) and (3) a lower rank subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam). A systematic study was carried out in the past quarter to validate the mathematical model for ignition phenomena presented in the previous quarterly report. Model predictions of the effect of pyrolysis heating rate, particle size, and oxygen concentration on ignition behavior are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Moreover, our results show that the model can be used to estimate the particle temperature during ignition and the minimum ignition temperature for various process conditions.

  16. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Quarterly technical report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zygourakis, K.

    1995-08-01

    The project will quantify the effect of the following pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure and on the subsequent reactivity of chars: (a) pyrolysis heating rate; (b) final heat treatment temperature (HTT); (c) duration of heat treatment at HTT (or soak time); (d) pyrolysis atmosphere (N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixtures); (e) coal particle size (100--1000 {mu}m in diameter); (f) sulfur-capturing additives (limestone); and (g) coal rank. Pyrolysis experiments will be carried out for three coals from the Argonne collection: (1) a high-volatile bituminous coal with high ash content (Illinois {number_sign}6), (2) a bituminous coal with low ash content (Utah Blind Canyon) and (3) a lower rank subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam). A systematic study was carried out in the past quarter to validate the mathematical model for ignition phenomena presented in the previous quarterly report. Model predictions of the effect of pyrolysis heating rate, particle size, and oxygen concentration on ignition behavior are in excellent agreement with experimental results. Moreover, our results show that the model can be used to estimate the particle temperature during ignition and the minimum ignition temperature for various process conditions.

  17. Coal combustion science quarterly progress report, October--December 1992. Task 1, Coal char combustion [and] Task 2, Fate of mineral matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L.

    1993-06-01

    In the Coal Combustion Laboratory (CCL) this quarter, controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to better understand the late stages of coal combustion and its relation to unburned carbon levels in fly ash. Optical in situ measurements were made during char combustion at high carbon conversions and the optical data were related to particle morphologies revealed by optical microscopy on samples extracted under the same conditions. Results of this work are reported in detail below. In the data presented below, we compare the fraction of alkali metal loss to that of the alkaline earth metals as a function of coal rank to draw conclusions about the mechanism of release for the latter. Figure 2.1 illustrates the fractional release of the major alkali and alkaline earth metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg) as a function of coal rank for a series of coals and for several coal blends. All data are derived from combustion experiments in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor (MFC) and represent the average of three to eight experiments under conditions where the mass loss on a dry, ash-free (daf) basis exceeds 95 %. There are no missing data in the figure. The several coals with no indicated result exhibited no mass loss of the alkali or alkaline earth metals in our experiments. There is a clear rank dependence indicated by the data in Fig. 2.1, reflecting the mode of occurrence of the material in the coal.

  18. Selective hydrocracking of light naphtha cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Koslov, I.T.; Khavkin, V.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

    1986-03-01

    For the production of high-quality automotive gasolines, technology has been developed for a combined ''isoreforming'' process, in which hydrocracking of a heavy straight-run naphtha cut to give a high-octane component with an octane number of 84-86 (MM) is combined with catalytic reforming of the residual fraction from hydrocracking. The ''isoreforming'' technology can be used to produce AI-93 automotive gasolines with aromatic hydrocarbon contents of 45-49% by weight, without TEL, in yields of 78-82% by weight on the original feed. The authors also discuss a catalytic upgrading process for light straight-run naphtha distillates or raffinates from catalytic reforming. The influence of the depth of reaction in hydrocracking n-paraffins in the straight-run 62-105 degrees C cut on the yield of the C5-EP cut and its octane number is investigated.

  19. Ethanol versus naphtha under Brazil's economy

    SciTech Connect

    Luchi, N.R.

    1982-05-01

    Ethanol is able to replace naphtha in two of its major usages, as raw material for ethylene production and as fuel for Otto engines. This possibility raises the question of value - or opportunity cost - of ethanol. Ethanol's economic value as a fuel is that value which equals the cost of the fuel consumed by a given vehicle travelling a given distance. In each case, unblended gasoline, a gasoline and ethanol blend or hydrated alcohol alone are the alternative fuels used. Ethanol's economic value as feedstock for producing ethylene is defined as that which makes the revenue from the ethylene derived from alcohol equal to the total revenue of products resulting from thermal cracking of 1 m/sup 3/ of naphtha. In this paper it is shown that ethanol's highest value corresponds to its use as hydrated alcohol feedstock for ethylene production. However, present tax laws and subsidies favor ethanol fuel use. 4 refs.

  20. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, September 20, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The main task of this quarter was to install reactors to conduct preconversion and liquefaction of coal. Coal and coal liquids were collected. The anaerobic chamber (Model 855-AC; Plas Labs, inc.) was procured and set up to store coal samples under an inert gas. Equipment to treat products was assembled, including Soxhlet extraction units, fractionation columns, a distillation column, and a rotary evaporator. Two gas chromatographs for analysis of gases and liquid were adjusted. Two reactor systems were installed for the experimental apparatus. One was Model 4576 high-temperature and high-pressure autoclave (Parr Instrument, 500{degrees}C and 5000 psi) (see Figure 1); the other was a 27 ml of microreactors. The autoclave was obtained from the manufacturer and assembled. The experimental set-up of microreactors are shown in Figure 2.

  1. Mass spectral study of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, L.

    1992-08-01

    This report reviews the second quarter progress of a new project to examine the chemical environment of organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of Illinois coal by laser desorption mass spectrometry inside a modified ion trap mass spectrometer. This project is developing new laser desorption and ionization schemes for coal which preserve the polymeric matrix, will compare mass spectra of whole coal with its separated macerals, and will analyze organic sulfur in the polymeric matrix of coal.

  2. Coal-gasification basic research and costs studies. Quarterly report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-15

    Work was continued on basic research and cost studies supporting the Department of Energy's coal gasification program. Two major activities or tasks are being performed. The first activity is the development of a process or processes to produce agglomerates from coal fines suitable for use as a feed to fixed-bed gasifiers. During the Fourth Quarter approximately 70 double-roll briquetting runs and 97 pelletizing runs were performed to evaluate promising binder candidates and to investigate other briquetting and pelletizing variables. All agglomerates were tested for room temperature handling ease (measured by crush-strength and drop-shatter tests) and for stability and performance at gasifier temperatures. The best agglomerates were further evaluated in a modified Burghardt test and in a tumbler test. Ten agglomerate compositions, eight briquettes and two pellets, were run in a small gasifier at American Natural Resources. Most agglomerates performed well in this gasifier. In Task II, the design of a gasification plant with Rockwell Molten Salt gasifiers was completed, and estimates of capital and operating costs were developed. Work on all basic cases has now been completed and only the incorporation of a briquetting facility into the fixed-bed plant design remains to be done.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamics coal-fired flow facility: Quarterly progress report, July--September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In this Quarterly Technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress in proof-of-concept (POC) testing and development of the components for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) steam bottoming plant. The primary activities discussed are results of a 252 hour, coal-fired test in the Department of Energy Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). The performance of the upstream components, which simulate the MHD topping cycle for the generation of test gases with the correct time-temperature history, was significantly more reliable than in previous tests. In the bottoming cycle tests continued on candidate superheater test module (SHTM) tube materials in three different temperature zones. The test achieved all objectives in this area. Difficulties continued in keeping the accumulation of deposits sufficiently blown-off on the high temperature tubes of the first test section and the following cooling section. Particulate loading samples were taken to evaluate the effectiveness of the baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Results of varying the flow rate through the ESP to determine the minimum specific collection area (SCA) to meet the New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) particulate emission standards are reported. Reports of on-going studies and analyses are summarized. Results of utilization of advanced diagnostics by both UTSI and MSU are included. Data and analyses from stack gas analysis, water quality, ambient air sampling and terrestrial ecology programs are summarized and future plans are outlined. 14 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Lancet, M.S.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-11-01

    This is the eleventh Quarterly Technical Progress Report under DOE Contract DE-AC22-89PC89883. Major topics reported are: (1) The results of a study designed to determine the effects of the conditions employed at the Wilsonville slurry preheater vessel on coal conversion is described. (2) Stable carbon isotope ratios were determined and used to source the carbon of three product samples from Period 49 of UOP bench-scale coprocessing Run 37. The results from this coprocessing run agree with the general trends observed in other coprocessing runs that we have studied. (3) Microautoclave tests and chemical analyses were performed to ``calibrate`` the reactivity of the standard coal used for determining donor solvent quality of process oils in this contract. (4) Several aspects of Wilsonville Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) resid conversion kinetics were investigated; results are presented. Error limits associated with calculations of deactivation rate constants previously reported for Runs 258 and 261 are revised and discussed. A new procedure is described that relates the conversions of 850{degrees}F{sup +} , 1050{degrees}F{sup +}, and 850 {times} 1050{degrees}F material. Resid conversions and kinetic constants previously reported for Run 260 were incorrect; corrected data and discussion are found in Appendix I of this report.

  5. Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion: A Comprehensive Assessment: Quarterly report, 1 July 1996-30 September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E.; Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Peterson, T.W.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Zeng, T.; Crowley, S.; Finkelman, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify a number of hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) as candidates for regulation. Should regulations be imposed on HAP emissions from coal-fired power plants, a sound understanding of the fundamental principles controlling the formation and partitioning of toxic species during coal combustion will be needed. With support from the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and VTT (Finland), Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has teamed with researchers from USGS, MIT, the University of Arizona (UA), the University of Kentucky (UKy), the University of Connecticut, and Princeton University to develop a broadly applicable emissions model useful to regulators and utility planners. The new Toxics Partitioning Engineering Model (ToPEM) will be applicable to all combustion conditions including new fuels and coal blends, low-NO{sub x}, combustion systems, and new power generation plants. Development of ToPEM will be based on PSI`s existing Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF). Extensive coal characterization and laboratory work has begun in order to develop and test new sub-models. Trace element concentrations in the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 coals, and in size/density fractions of these coals, were completed. Coal characterization in the past quarter also included direct identification of the modes of occurrence of various trace inorganic species in coal and ash using unique analytical techniques such as XAFS analysis and selective leaching. Combustion testing of these two coals was begun and preliminary data obtained on trace element 0301 vaporization in the combustion zone. Modeling efforts in the past quarter include the development on a preliminary model to assess mercury speciation in combustion systems.

  6. Optimization of reactor configuration in coal liquefaction. Fourth quarterly report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.M.

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly report covers activities of optimization of Reactor Configuration in Coal Liquefaction during the period July 1--September 30, 1992, at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. in Lawrenceville and Princeton, New Jersey. This DOE contract period is from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1993. The overall objective of the program is to achieve a new approach to liquefaction that generates an all distillates product slate at reduced cost of about $25 per barrel of crude oil equivalent. The quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Support, Laboratory Scale Operations, Technical Assessment, and Project Management.

  7. Preconversion processing of bituminous coals: New directions to improved direct catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The near equal conversions were obtained even with high coal/liquid ratio (1/3--1/2) for two-step wise high-temperature soaking and the first stage liquefaction. Expected conversions were not observed when vacuum distillation after soaking was used in stead of cyclohexane extraction. This is presumably due to the difficulty with redispersion of vacuum distillated bottoms in the coal liquid, because a batch wise procedure was taken by using glasswares. It is suggested that the proposed procedure in the previous quarter should be tested by a continuous procedure under enough heating conditions to keep low viscosity of the bottoms.

  8. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-12-31

    The bench unit was operated in the two stage configuration during this quarter, and two runs (DOE-008 and DOE-009), which included eight mass balance periods were completed. Addition of potassium carbonate, although the best catalyst for promoting the shift reaction in the first stage, led to severe plugging problems particularly between the first and second stage reactors. Therefore, sodium aluminate, less effective as a shift catalyst, but better for unit operation, was used as an alternate. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate was used throughout as a second stage catalyst, with and without sodium aluminate as shift catalyst. Overall coal conversions under the conditions studied were approximately 80% wt on MAF coal and C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} gas yields were about 10% wt. Conditions in both stages need to be optimized to improve coal conversion and maximize distillable oil yield. The results so far indicate that increased severity and better carbon monoxide shift conversion are required in the first stage, while maximum pressure ({approximately}2,500 psi) is needed in the second stage. The effects of other catalysts also need to be determined, including the establishment of optimum conditions for operation with those catalysts. Ammonium tetrathiomolybdate was shown to possess no measurable activity as a shift catalyst at the level used (600 ppM on total feed) in either the bench unit or autoclave tests. However, in autoclave tests, the addition of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate did improve asphaltene and preasphaltene conversion to oils (and therefore, product quality) in both one and two stage tests when compared with iron sulfide.

  9. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the third quarter of 1996 were in the areas of hydrotreating production runs and FCC production run. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M. W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed. The major efforts conducted during the first quarter of 1996 were in the areas of: DL2 light distillate hydrotreating; and DL2 heave distillate catalytic cracking.

  11. Photochemical coal dissolution. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Research continued on coal photochemical dissolution. Experiments were performed in a newly constructed, computerized, coal photochemical reactor. The experiments demonstrated the active participation of coal in photochemistry.

  12. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. 3rd quarterly report for 1995, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1995-12-31

    During this quarter (1/1/95-9/30/95), major progress has been made in the following areas of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: (1) Conceptual design of a test machine based on hydraulic presses to mass-produce 5.4-inch-diameter coal logs for testing in a 6-inch-diameter pipeline has been completed. (2) Conceptual design of a rotary-press machine to produce 1.9-inch-diameter coal logs for testing in a 2-inch-diameter pipeline has also been completed. (3) It has been confirmed through experiments that molds with round-edge exit can make logs as good as those made with tapered exit. (4) Conducted a study to determine the effect of surface condition of mold and lubricants on the quality of coal logs. (5) Completed an evaluation of the effect of fiber (wood pulp) on coal log quality. (6) Prepared an apparatus for testing fast compaction of coal logs -- 2 second per log. (7) Compacted coal logs in a 5.3-inch-diameter mold. (8) Completed a preliminary study to assess vacuum and steam heating systems to enhance coal log production and quality. (9) Changed the small-scale-CLP-demo loop from a once-through system to a recirculating system. (10) Completed revision of CLP economic model and revised the 1993 report.

  13. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data. PMID:15909350

  14. Coal log pipeline research at University of Missouri. Second quarterly technical progress report, 1 April--30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1996-06-01

    During this quarter, significant progress has been made in the following, fronts of coal log pipeline research, development and technology transfer: 1. Design of the special 300-ton coal log compaction machine was completed, Furthermore, much progress has been made in the design of the system needed to feed coal into the coal log compaction machine, and the design of the system to remove logs automatically as soon as they are compacted. 2. Coal mixtures containing different amounts of moisture were compacted into 1.91- inch-diameter coal logs rapidly (in 6 seconds). It was found that for the Mettiki coal tested, the optimum moisture is around 8%. Under the test conditions (room temperature and 3% binders), the rapidly compacted coal logs with 8% moisture had less than 4% weight loss in 350 cycles of circulation. 3. Completed evaluation of the effectiveness of using wall lubricants to enhance coal log quality. Both calcium sterarate and MoS{sub 2} were found to be effective. 4. It was found that when the interior of a mold is not cleaned after coal log has been compacted, the coal mixture film clinging to the wall hardens in time and form a hard crust which affects the quality of the next log to be produced. But, if the second log is produced immediately after the first, no hard crust is formed and the quality of the second log, is not affected. 5. Coal logs made with the coal crushed by the Gundlach Company were found to be better than coal logs made with the coal crushed by the CPRC`s hammer mill. 7. A 320-ft-long, 6-inch-diameter coal log pipeline test facility was constructed in Rolla during this period. 8. Completed the simulation of an 8-inch-diameter, 20-mile-long coal log pipeline recirculating loop driven by a pump bypass. 9. Continued improvement was accomplished in the hydraulic model of HCP and CLP to predict pressure drop and capsule velocity for both single capsules and capsule train. Also, work has started to extend the analysis to sloped pipelines.

  15. Combustion of Illinois coals and chars with natural gas. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Buckius, R.O.; Peters, J.E.; Krier, H.

    1992-10-01

    Combined combustion of coal and natural gas offers advantages compared to burning coal or natural gas alone. For example, low volatile coals or low volatile chars derived from treatment or gasification processes can be of limited use due to their poor flammability characteristics. However, the use of natural gas in conjunction with the solid fuel can provide the necessary ``volatiles`` to enhance the combustion. Additionally, natural gas provides a clean cofiring fuel source which can enhance the usefulness of coals with high sulfur content. Addition of natural gas may reduce SO{sub x} emissions through increased sulfur retention in the ash and reduce NO{sub x} emissions by varying local stoichiometry and temperature levels. This research program seeks to clarify the contributions and to identify the controlling mechanisms of coining natural gas with Illinois coal through studies of particle ignition, burning rates and ash characterization. The first two quarters focused on the ignition delay measurements and their analysis, along with the incorporation of particle porosity into the burning rate model. The emphasis of the third quarter was on a more detailed understanding of the burning rate process, as well as understanding of cofiring`s effects on sulfur retention. The contributions of particle burning area to the quantification of the particle burning mechanisms have been shown to be important and continue to be investigated. Ash samples for various methane concentrations under similar other conditions have shown positive trends in reducing S0{sub 2} emission through increased sulfur capture in the ash.

  16. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

    1996-10-25

    This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

  17. Advanced coal gasification system for electric power generation. Third quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-25

    The operation, maintenance and modifications to the Westinghouse gasification process development unit during the quarter are reviewed. The tests of the gasifier-agglomerator included direct coal feed as well as oxygen-blown gasification of a char or coal bed. Then the whole system was tested in single and double stage operation. Laboratory support involved fluidized bed test facilities at ambient temperature and at design temperature for devolatilization and gasification studies. Other laboratory systems were related to thermal analysis and pressurized high temperature studies of gasification and gas cleaning. (LTN)

  18. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. During this quarter, analyses were completed on 65 process samples from representative periods of HRI Run POC-2 in which coal, coal/plastics, and coal/rubber were the feedstocks. A sample of the oil phase of the oil/water separator from HRI Run POC-1 was analyzed to determine the types and concentrations of phenolic compounds. Chemical analyses and microautoclave tests were performed to monitor the oxidation and measure the reactivity of the standard coal (Old Ben Mine No. 1) which has been used for the last six years to determine solvent quality of process oils analyzed in this and previous DOE contracts.

  19. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 6, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-03-01

    This sixth quarterly report describes the activities and accomplishments of the research team at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, related to the project entitled ``Combustion of Pulverized Coal in Vortex Structures`` during the period January 1, 1995 to March 31, 1995. The work performed in this quarter consisted of the following four tasks: (1) design and fabrication of a computer-driven traversing mechanism for traversing LDV transmitter and receiving optics, (2) color schlieren photography, (3) presenting a report in the panel-review meeting in Pittsburgh, (4) installation of additional safety devices in response to the letter of Dr. Sean Plasynski, and (5) streamwise velocity measurement in the isothermal heterogeneous shear layer with nonreacting particles using LDV. In the next quarter, we plan to continue this work with heated shear layers in which particles undergo pyrolysis. Flow visualization and mean velocity field measurement instrumentation will continue as the major experimental techniques.

  20. [Basic properties of coals and other solids]. Eighth quarterly report, [September--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-25

    This report discusses basic properties of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coals. Properties of coal liquids are also investigated. Heats of immersion in strong acids are found for Pittsburgh {number_sign}8, Illinois {number_sign}6, and Wyodak coals. Production of coal liquids by distillation is discussed. Heats of titration of coal liquids and coal slurries are reported. (VC)

  1. Advanced coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This project investigated the use of ceramic membranes to improve liquefaction processes to meet both economical and environmental requirements. The separation of model compounds with a series of modified membranes were complete for Yr. I. The experimental system is presently under modification for performing the catalytic membrane reaction. In this quarter, the authors summarized the Yr.I experimental result as quarterly to satisfy the contractual reporting requirement. A series of 1{double_prime} and 10{double_prime} long membranes were modified through the CVD method to reduce the pore size. These tubes were characterized by He and N{sub 2} permeation as well as He/SF{sub 6} separation. The He and N{sub 2} permeances decreased with reducing pore size and porosity. The coronene and compound No. 11 mixture separation were performed in 10-inch long membranes. The model compound chosen for the catalytic membrane reaction was NBBM (naphthyl-bibenzyl-methane). The hydrogenolysis of this compound will generate toluene which can be selectively removed by the modified membrane. The NBBM/toluene separation was performed in 1{double_prime} long modified membranes. The GC calibration of NBBM, coronene, compound No. 11 and toluene were established and gave good accurate analysis. The results were accurate and reproducible using wide board capillary column with appropriate GC conditions. The coal-liquid separation through microporous ceramic membranes could be described by an ultrafiltration model. Two transport phenomenons, molecular diffusion and convection, were the most important mechanisms. The hindrance factors were necessary of these mechanisms to evaluate the separation performance of membrane and to design the catalytic membrane reactor. The hindrance factors can be calculated from that rejection and permeate flux based on the simplified Niemi-Palosaari method.

  2. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc ferrite and zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) may be a viable alternative to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc hence it is not as likely to undergo depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron hence the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Fifth Quarterly Report documents progress in pellet testing via thermogravimetric analysis of pellet formulation FORM4-A of a manganese ore/alumina combination. This formulation, described more fully in the Quarterly Technical Progress Report of October 15, 1993, consists of manganese carbonate combined with alundum. A 2-inch fixed-bed reactor has been fabricated and is now ready for subjecting pellets to cyclic loading and regeneration; however, a minor problem has arisen during the regeneration cycle in that sulfur tends to form and plug the exit tube during the early stage of regeneration. This problem is about to be overcome by increasing the flow rate of air during the regeneration cycle resulting in more oxidizing conditions and hence less tendency for sulfide sulfur (S{sup =}) to oxidize to the intermediate elemental form (S{sup o}) rather than to 4-valent (S{sup +4}).

  3. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-sixth quarterly report: Quarterly status for the period January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1994-04-15

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science and Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-sixth quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  4. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 8, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-10-01

    This eighth quarterly report describes the activities and accomplishments of the research team at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, related to the project entitled {open_quotes}Combustion of Pulverized Coal in Vortex Structures{close_quotes} during the period July 1, 1995 to September 30, 1995. The work performed in this quarter consisted of the following four tasks: (i) Completion of the schlieren flow visualization experiments, (ii) Conducting experiments with particulate laden shear layers in cold flow to measure mean velocity and turbulence intensity field, (iii) Conducting experiments with particulate laden shear layers in heated flow where the initial temperature was above the pyrolysis temperature of the coal, (iii) Conducting experiments with particulate laden shear layers in heated flow where the initial temperature was above the ignition temperature of the coal, and (iv) Revising and preparing the final version of a paper for the Energy Conference to be held in Houston in 1996. A 90-day no-cost extension of the project was obtained. In the final quarter, we plan to complete this work by conducting the final task of measuring concentration fields.

  5. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-09-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. The paper describes activities carried out this quarter. 11 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, through March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Accomplishments for this quarter are described.

  7. Determination of the surface reactivity of coal powders. Third quarterly report, March 1, 1983-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Fowkes, F.M.; Jones, K.L.

    1983-07-27

    The electrophoresis of coal powders in organic media was initiated in the previous quarter as a quick method of determining surface acidity of basicity. Initially Freon 113 was used as an inert liquid medium and pyridine was added up to 1% to act as an electron-donor to coal particles. In this period we have explored electrophoresis directly in acidic (electron-accepting) and in basic (electron-donating) liquids of our four coal samples (high and low ash anthracites and bituminous coals). The results obtained in acidic (electron-acceptor) liquids (methylene chloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dichloroethane), in basic (electron-donor) liquids (acetone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and pyridine) and lower alcohols are shown in tubular forms. Electron-donor liquids provide negative potentials to electron-accepting (acidic) surface sites and electron-accepting liquids provide positive potentials to electron-donor (basic) surface sites. The two anthracite coals (PSOC 870 and 868) appear to have more surface acidity and basicity than the bituminous coals (PSOC 11 and 213), and the high basicity of the high-ash anthracite is most noteworthy. The coal suspensions with high zeta-potential do not settle out appreciably and they were found to be very rapidly electro-deposited. 5 figures. 2 tables.

  8. Coal Combustion Science quarterly progress report, January--March 1993. Task 1, Coal char combustion: Task 2,, Fate of mineral matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hardesty, D.R.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L.

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain insights into the mechanisms of combustion, fragmentation, and final burnout, and to use the insights to aid in the interpretation of the quantitative data generated in Subtasks 1 and 2. The initial image sequences for Illinois No. 6 coal confirm the presence of an early near-extinction process (discussed in previous reports) and the asymptotic nature of the carbon burnout process. The technique also provided important new insights into the processes of particle fragmentation and reagglomeration at high burnout. During this quarter, chemical fractionation tests on coals pulverized to different sizes were completed. These data will help us to asses the accuracy of the fuels characterizations for the purpose of interpreting inorganic release during coal devolatilization. Chemical fractionation tests on mineral species are proceeding for the same purposes, but these are not yet completed.

  9. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1995-12-01

    The objectives of this project are to support the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development program and to improve the useful application of analytical chemistry to direct coal liquefaction process development. Independent analyses by well-established methods will be obtained of samples produced in direct coal liquefaction processes under evaluation by DOE. Additionally, analytical instruments and techniques which are currently underutilized for the purpose of examining coal-derived samples will be evaluated. The data obtained from this study will be used to help guide current process development and to develop an improved data base on coal and coal liquids properties. A sample bank will be established and maintained for use in this project and will be available for use by other researchers. The reactivity of the non-distillable resids toward hydrocracking at liquefaction conditions (i.e., resid reactivity) will be examined. From the literature and data experimentally obtained, a mathematical kinetic model of resid conversion will be constructed. It is anticipated that such a model will provide insights useful for improving process performance and thus the economics of direct coal liquefaction. Some of the contract activities for this quarter are: We completed many of the analyses on the 81 samples received from HTI bench-scale run CMSL-9, in which coal, coal/mixed plastics, and coal/high density polyethylene were fed; Liquid chromatographic separations of the 15 samples in the University of Delaware sample set were completed; and WRI completed CP/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR analyses on the Delaware sample set.

  10. Vhf EPR quantitation and speciation of organic sulfur in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.I.

    1994-06-01

    The existence of free electrons in coals` natural site offers a great attraction for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) analysis to aid in the study of the structure and composition of coal. This direct and non-destructive approach to coal analysis has been hindered by the problem of resolution using the conventional 9.5 GHz EPR spectrometers. In the past few years, we have developed techniques including W-band Very High Frequency EPR spectroscopy as a means of determining the quantity and structure of organic sulfur in native and desulfurized coals. The state of the art 95 GHz (W-band) EPR spectrometer which we have constructed shows a well resolved spectrum including the interaction between unpaired electrons and the heteroatom like sulfur. The spectra also provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding different sulfur species. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Kentucky, we are also analyzing the result of desulfurization techniques on the presence of various sulfur species in coal. In the past, we have tried to synthesize various model compounds comparing their W-band spectra with other models, the predictions of theoretical models, and with the W-band spectra of coal specimens. In this quarter, we have been concentrating our efforts on developing a new standard protocol in handling and preparing the coal samples for EPR measurements to provide a quantitative comparison between the EPR spectra of coal in the natural state and desulfurized. Ten coal samples, both native and desulfurized, have been provided to us. These samples have been run in both laboratories. The simulation of coal EPR spectra has been carried out using several mathematical models. EPR results now are being compared with XANES data.

  11. Pilot plant testing of Illinois coal for blast furnace injection. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of Illinois coal in the blast furnace injection process in a new and unique pilot plant test facility. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it is the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1993--94 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco and Inland steel companies and to demonstrate quantitatively the suitability of both the Herrin No. 6 and Springfield No. 5 coals for blast furnace injection. The main feature of the current work is the testing of Illinois coals at CANMET`s (Canadian Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) pilot plant coal combustion facility. This facility simulates blowpipe-tuyere conditions in an operating blast furnace, including blast temperature (900{degrees}C), flow pattern (hot velocity 200 m/s), geometry, gas composition, coal injection velocity (34 m/s) and residence time (20 ms). The facility is fully instrumented to measure air flow rate, air temperature, temperature in the reactor, wall temperature, preheater coil temperature and flue gas analysis. During this quarter there were two major accomplishments.

  12. Advanced physical coal cleaning to comply with potential air toxic regulations. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C.; Wang, D.

    1995-12-31

    Studies have indicated that the potentially hazardous trace elements found in coal have a strong affinity for coal pyrite. Thus, by maximizing the rejection of pyrite, one can minimize the trace element content of a given coal while also reducing sulfur emissions. The pyrite in most Illinois Basin coals, however, is finely disseminated within the coal matrix. Therefore, to remove the pyrite using physical coal cleaning techniques, the pyrite must be liberated by grinding the coal to ultrafine particle sizes. Fortunately, the coals being fed to pulverized coal boilers (PCB) are already ground to a very fine size, i.e., 70% passing 200 mesh. Therefore, this research project will investigate the use of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies for cleaning PCB feed as a compliance strategy. Work in this quarter has focused on the processing of a PCB feed sample collected from Central Illinois Power`s Newton Power Station using column flotation and an enhanced gravity separator as separate units and in a circuitry arrangement. The PCB feed sample having a low ash content of about 12% was further cleaned to 6% while achieving a very high energy recovery of about 90% in a single stage column flotation operation. Enhanced gravity treatment is believed to be providing excellent total sulfur rejection values, although with inferior ash rejection for the {minus}400 mesh size fraction. The circuitry arrangement with the Falcon concentrator as the primary cleaner followed by the Microcel column resulted in an excellent ash rejection performance, which out performed the release analysis. Trace element analyses of the samples collected from these tests will be conducted during the next report period.

  13. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic olefins in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic olefins, such as 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin) and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), are highly reactive donor compounds that readily donate their hydrogen to coal and model acceptors when heated to temperatures of 200{degrees}C and above. These donors are active donors in the low severity liquefaction of coal at 350{degrees}C as shown in the research performed in this project. The infrared studies are being performed in a high temperature infrared cell that was obtained from AABSPEC. Modifications to that cell have been made and have been reported in previous progress reports. During this last quarter the useful temperature range of the high temperature infrared cell was extended to 230{degrees}C through the use of a high-boiling perfluorocarbon solvent. The solvent used was an Air Products and Chemicals Company proprietary product trade named Multifluor APF-240. Solubilities of aromatics and cyclic olefins were quite low in APF-240, usually less than 0.1 wt% at room temperature, but were found to be a strong function of temperature, increasing markedly when the mixtures were heated to 65{degrees}C. Spectra have been obtained of n-hexadecane and naphthalene at temperatures of 65, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200 and 230{degrees}C. This demonstration of the safe operation of the high temperature IR cell and the acquisition of spectra at elevated temperatures paves the way for kinetic studies of the hydrogen donor capability of isotetralin. A perfluoroether has been obtained from Dupont which should extend the useful temperature range of the high temperature IR cell to 350{degrees}C.

  14. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  15. Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese based sorbents. Quarterly report, June--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

    1994-11-01

    The focus of work being performed on hot coal gas desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) appears to be a strong contender to zinc-based sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc; hence, it is not as likely to undergo zinc-depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron; hence, the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Also manganese chlorides are much less stable and volatile than zinc chlorides. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Eighth Quarterly Report documents progress in pelletizing and testing via thermo-gravimetric analysis of individual pellet formulations of manganese ore/alumina combinations and also manganese carbonate/alumina with two binders, dextrin and bentonite.

  16. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-eighth quarterly report, July--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  17. Fundamental kinetics of supercritical coal liquefaction: effect of catalysts and hydrogen-donor solvents. Second quarterly report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Madras, G.; Kodera, Y.

    1996-07-01

    This quarterly report relates our recent progress toward the overall objective of understanding the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our approach is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material and study the degradation of polymers under various conditions, including temperature, pressure, and solvent. The degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Another potential application of this research is to the recycling of plastics. Our recent research involved the study of the oxidative degradation of polystyrene in tricholorobenzene using tertbutyl peroxide. A continuous-mixture kinetics model for the rate of polymer degradation and peroxide consumption was developed to describe the temporal behavior of the molecular-weight distributions and its various moments. Based on this work, a research paper entitled `Oxidative Degradation Kinetics of Polystyrene in Solution,` will be submitted to the journal, Chemical Engineering Science.

  18. Char particle fragmentation and its effect on unburned carbon during pulverized coal combustion. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1996-08-13

    This document is the eleventh quarterly status report of work on a project concerned with the fragmentation of char particles during pulverized coal combustion that was conducted at the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University, Stanford, California. The project is intended to satisfy, in part, PETC`s research efforts to understand the chemical and physical processes that govern coal combustion. The work is pertinent to the char oxidation phase of coal combustion and focuses on how the fragmentation of coal char particles affects overall mass loss rates and how char fragmentation phenomena influence coal conversion efficiency. The knowledge and information obtained allows the development of engineering models that can be used to predict accurately char particle temperatures and total mass loss rates during pulverized coal combustion. In particular, the work provides insight into causes of unburned carbon in the ash of coal-fired utility boilers and furnaces. The overall objectives of the project are: (i) to characterize fragmentation events as a function of combustion environment, (ii) to characterize fragmentation with respect to particle porosity and mineral loadings, (iii) to assess overall mass loss rates with respect to particle fragmentation, and (iv) to quantify the impact of fragmentation on unburned carbon in ash. The knowledge obtained during the course of this project will be used to predict accurately the overall mass loss rates of coals based on the mineral content and porosity of their chars. The work will provide a means of assessing reasons for unburned carbon in the ash of coal fired boilers and furnaces.

  19. Utilization of coal associated minerals. Quarterly report No. 11, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Slonaker, J. F.; Akers, D. J.; Alderman, J. K.

    1980-08-29

    The purpose of this research program is to examine the effects of coal mineral materials on coal waste by-product utilization and to investigate new and improved methods for the utilization of waste by-products from cleaning, combustion and conversion processing of coal. The intermediate objectives include: (1) the examination of the effects of cleaning, gasification and combustion on coal mineral materials; and (2) the changes which occur in the coal wastes as a result of both form and distribution of mineral materials in feed coals in conjunction with the coal treatment effects resulting from coal cleaning or either gasification or combustion.

  20. Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, F.F.

    1993-12-31

    Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

  1. Vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary coal tars. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    There is significant current interest in general area of coal pyrolysis, particularly because of the central role of pyrolysis in all thermally driven coal conversion processes-gasification, combustion, liquefaction, mild gasification, or thermal beneficiation. There remain several key data needs in these application areas. Among them is a need for more reliable correlation for prediction of vapor pressure of heavy, primary coal tars. The vapor pressure correlations that exist at present for coal tars are very crude and they are not considered reliable to even an order of magnitude when applied to tars. The present project seeks to address this important gap in the near term by direct measurement of vapor pressures of coal tar fractions, by application of well-established techniques and modifications thereof. The principal objectives of the program are to: (1) obtain data on the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of tars from a range of ranks of coal, (2) develop correlations based on a minimum set of conveniently measurable characteristics of the tars, (3) develop equipment that would allow performing such measurements in a reliable, straightforward fashion. A significant amount of time has been devoted during this quarter to extending the work on measurements of vapor pressures of tars. For this purpose, cellulose tar and cellulose tar related compounds have been selected as model systems. Cellulose tar has a much narrower distribution of molecular weight than does coal tar, and it is much more homogeneous. Thus it is better to develop the methods to be used for coal tars on this simpler model system first.

  2. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation: Quarterly report No. 2, January 1--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Narayanan, K.S.; Khan, L.; Diao, J.; Yin, Y.; Waltermire, M.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.

    1989-06-01

    The primary goal of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods of coal cleaning in order to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur removal at 90% Btu yield, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. The investigation of mechanisms for the control of coal and pyrite surfaces prior to fine coal flotation is an important aspect of the project objectives. A second major objective is to investigate the factors involved in the progressive weathering and oxidation of coal stored in three storage modes, namely, open, covered and in an argon-inerted atmosphere, over a period of twelve months. 37 figs., 41 tabs.

  3. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 9, March 20, 1980-June 19, 1980. [Hydroxydiphenylmethane, diphenylether, diphenymethane

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, Donald F.; Ogier, Walter C.

    1980-11-19

    This report describes work accomplished under two tasks: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond Types Present in Coals, and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, the very effective catalysis of carbon-carbon bond cleavage by iron oxides in hydroxydiphenylmethane structures has been further characterized. An electron-transfer mechanism offers the most likely explanation of the observations that (1) alumina and silica-alumina surfaces are less active catalysts than Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/, (2) meta-hydroxydiphenylmethane is almost as subject to catalysis as para-hydroxydiphenylmethane, (3) diphenyl ether is less subject to Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ catalysis than diphenylmethane, and (4) ortho-methoxydiphenylmethane exhibits the same susceptibility to Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ catalysis as ortho-hydroxydiphenylmethane. Under Task B, this quarter we have completed the survey of possible metal catalysts present in the Hastelloy C autoclave. We have found that coal conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O systems is effective when metal oxides such as MoO/sub 4//sup =/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup =/, and MnO/sub 4//sup -/ are used as catalysts, but there is less or no coal conversion with FeCl/sub 3/ or Ni(CH/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/. While studying the fate of the catalyst after the reaction, we have isolated formate in the water-soluble fraction. This important information could help us in studying the role of formate in coal conversion. During this quarter, we have also studied the influence of reaction time and fresh CO on coal conversion in the presence of a catalyst. A striking result of 67% of benzene-soluble materials was obtained with an equivalent of 6000 ppM of Cr as sodium dichromate.

  4. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1992--February 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron catalysts have been shown in previous reports of this project to significantly improve yields of heptane-soluble products obtained in the liquefaction of both as received and acid-exchanged Wyodak subbituminous coal and Blind Canyon bituminous coal. In this quarter, the soluble product (LSW) obtained from the noncatalytic low-severity liquefaction of Wyodak coal was used as a feed to determine the activity of iron based catalysts for the hydrogenation and depolymerization steps. Comparison data for liquefaction of the soluble LSW with other catalysts were desired, and these data were obtained for a dispersed form of iron sulfide, prepared via iron hydroxyoxide (PETC method). The iron oxyhydroxide catalyst was directly precipitated on LSW product using either water or ethanol as the solvent. An insight into the functioning of the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay in coal liquefaction was investigated by preparing and studying an iron oxoaluminate structure. An investigation of new methods for the production of tetralin soluble iron oxometallate catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. The hydrogenation activity of iron oxoaluminate was investigated using pyrene and 1-methylnaphthalene as the test compounds, and results were compared with thermal reactions. In order to determine the loss of activity, recovered catalyst was recycled a second time for the hydrotreating of pyrene. Reaction of 1-methylnaphthalene with iron oxoaluminate also gave very high conversion to 1- and 5-methyltetralins and small amount of 2- and 6-methyltetralins. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous and Blind Canyon bituminous coal was investigated using an in situ sulfided soluble iron oxoaluminate catalyst.

  5. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1993--May 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production and utilization of tetralin-soluble iron oxometallate precursors for coal liquefaction catalysts was continued in this quarter. Further descriptions of the catalytic activities of the sulfided forms were obtained. The hydrogenation activities of catalysts derived from iron oxotitanate and cobalt oxoaluminate were investigated using pyrene as a the test compound, and results were compared with thermal reactions. The hydrogenation activity of iron oxotitanate was superior to other catalysts including iron oxoaluminate. The hydrogenation activity of cobalt oxoaluminate was similar to that of iron oxoaluminate reported in previous quarterly report. The liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was investigated using in situ sulfided iron oxotitanate catalyst. In order to improve the usefulness of iron oxoaluminate as a liquefaction catalyst, iron oxoaluminate was supported on acid-treated montmorillonite (K-10). Supporting the iron oxoaluminate on an acidic support significantly improved the hydrogenation activity of iron oxoaluminate. The hydrocracking activity was increased by a large factor. Thus the aluminate and titanate structures surrounding the pyrrhotite that forms during sulfidation have a beneficial effect in preventing deactivation of the iron sites, and the presence of the acidic sites in the clay results in effective catalytic synergism between catalyst and support. These clay-supported iron oxometallates are highly promising catalysts for coal liquefaction. Iron oxyhydroxide and triiron supported on acid-treated montmorillonite (K-10) were tested for the liquefaction of ion-exchanged Wyodak (IEW) to minimize effects of the coal mineral matter. Both sulfided catalysts gave very high conversions of coal to THF-soluble and heptane-soluble (oils) products.

  6. Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams. Quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

    1993-02-01

    Our efforts this quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of primary devolatilization. In the long (12.5 cm) hot zone, Preliminary studies with a Pit. No. 8 hvA bituminous coal showed that a furnace temperature of 1380 K yields the best resolution of primary devolatilization from secondary pyrolysis. There is no soot at all in the PAH samples collected during the first half of tar evolution. Although some soot is present in the total sample of all tar from primary devolatilization it never amounts to more than 10 % of the aerosol and is usually less than 5 %. Also, the maximum weight loss observed with the new operating conditions is nearly 50 wt. % daf, which compares favorably to our previous value of 55 wt. % for this coal. Regarding PAH analysis during this quarter, the assembly of the gravity-flow column chromatographic system for prefractionating the coal tar was completed. Standard compounds spanning a wide range of polarities and molecular weights were selected and purchased. These compounds were utilized to begin testing and refining the prefractionation procedure.

  7. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation: Quarterly report No. 1, October 3, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The document is the first quarterly report prepared. This report will cover only the technical aspects of the work completed during the reporting period including: materials, procurement, sampling, grinding, and flotation tests.

  8. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Joffe, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The project objectives outlined in the previous reports involved defining conditions and cultures best suited to achieve the most effective metal release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts by microbial processes. The work initiated in the first quarter of 1993 was continued and expanded using solvent extraction systems defined by the multiple solvent tests used for washing the catalysts. To reduce the number of solvent systems the data were examined and two solvents selected for continued testing. The two solvent systems which were chosen and have been employed are the isopropanol and a tetrahydrofuran (THF) extractive solvents. In the present simplified extractive system, the catalysts are washed with the solvent with simple agitation to prevent catalyst breakage. Studies on the effect of catalyst surface area will be continued in conjunction with the progressive development of the optimized microbial metal releasing system. Thermophilic cultures (Bacillus stearothermophilus and Metallosphaera sedula) are being grown at 60 C for initial metal releasing studies. Since THF has proven to be a superior solvent system as judged by metal release, research has concentrated on using THF as the solvent system allowing work to proceed rapidly. However, additional work will still be directed toward defining any solvent system superior to THF in terms of aiding microbiological release of metals and economic feasibility. These studies include measurements of metal release at various catalyst-media ratios for both the tetrahydrofuran and isopropanol washed catalysts. The importance of the catalyst-media ratios is assuming a greater importance since it is desired to reduce the media volume to the lowest level possible while still retaining good metals release.

  9. Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Quarterly report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

    1994-06-01

    The focus of work being performed on Hot Coal Gas Desulfurization at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is primarily in the use of zinc titanate sorbents; however, prior studies indicated that an alternate sorbent, manganese dioxide-containing ore in mixture with alumina (75 wt% ore + 25 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) appears to be a strong contender to zincbased sorbents. Manganese, for example, has a lower vapor pressure in the elemental state than zinc; hence, it is not as likely to undergo zinc-depletion from the sorbent surface upon loading and regeneration cycles. Also manganese oxide is less readily reduced to the elemental state than iron; hence, the range of reduction potentials for oxygen is somewhat greater than for zinc ferrite. In addition, thermodynamic analysis of the manganese-oxygen-sulfur system shows it to be less amenable to sulfation than zinc ferrite. Also manganese chlorides are much less stable and volatile than zinc chlorides. Potential also exists for utilization of manganese at higher temperatures than zinc ferrite or zinc titanate. This Seventh Quarterly Report documents progress in bench-scale testing of a leading manganese-based sorbent pellets (FORM4-A). This formulation is a high-purity manganese carbonate-based material. This formulation was subjected to 20 consecutive cycles of sulfidation and regeneration at 900{degrees}C in a 2-inch fixed bed reactor. The sulfidation gas was a simulated Tampella U-gas with an increased hydrogen sulfide content of 3% by volume to accelerate the rate of breakthrough, arbitrarily taken as 500 ppmv. Consistent with thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) on individual pellets, the fixed bed tests show small improvement in capacity and kinetics with the sulfur-loading capacity being about 22% by weight of the original pellet, which corresponds to approximately 90% bed utilization!

  10. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March 1982-May 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  11. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, June 1982-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set.

  12. Destructive hydroisomerization of naphtha cuts over zeolitic nickel aluminosilicate catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Abad-zade, K.I.; Rustamov, M.I.

    1987-05-01

    The authors discuss a process developed for hydroisomerization of low-octane naphtha cuts with the aim of obtaining light isoparaffinic hydrocarbons. A zeolitic Ni-Al-Si catalyst with highly dispersed nickel was synthesized. The characteristics of the naphtha cuts used are provided. Data is given on the influence of temperature on destructive hydroisomerization of the 85-195/sup 0/C cut. It is found that the zeolitic Ni-Al-Si catalyst is adequate in activity so that the naphtha cut can be subjected to thorough destructive hydroisomerization through an ionic mechanism with little formation of C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ hydrocarbons.

  13. Co-cracking of ethane and naphtha in millisecond furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nowowiejski, G.B.; Petterson, W.C.; Kii, T.; Suwa, A.

    1982-05-01

    This paper presents results of an experimental program in which the process of short contact pyrolysis of mixtures of ethane and naphthas has been investigated as an economic alternative way to the production of olefins. The benefits of co-cracking of ethane recycle with naphtha feed in millisecond furnace are demonstrated. There is a directional improvement is selectivity to ethylene product which would result in about 2% less naphtha consumption at constant ethylene production. There is greater operating flexibility in terms of processing additional fresh ethane or LPG, when the furnace area is designed with the co-cracking concept.

  14. Great Plains Coal Gasification Project, Mercer County, North Dakota. Quarterly technical and environmental report, second quarter, 1984. [Mercer County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Project activities remain on schedule to meet Great Plains Gasification Associates' full gas production date. Detailed engineering is complete for the gasification plant. The only remaining engineering tasks involve field support activities and special projects. Construction is nearly complete. The majority of the remaining tasks involve civil, painting and electrical work. Start-up operations are proceeding very well. Many significant achievements were accomplished during the quarter. Coal was successfully gasified with oxygen. All of the first train's seven gasifiers completed successful production test runs. The only remaining plant permit is the Permit to Operate, which is expected to be issued in late 1985. Quality assurance/quality control activities included major equipment inspections, development of welding procedures and equipment turnover inspections. Freedom Mine development activities remain on schedule.

  15. Coal-derived promoters for the liquefaction of Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.H.; Knight, R.A.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate the use of liquids derived from coal either by mild gasification or supercritical extraction (SCE) to promote direct liquefaction of Illinois coal. Some organic sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds have been found to enhance liquefaction reactions. The use of Illinois coal to produce liquid fractions rich in these types of compounds could increase the rates of liquefaction reactions, thus improving the process economics. An integrated process combining direct liquefaction with mild gasification or SCE of coal is being developed by IGT.

  16. Improved coal conversion in CO/water systems. Quarterly report No. 2, December 4, 1984-March 3, 1985. [Polynaphthoquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; Hum, G.; Miin, T.C.

    1985-04-01

    This research program is a study of conversion mechanisms in CO/H/sub 2/O systems. We have previously reported the conversion of an Illinois No. 6 coal to toluene-soluble (TS) product at 400/sup 0/C for 20 minutes. The conversion was found to follow the water-gas-shift reaction (WGSR), CO + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. CO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/. More specifically, the levels of conversion correlated with the degree of CO disappearance. The extent of CO being converted in the WGSR is controlled by the amount of KOH present. Ultimately, the level of conversion was controlled by varying the initial pH of the H/sub 2/O solution. The intermediate is believed to be formate, formed by the reaction of CO and KOH. Ross has postulated the mechanism of coal conversion in CO/H/sub 2/O systems in a recent review on aqueous conversion. It is suggested that the thermolysis of weak bibenzyl type bonds in coal conversion is not a significant process, but rather that reactions involving phenolic constituents in the coal are more important. We have synthesized a model polymer, polynaphthoquinone (PNQ), and have reduced it to its polyphenolic structure for studying the importance of phenolic functions and its correlation to coal conversion. The research is being performed in two tasks. In the first, we are investigating formate-promoted conversions of Illinois No. 6 coal. In the second, the reactions of the model polymer PNQ are being studied in the CO/H/sub 2/O system. Our objectives are to improve conversion effectiveness with formate and to determine the correlation of phenolic functions present in coal structures with conversion. This quarter, we have focused on the synthesis and reduction of PNQ. We are at present designing an appropriate microreactor system for the formate study. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Novel catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.T.; Savage, P.E.; Briggs, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    The principal objective of this research is to evaluate the hydrotreatment properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Mo oxynitride and oxycarbide catalysts. This information will be used to assess the potential of these materials for use as commercial catalysts for hydrotreating coal-derived liquids. During this quarter, the authors evaluated the catalytic properties of a series of supported molybdenum nitride catalysts. These catalysts were prepared in the laboratory for comparison with the supported molybdenum oxynitrides. Pyridine hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was used as the test reaction.

  18. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste: Quarterly report, 1 May 1996-31 July, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. This quarterly report describes activities completed in the design, procure, install and start-up phase.

  19. Photoassisted electrolysis applied to coal gasification. Quarterly report, 1 July 1982-30 September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The literature search was continued on the electrochemical oxidation and reduction of coal. Humic acids are generated upon oxidation of coal in alkali media. Similar results were reported for the oxidation of coal. The reduction coal in nonaqueous solutions gave reduced coal of various degrees of hydrogenation depending on experimental conditions. These earlier results suggest that a proper combination of electrochemical oxidation and reduction of coal may lead to various classes of derivatized coal including liquid coals. Both CdS and CdSe thin film electrodes were tested for photoassisted coal gasification. Although high photocurrents were observed the electrodes were not stable. To stabilize the electrodes the electrode surface was modified by coating with a conductive organic polymer, which behaves as an electron transfer mediator. Various experiments in this effort are described.

  20. Cooperative research in coal liquefaction infratechnology and generic technology development: Quarterly report, July 1-October 1, 1987. [Kentucky coal deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Sendlein, L.V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Research programs in coal liquefaction continued in the following areas: (1) catalytic coal liquefaction using Mo catalysts; (2) coprocessing experiments, using Maya topper long resid as a solvent for Illinois No. 6 coal using a variety of both unimodal and bimodal catalysts. The effect of agitation rate on conversion in a horizontally aligned tubing bond experiment was investigated; (3) the effect of tetrabutyltin and FeSO/sub 4/ . 7H/sub 2/O catalysts on coprocessing. A mathematical model was used to determine critical coprocessing rate constants; (4) a study of the bond cleavage reactions of benzl phenyl ethers was completed. Similar bond cleavages may be induced in coal and lead to liquid products under low severity conditions. EPR studies of Cr(V) model compounds established an unusual lineshape. Solvent extraction using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone on a high resinite coal from Utah. New NMP experimets are in progress on oil shales and tar sands. New experimental apparatus has been devised for investigating the kinetics of the extraction process; (5) collection and analysis of the eastern Kentucky coals was completed. Chemical and petrographic analyses were placed in the KECL coal data base; (6) liquefaction screening of the eastern Kentucky coals was completed. Liquefaction data is being correlated with the coal properties; (7) a new /sup 13/C NMR technique, variable angle sample spinning (VASS), show great promise for determining the average cluster size in coal. Sink/float methods are being developed to obtain gram quantities of maceral enriched (> 90%) specimens on which liquefaction studies can be made. Pyrolysis and mass spectrometry studies are being made on raw Elkhorn coal; (8) biological desulfurization studies emphasized experiments with Sulfolobus brierleyi. The growth of Sulfolobus solfataricus on casamino acids and yeast extract was investigated; (9) the CFFLS computer network/liquefaction database became operational. 4 refs., 13 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1, 1993--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, G.P.

    1994-07-01

    This report summarizes progress in four areas of research under the general heading of Coal Liquefaction. Results of studies concerning the coliquefaction of coal with waste organic polymers or chemical products of these polymers were reported. Secondly, studies of catalytic systems for the production of clean transportation fuels from coal were discussed. Thirdly, investigations of the chemical composition of coals and their dehydrogenated counterparts were presented. These studies were directed toward elucidation of coal liquefaction processes on the chemical level. Finally, analytical methodologies developed for in situ monitoring of coal liquefaction were reported. Techniques utilizing model reactions and methods based on XAFS, ESR, and GC/MS are discussed.

  2. Advanced pulverized coal combustor for control of NO/sub x/ emissions. First quarterly report, September 24-December 24, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Pam, R.; Chu, E. K.; Kelly, J. T.

    1981-01-30

    The first quarter results under the Advanced Pulverized Coal Combustor for Control of NO/sub x/ Emissions Program (DOE Contract DE-AC22-80PC30296) are reported. A preliminary gas phase reaction model for predicting fuel NO/sub x/ formation during combustion of methane fuel has been constructed. Predictions of NO/sub x/ formation under stirred reactor conditions agree with existing experimental data. Thermal NO/sub x/ and coal reaction data will be developed and verified during the next reporting period. Progress has been made in formulating the changes necessary to upgrade the Acurex PROF code for use as the comprehensive data analysis tool in this program. The radiation modeling and the incorporation of the needed modifications into the PROF code will occur during the next reporting period. The idealized combustor was designed, and requests for bids to fabricate the combustor were submitted. Combustor fabrication will be completed during the next reporting period.

  3. Rhelogical properties essential for the atomization of coal water slurries (CWS). Quarterly progress report, June 15, 1992--September 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ohene, F.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of high shear and extensional properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the extensional and high shear properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During the past quarter, several experimental studies on pressure dependent atomization of Coal-water slurries and simulated fluids were performed. Also surface tension, elastic, high and low shear viscosities were performed. These tests were performed to initiate the understanding of the fundamental parameters that govern the atomization process of CWS.

  4. Investigation of coal structure. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the physical structure of coal: the extent to which coal molecules may be covalently cross-linked and/or physically associated. Coal structure should be well understood for its effective utilization, and better understanding of physical structure of coal is the first step for the development of coal utilization. Solvent swelling of coal and multistep sequences of extraction are the two main probes of investigation. No single solvent appears to disrupt all of the relatively strong secondary interactions in coal. Various relatively strong secondary interactions need to be solvated step by step by appropriate procedures. If physical association is considerable, it should be possible to extract coal by the multistep sequences. Secondly, physical association will be evaluated by coal swelling. For the investigation of the effects of low coal concentration and continuous mixing, a new method will be developed. The focus of the work will be on a specific bituminous coal low in sulfur and iron. As requested by DOE, Blind Canyon coal (DECS-16) obtained from the Penn State Coal Bank has been used in this project.

  5. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, J. H.; Baldwin, R. M.; Bain, R. L.

    1980-02-01

    Colorado School of Mines is conducting coal hydrogenation research with the following objectives and scope of work: (1) Comparison of the rates of coal hydrogenation in continuous flow stirred tank and tube flow reactors using pure hydrogen, catalyzed CO-STEAM, and syngas processing conditions; (2) Investigation of the influence of coal rank on the rate of hydrogenation of coal to preasphaltene, asphaltenes, and oil in batch reactors; (3) Batch evaluation of the effect of operating conditions (temperature and pressure) on the rate of hydrogenation of coal-derived preasphaltanes and asphaltenes; (4) Determination of the effect of selected disposable catalysts on the rate of batch hydrogenation of preasphaltenes and asphaltenes and selected bituminous coals. Testing and evaluation of promising catalyst systems in the contunuous processing unit; (5) Formulation of a unified kinetic/mechanistic model for coal liquefaction taking into account petrography of the feed coal and hydrocarbon lumps in the product oil.

  6. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Eighth quarterly report, [January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.; Bumpus, J.A.

    1996-07-28

    Progress is reported on solubilization of low-rank coal by enzyme activity derived from Trametes versicolor or P. chrysosporium. Specifically during the reporting period efforts were directed towards the determining the effect of pH on solubilization of leonardite, the role of laccase in low coal solubilization and metabolism, the decolorization of soluble coal macromolecule by P. chrysosprium and T. versicolor in solid agar gel, and the solubilization of low rank coal in slurry cultures and solid phase reactors.

  7. Environmental impact assessment of selenium from coal mine spoils. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.

    1990-10-01

    The development of environmental impact assessment of selenium from coal mine spoils will provide a useful guideline to predict the environmental impact of Se from abandoned coal mine operations. Information obtained from such a study can be applied in areas where coal mining has not yet begun in order to predict and identify the geochemistry of rocks, soils, surface waters and groundwaters likely to be disturbed by coal mining operation.

  8. Slag characterization and removal using pulse detonation for coal gasification. Quarterly research report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

    1996-03-25

    Microbeam Technologies Incorporated (MTI) is working with Prairie View to develop and demonstrate a new method to remove deposits from coal-fired utility boilers. MTI is providing background information on fuel properties, ash formation, ash deposition, and ash removal. In addition, MTI is providing deposits collected from a full scale utility boilers. Ash deposits on fireside heat exchange surfaces of power plants significantly decrease plant efficiency and are aggravated by variability in coal quality. Deposit formation is related to coal quality (chemical and physical characteristics of the inorganic material), system operating conditions, and system design. Variations in coal quality can significantly influence ash deposition on heat transfer surfaces resulting in decreased plant performance and availability. Ash accumulations on heat transfer surfaces require annual or semi-annual shutdowns for cleaning which result in cleaning costs and lost revenues from being off-line. In addition, maintaining slag flow in wet bottom boilers and cyclone-fired boilers can require co-firing of other fuels and outages to remove frozen slag resulting in decreased efficiency and availability. During this reporting period MTI performed analysis of deposits collected from full-scale utility boilers. Deposit samples were obtained from Basin Electric and from Northern States Power (NSP). The analyses were conducted using scanning electron microscopy/microprobe techniques as described in the past quarterly report. The chemical and physical properties of the deposits were determined. The results for sample collected from NSP`s Riverside plant are reported here.

  9. Vhf EPR analysis of organic sulfur in coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, R.B.; Belford, R.L.

    1992-10-01

    This third quarterly report of the project`s first year reports that, consonant with our research goals, we have refined the quantitative measurement of organic sulfur in coals, and extended this technique to analysis of treated and desulfurized coals, using either low temperature pyrolysis in our labs, or other techniques as supplied by DOE-PETC. The evolution of the central carbon and downfield sulfur peak amplitudes vs pyrolysis temperature support both the hypothesis of increase in aromatic carbon radicals and the evolution of some sulfur, even at low temperatures. The examination of evacuation effects, and differentiation of species by microwave power saturation levels and second derivative W-band detection also continued. Finally, model sulfur-containing carbonaceous solids -- chars from sucrose or cellulose, and various model sulfur compounds (elemental, mono- and di-thiophenic, and thiosulfidal) - are under development. Already, the W-band spectra of some of these char models show striking similarities to those of whole and treated coals. The further development of these models in conjunction with all other aspects of this program are progressing steadily toward the goal of better quantitative md qualitative differentiation of aromatic heteroatoms in coal.

  10. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Twenty-second quarterly report, January 2, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this proposed study are to establish the mechanisms and rates of basic steps in coal conversion processes, to integrate and incorporate this information into comprehensive computer models for coal conversion processes, to evaluate these models and to apply them to gasification, mild gasification and combustion in heat engines. This report describes progress during twenty second quarter of the program. Specifically, the paper discusses progress in three task areas: (1) Submodel development and evaluation: coal to char chemistry submodel; fundamental high-pressure reaction rate data; secondary reaction of pyrolysis product and burnout submodels; ash physics and chemistry submodel; large particle submodels; large char particle oxidation at high pressures; and SO{sub x}-NO{sub x} submodel development and evaluation; (2) Comprehensive model development and evaluation: integration of advanced submodels into entrained-flow code, with evaluation and documentation; comprehensive fixed-bed modeling review, development evaluation and implementation; and generalized fuels feedstock submodel; and (3) Application of integrated codes: application of generalized pulverized coal comprehensive code and application of fixed-bed code.

  11. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Fourth quarterly progress report, May 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.

    1995-07-24

    To test the hypothesis that coal (leonardite) Solubilization and the subsequent depolymerization of the solubilized coal macromolecules are distinct events in lignin degrading fungi. In addition to T versicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, another lignin degrading fungus that also has the ability to solubilize coal, will be studied. To test the hypothesis that the processes of coal (leonardite) solubilization and coal macro molecule depolymerization in lignin degrading fungi can be regulated by altering the nutritional status of the microorganism. Coal solubilization is expected to occur in nutrient rich media whereas depolymerization of solubilized coal macromolecules is expected to occur in nutrient limited media. To determine the role of extracellular enzymes (laccases, lignin peroxidases and Mn peroxidases) that are secreted by lignin degrading fungi during coal solubilization or coal macro molecule depolymerization. To assess the role of enzymatically generated oxygen radicals, non-radical active oxygen species, veratryl alcohol radicals and Mn{sup +++} complexes in coal macro molecule depolymerization. To characterize products of coal solubilization and coal macro molecule depolymerization that are formed by T. versicolor and P. chrysosporium and their respective extracellular enzymes. Solubilization products formed using oxalic acid and other metal chelators will also be characterized and compared.

  12. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.; Martin, L.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experiments on flotation of 60--200 mesh treated Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539) and Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) were performed. The coals were treated with 20-ppM alcohol aqueous solutions (soln) for 1-24 hours at the 0.002-g/min mass flow rate at 225C. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with 1-propanol aqueous solution, increases with treatment durations for the first 10 hours and then decreases. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with isopropanol soln increases with treatment durations for the first 18 hours and then levels off. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with butanol soln, increases with treatment durations. Flotation of 1-butanol-treated Illinois No. 6 coal is higher than that of t-butanol-treated Illinois No. 6 coal. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with 20-ppM-isobutanol 20-ppM-HCl soln, increases with treatment durations for the first 10 hours treatment period, and then decreases sharply with treatment durations. Flotation of Wyodak coal, treated with water only, increases with treatment durations. Effects of water treatment on flotation of Wyodak coal are significantly pronounced compared to Illinois No. 6 coal.

  13. Characterization and supply of coal based fuels. Quarterly report, August 1, 1987--October 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements; Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is discussed.

  14. Magnetic relaxation -- coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the CW (continuous wave) and pulsed EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) have been examined of the swelled Argonne Premium whole coals and the swelled residues of these coals. The CW EPR spectra will not be of high quality due to the unexpectedly microwave-lossy character of the pyridine used for swelling. Being relatively unaffected by this characteristic, the pulsed EPR measurements of the spin relaxation times of the broad (non-inertinite) and narrow (inertinite) macerals have been completed. Although detailed analyses of these results have not yet been done, marked differences have been found between the relaxation times of the swelled and unswelled coals and residues. The most startling are the less than 200 nsec times T{sub 1} of the spin-lattice relaxation of the inertinite radicals in the swelled samples. The T{sub 1} of this maceral in the unswelled coal were approaching 1 millisecond. The T{sub 1} contrast was much less pronounced between the swelled and non-swelled non-inertinite macerals. The prospects of significant progress in coal pore size measurements with xenon and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) have dimmed since the beginning of this project. This assessment is based on the dearth of these types of studies, a paper at a contractors` meeting on this subject that did not materialize, and discussions with colleagues with experience with the technique in coals. Instead, the authors have been developing a pulsed EPR technique for the spin probing of molecular motion to be applied to pores in carbonaceous materials. This report contains a copy of a nearly final draft of a paper being prepared on the development of this technique, entitled {open_quotes}Physical Characterization of the State of Motion of the Phenalenyl Spin Probe in Cation-Exchanged Faujasite Zeolite Supercages with Pulsed EPR.{close_quotes}

  15. Coal materials handling coal feeder development, Phase I. First quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-20

    The FMA Linear Pocket Feeder (LPF) is a positive displacement feed system in which the pressure seal is developed by a set of mechanical labyrinth seals between the piston rings and the sealing tube. The pressure seal is completely independent of the type and size of coal used. The LPF can maintain a pressure difference with no coal in the system and can achieve steady state operation in less than a minute after startup. Coal flow rate can be changed while the LPF is operating at design speed and operating pressure with no effect on the LPF's performance. The LPF has the potential for operating on all types and sizes of coal as long as they are free flowing. The existing LPF will be upgraded utilizing the knowledge gained during the previous 330 hours of operation. The loading station will be redesigned to allow the infeed of coarse coal in such a manner that minimum degradation occurs during entry into the pockets of the feeder and feed of pulverized coal in a way that minimizes entrapment of air under the coal charge to allow quicker settling. Certain other proposed design changes are described also. (LTN)

  16. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Eighth quarterly report, [April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.; Bumpus, J.A.

    1996-07-28

    This project addresses the solubilization of low-rank coal (leonardite) by lignin degrading fungi. During this reporting period efforts were focused on determining the effect of pH on coal solubilization by oxalate ion and other biologically important compounds that might function as metal chelators, on the role of laccase in coal solubilization and metabolism, on decolorization of soluble coal macromolecule by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and T. versicolor in solid agar media, and on solubilization of coal in slurry cultures and solid phase reactors.

  17. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 7, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.

    1995-07-01

    This seventh quarterly report describes the activities and accomplishments of the research team at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, related to the project entitled {open_quotes}Combustion of Pulverized Coal in Vortex Structures{close_quotes} during the period April 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995. The work performed in this quarter consisted of the following four tasks: (i) conducting experiments with particulate laden shear layers to measure mean velocity and turbulence intensity field (ii) preparing an abstract for the 1995 UCR contractor`s meeting, and a paper for the Energy Conference to be held in Houston in 1996, (iii) participating and presenting a paper UCR meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, (iv) design and installation of devices to traverse the test section while keeping the optics undisturbed, and (v) and design and testing of a natural gas burner system to heat either of the streams to conduct pyrolysis and combustion experiments. In the next quarter, we plan to continue this work with heated shear layers in which particles undergo pyrolysis and combustion. Flow visualization and mean velocity field measurement instrumentation will continue as the major experimental techniques.

  18. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1994, through March 31, 1994. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal drying process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal processing, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership`s ACCP Demonstration Facility entered Phase III, Demonstration Operation, in April 1992 and operated in an extended startup mode through August 10, 1993, when the facility became commercial. Rosebud SynCoal Partnership instituted an aggressive program to overcome startup obstacles and now focuses on supplying product coal to customers. Significant accomplishments in the history of the SynCoal{reg_sign} process development are shown in Appendix A.

  19. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, March-May 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    This project consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Techniques developed in the first three areas were used in additional research on Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky. Some of the findings are: percent variations (pseudovitrinite-vitrinite/vitrinite X100) indicate greater dispersions in Vicker's microhardness values, MH(v), of vitrinite and pseudovitrinite from eastern Kentucky coals than those of western Kentucky coals; reflectance data confirm a previously suspected rank increase from eastern Knott and Magoffin Counties to eastern Pike County; microhardness investigation of Upper Elkhorn 2 coal in eastern Kentucky indicates that pseudovitrinite is consistently harder than vitrinite; and of the western coals studied, Dunbar and Lead Creek, there appears to be some correlations between vitrinite, ash, sulfur, and thickness. 6 tables.

  20. Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 1983-February 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Paranjape, A.S.

    1984-04-30

    Five Bench-Scale coal liquefaction runs were completed with Wyoming subbituminous coal in a two-stage process scheme. In this process scheme, LDAR, the lighter fraction of ash-free resid, was fed to the catalytic stage prior to its recycle to the thermal stage, whereas DAR, the heavy fraction of the deashed resid, was directly recycled to the thermal stage without any intermediate processing step. The results indicate that increasing coal space rate in the dissolver resulted in lower coal conversion and reduced distillate yield in this process configuration. The coal conversions decreased from 92 wt% to 89 wt% (MAF coal) and the distillate yield was reduced from 50 wt% to less than 40 wt% (MAF coal), as the coal space velocity increased. Attempts to duplicate the yields of Run 32, at comparable process conditions in Runs 37 and 38, were unsuccessful. Several process parameters were investigated but failed to show why the yields of Run 32 could not be duplicated. Valuable process related information was gained as a result of process parameter studies completed during these runs. At comparable process conditions, coal conversions were lower by about 3 to 4 relative percent and were only in the 87 wt% (MAF coal) range. Similarly, the distillate yield was about 40 wt% (MAF coal) which is about 10 wt% lower than observed in Run 32. Although no exact cause for these results could be determined, it appeared that the H/C atomic ratio of the solvent and possibly the flow pattern (plug-flow versus back-mixed) could have affected the coal conversion and quantity of distillate product produced. A significant decrease in coal conversion of 4 to 5 wt% was observed when the disposable catalyst (iron oxide) was removed from the reaction mixture and therefore substantiates the need for a disposable catalyst in the liquefaction of Wyoming subbituminous coal.

  1. Advanced coal liquefaction. Final quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    In this quarter, we successfully prepared a granular catalyst required for decomposing compound number 9 in the catalytic membrane reactor. The surface and porous properties of this catalyst are similar to the properties of the ceramic membrane surface. Thus, the catalytic reaction pattern from the granular catalyst is expected to be similar to that from the membranes surface. Further, this catalyst demonstrates a typical property of acid catalysts. The catalytic membrane reactor activity will be resumed in the next quarter using the catalyst prepared in this quarter. In addition, carbon coating of this catalyst did not reduce its acidic property significantly. More study will performed to determine the role of the carbon coating.

  2. The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the pre-combustion removal of sulfur from coal. Microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal; however, the removal of organic sulfur form coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal samples for subsequent biodesulfurization. During the current quarter, chemical comminution and combined chemical treatment/explosive comminution experiments have been performed to generate coal samples with increased surface area and porosity. Ammonia vapor was found to be the most effective chemical comminution agent and the optimum conditions for combined chemical treatment/explosive comminution have not yet been determined.

  3. Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Shake flask tests were completed of microbial pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Rosebud subbituminous coal. Significant amounts of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and Be were removed from this coal. Analyses in connection with leach column tests of Pittsburgh coal were completed and confirmed significant removal of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and As from this coal. Although Hg was not removed from Pittsburgh coal by microbial attack, there was a correlation between HCl leaching of Hg from this coal and the extent of depyritization. Since HgS is soluble in HCl, the results suggest HgS is exposed by chemical and microbial dissolution of coal pyrite. Column tests with cleaned Indiana No. 5 coal are in progress and show significant early dissolution of Ni, Mn, Cd, Co and As. A final shake flask test with Kentucky No. 9 coal was begun. Pittsburgh coal with a low content of fines was shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in preparation for slurry column tests of HAP precursor removal. Project results were presented at the PETC contractor`s conference held in Pittsburgh. A project progress review meeting was also held with the PETC technical project monitor.

  4. Upgraded coal interest group. First quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, W.; Lebowitz, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    The interest group got under way effective January 1, 1994, with nine utility members, EPRI, Bechtel, and the Illinois Clean Coal Institute. DOE participation was effective October 1, 1994. The first meeting was held on April 22, 1994 in Springfield, Illinois and the second meeting was held on August 10--11, 1994 at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Technical reviews were prepared in several areas, including the following: status of low rank coal upgrading, advanced physical coal cleaning, organic sulfur removal from coal, handling of fine coal, combustion of coal water slurries. It was concluded that, for bituminous coals, processing of fines from coal cleaning plants or impoundments was going to be less costly than processing of coal, since the fines were intrinsically worth less and advanced upgrading technologies require fine coal. Penelec reported on benefits of NOX reductions when burning slurry fuels. Project work was authorized in the following areas: Availability of fines (CQ, Inc.), Engineering evaluations (Bechtel), and Evaluation of slurry formulation and combustion demonstrations (EER/MATS). The first project was completed.

  5. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals. Quarterly report, [April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-08-01

    The effect of weathering (oxidation and dehydration upon exposure to air) on the molecular accessibility of potential catalysts was studied by the EPR spin probe technique. Fresh samples of all 8 APCS coals were exposed to air for periods up to 36 days. Weathering produced significant effects on the retention of spin probes in most of the APCS coals under 91 % carbon (dmmf). It was determined that the lower ranked coal (Beulah Zap and Wyodak) under went a structural collapse which precluded retention of even spin probe VIII. However, medium ranked coals exhibited improved retention upon weathering when swelled in toluene. Swelling with pyridine opened up small pores for 81--86% carbon which is not observed for swelling with toluene. Changes in coal structure were successfully followed by the EPR spin probe method. A detailed analysis of the data collected from the swelling of coals oxidized in a moisture free environment was completed to differentiate between weathering and oxidation. Eight vacuum dried APCS coals were oxidized in an enclosed, pure oxygen, moisture free environment, and the effects of oxidation alone on coal structure were studied by the intercalation of EPR spin probes. The data shows a factor of 5 increase in spin probe retention for some coals oxidized in O{sub 2} versus air., suggesting a large increase in oxidized material. Particular care was taken during the swelling procedures to avoid exposure of the coal samples to air or moisture. EPR spectra were then obtained for these 300 samples.

  6. Biochemical bond breaking in coal: Third quarterly report, (April through June 1987)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    Major research efforts are presently being conducted in three principal areas of focus: (1) optimization of coal biosolubilization; (2) characterization of the solubilized products resulting from microbial coal depolymerization; and (3) degradation of model compounds to assess potential interunit linkages which may be attacked by whole culture or cell-free culture supernatants containing extracellular enzymes. Initial evaluations of the various combinations of microbes, coals, and coal pretreatments indicated that CP1 and CP1 + 2 solubilized all of the coals selected for this project at substantially higher rates than S. setonii or T. versicolor. The ARC CP1 + 2 consortium was chosen as the primary culture for detailed evaluation of coal biosolubilization and model compound degradation. Studies were conducted to determine if solubilization of coal by CP1 + 2 supernatants could be enhanced by elevating the temperature. Solubilization of both untreated Leonardite and HNO3 treated Wyodak (Smith-Roland) subbituminous coal was increased when elevating the temperature from ambient to 35C. The initial solubilization rate (T0 - 1 hour) of Leonardite at 22C was 16 OD units/hour and at 35C was 18 OD units/hour. Thus, an elevation of 13C enhanced solubilization of this coal by 12.5%. The effect of temperature on solubilization of Wyodak coal appeared to be more pronounced. Solubilization of HNO3 treated coals by the CP organisms is not only relatively rapid, but is also extensive. The relatively rapid and extensive coal solubilization attainable by CP1 + 2 has enabled us to produce quantities of product sufficient for analytical methods development and for characterization of the coal products. Initial attempts have been made to characterize the depolymerized products using HPLC and GC/MS. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Gutterman, C.; Chander, S.

    1993-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and carrying out a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The primary coal of this program, Black Thunder subbituminous coal, can be effectively beneficiated to about 3.5 wt % ash using aqueous sulfurous acid pretreatment. This treated coal can be further beneficiated to about 2 wt % ash using commercially available procedures. All three coals used in this study (Black Thunder, Burning Star bituminous, and Martin Lake lignite) are effectively swelled by a number of solvents. The most effective solvents are those having hetero-functionality. laboratory- and bench-scale liquefaction experimentation is underway using swelled and catalyst impregnated coal samples. Higher coal conversions were observed for the SO{sub 2}-treated subbituminous coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Conversions of swelled coal were highest when Molyvan L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively, were added to the liquefaction solvent. The study of bottoms processing consists of combining the ASCOT process which consists of coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking to maximize the production of coal-derived liquids while rejecting solids within the coke drum. The asphalt production phase has been completed; representative product has been evaluated. The solvent system for the deasphalting process has been established. Two ASCOT tests produced overall liquid yields (63.3 wt % and 61.5 wt %) that exceeded the combined liquid yields from the vacuum tower and ROSE process.

  8. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. [Quarterly] technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Huang, L.; Saini, A.K.; Schobert, H.H.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1993-07-01

    In this quarter, progress has been made in the following two aspects: (1) effects of drying and mild oxidation on conversion and product distribution during non-catalytic and catalytic liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous coal (DECS-9); and (2) effects of solvent and catalyst on conversion and structural changes of a Texas subbituminous coal (DECS-1). Influence of drying and mild oxidation on catalytic and non-catalytic liquefaction (at 350C for 30 min with 6.9 MPa (cold) H{sub 2} was studied using Wyodak subbituminous coal. For non-catalytic runs, fresh raw coal gave higher conversion and higher oil yield than both the vacuum- and air-dried coals, regardless of the solvent. Compared to the vacuum-dried coal, the coal dried in air in 100C for 2 h gave a better conversion in the presence of either a hydrogen donor tetralin or a non-donor 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) solvent. Catalytic runs were performed using in-situ generated molybdenum sulfide catalyst from ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (ATTM) precursor impregnated on either raw coal or predried coal samples. The solvent-free runs using ATTM loaded on the raw coal gave higher conversion and higher oil yield than loading ATTM on vacuum- or air-dried coal. In the presence of either tetralin or 1-MN, however, the runs using ATTM loaded on air-dried coal afford better conversions and oil yields as compared to the runs using vacuum-dried coal. Upon drying coal in air at 150C for 20 h, the conversion significantly decreased to a lower value than that of the vacuum-dried coal in the non-catalytic runs, and the same trend was observed in the runs of the dried coals loaded with ATTM. Physical, chemical, and surface chemical aspects of effects of drying and oxidation and the role of water are also discussed in the report.

  9. Photochemicl coal dissolution. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Doetchman, D.C.

    1996-09-01

    Work begun and described for the previous quarter on electron transfer processes in porous media continued to be the focus of work this quarter. Work focused on diphenylamine and benzophenone individually doped into the supercages of cation-exchanged X-type faujasite zeolites. the results show that diphenylamine exhibits the major effect in Na-X, K-X and Rb-X while benzophenone generally serves only to suppress weak background signals.

  10. Deeply etherify FCC light cracked Naphtha (LCN)

    SciTech Connect

    Trotta, R.

    1996-03-01

    Drastic changes in refinery operations and economics resulting from implementation of environmentally driven U.S. legislation such as the Complex Model in 1998, as well as possible changes beyond that will necessitate several changes. An effective method of adjusting to these process challenges is by deep etherification of the entire FCC light cracked naphtha (LCN) stream, which is the FCC product fraction containing C{sub 5}, C{sub 6} and C{sub 7} hydrocarbons having a typical 1 atm boiling range of 95{degrees}F to 212{degrees}F. Deep etherification technology (DET) can solve five or six problems at once. All U.S. refineries which have an FCC unit have an LCN stream (or possibly a separate LCN stream). Snaprogetti`s LCN DET technology is essentially an upgrade of an otherwise already finished product-which in today`s processing and operations environment, would be sent directly to the gasoline pool. The technology is simply an add-on and does not substantially change refinery operations. As the LCN DET does not require changes in the FCC and catalytic reformer, DET does not cause disturbances to the refinery`s operation.

  11. Optimize syngas to naphtha over ruthenium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, R.A.; Murchison, C.B.

    1984-06-01

    In this work the authors undertake the design of a catalyst system which would efficiently utilize a stream of CO--H/sub 2/, available as a byproduct of partial combustion cracking. The H/sub 2//CO ratio of this stream was fixed by the conditions of the ethylene production process, making it desirable to reject the oxygen in CO as water rather than CO/sub 2/. A second important goal was to maximize the C/sub 2/+ selectivity in order to obtain the highest possible yield of feedstock crackable to ethylene in conventional LPG and naphtha crackers. Using an optimized potassium-promoted, aluminasupported ruthenium catalyst of practical concentration (1% Ru, 0.5% K) on a commercially available support, campaigns of over 1,000 hours on stream were achieved. Impregnation techniques which are readily scaled up were used. During these campaigns the C/sub 2/+ selectivity averaged about 90%. Of the C/sub 2/+ product, about onethird was C/sub 2/-C/sub 5/ while the C/sub 6/+ represents two-thirds.

  12. Transition metal catalysis of hydrogen shuttling in coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1985-November 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to uncover new catalytic processes for the liquefaction of coal and for upgrading coal-derived fuels by removing undesirable organosulfur, organonitrogen and organooxygen constituents. Basic to both the liquefaction of coal and the purification of coal liquids is the transfer of hydrogen from such sources as dihydrogen, metal hydrides or partially reduced aromatic hydrocarbons to the extensive aromatic rings in coal itself or to aromatic sulfides, amines and ethers. Accordingly, this study is exploring how such crucial hydrogen-transfer processes might be catalyzed by soluble, low-valent transition metal complexes under moderate conditions of temperature and pressure. During the fifth quarter of this three-year grant the following phases of this study received particular attention: (a) the principal investigator completed his three-month period as visiting scientist at Cornell University, October 1 to December 31, 1985, with Professor Roald Hoffmann on the topic of Extended Hueckel Molecular Orbital calculations of organometallic structure; (b) final gas evolution studies between LiAlH/sub 4/ and bipyridyl(1,5-cyclooctadiene) nickel have been made and the related manuscript written for publication; (c) gas evolution studies between diisobutylaluminum hydride and phosphine complexes of Pt(0) and Ni(0) have been undertaken, as part of our trying to understand how powerful reducing agents can be generated from such combinations; (d) hydrogen shuttling studies continue between dihydroaromatic hydrocarbons and Ni(0) complexes; (e) studies on the cleavage of benzylic C-C bonds by Ni(0) and Cr(0) complexes are being intensified; and (f) attempts are being made to isolate crystalline samples of several organonickel intermediates in the foregoing cleavage reactions, so that x-ray structure determinations can be carried out.

  13. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly progress report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-10-01

    The advanced fine-coal cleaning techniques such as column flotation, recovers a low-ash ultra-fine size clean-coal product. However, economical dewatering of the clean coal product to less than 20 percent moisture using conventional technology is difficult. This research program objective is to evaluate a novel coal surface modification technique developed at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research in conjunction with conventional and advanced dewatering technique at a pilot scale. The study which is in progress is being conducted at the Powell Mountain Coal Company`s Mayflower preparation plant located in St. Charles, VA. During this quarter laboratory dewatering studies were conducted using a 4-in diameter laboratory chemical centrifuge. The baseline data provided a filter cake with about 32% moisture. Addition of 0.3 kg/t of a cationic surfactant lowered the moisture to 29%. Addition of anionic and non-ionic surfactant was not effective in reducing the filter cake moisture content. In the pilot scale studies, a comparison was conducted between the high pressure and vacuum dewatering techniques. The base line data with high pressure and vacuum filtration provided filter cakes with 23.6% and 27.8% moisture, respectively. Addition of 20 g/t of cationic flocculent provided 21% filter cake moisture using the high pressure filter. A 15% moisture filter cake was obtained using 1.5 kg/t of non-ionic surfactant. Vacuum filter provided about 23% to 25% moisture product with additional reagents. The high pressure filter processed about 3 to 4 times more solids compared to vacuum filter.

  14. Applications of micellar enzymology to clean coal technology. Tenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.

    1992-04-29

    Full implementation of coal fuel sources will require more effective methods of providing ``clean coal`` as a fuel source. Methods must be developed to reduce the sulfur content of coal which significantly contributes to environmental pollution. This project is designed to develop methods for pre-combustion coal remediation by implementing recent advances in enzyme biochemistry. The novel approach of this study is incorporation of hydrophilic oxidative enzymes in reverse micelles in an organic solvent. Enzymes from commercial sources or microbial extracts are being investigated for their capacity to remove organic sulfur from coal by oxidation of the sulfur groups, splitting of C-S bonds and loss of sulfur as sulfuric acid. Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS) are serving as models of organic sulfur-containing components of coal in initial studies.

  15. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Ninth quarterly report, October, November, December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1989-12-31

    A new base catalyzed C-alkylation reaction that employs a mixture of n-butyllithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane to produce coal anions that are subsequently treated with n-alkyl halides at 0{degree}C has been developed. Almost quantitative pyridine solubilization was achieved by C-octylation of a Lower Kittanning coal, PSOC 1197. C-Octylation was less successful for the solubilization of bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal, APCSP 3, and subbituminous Wyodak coal, APCSP 2, which gave 35 and 33% soluble material, respectively. Their O-methyl derivatives yielded 43 and 20% soluble material in the same reaction. The observations are in accord with the concept of Ouchi and his associates that higher rank coals, although more aromatic in character, have a lower degree of polymerization than low rank coals. Relatively mild chemical reactions, such as Calkylation, that lead to modest changes in molecular dimensions, can disrupt intermolecular forces and accomplish solubilization.

  16. Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.C.; Rigby, R.R.

    1993-12-31

    Experiments on flotation of 60--200 mesh treated Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539) were performed during the October--December period, 1993. The coal was treated with water as well as 20--1000 ppM aqueous alcohol solutions for 3-24 hours at 150--225{degree}C. Experiments on flotation of the treated coal were conducted at room temperature, using distilled water only as a flotation medium. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with 0.002-g/min 1000-ppM methanol aqueous solution for 3 hours, increases with treatment temperatures. Flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal, treated with water for 3-4 hours, also increases with treatment temperatures. Mass flow rates of 1000-ppM methanol aqueous solution, during treating Illinois No. 6 coal with the methanol solution for 3 hours at 225{degree}C, increase with decreased flotation of the treated Illinois coal. However, mass flow rates of 1000-ppM n-heptanol aqueous solution, during treating Illinois No. 6 coal with the solution under the same treatment condition, do not affect flotation of the treated coal. Concentrations of alcohols such as methanol and isopropanol in water do not affects flotation of Illinois No. 6 coal treated for 3 hours at 225{degree}C and 0.002 g/min, whereas concentrations of isopropanol, during treating Illinois No. 6 coal with isopropanol aqueous solutions, increase with decreased flotation of the coal treated for 24 hours at 225{degree}C and 0.002 g/min.

  17. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods. Fifth quarterly report, October--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1988-12-31

    Liquefaction of coal by depolymerization in an organic solvent has been studied for several years. The liquefied coal extract which results from such a process is far more suitable for conversion into liquid fuel by hydrogenolysis than is the untreated coal. Investigations on the chemical structure and the reactive sites of coal can help to select useful reactions for the production of liquids from coal. Sternberg et al. demonstrated that the reductive alkylation method transforms bituminous coal into an enormously soluble substance, irrespective of the mild reaction conditions. The effectiveness of newly introduced alkyl groups for the disruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonds and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic sheets in coal macromolecules has been recognized. It has been reported by Ignasiak et al. that a C-alkylabon reaction using sodium or potassium amide in liquid ammonia can be used to introduce alkyl groups at acidic carbon sites. A method has been developed recently in this laboratory for the solubilization of high rank coals. In the previous reports it was shown that n-butyl lithium and potassium t-butoxide in refluxing heptane produced coal anions which could be alkylated with different alkyl halides. Such alkylated coals were soluble up to 92% in solvents like pyridine. Though the solubilization of coal depended very much on the length of the alkyl group, it also depended very much on the nature of the base used. Strong bases like n-butyl lithium (pKa=42) can cause proton abstraction from aromatic structures, if the more acidic benzylic protons are absent. The utility of this procedure, initially developed and used by Miyake and Stock, has now been tested with the high oxygen containing, low rank Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coals.

  18. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The Diels-Alder reaction of anthracene and 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide.

  19. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1991-11-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  20. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane.

  1. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which resemble the organic nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal denitrogenation. The tautomeric equilibrium of a Schiff base was chosen as the model system and was investigated in supercritical ethane and cosolvent modified supercritical ethane.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progresss report, January 1--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.

    1991-09-01

    Consol R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  3. Characterization and supply of coal-based fuels. Quarterly report, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Contract objectives are as follows: Develop fuel specifications to serve combustor requirements. Select coals having appropriate compositional and quality characteristics as well as an economically attractive reserve base; Provide quality assurance for both the parent coals and the fuel forms; and deliver premium coal-based fuels to combustor developers as needed for their contract work. Progress is discussed, particulary in slurry fuel preparation and particle size distribution.

  4. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-12-31

    significant achievements were: (1) Coal decarboxylation was achieved by batch bioreactor systems using adapted anaerobic microbial consortium. (2) Two new isolates with coal decarboxylation potential were obtained from adapted microbial consortia. (3) CHN and TG anaysis of anaerobically biotreated coals have shown an increase in the H/C ratio and evolution rate of volatile carbon which could be a better feedstock for the liquefaction process.

  5. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1992-03-01

    CONSOL R&D is conducting a three-year program to characterize process and product streams from direct coal liquefaction process development projects. The program objectives are two-fold: (1) to obtain and provide appropriate samples of coal liquids for the evaluation of analytical methodology, and (2) to support ongoing DOE-sponsored coal liquefaction process development efforts. The two broad objectives have considerable overlap and together serve to provide a bridge between process development and analytical chemistry.

  6. Coal combustion under conditions of blast furnace injection; [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Crelling, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    A potentially new use for Illinois coal is its use as a fuel injected into a blast furnace to produce molten iron as the first step in steel production. Because of its increasing cost and decreasing availability, metallurgical coke is now being replaced by coal injected at the tuyere area of the furnace where the blast air enters. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the combustion of coal during the blast furnace injection process and to delineate the optimum properties of the feed coal. This investigation is significant to the use of Illinois coal in that the limited research to date suggests that coals of low fluidity and moderate to high sulfur and chlorine contents are suitable feedstocks for blast furnace injection. This study is unique in that it will be the first North American effort to directly determine the nature of the combustion of coal injected into a blast furnace. This proposal is a follow-up to one funded for the 1992--1993 period. It is intended to complete the study already underway with the Armco Inc. steel company and to initiate a new cooperative study along somewhat similar lines with the Inland Steel Company. The results of this study will lead to the development of a testing and evaluation protocol that will give a unique and much needed understanding of the behavior of coal in the injection process and prove the potential of Illinois coals f or such use.

  7. Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Analytical methods were finalized and all analyses completed on shake flask tests with Indiana No. 5 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. A column leaching-rotating biological contractor (RBC) unit was used to bioleach pyrite and hazardous air pollutant precursors from Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. Shake flask tests with Rosebud subbituminous coal were begun. In connection with upcoming slurry column reactor tests, coal was prepared and shipped to INEL, and a detailed work plan was developed for operation and sampling for the tests. A manuscript and poster was prepared for presentation at the PETC contractors conference.

  8. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Quarterly report, 31 July 1997--30 September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-12-31

    During this reporting period the authors continued their investigations of how low rank coals are degraded by wood rotting fungi. Previous investigations showed that ligninolytic cultures of P. chrysosporium could decolorize soluble low rank coal macromolecule. The authors continue to investigate this phenomenon. Consistent with earlier observations they conclude that soluble coal macromolecule is decolorized in ligninolytic cultures of P. chrysosporium. To determine if this fungus can depolymerize coal macromolecule, samples were analyzed by GPC-HPLC. These analyses suggested that when coal macromolecules were incubated with ligninolytic cultures of P. chrysosporium a slight decrease in the average peak molecular weight of this mixture had occurred. During this reporting period they also discovered that changes in buffer composition can alter the peak retention times of coal macromolecules during GPC-HPLC probably by causing dissociation and reassociation of individual macromolecules. In other experiments it has been shown that lignin peroxidases that are secreted by ligninolytic cultures of P. chrysosporium are responsible, at least in part, for decolorization of coal macromolecules. Taken together, these studies show that the lignin degrading system of P. chrysosporium is able to enzymatically attack macromolecules solubilized from low rank coal. The ability of nonacclimated bacteria from sewage sludge to used leonardite and soluble coal macromolecule as a substrate for methanogenesis was also investigated. To date, the bacterial consortium studied was unable to use these substrates for this purpose.

  9. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, April-June

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.M.; Furlong, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program for the Department of Energy to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal derived products such as preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The continuous flow coal processing unit was modified to alleviate problems with non-representative sampling during the course of operation. A synthetic recycle oil solvent was prepared to allay any doubts regarding the distribution of reacted solvent components in the product samples. Data from the coal reactivity study was fitted by true second-order reversible kinetics expressions. The forward rate constants were correlated with H/C ratio, mean-max reflectance, and fraction reactive macerals of the parent coals. Kinetic reactivities were also shown to correlate with the percentage of volatile carbon in the parent coals. Intrinsic THF solubilities of the parent coals were measured experimentally and the resulting values incorporated in the evaluation of second-order rate constants. The reactivities were not significantly affected by this modification. Reproductibility tests were initiated in the disposable catalysts study. Agreement between these data and those from the initial phase of this study were fair. Further tests will be made to verify these results.

  10. Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Exciting opportunities exist for the application of supercritical fluid (SCF) reactions for the pre-treatment of coal. Utilizing reactants which closely resemble the organic sulfur and nitrogen containing components of coal, we propose to develop a method to tailor chemical reactions in supercritical fluid solvents for the specific application of coal desulfurization and denitrogenation. Diels-Alder reactions involving such compounds have been extensively studied and characterized in liquids. However, there is very little understanding of such reactions in SCF`s. We are developing an approach which will allow optimum design of coal desulfurization and denitrogenation processes.

  11. Exploratory research on novel coal liquefaction concept. [Quarterly report], May 24--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Derbyshire, F.J.; Kimber, G.; Anderson, R.K.; Carter, S.D.; Peluso, M.

    1995-11-08

    CONSOL Inc., the University of Kentucky/Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), and LDP Associates are conducting a three-year research program to explore the technical and economic feasibility of a novel direct coal liquefaction concept. The purpose of this research program is to explore a new approach to direct coal liquefaction in which the primary coal dissolution step is effected by chemical rather than thermal cleavage of bonds in the coal. This is done at a temperature which is significantly lower than that typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. Reaction at this low temperature results in high conversion of the coal to a solubilized form, with little hydrocarbon gas make, and avoids the thermally induced retrograde reactions which are unavoidable in conventional thermal processes. In addition, for low-rank coals, a substantial portion of the oxygen in the coal is removed as CO and CO{sub 2} during the dissolution. The higher selectivity to liquid products and rejection of oxygen as carbon oxides should result in improved hydrogen utilization. The basis of the novel concept is the discovery made by CONSOL R&D that certain hydride transfer agents are very active for coal dissolution at temperatures in the range of 350{degree}C. Because of the exploratory nature of the research, the project is divided into sequential tasks that are designed to first evaluate key elements of the process is presented for the following tasks: management plan; evaluation of process steps; engineering and economic study and reporting.

  12. Photochemical coal dissolution. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1996-05-01

    The remaining types of photochemical extraction experiments originally proposed have now been examined. Experiments in which benzophenone (BP) in solution was employed as a photochemical extraction reagent on pre-extracted coals were performed with Hg arc light through a quartz light filter at a concentration permitting light absorption primarily by the coal. Experiments were done on pre-extracted coals in which tetralin was employed as the photochemical extraction reagent. Finally experiments were performed in which the pre-extracted coal was swelled with BP above its melting point, irradiated through a quartz filter and extracted. The solvent was acetonitrile in all cases.

  13. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Fifth quarterly report, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.

    1995-10-24

    This research program investigates the solubilization and depolymerization of coal polymer degradation by Fungi. We investigate the hypothesis that solubilization and depolymerization are distinctive events.

  14. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, September-November 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    The project Petrographic Characterization of Kentucky Coals consists of research in three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington (No. 4, also known as Mining City and Lewisport) coal will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Certain suits of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the samples. Preliminary results are reported.

  15. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, March 30, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Neufeld, R.D.; Blachere, J.R.

    1998-04-01

    Progress is described on the use of by-products form clean coal technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. During the third quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating Phase 1 samples (including evaluation of a seventh waste), conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts.

  16. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. Eleventh quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-08-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA`s of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  17. Stability, rheology and flow of coal-water mixtures. Quarterly progress report, September 1-November 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Turian, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the first quarterly progress report on the subject DOE grant since the starting date of September 1, 1984. During the present reporting period we have been occupied with the details of starting up of the project. Activities during this period have included hiring graduate research assistants for the project, providing them with full details of the research and its objectives, design and construction of research equipment, purchase and installation of coal slurry preparation equipment, setting up of newly purchased research instruments, and testing and calibration of instruments and equipment. Our objective is to test and hopefully establish a definitive method for measurement of yield stress as an intrinsic property (as contrasted to a rheological model parameter) which will then be related to the microstructure of the coal suspension. We have also calibrated the new capillary tubes using Newtonian standards, and tested them extensively using stabilized titanium dioxide dispersions and the laterite slurries discussed above. Among major new instruments that are being set up are the mercury porosimeter and the BET adsorption apparatus. We hope to start preliminary tests on concentrated coal suspensions during the coming period.

  18. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-30

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a {open_quotes}Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes} is a project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was completing the system modification installation designs, completing the TSCA ash testing, and conducting additional industry funded testing. Final detailed installation designs for the integrated test system configuration are being completed.

  19. Microbial strain improvement for organosulfur removal from coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1992-10-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture of Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore will permit more favorable biodesulfurization process conditions: faster rates, more complete removal, and smaller reactor size. Strain improvement is the single most important aspect to the development of a practical coal desulfurization process and accordingly is the focus of research in this project. During the current quarter the screening of genomic libraries resulted in the detection of a clone that scored positively in the UV fluorescence spray plate assay; however, subsequent analysis failed to reveal the presence of a desulfurization gene. Preliminary results using subtractive hybridization to screen genomic libraries have been obtained but desulfurization genes have not yet been identified. In additional studies a gene encoding chloramphenicol resistance in Rhodococcus cultures has been cloned and the promoter region is currently being sequenced. This promoter will subsequently be used to obtain high levels of expression of desulfurization genes.

  20. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  1. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 6, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-05-03

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20% or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1- March 31, 1996.

  2. Integrated coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Effron, Edward

    1978-01-01

    In a process for the liquefaction of coal in which coal liquids containing phenols and other oxygenated compounds are produced during the liquefaction step and later hydrogenated, oxygenated compounds are removed from at least part of the coal liquids in the naphtha and gas oil boiling range prior to the hydrogenation step and employed as a feed stream for the manufacture of a synthesis gas or for other purposes.

  3. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, April 1, 1990--June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Flowers, R.A. II

    1990-07-24

    TCNQ Charge Transfer Complexes with Coals. TCNQ can be readily deposited in coals from pyridine solution. IR spectra of TCNQ and TCNQ in Illinois No. 6 coal are shown in Fig. 1. It is clear that the stretching frequency has been shifted by the full 44 cm{sup {minus}1} caused by the transfer of a single electron. Similar behavior has been observed with a variety of coals, including lignites, subbituminous and a range of bituminous coals. There are two possible explanations for the observed shift. The simplest explanation is that there exist in coals structures which are excellent single electron donors capable of transferring an electron to TCNQ in the ground state. All of the TCNQ dissolved in the coal is shifted. No uncomplexed TCNQ remains in the sample, as demonstrated by the absence of the unaltered CN stretch at 2227 cm{sup {minus}1}. The spectrum shown is for TCNQ in coal in a molar concentration equivalent to approximately 20% of the PNA systems in this coal as deduced from the NMR studies of Solum et al. (1989). It is highly unlikely that 20% of the PNA systems in coal are such good electron donors that the charge transfer complex would have an electron transferred in the ground state. The second explanation is that cooperative interactions between the TCNQ and the aromatic systems in coal have led to the formation of an extended valance band structure, that the TCNQ LUMO is part of this band structure, and that the band is half filled.

  4. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    PETC has implemented a number of advanced combustion research projects that will lead to the establishment of a broad, commercially acceptable engineering data base for the advancement of coal as the fuel of choice for boilers, furnaces, and process heaters. Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a {open_quotes}Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications{close_quotes} is a project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was concentrated on conducting the 100 hour demonstration test. The test was successfully conducted from September 12th through the 16th. The test program consisted of one test run, with a duration of 100 hours at a nominal feed rate of 1000 lbs/hr. Throughout the test, the CMS was fired with coal and a coal by-product (i.e. coal-fired boiler flyash) as the primary fuels. Natural gas was used as an auxiliary fuel as necessary to provide process trim. The feedstock consisted of a coal-fired utility boiler flyash and dolomite and produced a stable, fully-reacted vitrified product. The fly ash, supplied by PENELEC, contained between 6 and 12% by weight of carbon because of the low NO{sub x} burners on the PENELEC boilers.

  5. Regulation of coal polymer degradation by fungi. Ninth quarterly report, [July--September, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.; Bumpus, J.A.

    1996-10-28

    Several investigations have demonstrated that oxalate anion secreted by fungi is able to mediate solubilization of leonardite, a highly oxidized lignite. We have studied oxalate mediated solubilization of several Argonne Premium Coals. Results showed that, relative to leonardite, oxalate solubilized minimal amounts of these coals.

  6. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-20

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies are being conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model will be developed by West Virginia University. The most promising approach to improving spiral separation efficiency is through extensive computer modeling of fluid and solids flow in the various operating regions of the spiral. Accomplishments for these two tasks are described.

  7. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    The following conclusions are drawn: (1) the aromaticity of petroleum-derived asphaltene (f/sub a/ = 0.2-0.5) is lower than that of coal-derived asphaltene (f/sub a/ = 0.6-0.7). (2) The aromatic ring systems within petroleum-derived asphaltene are much more ccondensed (peri) (H/sub aru//C/sub ar/ = 0.3-0.5) than that of coal-derived asphaltene (kata)(H/sub aru//C/sub ar/ = 0.5-0.7). (3) The substituents of the petroleum-derived asphaltenes are longer (n = 4-6) than those of coal-derived asphaltenes (n = 1). (4) The aromatic system of petroleum-derived asphaltene is extensively substituted (70 to 80%), whereas the coal-derived asphaltene is sparingly substituted (35 to 45%). (5) The molecular weight of petroleum-derived asphaltene is ca. 10 times higher than that of the coal-derived asphaltene. (6) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is less reactive to physical or chemical agents than that of coal-derived asphaltene. (7) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is more highly associated (Me = 5-7) than that of coal-derived asphaltene (Me-2-4). This will be reflected in the ease of processing. (8) Petroleum-derived asphaltene is less poplar than the coal-derived asphaltene.

  8. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption. Quarterly report, August 16, 1989--November 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The goal of this task is to accurately measure the elongation and shrinkage exhibited by coal as it sorbs and desorbs methane gas at elevated pressure. Our research group has discussed several possible methods to measure this strain, including: optical microscopy, laser interferometry, conventional strain gauges, and LVDT strain gauges. There are advantages and disadvantages of each method. We had planned to use optical microscopy but, on further investigation, this approach will be less satisfactory than the strain gauge method. Accordingly, we have switched our focws to the use of strain gauges. Conventional strain gauges also involve potential problems which must be overcome, including: (1) Contrast in strength between the coal and the strain gauge must be minimized, (2) The proper glue that is neither too strong or too weak must be used to affix the strain gauge to the coal or the strain in the coal will not be accurately transmitted to the gauge, and (3) We must be aware that the total strain in the coal may not be homogeneously distributed through the specimen (due either either to boundary effects or contrast in composition of the coal layers). A high pressure chamber for sorption-strain experiments is currently being tested an modified and tested. The chamber will accommodate several small blocks of coal simultaneously. This will optimize efficiency, owing to the long times required to reequilibrate the coal blocks to changes in methane pressure.

  9. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, J H; Baldwin, R M; Bain, R L; Furlong, M W

    1981-01-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal-derived products such as preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. Safety modifications to the CSM continuous processing unit were completed to shield the control room from the gas and liquid-solid product sampling systems. A mass balance analysis of sample validity was begun. All but two of sixteen coals in the suite of coal reactivity study coals have been run. Computer modelling of proposed reaction networks was started. Initial efforts at coal property versus reactivity correlations were begun. Feed material preparation for the asphaltene hydrogenation study was completed, and preliminary testing of the reactor system was begun. The experimental portion of the disposable catalyst study screening program was completed. Conclusions are pending statistical analyses of the data.

  10. Mechanism of hydrogen incorporation in coal liquefaction. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Mechanisms important to coal liquefaction and hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction are being investigated. We continued our studies of the reactions of various organic compounds with D{sub 2}. Also described in this report is the success of hydrogenating naphthalene utilizing silica as a catalyst.

  11. The single electron chemistry of coals. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate and characterize the single electron reactions of alkyl and alkoxy aromatic compounds in order to determine the role these reactions play in the chemistry of coal. The work here is concerned with the interactions of coals, such as Illinois No. 6, with tetracyanoethylene.

  12. The single electron chemistry of coals. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate and characterize the single electron reactions of alkyl and alkoxy aromatic compounds in order to determine the role these reactions play in the chemistry of coal. The work here is concerned with the interactions of coals, such as Illinois No. 6, with tetracyanoethylene.

  13. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, April--June, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic alkenes in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic alkenes are highly reactive donors of hydrogen to coal in low severity coal liquefaction.

  14. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1992-08-01

    Physical cleaning of ultra-fine coal using an advanced froth flotation techniques provides a low ash product, however, due to high surface area of particles the amount of water associated with clean coal is high. Economic removal of water from the froth will be important for commercial applicability of advanced froth flotation processes. The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand the dewatering characteristics of ultra-fine clean coal and to develop process parameters to effectively reduce the moisture to less than 20 percent in the clean coal product. The research approach under investigation utilizes synergistic effects of metal ions and surfactant to lower the moisture of clean coal using a conventional vacuum dewatering technique. The studies have identified a combination of metal ion and surfactant found to be effective in providing a 22 percent moisture filter cake.

  15. Thermodynamics and surface structure of coals. Quarterly report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.S.; Larsen, J.W.; Quay, D.M.; Roberts, J.E.; Wernett, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    We have reported the determination of the average micropore diameter of an Argonne Illinois No. 6 coal (77% C, daf) and a standard 15 A diameter Spherocarb sample by {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy. We have successfully applied this technique to determine the average micropore diameter of the full series of Argonne coals. We have recently developed a computer program (Appendix A) which correlates the 129 Xe NMR spectrum of Coals directly to the micropore size distribution of each Argonne coal. The micropore size distribution of Argonne: Pocahontas No. 3 (91.8% C, dmmf); Pittsburgh No. 8 (85.0% C, dmmf); and Blind Canyon (81.3% C, dmmf) coals, determined by 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy are shown in Figures 2, 4, and 6, respectively.

  16. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1982. [Ammonium paramolybdate; stannous chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S.W.

    1982-01-01

    Coal liquefaction experiments have been carried out in a stirred autoclave under nitrogen. Tetralin was employed as solvent, and the catalyst, when used, was ammonium paramolybdate (impregnated) or stannous chloride (powdered). Production of pentane-soluble oil was higher in the runs with catalysts, but the net hydrogen transfer from tetralin to coal was less when catalyst was used. Coal and powdered stannous chloride exhibited a marked synergistic effect on the dehydrogenation of tetralin. A free radical mechanism was suggested to explain this effect, and model experiments with bibenzyl (but no coal) gave results that were consistent with this mechanism. An apparent synergistic effect of coal and impregnated ammonium paramolybdate was shown to be attributable simply to improved distribution (higher surface area) of the impregnated catalyst.

  17. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1982 to February 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.; Graese, A.M.; Raione, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    The project Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals consists of three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals, properties of semi-inert macerals, and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky and the Alma coal zone in eastern Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability in the sample set. Due to the discrete nature of the projects, the final reports will be submitted in several parts. The first report on spectral fluorescence is in development and should be submitted prior to the end of the project. The other reports will be submitted shortly after the end of the project.

  18. Improvement of storage, handling and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-16

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this third quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the feedstock coal options at the Chetopa Plant was conducted and mulling characteristics determined to enable a decision to be made regarding the feedstock selection. It was decided that the froth concentrate will be the feedstock wet fine coal used for the project. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement were initiated.

  19. Investigation of pyrite as a contributor to slagging in eastern bituminous coals. Quarterly progress report 9, October 1-December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bryers, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    The objective of this program is to examine slags formed as a result of firing coals with varying concentration levels, size distribution, and orientation of pyrite with regard to mineral matter in the coal in a laboratory furnace. The program tasks are: (1) selection of eight candidate coals; (2) chemical characterization of the coal samples and identification of the pyrite size, distribution, and orientation with respect to other mineral matter and concentration levels; (3) testing of the candidate coals in a laboratory furnace; (4) chemical and physical characterization of the slag and fly ash samples created by the impurities in the coal sample; (5) influence of coal beneficiation on furnace slagging; and (6) analysis of data and identification of parameters influencing the contribution of pyrite to slagging problems. Washing of the Upper Freeport coal from Indiana County, Pennsylvania, was completed by the last quarter of 1983. The washed product was characterized for mineral content, and a combustion test was performed. Kentucky No. 9 from Henderson County, Kentucky, selected as the sixth coal to be investigated, was characterized using size and gravity fractionation techniques and was combusted in the laboratory furnace to evaluate its slagging and fouling potential. The remaining two coals to be characterized and combusted were identified as Illinois No. 5 and Lower Kittanning from Clarion County, Pennsylvania. 80 figures, 27 tables.

  20. Coal log pipeline research at the University of Missouri. 4th Quarterly report for 1994, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Wilson, J.W.

    1995-06-01

    Several factors involved in coal log fabrication, storage and handling, such as curing time, aspect ratio and particle size distribution, were evaluated during the fourth quarter of 1994. When Orimulsion is used for coal log fabrication, a certain period of time is required to build up the strength of coal log. From the test results obtained, the longer the curing period the greater the wear resistance of the coal log. From previous studies, the coal log length to diameter ratio (aspect) was found to be an important factor affecting coal log performance during the pipeline degradation test. From the 2 inches pipeline degradation test results, coal logs with aspect ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.2 traveled in a more stable manner, and had lower weight loss than coal logs with aspect ratios less than 1.6. The influence of particle size on the performance of a coal log was evaluated to determine the optimum particle size for coal log fabrication, based on practical and economical considerations.

  1. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 3, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-08-05

    Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20% or lower level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced fine coal cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept (POC) scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the UKCAER will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. The Mayflower Plant processes coals from five different seams, thus the dewatering studies results could be generalized for most of the bituminous coals. During this quarter, addition of reagents such as ferric ions and a novel concept of in-situ polymerization (ISP) was studied in the laboratory. Using the ISP approach with vacuum filtration provided 25% moisture filter cake compared to 65.5% moisture obtained conventionally without using the ISP. A series of dewatering tests were conducted using the Andritz hyperbaric pilot filter unit with high sulfur clean coal slurry.

  2. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. Eighth quarterly (second annual) report

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1990-09-01

    A nondestructive method to determine the atomic and molecular structures present in the organic (maceral) components of whole coal and coal products has been sought for many years. This program of research is designed to address that analytical need by applying advanced electron magnetic resonance techniques to the determination of coal molecular structure. Structural information has be obtained by using the naturally occurring unpaired electrons in coal as ``observation posts`` from which to survey neighboring atoms through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. Such an overall approach has been termed ELECTRON SPIN MAPPING of coal structure. New techniques like 2-dimensional ENDOR and ESE spectroscopies and multifrequency EPR, including the world`s first S-band ESE spectrometer and one of the first W-band instruments, which we have developed in our laboratory, were employed in the determination. The materials studied were well separated macerals obtained by density gradient centrifugation techniques from Illinois {number_sign}6 coals, a well as whole Illinois {number_sign}6, {number_sign}5, and Argonne Premium Sample Coals. model compounds, chosen to represent molecular structures typical of those believed to exist in coal also were studied by the various electron magnetic resonance (EMR) methods. Utilizing the various EMR methods available in our laboratory, we studied approaches to determine parameters that direcly reflect the atomic and molecular structure of coal. The naturally occurring unpaired electrons in coal were utilized as probes of their local environment, which they reflect through hyperfine interactions with neighboring 1 > 0 nuclei (eg, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C).

  3. Investigation of coal structure. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    As seen from Table 2, retention of NMP and phenol on coal sample was less than 4 wt % when retention experiments were carried out for 24 hours duration, which is not substantial. Also, no trend with respect to temperature was observed. At 250{degree}C, some amount of soluble matter from coal was extracted which gave less retention of these solvents at higher temperatures. However, the effect of duration on retention of phenol was much more pronounced as is evident from Table 3. Approximately 12.5 wt % of phenol retention was observed for retention time of 4 and 7 days. Retention of phenol for 24 hours duration was approximately 9.5 wt % (expt. No. 27). Although association of coal-derived material has been studied, the associated nature of coal extract has not been reported. The phenomenon of thermally induced dissociation as observed in coal has also been examined for coal extract in our recent paper. The molecular weight distribution of the pyridine soluble fraction of coal, PS{sub 25 c} at room temperature, and the molecular weight of pyridine insoluble fraction of Soxhlet extracted pyridine soluble fraction, i.e., (PI:PS{sub sox}){sub 25 c}, using room temperature extraction were determined with gel permeation chromatography. There was a clear shift to lower molecular weight at 70{degree}C (Soxhlet extraction) compared to room temperature extraction. This demonstrated association of coal extract in pyridine at room temperature. A further study is necessary to examine association of the extract. Association of polymeric solutions is well known. Viscosity measurements is one of the easiest methods for the evaluation of associated nature of these extracts. The application of this method for coal extract was the objective of this task to evaluate the association of coal extract in solution.

  4. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1990-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 15, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-07-25

    Goal is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on 6 coals to optimize these processes, followed by design/construction/operation of a 2-t/hr PDU. During this quarter, parametric testing of the 30-in. Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn plant was completed and clean coal samples submitted for briquetting. A study of a novel hydrophobic dewatering process continued at Virginia Tech. Benefits of slurry PSD (particle size distribution) modification and pH adjustment were evaluated for the Taggart and Hiawatha coals; they were found to be small. Agglomeration bench-scale test results were positive, meeting product ash specifications. PDU Flotation Module operations continued; work was performed with Taggart coal to determine scaleup similitude between the 12-in. and 6-ft Microcel{trademark} columns. Construction of the PDU selective agglomeration module continued.

  6. Pulverized coal firing of aluminum melting furnaces. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    West, C E

    1980-10-01

    Heaviest acitivity this quarter has been in the area of system design and specification and purchase of system components. Mechanical design is now complete. The design of electrical power, process control and data acquisition systems has begun. Combustor design meetings with General Electric Space Science Labs have resulted in an increasing awareness that analytical flow field modeling of the cyclonic combustor could not only enhance current understanding of the process but also broaden the future scope of implementation. A proposal to add specific additional modeling tasks was presented to the Department of Energy, and is included herein in Appendix B. Equipment procurement will continue and system construction will begin during the next quarter.

  7. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L. |

    1993-11-01

    Construction and commissioning of the bench unit for operation of the first stage of the process was completed. Solubilization of Black Thunder coal using carbon monoxide and steam was successfully demonstrated in the counterflow reactor system. The results were comparable with those obtained in the autoclave with the exception that coal solubilization at the same nominal residence times was slightly lower. The bench unit has now been modified for two stage operation. The Wilsonville process derived solvent for Black Thunder coal (V-1074) was found to be essentially as stable as the previous solvent used in the autoclave runs (V-178 + 320) at reactor conditions. This solvent (V-1074) is, therefore, being used in the bench unit tests. Carbon monoxide may be replaced by synthesis gas for the coal solubilization step in the process. However, in autoclave tests, coal conversion was found to be dependent on the amount of carbon monoxide present in the synthesis gas. Coal conversions ranged from 88% for pure carbon monoxide to 67% for a 25:75 carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixture at equivalent conditions. Two stage liquefaction tests were completed in the autoclave using a disposable catalyst (FeS) and hydrogen in the second stage. Increased coal conversion, higher gas and oil and lower asphaltene and preasphaltene yields were observed as expected. However, no hydrogen consumption was observed in the second stage. Other conditions, in particular, alternate catalyst systems will be explored.

  8. Chemistry and structure of coal derived asphaltenes and preasphaltenes. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T. F.

    1980-01-01

    It is the objective of this project to isolate the asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions from coal liquids from a number of liquefaction processes. These processes consist of in general: catalytic hydrogenation, staged pyrolysis and solvent refining. These asphaltene fractions may be further separated by both gradient elution through column chromatography, and molecular size distribution through gel permeation chromatography. Those coal-derived asphaltene and preasphaltene fractions will be investigated by various chemical and physical methods for characterization of their structures. After the parameters are obtained, these parameters will be correlated with the refining and conversion variables which control a given type of liquefaction process. The effects of asphaltene in catalysis, ash or metal removal, desulfurization and denitrification will also be correlated. It is anticipated that understanding the role of asphaltenes in liquefaction processes will enable engineers to both improve existing processes, and to make recommendations for operational changes in planned liquefaction units in the United States. The objective of Phase 1 was to complete the isolation and separation of coal liquid fractions and to initiate their characterization. The objective of Phase 2 is to continue the characterization of coal asphaltenes and other coal liquid fractions by use of physical and instrumental methods. The structural parameters obtained will be used to postulate hypothetical average structures for coal liquid fractions. The objective of Phase 3 is to concentrate on the characterization of the preasphaltene (benzene insoluble fraction) of coal liquid fraction by the available physical and chemical methods to obtain a number of structural parameters.

  9. Investigation of coal structure. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The goal of the present work is to conduct multi-stage sequences of extraction experiments and direct solvent swelling measurements of raw and extracted coal to study in a greater depth the role of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the structure of coal. One of the possible ways to investigate the structure of coal is to extract it with a series of procedures. The individual extraction step chosen will be such that it weaken or disrupt intra- and intermolecular interactions that are particular to the rank of the test coal. To date, we attempted to extract raw and pyridine extracted (PI) DECS 16 coal with two solvents; 1:1 volume percent carbon disulfide & 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMEP) mixed solvent and 1:3 volume percent 1M tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) in methanol & pyridine. Also, raw DECS 16 coal was o-butylated followed by pyridine extraction in a soxhlet apparatus and the ultimate extraction yields were compared with o-butylated pyridine extracted coal.

  10. Petrographic characterization of Kentucky coals. Quarterly progress report, December 1981-February 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hower, J.C.; Ferm, J.C.; Cobb, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.; Frankie, K.A.; Poe, S.H.; Baynard, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    The project involves three specific areas of coal petrology: spectral fluorescence of liptinite macerals; properties of semi-inert macerals; and size/form/microlithotype association of pyrite/marcasite. Additional research on the Mannington and Dunbar coals in western Kentucky will apply techniques developed in the first three areas. Suites of coals from other states will also be studied to expand the variability for the project which involves the determination of coal rank through the use of fluorescence measurements on sporinite, all samples have been studied and data analysis is still incomplete. Interpretation of results will be presented in future reports. The actual developments of pseudovitrinites are being investigated. Two possible mechanisms for the origin of pseudovitrinites have been suggested. The first mechanism is differential coalification of similar materials. The second factor for influencing the development of pseudovitrinite is an actual difference in original plant composition. Pyrite analysis of western Kentucky coals has been completed, however data reduction is still incomplete. Changes in the petrography of western coals may be related to depositional environments of the coal.

  11. Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Ninth quarterly technical report, September 1, 1992--December 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zygourakis, K.

    1993-12-31

    Our efforts during the past quarter focused on the development of an image processing technique for characterizing the macropore structure of chars produced from Illinois No. 6 coal. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a microscope-stage reactor in inert and reacting atmospheres and at various pyrolysis heating rates. Particles from several pyrolysis runs were embedded in an epoxy resin block and polished sections . were prepared. Digital images of char particle cross-sections were acquired and analyzed to measure the structural properties of the chars. The macropore analysis procedure is presented here in detail. Future reports will present the data showing the effects of pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure of Illinois No. 6 chars.

  12. Bioconversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, H.

    1993-07-16

    The overall objective of the project is to develop two stage fermentation process for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to a mixture of alcohols. This is achieved in two steps. In the first step, B .methylotrophicum converts carbon monoxide (CO) to butyric and acetic acids. Subsequent fermentation of the acids by Clostridium acetobutylicum leads to the production of butanol and ethanol. The tasks for this quarter were: Development/isolation of superior strains for fermentation of syn gas; optimization of process conditions for fermentation of syn gas; evaluation of bioreactor configuration for improved mass transfer of syn gas; and optimization of process conditions for reducing carbon and electron loss by H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} fermentation.

  13. Plant response to FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Darmody, R.G.; Dunker, R.E.; Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steel, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    The goal of this project is to test the feasibility of stabilizing coal slurry solids (CSS) wastes by directly seeding plants into the waste. This is not done conventionally because the waste can generate toxic amounts of sulfuric acid. Our approach is to neutralize the potential acidity by mixing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) waste into the slurry. If successful, this approach would both help dispose of FBC wastes while providing a more economical slurry stabilization technique. The project involves growing forage plants in CSS-FBC mixtures in the greenhouse. This is the first quarter of the project. We have designed the experiment, secured greenhouse space, purchased the seeds, collected and dried the FBC and CSS samples. The samples represent a typical range of properties. We retrieved two FBC and two CSS samples. One CSS sample appears to have a higher pyrite content than the other.

  14. Applications of micellar enzymology to clean coal technology. First quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.

    1990-01-20

    This project is designed to develop methods for pre-combustion coal remediation by implementing recent advances in enzyme biochemistry. The novel approach of this study is incorporation of hydrophilic oxidative enzymes in reverse micelles in an organic solvent. Enzymes from commercial sources or microbial extracts are being investigated for their capacity to remove organic sulfur from coal by oxidation of the sulfur groups, splitting of C-S bonds and loss of sulfur as sulfuric acid Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ehtylphenylsulfide (EPS)are serving as serving as models of organic sulfur-containing components of coal in initial studies.

  15. Utilization of coal associated minerals. Quarterly report No. 8, July 1-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Slonaker, J.F.; Alderman, J.K.; Buttermore, W.H.; Durham, D.L.; Gierl, D.B.; Grady, W.C.; McMillan, B.G.; Muter, R.B.; Simonyi, T.A.

    1980-03-31

    Work continued at the Morgantown pilot preparation facility to upgrade system components. The primary focus of this report period, as documented herein, was on the mineralogical quantification/semiquantification of the District 3 Pittsburgh seam coal samples. An in-depth discussion of the combined-techniques-mineralogical-quantification (CTMQ) of major coal-associated minerals in this coal, and a review of how standardized equations and data are derived is discussed in depth. The development of a procedure for the production of aerated concrete was started.

  16. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Eskay, T.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objectives of this project is to investigate and characterize the single electron reactions of alkyl and alkoxy aromatic compounds in order to determine the role these reactions play in the chemistry of coal. Scope of Work: (1) attempts will be made to demonstrate that the radicals from inertinite maceral group will initiate the polymerization of 4-vinylpyridine; (2) the molecule, N,N-diphenyl-phenylenediamine, will be deposited in coals to characterize their native free radicals; and (3) tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) will be used to characterize the numbers and strengths of single electron donors in coals.

  17. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    Objective was to investigate the single electron reactions of alkyl and alkoxy aromatic compounds and the role of these reactions in the chemistry of coal. During this period, the reactions of Illinois No. 6 coal with tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) was studied using diffuse reflectance infrared spectra. Results showed that no chemical reaction occurred, either Diels-Alder or addition, even at 180 C; TCNE`s lowest unoccupied molecular orbital was still occupied 2/3 of an electron transferred by Illinois No. 6 coal.

  18. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1993-12-31

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) were used earlier in an attempt to determine the single electron donating ability of aromatic groups in coals. The extent of electron transfer from coals to these compounds was measured by determining the frequency shift of the nitrile stretching bands in the Diffuse Reflectance (DR) infrared spectra. Our addition to this work will be to study the interactions of coals, such as Illinois No. 6, with TCNE. We will determine whether a Diels-Alder reaction or other addition reactions are occurring.

  19. Thermodynamic behavior of coal liquids in the presence of coal solids characterization of IOM and ASH. Seventh quarterly progress report, March 1-June 1, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G.D.; Dempsey, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine the effect of coal solids (IOM and ASH) on the thermodynamic properties (i.e., vapor pressure) of coal liquids. Presently the interaction of a linear chain molecule with an aromatic is being studied. Three systems of interest are Hexadecane/Tetralin, Decane/Tetralin, and Decane/1-Methylnaphthalene. The binary system of Hexadecane/Tetralin has been studied this past quarter. The P-T and P-X-T diagrams have been included in this report. As part of the data analysis all data have been regressed to fit an Antoine equation of the form: 1n P/sub (psia)/ = Al - B1/(C1 + T(K)). The regressed Antoined Constants for the systems studied are included as Appendix II. From the P-X-T diagram it can be seen that the Hexadecane/Tetralin system demonstrates a negative deviation from Rauoult's law behavior (dashed line). The system has been modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state to represent both the liquid and vapor phases. Preliminary results indicate that this model is unable to accurately describe this system. The universal quasi chemical (UNIQUAC) expression is currently being used to model the liquid phase with the Peng-Robinson equation of state modeling the vapor phase. 4 figs.

  20. Microbial strain improvement for organosulfur removal from coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1993--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II

    1993-09-01

    IGT has developed a microbial culture Rhodococcus rhodochrous, designated as IGTS8, that is of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds in a range of organosulfur model compounds and is capable of removing organic sulfur from coal and petroleum without significantly sacrificing the calorific value of the fuel. Although IGTS8 possesses the ability to specifically remove organic sulfur from coal, a major research need is to develop improved strains of microorganisms that possess higher levels of desulfurization activity and therefore permit favorable biodesulfurization process conditions. During the past quarter, promoter probe vectors thought to possess promoter inserts were isolated. Two new promoter probe vectors were constructed: pRCAT2; which is pRAT1 (second quarterly report) with the BamHI site removed, and pRCAT3; which is pRCAT2 with a synthetic oligonucleotide inserted at the HindIII site that will allow a wider range of restriction fragments to be examined for promoter activity including the fragments from the twenty mutants isolated from the Rhodococcus strains exhibiting increased resistance to chloramphenicol. Sequence analysis of six of these mutants has been initiated, computer comparisons made, and base change confirmation is in progress. As research to isolate strong Rhodococcus promoters is the goal, the promoter for the 16S ribosomal RNA structural gene is a good candidate for a strong promoter based on analyses of the 16S RNA gene in other species. Since the sequence of the 16S RNA gene is well conserved among species, straightforward techniques are available to isolate the promoter and such efforts are in progress.

  1. Mechanism of aromatic hydrocarbon formation in FCC naphtha

    SciTech Connect

    Mota, C.J.A.; Rawet, R.

    1995-12-01

    A microactivity test study of the FCC naphtha composition at increasing conversions was carried out. At low conversions (ca. 10--20%), the naphtha is rich in olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. As the conversion increases, the composition changes dramatically. The olefins initially increase and then decrease sharply. The paraffins increase continually, and the aromatics initially decrease and then increase slightly. The naphthenics remain constant in the conversion range studied. These results indicate that, at low conversions, the aromatics in the gasoline are mainly formed by dealkylation of heavy aromatic molecules present in the feed. At higher conversions, however, the aromatics in the naphtha are mainly formed by cyclization followed by hydrogen transfer of the olefins formed during cracking. This reaction also increases the relative concentration of paraffinic hydrocarbons. The distribution of C9 aromatics showed that, as the conversion increases, there occurs an isomerization of the alkyl chain, to increase the branching of the ring.

  2. Effects of minerals on coal-beneficiation processes. Quarterly report No. 10, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, B. G.; Muter, R. B.; Buttermore, W. H.; Grady, W. C.; Alderman, J. K.; Durham, D. L.

    1980-10-15

    All basic data acquisition relevant to characterization of the contract samples physically and chemically has been completed. Assessment of this data and inter-relationships with mineralogical characterization data is concurrently on-going, with final petrographic data acquisition for the contract to be affected during the next quarter. This remaining analytical work is the detailed maceral analysis of the Illinois No. 6 samples. Work during this quarter focused on coarse and fine coal heavy-media pilot-scale cleaning operations using a heavy-media drum separation and a heavy-media cyclone. Chemical and mineralogical effects produced by these tests are reported herein, completing Task 4 testing of the effects of laboratory pilot cleaning on mineral composition and distribution. Results for froth flotation, size by gravity, jigging, and tabling for this task have been previously reported. Also completed during the work period was the chemical characterization of the Illinois No. 6 slurry-fines sample. Mineralogical data for this sample were reported in Progress Report Number 9.

  3. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Quarterly progress report No. 2, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gollahalli, S.R.

    1994-04-01

    This second quarterly report describes the activities and accomplishments of the research team at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, related to the project entitled ``Combustion of Pulverized Coal in Vortex Structures`` during the period January 1, 1994 to March 31, 1994. The construction of the experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been completed. Preliminary shake-down test of the test facility were conducted for debugging and fine-tuning. A smoke generator was constructed for smoke-visualization of shear layers. Direct photographs of smoke flow patterns of the interfacial region of the mixing layers have been taken. Mean velocity profiles in the direction normal to the tunnel stream direction have been measured with a hot-wire anemometer for different ratios of the initial velocities of the mixing streams. In the next quarter, we plan to conduct schlieren flow visualization of the shear layer, fabricate the particulate feeding system, and measure the velocity field as a function of the particulate concentration in one of the streams.

  4. [Enhancement of coal liquefaction efficiency with ceramic membrane reactors]. Second final quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    In this quarter, the gas chromatography GC calibrations of compound No. 9, No. 11 and toluene were established. The results were accurate and reproducible using wide bore capillary column. A three-component mixture -- toluene, tetraline and compound No. 9 --also could be analyzed with a modified injection procedure. The experimental procedures of modified membrane separation were finalized based on the literature review. The coal-liquid separation could be described as an ultrafiltration process. For microporous membrane separation, two transport phenomenons, molecular diffusion and convection, were the most important mechanisms. The hindrance factors of those mechanisms were necessary to evaluate the separation performance of the membrane and to design the catalytic membrane reactor. Experimentally, with the relation of rejection and permeate flux, the hindrance factors can be calculated based on the simplified Niemi-Palosaari method. In this quarter, we first tested the 40{Angstrom} pore membrane. The preliminary results indicated that the concentration polarization was observed due to the low Reynolds number, i.e. low feed flow rate. The experimental instrumentation and procedures will be improved in the future. These factors will be used to conduct the modification of the membrane and the catalytic membrane reactor. The model compound for catalytic membrane was compound No. 9, 1-[4-[2(Phenylethyl) benzyl

  5. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-11-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: single particle measurement of size and charge; electrodynamic balance for trapping single particles for measurement; and tribocharging of coal particles passed through a circular tube.

  6. Applications of micellar enzymology to clean coal technology. Ninth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.

    1991-01-30

    This project is designed to develop methods for pre-combustion coal remediation by implementing recent advances in enzyme biochemistry. The novel approach of this study is incorporation of hydrophilic oxidative enzymes in reverse micelles in an organic solvent. Enzymes from commercial sources or microbial extracts are being investigated for their capacity to remove organic sulfur from coal by oxidation of the sulfur groups, splitting of C-S bonds and loss of sulfur as sulfuric acid. Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS) are serving as models or organic sulfur-containing components of coal in initial studies. A goal of this project is to define a reverse micelle system that optimizes the catalytic activity of enzymes toward desulfurization of model compounds and ultimately coal samples. Among the variables which will be examined are the surfactant, the solvent, the water:surfactant ratio and the pH and ionic strength of the aqueous phase.

  7. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion. Quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Amui, J.

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stages of direct coal liquefaction. Scope of work study the conversion of Argonne Premium coals in tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin and compare the following: conversion to soluble products and product composition. Hydrogen donated by both solvents will be measured by gas chromatography and the same technique will be used to establish the amount of dealkylation of 2-t-butyltetralin. Reactions will be performed at several different temperatures for varying amounts of time.

  8. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion. Quarterly report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Amui, J.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this program include: Determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stages of direct coal liquefaction. The scope includes the study of the conversion of Argonne Premium coals in tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin and a comparison of the following: Conversion to soluble products and product composition. Hydrogen donated by both solvents will be measured by gas chromatography and the same technique will be used to establish the amount of dealkylation of 2-t-butyltetralin. Reactions will be performed at several different temperatures for varying amounts of time.

  9. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. Thirteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    The goals of this program include developing a system for the analysis of the chemical forms of organic sulfur in coal and for study of coal particle surfaces by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy, ENDOR, and ESE spectroscopy and Applying it to coals, to the effects of treatment upon their sulfur-containing organic components, and to related carbonaceous materials (chars and the like). The approach is to utilize the naturally-occurring unpaired electrons in the organic structures of coals as spies to provide molecular structure information, reading out the information with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Several forms of EPR are employed: Multifrequency continuous-wave (CW) EPR, from 1 GHz to 240 GHz source frequency; electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), in which NMR spectra at paramagnetic centers are obtained by EPR detection; and pulsed EPR, including ESE (Electron Spin Echo) spectroscopy.

  10. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly], April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Eskay, T.P.

    1992-10-01

    Depolymerization of coals at low temperatures may offer advantages over thermal bond cleavage. Because bond cleavage energies of radical cations are lower than the corresponding homolytic bond cleavage energies of the same bond, generation of radical cations in coal may make possible depolymerization at lower temperatures. We seek to investigate the above possibility using single molecules containing functional groups common in coals. Since the generation of a radical cation requires the removal of an electron from a neutral molecule, a primary focus of the study will be finding oxidants that will remove an electron from compounds with structural similarity to those typically found in coals. The study will also be concerned with the decomposition of radical cations and the products formed as a result of the decomposition.

  11. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, October 1--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Eskay, T.P.

    1992-01-31

    Depolymerization of coals at low temperatures may offer advantages over thermal bond cleavage. Because bond cleavage energies of radical cations are lower than the corresponding homolytic bond cleavage energies of the same bond, generation of radical cations in coal may make possible depolymerization at lower temperatures. We seek to investigate the above possibility using single molecules containing functional groups common in coals. Since the generation of a radical cation requires the removal of an electron from a neutral molecule, a primary focus of the study will be finding oxidants that will remove an electron from compounds with structural similarity to those typically found in coals. The study must also be concerned with the decomposition of radical cations and the products formed as a result of the decomposition.

  12. Coal-log pipeline system development. Fifth quarterly report, August 25, 1991--November 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.

    1991-12-01

    Project tasks include: (1) Perform the necessary testing and development to demonstrate that the amount of binder in coal logs can be reduced to 8% or lower to produce logs with adequate strength to eliminate breakage during pipeline transportation, under conditions experienced in long distance pipeline systems. Prior to conducting any testing and demonstration, grantee shall perform an information search and make full determination of all previous attempts to extrude or briquette coal, upon which the testing and demonstration shall be based. (2) Perform the necessary development to demonstrate a small model of the most promising injection system for coal-logs, and tests the logs produced. (3) Conduct economic analysis of coal-log pipeline, based upon the work to date. Refine and complete the economic model. (VC)

  13. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS Process). Eighth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-28

    This report describes progress on three fronts of the project. First in studies to elucidate optimal growing conditions for the consortia of coal degraders employed indicates that best growth occurs with 0. 2% w/v Shefton T. Secondly in comparing the biodegradative properties of the coal degraders, isolates identified as Mic-1 and Mic-4 were the best performers. And lastly bioreactors studies in batch mode are related.

  14. A model approach to highly dispersing catalytic materials in coal for gasification. Eleventh quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bota, K.B.

    1992-10-01

    This project seeks to develop a technique, based on coal surface properties, for highly dispersing catalysts in coal for gasification and to investigate the potential of using potassium carbonate and calcium acetate mixtures as catalysts for coal gasification. The lower cost and higher catalytic activity of the latter compound will produce economic benefits by reducing the amount of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} required for high coal char reactivities. As was shown in previous reports, coal loading with potassium or calcium at different pHs produced CO{sub 2} gasification activities which increased in the order pH 6 > pH 10 >>pH 1. A similar trend was obtained when calcium and potassium were simultaneously loaded and char reaction times were less than about 75 min. In the last quarter, the potential application of ammonia as a reactive medium for coal gasification has been investigated. This gas has not been previously applied to coal gasification. However, related work suggests that the potential chemical feedstock base can be broadened by using ammonia to generate hydrogen cyanide and cyanogen from coal. The current report shows that the reactivity of a demineralized lignite in ammonia is significantly higher in the presence of calcium or potassium catalyst than that for the char without added catalyst and suggests that ammonia is a potentially reactive gas for catalyzed coal gasification.

  15. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 26, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery. The overall project scope of the engineering development project is to conceptually develop a commercial flowsheet to maximize pyritic sulfur reduction at practical energy recovery values. This is being accomplished by utilizing the basic research data on the surface properties of coal, mineral matter and pyrite obtained from the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Fine Coal Flotation Project, to develop this conceptual flowsheet. This progress report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  16. Advanced direct coal liquefaction concepts. Quarterly report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, D.J.; Parker, R.J.; Simpson, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Five barrels of a Wilsonville process derived solvent (V-1074) from Black Thunder coal were obtained. This material boils within the preferred gas oil range, is more aromatic than previous solvents, and will therefore be used for the bench unit studies. Several repeat runs were performed in the autoclave to confirm the results of the matrix study. In addition, runs were carried out with different catalysts, with agglomerates and with the V-1074 solvent. The results of the autoclave runs were analyzed with respect to coal conversion, CO conversion, oil yield, hydrogen consumption and oxygen removal. It was concluded that the best operating conditions for the first stage operation was a temperature of at least 390{degrees}C, residence time of at least 30 minutes, cold CO pressure of at least 600 psig and potassium carbonate catalyst (2% wt on total feed). The data also indicated however, that the coal conversion goes through a maximum, and too high a severity leads to retrograde reaction and lower coal solubilization. The scope for increasing temperature and time is therefore limited. Petrographic examination of the THF insoluble resids from the autoclave program indicated a maximum coal conversion of about 90% for Black Thunder coal. The bench unit construction was also essentially completed and the bench unit program to be carded out in the next twelve months was defined.

  17. Desulfurization of coal: enhanced selectivity using phase transfer catalysts. Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.R.; Hippo, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    Due to environmental problems related to the combustion of high sulfur Illinois coal, there continues to be interest in the development in viable pre-combustion desulfurization processes. Recent studies by the authors have obtained very good sulfur removals but the reagents that are used are too expensive. Use of cheaper reagents leads to a loss of desired coal properties. This study investigated the application phase transfer catalysts to the selective oxidation of sulfur in coal using air and oxygen as oxidants. The phase transfer catalyst is expected to function as a selectivity moderator by permitting the use of milder reaction conditions that otherwise necessary. This would enhance the sulfur selectivity and help retain the heating value of the coal. The use of certain coal combustion wastes for desulfurization, and the application of cerium (IV) catalyzed air oxidation for selective sulfur oxidation are also being studied. If successful, this project could lead to the rapid development of a commercially viable desulfurization process. This would significantly improve the marketability of Illinois coal.

  18. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, October--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1993-12-31

    Acid pretreatment removes those alkaline metal and alkaline earth cations which inhibit coal reactivity and hydrogen transfer. Shams et al. (1992) found that through this pretreatment a large portion of the calcium present in coal was removed. Hydrochloric acid was used in that study, but sulfurous acid, if similar results are achieved, would be a much more suitable acid for processing. Another pretreatment method to remove these cations is one using ammonium acetate (Hengel and Walker, 1984). This study will evaluate the effect of combining these two principles, acid pretreatment of coal and rapid hydrogen transfer, for improving hydrogen transfer under low severity conditions. The acid pretreatment methods showed more success with low rank, subbituminous coals and lignite. Therefore, Wyodak subbituminous coal (WY) from the Argonne Premium Sample Bank and Black Thunder subbituminous coal (BT) from Amoco are being used and compared in this study. The cyclic olefin, 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin, ISO) and its analogue, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin, TET), will also be used and compared in this study. The efficacy of the two-ringed ISO can then be compared with the previously studied three-ringed HHA. Dr. James Hool, Professor of Industrial Engineering and an expert in statistics and experimental design, assisted in formulating the four-dimensional experimental matrix found in Figure 1. It is through this parametric analysis that the effect of each factor in this pretreatment and low severity liquefaction system will be determined.

  19. Reactions governing coal solubilization. Second quarterly progress report, October 15, 1983-January 15, 1984. [Benzophenone

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Diaryl ketones such as benzophenone and fluorenone have been quite widely used to assess the hydrogen donor capacity of coals and macerals. Brower (Brower, K.R. Fuel, 1977, 56, 245) has, in addition, postulated that carbonyl compounds play special roles in liquefaction of some coals. The fundamental pathways important in the reactions of the ketones and hydrocarbons, however, remain unestablished. Accordingly, we undertook a study of the basic reactions. The reduction of benzophenone by hydrogen donor molecules such as tetralin and dihydroanthracene to give diphenylmethane was investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 400/sup 0/C. Several lines of evidence indicate that the reaction occurs in three distinct stages. The first stage is a radical process which gives benzhydrol. In the second stage, this intermediate undergoes an S/sub N/ reaction to produce water and bis(diphenylmethyl) ether. The ether disproportionates in a readily initiated, free radical chain reaction to give diphenylmethane and benzophenone. The reaction sequence is outlined. The reaction in the presence of coal is more complex because the reactive coal molecules intercept the intermediate diphenylmethyl carbocation to form adduction products with phenols and multiring aromatic compounds. The amount of diphenylmethane produced in the case of coal, therefore, represents a minimum value of the hydrogen donor capacity of that coal or maceral. 22 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrer, A.R.; Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Williams, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of twenty-three aromatic compounds were ranked for their donor solvent efficacy for the dissolution of Western Kentucky No. 9/14 coal. The transfer of hydrogen from the solvent to the coal fragments, as measured by coal conversion, was examined at three levels of available hydrogen. The hydrogen donors are ranked according to their ability to convert coal to THF solubles. Aromatic analogs of the donors showed little ability to convert coal to THF solubles. Factors which influence hydrogen donation include the presence of heteroatoms or substituents both internal and external to the aromatic or hydroaromatic rings, the degree of hydrogenation, the aromaticity or nonaromaticity of the hydroaromatics, and the presence of five-membered rings. A relationship between heats of formation and hydrogen donor ability is shown for hydroaromatics within two ring or three ring homologous series. A model hydrogen acceptor, benzophenone, is also used to rank donors. No correlation exists in the ranking of hydrogen donors by the model acceptor used in this work and in other experimental studies and that obtained by conversion of Western Kentucky coal at typical liquefaction conditions. 24 references.

  1. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical report, May 9, 1991--August 8, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  2. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 11, April--June, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-07-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 tons of each of three project coals, by each process. During Quarter 11 (April--June, 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant with the installation and calibration of a refurbished 30-inch diameter column. The evaluation of toxic trace element data for column flotation samples continued, with preliminary analysis indicating that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements, and that significant reductions in the concentration of many elements were observed from raw coal, to flotation feed, to flotation product samples. Significant progress was made on Subtask 6.5 selective agglomeration bench-scale testing. Data from this work indicates that project ash specifications can be met for all coals evaluated, and that the bulk of the bridging liquid (heptane) can be removed from the product for recycle to the process. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module progressed this quarter with the completion of several revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Procurement of coal for PDU operation began with the purchase of 800 tons of Taggart coal. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU continued through this reporting quarter and is currently approximately 60% complete.

  3. A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-30

    Vortec Corporation`s Phase III development contract DE-AC22-91PC91161 for a ``Coal-Fired Combustion System for Industrial Process Heating Applications`` is project funded under the DOE/PETC advanced combustion program. This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase III research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase III project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the designs of the remaining major components of the integrated system were completed and the equipment was ordered. DOE has elected to modify the scope of the existing R&D program being conducted under this contract to include testing of a simulated TSCA incinerator ash. The modification will be in the form of an additional Task (Task 8 -- TSCA Ash Testing) to the original Statement of Work.

  4. Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit. Phase 2. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, M. H.

    1981-01-20

    This represents the second quarterly progress report on Phase 2 of the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) Program. Phase 1 of this program started in March 1976 and included the design, construction, and initial operation of the PDU. On June 25, 1980, Phase 2 of the program was initiated. It covers a 1-year operations program utilizing the existing PDU and is planned to include five runs with a targeted total operating time of 9 weeks. During this report period, Run 6, the initial run of the Phase 2 program was completed. The gasification system was operated for a total of 95 h at pressures up to 10 atm. Average product gas HHV values of 100 Btu/scf were recorded during 10-atm operation, while gasifying coal at a rate of 1100 lb/h. The run was terminated when the melt overflow system plugged after 60 continuous hours of overflow. Following this run, melt withdrawal system revisions were made, basically by changing the orifice materials from Monofrax to an 80 Cobalt-20 Chromium alloy. By the end of the report period, the PDU was being prepared for Run 7.

  5. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 8, 1993--August 8, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    High hydrocracking and liquefaction activity can be achieved with 10 wt.% of sulfided clay-supported iron catalysts. Further tests and demonstrations of this activity were required. Iron hydroxyoxide was generated on acid-treated montmorillonite. The new batch of catalyst exhibited high hydrocracking activity, Three hour tests with the solubilized intermediate from low-severity treatment of Wyodak coal (LSW) gave a high conversion (45%) of the heptane-insoluble LSW intermediate to heptane-soluble products. An investigation of new methods for the production of catalysts from tetralin-soluble iron oxometallates and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Iron oxotitanate and iron oxoaluminate gave very high conversions of LSW to heptane solubles (61% and 54%, respectively). The high yields of heptane soluble products obtained with these catalysts offers a potential for use in liquefaction stages with solubilized coal, or at least serve as a model for producing active catalysts via mixed metal oxides. Methods for successfully testing dispersed iron catalysts with the low-severity intermediate were also devised. Catalyst recovered from the dispersed iron hydroxyoxide-catalyzed reaction of ion-exchanged Wyodak gave a high conversion (47%) of LSW to heptane solubles.

  6. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly technical report, September 1, 1994--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-03-01

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a technical and economic study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert an environmental problem (fly ash) into valuable products - bricks. During this quarter, the authors set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., provided an expanded NEPA questionnaire for DOE, made preliminary arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co., revised laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, and began characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products.

  7. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion. Quarterly status report, [July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong

    1995-09-30

    The research was focused continually on the general tasks: Task 1, molecular organometallic catalysts for hydrogenation and Task 2, organic base catalysts for arene hydrogenation and the hydrotreating of the coal liquids. With regard to Task 1, the [1,5-HDRhCl]{sub 2}/buffer catalyst system has been investigated in detail to improve its performance. In the presence of CTAB, the stability of the catalyst was improved greatly. The relationship between the turnover number of the catalyst and the reaction time was obtained. Other aromatic compounds such as toluene, n-butylbenzene, tetralin, o-xylene all can be hydrogenated into the corresponding substituted cyclohexane derivatives in more than 94% yields when catalyzed by [1,5- HDRhCl]{sub 2} in the presence of small amount of surfactant molecules. The optimum catalyst system has been applied for the hydrogenation of tetralin in the presence of a coal liquid derived from the coal liquefaction. It was found that about 80-85% of tetralin in the mixture was hydrogenated to decalin under the conditions of these experiments. Task 2 was continually focused on the hydrogenation of coal liquids. Institution of dideuterium for dihydrogen in the hydrotreating of coal liquid at 250 {degrees}C and 1000 psig of dideuterium yielded a product that was characterized by {sup 2}H NMR. Two groups of deuteron located in the region of 6.5-8.0 ppm and 1.0-3.5 ppm, respectively, were observed. The former group was assigned to the deuterons on carbon atoms on aromatic rings and the latter to the deuterons linked to the aliphatic carbon atoms. In addition, naphthalene was hydrogenated completely to tetralin in the presence of the coal liquid under the same conditions, implying that the reduction of multiaromatic compounds was not adversely influenced by the existence of the coal liquid which contains potential catalysts poisons such as sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen.

  8. Coal transformation chemistry. Second quarterly progress report, June 1, 1980-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Leon M.; Alemany, L. B.; Handy, C. I.; King, H. -H.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the information concerning the structure of Illinois No. 6 coal obtained in this laboratory and elsewhere provides the basis for a proposed structure for this bituminous coal. All the available facts concerning reduction, reductive alkylation, hydrogen atom exchange, oxidation, functional group analysis and so forth have been used to define a structural segment consisting of about 1000 atoms with a molecular weight in excess of 6000. This work is discussed in Part A. The study of the reductive alkylation reaction of Illinois No. 6 coal in liquid ammonia has been directed toward the optimization of the reaction conditions for the achievement of maximum solubility. The latest results indicate that about 55% of the original Illinois No. 6 coal can be converted to products which are soluble in tetrahydrofuran using potassium in liquid ammonia as the reducing agent and n-butyl iodide in tetrahydrofuran as the reducing alkylating agent. These observations are treated in Part B. The effort on donor solvent coal chemistry was directed to the role played by pericyclic reactions in the liquefaction process. The reactivity of a number of donors has been examined including 1,2- and 1,4-dihydronaphthalene. Although the research is not yet complete, the preliminary results indicate that free radical processes occur preferentially. Thus, the pericyclic reactions appear to be unimportant at the threshold reaction temperatures of 350 to 425/sup 0/C. This work is described in Part C.

  9. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Culture screening and performance studies were performed with a variety of cultures in removing nitrogen compounds from coal liquid. Two cultures were shown to be effective in removing 17 and 26 percent of the nitrogen in coal liquid as determined by elemental analysis. Experiments will continue in an effort to find additional cultures and isolates able to degrade nitrogen, as well as oxygen and sulfur as heteroatom compounds, from coal liquids. A biological process for upgrading of coal liquids would offer significant advantages, such as operation at ordinary temperature and pressure with better energy efficiency. Of greater importance is the fact that microorganisms do not require an external supply of hydrogen for heteroatom removal, obtaining required hydrogen from water. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are continuously regenerated by growth on the heteroatom compounds. Ring structures are degraded as the heteroatoms are removed. The heteroatoms are in an inocuous form, such as NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Therefore, there is significant potential for the development of an economical biological process for upgrading of coal liquids.

  10. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-10-01

    It is the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Under the reaction conditions employed, the behavior of other trace elements of concern will also be evaluated. The recovery of the chlorine removed from the coal as a marketable byproduct, calcium chloride suitable for use as a road deicer, is also being investigated using a novel absorption/crystallization device. A value of 6.29 hr{sup {minus}1} was determined for the dechlorination rate constant of IBC-109 coal at 385{degrees}C, and an activation energy of 34.7 kcal/mol was obtained from an Arrhenius plot over the temperature range of 300--385{degrees}C. A significant removal of chlorine (84.3%) was attained while retaining 92% of the energy of the coal in the solid product by preheating the coal at lower temperatures prior to a six-minute reaction at 385{degrees}C. Volatiles lost during the thermal dechlorination may be recovered for their heating value, and/or as a source of chemical feedstocks; this aspect will require further study, but it appears that the overall energy balance on the system should prove to be favorable. The design of the bench scale fluidized bed thermal dechlorination unit has been completed, and components ordered. Operation of this system should provide the information required for further scale-up of the process.

  11. A characterization and evaluation of coal liquefaction process streams. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, S.D.; Robbins, G.A.; Winschel, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    This is the Technical Progress Report for the twelfth quarter of activities. Described in this report are the following activities: (1) Thirty-nine samples from four run conditions of HTI Run PB-07 were received. Appropriate samples were characterized by proton NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, vacuum distillation, and solvent quality tests. (2) The University of Delaware completed their subcontract this quarter. A meeting was held on April 30, 1997 at the University to close out the subcontract. (3) Twelve sets of samples were chosen from the CONSOL sample bank for the study of the insoluble and presumed unreactive material from process stream samples. Each set consists of the whole process stream and the 454 C{sup +} (850 F{sup +}) distillation resid derived from that process stream. Processing data for all samples were compiled. The samples represent four Wilsonville pilot plant runs and two HTI runs.

  12. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 12, June 18, 1995--September 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1995-12-31

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. It is the purpose of the project described here to provide such a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltene transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms.

  13. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 3, March 18, 1993--June 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1993-11-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. It is the purpose of this project to provide a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltene transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms.

  14. TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Utility Demonstration. Fourth Quarterly progress report, August 1989--October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O&R) Utility Corporation`s Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/ou desip unit to fire 2.5 sulfur coal. The slogging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Envirommental Standards. TRW-CBU scope of work includes the engineering, design and supply of the slogging combustors, coal and limestone feed systems and a control system for these components. During this report period, the design activities for all systems progressed to permit the release of specifications and requests for proposals. Award of contracts for long-delivery items and major equipment are being placed to meet the revised program schedule.

  15. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal. Tenth quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

    1995-05-01

    The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench-scale results. This report describes the following: (1) laboratory support for bench run CMSL-09, (2) the laboratory-scale efforts for development of suitable catalysts for hydrocracking/depolymerization of waste plastics, (3) analysis of TBP (true boiling point) fractions of distillates from CMSL-08, and (4) objectives and run-plan for bench run CMSL-09.

  16. Use of ultrasound for enhanced direct coal liquefaction: Quarterly report, August 1988--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate whether high-intensity ultrasound is capable of inducing coal liquefaction under mild conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a solvent and in the presence or absence of a liquefaction catalyst. The role of high-intensity ultrasound in effective dispersion of solids and/or activation of catalysts will also be investigated using an appropriate liquefaction catalyst. The study will be conducted in two parts. First model compounds (bibenzyl and benzyl phenyl ether) will be subjected to high-intensity ultrasound to determine if any chemical bonds are broken under the action of ultrasound. In the second part, the effect of ultrasound on both catalyzed and non-catalyzed coal liquefaction will be determined. Two coals (sub-bituminous and bituminous) will be studied using tetralin as a hydrogen donating solvent and molybdenum sulfide as catalyst. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  18. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, October-December 1981. [Ammonium molybdates

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, S.W.

    1981-01-01

    This research has the following scope and objectives: (1) to characterize supported molybdena catalysts, in the sulfide as well as in the oxide form, with respect to total surface area, specific surface area by oxygen chemisorption, and catalytic activity in a standardized test reaction; (2) to study the effect of preparational variables in the liquefaction of coal with efficient catalysts, with particular emphasis on molybdenum catalysts employed in very small amount. Summary of progress do date - Tubing bomb experiments on the transfer of hydrogen from tetralin to coal have been extended to a series of impregnated metal salts and two acids, all at 1% concentration. Coal conversion, moderately high even with no catalyst, is incrementally higher with all catalysts tested. Apparent hydrogen transfer, based on naphthalene produced, is also increased by all catalysts but especially by ammonium molybdate (AM) and stannous chloride (SnCl/sub 2/). Blank runs with catalyst but no coal show a finite amount of naphthalene production; except for AM and SnCl/sub 2/, the apparent catalysis of hydrogen transfer may be an artifact associated with a catalytic effect on tetralin dissociation. This question is being examined in autoclave runs, where the gas volume: liquid volume is greater. Runs at 400/sup 0/C indicate a surprising effect: both coal and AM separately catalyze tetralin dissociation, but their combined effect is greater than the sum of the individual ones (synergy). The possibility that catalytic generation of radicals from coal in turn catalyzes tetralin dissociation is being studied at 450/sup 0/C with bibenzyl as a radical generator. 3 tables.

  19. Char particle fragmentation and its effects on unburned carbon during pulverized coal combustion. Quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    This document is the tenth quarterly status report of work on a project concerned with the fragmentation of char particles during pulverized coal combustion that is being conducted at the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. The project is intended to satisfy, in part, PETC`s research efforts to understand the chemical and physical processes that govern coal combustion. The work is pertinent to the char oxidation phase of coal combustion and focuses on how the fragmentation of coal char particles affects overall mass loss rates and how char fragmentation phenomena influence coal conversion efficiency. The knowledge and information obtained will allow the development of engineering models that can be used to predict accurately char particle temperatures and total mass loss rates during pulverized coal combustion. The overall objectives of the project are: (1) to characterize fragmentation events as a function of combustion environment, (2) to characterize fragmentation with respect to particle porosity and mineral loadings, (3) to assess overall mass loss rates with respect to particle fragmentation, and (4) to quantify the impact of fragmentation on unburned carbon in ash. The knowledge obtained during the course of this project will be used to predict accurately the overall mass loss rates of coals based on the mineral content and porosity of their chars. The work will provide a means of assessing reasons for unburned carbon in the ash of coal fired boilers and furnaces. Accomplishments for this period are presented for Task 3, char fragmentation studies and Task 4, fragmentation modelling.

  20. Structural environment of metallic constituents in coals: Quarterly report, 09/15/86-12/15/86

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.H.

    1987-01-20

    The first group of samples was assembled for examination via EXAFS at CHESS and at SSRL. Nine samples containing titanium (coals, reactor deposits, bottom resids) were obtained and prepared for runs to be made when beam time was allocated to this project. Reference compounds, structures of which are known were also assembled (Ti metal, for precise location of the K-edge position; TiO/sub 2/; TiC; TiO(AcAc)/sub 2/; TiN). These spectra will facilitate the interpretation of the NEXAFS and EXAFS spectra of the coals.

  1. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Tenth quarterly technical progress report, [September--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Kittle, J.D.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Fry, I.J.; Traunero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N.; Chakravanty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    1991-12-13

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The specific technical objectives of the project are to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotrophic bacterium; and conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  2. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Fry, I.; Wyza, R.E.; Palmer, D.T.; Zupancic, T.J.; Conkle, H.N.

    1990-06-14

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotropic bacterium; conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  3. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Third quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Fry, I.; Wyza, R.E.; Palmer, D.T.; Zupancic, T.J.; Conkle, H.N.

    1990-03-15

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: Clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; Return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; Transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotrophic bacterium; Conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  4. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. Ninth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Litchfield, J.H.; Zupancic, T.J.; Baker, B.; Palmer, D.T.; Fry, I.J.; Tranuero, C.G.; Wyza, R.E.; Schweitzer, A.; Conkle, H.N.; Chakravanty, L.; Tuovinen, O.H.

    1991-09-13

    The objective of this project is to produce one or more microorganisms capable of removing the organic and inorganic sulfur in coal. The original specific technical objectives of the project were to: clone and characterize the genes encoding the enzymes of the ``4S`` pathway (sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate) for release of organic sulfur from coal; return multiple copies of genes to the original host to enhance the biodesulfurization activity of that organism; transfer this pathway into a fast-growing chemolithotropic bacterium; conduct a batch-mode optimization/analysis of scale-up variables.

  5. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor Phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995 No. 16

    SciTech Connect

    Borio, R.W.

    1995-12-15

    The objective of this project is to retrofit a burner, capable of firing microfine coal, to a standard gas/oil designed industrial boiler to assess the technical and economic viability of displacing premium fuels with microfine coal. This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the sixteenth quarter (July `95 through September `95) of the program. The overall program has consisted of five major tasks: (1) A review of current state-of-the-art coal firing system components. (2) Design and experimental testing of a prototype HEACC (High Efficiency Advanced Coal Combustor) burner. (3) Installation and testing of a prototype HEACC system in a commercial retrofit application. (4) Economics evaluation of the HEACC concept for retrofit applications. (5) Long term demonstration under commercial user demand conditions.

  6. Coal materials handling/coal feeder development, Phase I. 2nd quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-27

    The essential objective of Phase I of our program is to demonstrate extended capabilities for the Linear Pocket Feeder (LPF). This requires extensive modification of both our test facility and the LPF. At this time we estimate that delays in modifications will prevent our testing the LPF until at least mid-May, a month and a half later than originally scheduled. However, we have reviewed our test plan and facility operation in detail and conclude that testing can probably be completed by the end of August as originally proposed, and that the program is not jeopardized in any other way. In fact, our projected delay in specified testing is due in part to our initial testing - crude but successful, with pulverized coal (PC). On the strength of this success, we are attempting to go immediately to an LPF and feed system that is fully modified for PC. A status report task by task is given.

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 14, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-04-30

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by June 1997. During Quarter 14 (January--March 1996), parametric testing of the 30-inch Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Plant continued under Subtask 3.2. Subtask 3. 3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter with parametric testing of the batch dewatering unit. Coal product moistures of 3 to 12 percent were achieved, with higher percent solids slurry feeds resulting in lower product moistures. For a given percent solids feed, the product moisture decreased with increasing butane to dry coal ratios. Stirring time, stirring rate, and settling time were all found to have little effect on the final moisture content. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-fuel slurry formulation for coals cleaned by selective agglomeration, indicated that pH adjustment to 10 resulted in marginally better (lower viscosity) slurries for one of the two coals tested. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that the new Taggart coal requires a grind with a d{sub 80} of approximately 33 microns to achieve the 1 lb ash/MBtu product quality specification. Also under Subtask 6.5, reductions in the various trace element concentrations accomplished during selective agglomeration were determined. Work was essentially completed on the detailed design of the PDU selective agglomeration module under Task 7 with the issuing of a draft report.

  8. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 6, December 18, 1993--March 17, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1994-08-01

    Throughout the experimental runs described herein, the authors utilized a high pressure, high temperature diffusion cell system. This diffusion system has been tested through the measurement of the diffusivity of a number of model coal liquids. The project is of both empirical and theoretical nature and is divided into a number of tasks which are reviewed here.

  9. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1997-01-01

    From previous study, we know that oxidation of the coal surface will decrease the efficiency of electrostatic beneficiation by increasing the negative charge of the carbon particles. The polarity and magnitude of charge acquired by the nonconducting particles varied depending on the state of ``oxidation`` of the surfaces and the work function relative to the metal surface. The formation of oxide layer on the coal particles are rather rapid, therefore, the grinding and charging processes are needed to be carried out in a nitrogen or argon atmosphere. It is clear that impaction efficiency between coal particle and charger will decrease with decreasing particle size and particle velocity. So, it is necessary to charge small particles in a different process. We plan to size classify the coal particles into three size fractions: (1)fine (<40{mu}m). (2) medium (40{approximately}100{mu}m). (3) coarse (100{approximately}200{mu}m). Static mixer and a new designed charger (powder pump connected with a circular tubing) are used in the experiment. And we planned to measure the charge to mass ratio distributions as a function of the particle size distribution on the separator plates. This report discusses the following: determination of the charge to mass ratio distributions as a function of particle size distribution; and method to measure the mass, charge and size of the particle.

  10. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction. Fourth quarterly report, 1 July 1991--30 September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, R.A.; Balogh-Nair, V.

    1992-06-18

    Steam pretreatment is the reaction of coal with steam at temperatures well below those usually used for solubilization. The objective of the proposed work is to test the application of steam pretreatment to coal liquefaction. A 300 ml stirred autoclave for liquefaction tests is being installed. Pretreatment and extraction tests were made with Blind Canyon coal alone, mixed with Illinois No. 6 coal, impregnated with iron, and impregnated with iron and sulfided using phenyl disulfide. Measurements show an increase in volatiles yield and a decrease in extraction yield with catalyst addition. These results are not yet definitive, because both yields may be artificially decreased by insoluble residue from phenyl disulfide. About one ram of purified {alpha}-naphthylmethyl phenyl ether was prepared and an additional 0. 8 gram were synthesized. Steam pretreatment of the model compound {alpha}-benzylnaphthyl ether was repeated with a Pyrex liner for the reactor tube. No differences have yet appeared as a result of using this liner (compared to bare stainless steel), evidence against any catalytic wall effect.

  11. Regulation of coal degradation by fungi. Third quarterly report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, R.L.; Bumpus, J.A.

    1995-04-24

    Progress is reported on the solubilization and depolymerization of coal by fungi. It is postulated the the solubilization and depolymerization are separate events. Other objectives include the determination of the role that laccases and peroxidases exert, to access the role of oxygen radicals and oxygen species, and to characterize the solubilization products formed.

  12. The single electron chemistry of coals. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Eskay, T.P.

    1992-11-11

    Depolymerization of coals at low temperatures may offer advantages over thermal bond cleavage. Because bond cleavage energies of radical cations are lower than the corresponding homolytic bond cleavage energies of the same bond, generation of radical cations in coal may make possible depolymerization at lower temperatures. We seek to investigate the above possibility using single molecules containing functional groups common in coals. Since the generation of a radical cation requires the removal of an electron from a neutral molecule, a primary focus of the study will be finding oxidants that will remove an electron from compounds with structural similarity to those typically found in coals. The study will also be concerned with the decomposition of radical cations and the products formed as a result of the decomposition. In our last report we described that treatment of bibenzyl and neo-pentylbenzene with Fe(III) (1,10-phenanthroline){sub 3}(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3} (Fe(III)(PHEN)) in refluxing CH{sub 3}CN (82{degrees}C) failed to produce substantial bond cleavage {beta} to the aromatic ring. Because bond cleavage was not observed, we have continued our study by moving to compounds which have lower ionization potentials as well as study other oxidants.

  13. Healy clean coal project. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New Source Performance Standards. (VC)

  14. Healy clean coal project. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better then the federal New Source Performance Standards. (VC)

  15. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-07-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following: modification to the electrostatic separator; review of DOE specifications for minimum beneficiation and calculations of grinding requirements based on washability; two-pass beneficiation; analysis of different sieve fractions; measurement of charge to mass ratio as a function of height of deposition; and charging of coal against different materials.

  16. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellog Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993 for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. The work has been divided into two parts, the Basic Program and Option 1. The objectives of the Basic Program are to characterize the coal liquids, develop an optimized refinery configuration for processing indirect and direct coal liquids, and develop a LP refinery model with the Process Industry Modeling System (PIMS) software. The objectives of Option 1 are to confirm the validity of the optimization work of the Basic Program, produce large quantities of liquid transportation fuel blending stocks, conduct engine emission tests, and determine the value and the processing costs of the coal liquids. The major efforts during the reporting period, October through December 1996, were in the areas of Option 1 blending and Option 1 FCC production run.

  17. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This report covers work carried out under Task 2, Concept Definition and Analysis, and Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and Particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (FHTAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. The cycle optimization effort has brought about several revisions to the system configuration resulting from: (1) the use of Illinois No. 6 coal instead of Utah Blind Canyon; (2) the use of coal rather than methane as a reburn fuel; (3) reducing radiant section outlet temperatures to 1700F (down from 1800F); and (4) the need to use higher performance (higher cost) steam cycles to offset losses introduced as more realistic operating and construction constraints are identified.

  18. Evaluation of hyperbaric filtration for fine coal dewatering. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.; Hogg, R.; Fonseca, A.

    1996-12-31

    The main objectives of the project are to investigate the fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction in fine coal dewatering, to conduct laboratory and pilot plant studies on the applicability of hyperbaric filter systems and to develop process conditions for dewatering of fine clean coal to less than 20 percent moisture. The program consist of three phases, namely Phase I, model development, Phase II, laboratory studies, Phase III, field testing. The Pennsylvania State University is leading efforts in Phase I, the University of Kentucky in Phase 11, and Consol Inc. in Phase III of the program. All three organizations are involved in all the three phases of the program. The Pennsylvania State University is developing a theoretical model for hyperbaric filtration systems, whereas the University of Kentucky is conducting experimental studies to investigate fundamental aspects of particle-liquid interaction and application of high pressure filter in fine coal dewatering. The optimum filtration conditions identified in Phase I and II will be tested in a Consol Inc. coal preparation plant using an Andritz Ruthner portable hyperbaric filtration unit. Accomplishments to date are reported for the three phases.

  19. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, April-June 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrer, A.R.; Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-07-01

    Although the numerous functions of the solvent during liquefaction are not completely understood, the provision for (and the maintenance of) an effective process solvent is necessary for effective coal liquefaction. In this project, the function of the process solvent regarding vapor-liquid equilibrium, hydrogen donation, and catalyst activity has been explored. In previously reported work, a number of donor compounds were evaluated for their relative efficiency in converting coal to cresol solubles. Attempts to correlate the relative efficiency of the various donor compounds were made on the basis of thermodynamic stability and structural features of the molecules. Currently, work is underway with selected donor compounds to determine if the chemical nature of the compound influences the product distribution obtained during coal liquefaction as well as affecting the amount of conversion obtained. The product distribution, which is being used to evaluate the liquefaction products, is based upon extraction of the products into different solvents. The products are divided into oil, pentane soluble material; asphaltenes, pentane insoluble, benzene soluble material; preasphaltenes, benzene insoluble, methylene chloride/methanol soluble material; and insoluble organic matter, methylene chloride/methanol insoluble material. The effectiveness of the hydrogen donor solvent will be measured by the amount of higher quality material (oil and asphaltenes) obtained as well as by the amount of coal converted.

  20. Applications of micellar enzymology to clean coal technology. Twelfth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.

    1993-03-09

    This project is designed to develop methods for precombustion coal remediation by implementing recent advances in enzyme biochemistry. The novel approach of this study is incorporation of hydrophilic oxidative enzymes in reverse micelles in an organic solvent. Enzymes from commercial sources or microbial extracts are being investigated for their capacity to remove organic sulfur from coal by oxidation of the sulfur groups, splitting of C-S bonds and loss of sulfur as sulfuric acid. Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS) are serving as models of organic sulfur-containing components of coal in initial studies. A goal of this project is to define a reverse micelle system that optimizes the catalytic activity of enzymes toward desulfurization of model compounds and ultimately coal samples. Studies by several groups (Martinek et al., 1981; Kabanov et al., 1988; Martinek, 1989; Verhaert et al., 1990) have shown that the surfactant AOT over a broad concentration range in organic solvents produces micelles, comparatively uniform in diameter, which incorporate hydrophilic enzymes. The activity (kcat) of certain enzymes in this system is higher than in aqueous solution. This surfactant is therefore being examined as a vehicle for enhancement of sulfoxidation reactions.

  1. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 5, May 1990--June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

    1990-08-01

    The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, conbustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Sciences, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the full-scale tests. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra-fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

  2. Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-20

    The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. During this fourth quarter of the contract period, activities were underway under Tasks 2 and 3. Sufficient characterization of the bench-scale testing and pilot-plant testing results enabled the design and procurement activities to move forward. On that basis, activities in the areas of design and procurement that had been initiated during the previous quarter were conducted and completed.

  3. Diffusion of gases in coals and chars: Technical progress report, quarterly report No. 5, 9/15/86-12/14/86

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Work during the past quarter involved: (1) surface area measurement; (2) mercury porosimetry; (3) NMR pore structure analysis; and (4) diffusion measurements. Surface area measurements via both nitrogen and carbon dioxide adsorption were completed for all group A coals. Four particle sizes of three coals were studied with mercury porosimetry. NMR relaxation experiments were used to determine continuous pore size distributions. Activity concerning diffusion measurements has been in the area of improving experimental design for both the pellet string reactor and batch desorption experiments. 1 ref.

  4. Program of basic research on the utilization of coal-water mixture fuels. Quarterly report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, E.Z.; Padmanaban, J.; Parfitt, G.D.; Rao, S.A.; Rubin, E.S.; Sommer, H.T.; Toor, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this research involves improving basic understanding of two areas of special importance to the successful use of coal-water slurries: mixture stability and atomization. The present report covers progress for the calendar quarter ending September 30, 1981; hence, reivews the start-up activities for the first three weeks of the project. Section 2 of this report reviews activities in the study of mixture stability. Section 3 discusses studies on the atomization of coal-water slurries. Sections 2 and 3 each are organized according to specific tasks listed in the proposal Statement of Work.

  5. High temperature electrochemical separation of H{sub 2}S from coal gasification. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Winnick, J.

    1993-09-01

    A method of polishing coal synthesis gas by an electrochemical operation is being perfected. The operation which takes advantage of an electrochemical potential gradient rather than conventional techniques, removes poisonous H{sub 2}S from the coal gas stream leaving only H{sub 2} to enrich the exiting flue goses. Sulfur is the by-product which is carried away by an inert sweep gas and condensed downstream. The technology is attractive due to aesthetics as well as economics when compared to other alternatives. Experiments this quarter focused on production of cobalt electrodes cable of sustaining pore symmetry in the cell environs.

  6. Photoassisted electrolysis applied to coal gasification. Third quarterly report, 1 January 1982-31 Mar 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The literature search on electrochemical studies of various carbons has been completed. Two conclusions were reached: (1) The surfaces of various carbons are covered by oxide films to different extents and the oxides resemble either the quinone-like structure in their oxidized form or the hydroquinone-like structure in the reduced form. (2) When carbonaceous materials are oxidized chemically, electrochemically, or thermally, the first stage involves formation of the oxide film and the later stages oxide gas (CO or CO/sub 2/) evolution. The catalytic reaction mechanism of coal oxidation was substantiated by adding Fe/sup 3 +/ or Ce/sup 4 +/ to a cell containing a coal slurry without passing any electrical current and by monitoring the amount of CO/sub 2/ evolved. Also, studies were performed on current efficiencies of CO/sub 2/ production reaction as a function of the particle size of coal samples. Finally, the catalytic rate constants of various redox catalysts for the coal oxidation reaction are reported. These results indicate that the thermodynamics of the reaction systems play a predominant role in determining the rate constants. Methods of studying the stability of semiconductor electrodes were established employing rotating ring-disk electrode techniques. The long-term stability of semiconductor electrodes would be needed to carry out the photoassisted coal gasification reaction. In the method we developed, the semiconductor was used as a disk electrode while the noble metal, e.g., Au or Pt, is used as a ring electrode. The species generated at the semiconductor electrode by light illumination is detected at the ring electrode by applying the proper electrode potential. If the ring detection current is lower than its expected value, the disk may undergo the photocorrosion reaction.

  7. Exploratory study of coal conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, September 20, 1979-December 19, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-05

    The objective of this task is to determine the mechanism of cleavage of key bond types in coal under nominal donor solvent coal conversion conditions. This is to be done by using selected model compounds as well as coals themselves under conditions comparable to those used in current donor solvent liquefaction processes. The specific model compounds have been chosen because i) they represent linkages and heteratom functionalities that are important in coals and ii) because their reported conversion rates are substantially greater than can be accounted for by the traditionally invoked free radical mechanism. Initially, we are focusing on a particular class of model compounds: hydroxylated diphenylmethanes. This class of compounds is important for two reasons: first, because the linkage and ring substituents are common in bituminous coals, and second, because it has been reported by Collins et al. that substitution of an -OH group on diphenylmethane makes the rate of conversion of hydroxy-diphenylmethanes to toluene and phenol (in Tetralin at 400/sup 0/C) roughly as fast as that of bibenzyl. The phenyl-CH/sub 2/ bond strength of hydroxyl diphenylmethane is at least 15 kcal/mole greater than the central bond in bibenzyl. Thus, if hydroxydiphenylmethane underwent conversion in tetralin by homolytic bond scission, its conversion at 400/sup 0/C would be slower by almost five orders of magnitude. In this report we discuss a possible mechanism that could account for this rapid conversion. Simple homolytic cleavage of the indicated bond in an intermediate would be fast, since it is at least 20 kcal/mole weaker than the central bond in bibenzyl.

  8. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1993-11-01

    Low-severity coal liquefaction allows for the solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. The idea being tested in this research is whether selective bond rupture occurs during liquefaction at low temperatures that can be satisfied by hydrogen donation from highly active hydrogen donor compounds. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective hydrogen donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin (ISO), which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA). These compounds have been shown to highly effective donors (Bedell and Curtis, 1991) which release their hydrogen at fairly low temperatures, in the 200 to 300{degree}C range. ISO has been shown to be much more effective than its hydroaromatic analogue tetralin (TET) in releasing hydrogen at low temperatures and transferring that hydrogen to an acceptor molecule or to coal (Bedell and Curtis, 1991). Likewise, at 380{degree}C, the ability of HHA to release hydrogen in both N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was greater than a comparative hydroaromatic compound, dihydroanthracene (DHA). However, when an acceptor molecule or coal was present, DHA was as or more active than HHA in transferring hydrogen (Bedell et al., 1993). In another study, at equivalent reaction conditions and in the presence of anthracene (ANT) as a hydrogen acceptor, ISO released more than 200 times as much hydrogen as TET and HHM released 18 to 25 times as much hydrogen as DHA (Wang, 1992).

  9. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1993-12-31

    Low-severity coal liquefaction allows for the solubilization of coal with reduced gas make. The idea being tested in this research is whether selective bond rupture occurs during liquefaction at low temperatures that can be satisfied by hydrogen donation from highly active hydrogen donor compounds. Promotion of coal solubilization through hydrogen transfer using highly active and effective hydrogen donors is the objective of this study. The highly effective hydrogen donors being tested are cyclic olefins. Representative cyclic olefins are isotetralin (ISO), which is 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 1,4,5,8,9, 10hexahydroanthracene (HHA). These compounds have been shown to highly effective donors (Bedell and Curtis, 1991) which release their hydrogen at fairly low temperatures, in the 200 to 300{degrees}C range. ISO has been shown to be much more effective than its hydroaromatic analogue tetralin (TET) in releasing hydrogen at low temperatures and transferring that hydrogen to an acceptor molecule or to coal (Bedell and Curtis, 1991). Likewise, at 380{degrees}C, the ability of HHA to release hydrogen in both N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} atmospheres was greater than a comparative hydroaromatic compound, dihydroanthracene (DHA). However, when an acceptor molecule or coal was present, DHA was as or more active than HHA in transferring hydrogen (Bedell et al., 1993). In another study, at equivalent reaction conditions and in the presence of anthracene (ANT) as a hydrogen acceptor, ISO released more than 200 times as much hydrogen as TET and HHA released 18 to 25 times as much hydrogen as DHA (Wang, 1992).

  10. Coal conversion processes. Quarterly report, December 13, 1983-March 12, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Biloen, P.; Holder, G.D.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.

    1984-05-01

    Experimental work is continuing on four separate projects related to coal conversion processes. The direct digital control of exothermic multiphase reactions is being studied in an experimental adiabatic flow reactor. The existence of two stable steady states for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction network at the same temperature and feed condition has been verified and quantified. Various absorbents for SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub X/ are being studied. The absorption of NO/sub 2/ by methanol and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone has been extensively examined. Preliminary data have been obtained with triethylene-tetraamine. Hindered amines will be studied next. Procedures for the preparation of liquid membranes have been tested and the incorporation of hindered amines in them will now be examined. Isotopic switching is being used to study the way in which promoters affect supported metal catalysts. With improved resolution from the mass spectrometer, early quantitative results give indications of three different surface species and of non-statistical ingrowth of /sup 13/C into the product molecules. A program for the study of the extraction of coal and oil shale using supercritical fluids is being carried out. The effect of the presence of piperidine on the amount of toluene solubles produced by supercritical extraction of coal with toluene/piperidine mixture has been determined. A new kinetic model for the extraction/liquefaction of coal by supercritical toluene and THF has been developed and proven satisfactory. Bruceton coal and Hi Na lignite have been extracted with supercritical water. 3 references, 7 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The presence of heteroatom and aromatic compounds in liquids obtained from coal liquefaction processes requires expensive hydrogenation treatment to derive an acceptable liquid fuel. This project will develop a simple biological process for removing N, O and S and reducing the aromaticity of coal liquids. Microorganisms, employing biocatalysts, are known to degrade aromatic heteroatom compounds in nature to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup =} and CO{sub 2}. Preliminary experiments in the ERI laboratories to determine the feasibility of biological removal of N, O and S from coal and shale oil liquids have shown up to 20 percent nitrogen removal, 40 percent sulfur removal and 100 percent oxygen removal in a simple one stage incubation. A biological process for upgrading of coal liquids would offer significant advantages, such as operation at ordinary temperature and pressure with better energy efficiency. Of greater importance is the fact that microorganisms do not require an external supply of hydrogen for heteroatom removal, obtaining the required hydrogen from water. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are continuously regenerated by growth on the heteroatom compounds. Ring structures are degraded as the heteroatoms are removed. The heteroatoms are in an innocuous form, such as NH{sub 3}, S0{sub 4}{sup =}, C0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}0. Therefore, there is significant potential for the development of an economical biological process for upgrading coal liquids. This project will screen known bacteria and develop isolates for N, O and S removal and aromaticity reduction. The performance of the best of these cultures will be optimized for complete heteroatom removal in a single step. Continuous reactor experiments will be conducted with the optimal cultures to determine reaction kinetics and reactor design. The design and economics of this process, including product recovery, will be projected to define economic feasibility and high cost areas.

  12. Nonequilibrium sulfur capture and retention in an air cooled slagging coal combustor. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this 24 month project is to determine the degree of sulfur retention in slag in a full scale cyclone coal combustor with sulfur capture by calcium oxide sorbent injection into the combustor. This sulfur capture process consists of two steps: Capture of sulfur with calcined calcium oxide followed by impact of the reacted sulfur-calcium particles on the liquid slag lining the combustor. The sulfur bearing slag must be removed within several minutes from the combustor to prevent re-evolution of the sulfur from the slag. To accomplish this requires slag mass flow rates in the range of several 100 lb/hr. To study this two step process in the combustor, two groups of tests are being implemented. In the first group, calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum, or plaster of Paris, was injected in the combustor to determine sulfur evolution from slag. In the second group, the entire process is tested with limestone and/or calcium hydrate injected into the combustor. This entire effort consists of a series of up to 16 parametric tests in a 20 MMtu/hr slagging, air cooled, cyclone combustor. During the present quarterly reporting period ending September 30,1996, three tests in this project were implemented, bringing the total tests to 5. In addition, a total of 10 test days were completed during this quarter on the parallel project that utilizes the same 20 MMtu/hr combustor. The results of that project, especially those related to improved slagging performance, have a direct bearing on this project in assuring proper operation at the high slag flow rates that may be necessary to achieve high sulfur retention in slag.

  13. Advanced coal liquefaction. Final quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In this quarter, the authors investigated means to overcome the membrane fouling in the presence of tetraline at 150{degrees}C. Previously, it was indicated that tetraline underwent degradation at this temperature. Further, it was identified that this reaction could be minimized if one purged tetraline with nitrogen. It was hypothesized that tetraline could be stable at 150{degrees}C in the absence of oxygen. In this quarter, the authors attempted to apply the similar concept in the membrane filtration system. The entire filtration was thoroughly purged with nitrogen before introducing tetraline. Also during filtration, the collection bottle was purged with nitrogen. The permeate stream was maintained vacuum. Under this condition, the tetraline collected from reject and permeate did not show any chemical degradation. It is believed that the porous surface of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} membranes may act as a catalyst for the degradation of tetraline. The degradation products, likely polymeric, fouled the membrane. The above tests were repeated and a similar fouling phenomenon was observed.

  14. The physics of coal liquid slurry atomization. Quarterly technical report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    In this reporting period, the major objective of the research was to develop a technique for measuring the extensional viscosity of coal-water slurries. The Extensional properties of the suspending solutions (water + additives) and the slurries (coal + water + additives) are determined using the breakup of droplets in the drip mode. Photographic visualization of the breakup of viscoelastic materials in the drip mode has shown that these materials exhibit completely different breakup patterns when contrasted to viscoinelastic materials. The ligaments were seen to undergo a very large stretching motion before they breakup, resulting in long threads of liquid attached to droplets. The diameter of the ligaments at breakup, as measured by the Greenfield digital spray analyzer, was of the order of 30 {mu}m. The drip mode of breakup was used to extract useful information on the extensional properties of CWS.

  15. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    A biological process for upgrading of coal liquids would offer significant advantages, such as operation at ordinary temperature and pressure with better energy efficiency. Of greater importance is the fact that microorganisms do not require an external supply of hydrogen for heteroatom removal, obtaining the required hydrogen from water. Furthermore, the biocatalysts are continuously regenerated by growth on the heteroatom compounds. Ring structures are degraded as the heteroatoms are removed. The heteroatoms are in an innocuous form, such as NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Therefore, there is significant potential for the development of an economical biological process for upgrading coal liquids. This report describes experiments to screen known bacteria and develop isolates for N, O and S removal and aromaticity reduction.

  16. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sperl, P.L.; Sperl, G.T.

    1991-12-31

    This project was initiated on October 1, 1989, for the purpose of recovering metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. The catalyst is a Ni-Mo catalyst supported on alumina (Shell 324) as is used in a pilot scale coal liquefaction facility at Wilsonville, Alabama. This plant is run and operated by Southern Clean Fuels. A large sample of spent catalyst from this facility has been obtained. The object of the contract is to treat the spent catalysts with microorganisms, especially Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, but also other Thiobacillus sp. and possibly Sulfolobus, and other potentially useful microorganisms to leach and remove the metals (Ni and Mo) form the spent catalysts into a form which can be readily recovered by conventional techniques.

  17. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September 15--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Coal gasification technologies are finding increasing commercial applications for power generation or production of chemical feedstocks. The integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) coal conversion process has been demonstrated to be a clean, efficient, and environmentally acceptable method of generating power. However, the gasification process produces relatively large quantities of a solid waste termed slag. Regulatory trends with respect to solid waste disposal, landfill development costs, and public concern make utilization of slag a high-priority issue. Therefore, it is imperative that slag utilization methods be developed, tested, and commercialized in order to offset disposal costs. This project aims to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the slag utilization technologies developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates (LWA) and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag in a large-scale pilot operation, followed by total utilization of these aggregates in a number of applications.

  18. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic olefins in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic olefins, such as 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin) and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), are highly reactive donor compounds that readily donate their hydrogen to coal and model acceptors when heated to temperatures of 200{degrees}C and above. These donors are active donors in the low severity liquefaction of coal at 350{degrees}C as shown in the research performed in this project. The infrared studies are being performed in a high temperature infrared cell that was obtained from AABSPEC. Modifications to that cell have been made and have been reported in previous progress reports.

  19. Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR. First quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Belford, R.L.; Clarkson, R.B.

    1988-12-01

    Nondestructive chemical and physical characterization of whole Illinois coal and separated macerals, both before and after treatment by various desulfurization techniques is being performed using new electron magnetic resonance methods. The chemical structures of sulfur and non-sulfur containing organic species are being measured by the technique of HYPERFINE FINGERPRINT SPECTROSCOPY. Data on hyperfine couplings in a separated vitrinite maceral suggest the presence of small, condensed ring aromatic species, which may be linked by aliphatic bridging groups. Results from multi-frequency EPR experiments performed at X-, Q- and W-bands show slightly anisotropic spectra which have been analyzed by theoretical techniques developed in this laboratory. Analysis of the spectra reveals a nearly axial g-matrix, which agrees well with a model of planar conjugated aromatic species. The W-band data represents the first such experiments performed on coal and separated macerals.

  20. Electrostatic beneficiation of coal. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, M.K.; Lindquist, D.; Tennal, K.B.

    1996-04-01

    Two methods of examining the decay rate of charge on powders deposited on the separator plates were examined. In the first method the charge transferred from ground to the separator plate was measured directly with an electrometer after completion of the powder deposition and after turning off the electric field. In a second method an electrostatic field meter (Trek model 354A) was used to measure the field due to the charge on the plates or on thin Teflon or aluminum plates which had been placed over the metal separator plates. In addition the paper discusses the fabrication and use of a resistivity cell for coal powder; charging of small particles by milling; observations with silica gel; and a review of articles on particle charging. A separate section presents the electrostatic charging properties of coal macerals.

  1. Novel microorganism for selective separation of coal from ash and pyrite; First quarterly technical progress report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.; Raichur, A.M.

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the progress made during the first quarter of the research project entitled ``A Novel Microorganism for Selective Separation of Coal from Ash and Pyrite,`` DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-93PC93215. The objective of this project is to study the effectiveness of a novel hydrophobic microorganism, Mycobacterium phlei (M. phlei), for the selective flocculation of coal from pyrite and ash-forming minerals. During the reporting period, three different coal samples: Illinois No. 6 coal, Kentucky No. 9 coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, were collected to be used in the investigation. The microorganism, M. phlei, was obtained as freeze-dried cultures and the growth characteristics of the bacteria were studied. Scanning electron microphotographs revealed that M. phlei cells are coccal in shape and are approximately 1 {mu}m in diameter. Electrokinetic measurements showed that the Illinois No. 6 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal samples had an isoelectric point (IEP) around pH 6 whereas M. phlei had an IEP around pH 1.5. Electrokinetic measurements of the ruptured microorganisms exhibited an increase in IEP. The increase in IEP of the ruputured cells was due to the release of fatty acids and polar groups from the cell membrane.

  2. Development and testing of industrial scale, coal fired combustion system, Phase 3. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B.

    1993-05-17

    In the present reporting period, the first quarter of calendar year 1993, the effort was divided between Task 2. ``Pre Systems Tests`` and Task 4 ``Economics and Commercialization Plan.`` A major part of the task 2 effort was devoted converting the nozzle from adiabatic to air cooted operation. This conversion will allow immediate implementation of the longer duration task 3.2 tests after the completion of the task 2 tests. Therefore, a significant pan of the exit nozzle conversion effort is also part of task 3.1, ``Combustor Refurbishment.`` In task 1 the only activity remaining is to receive the results of the BYU combustion modeling. The results are anticipated this Spring. One of the three remaining tests in task 2 was implemented in late January under freezing weather and snow conditions. Ice plugged the coal feed lines and stack scrubber water outlet and ice jammed and damaged the coal metering auger. While these lines were thawed, the combustor was fired with oil. The coal used in this test contained fine fibrous tramp material which passed through the two tramp material retaining screens and eventually plugged several of the coal feed lines to the combustor. This cut the planned coal feed rate in half. As a result it was decided for the next test to increase the number of coal injection ports by 50% in order to provide excess capacity in the pneumatic feed feed. This will allow continued operation even in the presence of fine tramp material in the coal.

  3. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-02-01

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74{mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultrafine clean coal product to a 20% level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. The main objective of the proposed program is to evaluate a novel surface modification technique, which utilizes the synergistic effect of metal ions-surfactant combination, for dewatering of ultra-fine clean coal on a proof-of-concept scale of 1 to 2 tph. The novel surface modification technique developed at the the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research will be evaluated using vacuum, centrifuge, and hyperbaric filtration equipment. Dewatering tests will be conducted using the fine clean coal froth produced by the column flotation units at the Powell Mountain Coal Company, Mayflower Preparation Plant in St. Charles, Virginia. The POC-scale studies will be conducted on two different types of clean coal, namely, high sulfur and low sulfur clean coal. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  4. Coal-gasification-instrumentation program (PR 11734). Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-12

    Research programs involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman and infrared spectroscopy techniques to measure the concentrations of minority species in coal gasification streams are considered. Equipment modifications to improve the spectral quality (lower line widths), fundamental studies of spectral lines of gases of interest, detection limits and a study of possible interferences (including subtracting some of these) are presented. Some studies involve laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. This work involves two pulsed lasers and a timing system to introduce the appropriate delay. (LTN)

  5. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. First quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of culture selection studies for the removal of heteroatom compounds from coal liquids. A variety of pure cultures have been selected based upon a comprehensive literature review. In addition, cultures are being isolated from natural sources. Synthetic heteroatom compounds are presently being utilized in the degradation studies until the Environmental Assessment Questionnaire is approved. (VC)

  6. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Second quarterly report, October 1--December 15, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K.; Kitchell, J.P.

    1988-12-15

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ``model`` organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  7. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Fourth quarterly report, March 16--June 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.; Marquis, J.K.

    1989-06-16

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes as well as commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ``model`` organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  8. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. First quarterly report, May 5--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, J.K.; Kitchell, J.P.

    1988-10-07

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology, emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ``model`` organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix.

  9. Materials research for the clean utilization of coal. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Data Center personnel have received training in the use of the new Data Base Management System (DBMS). The Failure Information Data Base has been transferred to the new DBMS and is now operative on it. The normal activities of the Data Center have proceeded, especially with regard to production of the book of data for materials for coal gasification. This report describes the twelve station creep facility and presents data obtained on fused-cast-alumina and hot-pressed silicon carbide.

  10. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

  11. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, January 1994--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Cleveland, D.H.

    1994-07-01

    Mo release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts has been shown to be dependent upon many parameters, but release is dominated by microbial growth. The microbial Mo release is a rapid process requiring less than one week for 90% of the releaseable Mo to be solubilized from whole washed (THF) catalyst. It could be expected that the rates would be even greater with crushed catalyst. Efforts are now centering on optimizing the parameters that stimulate microbial growth and action.

  12. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process); 14th Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-01-28

    Reported here is the progress on the Development of Biological Coal Gasification for DOE contract No. DE-AC21-90MC27226 MOD A006. Task 1, NEPA Compliance and Updated Test Plan has been completed. Progress toward Task 2, Enhanced Methane Production, is reported in the areas of bacterial strain improvement, addition of co-substrates, and low cost nutrient amendment. Conclusions reached as a result of this work are presented. Plans for future work are briefly outlined.

  13. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report number 11, March 18--June 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1995-12-31

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. Contrary to laboratory reactors, where most of the studies of asphaltene`s chemical structure have taken place, most industrial reactors are continuous systems. The state of the asphaltene molecule therefore does not only depend on the temperature, pressure and polarity of the solvent but also on the reactor`s residence time. It is, therefore, very important to have a correct concept of the asphaltene`s structure and through careful experimentation, one can then decide whether such a concept has any practical implications at realistic upgrading conditions. It is the purpose of the project described here to provide such a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltenes transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms. 60 refs.

  14. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 4, June 18, 1993--September 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1993-12-31

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species by accurately known. It is the purpose of this project to provide a correct concept of coal asphaltenes by careful and detailed investigations of asphaltene transport through porous systems under realistic process temperature and pressure conditions. The experimental studies will be coupled with detailed, in-depth statistical and molecular dynamics models intended to provide a fundamental understanding of the overall transport mechanisms. The project is of both experimental and theoretical nature and is divided into a number of tasks. Experimental tasks cover measuring asphaltene diffusivity in: model catalysts under realistic temperature and pressure conditions; sol-gel ceramic membranes; and model and real membranes under reactive conditions. Theoretical tasks include: study of hindered transport in a single pore; transport and reaction in networks of interconnected pores; Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations; dilute simulations; low density diffusion with adsorption desorption; role of intramolecular, intermolecular and surface forces-accounting for aggregation and delamination phenomena; and molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Thermodynamics and surface structure of coals. Quarterly report, July 1, 1990--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Quay, D.M.; Roberts, J.E.; Wernett, P.C.

    1990-12-31

    We measured the surface areas of the Argonne coals using standard multipoint volumetric BET techniques, a series of aliphatic alkanes, N{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. All samples were dried by evacuation at 10{sup {minus}6} torr overnight on a Micromeritics Digisorb 2500 stainless steel adsorption rig. Twenty four hours equilibration for the first adsorption point and six hours equilibration for each subsequent point was allowed for the cyclic hydrocarbon gases, except where otherwise noted. Six hours equilibration between adsorption points was used for all the other gases except N{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup 10}. The data and measurement conditions for Argonne: Pocahontas No. 3, Upper Freeport, and Pittsburgh No. 8 coals are presented in figures 1--3 respectively. The coal surface areas obtained using CO{sub 2}, ethane and cyclopropane, all of similar cross sectional area, cannot be rationalized using a constricted pore model. Ethane (cylindrical) and cyclopropane (planar) have different shapes and slit like or cylindrical pores would discriminate between them.

  16. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Baucum, W. E.

    1980-07-31

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF), formerly the Research and Development Laboratory, are reported. CFFF Bid Package construction is now virtually complete. The remaining construction effort is being conducted by UTSI. On the quench system, another Task 1 effort, the cyclone was erected on schedule. On Tasks 2 through 6, vitiation heater and nozzle fabrication were completed, an investigation of a fish kill (in no way attributable to CFFF operations) in Woods Reservoir was conducted, major preparation for ambient air quality monitoring was made, a broadband data acquisition system for enabling broadband data to be correlated with all general performance data was selected, a Coriolis effect coal flow meter was installed at the CFFF. On Task 7, an analytical model of the coal flow combustor configuration was prepared, MHD generator testing which, in part, involved continued materials evaluation and the heat transfer characteristics of capped and uncapped electrodes was conducted, agglomerator utilization was studied, and development of a laser velocimeter system was nearly completed.

  17. Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal liquids. Quarterly report, August 1, 1982-October 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N. C.; Jones, L.; Yaggi, N. F.; Young, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Upgraded coal-derived liquids obtained from catalytic hydroprocessing of SRC-II and H-coal syncrudes have been studied by IR, PMR, GC/MS, and silica gel chromatography. With increase in residence time, nitrogen, oxygen, and aromatics decrease, accompanied by a large increase in naphthenes. Negligible hydrogen-bonded material was found in the upgraded liquids. All the upgraded liquids show low viscosity at 298 K (1.3 to 1.4 mNsm/sup -2/), even though saturate and aromatic fractions varied with processing severity. In the aromatic-I fraction, 1-ring aromatics increase, and 3-ring aromatics decrease, with an increase in severity of hydroprocessing. GC/MS analyses indicate a remarkable qualitative similarity for saturate and aromatic fractions irrespective of syncrude source. Only the heavier end of the aromatic-I fraction is noticeably different. Tentative identifications are made for most of the significant components based on mass spectra and GC retention times. 600-MHz PMR spectra of the upgraded SRC-II and H-coal liquids look identical, but NMR difference technique showed slight differences in concentrations of certain species between the two liquids.

  18. Microbial recovery of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Joffe, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The project objectives outlined in the previous reports involved defining conditions and cultures best suited to achieve the most effective metal release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts by microbial processes. The continuity of the research program was maintained during the period of principal investigator replacement. This transition period allowed the project data to be reviewed and research plans were formulated to gain new insights into the mechanisms involved in metals release. Various microbiological and physiochemical parameters which may be important in microbial release of metals from spent coal liquefaction catalysts continue to be investigated so that this technology can be optimized. Mo release from spent coal liquefaction catalysts has been shown to be dependent upon many parameters, but release is dominated by microbial growth. The microbial Mo release is a rapid process requiring less than one week for 90% of the releasable Mo to be solubilized from whole washed (THF) catalyst. It could be expected that the rates would be even greater with crushed catalyst. Efforts are now centering on optimizing the parameters that stimulate microbial growth and action.

  19. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly report No. 3, February 23, 1992--May 22, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B. Jr.

    1992-06-08

    Iron and molybdenum complexes were studied as precursors to high dispersion catalysts for coal liquefaction. The precursors were either organometallic complexes or water soluble salts and were impregnated into coals of various ranks. The molybdenum catalysts were found to be very effective for conversion of an Illinois {number_sign}6 bituminous coal whereas the iron catalysts were not. In contrast, the iron catalysts were found to be very effective for lignite conversions. A H-donor and a non-donor conversion system were compared, using tetralin and n-hexadecane, respectively. In each case the organometallic precursor gave greater yields of toluene soluble material, with differences being most dramatic in the hexadecane system. The yields using the organometallic molybdenum precursors in hexadecane were found to be almost as great as those in the tetralin system, indicating that good catalyst precursors do not require donor solvents. The impregnation techniques were evaluated by comparing conversion yields and analyzing the products using Field Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (f.i.m.s) and FT-IR.

  20. Heteronuclear probes of coal structure and reactivity. Quarterly report, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.; Hall, G.

    1994-04-30

    One of the goals of the proposal is to employ solution {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy in tandem with HPLC to speciate and quantitate phenols in coal resids. As solution {sup 31}P NMR tagging agents, we are using both 1 and 2 since the {sup 31}P chemical shifts provided by each are different for identical phenols. This allows a cross-check on the indentity of phenols (especially isomeric examples) as well as their concentration. By building a library of {sup 31}P chemical shifts of a wide variety of phenols derivatized with 1 and 2, speciation of phenols in coal liquids, for example, can be accomplished. Using preparative HPLC, we can separate the phenols and also derivatize them with 1 and 2 for speciation. Tables III and IV list chemical shifts for phenols derivatized with 1 and 2, respectively. In Table V we hst the total phenol contents of three Consol coal reaids using reagent 1 and a {sup 31}P NMR procedure we reported earlier. We are gratified to note how well our quantitations compare with those reported in the literature using FTER spectroscopy. Because sample 3 contained paramagnetic species, speciation of phenols was precluded, owing to peak breadth and overlap. However, samples 1 and 2 produced well-resolved signals. We are now in the process of identifying the phenols responsible for these peaks.

  1. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, July-- September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards. The final part of the project includes a detailed economic evaluation of the cost of processing the coal liquids to their optimum products. The cost analyses is for the incremental processing cost; in other words, the feed is priced at zero dollars. The study reflects costs for operations using state of the art refinery technology; no capital costs for building new refineries is considered. Some modifications to the existing refinery may be required. Economy of scale dictates the minimum amount of feedstock that should be processed.

  2. Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor phase III industrial boiler retrofit. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, P.; Borio, R.; McGowan, J.G.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the technical aspects of this project during the ninth quarter of the program. During this quarter, the natural gas baseline testing at the Penn State demonstration boiler was completed, results were analyzed and are presented here. The burner operates in a stable manner over an 8/1 turndown, however due to baghouse temperature limitations (300{degrees}F for acid dewpoint), the burner is not operated for long periods of time below 75% load. Boiler efficiency averaged 83.1% at the 100 percent load rate while increasing to 83.7% at 75% load. NO{sub x} emissions ranged from a low of 0.17 Lbs/MBtu to a high of 0.24 Lbs/MBtu. After the baseline natural gas testing was completed, work continued on hardware optimization and testing with the goal of increasing carbon conversion efficiency on 100% coal firing from {approx}95% to 98%. Several coal handling and feeding problems were encountered during this quarter and no long term testing was conducted. While resolving these problems several shorter term (less than 6 hour) tests were conducted. These included, 100% coal firing tests, 100% natural gas firing tests, testing of air sparges on coal to simulate more primary air and a series of cofiring tests. For 100% coal firing, the carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) obtained this quarter did not exceed the 95-96% barrier previously reached. NO{sub x} emissions on coal only ranged from {approx} 0.42 to {approx} 0.78 Lbs/MBtu. The burner has not been optimized for low NO{sub x} yet, however, due to the short furnace residence time, meeting the goals of 98% CCE and <0.6 Lbs/MBtu NO{sub x} simultaneously will be difficult. Testing on 100% natural gas in the boiler after coal firing indicated no changes in efficiency due to firing in a `dirty` boiler. The co-firing tests showed that increased levels of natural gas firing proportionately decreased NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and CO.

  3. Advanced characterization of forms of chlorine, organic sulfur and trace elements in available coals from operating Illinois mines. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Lytle, S.

    1995-12-31

    The goals of the study are (1) to use X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine forms of chlorine (inorganic, ionic, and organic) and forms of organic sulfur (organic sulfide and thiophenic sulfur) in as-shipped coals from Illinois mines, (2) to obtain basic data on chlorine removal via froth flotation at fine ({minus}200 mesh) and ultrafine ({minus}400 mesh) particle sizes, and (3) to evaluate XANES for direct assessment of the organic/inorganic affinities of trace elements. This is a cooperative effort among the Illinois State Geological Survey, the University of Kentucky, and Western Kentucky University. In this quarter, chlorine leachability during fine wet grinding of 21 coal samples was examined. The results show a general improvement in chlorine removal by grinding coals to {minus}200 mesh, but do not show further improvement by additional grinding to {minus}400 mesh. The chlorine and sulfur spectra of five coals , each from a distinct geographic location in Illinois, were examined. The chlorine XANES spectra for the five coals are similar and chloride anion was determined to be the predominant form of chlorine. The sulfur XANES data for the same coals show that a majority (61% to 82%) of organic sulfur in the coals is contributed from thiophenic sulfur. The distribution of organic sulfur shows that the high sulfur coals tend to have more organic sulfide than low sulfur coals. A more detailed interpretation may be possible after a complete analysis of all the samples selected. Evaluating the possibility of XANES for direct assessment of the organic/inorganic affinities of trace elements in an Illinois coal was completed.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.; Rowe, R.M.; Anast, K.R.; Jha, M.C.

    1994-05-06

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effectve replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States as well as for advanced combustars currently under development. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals fbr clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 51-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress, made during the 6th quarter of the project from January 1 to March 31, 1994. The project has three major objectives: (1) The primary objective is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to coal-water slurry fuel for premium fuel applications. The fine coal cleaning technologies are advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration. (2) A secondary objective is to develop the design base for near-term application of these advanced fine coal cleaning technologies in new or existing coal preparation plants for efficiently processing minus 28-mesh coal fines and converting this to marketable products in current market economics. (3) A third objective is to determine the removal of toxic trace elements from coal by advance column flotation and selective agglomeration technologies.

  5. Pelletizing/reslurrying as a means of distributing and firing clean coal. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 7, January 1, 1992-- March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Conkle, H.N.

    1992-06-09

    Work in this quarter focused on completing (1) the final batch of pilot-scale disk pellets, (2) storage, handling, and transportation evaluation, (3) pellet reslurrying and atomization studies, and (4) cost estimation for pellet and slurry production. Disk pelletization of Elkhorn coal was completed this quarter. Pellets were approximately 1/2- to 3/4-in. in diameter. Pellets, after thermal curing were strong and durable and exceeded the pellet acceptance criteria. Storage and handling tests indicate a strong, durable pellet can be prepared from all coals, and these pellets (with the appropriate binder) can withstand outdoor, exposed storage for at least 4 weeks. Pellets in unexposed storage show no deterioration in pellet properties. Real and simulated transportation tests indicate truck transportation should generate less than 5 percent fines during transport. Continuous reslurrying testing and subsequent atomization evaluation were performed this quarter in association with University of Alabama and Jim Walter Resources. Four different slurries of approximately 55-percent-solids with viscosities below 500 cP (at 100 sec{sup {minus}1}) were prepared. Both continuous pellet-to-slurry production and atomization testing was successfully demonstrated. Finally, an in depth evaluation of the cost to prepare pellets, transport, handle, store, and convert the pellet into Coal Water Fuel (CWF) slurries was completed. Cost of the pellet-CWF option are compared with the cost to directly convert clean coal filter cake into slurry and transport, handle and store it at the user site. Findings indicate that in many circumstances, the pellet-CWF option would be the preferred choice. The decision depends on the plant size and transportation distance, and to a lesser degree on the pelletization technique and the coal selected.

  6. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of (1) > 47% thermal efficiency; (2) NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {<=}25% NSPS; (3) cost {>=}65% of heat input; (4) all solid wastes benign. In our design consideration, we have tried to render all waste streams benign and if possible convert them to a commercial product. It appears that vitrified slag has commercial values. If the flyash is reinjected through the furnace, along with the dry bottom ash, then the amount of the less valuable solid waste stream (ash) can be minimized. A limitation on this procedure arises if it results in the buildup of toxic metal concentrations in either the slag, the flyash or other APCD components. We have assembled analytical tools to describe the progress of specific toxic metals in our system. The outline of the analytical procedure is presented in the first section of this report. The strengths and corrosion resistance of five candidate refractories have been studied in this quarter. Some of the results are presented and compared for selected preparation conditions (mixing, drying time and drying temperatures). A 100 hour pilot-scale stagging combustor test of the prototype radiant panel is being planned. Several potential refractory brick materials are under review and five will be selected for the first 100 hour test. The design of the prototype panel is presented along with some of the test requirements.

  7. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1991--February 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    The investigation of methods for the production and testing of iron-pillared clay catalysts was continued in this quarter. The surface area of the mixed alumina/iron pillared clay catalyst decreased to 51 m{sup 2}/g on sulfidation. Thus the stability of the alumina pillars during the sulfidation and thermal treatments prevented the total collapse that occurred in the case of the iron-pillared clays. Previously the mixed alumina/iron pillared clays were tested for hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl. This testing was extended to a determination of activity with a second model compound substrate (pyrene), representative of the polynuclear aromatic systems present in coal. Testing of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts with 1-methylnaphthalene gave interesting results that demonstrate shape selectivity. The clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts prepared by impregnation of iron species on acidic clays were further investigated. Sulfidation of these catalysts using the carbon disulfide in situ method gave hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl that were somewhat less than those obtained by presulfidation with H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S mixtures. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was very successful with the iron impregnated clay catalyst, giving a highly soluble product. High conversions were also obtained with the mixed alumina/iron-pillared clay catalyst, but the yield of oil-solubles was considerably lower. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. These catalysts were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars. Finally the iron component was added either before or after thermal removal of organic pillars.

  8. Brick manufacture with fly ash from Illinois coals. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.E.; Dreher, G.; Frost, J.; Moore, D.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Fiocchi, T.; Swartz, D.

    1995-12-31

    This investigation seeks to utilize fly ash in fired-clay products such as building and patio bricks, ceramic blocks, field and sewer tile, and flower pots. This goal is accomplished by (1) one or more plant-scale, 5000-brick tests with fly ash mixed with brick clays at the 20% or higher level; (2) a laboratory-scale study to measure the firing reactions of a range of compositions of clay and fly ash mixtures; (3) a preliminary study to evaluate the potential environmental and economic benefits of brick manufacture with fly ash. Bricks and feed materials will be tested for compliance with market specifications and for leachability of pollutants derived from fly ash. The laboratory study will combine ISGS databases, ICCI-supported characterization methods, and published information to improve predictions of the firing characteristics of Illinois fly ash and brick clay mixtures. Because identical methods are used to test clay firing and coal ash fusion, and because melting mechanisms are the same, improved coal ash fusion predictions are an additional expected result of this research. If successful, this project should convert a disposal problem (fly ash) into valuable products-bricks. During this quarter we set up the manufacturing run at Colonial Brick Co., finalized arrangements for a larger brick manufacturing run at Marseilles Brick Co. in YR2, revised our laboratory procedures for selective dissolution analysis, obtained information to select three standard fly ashes, and continued our characterization of brick clays that could be mixed with fly ash for fired-clay products. Due to delays in other areas, we began construction of the optimization program for year 2. We discovered recently that fly ash dust will be an unanticipated problem at the brick plant.

  9. Separation and characterization of coal derived components. Quarterly report, 1 October 1983-31 December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.H.; Silver, H.F.

    1984-01-16

    No new field-ionization data was obtained this quarter. For preasphaltenes, elemental analysis data was obtained on Kentucky and Wyodak preasphaltene samples. In conjunction with the preasphaltene work, solubility and thin-layer chromatography experiments were performed. The results indicated that basic alumina would not be useful as a general stationary phase for the separation of preasphaltenes. Several experiments were carried out with Chromasorb T, and the results showed it would be an adequate substitute for Fluoropak. The hydrocarbons in a sample from Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center were separated by the number of double bonds. The optimum mobile phases for the separation of monohydroxyl aromatics and dihydroxyl aromatics by reversed-phase liquid chromatography were obtained. In addition, a means of predicting retention in normal-phase chromatography was considered, and a NO/sub 2/ high-performance chromatographic column showed promise for the separation of compound classes. 6 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  10. Coal-feeder development. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, D.K.

    1981-04-01

    The pilot-scale piston-feeder development is progressing satisfactorily and should proceed as planned. The bench scale testing of components, sub-system and critical areas continued to provide very useful information in support of the development of the complete feeder. The K30M seals and polyurethane scrapers are showing very promising results. The components development facility is being upgraded and testing at the bench scale level should be vigorously perused. The upgrading of the pilot scale feeder and its system will be emphasized during the next quarter to perform feeder capabilities and limitations testing. No progress on the 5.5-in. diameter pilot scale screw feeder has been made because IRRI is waiting decision from METC as to when the feeder can be installed on the 42-in. gas producer.

  11. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1--July 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1993-07-14

    In our last report we discussed observations in our cell concerning the behavior or Illinois No. 6 coal in tetralin to 460{degrees}C. We noted that there were possibly two distinct types of particles comprising the organic phase, reacting respectively at 420{degrees}--430{degrees}C, and at 450{degrees}--460{degrees}C. Alternatively we could interpret the data as describing a range of reactivity bounded by those temperatures. As evidenced by the contraction of the particles, the reactions were rapid. The particles lost half of their substance within 1 min, and we suggested that the rates were too fast to be accommodated by the commonly held scheme for coal liquefaction involving thermolytic scission of weak, bibenzyl-like bonds. Our analyses were aided by our use of Adobe Photoshop, which allows us to store, digitized versions of our recorded images. The images can then be manipulated at will to provide quantitative data on morphological changes. We noted in our last report that printer limitations prevented us from presenting images with the desirable quality, and we are at present attempting to find access to equipment which will provide satisfactory figures. Accordingly our progress will be described here without any photographs, and we expect to present a more complete account of our work in our next report. The work reported here includes studies of Illinois No. 6 coal with water as the medium, and a control run with argon as medium. Our temperature ramping was like that used last time, 25{degrees}C/min to 250{degrees}C, and then 10{degrees}C/min to 450{degrees}C. The results from the earlier work and the data presented here can therefore be directly compared.

  12. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, September--November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Coal gasification technologies are finding increasing commercial applications for power generation or production of chemical feedstocks. The integrated-gasification-combined-cycle coal conversion process has been demonstrated to be a clean, efficient, and environmentally acceptable method of generating power. However, the gasfication process produces relatively large quantities of a solid waste termed slag. Regulatory trends with respect to solid waste disposal, landfill development costs, and public concern make utilization of slag a high-priority issue. Therefore, it is imperative that slag utilization methods be developed, tested, and commercialized in order to offset disposal costs. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ``as-generated`` slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and landfill. We determined that it would be extremely difficult for ``as-generated`` slag to find acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that would meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag could be made into a lightweight material by heating it to between 1600 and 1900{degree}F in a kiln, which indicated the potential for using such materials as substitutes for lightweight aggregates. Between 1987 and 1993, the technologies to produce these materials from slag were developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, and internal resources.

  13. Catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Crynes, B L

    1981-04-15

    Run ZBF was conducted to determine the amount of sulfur and nitrogen removal from SRC-I/process solvent mixture in the absence of a hydrotreating catalyst. Negligible nitrogen and sulfur removal resulted from this experiment. The hydrogen content of the coal liquid increased slightly over that of the feedstock. In similar studies using other coal liquids some sulfur removal (10 to 40%) was noted under non-catalyzed conditions. Several commercial NiMo supported catalysts were analyzed for silica contents using atomic absorption. These results revealed that catalysts with large micropore size structures also contain high silica content (up to 22.5 weight percent). Several short duration runs (12 to 110 hours) were conducted in the CLTU to gather data on catalyst coking mechanisms. Using the SRC material mixed with a process solvent or creosote oil (30 weight percent SRC), solid materials were observed to form and precipitate in the latter portions of the reactor bed. The reactor system was modified to prevent the accumulation of these incompatible solids which would result in premature termination of the experimental runs. In the catalyst regeneration study (HDN-30, NiMo), a spent catalyst was regenerated and then used to hydrotreat a coal liquid consisting of 10% Synthoil II liquid mixed with raw anthracene oil. This regenerated catalyst gave equal and somewhat superior performance with respect to heteroatom removal compared to that of the fresh catalyst. A second regeneration of this same catalyst loading has been conducted and the regenerated catalyst is being prepared for a third cycle. The spent catalyst lost approximately 33% of its total surface area, yet regeneration recovered 97% of the fresh catalyst area.

  14. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 1, September 18, 1992--December 17, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1992-12-31

    The molecules comprising coal liquids can range from less than 10 to several hundred {angstrom} in diameter. Their size is, therefore, comparable to the average pore size of most hydroprocessing catalysts. Thus, during processing, transport of these molecules into the catalyst occurs mainly by ``configurational`` or ``hindered diffusion,`` which is the result of two phenomena occurring in the pores; the distribution of solute molecules in the pores is affected by the pores and the solute molecules experience an increased hydrodynamic drag. The field of hindered diffusion has been reviewed by Deen [16]. The earliest studies in the filed were by Renkin et al. [17].

  15. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Fourth quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install, provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated is as follows: Steam =20,000 lb/hr; Temperature = 353 F (saturated); Pressure= 125 psig; Steam quality = 98.5%

  16. Advanced NMR approaches in the characterization of coal. [Quarterly] report No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Maciel, G.E.

    1992-12-31

    A considerable effort in this project during the past few months has been focussed on the development of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR imaging techniques to yield spatially-resolved chemical shift (structure) information on coal. In order to yield the chemical shift information, a solid-state NMR imaging technique must include magic-angle spinning, so rotating gradient capabilities are indicated. A {sup 13}C MAS imaging probe and a {sup 1}H MAS imaging probe and the circuitry necessary for rotating gradients have been designed and constructed. The {sup 1}H system has already produced promising preliminary results, which are briefly described in this report.

  17. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal- based power generation. Quarterly report, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  18. Plant response to FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Darmody, R.G.; Dunker, R.E.; Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steel, J.D.

    1994-06-01

    The goal of this project is to test the feasibility of stabilizing coal slurry solids (CSS) wastes by directly seeding plants into the waste. This is not done conventionally because the waste can generate toxic amounts of sulfuric acid. Our approach is to neutralize the potential acidity by mixing fluidized bed combustion (FBC) waste into the slurry. If successful this approach would both help dispose of FBC wastes while providing a more economical slurry stabilization technique. The project involves growing forage plants in CSS-FBC mixtures in the greenhouse. This is the second quarter of the project. We have designed the experiment, secured greenhouse space, purchased the seeds, collected, dried, and are analyzing the FBC and CSS samples. The samples represent a typical range of properties. We retrieved two FBC and two CSS samples. One CSS sample had a relatively high CaCO{sub 3} content relative to the pyrite content and will require no FBC to neutralize the potential acidity. The other CSS sample will require from 4.2 to 2.7% FBC material to neutralize its potential acidity.

  19. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

    1996-01-01

    Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the hydrocracking of 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl in the presence of iron (Fe) catalysts and sulfur and residual wall catalytic effect. Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NMBB) predominantly yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Various iron compounds were examined as catalyst precursors. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors led to substantially higher catalyst activity and higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur in the absence of iron compounds, in concentrations of 1.2-3.4 wt%, corresponding to the conditions present in reactions with added iron compounds. Increasing sulfur concentrations led to higher NMBB conversions. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent effect on the reactor walls. A black sulfide layer formed on the surface which could not be removed mechanically. The supposed non-catalytic reactions done in the same reactor but after experiments with added sulfur showed higher conversions than comparable experiments done in new reactors. This wall catalytic effect can be reduced by treating the sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid. The results of this work demonstrate the significant effect of sulfur addition and sulfur-induced residual wall effects on carbon-carbon bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics.

  20. Molecular biology of coal bio-desulfurization; Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.; Gallagher, J.R.

    1991-04-17

    The aim of this project is to use the techniques of molecular genetics to identify, clone, sequence, and enhance the expression of proteins which remove sulfur covalently bound to coal. This includes the movement and expression of these proteins into bacterial species which may be more useful in the industrial application of a biological desulfurization process. This quarter, several mutants were constructed to inactivate specific cloned C18 dox genes. These mutants were consistent with the phenotypes expected if these genes participated in an oxidative degradation DBT. The dox genes from strain A15 have been isolated in several cosmid clones, one of which can transfer the DBT metabolic trait to our laboratory Pseudomonas strain. DBT desulfurizing strains of Rhodococcus rhodochrous (IGTS8 and IGTS85) were obtained. Bioavailability assays confirmed the ability of these isolates to remove sulfur from DBT. Several mutants of IGTS8 were isolated that had lost the ability to use DBT as a sole sulfur source. These mutants were investigated as preferred recipients of the gene libraries. Multiple trials are underway to discover a mechanism by which DNA can be successfully introduced into the Rhodococcus strains. 1 tab.

  1. Bioconversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels. Final quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, H.

    1993-10-25

    The overall objective of the project is to develop an integrated two stage fermentation process for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to a mixture of alcohols. This is achieved in two steps. In the first step, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum converts carbon monoxide (CO) to butyric and acetic acids. Subsequent fermentation of the acids by Clostridium acetobutylicum leads to the production of butanol and ethanol. The tasks for this quarter were: (1) development/isolation of superior strains for fermentation of syngas, (2) optimization of process conditions for fermentation of syngas, (3) evaluation of bioreactor configuration for improved mass transfer of syngas, (4) development of a membrane-based pervaporation system, (5) optimization of process conditions for reducing carbon and electron loss by H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} fermentation, and (6) synthesis gas fermentation in single-stage by co-culture. Progress is reported in isolation of CO utilizing anaerobic strains; investigating the product profile for the fermentation of syngas by B. methylotrophicum; and determining the effect of carbon monoxide on growth of C. acetobutylicum.

  2. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-second quarterly status report, January--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  3. Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines, (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-fourth quarterly status report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  4. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twentieth quarterly status report, July--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-10-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degree}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  5. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-ninth quarterly status report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  6. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-seventh quarterly status report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1994-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

  7. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Twenty-third quarterly status report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1993-07-19

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: A baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  8. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (Moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter). Seventeenth quarterly status report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

    1992-01-20

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300{degrees}F. This document reports the status of a program in the seventeenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

  9. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1996--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1996-07-31

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from April 1 - June 30, 1996.

  10. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report, No. 4, July 1995--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-11-06

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from July 1 - September 29, 1995.

  11. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique. Quarterly technical progress report 2, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1995-05-05

    Froth flotation technique is an effective and efficient process for recovering of ultra-fine (minus 74 {mu}m) clean coal. Economical dewatering of an ultra-fine clean coal product to a 20 percent level moisture will be an important step in successful implementation of the advanced cleaning processes. This project is a step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal could be effectively dewatered to 20 percent or lower moisture using either conventional or advanced dewatering techniques. The cost-sharing contract effort is for 36 months beginning September 30, 1994. This report discusses technical progress made during the quarter from January 1 to March 31, 1995.

  12. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 5, September 18, 1993--December 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1994-05-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. In this report, the authors report the publication of model studies of the diffusivity of Lennard-Jones particles in porous systems with dimensionality between two and three. Such a modeled system includes pillared clays. They also published a paper which addresses the sorption and aggregation of asphaltene particles with porous media such as catalysts. The paper presents new experimental data for the amount of asphalt precipitation formed with various solvents. The experimental results are compared to model calculations.

  13. Separation and characterization of coal derived components. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtubise, R.J.; Silver, H.F.

    1983-10-17

    The field-ionization mass spectral hydrocarbon data from F-45 (Wyodak coal-derived SRC) and F-51 (Kentucky 9/14 coal-derived SRC) were recalculated so the various hydrocarbon fractions could be compared directly on a weight percent basis. A computer program was developed which allows the field-ionization mass spectral hydrocarbon data to be compared in a three dimensional fashion. This approach provides for a rapid general comparson of all the field-ionization hydrocarbon data. The solubility of preasphaltenes was tested in several solvents. The preasphaltenes-2 were found to be largely soluble in pyridine:chloroform 9:1(v/v) or 7:3(v/v) and pyridine:chloroform:tetrahydrofuran 7:1:2(v/v/v). Experiments were carried out in which Chromasorb T was tested as a replacement for Fluoropak in the Fluoropak-basic alumina procedure. The results indicated Chromasorb T would be an adequate substitute for Fluoropak, but additional experiments will be run to confirm this. The chromatographic characteristics of numerous hydroxyl aromatics, nitrogen heterocycles, and aromatic amines were obtained on several normal-phase and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic systems. 30 references, 30 figures, 10 tables.

  14. Thermodynamics and surface structure of coals. Quarterly report, July 1, 1991--September 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, A.S.; Larsen, J.W.; Quay, D.M.; Roberts, J.E.; Wernett, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    Our work this month has been determining the effect of added surface dysprosium(III) ions on the NMR spectra of coal. We have also been examining the effect of this relaxation agent on our model system, an aryl sulfonate silica gel. To the best of our knowledge, NMR has not previously been. applied to surface studies of coal. It is a powerful technique because line positions and intensities are indicative of geometry, bonding hybridization and population of distinct functionalities as well as local environment effects. The NMR spectrum can be influenced by many factors including dipolar through-space coupling between an unpaired electron spin and the spin of the carbon atom. The unpaired electron can act as a relaxation sink, significantly shortening the spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) of the coupled carbon-13 atom. This shortening of the T{sub 1} can broaden the signal to the point where it disappears into the baseline noise. The effective range of interaction is proportional to the inverse sixth power of the separation of the two spins (r{sup {minus}6}). In this system, the effective range is a relatively short distance on the order of 1 nanometer.

  15. Biological upgrading of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple biological process for the removal of nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur heteroatoms from coal liquids, and simultaneously reducing aromaticity. Microorganisms, employing biocatalysts, are known to degrade aromatic heteroatom compounds in nature to NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2}. Preliminary experiments in the ERI laboratories to determine the feasibility of biological removal of N, 0, and S from coal and shale oil liquids have shown up to 20 percent nitrogen removal, 40 percent sulfur removal, and 100 percent oxygen removal in a simple one stage incubation. This project will screen known bacteria and develop isolates for N, 0, and S removal and aromaticity reduction. The performance of the best of these cultures will be optimized for complete heteroatom removal in a single step go up. An outline of the protocol used to select pure cultures and isolates for their suitability in degrading heteroatom compounds is presented. Also shown is a listing of nine model compounds to be used in culture comparison and selection studies. Preliminary results with isolate ERI4 shows that the bacterium grows on phenol as its sole carbon source and rapidly depletes the compound from the medium. Similar results are shown for ERI5, which grows on pyridine as its sole carbon and nitrogen source and rapidly removes the compound from the medium.

  16. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This report covers work carried out under Task 2, Concept Definition and Analysis, Task 3, Preliminary R&D and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under Contract AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and Particulates {le}25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. A survey of currently available high temperature alloys has been completed and some of their high temperature properties are shown for comparison. Several of the most promising candidates will be selected for testing to determine corrosion resistance and high temperature strength. The corrosion resistance testing of candidate refractory coatings is continuing and some of the recent results are presented. This effort will provide important design information that will ultimately establish the operating ranges of the HITAF.

  17. Assessment of pulverized coal-fired combustor performance. First quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, W.; Clark, W.; Payne, R.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this program is to provide the engineering tools necessary for an authoritative assessment of the performance of industrial furnaces firing pulverized coal. The program incorporates two experimental tasks and is constructed around an analytical task which will identify and upgrade the family of computer programs required to undertake the performance analysis studies. These analytical tools will be used to predict the effect of parameters such as fuel type and furnace variables on combustor performance, and to identify those properties which have a major impact on thermal performance. The second task uses a combustion reactor to screen the key variables identified and to provide data on the properties of coal particulate matter which affect heat transfer performance. Verification of the engineering analytical approach will be provided by measurements made in a pilot-scale furnace. This present report discusses technical progress during the first three months of the program, and considers the selection of the appropriate analytical tools and preliminary details of the experimental system.

  18. Kinetics of MN based sorbents for hot coal gas. Quarterly report, September--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Manganese-based sorbents have been investigated for the removal of hydrogen sulfide (the primary sulfur bearing compound) from hot coal gases prior to its use in combined cycle turbines. Four formulations of Mn-based sorbents were tested in an ambient-pressure fixed-bed reactor to determine steady state H{sub 2}S concentrations, breakthrough times and effectiveness of the sorbent when subjected to cyclic sulfidation and regeneration testing. In a previous report, the sulfidation results were presented. Manganese-based sorbents with molar ratios > 1:1 Mn:Substrate were effective in reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration in simulated coal gases to less than 100 ppmv over five cycles. Actual breakthrough time for formulation C6-2-1100 was as high as 73% of breakthrough time based on wt% Mn in sorbent. In this report, the regeneration results will be presented. Regeneration tests determined that loaded pellets can be fully regenerated in air/steam mixture at 750{degrees}C with minimal sulfate formation. 16 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Coal liquefaction catalyst development. Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. K.; Pellet, R. J.; Mahoney, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Catalytic baseline runs continued with HDS-1442A in order to improve our baseline statistics as well as to monitor batch reactor performance. Testing of several new catalyst formulations was completed. No promising candidates for testing in the continuous aging unit were identified. The new SRC-II slurry oil was evaluated as a hydrogen donor liquefaction solvent. Our data indicates that the SRC-II heavy distillate oil is not as effective a hydrogen donor solvent as the hydrogenated anthracene oil. It is possible that the catalyst plays a key role in the thermal liquefaction reactions by improving the hydrogen donor properties of the slurry oil through in-situ hydrogenation. The differences in liquefaction behavior between Illinois No. 6 and Wyodak coal were determined. A major portion of our effort was concerned with ascertaining the liquefaction behavior of a Western coal such as Wyodak with AMOCAT type catalysts. A two-month program to determine the feasibility of using the Amoco continuous aging unit for SRC-I product upgrading was outlined.

  20. Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, January 1, 1984-March 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1984-04-01

    In task 1, selective synthesis of gasoline-range components from synthesis gas, rate expressions were developed for four different iron catalysts (promoted and unpromoted). Data for all four catalysts can be correlated by a semi-empirical expression. In task 2 catalyzed low temperature reactions of carbon and water, the catalytic activity for the production of hydrocarbons from graphite and water over KOH plus a co-catalyst was investigated for several first row transition metals. NiO showed the greatest activity. Several samples of /sup 13/CO, /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/O adsorbed on graphite and on catalyst-graphite systems after reaction with steam were prepared for NMR investigation. In task 3 chemistry of coal solubilization and liquefaction, rate studies of quinoline reduction to tetrahydroquinoline in the presence of the homogeneous catalysts (phi/sub 3/P)/sub 3/RhCl have provided definitive evidence that benzothiophene, indole, pyrrole, carbazole, thiophene, p-cresol and dibenzothiophene enhance the initial rate of hydrogenation of quinoline by a factor greater than 1.5. P-cresol was found to enhance the initial rate of hydrogenation of quinoline (1.6 to 2 fold) in a model coal liquid with polymer-supported (2% cross-linked) (phi/sub 3/P)/sub 3/ RhCl. 2 references, 6 figures.

  1. Refining and end use study of coal liquids. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Bechtel, with Southwest Research Institute, Amoco Oil R&D, and the M.W. Kellogg Co. as subcontractors, initiated a study on November 1, 1993, for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to determine the most cost effective and suitable combination of existing petroleum refinery processes needed to make specification transportation fuels or blending stocks, from direct and indirect coal liquefaction product liquids. This 47-month study, with an approved budget of $4.4 million dollars, is being performed under DOE Contract Number DE-AC22-93PC91029. A key objective is to determine the most desirable ways of integrating coal liquefaction liquids into existing petroleum refineries to produce transportation fuels meeting current and future, e.g. year 2000, Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) standards. An integral part of the above objectives is to test the fuels or blends produced and compare them with established ASTM fuels. The comparison will include engine tests to ascertain compliance of the fuels produced with CAAA and other applicable fuel quality and performance standards.

  2. Data base for the analysis of compositional characteristics of coal seams and macerals. Quarterly technical progress report, May-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Alan; Suhr, N. H.; Spackman, W.; Painter, P. C.; Walker, P. L.; Given, P. H.

    1980-10-01

    The basic objectives of this new program are, firstly, to understand the systematic relationships between the properties of coals and macerals, and, secondly, to determine the lateral and vertical variability in the properties of a single seam imposed by varying environmental conditions at the time of coal formation. Thirty-four coal samples were collected during the quarter from Pennsylvania and Illinois. To date, 54 vitrinite concentrates have been hand picked and will be studied by a range of physical and chemical techniques. One hundred and forty coal samples and 53 printouts of coal data were provided on request to the coal research community. The Lower Kittanning seam has been selected for the study of the variability in chemical, petrographic, mineralogic, fluid, and conversion properties of a single seam. A description of the structural and stratigraphic settings of the important coal seam as they relate to this investigation is given. Bivariate plots of data from the Lower Kittanning seam are presented. The fluid temperature range as measured with the Gieseler plastometer reaches a maximum at a reflectance of 1.10 to 1.15% and carbon content of 87 to 88% dmmf. Liquefaction conversion in a tubing-bomb reactor with tetralin shows a linear decrease with rank (reflectance). The problems associated with the application Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to the characterization of coal structure are critically discussed. The micropore surface areas and micropore volumes of three selected coals and a vitrinite concentrate, as measured from uptake of CO/sub 2/ at 25/sup 0/C, increased with decreasing particle size. Work on measurements of apparent densities and uptake of methanol and water is in progress.

  3. POC-scale testing of an advanced fine coal dewatering equipment/technique: Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, D.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K.

    1997-01-21

    The advanced fine-coal cleaning techniques such as column flotation, recovers a low-ash ultra-fine size clean-coal product. However, economical dewatering of the clean coal product to less than 20 percent moisture using conventional technology is difficult. This research program objective is to evaluate a novel coal surface modification technique developed at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research in conjunction with conventional and advanced dewatering technique at a pilot scale at the Powell Mountain Coal Company`s Mayflower preparation plant located in St. Charles, VA. During this quarter in the laboratory dewatering studies were conducted using copper and aluminum ions showed that for the low sulfur clean coal slurry addition of 0.1 Kg/t of copper ions was effective in lowering the filter cake moisture from 29 percent to 26.3 percent. Addition of 0.3 Kg/t of aluminum ions provided filter cake with 28 percent moisture. For the high sulfur clean coal slurry 0.5 Kg/t of copper and 0.1 Kg/t of aluminum ions reduced cake moisture from 30.5 percent to 28 percent respectively. Combined addition of anionic (10 g/t) and cationic (10 g/t) flocculants was effective in providing a filter cake with 29.8 percent moisture. Addition of flocculants was not effective in centrifuge dewatering. In pilot scale screen bowl centrifuge dewatering studies it was found that the clean coal slurry feed rate of 30 gpm was optimum to the centrifuge, which provided 65 percent solids capture. Addition of anionic or cationic flocculants was not effective in lowering of filter cake moisture, which remained close to 30 percent for both clean coal slurries.

  4. The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Kilbane, J.J. II

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. Microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal; however, the removal of organic sulfur from coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal samples for subsequent biodesulfurization. During this quarter tests were performed involving prolonged (7 day) exposure to chemical comminution agents followed by explosive comminution. Combined chemical plus physical comminution yielded only minor differences between the chemical treatments tested (0.lN NAOH, methanol plus 0.lN NAOH, isopropanol plus 0.lN NAOH, and ammonia vapor) as regards particle size distribution. The densities of treated products varied somewhat with 0.lN NaOH and ammonia yielding the lowest and highest densities respectively. Biodesulfurization tests indicate that pre-grown IGTS8 biocatalysts can be used to desulfurized chemically treated IBC-107 coal.

  5. Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 6, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The main goal of this program is to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. This quarterly report covers activities during the period from April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1996. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort has continued on a no-cost extension of the original contract. Samples have been supplied to CPC participants so they could conduct their portions of the project as contracted through ORNL. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: project planning and administration; consortium administration and reporting; coal extraction; technical/economic evaluation of WVU extraction process; and technology transfer. Previous work has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for producing suitable base raw materials for carbon products. Current effort, therefore, involved the screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. As part of this program, the activation of the coal extraction residues was investigated for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon. A further task, which was started towards the end of the program, was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of these studies are summarized in this report.

  6. Advanced characterization of forms of chlorine, organic sulfur and trace elements in available coals from operating Illinois mines. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Demir, I; Ruch, R.R.; Lytle, J.M.; Bhagway, S; Li, Y.C.; Chou, C.L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    The goals of the study are (1) to use X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine forms of chlorine (inorganic, ionic, and organic) and forms of organic sulfur (organic sulfide and thiophenic sulfur) in as-shipped coals from Illinois mines, (2) to obtain basic data on chlorine removal via froth flotation at fine ({minus}200 mesh) and ultrafine ({minus}400 mesh) particle sizes, and (3) to evaluate XANES for direct assessment of the organic/inorganic affinities of trace elements. In the last quarter, chlorine leachability during fine wet grinding of 21 coal samples was examined. In this quarter, the effect of froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) on the Cl contents of coals ground to {minus}200 and {minus}400 mesh sizes is completed. The results indicate that a combination of wet grinding and FF/RA reduced Cl contents in most samples from regions 1,2, and 3 by 29--81% and in one sample from region 4S by 60%. The chlorine and sulfur spectra of 21 coals, from five distinct geographic locations in Illinois, were examined. The chlorine XANES spectra for the coals are similar and chloride anion was determined to be the predominant form of chlorine. The sulfur XANES data for these coals show that a majority (61% to 82%) of organic sulfur in the thiophenic form. The ratios of thiophenic sulfur to total organic sulfur show a correlation with sample location. For samples from regions 1 and 2, the ratios are relatively lower (61% to 64%), whereas, for samples from regions 3, 4H, and 4S, the ratios are relatively higher (64% to 82%). A more detailed interpretation in these correlations will be discussed in the next report.

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 13, October--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-01-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2-t/hr process development unit. During Quarter 13 (October--December 1995), testing of the GranuFlow dewatering process indicated a 3--4% reduction in cake moisture for screen-bowl and solid-bowl centrifuge products. The Orimulsion additions were also found to reduce the potential dustiness of the fine coal, as well as improve solids recovery in the screen-bowl centrifuge. Based on these results, Lady Dunn management now plans to use a screen bowl centrifuge to dewater their Microcel{trademark} column froth product. Subtask 3.3 testing, investigating a novel Hydrophobic Dewatering process (HD), continued this quarter. Continuing Subtask 6.4 work, investigating coal-water-slurry formulation, indicated that selective agglomeration products can be formulated into slurries with lower viscosities than advanced flotation products. Subtask 6.5 agglomeration bench-scale testing results indicate that a very fine grind is required to meet the 2 lb ash/MBtu product specification for the Winifrede coal, while the Hiawatha coal requires a grind in the 100- to 150-mesh topsize range. Detailed design work remaining involves the preparation and issuing of the final task report. Utilizing this detailed design, a construction bid package was prepared and submitted to three Colorado based contractors for quotes as part of Task 9.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of low-octane naphtha cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Tsadkin, M.A.; Ivanova, S.R.; Kabirova, R.Yu.; Kolesov, S.V.; Minsker, K.S.

    1988-09-01

    A promising path for utilization of secondary naphtha cuts is pyrolysis to produce gaseous feedstocks for petrochemical production. Catalytic pyrolysis in the presence of barium chloride catalysts is of practical interest. The process is carried out without steam dilution of the feed. The effect of feedstock mass velocity in pyrolysis on the gas yield and the total yield is shown. Catalytic pyrolysis offers a means for efficient processing of these feedstocks to obtain olefin-rich gas.

  9. Heterogeneous kinetics of coal gasification. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1983-30 June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Calo, J.M.; Ganapathi, R.

    1983-01-01

    In the current quarterly technical progress report we present data and results on transient kinetic studies of the steam-char reaction system for activated coconut and lignite chars. These experiments were conducted in a fashion similar to the previous char-CO/sub 2/ studies, under approximately the same experimental conditions. The two principal product species, H/sub 2/ and CO, were monitored using the automatic mass programming system developed especially for this project. In order to perform the steam-char experiments, the original apparatus was modified by the addition of a steam generation/condensate removal system. The steam-char reaction system, being somewhat more complex than the CO/sub 2/-char reaction system, was modeled with a six-parameter, elementary kinetic scheme. The ''effective'' active site concentrations determined from the steam gasification data were of the same order of magnitude, and behaved in a similar fashion, to those obtained for the CO/sub 2/ gasification studies. The implications of this result are briefly discussed. 21 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Fifth quarterly report, June 16--September 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.; Marquis, J.K.

    1989-11-07

    Our experimental approach focuses on the use of enzymes which catalyze the addition of oxygen to organic compounds. In tailoring the application of these enzymes to coal processing, we are particularly interested in ensuring that oxidation occurs at sulfur and not at carbon-carbon bonds. Previous studies with DBT have shown that the reaction most frequently observed in microbial oxidative pathways is one in which DBT is oxidized at ring carbons. These reactions, as we have said, are accompanied by a considerable decrease in the energy content of the compound. In addition, microbial pathways have been identified in which the sulfur atom is sequentially oxidized to sulfoxide, to sulfone, to sulfonate, and finally to sulfuric acid. In this case, the fuel value of the desulfurized compounds is largely retained. We are evaluating the potential of commercially available enzymes to selectively catalyze oxidation at sulfur.

  11. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Seventh quarterly report, December 16, 1989--March 15, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1990-03-23

    Our experimental approach focuses on the use of enzymes which catalyze the addition of oxygen to organic compounds. In tailoring the application of these enzymes to coal processing, we are particularly interested in ensuring that oxidation occurs at sulfur and not at carbon-carbon bonds. Previous studies with DBT have shown that the reaction most frequently observed in microbial oxidative pathways is one in which DBT is oxidized at ring carbons. These reactions, as we have said, are accompanied by a considerable decrease in the energy content of the compound. In addition, microbial pathways have been identified in which the sulfur atom is sequentially oxidized to sulfoxide, to sulfone, to sulfonate, and finally to sulfuric acid. In this case, the fuel value of the desulfurized compounds is largely retained. We are evaluating the potential of commercially available enzymes to perform this function.

  12. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  13. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of lightweight aggregates (LWA) and ultra-lightweight (ULWA) from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot-scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. The following significant events occurred during this reporting period: testing of slag-based lightweight aggregates for roof tile and concrete applications.

  14. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, December 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, this process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) along with some unconverted carbon, which is disposed of as solid waste. The objectives of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of slag utilization technologies for commercial production of lightweight aggregates (LWA) and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The scheduled date for completing Phase I, which includes production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot-scale, is 14 December 1995. The scheduled start date for Phase II, which involves commercial utilization of these aggregates in a number of applications, is 15 December 1995, and the scheduled completion date of the project is 14 March 1997.

  15. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, February - April, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. The steam generated is as follows: steam = 20,000 lb/hr; temperature = 353 F (saturated); pressure = 125 psig; and steam quality = {approximately}98.5%. During this reporting period: structural corrections have been made to make the facility meet the required building costs; and refractory bakeout was successfully completed during April 23-25, 1996 over a 54 -hour period. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed.

  16. Direct coal liquefaction baseline design and system analysis. Quarterly report, September--December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of the study is to develop a computer model for a base line direct coal liquefaction design based on two stage direct coupled catalytic reactors. This primary objective is to be accomplished by completing the following: a base line design based on previous DOE/PETC results from Wilsonville pilot plant and other engineering evaluations; a cost estimate and economic analysis; a computer model incorporating the above two steps over a wide range of capacities and selected process alternatives; a comprehensive training program for DOE/PETC Staff to understand and use the computer model; a thorough documentation of all underlying assumptions for baseline economics; and a user manual and training material which will facilitate updating of the model in the future.

  17. Development of biological coal gasification (MicGas process): 12th Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    Several experiments were conducted to study the efficiency of granulated sludge consortium (GSC) on the biomethanation of Texas lignite (TxL). With an aim of obtaining a better culture than Mic-1, GSC was used as inoculum at different concentrations. The first experiment was conducted under anaerobic conditions in 60-mL vials containing 40 mL 0.01% SNTM + 1% TxL + 10% GSC. Methane production was measured periodically in the vial headspace and after 20 days of incubation, methane was found to be up to 67 mole%. The second experiment was conducted to determine whether methane production was from biogasification of coal or from substrates used for growing the GSC. The effect of two different anaerobic conditions on biomethanation of Texas lignite was also studied.

  18. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal. Sixth quarterly report, September 16--December 15, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Y.N.; Crooker, S.C.; Kitchell, J.P.; Nochur, S.V.

    1989-12-14

    Our experimental approach focuses on the use of enzymes which catalyze the addition of oxygen to organic compounds., In tailoring the application of these enzymes to coal processing, we are particularly interested in ensuring that oxidation occurs at sulfur and not at carbon-carbon bonds. Previous studies with DBT have shown that the reaction most frequently observed in microbial oxidative pathways is one in which DBT is oxidized at ring carbons. These reactions, as we have said, are accompanied by a considerable decrease in the energy content of the compound. In addition, microbial pathways have been identified in which the sulfur atom is sequentially oxidized to sulfoxide, to sulfone, to sulfonate, and finally to sulfuric acid. In this case, the fuel value of the desulfurized compounds is largely retained. We are evaluating the potential of commercially available enzymes to perform this function.

  19. Coal transformation chemistry. First quarterly progress report, March 1, 1980-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Leon M.; Alemany, L. B.; Handy, C. I.; King, H. -H.

    1980-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made on the development of a convenient procedure for the alkylation of Illinois No. 6 coal in liquid ammonia. The results are presented in summary in Section IIIB, Task 1 and in more detail in Section IVB. Work on the chemistry of the liquefaction reaction has led to the conclusion that phenolic compounds participate in free radical reactions in hydrogen donor solvents. Phenolic compounds and benzoic acid derivatives do not function as acid catalysts in their reactions with tetralin and other representative compounds. In addition, the reaction of styrene with tetralin at 400/sup 0/C has been shown to be a complex process involving rather deepseated chemical transformations. The results are presented in summary in Section IIIB, Task 3 and in more detail in Section IVC.

  20. Conversion of light naphthas over sulfided nickle erionite

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, R.H.; Chen, Nai Y. . Central Research Laboratory)

    1993-06-01

    A natural erionite ore has been exchanged with ammonium and nickel salts to yield a Ni/H erionite catalyst that is active and stable for selectively hydrocracking only the n-paraffins from light straight-run naphthas. The primary product is a C[sup 5+] liquid that is 15-20 octane numbers higher than the feed and a propane- and butane-rich gas by-product. Results from a 110-day pilot plant run demonstrated that a catalyst life of more than 1 year should be possible. Naphthenes, aromatics, and isoparaffins are neither produced nor consumed in this process, resulting in a C[sup 5+] liquid product that is lower in benzene and total aromatics than attainable by catalytic reforming of these feeds. Although no further work is planned with this catalyst, a naphtha-upgrading process based on shape-selective zeolitic hydrocracking could provide an attractive alternative to catalytic reforming or isomerization for these hard to upgrade naphthas. It should be particularly attractive in areas where the by-product propane and butane have good value.

  1. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 2, December 18, 1992--March 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.; Webster, I.A.

    1993-06-01

    Throughout the experimental runs we utilize a high pressure, high temperature diffusion cell system. This diffusion system has been tested through the measurement of the diffusivity of a number of model coal liquids. The heart of the experimental system is a high pressure autoclave, which in its interior can accommodate one or several ceramic membranes. One side of these membranes is exposed to the contents of the autoclave, while the other side, through an independent flow system, is exposed to flowing pure solvent. The pressure in the interior and exterior of the membranes can be independently adjusted and controlled. This is also true with the flow rate of the solvent in the interior of the membrane. The diffusion experiments are initiated by placing the coal liquid solution (model liquids or asphaltenes) in the autoclave space exterior of the membrane, pressurizing the exterior and interior membrane volumes and initiating the flow of the solvent. One has the option of running the experiment in a batch (exterior)-continuous (interior) or batch-batch mode. The option also exists for loading catalyst in the exterior volume either in a pellet or slurry form or using metal impregnated membranes for simultaneously studying transport and reaction. Model membrane preparation and characterization will be carried out both at USC at the UNOCAL Science and Technology Division, of UNOCAL Corporation (USTD). UNOCAL, in addition, will contribute technician and machine time on apparatuses, such as Auger and XPS, preparative GPC, SEC, XRF, SEC/ICP, Low Angle Light Scattering Photometer, Electron Microscope, Atomic Adsorption, Porosimeters and BET. The project is of both experimental and theoretical nature and is divided into a number of tasks, a brief description of which.

  2. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.

    1993-12-01

    Process oil samples from HRI Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Bench Unit Run CC-16 (227-76) were analyzed to provide information on process performance. Run CC-16 was operated in December 1992 with Burning Star 2 Mine (Illinois 6 seam) coal to test and validate Akzo EXP-AO-60 Ni/Mo catalyst (1/16 in. extrudate). Results were compared with those of four previous HRI CTSL bench unit runs made with Ni/Mo catalysts. Major conclusions from this work are summarized. (1) Akzo EXP-AO-60 gave process oil characteristics in Run CC-16 similar to those of other Ni/Mo catalysts tested in Runs I-13, I-16, I-17, and I-18 (by our analytical and empirical test methods). No distinct performance advantage for any of the catalysts emerges from the process oil characteristics and plant performance. Thus, for commercial coal liquefaction, a number of equivalent catalysts are available from competitive commercial sources. The similarity of run performance and process oil characteristics indicates consistent performance of HRI`s bench unit operations over a period of several years; (2) Dominant effects on process oil properties in Run CC-16 were catalyst age and higher temperature operation in Periods 10--13 (Condition 2). Properties affected were the aromaticities and phenolic -OH concentrations of most streams and the asphaltene and preasphaltene concentrations of the pressure-filter liquid (PFL) 850{degrees}F{sup +} resid. The trends reflect decreasing hydrogenation and defunctionalization of the process streams with increasing catalyst age. Operation at higher temperature conditions seems to have partially offset the effects of catalyst age.

  3. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, March 1995--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, this process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) along with some unconverted carbon, which is disposed of as solid waste. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag could be made into a lightweight material by controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results indicated the potential for using such materials as substitutes for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project, funded by DOE`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  4. Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for {open_quotes}as-generated{close_quotes} slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700{degrees}F. These results indicated the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications.

  5. Coal-conversion support studies. Project 61046 quarterly report, November 19, 1981-February 18, 1882

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The entrainment unit was modified slightly to improve the previously developed technique for measuring the solids entrainment rate. Several tests were conducted with -40+400 mesh Ottawa sand at system pressures of 50, 150, 300 and 450 psig and at various fluidization velocities to determine the effects of pressure and bed fluidizing-gas velocity on the entrainment rate. The initial entrainment rate (E/sub i/) was found to be proportional to the 2.11, 4.33, 5.67, and 8.44 powers of the gas velocity at the four operating pressures. The results were also analyzed to estimate the effects of pressure and gas velocity on the specific entrainment rate (E/sub s/) of particles that were 49, 58, 69, and 83 microns in diameter. The E/sub s/ for each particle size increased significantly with system pressure and gas velocity. The entrainment rate was found to increase much more rapidly with increasing gas velocity at higher pressures than at lower pressures. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of temperature, gas velocity, and oxygen concentration on the tendency of coal chars to sinter in fluidized beds. Tests were also conducted to determine the effect additional fluidizing gas in the ring below the distributor nozzles had on the sintering tendency of coal chars. At 1600/sup 0/F, the distributor nozzles were clean; at 1650/sup 0/F, the nozzles were coated with a layer of ash. The sinters formed at 1775/sup 0/F were slightly larger and heavier than those formed at 1825/sup 0/F. It was observed that the quantity of sinters decreased with a decreasing oxygen input rate. At 1650/sup 0/F, the addition of fluidizing gas in the ring below the distributor nozzle did not have any apparent effect on char sintering. Certain other results are also described. (LTN)

  6. Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

  7. Coal-sand attrition system and its` importance in fine coal cleaning. Eighth quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Schultz, C.W.

    1993-08-26

    The research efforts on the importance of a coal-sand attrition continued with work in four categories: Continuous grinding tests using steel media; fracture tests on coal samples compacted at different pressure; SEM-Image analysis of feed and ground product coal samples; zeta potential measurements of coal samples ground by different media, and flotation test of coal samples ground by different media. Results are described.

  8. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 4, February 19-May 18, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; McMillen, D.F.; Ogier, W.C.; Fleming, R.H.; Hum, G.P.

    1982-06-01

    SRI is conducting a program on the chemistry of the conversion of coal to liquid fuels: Task A deals with mechanisms of donor solvent liquefaction; Task B is a study of the conversion of coal and model compounds in the CO/H/sub 2/O system. In Task A, determination of the products, rates, and mechanisms of central bond scission of diphenyl ether and 1,2-dinaphthylmethane in tetralin, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene allows us to determine the predominant mechanism of hydrogen transfer to these substrates. Diphenyl ether decomposes in the above three solvents by a radical addition-elimination mechanism, with defined first-order rate constants of approx. 1 x 10/sup -7/, 2 x 10/sup -6/, and 2 x 10/sup -7/ s/sup -1/, respectively. The relative reactivity of the two substrates, the relative reactivity in the three solvents, and the positional preference for hydrogen transfer provide compelling evidence for the previously unreported single-step transfer of hydrogen from a radical to a closed-shell ..pi..-system. Efforts in Task B were concentrated on the conversion of anisole in D/sub 2/O and in tetralin at 400/sup 0/C. Experiments were conducted in two different reactor systems, small glass ampoules and 1/4-in. 316 stainless steel tubes. Benzene and phenol were the major products with the rates of product formation affected by the reaction medium and the reactor walls. The rate of benzene formation was found to be more rapid in D/sub 2/O than tetralin, and somewhat greater in glass ampoules than in stainless steel reactors for 20 min. We also studied the conversion of bibenzyl in D/sub 2/O and in tetralin in stainless steel tubes at 400/sup 0/C. In tetralin, toluene was the major product. In D/sub 2/O, the products were toluene, benzene, diphenylmethane, stilbene, and phenanthrene. A novel hydration scheme is suggested for the reactions of bibenzyl in water.

  9. High pressure coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. Second quarterly report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The manuscript of the paper presented at the Advanced Coal-Fired Power Systems `95 Review Meeting at DOE METC, June 27, was submitted for inclusion in the published proceedings. The paper focused on the building of the pilot plant in Kennebunk, Maine, and the proof of concept tests performed to date. Slide shows and tours of the Kennebunk Test Facility were held for local community leaders, many of whom were concerned about plant noise levels. The Kennebunk Rotary Club was addressed on July 18. On July 24, a town manager attended a demonstration of noise abatement measures Hague had taken to address complaints about the sound of the facility`s ID fan. This resulted in a favorable newspaper story published in the Biddeford - Saco Journal Tribune on July 26. Heat Exchanger Development Task 2.4.1 - Tube- String Development: Improve Tube Toughness: Evaluation of an improved containment system is proceeding. Several prototype samples fabricated some time ago have been tested. The first round of tests successfully demonstrated the containment concept. Tests are planned to evaluate the containment scheme using so called `high temperature` materials suitable for use in the CerHx.

  10. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, August--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-03-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation. This would permit full capacity operation of the FBC year round in spite of the VA laundry that was shut down as well as efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste and steam generation. The State permitting process required for construction will be completed in early November to allow installation and construction to be completed. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. A request for proposal for stack sampling and biospore tests was released to four (4) vendors in mid-October. The proposals shall be reviewed during November and the stack sampler will be selected. Funding was approved as of August 1, 1995. Construction and installation resumed on August 21, 1995 at the LVAMC. Construction and installation continues and will be completed by late December 1995.

  11. Exxon catalytic coal-gasification process development program. Quarterly technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Euker, Jr, C. A.

    1980-03-01

    Work continued on the catalyst recovery screening studies to evaluate the economic impacts of alternative processing approaches and solid-liquid separation techniques. Equipment specifications have been completed for two cases with countercurrent water washing using rotary-drum filters for the solid-liquid separations. Material and energy balances have been completed for an alternative methane recovery process configuration using low pressure stripping which requires 26% less horsepower than the Study Design system. A study has been initiated to identify trace components which might be present in the CCG gas loop and to assess their potential impacts on the CCG process. This information will be used to assist in planning an appropriate series of analyses for the PDU gasifier effluent. A study has been initiated to evaluate the use of a small conventional steam reformer operating in parallel with a preheat furnace for heat input to the catalytic gasifier which avoids the potential problem of carbon laydown. Preliminary replies from ten manufacturers are being evaluated as part of a study to determine the types and performance of coal crushing equipment appropriate for commercial CCG plants. A material and energy balance computer model for the CCG reactor system has been completed. The new model will provide accurate, consistent and cost-efficient material and energy balances for the extensive laboratory guidance and process definition studies planned under the current program. Other activities are described briefly.

  12. AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Quarterly report, November 1995--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, J.M.

    1996-03-01

    The project objective is to design, construct, install provide operator training and start-up a circulating fluidized bed combustion system at the Lebanon Pennsylvania Veteran`s Affairs Medical Center. This unit will co-fire coal and hospital waste providing lower cost steam for heating and possibly cooling (absorption chiller) and operation of a steam turbine-generator for limited power generation while providing efficient destruction of both general and infectious hospital waste. Operating permits will be obtained after construction has been completed. The stack sampler has been selected. This vendor is currently developing the testing protocol. Severe weather in December and January caused work delays to the project, especially to outside work The fabrication and installation of the stack are complete. Only the insulation of the stack remains to be done. Budget problems began to occur in late January. Correction of this situation should occur shortly in February or March. A current schedule for the project is included with this report.

  13. MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Brosnan, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF) are described. On Task 1, the first phase of the downstream quench system was completed. On Task 2, all three combustor sections were completed, hydrotested, ASME code stamped, and delivered to UTSI. The nozzle was also delivered. Fabrication of support stands and cooling water manifolds for the combustor and vitiation heater were completed, heat transfer and thermal stress analysis, along with design development, were conducted on the generator and radiant furnace and secondary combustor installation progressed as planned. Under Task 3 an Elemental Analyzer and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer/Graphite Furnace were received and installed, sites were prepared for two air monitoring stations, phytoplankton analysis began, and foliage and soil sampling was conducted using all study plots. Some 288 soil samples were combined to make 72 samples which were analyzed. Also, approval was granted to dispose of MHD flyash and slag at the Franklin County landfill. Task 4 effort consisted of completing all component test plans, and establishing the capability of displaying experimental data in graphical format. Under Task 7, a preliminary testing program for critical monitoring of the local current and voltage non-uniformities in the generator electrodes was outlined, electrode metal wear characteristics were documented, boron nitride/refrasil composite interelectrode sealing was improved, and several refractories for downstream MHD applications were evaluated with promising results.

  14. The single electron chemistry of coals. [Quarterly] report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Rothenberg, S.E.

    1993-09-01

    Following the position of the nitrile band and using the assumption that there is a linear relationship for between the extent of charge transfer and frequency, a 69% charge transfer was obtained and successfully replicates Flowers` results. If a Diels-Alder reaction occurred, we would expect the position of nitrile group to have shifted down field to the 2260-2240 cm{sup {minus}1} range for a saturated alkyl nitrile. There is no evidence for this type of reaction under these conditions since we obtained a shift upfield from 2229 cm{sup {minus}1} to 2200 cm{sup {minus}1}. There are some peaks of interest in the 1660-1300 cm{sup {minus}1} range of the deposited coals which will be investigated. The TCNE-Illinois No. 6 reaction mixture will be heated from room temperature to 180{degrees}C within the Harrick cell during IR analysis to see if a Diels-Alder or other additions reaction could occur.

  15. Synthesis of acrylates and methacrylates from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-02

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas, under a contract from the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center. This three-step process consists of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde, and esterification of resulting methacrylic acid (MAA) with methanol to produce MMA. Eastman has focused on the propionate synthesis step. the resultant Mo catalysts work efficiently at much less severe conditions (170{degrees}C and 30 atm) than the conventional Ni catalysts (270{degrees}C and 180 atm). Bechtel has performed an extensive cost analysis which shows that Eastman`s propionate synthesis step is competitive with other technologies to produce the anhydride. In the second step, RTI and Eastman have developed active and stable V-Si-P ternary metal oxide catalysts Nb/SiO{sub 2} and Ta/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the condensation of propionic anhydride and acid with formaldehyde. RTI has demonstrated a novel correlation among the catalyst acid-base properties, condensation reaction yield, and long-term catalyst activity. Current research focuses on enhancing the condensation reaction yields by better understanding of the acid-base property correlation, in situ condensation in a high-temperature, high- pressure (HTHP) slurry reactor, and alternate formaldehyde feedstocks. Based on Eastman and RTI laboratory data, a cost estimate is also being developed for the integrated process.

  16. A novel, integrated treatment system for coal wastewaters. Quarterly report, September 2, 1992--December 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1992-12-31

    The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and the heavy metals present in coal conversion wastewaters. Hec-CBDA-DT, (HCDT), a modified hectorite containing a mixed bilayer of a cationic (CBDA) and a dismine (DT) type surfactants, has been shown to adsorb Cr (VI) strongly at PH below 5.0. A second kind of a modified clay, montmorillonite-DT, (MONT-DT), in which the protonated form of the diamine is directly attached to the negative sites of clay surface, has also been found to adsorb CR(VI) as strongly as Hec-CBDA-DT at a pH of 4.5. The adsorption of Cr (VI) onto these two modified-clays is strongly inhibited by an increase in the ionic strength of the medium. It is inferred that the main mechanism of adsorption of CR(VI) onto these two clay complexes is of the counterion. Preliminary data on the partitioning of phenanthrene, a three-ringed polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), reveal that organic carbon located on the external surfaces of clay complexes is more effective in partitioning nonionic, toxic organic compounds.

  17. A novel, integrated treatment systems for coal wastewaters. Quarterly Report, June 2, 1992--September 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1992-12-01

    The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and heavy metals present in coal conversion wastewaters. Hec-CBDA-DT, a modified hectorite containing a mixed bilayer of a cationic (CBDA) and a diamine (DT) type surfactants, was shown to adsorb simultaneously heavy metals such as Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} and toxic organics such as chlorophenols. The pH dependence of the adsorption of chlorophenols on Hec-CBDA-DT suggested hydrophobic partitioning, counterion adsorption and hydrogen-bond interaction of the phenolate ions with the surface diamine groups as the possible mechanisms of sorption. Adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} by Hec-CBDA-DT was shown to be only slightly affected by a large excess of counterions, thus indicating that Cu{sup 2+} adsorbed specifically to the surface. A second type of modified clay, Hec-CBDA-Palmitic Acid (Hec-CBDA-PA) adsorbed both Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} strongly. However, the pH optima for adsorption were 6.0 and 8.0 respectively in the case of Cu{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+}. It is inferred that the mechanisms of adsorption of these two metal ions to Hec-CBDA-PA are different, specific and counterion binding respectively in the case of Cu and Cd ions.

  18. A novel integrated treatment system for coal wastewaters. Quarterly report, March 2, 1992--June 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.Y.; Srinivasan, K.R.

    1992-08-01

    The aims of this study are to develop, characterize and optimize a novel treatment scheme that would be effective simultaneously against the toxic organics and heavy metals present in coal conversion wastewaters. To remove and recover heavy metals from wastewaters, four different types of surfactant-clay complexes have been prepared using hectored or montmorillonite as the base clays. The adsorbent is prepared by first coating the clay surface, upto a monolayer, with a cationic surfactant, CBDA, to which an amine, (DT), or a carboxylic acid (Palmitic acid, PA) is anchored using hydrophobic effect to form a mixed bilayer. Such an arrangement is expected to locate the functional groups in metal adsorption at the solid-solution interface. Complexes based on hectored are shown to adsorb Cu{sup 2+} ions more strongly than the ones based on montmorillonite. The rate of adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions is quite rapid and the adsorbed amount levels off in less than 2 hrs. The optimum pH for metal adsorption is around 6.5 and the amount of metal adsorbed declines sharply on the lower pH side of the pH optimum, suggesting that removal and recovery of adsorbed metal ions can be effected by a slight pH shift.

  19. Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

  20. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 17, August 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The construction of the DOE POC at the OCDO facility continued through this entire quarter. By the end of the quarter approximately 90% of all of the construction had been completed. All equipment has beeninstalled, checked for mechanical and installation and operated from a local pushbutton. During this quarter a review of items to be completed for start-up was compiled. This information was then presented to the construction subcontractors and agreement was concluded that all items will be completed and operational for processing coal by February 1, 1993. There are still several items that were not on site for installation during this quarter. These items are the flocculant controls supplied by Westec Engineering, Inc., and the discharge valve for the hyperbaric filter supplied by KHD. Neither of these items will prevent start-up. The flocculants can be manually controlled and provisions are all ready provided to bypass the hyperbaric filter to the Sharpels high-G centrifuge. Both of these items are scheduled for delivery in mid-January.