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Sample records for coarse aggregates

  1. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Limbachiya, M.C. . E-mail: m.limbachiya@kingston.ac.uk; Marrocchino, E.; Koulouris, A.

    2007-07-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO{sub 2} and increase in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  2. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    PubMed

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste. PMID:25188783

  3. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA. PMID:26161440

  4. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA. PMID:26161440

  5. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  6. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-06-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio ( w/ c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/ c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  7. Behaviour of Recycled Coarse Aggregate Concrete: Age and Successive Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Kirtikanta; Pathappilly, Robin Davis; Sarkar, Pradip

    2016-05-01

    Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA) concrete construction technique can be called as `green concrete', as it minimizes the environmental hazard of the concrete waste disposal. Indian standard recommends target mean compressive strength of the conventional concrete in terms of water cement ratio (w/c). The present work is an attempt to study the behaviour of RCA concrete from two samples of parent concrete having different age group with regard to the relationship of compressive strength with water cement ratios. Number of recycling may influence the mechanical properties of RCA concrete. The influence of age and successive recycling on the properties such as capillary water absorption, drying shrinkage strain, air content, flexural strength and tensile splitting strength of the RCA concrete are examined. The relationship between compressive strength at different w/c ratios obtained experimentally is investigated for the two parameters such as age of parent concrete and successive recycling. The recycled concrete using older recycled aggregate shows poor quality. While the compressive strength reduces with successive recycling gradually, the capillary water absorption increases abruptly, which leads to the conclusion that further recycling may not be advisable.

  8. STUDY ON THE EVALUATION FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE PROPERTIES OF COARSE AGGREGATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Katahira, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    Drying shrinkage of coarse aggregate is one of principal indexes to evaluate drying shrinkage of concrete. However, testing of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle has not been commonly conducted. We carried out measurement of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle using wire strain gauges and discussed the variation in the measurement. We found that variation among particles in drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate is intrinsic and much bigger than test result due to the simplified unidirectional strain measurement under the assumption of ignoring multi-axial strain field. Strong relationship between the mean value of drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate and drying shrinkage strain of concrete prism specimens was observed, which indicates that measured drying shrinkage strain of aggregate particles intrinsically contains large variation, however the mean value is an effective index to estimate drying shrinkage of concrete.

  9. Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Protein Folding and Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan; Deserno, Markus

    2009-03-01

    The complexity involved in protein structure is not only due to the rich variety of amino acids, but also the inherent weak interactions, comparable to thermal energy, and important cooperative phenomena. This presents a challenge in atomistic simulations, as it is associated with high-dimensionality and ruggedness of the energy landscape as well as long equilibration times. We have recently developed a coarse-grained (CG) implicit solvent peptide model which has been designed to reproduce key consequences of the abovementioned weak interactions. Its intermediate level of resolution, four beads per amino acid, allows for accurate sampling of local conformations by designing a force field that relies on simple interactions. A realistic ratio of α-helix to β-sheet content is achieved by mimicking a nearest-neighbor dipole interaction. We tune the model in order to fold helical proteins while systematically comparing the structure with NMR data. Very good agreement is achieved for proteins that have simple tertiary structures. We further probe the effects of cooperativity between amino acids by looking at peptide aggregation, where hydrophobic peptide fragments cooperatively form large-scale β-sheet structures. The model is able to reproduce features from atomistic simulations on a qualitative basis.

  10. Three-dimensional shape analysis of coarse aggregates: New techniques for and preliminary results on several different coarse aggregates and reference rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, S.T.; Quiroga, P.N.; Fowler, D.W.; Saleh, H.A.; Livingston, R.A.; Garboczi, E.J. . E-mail: edward.garboczi@nist.gov; Ketcham, P.M.; Hagedorn, J.G.; Satterfield, S.G.

    2006-09-15

    The shape of aggregates used in concrete is an important parameter that helps determine many concrete properties, especially the rheology of fresh concrete and early-age mechanical properties. This paper discusses the sample preparation and image analysis techniques necessary for obtaining an aggregate particle image in 3-D, using X-ray computed tomography, which is then suitable for spherical harmonic analysis. The shapes of three reference rocks are analyzed for uncertainty determination via direct comparison to the geometry of their reconstructed images. A Virtual Reality Modeling Language technique is demonstrated that can give quick and accurate 3-D views of aggregates. Shape data on several different kinds of coarse aggregates are compared and used to illustrate potential mathematical shape analyses made possible by the spherical harmonic information.

  11. Effect of Different Coarse Aggregate Sizes on the Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, M. A.; Busari, A. O.

    2015-11-01

    The high cost of conventional concrete materials is a major factor affecting housing delivery in developing countries such as Nigeria. Since Nigeria is blessed with abundant locally available materials like laterite, researchers have conducted comprehensive studies on the use of laterite to replace river sand partially or fully in the concrete. However, the works did not consider the optimum use of coarse aggregate to possibly improve the strength of the laterized concrete, since it is normally lower than that of normal concrete. The results of the tests showed that workability, density and compressive strength at constant water-cement ratio increase with the increase in the coarse aggregate particle size and also with curing age. As the percentage of laterite increases, there was a reduction in all these characteristics even with the particle size of coarse aggregate reduction due to loss from the aggregate-paste interface zone. Also, when sand was replaced by 25% of laterite, the 19.5mm and 12.5mm coarse aggregate particle sizes gave satisfactory results in terms of workability and compressive strength respectively at 28 days of curing age, compared to normal concrete. However, in case of 50% up to 100% laterite contents, the workability and compressive strength values were very low.

  12. Time-dependent behaviour of high performance concrete: influence of coarse aggregate characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makani, A.; Vidal, T.; Pons, G.; Escadeillas, G.

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the influence of coarse aggregate characteristics on the time-dependent deformations of High Performances Concretes (HPC). Four concretes made using the same cement paste but incorporating different types of aggregate (rolled siliceous gravel, crushed granite, crushed limestone and crushed siliceous gravels) were studied in order to investigate the effect of aggregate properties on the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage and creep. The results indicate that the aggregate type has a significant effect on creep and shrinkage deformations of HPC. An influence of the shape of aggregate on time-dependent deformations has also been observed. On the basis of these results, long-term behaviour seems to be correlated to the characteristics of the Interfacial Transition Zone (ITZ) strongly depending on the mineralogical nature and properties of aggregates. The experimental results are compared with the values calculated using the current Eurocode 2 model in order to assess the accuracy of the predictions.

  13. Effects of oil palm shell coarse aggregate species on high strength lightweight concrete.

    PubMed

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3-5, 6-9, and 10-15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10-15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days. PMID:24982946

  14. Effects of Oil Palm Shell Coarse Aggregate Species on High Strength Lightweight Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Ming Kun; Bin Mahmud, Hilmi; Ang, Bee Chin; Yew, Ming Chian

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different species of oil palm shell (OPS) coarse aggregates on the properties of high strength lightweight concrete (HSLWC). Original and crushed OPS coarse aggregates of different species and age categories were investigated in this study. The research focused on two OPS species (dura and tenera), in which the coarse aggregates were taken from oil palm trees of the following age categories (3–5, 6–9, and 10–15 years old). The results showed that the workability and dry density of the oil palm shell concrete (OPSC) increase with an increase in age category of OPS species. The compressive strength of specimen CD3 increases significantly compared to specimen CT3 by 21.8%. The maximum achievable 28-day and 90-day compressive strength is 54 and 56 MPa, respectively, which is within the range for 10–15-year-old crushed dura OPS. The water absorption was determined to be within the range for good concrete for the different species of OPSC. In addition, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) results showed that the OPS HSLWC attain good condition at the age of 3 days. PMID:24982946

  15. A Coarse-Grained Model for Polyglutamine Aggregation Modulated by Amphipathic Flanking Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Khan, Siddique J.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2014-01-01

    The aggregation of proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts is directly relevant to the formation of neuronal intranuclear inclusions in Huntington’s disease. In vitro studies have uncovered the effects of flanking sequences as modulators of the driving forces and mechanisms of polyQ aggregation in sequence segments associated with HD. Specifically, a seventeen-residue amphipathic stretch (N17) that is directly N-terminal to the polyQ tract in huntingtin decreases the overall solubility, destabilizes nonfibrillar aggregates, and accelerates fibril formation. Published results from atomistic simulations showed that the N17 module reduces the frequency of intermolecular association. Our reanalysis of these simulation results demonstrates that the N17 module also reduces interchain entanglements between polyQ domains. These two effects, which are observed on the smallest lengthscales, are incorporated into phenomenological pair potentials and used in coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations to investigate their impact on large-scale aggregation. We analyze the results from Brownian dynamics simulations using the framework of diffusion-limited cluster aggregation. When entanglements prevail, which is true in the absence of N17, small spherical clusters and large linear aggregates form on distinct timescales, in accord with in vitro experiments. Conversely, when entanglements are quenched and a barrier to intermolecular associations is introduced, both of which are attributable to N17, the timescales for forming small species and large linear aggregates become similar. Therefore, the combination of a reduction of interchain entanglements through homopolymeric polyQ and barriers to intermolecular associations appears to be sufficient for providing a minimalist phenomenological rationalization of in vitro observations regarding the effects of N17 on polyQ aggregation. PMID:25185558

  16. Leaching assessment of concrete made of recycled coarse aggregate: physical and environmental characterisation of aggregates and hardened concrete.

    PubMed

    Galvín, A P; Agrela, F; Ayuso, J; Beltrán, M G; Barbudo, A

    2014-09-01

    Each year, millions of tonnes of waste are generated worldwide, partially through the construction and demolition of buildings. Recycling the resulting waste could reduce the amount of materials that need to be manufactured. Accordingly, the present work has analysed the potential reuse of construction waste in concrete manufacturing by replacing the natural aggregate with recycled concrete coarse aggregate. However, incorporating alternative materials in concrete manufacturing may increase the pollutant potential of the product, presenting an environmental risk via ground water contamination. The present work has tested two types of concrete batches that were manufactured with different replacement percentages. The experimental procedure analyses not only the effect of the portion of recycled aggregate on the physical properties of concrete but also on the leaching behaviour as indicative of the contamination degree. Thus, parameters such as slump, density, porosity and absorption of hardened concrete, were studied. Leaching behaviour was evaluated based on the availability test performed to three aggregates (raw materials of the concrete batches) and on the diffusion test performed to all concrete. From an environmental point of view, the question of whether the cumulative amount of heavy metals that are released by diffusion reaches the availability threshold was answered. The analysis of concentration levels allowed the establishment of different groups of metals according to the observed behaviour, the analysis of the role of pH and the identification of the main release mechanisms. Finally, through a statistical analysis, physical parameters and diffusion data were interrelated. It allowed estimating the relevance of porosity, density and absorption of hardened concrete on diffusion release of the metals in study. PMID:24889792

  17. A coarse grained protein model with internal degrees of freedom. Application to α-synuclein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Wim J.

    2016-02-01

    Particles in simulations are traditionally endowed with fixed interactions. While this is appropriate for particles representing atoms or molecules, objects with significant internal dynamics—like sequences of amino acids or even an entire protein—are poorly modelled by invariable particles. We develop a highly coarse grained polymorph patchy particle with the ultimate aim of simulating proteins as chains of particles at the secondary structure level. Conformational changes, e.g., a transition between disordered and β-sheet states, are accommodated by internal coordinates that determine the shape and interaction characteristics of the particles. The internal coordinates, as well as the particle positions and orientations, are propagated by Brownian Dynamics in response to their local environment. As an example of the potential offered by polymorph particles, we model the amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, as a single particle with two internal states. The simulations yield oligomers of particles in the disordered state and fibrils of particles in the "misfolded" cross-β-sheet state. The aggregation dynamics is complex, as aggregates can form by a direct nucleation-and-growth mechanism and by two-step-nucleation through conversions between the two cluster types. The aggregation dynamics is complex, with fibrils formed by direct nucleation-and-growth, by two-step-nucleation through the conversion of an oligomer and by auto-catalysis of this conversion.

  18. Aggregation of alpha-synuclein by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry; Pandey, Ras

    Alpha-synuclein, an intrinsic protein abundant in neurons, is believed to be a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Alzheimer, Parkinson's disease). Abnormal aggregation of ASN leads to Lewy bodies with specific morphologies. We investigate the self-organizing structures in a crowded environment of ASN proteins by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. ASN is a chain of 140 residues. Structure detail of residues is neglected but its specificity is captured via unique knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. Large-scale simulations are performed to analyze a number local and global physical quantities (e.g. mobility profile, contact map, radius of gyration, structure factor) as a function of temperature and protein concentration. Trend in multi-scale structural variations of the protein in a crowded environment is compared with that of a free protein chain.

  19. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  20. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-28

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  1. The prediction of the freeze/thaw durability of coarse aggregate in concrete by mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, M. N.

    1980-10-01

    Aggregates from fifty-two Indiana highway cores were tested as were five rock samples supplied by the Portland Cement Association. The Expected Durability Factor values were determined from the pore size distributions, and an average value was assigned to each pavement associated with the cores. These values were then compared with the field performance of the pavement to ascertain the borderline between EDF values for durable and for nondurable aggregates. A good correlation between the field performance and the average EDF values was found. A pavement will be durable if its coarse aggregate has an EDF value greater than 50 for 90% or more of the aggregate. This criterion applies to stone and gravel aggregates with a maximum size of 1-1/2 to 2-1/2 inches. The pavement will be durable for at lest thirty years.

  2. Osmolyte Induced Changes in Peptide Conformational Ensemble Correlate with Slower Amyloid Aggregation: A Coarse-Grained Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Shahar; Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Stabilizing osmolytes are known to impact the process of amyloid aggregation, often altering aggregation kinetics. Recent evidence further suggests that osmolytes modify the peptide conformational dynamics, as well as change the physical characteristics of assembling amyloid fibrils. To resolve how these variations emerge on the molecular level, we simulated the initial aggregation steps of an amyloid-forming peptide in the presence and absence of the osmolyte sorbitol, a naturally occurring polyol. To this end, a coarse-grained force field was extended and implemented to access larger aggregate sizes and longer time scales. The force field optimization procedure placed emphasis on calibrating the solution thermodynamics of sorbitol, the aggregating peptide in its monomeric form, and the interaction of both of these components with each other and with water. Our simulations show a difference in aggregation kinetics and structural parameters in the presence of sorbitol compared to water, which qualitatively agree well with our experimentally resolved aggregation kinetics of the same peptide. The kinetic changes induced by sorbitol can be traced in our simulations to changes in monomer conformations resulting from osmolyte presence. These translate into changes in peptide conformations within the aggregated clusters and into differences in rates of monomer nucleation and of association to formed fibrils. We find that, compared to pure water as solvent, the presence of sorbitol induces formation of more aggregates each containing fewer peptides, with an increased tendency toward parallel interpeptide contacts. PMID:26587669

  3. Properties of concrete made with north carolina recycled coarse and fine aggregates. Final report, 1 July 1994-30 June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.H.; Fisher, D.G.; Sackett, K.W.

    1996-06-30

    Reconstruction of roadways generates large quantities of waste material and requires considerable amounts of aggregate. The recycling of concrete from old deteriorated pavements into aggregates for construction of new pavements reduces disposal costs as well as providing a source of aggregates to replace natural supplies. In this study, recycled coarse and fine aggregates were obtained from a portion of concrete pavement which was removed from Interstate 40 in North Carolina. Various amounts of recycled coarse and fine aggregates were volumerically substituted for natural coarse and fine aggregates of a control mixture. A relatively higher cement factor was used for the control mix, compared to NCDOT standard. The effects on plastic and hardened concrete properties were investigated.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of ionic aggregates in a coarse%3CU%2B2010%3Egrained ionomer melt.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lisa Michelle; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2010-11-01

    Ionomers--polymers containing a small fraction of covalently bound ionic groups--have potential application as solid electrolytes in batteries. Understanding ion transport in ionomers is essential for such applications. Due to strong electrostatic interactions in these materials, the ions form aggregates, tending to slow counterion diffusion. A key question is how ionomer properties affect ionic aggregation and counterion dynamics on a molecular level. Recent experimental advances have allowed synthesis and extensive characterization of ionomers with a precise, constant spacing of charged groups, making them ideal for controlled measurement and more direct comparison with molecular simulation. We have used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to simulate such ionomers with regularly spaced charged beads. The charged beads are placed either in the polymer backbone or as pendants on the backbone. The polymers, along with the counterions, are simulated at melt densities. The ionic aggregate structure was determined as a function of the dielectric constant, spacing of the charged beads on the polymer, and the sizes of the charged beads and counterions. The pendant ion architecture can yield qualitatively different aggregate structures from those of the linear polymers. For small pendant ions, roughly spherical aggregates have been found above the glass transition temperature. The implications of these aggregates for ion diffusion will be discussed.

  5. The influence of coarse aggregate size and volume on the fracture behavior and brittleness of self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Beygi, Morteza H.A.; Kazemi, Mohammad Taghi; Nikbin, Iman M.; Vaseghi Amiri, Javad; Rabbanifar, Saeed; Rahmani, Ebrahim

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on fracture characteristics and brittleness of self-compacting concrete (SCC), involving the tests of 185 three point bending beams with different coarse aggregate size and content. Generally, the parameters were analyzed by the work of fracture method (WFM) and the size effect method (SEM). The results showed that with increase of size and content of coarse aggregate, (a) the fracture energy increases which is due to the change in fractal dimensions, (b) behavior of SCC beams approaches strength criterion, (c) characteristic length, which is deemed as an index of brittleness, increases linearly. It was found with decrease of w/c ratio that fracture energy increases which may be explained by the improvement in structure of aggregate-paste transition zone. Also, the results showed that there is a correlation between the fracture energy measured by WFM (G{sub F}) and the value measured through SEM (G{sub f}) (G{sub F} = 3.11G{sub f})

  6. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Amyloid Aggregation Investigated by a Phenomenological Coarse-Grained Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, Andrea; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered polypeptide aggregates that have been implicated in several neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, [1, 2] and, more recently, also in biological functionalities. [3, 4, 5] These findings have paved the way for a wide range of experimental and computational studies aimed at understanding the details of the fibril-formation mechanism. Computer simulations using low-resolution models, which employ a simplified representation of protein geometry and energetics, have provided insights into the basic physical principles underlying protein aggregation in general [6, 7, 8] and ordered amyloid aggregation. [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] For example, Dokholyan and coworkers have used the Discrete Molecular Dynamics method [16, 17] to shed light on the mechanisms of protein oligomerization [18] and the conformational changes that take place in proteins before the aggregation onset. [19, 20] One challenging observation, which is difficult to observe by computer simulations, is the wide range of aggregation scenarios emerging from a variety of biophysical measurements. [21, 22] Atomistic models have been employed to study the conformational space of amyloidogenic polypeptides in the monomeric state, [23, 24, 25] the very initial steps of amyloid formation, [26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32] and the structural stability of fibril models. [33, 34, 35) However, all-atom simulations of the kinetics of fibril formation are beyond what can be done with modern computers.

  7. The Feasibility of Palm Kernel Shell as a Replacement for Coarse Aggregate in Lightweight Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itam, Zarina; Beddu, Salmia; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Issa Ayash, Usama

    2016-03-01

    Implementing sustainable materials into the construction industry is fast becoming a trend nowadays. Palm Kernel Shell is a by-product of Malaysia’s palm oil industry, generating waste as much as 4 million tons per annum. As a means of producing a sustainable, environmental-friendly, and affordable alternative in the lightweight concrete industry, the exploration of the potential of Palm Kernel Shell to be used as an aggregate replacement was conducted which may give a positive impact to the Malaysian construction industry as well as worldwide concrete usage. This research investigates the feasibility of PKS as an aggregate replacement in lightweight concrete in terms of compressive strength, slump test, water absorption, and density. Results indicate that by using PKS for aggregate replacement, it increases the water absorption but decreases the concrete workability and strength. Results however, fall into the range acceptable for lightweight aggregates, hence it can be concluded that there is potential to use PKS as aggregate replacement for lightweight concrete.

  8. Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Amyloid Beta (16–22) Aggregation Using Coarse-Grained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effect of crowding on protein aggregation, discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations combined with an intermediate resolution protein model, PRIME20, were applied to a peptide/crowder system. The systems contained 192 Aβ(16–22) peptides and crowders of diameters 5, 20, and 40 Å, represented here by simple hard spheres, at crowder volume fractions of 0.00, 0.10, and 0.20. Results show that both crowder volume fraction and crowder diameter have a large impact on fibril and oligomer formation. The addition of crowders to a system of peptides increases the rate of oligomer formation, shifting from a slow ordered formation of oligomers in the absence of crowders, similar to nucleated polymerization, to a fast collapse of peptides and subsequent rearrangement characteristic of nucleated conformational conversion with a high maximum in the number of peptides in oligomers as the total crowder surface area increases. The rate of conversion from oligomers to fibrils also increases with increasing total crowder surface area, giving rise to an increased rate of fibril growth. In all cases, larger volume fractions and smaller crowders provide the greatest aggregation enhancement effects. We also show that the size of the crowders influences the formation of specific oligomer sizes. In our simulations, the 40 Å crowders enhance the number of dimers relative to the numbers of trimers, hexamers, pentamers, and hexamers, while the 5 Å crowders enhance the number of hexamers relative to the numbers of dimers, trimers, tetramers, and pentamers. These results are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental and theoretical work. PMID:25347801

  9. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  10. A Study on Suitability of EAF Oxidizing Slag in Concrete: An Eco-Friendly and Sustainable Replacement for Natural Coarse Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Sekaran, Alan; Palaniswamy, Murthi; Balaraju, Sivagnanaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and economic factors increasingly encourage higher utility of industrial by-products. The basic objective of this study was to identify alternative source for good quality aggregates which is depleting very fast due to fast pace of construction activities in India. EAF oxidizing slag as a by-product obtained during the process in steel making industry provides great opportunity to utilize it as an alternative to normally available coarse aggregates. The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag in addition to supplementary cementing material fly ash. This study presents the experimental investigations carried out on concrete grades of M20 and M30 with three mixes: (i) Mix A, conventional concrete mix with no material substitution, (ii) Mix B, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash, and (iii) Mix C, 30% replacement of cement with fly ash and 50% replacement of coarse aggregate with EAF oxidizing slag. Tests were conducted to determine mechanical and durability properties up to the age of 90 days. The test results concluded that concrete made with EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash (Mix C) had greater strength and durability characteristics when compared to Mix A and Mix B. Based on the overall observations, it could be recommended that EAF oxidizing slag and fly ash could be effectively utilized as coarse aggregate replacement and cement replacement in all concrete applications. PMID:26421315

  11. Aggregation in complex triacylglycerol oils: coarse-grained models, nanophase separation, and predicted x-ray intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Bonnie; Peyronel, Fernanda; Gordon, Tyler; Marangoni, Alejandro; Hanna, Charles B.; Pink, David A.

    2014-11-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) are biologically important molecules which form crystalline nanoplatelets (CNPs) and, ultimately, fat crystal networks in edible oils. Characterizing the self-assembled hierarchies of these networks is important to understanding their functionality and oil binding capacity. We have modelled CNPs in multicomponent oils and studied their aggregation. The oil comprises (a) a liquid componentt, and (b) components which phase separately on a nano-scale (nano-phase separation) to coat the surfaces of the CNPs impenetrably, either isotropically or anisotropically, with either liquid-like coatings or crystallites, forming a coating of thickness Δ. We modelled three cases: (i) liquid-liquid nano-phase separation, (ii) solid-liquid nano-phase separation, with CNPs coated isotropically, and (iii) CNPs coated anisotropically. The models were applied to mixes of tristearin and triolein with fully hydrogenated canola oil, shea butter with high oleic sunflower oil, and cotton seed oil. We performed Monte Carlo simulations, computed structure functions and concluded: (1) three regimes arose: (a) thin coating regime, Δ \\lt 0.0701 u (b) transition regime, 0.0701 u≤slant Δ ≤slant 0.0916 u and (c) thick coating regime, Δ \\gt 0.0916 u . (arbitrary units, u) (2) The thin coating regime exhibits 1D TAGwoods, which aggregate, via DLCA/RLCA, into fractal structures which are uniformly distributed in space. (3) In the thick coating regime, for an isotropic coating, TAGwoods are not formed and coated CNPs will not aggregate but will be uniformly distributed in space. For anisotropic coating, TAGwoods can be formed and might form 1D strings but will not form DLCA/RLCA clusters. (4) The regimes are, approximately: thin coating, 0\\lt Δ \\lt 7.0 \\text{nm} transition regime, 7.0\\ltΔ \\lt 9.2 \\text{nm} and thick coating, Δ \\gt 9.2 \\text{nm} (5) The minimum minority TAG concentration required to undergo nano-phase separation is, approximately, 0.29% (thin

  12. Mechanism of fiber assembly: treatment of Aβ peptide aggregation with a coarse-grained united-residue force field.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ana; Liwo, Adam; Browne, Dana; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-12-01

    The growth mechanism of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide fibrils was studied by a physics-based coarse-grained united-residue model and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To identify the mechanism of monomer addition to an Aβ(1-40) fibril, we placed an unstructured monomer at a distance of 20 Å from a fibril template and allowed it to interact freely with the latter. The monomer was not biased towards fibril conformation by either the force field or the MD algorithm. With the use of a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics, a longer timescale was accessible, making it possible to observe how the monomers probe different binding modes during their search for the fibril conformation. Although different assembly pathways were seen, they all follow a dock-lock mechanism with two distinct locking stages, consistent with experimental data on fibril elongation. Whereas these experiments have not been able to characterize the conformations populating the different stages, we have been able to describe these different stages explicitly by following free monomers as they dock onto a fibril template and to adopt the fibril conformation (i.e., we describe fibril elongation step by step at the molecular level). During the first stage of the assembly ("docking"), the monomer tries different conformations. After docking, the monomer is locked into the fibril through two different locking stages. In the first stage, the monomer forms hydrogen bonds with the fibril template along one of the strands in a two-stranded β-hairpin; in the second stage, hydrogen bonds are formed along the second strand, locking the monomer into the fibril structure. The data reveal a free-energy barrier separating the two locking stages. The importance of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the stability of the Aβ fibril structure was examined by carrying out additional canonical MD simulations of oligomers with different numbers of chains (4-16 chains), with the fibril

  13. Coarse grained study of pluronic F127: Comparison with shorter co-polymers in its interaction with lipid bilayers and self-aggregation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, I.; Martini, M. F.; Albano, J. M. R.; Cuestas, M. L.; Mathet, V. L.; Pickholz, M.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to understand the interactions of the poloxamer Pluronic F127, with lipid bilayers and its ability to self-associate in an aqueous environment. Molecular dynamics simulations at the coarse-grain scale were performed to address the behavior of single Pluronic F127 and shorter poloxamers unimers in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline model membranes. According to the initial conditions and the poly-ethylene oxide/poly-propylene oxide composition, in water phase the unimer chain collapses into a coil conformation or adopts an interphacial U-shaped - or membrane spanning - distribution. A combination of poly-propylene oxide length, and the poly-ethylene oxide ability to cover poly-propylene oxide, is determinant for the conformation adopted by the unimer in each phase. Results of the simulations showed molecular evidence of strong interaction between Pluronic F127 and model membranes both in stable U-shaped and span conformations. The knowledge of this interaction could contribute to improve drug permeation. Additionally, we investigated the aggregation of one hundred Pluronic F127 unimers in water forming a micelle-like structure, suitable to be used as drug delivery system models.

  14. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  15. Coarse graining in micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, G; Koch, R H

    2003-05-23

    Numerical solutions of the micromagnetic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations provide valuable information at low temperatures (T), but produce egregious errors at higher T. For example, Curie temperatures are often overestimated by an order of magnitude. We show that these errors result from the use of block or coarse-grained variables, without a concomitant renormalization of the system parameters to account for the block size. Renormalization solves the problem of the Curie-point anomaly and improves the accuracy of more complicated micromagnetic simulations, even at low T. PMID:12785922

  16. The Aerosol Coarse Mode Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Adhikari, N.; Air, D.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the world show an aerosol volume distribution with a significant coarse mode and sometimes a dominant coarse mode. The large coarse mode is usually due to dust, but sea salt aerosol can also play an important role. However, in many field campaigns, the coarse mode tends to be ignored, because it is difficult to measure. This lack of measurements leads directly to a concomitant "lack of analysis" of this mode. Because, coarse mode aerosols can have significant effects on radiative forcing, both in the shortwave and longwave spectrum, the coarse mode -- and these forcings -- should be accounted for in atmospheric models. Forcings based only on fine mode aerosols have the potential to be misleading. In this paper we describe examples of large coarse modes that occur in areas of large aerosol loading (Mexico City, Barnard et al., 2010) as well as small loadings (Sacramento, CA; Kassianov et al., 2012; and Reno, NV). We then demonstrate that: (1) the coarse mode can contribute significantly to radiative forcing, relative to the fine mode, and (2) neglecting the coarse mode may result in poor comparisons between measurements and models. Next we describe -- in general terms -- the limitations of instrumentation to measure the coarse mode. Finally, we suggest a new initiative aimed at examining coarse mode aerosol generation mechanisms; transport and deposition; chemical composition; visible and thermal IR refractive indices; morphology; microphysical behavior when deposited on snow and ice; and specific instrumentation needs. Barnard, J. C., J. D. Fast, G. Paredes-Miranda, W. P. Arnott, and A. Laskin, 2010: Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 7325-7340. Kassianov, E. I., M. S. Pekour, and J. C. Barnard, 2012: Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

  17. Coarse frequency comb interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwider, J.

    2008-08-01

    Real wedge interferometers of the Fizeau-type do not allow for fringes in case of a spectral broad band source - or in short: for white light fringes. Here, the use of a suitable frequency comb source will help to overcome this limitation on the one hand and on the other will offer the capability for enhanced phase sensitivity in high precision measurements of surface deviations. Frequency combs can be produced either by using a pulse train from a fs-laser or by passive filtering of the light emitted by a broad band source as a superlum-diode or a fs-laser. The frequency comb produced by a common fs-laser is extremely fine, i.e., the frequency difference of consecutive peaks is very small or the distance of consecutive pulses of the pulse train might be of the order of 1m. Therefore, the coarse pulse train produced by passive filtering of a broad band source is better adapted to the needs of surface testing interferometers. White light fringes are either applied for the profiling of discontinuous surfaces and/or can serve as an indication for the correct choice of multiplication factors in superposition interferometry. During the last decennium it became more and more clear that spatially incoherent sources provide better measuring accuracy in surface measurements due to the reduced influence of dust diffraction patterns. The advantage of laser illumination can nevertheless be maintained if the laser light is made spatially incoherent through moving scatterers in the light path. Here, we will discuss the application of spatially incoherent broad band light frequency filtered through a Fabry-Perot filter. The main applications are in the following fields: (1) surface profiling applications using two-beam Fizeau interferometers, (2) selection of single cavities out of a series of interlaced cavities, and (3) sensitivity enhancement for multi-beam interferometers for planeness or sphericity measurements. Some of the discussed possibilities will be experimentally

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  19. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF COARSE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As determined in preliminary studies, we expect that coarse particle toxicity will be influenced by a variety of factors including particle components (e.g., crustal material vs. metals vs. biologics), particle concentration, and the differing composition of urban and ru...

  20. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  1. Coarse-graining in peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics that treats discontinuous media, including the evolution of discontinuities due to fracture, on the same mathematical basis as classically smooth media. A recent advance in the linearized peridynamic theory permits the reduction of the number of degrees of freedom modeled within a body. Under equilibrium conditions, this coarse graining method exactly reproduces the internal forces on the coarsened degrees of freedom, including the effect of the omitted material that is no longer explicitly modeled. The method applies to heterogeneous as well as homogeneous media and accounts for defects in the material. The coarse graining procedure can be repeated over and over, resulting in a hierarchically coarsened description that, at each stage, continues to reproduce the exact internal forces present in the original, detailed model. Each coarsening step results in reduced computational cost. This talk will describe the new peridynamic coarsening method and show computational examples.

  2. Continuous coarse ash depressurization system

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang; Vimalchand, Pannalal

    2012-11-13

    A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having coarse solid particles with entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for at least partially depressurizing and cooling the high pressure, high temperature dense phase solids stream having gas entrained therein and a pressure letdown device for further depressurization and separating cooled coarse solid particles from a portion of the entrained gas, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for downstream processing or discharge to a storage silo for future use and/or disposal. There are no moving parts in the flow path of the solids stream in the system.

  3. Impact into Coarse Grained Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Several experimental studies [1,2,3] indicate that differences in the grain size of the target relative to the projectile could influence the cratering process. Impacts into coarse sand grains of size comparable to the projectile show some discrepancies with existing relationships for crater growth [e.g. 4]. Similarly, targets of ne grained, uniform in diameter glass spheres show differences in crater depth, transient crater diameter, and volume of ejecta excavated as a function of grain size [2,3]. The purpose of this work is to continue investigating how the relative grain size may influence early time coupling between a projectile and target, with implications for subsequent ejecta excavation and crater growth. In previous efforts we used numerical techniques to focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media emphasizing the influence of relative grain size on crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, target strength, and crater shape [5,6,7]. In this study, we use experimental techniques - in part as a reality check for the numerical studies - to report on how coarse grained targets might influence ejecta excavation and crater shape. This body of work possesses important implications for ejecta excavation and cratering efficiency on asteroids that may possess rubble pile-like structures, and on planets that may possess either pre-fractured surfaces or large-scale heterogeneities in shock impedance.

  4. How coarse is too coarse for salmon spawning substrates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, J. K.; Riebe, C. S.; Ligon, F. K.; Overstreet, B. T.

    2009-12-01

    Populations of Pacific salmon species have declined sharply in many rivers of the western US. Reversing these declines is a top priority and expense of many river restoration projects. To help restore salmon populations, managers often inject gravel into rivers, to supplement spawning habitat that has been depleted by gravel mining and the effects of dams—which block sediment and thus impair habitat downstream by coarsening the bed where salmon historically spawned. However, there is little quantitative understanding nor a methodology for determining when a river bed has become too coarse for salmon spawning. Hence there is little scientific basis for selecting sites that would optimize the restoration benefits of gravel injection (e.g., sites where flow velocities are suitable but bed materials are too coarse for spawning). To develop a quantitative understanding of what makes river beds too coarse for salmon spawning, we studied redds and spawning use in a series of California and Washington rivers where salmon spawning ability appears to be affected by coarse bed material. Our working hypothesis is that for a given flow condition, there is a maximum “threshold” particle size that a salmon of a given size is able to excavate and/or move as she builds her redd. A second, related hypothesis is that spawning use should decrease and eventually become impossible with increasing percent coverage by immovable particles. To test these hypotheses, we quantified the sizes and spatial distributions of immovably coarse particles in a series of salmon redds in each river during the peak of spawning. We also quantified spawning use and how it relates to percent coverage by immovable particles. Results from our studies of fall-run chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha) in the Feather River suggest that immovable particle size varies as a function of flow velocity over the redd, implying that faster water helps fish move bigger particles. Our Feather River study also

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  7. Coarse Layering at 'Home Plate'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image shows coarse-grained layers from around the edge of a low plateau called 'Home Plate' inside Mars' Gusev Crater. One possible origin is material falling to the ground after being thrown aloft by an explosion such as a volcanic eruption or meteorite impact.

    The panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired the exposures for this image on Spirit's 749th Martian day (Feb. 10, 2006). This view is an approximately true-color rendering mathematically generated from separate images taken through all of the left Pancam's 432-nanometer to 753-nanometer filters.

  8. Coarse-graining the structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rojas, J; Calvo, F; Wales, D J

    2016-05-18

    Clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are essential components of soot and may concentrate a significant fraction of carbon matter in the interstellar medium. In this contribution, coarse-grained potentials are parameterized using all-atom reference data to model PAH molecules, such as coronene (C24H12) or circumcoronene (C54H18), and their aggregates. Low-energy structures of pure coronene or circumcoronene clusters obtained using basin-hopping global optimization are found to agree with atomistic results, and consist of finite 1D columnar motifs, sometimes juxtaposed in larger clusters. The structures are only weakly perturbed when quadrupolar interactions are included. π-Stacking also dominates in binary coronene/circumcoronene aggregates, although intriguing motifs are predicted in which one or more molecules are sandwiched between the other PAH species. The coarse-grained model is also extended to account for interaction with a flat graphitic substrate. In this case, binding is stronger with the substrate than with other molecules, and the PAHs are predicted to arrange into a flat triangular monolayer. PMID:27055581

  9. Coarse-graining stiff bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, P.; de la Torre, J. A.; Ferrario, M.; Ciccotti, G.

    2011-11-01

    The method of constraints in molecular dynamics is useful because it avoids the resolution of high frequency motions with very small time steps. However, the price to pay is that both the dynamics and the statistics of a constrained system differ from those of the unconstrained one. Instead of using constraints, we propose to dispose of high frequency motions by a coarse-graining procedure in which fast variables are eliminated. These fast variables are thus modeled as friction and thermal fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology with a simple model case, a diatomic molecule in a monoatomic solvent, in which the bond between the atoms of a diatomic molecule is stiff. Although the example is very simple and does not display the interesting effects of "wrong" statistics of the constrained system (i.e. the well-known issue connected to the Fixman potential), it is well suited to give the proof of concept of the whole procedure.

  10. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  11. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  12. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  13. FAST FLOW IN UNSATURATED COARSE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research proposal was developed to improve our understanding of the physics of unsaturated flow in coarse- to very coarse-textured sediments, and through this meet practical needs related to contaminant transport in such vadose environments. This is a critical area for impr...

  14. Mesoscale Simulation of Asphaltene Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-08-18

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction with a propensity to aggregate and precipitate out of solution during petroleum processing. Aggregation is thought to proceed according to the Yen-Mullins hierarchy, but the molecular mechanisms underlying mesoscopic assembly remain poorly understood. By combining coarse-grained molecular models parametrized using all-atom data with high-performance GPU hardware, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microsecond time scales. Our simulations reveal a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with the Yen-Mullins model, but the details are sensitive and depend on asphaltene chemistry and environment. At low concentrations asphaltenes exist predominantly as dispersed monomers. Upon increasing concentration, we first observe parallel stacking into 1D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates associated by offset, T-shaped, and edge-edge stacking. Asphaltenes possessing long aliphatic side chains cannot form nanoaggregate clusters due to steric repulsions between their aliphatic coronae. At very high concentrations, we observe a porous percolating network of rod-like nanoaggregates suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains with a fractal dimension of ∼2. The lifetime of the rod-like aggregates is described by an exponential distribution reflecting a dynamic equilibrium between coagulation and fragmentation. PMID:27455391

  15. Microcanonical thermostatistics of coarse-grained proteins with amyloidogenic propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.; Rizzi, Leandro G.; Alves, Nelson A.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fibrillar aggregates seems to be a common characteristic of polypeptide chains, although the observation of these aggregates may depend on appropriate experimental conditions. Partially folded intermediates seem to have an important role in the generation of protein aggregates, and a mechanism for this fibril formation considers that these intermediates also correspond to metastable states with respect to the fibrillar ones. Here, using a coarse-grained (CG) off-lattice model, we carry out a comparative analysis of the thermodynamic aspects characterizing the folding transition with respect to the propensity for aggregation of four different systems: two isoforms of the amyloid β-protein, the Src SH3 domain, and the human prion proteins (hPrP). Microcanonical analysis of the data obtained from replica exchange method is conducted to evaluate the free-energy barrier and latent heat in these models. The simulations of the amyloid β isoforms and Src SH3 domain indicated that the folding process described by this CG model is related to a negative specific heat, a phenomenon that can only be verified in the microcanonical ensemble in first-order phase transitions. The CG simulation of the hPrP heteropolymer yielded a continuous folding transition. The absence of a free-energy barrier and latent heat favors the presence of partially unfolded conformations, and in this context, this thermodynamic aspect could explain the reason why the hPrP heteropolymer is more aggregation-prone than the other heteropolymers considered in this study. We introduced the hydrophobic radius of gyration as an order parameter and found that it can be used to obtain reliable information about the hydrophobic packing and the transition temperatures in the folding process.

  16. Microcanonical thermostatistics of coarse-grained proteins with amyloidogenic propensity.

    PubMed

    Frigori, Rafael B; Rizzi, Leandro G; Alves, Nelson A

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fibrillar aggregates seems to be a common characteristic of polypeptide chains, although the observation of these aggregates may depend on appropriate experimental conditions. Partially folded intermediates seem to have an important role in the generation of protein aggregates, and a mechanism for this fibril formation considers that these intermediates also correspond to metastable states with respect to the fibrillar ones. Here, using a coarse-grained (CG) off-lattice model, we carry out a comparative analysis of the thermodynamic aspects characterizing the folding transition with respect to the propensity for aggregation of four different systems: two isoforms of the amyloid β-protein, the Src SH3 domain, and the human prion proteins (hPrP). Microcanonical analysis of the data obtained from replica exchange method is conducted to evaluate the free-energy barrier and latent heat in these models. The simulations of the amyloid β isoforms and Src SH3 domain indicated that the folding process described by this CG model is related to a negative specific heat, a phenomenon that can only be verified in the microcanonical ensemble in first-order phase transitions. The CG simulation of the hPrP heteropolymer yielded a continuous folding transition. The absence of a free-energy barrier and latent heat favors the presence of partially unfolded conformations, and in this context, this thermodynamic aspect could explain the reason why the hPrP heteropolymer is more aggregation-prone than the other heteropolymers considered in this study. We introduced the hydrophobic radius of gyration as an order parameter and found that it can be used to obtain reliable information about the hydrophobic packing and the transition temperatures in the folding process. PMID:23298062

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  18. Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Protein-Lipid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Spijker, Peter; van Hoof, Bram; Debertrand, Michel; Markvoort, Albert J.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hilbers, Peter A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many biological cellular processes occur at the micro- or millisecond time scale. With traditional all-atom molecular modeling techniques it is difficult to investigate the dynamics of long time scales or large systems, such as protein aggregation or activation. Coarse graining (CG) can be used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in such a system, and reduce the computational complexity. In this paper the first version of a coarse grained model for transmembrane proteins is presented. This model differs from other coarse grained protein models due to the introduction of a novel angle potential as well as a hydrogen bonding potential. These new potentials are used to stabilize the backbone. The model has been validated by investigating the adaptation of the hydrophobic mismatch induced by the insertion of WALP-peptides into a lipid membrane, showing that the first step in the adaptation is an increase in the membrane thickness, followed by a tilting of the peptide. PMID:20640160

  19. Biomembranes in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-08-01

    The architecture of biological membranes is tightly coupled to the localization, organization, and function of membrane proteins. The organelle-specific distribution of lipids allows for the formation of functional microdomains (also called rafts) that facilitate the segregation and aggregation of membrane proteins and thus shape their function. Molecular dynamics simulations enable to directly access the formation, structure, and dynamics of membrane microdomains at the molecular scale and the specific interactions among lipids and proteins on timescales from picoseconds to microseconds. This review focuses on the latest developments of biomembrane force fields for both atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the different levels of coarsening of biomolecular structures. It also briefly introduces scale-bridging methods applicable to biomembrane studies, and highlights selected recent applications.

  20. Coarse-graining methods for computational biology.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Marissa G; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Connecting the molecular world to biology requires understanding how molecular-scale dynamics propagate upward in scale to define the function of biological structures. To address this challenge, multiscale approaches, including coarse-graining methods, become necessary. We discuss here the theoretical underpinnings and history of coarse-graining and summarize the state of the field, organizing key methodologies based on an emerging paradigm for multiscale theory and modeling of biomolecular systems. This framework involves an integrated, iterative approach to couple information from different scales. The primary steps, which coincide with key areas of method development, include developing first-pass coarse-grained models guided by experimental results, performing numerous large-scale coarse-grained simulations, identifying important interactions that drive emergent behaviors, and finally reconnecting to the molecular scale by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations guided by the coarse-grained results. The coarse-grained modeling can then be extended and refined, with the entire loop repeated iteratively if necessary. PMID:23451897

  1. Thermodynamically Consistent Coarse-Graining of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenza, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of macromolecular liquids, melts and mixtures, bridge an extensive range of length- and time-scales. For these systems, the computational limitations of the atomistic description prevent the study of the properties of interest and coarse-grained models remain the only viable approach. In coarse-grained models, structural and thermodynamic consistency across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. This talk presents a coarse-graining approach that conserves structural and thermodynamic quantities independent of the extent of coarse-graining, and describes a model for the reconstruction of the dynamics measured in mesoscale simulations of the coarse-grained system. Some of the general challenges of preserving structural and thermodynamic consistency in coarse-grained models are discussed together with the conditions by which the problem is lessened. This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE-1362500.

  2. A technique for estimating spatial sampling errors in coarse-scale soil moisture estimates derived from point-scale observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The validation of satellite surface soil moisture retrievals requires the spatial aggregation of point-scale ground soil moisture measurements up to coarse resolution satellite footprint scales (>10 km). In regions containing a limited number of ground measurements per satellite footprint, a large c...

  3. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases. PMID:26989481

  4. Calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomic systems: application to semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Kathryn; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2014-07-01

    Coarse-grained models of atomic systems, created by aggregating groups of atoms into molecules to reduce the number of degrees of freedom, have been used for decades in important scientific and technological applications. In recent years, interest in developing a more rigorous theory for coarse graining and in assessing the predictivity of coarse-grained models has arisen. In this work, Bayesian methods for the calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are developed. For specificity, only configurational models of systems in canonical ensembles are considered. Among major challenges in validating coarse-grained models are (1) the development of validation processes that lead to information essential in establishing confidence in the model's ability predict key quantities of interest and (2), above all, the determination of the coarse-grained model itself; that is, the characterization of the molecular architecture, the choice of interaction potentials and thus parameters, which best fit available data. The all-atom model is treated as the "ground truth," and it provides the basis with respect to which properties of the coarse-grained model are compared. This base all-atom model is characterized by an appropriate statistical mechanics framework in this work by canonical ensembles involving only configurational energies. The all-atom model thus supplies data for Bayesian calibration and validation methods for the molecular model. To address the first challenge, we develop priors based on the maximum entropy principle and likelihood functions based on Gaussian approximations of the uncertainties in the parameter-to-observation error. To address challenge (2), we introduce the notion of model plausibilities as a means for model selection. This methodology provides a powerful approach toward constructing coarse-grained models which are most plausible for given all-atom data. We demonstrate the theory and

  5. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  6. Quasiclassical coarse graining and thermodynamic entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    2007-08-15

    Our everyday descriptions of the universe are highly coarse grained, following only a tiny fraction of the variables necessary for a perfectly fine-grained description. Coarse graining in classical physics is made natural by our limited powers of observation and computation. But in the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems, some measure of coarse graining is inescapable because there are no nontrivial, probabilistic, fine-grained descriptions. This essay explores the consequences of that fact. Quantum theory allows for various coarse-grained descriptions, some of which are mutually incompatible. For most purposes, however, we are interested in the small subset of 'quasiclassical descriptions' defined by ranges of values of averages over small volumes of densities of conserved quantities such as energy and momentum and approximately conserved quantities such as baryon number. The near-conservation of these quasiclassical quantities results in approximate decoherence, predictability, and local equilibrium, leading to closed sets of equations of motion. In any description, information is sacrificed through the coarse graining that yields decoherence and gives rise to probabilities for histories. In quasiclassical descriptions, further information is sacrificed in exhibiting the emergent regularities summarized by classical equations of motion. An appropriate entropy measures the loss of information. For a 'quasiclassical realm' this is connected with the usual thermodynamic entropy as obtained from statistical mechanics. It was low for the initial state of our universe and has been increasing since.

  7. Fractal dimension and mechanism of aggregation of apple juice particles.

    PubMed

    Benítez, E I; Lozano, J E; Genovese, D B

    2010-04-01

    Turbidity of freshly squeezed apple juice is produced by a polydisperse suspension of particles coming from the cellular tissue. After precipitation of coarse particles by gravity, only fine-colloidal particles remain in suspension. Aggregation of colloidal particles leads to the formation of fractal structures. The fractal dimension is a measure of the internal density of these aggregates and depends on their mechanism of aggregation. Digitized images of primary particles and aggregates of depectinized, diafiltered cloudy apple juice were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Average radius of the primary particles was found to be a = 40 ± 11 nm. Maximum radius of the aggregates, R(L), ranged between 250 and 7750 nm. Fractal dimension of the aggregates was determined by analyzing SEM images with the variogram method, obtaining an average value of D(f) = 2.3 ± 0.1. This value is typical of aggregates formed by rapid flocculation or diffusion limited aggregation. Diafiltration process was found to reduce the average size and polydispersity of the aggregates, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. Average gyration radius of the aggregates before juice diafiltration was found to be R(g) = 629 ± 87 nm. Average number of primary particles per aggregate was calculated to be N = 1174. PMID:21339133

  8. Influence of pH and sequence in peptide aggregation via molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Enciso, Marta; Schütte, Christof; Delle Site, Luigi

    2015-12-28

    We employ a recently developed coarse-grained model for peptides and proteins where the effect of pH is automatically included. We explore the effect of pH in the aggregation process of the amyloidogenic peptide KTVIIE and two related sequences, using three different pH environments. Simulations using large systems (24 peptides chains per box) allow us to describe the formation of realistic peptide aggregates. We evaluate the thermodynamic and kinetic implications of changes in sequence and pH upon peptide aggregation, and we discuss how a minimalistic coarse-grained model can account for these details.

  9. VERIFICATION OF 3-PHASES COMPOSITE MODEL FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE OF CONCRETE WITH DEFFERENT AGGREGATE PROPERTIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kie; Shima, Hiroshi

    Properties of aggregate are not taken into account in current codes for drying shrinkage of concrete although the drying shrinkage is affected by the properties of aggregate. Aggregate restrains cement paste from shrinkage so that the drying shrinkage of concrete is controlled by drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate itself. The effect of the aggregate properties on drying shrinkage of concrete can be calculated by composite model in which concrete consists of cement paste and aggregate. Several different kind of coarse aggregate were used in order to verify a 3-phases composite model for drying shrinkage. Drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of cement paste, aggregate and concrete were measured. It was verified that drying shrinkage of concrete can be estimated accurately by the composite model associating with both drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate.

  10. Interplay between the hydrophobic effect and dipole interactions in peptide aggregation at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Sai J; Matysiak, Silvina

    2016-01-28

    Protein misfolding is an intrinsic property of polypeptides, and misfolded conformations have a propensity to aggregate. In the past decade, the development of various coarse-grained models for proteins has provided key insights into the driving forces in folding and aggregation. We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model (WEPPROM) by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads. With this model, we were able to achieve significant α/β secondary structure content, without any added bias. We now extend the model to study peptide aggregation at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces and draw comparisons to aggregation in explicit water solvent. Elastin-like octapeptides (GV)4 are used as a model system for this study. A condensation-ordering mechanism of aggregation is observed in water. Our results suggest that backbone interpeptide dipolar interactions, not hydrophobicity, plays a more significant role in fibril-like peptide aggregation. We observe a cooperative effect in hydrogen bonding or dipolar interactions, with an increase in aggregate size in water and at interfaces. Based on this cooperative effect, we provide a potential explanation for the observed nucleus size in peptide aggregation pathways. The presence of a hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface increases both (a) order of aggregates formed, and (b) rate of the aggregation process. Without dipolar particles, peptide aggregation is not observed at the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface. Thus, the presence of dipoles, not hydrophobicity, plays a key role in aggregation observed at hydrophobic interfaces. PMID:26698374

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  12. Mesoscale simulation of asphaltene aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction that can aggregate and precipitate out of solution. Association is thought to proceed hierarchically according to the Yen-Mullins model, but the molecular mechanisms and pathways remain poorly understood. In this study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microseconds using the coarse-grained Martini force field. We identified a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with Yen-Mullins model, but the details of which are strongly dependent on asphaltene molecular structure. Monomeric asphaltenes first self-assemble into 1-D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates. At high concentrations, asphaltenes with short aliphatic side chains assemble into a percolating network with the binding of 1-D rods. Conversely, molecules with more and longer side chains cannot efficiently stack, producing a fractal network of 1-D rods suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains. Our results provide the first molecularly-detailed validation of the full Yen-Mullins hierarchy, and are in good agreement with recent computational and experimental studies. ACS Petroleum Research Fund.

  13. Unconstrained Structure Formation in Coarse-Grained Protein Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan

    The ability of proteins to fold into well-defined structures forms the basis of a wide variety of biochemical functions in and out of the cell membrane. Many of these processes, however, operate at time- and length-scales that are currently unattainable by all-atom computer simulations. To cope with this difficulty, increasingly more accurate and sophisticated coarse-grained models are currently being developed. In the present thesis, we introduce a solvent-free coarse-grained model for proteins. Proteins are modeled by four beads per amino acid, providing enough backbone resolution to allow for accurate sampling of local conformations. It relies on simple interactions that emphasize structure, such as hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity. Realistic alpha/beta content is achieved by including an effective nearest-neighbor dipolar interaction. Parameters are tuned to reproduce both local conformations and tertiary structures. By studying both helical and extended conformations we make sure the force field is not biased towards any particular secondary structure. Without any further adjustments or bias a realistic oligopeptide aggregation scenario is observed. The model is subsequently applied to various biophysical problems: (i) kinetics of folding of two model peptides, (ii) large-scale amyloid-beta oligomerization, and (iii) protein folding cooperativity. The last topic---defined by the nature of the finite-size thermodynamic transition exhibited upon folding---was investigated from a microcanonical perspective: the accurate evaluation of the density of states can unambiguously characterize the nature of the transition, unlike its corresponding canonical analysis. Extending the results of lattice simulations and theoretical models, we find that it is the interplay between secondary structure and the loss of non-native tertiary contacts which determines the nature of the transition. Finally, we combine the peptide model with a high-resolution, solvent-free, lipid

  14. Insights into DNA-mediated interparticle interactions from a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yajun; Mittal, Jeetain

    2014-11-14

    DNA-functionalized particles have great potential for the design of complex self-assembled materials. The major hurdle in realizing crystal structures from DNA-functionalized particles is expected to be kinetic barriers that trap the system in metastable amorphous states. Therefore, it is vital to explore the molecular details of particle assembly processes in order to understand the underlying mechanisms. Molecular simulations based on coarse-grained models can provide a convenient route to explore these details. Most of the currently available coarse-grained models of DNA-functionalized particles ignore key chemical and structural details of DNA behavior. These models therefore are limited in scope for studying experimental phenomena. In this paper, we present a new coarse-grained model of DNA-functionalized particles which incorporates some of the desired features of DNA behavior. The coarse-grained DNA model used here provides explicit DNA representation (at the nucleotide level) and complementary interactions between Watson-Crick base pairs, which lead to the formation of single-stranded hairpin and double-stranded DNA. Aggregation between multiple complementary strands is also prevented in our model. We study interactions between two DNA-functionalized particles as a function of DNA grafting density, lengths of the hybridizing and non-hybridizing parts of DNA, and temperature. The calculated free energies as a function of pair distance between particles qualitatively resemble experimental measurements of DNA-mediated pair interactions. PMID:25399156

  15. Determination of the dynamic elastic constants of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, construction and demolition waste constitutes a major portion of the total solid waste production in the world. Due to both environmental and economical reasons, an increasing interest concerning the use of recycled aggregate to replace aggregate from natural sources is generated. This paper presents an investigation on the properties of recycled aggregate concrete. Concrete mixes are prepared using recycled aggregates at a substitution level between 0 and 100% of the total coarse aggregate. The influence of this replacement on strengthened concrete's properties is being investigated. The properties estimated are: density and dynamic modulus of elasticity at the age of both 7 and 28 days. Also, flexural strength of 28 days specimens is estimated. The determination of the dynamic elastic modulus was made using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method. The results reveal that the existence of recycled aggregates affects the properties of concrete negatively; however, in low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates is almost negligible. Concluding, the controlled use of recycled aggregates in concrete production may help solve a vital environmental issue apart from being a solution to the problem of inadequate concrete aggregates.

  16. A closed-loop life cycle assessment of recycled aggregate concrete utilization in China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Xiao, Jianzhuang; Tam, Vivian W Y

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies the potential environmental impact of recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) for concrete production in China. According to the cradle-to-cradle theory, a closed-loop life cycle assessment (LCA) on recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) utilization in China with entire local life cycle inventory (LCI) is performed, regarding the environmental influence of cement content, aggregate production, transportation and waste landfilling. Special attention is paid on the primary resource and energy conservation, as well as climate protection induced by RAC applications. Environmental impact between natural aggregate concrete (NAC) and RAC are also compared. It is shown that cement proportion and transportation are the top two contributors for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy consumption for both NAC and RAC. Sensitivity analysis also proves that long delivery distances for natural coarse aggregate (NCA) leave a possible opportunity for lowering environmental impact of RAC in China. PMID:27297045

  17. Investigations on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Recycled Aggregate Self Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, P.; Selvi, R. S.; Velin, S. S.

    2013-09-01

    In the recent years, construction and demolition waste management issues have attracted the attention from researchers around the world. In the present study, the potential usage of recycled aggregate obtained from crushed demolition waste for making self compacting concrete (SCC) was researched. The barriers in promoting the use of recycled material in new construction are also discussed. In addition, the results of an experimental study involving the use of recycled concrete aggregate as coarse aggregates for producing self-compacting concrete to study their flow and strength characteristics are also presented. Five series of mixture were prepared with 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % coarse recycled aggregate adopting Nan Su's mix proportioning method. The fresh concrete properties were evaluated through the slump flow, J-ring and V-funnel tests. Compressive and tensile strengths were also determined. The results obtained showed that SCC could be successfully developed by incorporating recycled aggregates.

  18. Coarse-graining Landau-Lifshitz damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuebing; Visscher, P. B.

    2001-06-01

    High speed switching in magnetic materials is usually studied with the Landau-Lifshitz (LL) equation, which describes damping through a phenomenological coefficient. The results of micromagnetic calculations based on the LL equation have been observed to depend strongly on the cell size. We take a coarse-graining or renormalization-group approach to this cell size dependence: from a simulation using cell size L, we look at the dynamics of a cell of size 2L and determine an effective damping coefficient that describes the larger-scale dynamics. This can be thought of as a Green-Kubo calculation of the effective damping coefficient. In principle, this makes it possible to coarse grain from the atomic scale to determine the micromagnetic damping coefficient.

  19. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  20. On the evolution of coarse categories.

    PubMed

    Mengel, Friederike

    2012-08-21

    We compare the evolutionary fitness of different cultures (or populations), where we think of culture as partitioning a set of decision situations into categories of situations treated the same. Information about optimal behavior in each category is passed on via a process of noisy cultural transmission. We show that coarse partitions (distinguishing less situations) can provide higher evolutionary fitness even if there are no explicit costs to holding finer partitions. PMID:22659044

  1. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  2. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  3. Critical time scale of coarse-graining entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jang-il

    2016-04-01

    We study coarse-grained entropy production in an asymmetric random walk system on a periodic one-dimensional lattice. In coarse-grained systems, the original dynamics are unavoidably destroyed, but the coarse-grained entropy production is not hidden below the critical time-scale separation. The hidden entropy production is rapidly increasing near the critical time-scale separation.

  4. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  5. Coarse grained open system quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Thanopulos, Ioannis; Brumer, Paul; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-11-21

    We show that the quantum dynamics of a system comprised of a subspace Q coupled to a larger subspace P can be recast as a reduced set of 'coarse grained' ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. These equations can be solved by a single diagonalization of a general complex matrix. The method makes no assumptions about the strength of the couplings between the Q and the P subspaces, nor is there any limitation on the initial population in P. The utility of the method is demonstrated via computations in three following areas: molecular compounds, photonic materials, and condensed phases.

  6. Coarse-grained modelling of surface nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfils, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscale gaseous objects that form on hydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. Understanding nanobubble formation and stability remains challenging due to the lack of appropriate theoretical framework and adequate modelling. Here we present a non-equilibrium coarse-grained model for nanobubbles at hydrophobic surfaces. The model is based on a lattice-gas model that has been proposed to understand the hydrophobic effect to which dynamical properties are added. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the model to reproduce the basic features of stable surface nanobubbles, which, thereby, supports the dynamical origin of these objects.

  7. A Coarse Pointing Assembly for Optical Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szekely, G.; Blum, D.; Humphries, M.; Koller, A.; Mussett, D.; Schuler, S.; Vogt, P.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a contract with the European Space Agency, RUAG Space are developing a Coarse Pointing Assembly for an Optical Communication Terminal with the goal to enable high-bandwidth data exchange between GEO and/or LEO satellites as well as to earth-bound ground stations. This paper describes some development and testing aspects of such a high precision opto-mechanical device, with emphasis on the influence of requirements on the final design, the usage of a Bearing Active Preload System, some of the lessons learned on the BAPS implementation, the selection of a flex print design as rotary harness and some aspects of functional and environmental testing.

  8. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  9. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  10. Effects of maximum aggregate size on UPV of brick aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Tarek Uddin; Mahmood, Aziz Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Investigation was carried out to study the effects of maximum aggregate size (MAS) (12.5mm, 19.0mm, 25.0mm, 37.5mm, and 50.0mm) on ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of concrete. For investigation, first class bricks were collected and broken to make coarse aggregate. The aggregates were tested for specific gravity, absorption capacity, unit weight, and abrasion resistance. Cylindrical concrete specimens were made with different sand to aggregate volume ratio (s/a) (0.40 and 0.45), W/C ratio (0.45, 0.50, and 0.55), and cement content (375kg/m(3) and 400kg/m(3)). The specimens were tested for compressive strength and Young's modulus. UPV through wet specimen was measured using Portable Ultrasonic Non-destructive Digital Indicating Tester (PUNDIT). Results indicate that the pulse velocity through concrete increases with an increase in MAS. Relationships between UPV and compressive strength; and UPV and Young's modulus of concrete are proposed for different maximum sizes of brick aggregate. PMID:27085110

  11. Temporal stability of a coarse sediment community in the Central Eastern English Channel Paleovalleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozach, Sophie; Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2012-07-01

    The natural variation of the benthic community of eastern Channel paleovalleys was investigated over a four-year period in the context of an aggregate extraction licence for the French side of the English Channel. Six surveys were conducted: twice a year (mid-April: pre-recruitment and the end of August: post-recruitment) in 2007, 2009 and 2010. The area showed similar features of community structural parameters, to other coarse sediment areas in the eastern English Channel. This area also presented an outstanding constancy over time. The baseline obtained allows the identification of cause-effect relationships between the impact of aggregate dredging and environmental changes and also highlights the consequences of dredging on key ecological attributes. The long-term biological recovery rate will thereby be easier to assess. The use of this baseline is discussed in terms of implications for future management of the study area.

  12. Protein Simulations in Fluids: Coupling the OPEP Coarse-Grained Force Field with Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-04-14

    A novel simulation framework that integrates the OPEP coarse-grained (CG) model for proteins with the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methodology to account for the fluid solvent at mesoscale level is presented. OPEP is a very efficient, water-free and electrostatic-free force field that reproduces at quasi-atomistic detail processes like peptide folding, structural rearrangements, and aggregation dynamics. The LB method is based on the kinetic description of the solvent in order to solve the fluid mechanics under a wide range of conditions, with the further advantage of being highly scalable on parallel architectures. The capabilities of the approach are presented, and it is shown that the strategy is effective in exploring the role of hydrodynamics on protein relaxation and peptide aggregation. The end result is a strategy for modeling systems of thousands of proteins, such as in the case of dense protein suspensions. The future perspectives of the multiscale approach are also discussed. PMID:26574390

  13. Compressive strength and resistance to chloride ion penetration and carbonation of recycled aggregate concrete with varying amount of fly ash and fine recycled aggregate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jongsung; Park, Cheolwoo

    2011-11-01

    Construction and demolition waste has been dramatically increased in the last decade, and social and environmental concerns on the recycling have consequently been increased. Recent technology has greatly improved the recycling process for waste concrete. This study investigates the fundamental characteristics of concrete using recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for its application to structural concrete members. The specimens used 100% coarse RCA, various replacement levels of natural aggregate with fine RCA, and several levels of fly ash addition. Compressive strength of mortar and concrete which used RCA gradually decreased as the amount of the recycled materials increased. Regardless of curing conditions and fly ash addition, the 28 days strength of the recycled aggregate concrete was greater than the design strength, 40 MPa, with a complete replacement of coarse aggregate and a replacement level of natural fine aggregate by fine RCA up to 60%. The recycled aggregate concrete achieved sufficient resistance to the chloride ion penetration. The measured carbonation depth did not indicate a clear relationship to the fine RCA replacement ratio but the recycled aggregate concrete could also attain adequate carbonation resistance. Based on the results from the experimental investigations, it is believed that the recycled aggregate concrete can be successfully applied to structural concrete members. PMID:21784626

  14. Coarse-Grain Modeling of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical and thermal loading of energetic materials can incite responses over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales due to inherent nano- and microscale features. Many energy transfer processes within these materials are atomistically governed, yet the material response is manifested at the micro- and mesoscale. The existing state-of-the-art computational methods include continuum level approaches that rely on idealized field-based formulations that are empirically based. Our goal is to bridge the spatial and temporal modeling regimes while ensuring multiscale consistency. However, significant technical challenges exist, including that the multiscale methods linking the atomistic and microscales for molecular crystals are immature or nonexistent. To begin addressing these challenges, we have implemented a bottom-up approach for deriving microscale coarse-grain models directly from quantum mechanics-derived atomistic models. In this talk, a suite of computational tools is described for particle-based microscale simulations of the nonequilibrium response of energetic solids. Our approach builds upon recent advances both in generating coarse-grain models under high strains and in developing a variant of dissipative particle dynamics that includes chemical reactions.

  15. Coarse-grained distributions and superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2006-01-01

    We show an interesting connection between non-standard (non-Boltzmannian) distribution functions arising in the theory of violent relaxation for collisionless stellar systems [D. Lynden-Bell, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 136 (1967) 101.] and the notion of superstatistics recently introduced by [Beck and Cohen Physica A 322 (2003) 267]. The common link between these two theories is the emergence of coarse-grained distributions arising out of fine-grained distributions. The coarse-grained distribution functions are written as a superposition of Boltzmann factors weighted by a non-universal function. Even more general distributions can arise in case of incomplete violent relaxation (non-ergodicity). They are stable stationary solutions of the Vlasov equation. We also discuss analogies and differences between the statistical equilibrium state of a multi-components self-gravitating system and the metaequilibrium (or quasi-equilibrium) states of a collisionless stellar system. Finally, we stress the important distinction between entropies, generalized entropies, relative entropies and H-functions. We discuss applications of these ideas in two-dimensional turbulence and for other systems with long-range interactions.

  16. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Pim W J M; Ulijn, Rein V; Hunt, Neil T; Tuttle, Tell

    2011-10-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  17. Virtual Screening for Dipeptide Aggregation: Toward Predictive Tools for Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Several short peptide sequences are known to self-assemble into supramolecular nanostructures with interesting properties. In this study, coarse-grained molecular dynamics is employed to rapidly screen all 400 dipeptide combinations and predict their ability to aggregate as a potential precursor to their self-assembly. The simulation protocol and scoring method proposed allows a rapid determination of whether a given peptide sequence is likely to aggregate (an indicator for the ability to self-assemble) under aqueous conditions. Systems that show strong aggregation tendencies in the initial screening are selected for longer simulations, which result in good agreement with the known self-assembly or aggregation of dipeptides reported in the literature. Our extended simulations of the diphenylalanine system show that the coarse-grain model is able to reproduce salient features of nanoscale systems and provide insight into the self-assembly process for this system. PMID:23795243

  18. Organic carbon, water repellency and soil stability to slaking at aggregate and intra-aggregate scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán López, Antonio; García-Moreno, Jorge; Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Cerdà, Artemi; Alanís, Nancy; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    intensity of WR in aggregates of different sizes. [ii] the intra-aggregate distribution of OC and the intensity of WR and [iii] the structural stability of soil aggregates relative to the OC content and the intensity of WR in soils under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different treatments (conventional tilling and mulching). Soil samples were collected from an experimental area (Luvic Calcisols and Calcic Luvisols) in the province of Sevilla (Southern Spain) under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different management types (conventional tillage with moldboard plow) and mulching (no-tilling and addition of wheat residues at rates varying between 5 and 8 Mg/ha/year). At each sampling site, soil blocks (50 cm long × 50 cm wide × 10 cm deep) were carefully collected to avoid disturbance of aggregates as much as possible and transported to the laboratory. At field moist condition, undisturbed soil aggregates were separated by hand. In order to avoid possible interferences due to disturbance by handling, aggregates broken during this process were discarded. Individual aggregates were arranged in paper trays and air-dried during 7 days under laboratory standard conditions. After air-drying, part of each sample was carefully divided for different analyses: [i] part of the original samples was sieved (2 mm) to eliminate coarse soil particles and homogenized for characterization of OC and N contents, C/N ratio and texture; [ii] part of the aggregates were dry-sieved (0.25-0.5, 0.5-1 and 1-2 mm) or measured with a caliper (2-5, 5-10 and 10-15 mm) and separated in different sieve-size classes for determination of WR and OC content; [iii] aggregates 10-15 mm in size were selected for obtaining aggregate layers using a soil aggregate erosion (SAE) apparatus and WR and OC content were determined at each layer; finally, [iv] in order to study the relation between stability to slaking, WR and OC, these properties were determined in 90 air-dried aggregates

  19. Effect of Coarse Materials Percentage in the Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshameri, B.; Bakar, I.; Madun, A.; Abdeldjouad, L.; Haimi Dahlan, S.

    2016-07-01

    There are several factors that affecting the shear strength and shear strength parameters (i.e. cohesion and friction angle). In this study, the effect of coarse material percentage was tested. Six different mixtures of soils (clay and sand) with different coarse material percentages (i.e. from 80% to 30% of coarse material percentage) were tested via using direct shear test under different moisture content percentage. The results indicated that the shear strength and friction angle were decreased by the increment of the percentage of coarse materials (sand). However, the cohesion results showed unique behavior. The cohesion (at every moisture content values) increased with the increment of the percentage of coarse materials until specific point then it started to decrease with the increment of the percentage of coarse materials.

  20. Aggregate-mediated charge transport in ionomeric electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Keran; Maranas, Janna; Milner, Scott

    Polymers such PEO can conduct ions, and have been studied as possible replacements for organic liquid electrolytes in rechargeable metal-ion batteries. More generally, fast room-temperature ionic conduction has been reported for a variety of materials, from liquids to crystalline solids. Unfortunately, polymer electrolytes generally have limited conductivity; these polymers are too viscous to have fast ion diffusion like liquids, and too unstructured to promote cooperative transport like crystalline solids. Ionomers are polymer electrolytes in which ionic groups are covalently bound to the polymer backbone, neutralized by free counterions. These materials also conduct ions, and can exhibit strong ionic aggregation. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics, we explore the forces driving ionic aggregation, and describe the role ion aggregates have in mediating charge transport. The aggregates are string-like such that ions typically have two neighbors. We find ion aggregates self-assemble like worm-like micelles. Excess charge, or free ions, occasionally coordinate with aggregates and are transported along the chain in a Grotthuss-like mechanism. We propose that controlling ionomer aggregate structure through materials design can enhance cooperative ion transport.

  1. Coarse-grained modeling of DNA curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins occurs over a wide range of length scales, and depends critically on its local structure. In particular, recent experimental work suggests that the intrinsic curvature of DNA plays a significant role on its protein-binding properties. In this work, we present a coarse grained model of DNA that is capable of describing base-pairing, hybridization, major and minor groove widths, and local curvature. The model represents an extension of the recently proposed 3SPN.2 description of DNA [D. M. Hinckley, G. S. Freeman, J. K. Whitmer, and J. J. de Pablo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144903 (2013)], into which sequence-dependent shape and mechanical properties are incorporated. The proposed model is validated against experimental data including melting temperatures, local flexibilities, dsDNA persistence lengths, and minor groove width profiles.

  2. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  3. Comparative environmental assessment of natural and recycled aggregate concrete.

    PubMed

    Marinković, S; Radonjanin, V; Malešev, M; Ignjatović, I

    2010-11-01

    Constant and rapid increase in construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation and consumption of natural aggregate for concrete production became one of the biggest environmental problems in the construction industry. Recycling of C&D waste represents one way to convert a waste product into a resource but the environment benefits through energy consumption, emissions and fallouts reductions are not certain. The main purpose of this study is to determine the potentials of recycled aggregate concrete (concrete made with recycled concrete aggregate) for structural applications and to compare the environmental impact of the production of two types of ready-mixed concrete: natural aggregate concrete (NAC) made entirely with river aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate. Based on the analysis of up-to-date experimental evidence, including own tests results, it is concluded that utilization of RAC for low-to-middle strength structural concrete and non-aggressive exposure conditions is technically feasible. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed for raw material extraction and material production part of the concrete life cycle including transport. Assessment is based on local LCI data and on typical conditions in Serbia. Results of this specific case study show that impacts of aggregate and cement production phases are slightly larger for RAC than for NAC but the total environmental impacts depend on the natural and recycled aggregates transport distances and on transport types. Limit natural aggregate transport distances above which the environmental impacts of RAC can be equal or even lower than the impacts of NAC are calculated for the specific case study. PMID:20434898

  4. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  5. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  6. Effect of β-sheet propensity on peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellesia, Giovanni; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2009-04-01

    The effect of β-sheet propensity on the structural features of peptide aggregates was investigated using an off-lattice coarse-grained peptide model. A phase diagram as a function of temperature and β-sheet propensity reveals a diverse family of supramolecular assemblies. Highly rigid peptides (peptides with high β-sheet propensity) are seen to assemble predominantly into fibrillar structures. Increasing the flexibility of the peptide (reducing β-sheet propensity) leads to a variety of structures, including fibrils, β-barrel structures, and amorphous aggregates. Nonfibrillar entities have been suggested as primary causative agents in amyloid diseases and our simulations indicate that mutations that decrease β-sheet propensity will decrease fibril formation and favor the formation of such toxic oligomers. Parallels between β-sheet aggregates and nematic liquid crystals are discussed.

  7. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  8. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  9. Coarse grained dynamics in the glass phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smessaert, Anton; Rottler, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Atomic scale dynamics in glasses is dominated by extended periods of localized vibration, where the crowded surroundings of a particle act as a cage. Collective motion is necessary to escape the cage, and the succession of particle jumps or hops leads to diffusion. Each jump is an elementary relaxation event since the local structure is stable until a jump occurs. The link between local dynamics and structural properties has become of increasing interest in recent years. Aging of the mechanical response has been tied to a power-law distribution of persistence times in the cages, and concentration of hops into dynamical heterogeneities (DH) was observed in granular media and simulations of supercooled liquids in 2D. These studies were limited to small systems or hop detection in subsets, because of the post processing requirements. We present results based on a new algorithm that allows us to detect the hops of all particles during a molecular dynamics simulation. This complete coarse-grained ``map'' of the dynamics allows us to directly investigate temporal and spatial correlations between relaxation events. Furthermore, we can readily identify DH using a cluster algorithm and we explore the impact of aging and deformation on the size and shape of DH.

  10. Coarse-grained models for biological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhe; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2011-03-01

    The large timescales and length-scales of interest in biophysics preclude atomistic study of many systems and processes. One appealing approach is to use coarse-grained (CG) models where several atoms are grouped into a single CG site. In this work we describe a new CG force field for lipids, surfactants, and amino acids. The topology of CG sites is the same as in the MARTINI force field, but the new model is compatible with a recently developed CG electrostatic water (Big Multiple Water, BMW) model. The model not only gives correct structural, elastic properties and phase behavior for lipid and surfactants, but also reproduces electrostatic properties at water-membrane interface that agree with experiment and atomistic simulations, including the potential of mean force for charged amino acid residuals at membrane. Consequently, the model predicts stable attachment of cationic peptides (i.e., poly-Arg) on lipid bilayer surface, which is not shown in previous models with non-electrostatic water.

  11. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  12. Creep of dry clinopyroxene aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, Misha; Mackwell, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    We have determined diffusional and dislocation creep rheologies for clinopyroxenite Ca1.0Mg0.8Fe0.2Si2O6 under dry conditions by deforming natural and hot-pressed samples at confining pressures of 300-430 MPa and temperatures of 1100°-1250°C with the oxygen fugacity buffered by either nickel-nickel oxide or iron-wüstite powders. The coarse-grained natural Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite yielded a stress exponent of n = 4.7 ± 0.2 and an activation energy for creep of Q = 760 ± 40 kJ mol-1, consistent with deformation in the dislocation creep regime. The strength of the natural clinopyroxenite is consistent with previous high-temperature measurements of dislocation creep behavior of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite by Kirby and Kronenberg [1984] and Boland and Tullis [1986]. Fine-grained clinopyroxenite was prepared from ground powders of the natural clinopyroxenite. Hot-pressed samples were deformed under similar conditions to the natural samples. Mixed-mode deformation behavior was observed, with diffusional creep (n = 1) at lower differential stresses and dislocation creep (with n and Q similar to those of the natural samples) at higher differential stresses. Within the dislocation creep field the predried hot-pressed samples generally yielded creep rates that were about an order of magnitude faster than the natural samples. Thus, even at the highest differential stresses, a component of strain accommodation by grain boundary diffusion was present in the hot-pressed samples. Optical and electron microscope investigations of the deformation microstructures of the natural and hot-pressed samples show evidence for mechanical twinning and activation of dislocation slip systems. When extrapolated to geological conditions expected in the deep crust and upper mantle on Earth and other terrestrial planets, the strength of dry single-phase clinopyroxene aggregates is very high, exceeding that of dry olivine-rich rocks.

  13. Multi-scale morphology in self-assembly of peptides to proteins via a coarse-grain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2015-03-01

    Self-organizing structures of short peptides (6-7 residues) and proteins (136 residues) are studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. Peptides and proteins are described by coarse-grained chains of residues whose interactions are described by a knowledge-based residue-residue interaction potential that captures the compositional specificity. Large-scale computer simulations are performed to study the structural evolution e.g. aggregation, network, etc. at a range of temperatures and concentrations. A number of local and global physical quantities including structure factor are examined. We find that the residue interactions, concentration, and size of chains are very important in modulating the structure of emerging morphologies in the specified temperature range. Estimates are provided for the effective (fractal) dimension of the assembly over various length scales as a function of temperature. This work is supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  14. PACSAB: Coarse-Grained Force Field for the Study of Protein-Protein Interactions and Conformational Sampling in Multiprotein Systems.

    PubMed

    Emperador, Agustí; Sfriso, Pedro; Villarreal, Marcos Ariel; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of proteins are usually performed on a single molecule, and coarse-grained protein models are calibrated using single-molecule simulations, therefore ignoring intermolecular interactions. We present here a new coarse-grained force field for the study of many protein systems. The force field, which is implemented in the context of the discrete molecular dynamics algorithm, is able to reproduce the properties of folded and unfolded proteins, in both isolation, complexed forming well-defined quaternary structures, or aggregated, thanks to its proper evaluation of protein-protein interactions. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the method makes it a universal tool for the study of the structure, dynamics, and association/dissociation of proteins. PMID:26597989

  15. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamic cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staar, P.; Jiang, M.; Hähner, U. R.; Schulthess, T. C.; Maier, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) and its DCA+ extension use coarse-graining of the momentum space to reduce the complexity of quantum many-body problems, thereby mapping the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. While it gives a more localized self-energy for a given cluster size, we show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which converge to the results obtained from the standard coarse-graining with increasing cluster size. Most importantly, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem of the underlying quantum Monte Carlo cluster solver and thus allows for calculations on larger clusters. This enables the treatment of correlations longer ranged than those accessible with the standard coarse-graining and thus can allow for the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. As a demonstration, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the extended DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes for which the results can be fit with a Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law.

  16. Molecular Approaches to Understand Nutritional Potential of Coarse Cereals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Rakesh; Subramani, Rajkumar; Kumar, Rajesh; Wankhede, Dhammaprakash P

    2016-06-01

    Coarse grains are important group of crops that constitutes staple food for large population residing primarily in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world. Coarse grains are designated as nutri-cereals as they are rich in essential amino acids, minerals and vitamins. In spite of having several nutritional virtues in coarse grain as mentioned above, there is still scope for improvement in quality parameters such as cooking qualities, modulation of nutritional constituents and reduction or elimination of anti-nutritional factors. Besides its use in traditional cooking, coarse grains have been used mainly in the weaning food preparation and other malted food production. Improvement in quality parameters will certainly increase consumer's preference for coarse grains and increase their demand. The overall genetic gain in quality traits of economic importance in the cultivated varieties will enhance their industrial value and simultaneously increase income of farmers growing these varieties. The urgent step for improvement of quality traits in coarse grains requires a detailed understanding of molecular mechanisms responsible for varied level of different nutritional contents in different genotypes of these crops. In this review we have discussed the progresses made in understanding of coarse grain biology with various omics tool coupled with modern breeding approaches and the current status with regard to our effort towards dissecting traits related to improvement of quality and nutritional constituents of grains. PMID:27252585

  17. Non-Galerkin Coarse Grids for Algebraic Multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Falgout, Robert D.; Schroder, Jacob B.

    2014-06-26

    Algebraic multigrid (AMG) is a popular and effective solver for systems of linear equations that arise from discretized partial differential equations. And while AMG has been effectively implemented on large scale parallel machines, challenges remain, especially when moving to exascale. Particularly, stencil sizes (the number of nonzeros in a row) tend to increase further down in the coarse grid hierarchy, and this growth leads to more communication. Therefore, as problem size increases and the number of levels in the hierarchy grows, the overall efficiency of the parallel AMG method decreases, sometimes dramatically. This growth in stencil size is due to the standard Galerkin coarse grid operator, $P^T A P$, where $P$ is the prolongation (i.e., interpolation) operator. For example, the coarse grid stencil size for a simple three-dimensional (3D) seven-point finite differencing approximation to diffusion can increase into the thousands on present day machines, causing an associated increase in communication costs. We therefore consider algebraically truncating coarse grid stencils to obtain a non-Galerkin coarse grid. First, the sparsity pattern of the non-Galerkin coarse grid is determined by employing a heuristic minimal “safe” pattern together with strength-of-connection ideas. Second, the nonzero entries are determined by collapsing the stencils in the Galerkin operator using traditional AMG techniques. The result is a reduction in coarse grid stencil size, overall operator complexity, and parallel AMG solve phase times.

  18. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi make a complex contribution to soil aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, Peter; Daynes, Cathal; Damien, Field

    2013-04-01

    Soil aggregates contain solid and fluid components. Aggregates develop as a consequence of the organic materials, plants and hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi acting on the solid phase. Various correlative studies indicate hyphae of AM fungi enmesh soil particles, but their impact on the pore space is poorly understood. Hyphae may penetrate between particles, remove water from interstitial spaces, and otherwise re-arrange the solid phase. Thus we might predict that AM fungi also change the pore architecture of aggregates. Direct observations of pore architecture of soil, such as by computer-aided tomography (CT), is difficult. The refractive natures of solid and biological material are similar. The plant-available water in various treatments allows us to infer changes in pore architecture. Our experimental studies indicate AM fungi have a complex role in the formation and development of aggregates. Soils formed from compost and coarse subsoil materials were planted with mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal seedlings and the resultant soils compared after 6 or 14 months in separate experiments. As well as enmeshing particles, AM fungi were associated with the development of a complex pore space and greater pore volume. Even though AM fungi add organic matter to soil, the modification of pore space is not correlated with organic carbon. In a separate study, we visualised hyphae of AM fungi in a coarse material using CT. In this study, hyphae appeared to grow close to the surfaces of particles with limited ramification across the pore spaces. Hyphae of AM fungi appear to utilise soil moisture for their growth and development of mycelium. The strong correlation between moisture and hyphae has profound implications for soil aggregation, plant utilisation of soil water, and the distribution of water as water availability declines.

  20. Kinetics of formation of bile salt micelles from coarse-grained Langevin dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Vila Verde, Ana; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-06-21

    We examine the mechanism of formation of micelles of dihydroxy bile salts using a coarse-grained, implicit solvent model and Langevin dynamics simulations. We find that bile salt micelles primarily form via addition and removal of monomers, similarly to surfactants with typical head-tail molecular structures, and not via a two-stage mechanism - involving formation of oligomers and their subsequent aggregation to form larger micelles - originally proposed for bile salts. The free energy barrier to removal of single bile monomers from micelles is ≈2kBT, much less than what has been observed for head-tail surfactants. Such a low barrier may be biologically relevant: it allows for rapid release of bile monomers into the intestine, possibly enabling the coverage of fat droplets by bile salt monomers and subsequent release of micelles containing fats and bile salts - a mechanism that is not possible for ionic head-tail surfactants of similar critical micellar concentrations. PMID:27199094

  1. Generalization of the DLA process with different immiscible components by time-scale coarse graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, E. B.; Ryabov, A. B.; Loskutov, A.

    2007-10-01

    In the framework of the mean-field approximation we propose a new approach to the description of the growth of fractal structures which are formed as a result of the process of diffusion limited aggregation. Our approach is based on the coarse graining of the time scale which takes into account the property of discreteness of such structures. The obtained system of partial differential equations allows us to evaluate numerically the fractal dimension and the cluster density depending on the distance from the cluster center. The results are in a quite good agreement with values found by the direct numerical simulations. The proposed approach is generalized for the case of the cluster description with different immiscible particles.

  2. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  3. Two-level method with coarse space size independent convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Vanek, P.; Brezina, M.; Tezaur, R.; Krizkova, J.

    1996-12-31

    The basic disadvantage of the standard two-level method is the strong dependence of its convergence rate on the size of the coarse-level problem. In order to obtain the optimal convergence result, one is limited to using a coarse space which is only a few times smaller than the size of the fine-level one. Consequently, the asymptotic cost of the resulting method is the same as in the case of using a coarse-level solver for the original problem. Today`s two-level domain decomposition methods typically offer an improvement by yielding a rate of convergence which depends on the ratio of fine and coarse level only polylogarithmically. However, these methods require the use of local subdomain solvers for which straightforward application of iterative methods is problematic, while the usual application of direct solvers is expensive. We suggest a method diminishing significantly these difficulties.

  4. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  5. Polarisation mode dispersion correlations with the coarse-step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braimiotis, Christos; Eberhard, Marc; Blow, Keith

    2006-06-01

    Having a fixed differential-group delay (DGD) term b‧ in the coarse-step method results in a repetitive pattern in the autocorrelation function (ACF). We solve this problem by inserting a varying DGD term at each integration step. Furthermore we compute the range of values needed for b‧ and simulate the phenomenon of polarisation mode dispersion for different statistical distributions of b‧. We examine systematically the modified coarse-step method compared to the analytical model, through our simulation results.

  6. Hot Mix Asphalt Using Light Weight Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwad, Mohammad T.

    Hot mix asphalt concrete is produced by properly blending asphalt, coarse and fine aggregates in addition to filler at temperatures ranging from 80 to 165°C. This research is directed to study the effect of replacing the conventional aggregates by the recycled Light Weight Aggregate Concrete (LWAC) on the properties of the produced asphalt mix. The research studied the optimum asphalt content and the effect of some parameters on the properties of the recycled LWAC. The research included studying thirty-six Marshal Specimens lie in four main groups. Each group was made from crushed LWAC in addition to a comparison group used the pumice instead of the crushed LWAC. The LWAC mixes contained (0, 10, 15 and 20%) of silica powder content. The density, stability, flow, percentages of the air Voids in the Compacted Mixture (VTM), compacted mineral aggregate (VMA) and the Voids Filled by Asphalt (VFA) were investigated for all the studied specimens. The main conclusions drawn from the current research implies that the optimum percent of asphalt was 7.5% for the different percentages of silica powder ratios. The presence of voids in the light weight aggregates and the porosity of the obtained concrete affected largely the behavior of the obtained mix.

  7. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamical cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehner, Urs; Staar, Peter; Jiang, Mi; Maier, Thomas; Schulthess, Thomas

    The negative sign problem remains a challenging limiting factor in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of strongly correlated fermionic many-body systems. The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) makes this problem less severe by coarse-graining the momentum space to map the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. We show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which with increasing cluster size converge to the results obtained using the standard coarse-graining. In addition, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem. Therefore, it enables calculations on much larger clusters and can allow the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. To demonstrate this, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes, for which the results can be fitted with the Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) awarded by the INCITE program, and of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center. OLCF is a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Energy-conserving coarse-graining of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Serrano, Mar; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2016-05-25

    Coarse-graining (CG) of complex molecules is a method to reach time scales that would be impossible to access through brute force molecular simulations. In this paper, we formulate a coarse-grained model for complex molecules using first principles caculations that ensures energy conservation. Each molecule is described in a coarse way by a thermal blob characterized by the position and momentum of the center of mass of the molecule, together with its internal energy as an additional degree of freedom. This level of description gives rise to an entropy-based framework instead of the usual one based on the configurational free energy (i.e. potential of mean force). The resulting dynamic equations, which account for an appropriate description of heat transfer at the coarse-grained level, have the structure of the dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (DPDE) model but with a clear microscopic underpinning. Under suitable approximations, we provide explicit microscopic expressions for each component (entropy, mean force, friction and conductivity coefficients) appearing in the coarse-grained model. These quantities can be computed directly using MD simulations. The proposed non-isothermal coarse-grained model is thermodynamically consistent and opens up a first principles CG strategy for the study of energy transport issues that are not accessible using current isothermal models. PMID:27127809

  9. Bayesian parametrization of coarse-grain dissipative dynamics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequidt, Alain; Solano Canchaya, Jose G.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new bottom-up method for the optimization of dissipative coarse-grain models. The method is based on Bayesian optimization of the likelihood to reproduce a coarse-grained reference trajectory obtained from analysis of a higher resolution molecular dynamics trajectory. This new method is related to force matching techniques, but using the total force on each grain averaged on a coarse time step instead of instantaneous forces. It has the advantage of not being limited to pairwise short-range interactions in the coarse-grain model and also yields an estimation of the friction parameter controlling the dynamics. The theory supporting the method is exposed in a practical perspective, with an analytical solution for the optimal set of parameters. The method was first validated by using it on a system with a known optimum. The new method was then tested on a simple system: n-pentane. The local molecular structure of the optimized model is in excellent agreement with the reference system. An extension of the method allows to get also an excellent agreement for the equilibrium density. As for the dynamic properties, they are also very satisfactory, but more sensitive to the choice of the coarse-grain representation. The quality of the final force field depends on the definition of the coarse grain degrees of freedom and interactions. We consider this method as a serious alternative to other methods like iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and Green-Kubo formulae.

  10. Wavelets as basis functions to represent the coarse-graining potential in multiscale coarse graining approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolo, M.; Vancheri, A.; Krause, R.; Danani, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we apply Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) to develop sparse but accurate representations for the Multiscale Coarse-Graining (MSCG) approximation to the many-body potential of mean force. We rigorously framed the MSCG method into MRA so that all the instruments of this theory become available together with a multitude of new basis functions, namely the wavelets. The coarse-grained (CG) force field is hierarchically decomposed at different resolution levels enabling to choose the most appropriate wavelet family for each physical interaction without requiring an a priori knowledge of the details localization. The representation of the CG potential in this new efficient orthonormal basis leads to a compression of the signal information in few large expansion coefficients. The multiresolution property of the wavelet transform allows to isolate and remove the noise from the CG force-field reconstruction by thresholding the basis function coefficients from each frequency band independently. We discuss the implementation of our wavelet-based MSCG approach and demonstrate its accuracy using two different condensed-phase systems, i.e. liquid water and methanol. Simulations of liquid argon have also been performed using a one-to-one mapping between atomistic and CG sites. The latter model allows to verify the accuracy of the method and to test different choices of wavelet families. Furthermore, the results of the computer simulations show that the efficiency and sparsity of the representation of the CG force field can be traced back to the mathematical properties of the chosen family of wavelets. This result is in agreement with what is known from the theory of multiresolution analysis of signals.

  11. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  12. Concrete using waste oil palm shells as aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Basri, H.B.; Mannan, M.A.; Zain, M.F.M.

    1999-04-01

    Concrete with oil palm shells (OPS) as coarse aggregate was investigated for its workability, density, and compressive strength development over 56 days under three curing conditions. The effect of fly ash as partial cement replacement was also studied. Fresh OPS concrete was found to have better workability while its 28-day air-dry density was 19--20% lower than ordinary concrete. Compressive strength after 56 days was found to be 41--50% lower than ordinary concrete. These results were still within the normal range for structural lightweight concrete. Fly ash was found to lower the compressive strength of OPS concrete, which was the opposite of its effect on normal concrete.

  13. Coarse-grained simulations of the solution-phase self-assembly of poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Kyra N.; Kee, Tak W.; Huang, David M.

    2013-02-01

    Under certain conditions the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) self-assembles into high-aspect-ratio nanostructures (known as nanofibres, nanowires, or nanoribbons) when cooled below its solubility limit in a marginal solvent such as anisole. Such nanostructures are potentially beneficial for organic photovoltaic device performance. In this work, Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of P3HT in implicit anisole solvent are used to study the self-assembly of P3HT nanostructures for polymer chain lengths and concentrations used experimentally to prepare P3HT nanofibres. The coarse-grained model is parametrised to match the local structure and dynamics of an atomistic model with explicit solvent. Nanofibres are also prepared experimentally and characterised by atomic force microscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. The simulations match the experimental phase behaviour of P3HT in anisole, showing aggregation of P3HT at 293 and 308 K but not at 323 or 353 K. Single-chain simulations at 293 K reveal two distinct nano-scale aggregate morphologies: hairpins and helices. Hairpin aggregates, which are the precursors of nanofibres, are slightly favoured energetically at 293 K for nuclei of the critical size of ~80 monomers for aggregation. Consequently, chains in multi-chain aggregates adopt the hairpin morphology exclusively in simulations at experimental concentrations at 293 K. The simulated aggregate sizes match experimentally measured nanofibre widths. An estimate of the shift in UV-vis absorption of P3HT due to the change in conjugation length with aggregation in the simulations agrees reasonably well with experiment and shows that most of the spectral red shift that occurs with nanofibre formation is due to increased planarisation of the P3HT chains. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms of nanofibre formation, the simulations resolve details of the molecular-level organisation of chains in P3HT nanofibres hitherto inaccessible

  14. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks. PMID:19398196

  15. Exploring energy landscapes of protein folding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Human diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob's are associated with misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins into amyloid fibrils sharing a generic cross-beta structure. The self-assembly process is complex, but once a nucleus is formed, rapid fibril formation occurs. Insight into the structures of the oligomers during the lag phase, varying between hours and days, is very difficult experimentally because these species are transient, and numerically using all-atom molecular dynamics because the time scale explored is on the order of 10-100 ns. It is therefore important to develop simplified protein models and alternative methods to sample more efficiently the conformational space. In the past few years, we have developed the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) coupled to the OPEP coarse-grained force field. This review reports the application of ART-OPEP on protein folding and aggregation. PMID:18508525

  16. Photophoretic force on aggregate grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Kimery, Jesse B.; Wurm, Gerhard; de Beule, Caroline; Kuepper, Markus; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-01-01

    The photophoretic force may impact planetary formation by selectively moving solid particles based on their composition and structure. This generates collision velocities between grains of different sizes and sorts the dust in protoplanetary discs by composition. This numerical simulation studied the photophoretic force acting on fractal dust aggregates of μm-scale radii. Results show that aggregates tend to have greater photophoretic drift velocities than spheres of similar mass or radii, though with a greater spread in the velocity. While the drift velocities of compact aggregates continue to increase as the aggregates grow larger in size, fluffy aggregates have drift velocities which are relatively constant with size. Aggregates formed from an initially polydisperse size distribution of dust grains behave differently from aggregates formed from a monodisperse population, having smaller drift velocities with directions which deviate substantially from the direction of illumination. Results agree with microgravity experiments which show the difference of photophoretic forces with aggregation state.

  17. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: how to represent an environment driven conformational transition.

    PubMed

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Peter, Christine; Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties. PMID:24359360

  18. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Peter, Christine; Sayar, Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  19. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  20. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Organic carbon, water repellency and soil stability to slaking at aggregate and intra-aggregate scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordán López, Antonio; García-Moreno, Jorge; Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; Zavala, Lorena M.; Cerdà, Artemi; Alanís, Nancy; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    intensity of WR in aggregates of different sizes. [ii] the intra-aggregate distribution of OC and the intensity of WR and [iii] the structural stability of soil aggregates relative to the OC content and the intensity of WR in soils under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different treatments (conventional tilling and mulching). Soil samples were collected from an experimental area (Luvic Calcisols and Calcic Luvisols) in the province of Sevilla (Southern Spain) under different crops (apricot, citrus and wheat) and different management types (conventional tillage with moldboard plow) and mulching (no-tilling and addition of wheat residues at rates varying between 5 and 8 Mg/ha/year). At each sampling site, soil blocks (50 cm long × 50 cm wide × 10 cm deep) were carefully collected to avoid disturbance of aggregates as much as possible and transported to the laboratory. At field moist condition, undisturbed soil aggregates were separated by hand. In order to avoid possible interferences due to disturbance by handling, aggregates broken during this process were discarded. Individual aggregates were arranged in paper trays and air-dried during 7 days under laboratory standard conditions. After air-drying, part of each sample was carefully divided for different analyses: [i] part of the original samples was sieved (2 mm) to eliminate coarse soil particles and homogenized for characterization of OC and N contents, C/N ratio and texture; [ii] part of the aggregates were dry-sieved (0.25-0.5, 0.5-1 and 1-2 mm) or measured with a caliper (2-5, 5-10 and 10-15 mm) and separated in different sieve-size classes for determination of WR and OC content; [iii] aggregates 10-15 mm in size were selected for obtaining aggregate layers using a soil aggregate erosion (SAE) apparatus and WR and OC content were determined at each layer; finally, [iv] in order to study the relation between stability to slaking, WR and OC, these properties were determined in 90 air-dried aggregates

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng

    This thesis applies molecular dynamics simulations and statistical mechanics to study: (i) protein folding; and (ii) protein aggregation. Most small proteins fold into their native states via a first-order-like phase transition with a major free energy barrier between the folded and unfolded states. A set of protein conformations corresponding to the free energy barrier, Delta G >> kBT, are the folding transition state ensemble (TSE). Due to their evasive nature, TSE conformations are hard to capture (probability ∝ exp(-DeltaG/k BT)) and characterize. A coarse-grained discrete molecular dynamics model with realistic steric constraints is constructed to reproduce the experimentally observed two-state folding thermodynamics. A kinetic approach is proposed to identify the folding TSE. A specific set of contacts, common to the TSE conformations, is identified as the folding nuclei which are necessary to be formed in order for the protein to fold. Interestingly, the amino acids at the site of the identified folding nuclei are highly conserved for homologous proteins sharing the same structures. Such conservation suggests that amino acids that are important for folding kinetics are under selective pressure to be preserved during the course of molecular evolution. In addition, studies of the conformations close to the transition states uncover the importance of topology in the construction of order parameter for protein folding transition. Misfolded proteins often form insoluble aggregates, amyloid fibrils, that deposit in the extracellular space and lead to a type of disease known as amyloidosis. Due to its insoluble and non-crystalline nature, the aggregation structure and, thus the aggregation mechanism, has yet to be uncovered. Discrete molecular dynamics studies reveal an aggregate structure with the same structural signatures as in experimental observations and show a nucleation aggregation scenario. The simulations also suggest a generic aggregation mechanism

  3. Coarse-grained interaction potentials for anisotropic molecules.

    PubMed

    Babadi, M; Everaers, R; Ejtehadi, M R

    2006-05-01

    We have proposed an efficient parametrization method for a recent variant of the Gay Berne potential for dissimilar and biaxial particles [Phys. Rev. E 67, 041710 (2003)] and demonstrated it for a set of small organic molecules. Compared with the previously proposed coarse-grained models, the new potential exhibits a superior performance in close contact and large distant interactions. The repercussions of thermal vibrations and elasticity have been studied through a statistical method. The study justifies that the potential of mean force is representable with the same functional form, extending the application of this coarse-grained description to a broader range of molecules. Moreover, the advantage of employing coarse-grained models over truncated atomistic summations with large distance cutoffs has been briefly studied. PMID:16689591

  4. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  5. Role of Ionic Clusters in Dynamics of Ionomer Melts: From Atomistic to Coarse Grained Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Anupriya

    Ionomers, polymers decorated with ionizable groups, have found application in numerous technologies where ionic transport is required. The ionic groups associate into random clusters resulting in substantial effect on structure, dynamics and transport of these materials. The effects of topology, size and dynamics of these aggregates however remain an open question. Here we probe cluster formation correlated with polymer dynamics through a model system of randomly sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) melts with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations over a broad time and length scales ranging from that within the ionic clusters through polymer segmental dynamics to the motion of the entire molecules. The cluster evolution was probed by fully atomistic studies. We find ladder-like aggregates that transform to globule-like with increasing the dielectric constant of media for sodium neutralized SPS. With increasing dielectric constant, the size of the aggregates decrease and their number increases. Concurrently, the mobility of the polymer increases. The counterion radius and valency affect both morphology and dynamics as is evident in the calculated static and dynamic structure factors. It is further manifested in the results of viscosity obtained through non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique. Finally, to access larger length scales a three bead coarse-grained model to describe sulfonated styrene that we have developed will be discussed in view of the outstanding challenges in ionic polymers. Supported in part by DOE Grant No. DE-SC007908. This work was carried out in collaboration with Dvora Perahia and Gary Grest while I was a postdoc at Clemson University. I gratefully acknowledge both of them for their support and encouragement.

  6. A Transferable Coarse-Grained Model for Hydrogen Bonding Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Golubkov, Pavel A.; Wu, Johnny C.; Ren, Pengyu

    2008-01-01

    We present here a recent development of a generalized coarse-grained model for use in molecular simulations. In this model, interactions between coarse-grained particles consist of both van der Waals and explicit electrostatic components. As a result, the coarse-grained model offers the transferability that is lacked by most current effectivepotential based approaches. The previous center-of-mass framework1 is generalized here to include arbitrary off-center interaction sites for both Gay-Berne and multipoles. The new model has been applied to molecular dynamic simulations of neat methanol liquid. By placing a single point multipole at the oxygen atom rather than at the center of mass of methanol, there is a significant improvement in the ability to capture hydrogen-bonding. The critical issue of transferability of the coarse-grained model is verified on methanol-water mixtures, using parameters derived from neat liquids without any modification. The mixture density and internal energy from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations show good agreement with experimental measurements, on a par with what has been obtained from more detailed atomic models. By mapping the dynamics trajectory from the coarse-grained simulation into the all-atom counterpart, we are able to investigate atomic .level structure and interaction. Atomic radial distribution functions of neat methanol, neat water and mixtures compare favorably to experimental measurements. Furthermore, hydrogen-bonded 6- and 7-molecule chains of water and methanol observed in the mixture are in agreement with previous atomic simulations. PMID:18688358

  7. Applied Electric Fields and the Aggregation of Highly Charged Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Sorensen, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, along with other neurodegenerative disorders, and there is increasing evidence that prefibrillar clusters, rather than fully-formed amyloid plaques, are primarily responsible. Therefore, weakly invasive methods, such as dynamic light scattering, which can probe the size distribution and structure factor of early nuclei and proto-aggregate clusters, can serve an important role in understanding this process, and may lead to insights regarding future therapeutic interventions. Here we study a highly charged model protein, lysozyme, under the influence of applied AC and DC fields in an effort to evaluate general models of protein aggregation, including the coarse-grained ``patchy protein'' method of visualizing charge heterogeneity. This anisotropy in the interprotein interaction can lead to frustrated crystalline order, resulting in low density phases. Dynamic measurements of the size distribution and structure factor can reveal local ordering, hierarchical clustering, and fractal properties of the aggregates. Early results show that applied fields affect early cluster growth by modulating local protein and counterion concentrations, in addition to their influence on protein alignment.

  8. Coarse-grid selection for parallel algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A. J., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The need to solve linear systems arising from problems posed on extremely large, unstructured grids has sparked great interest in parallelizing algebraic multigrid (AMG) To date, however, no parallel AMG algorithms exist We introduce a parallel algorithm for the selection of coarse-grid points, a crucial component of AMG, based on modifications of certain paallel independent set algorithms and the application of heuristics designed to insure the quality of the coarse grids A prototype serial version of the algorithm is implemented, and tests are conducted to determine its effect on multigrid convergence, and AMG complexity

  9. Relation between Molecular Shape and the Morphology of Self-Assembling Aggregates: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Vácha, Robert; Frenkel, Daan

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can aggregate in a wide variety of structures, both compact and extended. We present simulations of a coarse-grained anisotropic model that reproduce many of the experimentally observed aggregate structures. Conversely, all structures predicted by our model have experimental counterparts (ribbons, multistranded fibrils, and vesicles). The model we use is that of a rodlike particle with an attractive (hydrophobic) stripe on its side. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that aggregate morphologies crucially depend on two parameters. The first one is the width of the attractive stripe and the second one is a presence or absence of attractive interactions at the particle ends. These results provide us with a generic insight into the relation between the shape of protein-protein interaction potential and the morphology of protein aggregates. PMID:21943424

  10. Characterization of coarse particulate matter in school gyms

    SciTech Connect

    Branis, Martin; Safranek, Jiri

    2011-05-15

    We investigated the mass concentration, mineral composition and morphology of particles resuspended by children during scheduled physical education in urban, suburban and rural elementary school gyms in Prague (Czech Republic). Cascade impactors were deployed to sample the particulate matter. Two fractions of coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10-2.5} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0}) were characterized by gravimetry, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. Two indicators of human activity, the number of exercising children and the number of physical education hours, were also recorded. Lower mass concentrations of coarse particulate matter were recorded outdoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 4.1-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 2.0-3.3 {mu}g m{sup -3}) than indoors (average PM{sub 10-2.5} 13.6-26.7 {mu}g m{sup -3} and PM{sub 2.5-1.0} 3.7-7.4 {mu}g m{sup -3}). The indoor concentrations of coarse aerosol were elevated during days with scheduled physical education with an average indoor-outdoor (I/O) ratio of 2.5-16.3 for the PM{sub 10-2.5} and 1.4-4.8 for the PM{sub 2.5-1.0} values. Under extreme conditions, the I/O ratios reached 180 (PM{sub 10-2.5}) and 19.1 (PM{sub 2.5-1.0}). The multiple regression analysis based on the number of students and outdoor coarse PM as independent variables showed that the main predictor of the indoor coarse PM concentrations is the number of students in the gym. The effect of outdoor coarse PM was weak and inconsistent. The regression models for the three schools explained 60-70% of the particular dataset variability. X-ray spectrometry revealed 6 main groups of minerals contributing to resuspended indoor dust. The most abundant particles were those of crustal origin composed of Si, Al, O and Ca. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, in addition to numerous inorganic particles, various types of fibers and particularly skin scales make up the main part of the resuspended dust in the gyms. In conclusion, school

  11. The multiscale coarse-graining method. II. Numerical implementation for coarse-grained molecular models

    PubMed Central

    Noid, W. G.; Liu, Pu; Wang, Yanting; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Ayton, Gary S.; Izvekov, Sergei; Andersen, Hans C.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method [S. Izvekov and G. A. Voth, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 2469 (2005);J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134105 (2005)] employs a variational principle to determine an interaction potential for a CG model from simulations of an atomically detailed model of the same system. The companion paper proved that, if no restrictions regarding the form of the CG interaction potential are introduced and if the equilibrium distribution of the atomistic model has been adequately sampled, then the MS-CG variational principle determines the exact many-body potential of mean force (PMF) governing the equilibrium distribution of CG sites generated by the atomistic model. In practice, though, CG force fields are not completely flexible, but only include particular types of interactions between CG sites, e.g., nonbonded forces between pairs of sites. If the CG force field depends linearly on the force field parameters, then the vector valued functions that relate the CG forces to these parameters determine a set of basis vectors that span a vector subspace of CG force fields. The companion paper introduced a distance metric for the vector space of CG force fields and proved that the MS-CG variational principle determines the CG force force field that is within that vector subspace and that is closest to the force field determined by the many-body PMF. The present paper applies the MS-CG variational principle for parametrizing molecular CG force fields and derives a linear least squares problem for the parameter set determining the optimal approximation to this many-body PMF. Linear systems of equations for these CG force field parameters are derived and analyzed in terms of equilibrium structural correlation functions. Numerical calculations for a one-site CG model of methanol and a molecular CG model of the EMIM+∕NO3− ionic liquid are provided to illustrate the method. PMID:18601325

  12. Making Graphene Resist Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayan

    Graphene-based sheets have stimulated great interest in many scientific disciplines and shown promise for wide potential applications. Among various ways of creating single atomic layer carbon sheets, a promising route for bulk production is to first chemically exfoliate graphite powders to graphene oxide (GO) sheets, followed by reduction to form chemically modified graphene (CMG). Due to the strong van der Waals attraction between graphene sheets, CMG tends to aggregate. The restacking of sheets is largely uncontrollable and irreversible, thus it reduces their processability and compromises properties such as accessible surface area. Strategies based on colloidal chemistry have been applied to keep CMG dispersed in solvents by introducing electrostatic repulsion to overcome the van der Waals attraction or adding spacers to increase the inter-sheet spacing. In this dissertation, two very different ideas that can prevent CMG aggregation without extensively modifying the material or introducing foreign spacer materials are introduced. The van der Waals potential decreases with reduced overlapping area between sheets. For CMG, reducing the lateral dimension from micrometer to nanometer scale should greatly enhance their colloidal stability with additional advantages of increased charge density and decreased probability to interact. The enhanced colloidal stability of GO and CMG nanocolloids makes them especially promising for spectroscopy based bio-sensing applications. For potential applications in a compact bulk solid form, the sheets were converted into paper-ball like structure using capillary compression in evaporating aerosol droplets. The crumpled graphene balls are stabilized by locally folded pi-pi stacked ridges, and do not unfold or collapse during common processing steps. They can tightly pack without greatly reducing the surface area. This form of graphene leads to scalable performance in energy storage. For example, planer sheets tend to aggregate and

  13. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  14. The Optimum Production Method for Quality Improvement of Recycled Aggregates Using Sulfuric Acid and the Abrasion Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseog; Park, Sangki; Kim, Hayong

    2016-01-01

    There has been increased deconstruction and demolition of reinforced concrete structures due to the aging of the structures and redevelopment of urban areas resulting in the generation of massive amounts of construction. The production volume of waste concrete is projected to increase rapidly over 100 million tons by 2020. However, due to the high cement paste content, recycled aggregates have low density and high absorption ratio. They are mostly used for land reclamation purposes with low added value instead of multiple approaches. This study was performed to determine an effective method to remove cement paste from recycled aggregates by using the abrasion and substituting the process water with acidic water. The aim of this study is to analyze the quality of the recycled fine aggregates produced by a complex method and investigate the optimum manufacturing conditions for recycled fine aggregates based on the design of experiment. The experimental parameters considered were water ratio, coarse aggregate ratio, and abrasion time and, as a result of the experiment, data concerning the properties of recycled sand were obtained. It was found that high-quality recycled fine aggregates can be obtained with 8.57 min of abrasion-crusher time and a recycled coarse aggregate ratio of over 1.5. PMID:27483298

  15. The Optimum Production Method for Quality Improvement of Recycled Aggregates Using Sulfuric Acid and the Abrasion Method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haseog; Park, Sangki; Kim, Hayong

    2016-01-01

    There has been increased deconstruction and demolition of reinforced concrete structures due to the aging of the structures and redevelopment of urban areas resulting in the generation of massive amounts of construction. The production volume of waste concrete is projected to increase rapidly over 100 million tons by 2020. However, due to the high cement paste content, recycled aggregates have low density and high absorption ratio. They are mostly used for land reclamation purposes with low added value instead of multiple approaches. This study was performed to determine an effective method to remove cement paste from recycled aggregates by using the abrasion and substituting the process water with acidic water. The aim of this study is to analyze the quality of the recycled fine aggregates produced by a complex method and investigate the optimum manufacturing conditions for recycled fine aggregates based on the design of experiment. The experimental parameters considered were water ratio, coarse aggregate ratio, and abrasion time and, as a result of the experiment, data concerning the properties of recycled sand were obtained. It was found that high-quality recycled fine aggregates can be obtained with 8.57 min of abrasion-crusher time and a recycled coarse aggregate ratio of over 1.5. PMID:27483298

  16. 7. DETAIL OF ROOM BELOW GRIZZLY SHOWING BOTTOM OF COARSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF ROOM BELOW GRIZZLY SHOWING BOTTOM OF COARSE ORE BIN AND CHUTE TO BEGINNING OF CONVEYOR BELT, SOUTH VIEW. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  17. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Claire Y.; Han, Sang M.; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Sinno, Talid

    2015-10-01

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the "equation-free" framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the "lifting" operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  18. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Claire Y; Han, Sang M; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A; Sinno, Talid

    2015-10-01

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the "equation-free" framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the "lifting" operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO2 substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO2 using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system. PMID:26450324

  19. Multiscale coarse graining of liquid-state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Voth, Gregory A.

    2005-10-01

    A methodology is described to systematically derive coarse-grained (CG) force fields for molecular liquids from the underlying atomistic-scale forces. The coarse graining of an interparticle force field is accomplished by the application of a force-matching method to the trajectories and forces obtained from the atomistic trajectory and force data for the CG sites of the targeted system. The CG sites can be associated with the centers of mass of atomic groups because of the simplicity in the evaluation of forces acting on these sites from the atomistic data. The resulting system is called a multiscale coarse-grained (MS-CG) representation. The MS-CG method for liquids is applied here to water and methanol. For both liquids one-site and two-site CG representations without an explicit treatment of the long-ranged electrostatics have been derived. In addition, for water a two-site model having the explicit long-ranged electrostatics has been developed. To improve the thermodynamic properties (e.g., pressure and density) for the MS-CG models, the constraint for the instantaneous virial was included into the force-match procedure. The performance of the resulting models was evaluated against the underlying atomistic simulations and experiment. In contrast with existing approaches for coarse graining of liquid systems, the MS-CG approach is general, relies only on the interatomic interactions in the reference atomistic system.

  20. Personal Coarse Particulate Matter Exposures in an Adult Cohort

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volunteers associated with the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment Study (NCAAES) participated in an investigation of personal daily exposures to coarse and fine particulate matter size fractions (PM10-2.5, PM2.5). Data from these personal measuremen...

  1. Quantum particles from coarse grained classical probabilities in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-07-15

    Quantum particles can be obtained from a classical probability distribution in phase space by a suitable coarse graining, whereby simultaneous classical information about position and momentum can be lost. For a suitable time evolution of the classical probabilities and choice of observables all features of a quantum particle in a potential follow from classical statistics. This includes interference, tunneling and the uncertainty relation.

  2. Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: adiabaticity and fast simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Hengartner, Nick

    2008-01-01

    We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscoplc, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenhelmer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path Integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemIcal reactions, It produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, Interpretable representation and can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions, and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations are in an agreement, but the coarse-gralned simulations are three orders of magnitude faster.

  3. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-09-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10–50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains.

  4. COARSE PM EMISSIONS MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND INVENTORY VALIDATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research will contribute to our understanding of the sources and controlling variables of coarse PM. This greater understanding, along with an increase in our ability to predict these emissions, will enable more efficient pollution control strategy development. Ad...

  5. On coarse projective integration for atomic deposition in amorphous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Claire Y. E-mail: meister@unm.edu Sinno, Talid; Han, Sang M. E-mail: meister@unm.edu; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A. E-mail: meister@unm.edu

    2015-10-07

    Direct molecular dynamics simulation of atomic deposition under realistic conditions is notoriously challenging because of the wide range of time scales that must be captured. Numerous simulation approaches have been proposed to address the problem, often requiring a compromise between model fidelity, algorithmic complexity, and computational efficiency. Coarse projective integration, an example application of the “equation-free” framework, offers an attractive balance between these constraints. Here, periodically applied, short atomistic simulations are employed to compute time derivatives of slowly evolving coarse variables that are then used to numerically integrate differential equations over relatively large time intervals. A key obstacle to the application of this technique in realistic settings is the “lifting” operation in which a valid atomistic configuration is recreated from knowledge of the coarse variables. Using Ge deposition on amorphous SiO{sub 2} substrates as an example application, we present a scheme for lifting realistic atomistic configurations comprised of collections of Ge islands on amorphous SiO{sub 2} using only a few measures of the island size distribution. The approach is shown to provide accurate initial configurations to restart molecular dynamics simulations at arbitrary points in time, enabling the application of coarse projective integration for this morphologically complex system.

  6. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  7. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  8. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains— Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  9. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  10. Evaluation of a Direct Personal Coarse Particulate Matter Monitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    One aspect of the North Carolina Adult Asthma and Environment study (NCAAES) was to evaluate personal exposures to coarse particulate matter (PM 10-2.5) and their associated variability. As part of this, we examined the ability of a community-based monitor to act as...

  11. Coarse-Grained and Atomistic Modeling of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for a set of three polyimide isomers is developed. Each polyimide is comprised of BPDA (3,3,4,4' - biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride) and one of three APB isomers: 1,3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene or 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene. The coarse-grained model is constructed as a series of linked vectors following the contour of the polymer backbone. Beads located at the midpoint of each vector define centers for long range interaction energy between monomer subunits. A bulk simulation of each coarse-grained polyimide model is performed with a dynamic Monte Carlo procedure. These coarsegrained models are then reverse-mapped to fully atomistic models. The coarse-grained models show the expected trends in decreasing chain dimensions with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit, although these differences were minor due to the relatively short chains simulated here. Considerable differences are seen among the dynamic Monte Carlo properties of the three polyimide isomers. Decreasing relaxation times are seen with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit.

  12. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  13. Coarse-Grained Clustering Dynamics of Heterogeneously Coupled Neurons.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Joon; Cook, Katherine A; Rajendran, Karthikeyan; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Cisternas, Jaime; Laing, Carlo R

    2015-12-01

    The formation of oscillating phase clusters in a network of identical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is studied, along with their dynamic behavior. The neurons are synaptically coupled in an all-to-all manner, yet the synaptic coupling characteristic time is heterogeneous across the connections. In a network of N neurons where this heterogeneity is characterized by a prescribed random variable, the oscillatory single-cluster state can transition-through [Formula: see text] (possibly perturbed) period-doubling and subsequent bifurcations-to a variety of multiple-cluster states. The clustering dynamic behavior is computationally studied both at the detailed and the coarse-grained levels, and a numerical approach that can enable studying the coarse-grained dynamics in a network of arbitrarily large size is suggested. Among a number of cluster states formed, double clusters, composed of nearly equal sub-network sizes are seen to be stable; interestingly, the heterogeneity parameter in each of the double-cluster components tends to be consistent with the random variable over the entire network: Given a double-cluster state, permuting the dynamical variables of the neurons can lead to a combinatorially large number of different, yet similar "fine" states that appear practically identical at the coarse-grained level. For weak heterogeneity we find that correlations rapidly develop, within each cluster, between the neuron's "identity" (its own value of the heterogeneity parameter) and its dynamical state. For single- and double-cluster states we demonstrate an effective coarse-graining approach that uses the Polynomial Chaos expansion to succinctly describe the dynamics by these quickly established "identity-state" correlations. This coarse-graining approach is utilized, within the equation-free framework, to perform efficient computations of the neuron ensemble dynamics. PMID:26458901

  14. Bridging scales: from atoms to coarse-grained models for soft matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Molecular simulation has extended to increasingly complex soft matter systems, and time-scale and system-size requirements have instigated the use of simulation models on multiple levels of resolution. On the classical particle-based level, a large variety of methods to develop coarse grained (CG) simulation models has emerged, an important subgroup being those scale-bridging methods where the CG model is derived from and systematically linked to an underlying atomistic description. In my talk, I will introduce a few of these methods, address the underlying concepts as well as some of the ongoing challenges that are inherent to coarse graining. A natural consequence of reducing the level of resolution in a simulation model is a loss of transferability, i.e. a decreasing ability to correctly describe a system at several thermodynamic state points. Intimately linked to this is a loss of the ability to correctly represent all structural, thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the system. Examples for these limitations are easily found in all CG simulations of multicomponent or multiphase soft matter systems - ranging from liquid crystals, biomolecular aggregates, biomaterials to hard/soft nanocomposites. A correct representation of phase transitions, phase coexistence, environment-induced conformational transitions, or effects due to surfaces and interfaces is a severe challenge for bottom-up CG models. Addressing this challenge requires both a method of generating CG potentials as well as finding and rationalizing an appropriate reference state point to start out from. I will illustrate several of these aspects using examples from the biomolecular and (biomimetic-) materials world.

  15. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Frank C; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  16. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-Grained Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) G-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the G-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG G model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  17. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  18. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  19. Simulation of Ionic Aggregation and Ion Dynamics in Model Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischknecht, Amalie L.

    2012-02-01

    Ionomers, polymers containing a small fraction of covalently bound ionic groups, are of interest as possible electrolytes in batteries. A single-ion conducting polymer electrolyte would be safer and have higher efficiency than the currently-used liquid electrolytes. However, to date ionomeric materials do not have sufficiently high conductivities for practical application. This is most likely because the ions tend to form aggregates, leading to slow ion transport. A key question is therefore how molecular structure affects the ionic aggregation and ion dynamics. To probe these structure-property relationships, we have performed molecular simulations of a set of recently synthesized poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers and ionomers, with a focus on the morphology of the ionic aggregates. The ionomers have a precise, constant spacing of charged groups, making them ideal for direct comparisons with simulations. Ab initio calculations give insight into the expected coordination of cations with fragments of the ionomers. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the ionomer melt show aggregation of the ionic groups into extended string-like clusters. An extensive set of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations extend the results to longer times and larger length scales. The structure factors calculated from the MD simulations compare favorably with x-ray scattering data. Furthermore, the simulations give a detailed picture of the sizes, shapes, and composition of the ionic aggregates, and how they depend on polymer architecture. Implications for ion transport will be discussed. [Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  1. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  2. Peptide aggregation in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Regina M

    2002-01-01

    In the not-so-distant past, insoluble aggregated protein was considered as uninteresting and bothersome as yesterday's trash. More recently, protein aggregates have enjoyed considerable scientific interest, as it has become clear that these aggregates play key roles in many diseases. In this review, we focus attention on three polypeptides: beta-amyloid, prion, and huntingtin, which are linked to three feared neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's, "mad cow," and Huntington's disease, respectively. These proteins lack any significant primary sequence homology, yet their aggregates possess very similar features, specifically, high beta-sheet content, fibrillar morphology, relative insolubility, and protease resistance. Because the aggregates are noncrystalline, secrets of their structure at nanometer resolution are only slowly yielding to X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and other techniques. Besides structure, the aggregates may possess similar pathways of assembly. Two alternative assembly pathways have been proposed: the nucleation-elongation and the template-assisted mode. These two modes may be complementary, not mutually exclusive. Strategies for interfering with aggregation, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches, are under development. The structural similarities between protein aggregates of dissimilar origin suggest that therapeutic strategies successful against one disease may have broad utility in others. PMID:12117755

  3. Linear mixing model applied to coarse resolution satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear mixing model typically applied to high resolution data such as Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, Thematic Mapper, and Multispectral Scanner System is applied to the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer coarse resolution satellite data. The reflective portion extracted from the middle IR channel 3 (3.55 - 3.93 microns) is used with channels 1 (0.58 - 0.68 microns) and 2 (0.725 - 1.1 microns) to run the Constrained Least Squares model to generate fraction images for an area in the west central region of Brazil. The derived fraction images are compared with an unsupervised classification and the fraction images derived from Landsat TM data acquired in the same day. In addition, the relationship betweeen these fraction images and the well known NDVI images are presented. The results show the great potential of the unmixing techniques for applying to coarse resolution data for global studies.

  4. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Petr; Romano, Flavio; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  5. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Louis, Ard A.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2014-06-21

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  6. Coarse-graining of proteins based on elastic network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2013-08-01

    To simulate molecular processes on biologically relevant length- and timescales, coarse-grained (CG) models of biomolecular systems with tens to even hundreds of residues per CG site are required. One possible way to build such models is explored in this article: an elastic network model (ENM) is employed to define the CG variables. Free energy surfaces are approximated by Taylor series, with the coefficients found by force-matching. CG potentials are shown to undergo renormalization due to roughness of the energy landscape and smoothing of it under coarse-graining. In the case study of hen egg-white lysozyme, the entropy factor is shown to be of critical importance for maintaining the native structure, and a relationship between the proposed ENM-mode-based CG models and traditional CG-bead-based models is discussed. The proposed approach uncovers the renormalizable character of CG models and offers new opportunities for automated and computationally efficient studies of complex free energy surfaces.

  7. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics: Dissipation Due to Internal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2001-12-21

    We describe progress on the issue of pathological elastic wave reflection in atomistic and multiscale simulation. First we briefly review Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD). Originally CGMD was formulated as a Hamiltonian system in which energy is conserved. This formulation is useful for many applications, but recently CGMD has been extended to include generalized Langevin forces. Here we describe how Langevin dynamics arise naturally in CGMD, and we examine the implication for elastic wave scattering.

  8. Enhancing physiologic simulations using supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; O'Brien, Caroline C.; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer R.; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modelling of physical and biochemical processes has emerged as a means of evaluating medical devices, offering new insights that explain current performance, inform future designs and even enable personalized use. Yet resource limitations force one to compromise with reduced order computational models and idealized assumptions that yield either qualitative descriptions or approximate, quantitative solutions to problems of interest. Considering endovascular drug delivery as an exemplary scenario, we used a supervised machine learning framework to process data generated from low fidelity coarse meshes and predict high fidelity solutions on refined mesh configurations. We considered two models simulating drug delivery to the arterial wall: (i) two-dimensional drug-coated balloons and (ii) three-dimensional drug-eluting stents. Simulations were performed on computational mesh configurations of increasing density. Supervised learners based on Gaussian process modelling were constructed from combinations of coarse mesh setting solutions of drug concentrations and nearest neighbourhood distance information as inputs, and higher fidelity mesh solutions as outputs. These learners were then used as computationally inexpensive surrogates to extend predictions using low fidelity information to higher levels of mesh refinement. The cross-validated, supervised learner-based predictions improved fidelity as compared with computational simulations performed at coarse level meshes—a result consistent across all outputs and computational models considered. Supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions can augment traditional physics-based modelling of complex physiologic phenomena. By obtaining efficient solutions at a fraction of the computational cost, this framework has the potential to transform how modelling approaches can be applied in the evaluation of medical technologies and their real-time administration in an increasingly personalized fashion. PMID:25652458

  9. Enhancing physiologic simulations using supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions.

    PubMed

    Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; O'Brien, Caroline C; Shazly, Tarek; Edelman, Elazer R; Kolachalama, Vijaya B

    2015-03-01

    Computational modelling of physical and biochemical processes has emerged as a means of evaluating medical devices, offering new insights that explain current performance, inform future designs and even enable personalized use. Yet resource limitations force one to compromise with reduced order computational models and idealized assumptions that yield either qualitative descriptions or approximate, quantitative solutions to problems of interest. Considering endovascular drug delivery as an exemplary scenario, we used a supervised machine learning framework to process data generated from low fidelity coarse meshes and predict high fidelity solutions on refined mesh configurations. We considered two models simulating drug delivery to the arterial wall: (i) two-dimensional drug-coated balloons and (ii) three-dimensional drug-eluting stents. Simulations were performed on computational mesh configurations of increasing density. Supervised learners based on Gaussian process modelling were constructed from combinations of coarse mesh setting solutions of drug concentrations and nearest neighbourhood distance information as inputs, and higher fidelity mesh solutions as outputs. These learners were then used as computationally inexpensive surrogates to extend predictions using low fidelity information to higher levels of mesh refinement. The cross-validated, supervised learner-based predictions improved fidelity as compared with computational simulations performed at coarse level meshes--a result consistent across all outputs and computational models considered. Supervised learning on coarse mesh solutions can augment traditional physics-based modelling of complex physiologic phenomena. By obtaining efficient solutions at a fraction of the computational cost, this framework has the potential to transform how modelling approaches can be applied in the evaluation of medical technologies and their real-time administration in an increasingly personalized fashion. PMID:25652458

  10. Coarse pointing mechanism assembly for satellite interlink experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeusli, P. A.; Ivorra, M. T.; Gass, V.; Berthoud, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1975, MECANEX S.A. has been manufacturing components for solar array drives and mechanisms used in space applications. In 1991, work was started in an early phase C (Engineering Model) on a Coarse Pointing Mechanism Assembly (CPMA) for the Semiconductor-laser Inter-satellite Link EXperiment (SILEX). This paper deals with the history, the evolution, and the lessons learned from taking over a pre-design in 1991 to the delivery of last flight models (FM 5 & 6) in 1995.

  11. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  12. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  13. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  14. Imbibition kinetics of spherical aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébraud, Pascal; Lootens, Didier; Debacker, Alban

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed : in the first one, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Then, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the Laplace pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases, up to a point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the Laplace pressure of small bubbles. Depending on the curvature of the bubble, the system may then be in an unstable state. The imbibition then starts again, but with an inner pressure in equilibrium with these bubbles. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate.

  15. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab M; Panchal, Jainik P; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Blum, Janice S; Joubert, Marisa K; Narhi, Linda O; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins have a propensity for aggregation during manufacturing, shipping, and storage. The presence of aggregates in protein drug products can induce adverse immune responses in patients that may affect safety and efficacy, and so it is of concern to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies. In this vein, there is a lack of understanding of the physicochemical determinants of immunological responses and a lack of standardized analytical methods to survey the molecular properties of aggregates associated with immune activation. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic immune mechanisms in the context of interactions with protein aggregates. We then critically examine the literature with emphasis on the underlying immune mechanisms as they relate to aggregate properties. Finally, we highlight the gaps in our current understanding of this issue and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:26869409

  16. Eco-friendly porous concrete using bottom ash aggregate for marine ranch application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Jae; Prabhu, G Ganesh; Lee, Bong Chun; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the test results of an investigation carried out on the reuse of coal bottom ash aggregate as a substitute material for coarse aggregate in porous concrete production for marine ranch applications. The experimental parameters were the rate of bottom ash aggregate substitution (30%, 50% and 100%) and the target void ratio (15%, 20% and 25%). The cement-coated granular fertiliser was substituted into a bottom ash aggregate concrete mixture to improve marine ranch applications. The results of leaching tests revealed that the bottom ash aggregate has only a negligible amount of the ten deleterious substances specified in the Ministry of Environment - Enforcement Regulation of the Waste Management Act of Republic Korea. The large amount of bubbles/air gaps in the bottom ash aggregate increased the voids of the concrete mixtures in all target void ratios, and decreased the compressive strength of the porous concrete mixture; however, the mixture substituted with 30% and 10% of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser, respectively, showed an equal strength to the control mixture. The sea water resistibility of the bottom ash aggregate substituted mixture was relatively equal to that of the control mixture, and also showed a great deal of improvement in the degree of marine organism adhesion compared with the control mixture. No fatality of fish was observed in the fish toxicity test, which suggested that bottom ash aggregate was a harmless material and that the combination of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser with substitution rates of 30% and 10%, respectively, can be effectively used in porous concrete production for marine ranch application. PMID:26687102

  17. Coarse-Grained Model for Colloidal Protein Interactions, B22, and Protein Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marco A.; Sahin, Eric; Robinson, Anne S.; Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semi-quantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22). Based on earlier work, this CG model treats proteins as rigid bodies composed of one bead per amino acid, with each amino acid having specific parameters for its size, hydrophobicity, and charge. The net interactions are a combination of steric repulsions, short-range attractions, and screened long-range charge-charge interactions. Model parametrization was done by fitting simulation results against experimental values of the B22 as a function of solution ionic strength for α-chymotrypsinogen A and γD-crystallin (gD-Crys). The CG model is applied to characterize the pairwise interactions and dimerization of gD-Crys and the dependance on temperature, protein concentration, and ionic strength. The results illustrate that at experimentally relevant conditions where stable dimers do not form, the entropic contributions are predominant in the free-energy of protein cluster formation and colloidal protein interactions, arguing against interpretations that treat B22 primarily from energetic considerations alone. Additionally, the results suggest that electrostatic interactions help to modulate the population of the different stable configurations for protein nearest-neighbor pairs, while short-range attractions determine the relative orientations of proteins within these configurations. Finally, simulation results are combined with Principal Component Analysis to identify those amino-acids / surface patches that form inter-protein contacts

  18. Use of recycled fine aggregate in concretes with durable requirements.

    PubMed

    Zega, Claudio Javier; Di Maio, Angel Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The use of construction waste materials as aggregates for concrete production is highly attractive compared to the use of non-renewable natural resources, promoting environmental protection and allowing the development of a new raw material. Several countries have recommendations for the use of recycled coarse aggregate in structural concrete, whereas the use of the fine fraction is limited because it may produce significant changes in some properties of concrete. However, during the last decade the use of recycled fine aggregates (RFA) has achieved a great international interest, mainly because of economic implications related to the shortage of natural sands suitable for the production of concrete, besides to allow an integral use of this type of waste. In this study, the durable behaviour of structural concretes made with different percentage of RFA (0%, 20%, and 30%) is evaluated. Different properties related to the durability of concretes such as absorption, sorptivity, water penetration under pressure, and carbonation are determined. In addition, the results of compressive strength, static modulus of elasticity and drying shrinkage are presented. The obtained results indicate that the recycled concretes have a suitable resistant and durable behaviour, according to the limits indicated by different international codes for structural concrete. PMID:21775123

  19. Experimental investigation of coarse particle conveying in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasak, Pavel; Chara, Zdenek; Konfrst, Jiri; Krupička, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The advanced knowledge of particle-water mixture flow behaviour is important for safe, reliable, and economical design and operation of the freight pipelines. The effect of the mixture velocity and concentration on the coarse particle - water mixtures flow behaviour was experimentally investigated on an experimental pipe loop of inner diameter D = 100 mm with horizontal, vertical, and inclined pipe sections. Narrow particle size distribution basalt pebbles were used as model of coarse-grained solid particles. The radiometric method was used to measure particle concentration distribution in pipe cross-section. Mixture flow behaviour and particles motion along the pipe invert were studied in a pipe viewing section. The study revealed that the coarse particlewater mixtures in the horizontal and inclined pipe sections were significantly stratified. The particles moved principally in a layer close to the pipe invert. However, for higher and moderate flow velocities the particles moved also in the central part of the pipe cross-section, and particle saltation was found to be dominant mode of particle conveying.

  20. Lung Response to Coarse PM: Bioassay in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wegesser, Teresa C.; Last, Jerold A.

    2008-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) elicits inflammatory and toxic responses in the lung specific to its constituents, which can vary by region, time, and particle size. To identify the mechanism of toxicity in PM collected in a rural area in the San Joaquin Valley of Central California, we studied coarse particles of 2.5 – 10 μm diameter (PM2.5-PM10). Potential pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of PM2.5-PM10 in the lung were investigated using intratracheally instilled mice. We determined total and differential cell profiles and inflammatory chemokines in lung lavage fluid, and biomarkers of toxicity resulting from coarse PM exposure. Responses of the mice were readily observed with total doses of 25–50 ug of PM per mouse. Changes in pro-inflammatory cellular profiles and chemokines showed both dose and time response; peak responses were observed 24 hours after PM instillation, with recovery as early as 48 hours. Furthermore, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) profiles following PM exposures were correlated to levels of measured macrophages and neutrophils recovered from lung lavage fluid of PM treated animals. Our data suggest that pro-inflammatory effects observed from coarse PM collected during the summer months from California’s hot and dry Central Valley are driven largely by the insoluble components of the PM mixture, and are not caused by endotoxin. PMID:18384828

  1. Components and activity of polysaccharides from coarse tea.

    PubMed

    Wang Dongfeng, W; Wang Chenghong, W; Li Jun, L; Zhao Guiwen, Z

    2001-01-01

    Coarse tea contained a high content of polysaccharide complex. Composed of polysaccharide and protein, the polysaccharide complex from tea (TPS) belonged to glycoprotein with the molecular weight () of (10.7-11.0) x 10(4). When mice (7 weeks old, C57BL/8) were injected with TPS, the levels of blood glucose (BG) in normal mice and model mice with high BG were decreased significantly by averages of 13.54 and 22.18%, respectively. The antibody concentration (OD(413 nm)) in the mice injected with 2.4 mg/mL TPS was increased evidently by 44.93% (p < 0.01). TPS treatment was beneficial not only for the subsequent production of interleukin (IL) 2 in spleen cells of adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats but also because it prohibited the body from producing too much IL-1 in AA rats. Treatment of diabetes with coarse tea in both China and Japan may be related to TPS and the content of TPS in coarse tea. PMID:11170619

  2. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  3. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4–6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  4. Biomolecular pleiomorphism probed by spatial interpolation of coarse models.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mirabela; Birmanns, Stefan; Wriggers, Willy

    2008-11-01

    In low resolution structures of biological assemblies one can often observe conformational deviations that require a flexible rearrangement of structural domains fitted at the atomic level. We are evaluating interpolation methods for the flexible alignment of atomic models based on coarse models. Spatial interpolation is well established in image-processing and visualization to describe the overall deformation or warping of an object or an image. Combined with a coarse representation of the biological system by feature vectors, such methods can provide a flexible approximation of the molecular structure. We have compared three well-known interpolation techniques and evaluated the results by comparing them with constrained molecular dynamics. One method, inverse distance weighting interpolation, consistently produced models that were nearly indistinguishable on the alpha carbon level from the molecular dynamics results. The method is simple to apply and enables flexing of structures by non-expert modelers. This is useful for the basic interpretation of volumetric data in biological applications such as electron microscopy. The method can be used as a general interpretation tool for sparsely sampled motions derived from coarse models. PMID:18757874

  5. The Theory of Ultra-Coarse-Graining. 2. Numerical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Aram; Dama, James F; Sinitskiy, Anton V; Voth, Gregory A

    2014-12-01

    The increasing interest in the modeling of complex macromolecular systems in recent years has spurred the development of numerous coarse-graining (CG) techniques. However, many of the CG models are constructed assuming that all details beneath the resolution of CG degrees of freedom are fast and average out, which sets limits on the resolution of feasible coarse-grainings and on the range of applications of the CG models. Ultra-coarse-graining (UCG) makes it possible to construct models at any desired resolution while accounting for discrete conformational or chemical changes within the CG sites that can modulate the interactions between them. Here, we discuss the UCG methodology and its numerical implementation. We pay particular attention to the numerical mechanism for including state transitions between different conformations within CG sites because this has not been discussed previously. Using a simple example of 1,2-dichloroethane, we demonstrate the ability of the UCG model to reproduce the multiconfigurational behavior of this molecular liquid, even when each molecule is modeled with only one CG site. The methodology can also be applied to other molecular liquids and macromolecular systems with time scale separation between conformational transitions and other intramolecular motions and rotations. PMID:26583210

  6. Is Coarse-to-Fine Strategy Sensitive to Normal Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Musel, Benoit; Chauvin, Alan; Guyader, Nathalie; Chokron, Sylvie; Peyrin, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Theories on visual perception agree that visual recognition begins with global analysis and ends with detailed analysis. Different results from neurophysiological, computational, and behavioral studies all indicate that the totality of visual information is not immediately conveyed, but that information analysis follows a predominantly coarse-to-fine processing sequence (low spatial frequencies are extracted first, followed by high spatial frequencies). We tested whether such processing continues to occur in normally aging subjects. Young and aged participants performed a categorization task (indoor vs. outdoor scenes), using dynamic natural scene stimuli, in which they resorted to either a coarse-to-fine (CtF) sequence or a reverse fine-to-coarse sequence (FtC). The results show that young participants categorized CtF sequences more quickly than FtC sequences. However, sequence processing interacts with semantic category only for aged participants. The present data support the notion that CtF categorization is effective even in aged participants, but is constrained by the spatial features of the scenes, thus highlighting new perspectives in visual models. PMID:22675568

  7. Coarse graining of force fields for metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dürholt, Johannes P; Galvelis, Raimondas; Schmid, Rochus

    2016-03-14

    We have adapted our genetic algorithm based optimization approach, originally developed to generate force field parameters from quantum mechanic reference data, to derive a first coarse grained force field for a MOF, taking the atomistic MOF-FF as a reference. On the example of the copper paddle-wheel based HKUST-1, a maximally coarse grained model, using a single bead for each three and four coordinated vertex, was developed as a proof of concept. By adding non-bonded interactions with a modified Buckingham potential, the resulting MOF-FF-CGNB is able to predict local deformation energies of the building blocks as well as bulk properties like the tbovs.pto energy difference or elastic constants in a semi-quantitative way. As expected, the negative thermal expansion of HKUST-1 is not reproduced by the maximally coarse grained model. At the expense of atomic resolution, substantially larger systems (up to tens of nanometers in size) can be simulated with respect to structural and mechanical properties, bridging the gap to the mesoscale. As an example the deformation of the [111] surface of HKUST-1 by a "tip" could be computed without artifacts from periodic images. PMID:26732756

  8. Coarse Point Cloud Registration by Egi Matching of Voxel Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhu; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Shen, Yueqian; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning samples the surface geometry of objects efficiently and records versatile information as point clouds. However, often more scans are required to fully cover a scene. Therefore, a registration step is required that transforms the different scans into a common coordinate system. The registration of point clouds is usually conducted in two steps, i.e. coarse registration followed by fine registration. In this study an automatic marker-free coarse registration method for pair-wise scans is presented. First the two input point clouds are re-sampled as voxels and dimensionality features of the voxels are determined by principal component analysis (PCA). Then voxel cells with the same dimensionality are clustered. Next, the Extended Gaussian Image (EGI) descriptor of those voxel clusters are constructed using significant eigenvectors of each voxel in the cluster. Correspondences between clusters in source and target data are obtained according to the similarity between their EGI descriptors. The random sampling consensus (RANSAC) algorithm is employed to remove outlying correspondences until a coarse alignment is obtained. If necessary, a fine registration is performed in a final step. This new method is illustrated on scan data sampling two indoor scenarios. The results of the tests are evaluated by computing the point to point distance between the two input point clouds. The presented two tests resulted in mean distances of 7.6 mm and 9.5 mm respectively, which are adequate for fine registration.

  9. Moving Beyond Watson-Crick Models of Coarse Grained DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Kevin; Linak, Margaret; Tourdot, Richard

    2012-02-01

    DNA structure possesses several levels of complexity, ranging from the sequence of bases (primary structure) to base pairing (secondary structure) to its three-dimensional shape (tertiary structure) and can produce a wide variety of conformations in addition to canonical double stranded DNA. By including non-Watson-Crick interactions in a coarse-grained model, we developed a system that not only can capture the traditional B-form double helix, but also can adopt a wide variety of other DNA conformations. In our experimentally parameterized, coarse-grained DNA model we are able to reproduce the microscopic features of double-stranded DNA without the need for explicit constraints and capture experimental melting curves for a number of short DNA hairpins. We demonstrate the utility of the model by simulating more complex tertiary structures such as the folding of the thrombin aptamer, which includes G-quartets, and strand invasion during triplex formation. Our results highlight the importance of non-canonical interactions in DNA coarse- grained models.

  10. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  11. Coarse-grained models for aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsong; Mondal, Jagannath; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained force field is developed for polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water. The force field is based on the MARTINI model but with the big multipole water (BMW) model for the solvent. The polymer force field is reparameterized using the MARTINI protocol. The new force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in simulations of short chains with the MARTINI force field; these conformations are not observed in atomistic simulations. We also investigate the effect of using parameters for the end-group that are different from those for the repeat units, with the MARTINI and BMW/MARTINI models. We find that the new BMW/MARTINI force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in the MARTINI models and has more accurate predictions for the density of neat PEG. However, solvent-separated-pairs between chain ends and slow dynamics of the PEG reflect its own artifacts. We also carry out fine-grained simulations of PEG with bundled water clusters and show that the water bundling can lead to ring-like conformations of the polymer molecules. The simulations emphasize the pitfalls of coarse-graining several molecules into one site and suggest that polymer-solvent systems might be a stringent test for coarse-grained force fields. PMID:24350686

  12. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking.

    PubMed

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼ 3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4-6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  13. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films withmore » up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  14. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  15. Penetration Test Modelling in a Coarse Granular Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breul, P.; Benz, M.; Gourvès, R.; Saussine, G.

    2009-06-01

    Penetration test is a simple and useful test to characterize soils and granular materials. Several studies have shown the link between cone penetration resistance and density for a given material if the relation connecting these two parameters has been established beforehand. A granular materials bank currently including more than 35 granular materials has been developed to this end. Unfortunately, to be able to generalize and cover the broadest possible material range, it would be necessary to multiply the tests and the number of materials. Moreover in coarse granular media, it is necessary to carry out a large number of tests in order to achieve a reliable relation between density and cone resistance.Consequently, being able to model this test in a realistic way will enable increasing the number of tests on a material and carry out more precise parametric studies to evaluate the influence of any parameter on the test response. This article presents the work carried out to model a penetration test within a coarse granular medium. The penetrometer used is a light penetrometer with a 2 cm2 cone. The first part will present the experimental protocol developed with the material bank in order to establish the relation between cone resistance and material density. The results obtained on a coarse material of a railway ballast type will be presented. The second part will present the test modelling using discrete elements and parameter identification to obtain the relation found in the experimental tests and connecting cone resistance to material density.

  16. Coarse bedload routing and dispersion through tributary confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, Kurt S.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    Sediment routing fundamentally influences channel morphology and the propagation of disturbances such as debris flows. The transport and storage of bedload particles across headwater channel confluences, which may be significant nodes of the channel network in terms of sediment routing, morphology, and habitat, are poorly understood, however. We investigated patterns and processes of sediment routing through headwater confluences by comparing them to published results from lower-gradient confluences and by comparing the dispersive behavior of coarse bedload particles between headwater confluence and non-confluence reaches. We addressed these questions with a field tracer experiment using passive-integrated transponder and radio-frequency identification technology in the East Fork Bitterroot River basin, Montana, USA. Within the confluence zone, tracers tended to be deposited towards scour-hole and channel margins, suggesting narrow, efficient transport corridors that mirror those observed in prior studies, many of which are from finer-grained systems. Coarse particles in some confluence reaches experienced reduced depositional probabilities within the confluence relative to upstream and downstream of the confluence. Analysis of particle transport data suggests that variation in the spatial distribution of coarse-sediment particles may be enhanced by passing through confluences, though further study is needed to evaluate confluence effects on dispersive regimes and sediment routing on broader spatial and temporal scales.

  17. Coarse-graining the electrostatic potential via distributed multipole expansions

    PubMed Central

    Gramada, Apostol; Bourne, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Multipole expansions offer a natural path to coarse-graining the electrostatic potential. However, the validity of the expansion is restricted to regions outside a spherical enclosure of the distribution of charge and, therefore, not suitable for most applications that demand accurate representation at arbitrary positions around the molecule. We propose and demonstrate a distributed multipole expansion approach that resolves this limitation. We also provide a practical algorithm for the computational implementation of this approach. The method allows the partitioning of the charge distribution into subsystems so that the multipole expansion of each component of the partition, and therefore of their superposition, is valid outside an enclosing surface of the molecule of arbitrary shape. The complexity of the resulting coarse-grained model of electrostatic potential is dictated by the area of the molecular surface and therefore, for a typical three-dimensional molecule, it scale as N2/3 with N, the number of charges in the system. This makes the method especially useful for coarse-grained studies of biological systems consisting of many large macromolecules provided that the configuration of the individual molecules can be approximated as fixed. PMID:21572587

  18. Insights on protein-DNA recognition by coarse grain modelling

    PubMed Central

    Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Hartmann, Brigitte; Prévost, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Coarse grain modelling of macromolecules is a new approach potentially well adapted to answer numerous issues, ranging from physics to biology. We propose here an original DNA coarse grain model specifically dedicated to protein–DNA docking, a crucial, but still largely unresolved, question in molecular biology. Using a representative set of protein–DNA complexes, we first show that our model is able to predict the interaction surface between the macromolecular partners taken in their bound form. In a second part, the impact of the DNA sequence and electrostatics, together with the DNA and protein conformations on docking is investigated. Our results strongly suggest that the overall DNA structure mainly contributes in discriminating the interaction site on cognate proteins. Direct electrostatic interactions between phosphate groups and amino acids side chains strengthen the binding. Overall, this work demonstrates that coarse grain modelling can reveal itself a precious auxiliary for a general and complete description and understanding of protein–DNA association mechanisms. PMID:18478582

  19. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  20. Lung response to coarse PM: Bioassay in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wegesser, Teresa C.; Last, Jerold A.

    2008-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM) elicits inflammatory and toxic responses in the lung specific to its constituents, which can vary by region, time, and particle size. To identify the mechanism of toxicity in PM collected in a rural area in the San Joaquin Valley of Central California, we studied coarse particles of 2.5-10 {mu}m diameter (PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10}). Potential pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of PM{sub 2.5}-PM{sub 10} in the lung were investigated using intratracheally instilled mice. We determined total and differential cell profiles and inflammatory chemokines in lung lavage fluid, and biomarkers of toxicity resulting from coarse PM exposure. Responses of the mice were readily observed with total doses of 25-50 {mu}g of PM per mouse. Changes in pro-inflammatory cellular profiles and chemokines showed both dose and time responses; peak responses were observed 24 h after PM instillation, with recovery as early as 48 h. Furthermore, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2) profiles following PM exposures were correlated to levels of measured macrophages and neutrophils recovered from lung lavage fluid of PM-treated animals. Our data suggest that pro-inflammatory effects observed from coarse PM collected during the summer months from California's hot and dry Central Valley are driven largely by the insoluble components of the PM mixture, and are not caused by endotoxin.

  1. Neutron attenuation characteristics of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and heavy aggregate concrete and mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Othman, F.

    1994-03-01

    Polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets were introduced into concrete to improve its neutron attenuation characteristics while several types of heavy coarse aggregates were used to improve its gamma ray attenuation properties. Neutron and gamma ray attenuation were studied in concrete samples containing coarse aggregates of barite, pyrite, basalt, hematite, and marble as well as polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride pellets in narrow-beam geometry. The highest neutron attenuation was shown by polyethylene mortar, followed by polyvinyl chloride mortar; barite and pyrite concrete showed higher gamma ray attenuation than ordinary concrete. Broad-beam and continuous (infinite) medium geometries were used to study the neutron attenuation of samples containing polymers at different concentrations with and without heavy aggregates, the fitting equations were established, and from these the neutron removal coefficients were deduced. In a radiation field of neutrons and gamma rays, the appropriate concentration of polymer and heavy aggregate can be selected to give the optimum total dose attenuation depending on the relative intensities of each type of radiation. This would give much better design flexibility over ordinary concrete. The compressive strength tests performed on mortar and concrete samples showed that their value, in general, decreases as polymer concentration increases and that the polyvinyl chloride mortar showed higher values than the polyethylene mortar. For general construction purposes, the compression strength was considered acceptable in these samples. 34 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Perspectives on Preference Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Regenwetter, Michel

    2009-07-01

    For centuries, the mathematical aggregation of preferences by groups, organizations, or society itself has received keen interdisciplinary attention. Extensive theoretical work in economics and political science throughout the second half of the 20th century has highlighted the idea that competing notions of rational social choice intrinsically contradict each other. This has led some researchers to consider coherent democratic decision making to be a mathematical impossibility. Recent empirical work in psychology qualifies that view. This nontechnical review sketches a quantitative research paradigm for the behavioral investigation of mathematical social choice rules on real ballots, experimental choices, or attitudinal survey data. The article poses a series of open questions. Some classical work sometimes makes assumptions about voter preferences that are descriptively invalid. Do such technical assumptions lead the theory astray? How can empirical work inform the formulation of meaningful theoretical primitives? Classical "impossibility results" leverage the fact that certain desirable mathematical properties logically cannot hold in all conceivable electorates. Do these properties nonetheless hold true in empirical distributions of preferences? Will future behavioral analyses continue to contradict the expectations of established theory? Under what conditions do competing consensus methods yield identical outcomes and why do they do so? PMID:26158988

  3. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-12-28

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operator are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model.

  4. Efficient coarse simulation of a growing avascular tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kavousanakis, Michail E.; Liu, Ping; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Lowengrub, John; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this work is the development and implementation of algorithms which accelerate the simulation of early stage tumor growth models. Among the different computational approaches used for the simulation of tumor progression, discrete stochastic models (e.g., cellular automata) have been widely used to describe processes occurring at the cell and subcell scales (e.g., cell-cell interactions and signaling processes). To describe macroscopic characteristics (e.g., morphology) of growing tumors, large numbers of interacting cells must be simulated. However, the high computational demands of stochastic models make the simulation of large-scale systems impractical. Alternatively, continuum models, which can describe behavior at the tumor scale, often rely on phenomenological assumptions in place of rigorous upscaling of microscopic models. This limits their predictive power. In this work, we circumvent the derivation of closed macroscopic equations for the growing cancer cell populations; instead, we construct, based on the so-called “equation-free” framework, a computational superstructure, which wraps around the individual-based cell-level simulator and accelerates the computations required for the study of the long-time behavior of systems involving many interacting cells. The microscopic model, e.g., a cellular automaton, which simulates the evolution of cancer cell populations, is executed for relatively short time intervals, at the end of which coarse-scale information is obtained. These coarse variables evolve on slower time scales than each individual cell in the population, enabling the application of forward projection schemes, which extrapolate their values at later times. This technique is referred to as coarse projective integration. Increasing the ratio of projection times to microscopic simulator execution times enhances the computational savings. Crucial accuracy issues arising for growing tumors with radial symmetry are addressed by

  5. Supramolecular assembly of a biomineralizing antimicrobial peptide in coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Eby, D Matthew; Johnson, Glenn R; Farmer, Barry L; Pandey, Ras B

    2011-01-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the self-organizing behavior of the biomineralizing peptide KSL (KKVVFKVKFK) in the presence of phosphate. Originally identified as an antimicrobial peptide, KSL also directs the formation of biosilica through a hypothetical supramolecular template that requires phosphate for assembly. Specificity of each residue and the interactions between the peptide and phosphate are considered in a coarse-grained model. Both local and global physical quantities are calculated as the constituents execute their stochastic motion in the presence and absence of phosphate. Ordered peptide aggregates develop after simulations reach thermodynamic equilibrium, wherein phosphates form bridging ligands with lysines and are found interdigitated between peptide molecules. Results demonstrate that interactions between the lysines and phosphate drive self-organization into lower energy conformations of interconnected peptide scaffolds that resemble the supramolecular structures of polypeptide- and polyamine-mediated silica condensation systems. Furthermore, the specific phosphate-peptide organization appears to mimic the zwitterionic structure of native silaffins (scaffold proteins of diatom shells), suggesting a similar template organization for silica deposition between the in vitro KSL and silaffin systems. PMID:21072418

  6. Coarse-grained simulation study of sequence effects on DNA hybridization in a concentrated environment.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Fu, Iris W; Reddy, K Anki; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-02-01

    A novel coarse-grained model is developed to elucidate thermodynamics and kinetic mechanisms of DNA self-assembly. It accounts for sequence and solvent conditions to capture key experimental results such as sequence-dependent thermal property and salt-dependent persistence length of ssDNA and dsDNA. Moreover, constant-temperature simulations on two single strands of a homogeneous sequence show two main mechanisms of hybridization: a slow slithering mechanism and a one-order faster zippering mechanism. Furthermore, large-scale simulations at a high DNA strand concentration demonstrate that DNA self-assembly is a robust and enthalpically driven process in which the formation of double helices is deciphered to occur via multiple self-assembly pathways including the strand displacement mechanism. However, sequence plays an important role in shifting the majority of one pathway over the others and controlling size distribution of self-assembled aggregates. This study yields a complex picture on the role of sequence on programmable self-assembly and demonstrates a promising simulation tool that is suitable for studies in DNA nanotechnology. PMID:25581253

  7. Connecting Macroscopic Observables and Microscopic Assembly Events in Amyloid Formation Using Coarse Grained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bieler, Noah S.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan; Vácha, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The pre-fibrillar stages of amyloid formation have been implicated in cellular toxicity, but have proved to be challenging to study directly in experiments and simulations. Rational strategies to suppress the formation of toxic amyloid oligomers require a better understanding of the mechanisms by which they are generated. We report Dynamical Monte Carlo simulations that allow us to study the early stages of amyloid formation. We use a generic, coarse-grained model of an amyloidogenic peptide that has two internal states: the first one representing the soluble random coil structure and the second one the -sheet conformation. We find that this system exhibits a propensity towards fibrillar self-assembly following the formation of a critical nucleus. Our calculations establish connections between the early nucleation events and the kinetic information available in the later stages of the aggregation process that are commonly probed in experiments. We analyze the kinetic behaviour in our simulations within the framework of the theory of classical nucleated polymerisation, and are able to connect the structural events at the early stages in amyloid growth with the resulting macroscopic observables such as the effective nucleus size. Furthermore, the free-energy landscapes that emerge from these simulations allow us to identify pertinent properties of the monomeric state that could be targeted to suppress oligomer formation. PMID:23071427

  8. Heat-Treatment of MgSiO Smokes of Astrophysical Interest: Possible Implications for Olivine-Pyroxene-Silica Assemblages in Chondritic Aggregate IDPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Nuth, J. A., III; Hallenbeck, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Anhydrous silicates in coarse-grained ferromagnesiosilica principal components (PCs) formed during atmospheric entry flash-heating also constrain the astromineralogy of astrophysical dust. This is because of the unique closed-system behavior of these PCs in chondritic aggregate interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepuritis, Rolands; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2014-05-01

    COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway Rolands Cepuritis, Norcem/NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF Aggregate production is a mining operation where no purification of the "ore" is necessary. Still it is extremely rare that an aggregate production plant is operating on the basis of zero-waste concept. This is since historically the fine crushed aggregate (particles with a size of less than 2, 4 or sometimes 8 mm) has been regarded as a by-product or waste of the more valuable coarse aggregate production. The reason is that the crushed coarse aggregates can easily replace coarse rounded natural stones in almost any concrete composition; while, the situation with the sand is different. The production of coarse aggregate normally yields fine fractions with rough surface texture, flaky or elongated particles an inadequate gradation. When such a material replaces smooth and rounded natural sand grains in a concrete mix, the result is usually poor and much more water and cement has to be used to achieve adequate concrete flow. The consequences are huge stockpiles of the crushed fine fractions that can't be sold (mass balance problems) for the aggregate producers, sustainability problems for the whole industry and environmental issues for society due to dumping and storing of the fine co-generated material. There have been attempts of utilising the material in concrete before; however, they have mostly ended up in failure. There have been attempts to adjust the crushed sand to the properties of the natural sand, which would still give a lot of waste, especially if the grading would have to be adjusted and the high amounts of fines abundantly present in the crushed sand would have to be removed. Another fundamental reason for failure has been that historically such attempts have mainly ended up in a research carried out by people (both industrial and academic) with aggregate background (= parties willing to find market

  10. Effects of oxidative modification on thermal aggregation and gel properties of soy protein by malondialdehyde.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Hua, Yufei; Lin, Qinlu

    2014-03-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) was selected as a representative of lipid peroxidation products to investigate the effects of oxidative modification on thermal aggregation and gel properties of soy protein by lipid peroxidation products. Incubation of soy protein with increasing concentration of MDA resulted in gradual decrease of particle size and content of thermal aggregates during heat denaturation. Oxidative modification by MDA resulted in a decrease in water holding capacity, gel hardness, and gel strength of soy protein gel. An increase in coarseness and interstice of MDA modified protein gel network was accompanied by uneven distribution of interstice as MDA concentration increased. The results showed that degree of thermal aggregation of MDA-modified soy protein gradually decreased as MDA concentration increased, which contributed to a decrease in water holding capacity, gel hardness, and gel strength of MDA-modified soy protein gel. PMID:24587523

  11. Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations of the self-assembly of pentablock copolymers into micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chushak, Y.; Travesset, A.

    2005-12-01

    Multiblock polymers in aqueous solution, where one or several blocks are hydrophobic, exhibit a rich variety of phases and states of aggregation. In this paper, we investigate a pentablock system ABCBA, where the B block is always hydrophilic and the A and C blocks have varying degrees of hydrophobicity depending on external conditions. We report coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations where the solvent is included explicitly and monomers interact via a 6-9 Lennard Jones potential function. The hydrophobic interaction is modeled by tuning the parameter controlling the strength of the interaction between the hydrophobic monomers and the solvent. We investigate the structure and morphology of the micelles for two concrete situations representing changes in temperature and the pH level. The simulated system is directly relevant to a recently synthesized pentablock system consisting of a triblock Pluronic® with an added pH-sensitive end group [B. C. Anderson et al., Macromolecules 36, 1670 (2003)].

  12. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Han, Wei; Ma, Wen; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and 3J(HNHCα)-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  13. Transient β-hairpin formation in α-synuclein monomer revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hang; Ma, Wen; Han, Wei; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-12-28

    Parkinson’s disease, originating from the intrinsically disordered peptide α-synuclein, is a common neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 5% of the population above age 85. It remains unclear how α-synuclein monomers undergo conformational changes leading to aggregation and formation of fibrils characteristic for the disease. In the present study, we perform molecular dynamics simulations (over 180 μs in aggregated time) using a hybrid-resolution model, Proteins with Atomic details in Coarse-grained Environment (PACE), to characterize in atomic detail structural ensembles of wild type and mutant monomeric α-synuclein in aqueous solution. The simulations reproduce structural properties of α-synuclein characterized in experiments, such as secondary structure content, long-range contacts, chemical shifts, and {sup 3}J(H{sub N}H{sub C{sub α}})-coupling constants. Most notably, the simulations reveal that a short fragment encompassing region 38-53, adjacent to the non-amyloid-β component region, exhibits a high probability of forming a β-hairpin; this fragment, when isolated from the remainder of α-synuclein, fluctuates frequently into its β-hairpin conformation. Two disease-prone mutations, namely, A30P and A53T, significantly accelerate the formation of a β-hairpin in the stated fragment. We conclude that the formation of a β-hairpin in region 38-53 is a key event during α-synuclein aggregation. We predict further that the G47V mutation impedes the formation of a turn in the β-hairpin and slows down β-hairpin formation, thereby retarding α-synuclein aggregation.

  14. Modeling the Self-Assembly and Stability of DHPC Micelles Using Atomic Resolution and Coarse Grained MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Johan F; Vestergaard, Mikkel; Schiøtt, Birgit; Thøgersen, Lea

    2012-05-01

    Membrane mimics such as micelles and bicelles are widely used in experiments involving membrane proteins. With the aim of being able to carry out molecular dynamics simulations in environments comparable to experimental conditions, we set out to test the ability of both coarse grained and atomistic resolution force fields to model the experimentally observed behavior of the lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), which is a widely used lipid for biophysical characterization of membrane proteins. It becomes clear from our results that a satisfactory modeling of DHPC aggregates in solution poses different demands to the force field than do the modeling of bilayers. First, the representation of the short tailed lipid DHPC in the coarse grained force field MARTINI is assessed with the intend of successfully self-assemble micelles with structural characteristics comparable to experimental data. Then, the use of the recently presented polarizable water model in MARTINI is shown to be essential for producing micelles that are structurally in accordance with experiments. For the atomistic representations of DHPC micelles in solution the GROMOS96 force field with lipid parameters by A. Kukol fails to maintain stable micelles, whereas the most recent CHARMM36 lipid parameters and GROMOS96 with the so-called Berger lipid parameters both succeed in this regard. PMID:26593649

  15. Algebraic Multigrid by Smoothed Aggregation for Second and Fourth Order Elliptic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, Petr; Mandel, Jan; Brezina, Marian

    1996-01-01

    Multigrid methods are very efficient iterative solvers for system of algebraic equations arising from finite element and finite difference discretization of elliptic boundary value problems. The main principle of multigrid methods is to complement the local exchange of information in point-wise iterative methods by a global one utilizing several related systems, called coarse levels, with a smaller number of variables. The coarse levels are often obtained as a hierarchy of discretizations with different characteristic meshsizes, but this requires that the discretization is controlled by the iterative method. To solve linear systems produced by existing finite element software, one needs to create an artificial hierarchy of coarse problems. The principal issue is then to obtain computational complexity and approximation properties similar to those for nested meshes, using only information in the matrix of the system and as little extra information as possible. Such algebraic multigrid method that uses the system matrix only was developed by Ruge. The prolongations were based on the matrix of the system by partial solution from given values at selected coarse points. The coarse grid points were selected so that each point would be interpolated to via so-called strong connections. Our approach is based on smoothed aggregation introduced recently by Vanek. First the set of nodes is decomposed into small mutually disjoint subsets. A tentative piecewise constant interpolation (in the discrete sense) is then defined on those subsets as piecewise constant for second order problems, and piecewise linear for fourth order problems. The prolongation operator is then obtained by smoothing the output of the tentative prolongation and coarse level operators are defined variationally.

  16. Influence of recycled aggregate quality and proportioning criteria on recycled concrete properties.

    PubMed

    López-Gayarre, F; Serna, P; Domingo-Cabo, A; Serrano-López, M A; López-Colina, C

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental research using concrete produced by substituting part of the natural coarse aggregates with recycled aggregates from concrete demolition. The influence of the quality of the recycled aggregate (amount of declassified and source of aggregate), the percentage of replacement on the targeted quality of the concrete to be produced (strength and workability) has been evaluated. The granular structure of concrete and replacement criteria were analyzed in this study, factors which have not been analyzed in other studies. The following properties of recycled concretes were analyzed: density, absorption, compressive strength, elastic modulus, amount of occluded air, penetration of water under pressure and splitting tensile strength. A simplified test program was designed to control the costs of the testing while still producing sufficient data to develop reliable conclusions in order to make the number of tests viable whilst guaranteeing the reliability of the conclusions. Several factors were analyzed including the type of aggregate, the percentage of replacement, the type of sieve curve, the declassified content, the strength of concrete and workability of concrete and the replacement criteria. The type of aggregate and the percentage of replacement were the only factors that showed a clear influence on most of the properties. Compressive strength is clearly affected by the quality of recycled aggregates. If the water-cement ratio is kept constant and the loss of workability due to the effect of using recycled aggregate is compensated for with additives, the percentage of replacement of the recycled aggregate will not affect the compressive strength. The elastic modulus is affected by the percentage of replacement. If the percentage of replacement does not exceed 50%, the elastic modulus will only change slightly. PMID:19709870

  17. Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J.

    2009-11-15

    Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

  18. Simulating Fiber Ordering and Aggregation In Shear Flow Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimatze, Justin T.

    We have developed a mesoscale simulation of fiber aggregation in shear flow using LAMMPS and its implementation of dissipative particle dynamics. Understanding fiber aggregation in shear flow and flow-induced microstructural fiber networks is critical to our interest in high-performance composite materials. Dissipative particle dynamics enables the consideration of hydrodynamic interactions between fibers through the coarse-grained simulation of the matrix fluid. Correctly simulating hydrodynamic interactions and accounting for fluid forces on the microstructure is required to correctly model the shear-induced aggregation process. We are able to determine stresses, viscosity, and fiber forces while simulating the evolution of a model fiber system undergoing shear flow. Fiber-fiber contact interactions are approximated by combinations of common pairwise forces, allowing the exploration of interaction-influenced fiber behaviors such as aggregation and bundling. We are then able to quantify aggregate structure and effective volume fraction for a range of relevant system and fiber-fiber interaction parameters. Our simulations have demonstrated several aggregate types dependent on system parameters such as shear rate, short-range attractive forces, and a resistance to relative rotation while in contact. A resistance to relative rotation at fiber-fiber contact points has been found to strongly contribute to an increased angle between neighboring aggregated fibers and therefore an increase in average aggregate volume fraction. This increase in aggregate volume fraction is strongly correlated with a significant enhancement of system viscosity, leading us to hypothesize that controlling the resistance to relative rotation during manufacturing processes is important when optimizing for desired composite material characteristics.

  19. Kinetics of Amyloid Aggregation: A Study of the GNNQQNY Prion Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-01-01

    The small amyloid-forming GNNQQNY fragment of the prion sequence has been the subject of extensive experimental and numerical studies over the last few years. Using unbiased molecular dynamics with the OPEP coarse-grained potential, we focus here on the onset of aggregation in a 20-mer system. With a total of 16.9 of simulations at 280 K and 300 K, we show that the GNNQQNY aggregation follows the classical nucleation theory (CNT) in that the number of monomers in the aggregate is a very reliable descriptor of aggregation. We find that the critical nucleus size in this finite-size system is between 4 and 5 monomers at 280 K and 5 and 6 at 300 K, in overall agreement with experiment. The kinetics of growth cannot be fully accounted for by the CNT, however. For example, we observe considerable rearrangements after the nucleus is formed, as the system attempts to optimize its organization. We also clearly identify two large families of structures that are selected at the onset of aggregation demonstrating the presence of well-defined polymorphism, a signature of amyloid growth, already in the 20-mer aggregate. PMID:23209391

  20. Mucin aggregation from a rod-like meso-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Nicolas; Perilla, Jairo E.; Colina, Coray M.; Lísal, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics, a meso-scale particle-based model, was used to study the aggregation of mucins in aqueous solutions. Concentration, strength of the mucin-water interactions, as well as the effects of size, shape, and composition of the model molecules were studied. Model proteins were represented as rod-like objects formed by coarse-grained beads. In the first model, only one type of beads formed the mucin. It was found that all the surfaces were available to form aggregates and the conformation of the aggregates was a function of the strength of the mucin-water interaction. With this model, the number of aggregates was unaffected by the initial position of the mucins in the simulation box, except for the lowest mucin concentration. In a more refined mucin model, two kinds of beads were used in the molecule in order to represent the existence of cysteine-like terminal groups in the actual molecule. With this new scheme, aggregation took place by the interaction of the terminal groups between model molecules. The kinetic analysis of the evolution of the number of aggregates with time was also studied for both mucin models.

  1. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  2. Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Siniuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R.; Tripathi, S. N.; Dubovik, O.; Giles, D. M.; Martins, J.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.

    2009-12-01

    Several regions of the earth exhibit seasonal mixtures of fine and coarse mode sized aerosol types, which are challenging to characterize from satellite remote sensing. Over land the coarse mode size aerosols (radius >1 micron) originate primarily from arid regions, which generate airborne soil dust, and the dominant fine mode sources are gases and particulates from urban/industrial emissions and from biomass burning. AERONET sun-sky radiometer almucantar retrievals from several years are analyzed for the urban sites of Beijing, China and Kanpur, India (in the Ganges floodplain) where seasonal coarse mode dust particles mix with fine mode pollution aerosol, predominately in the spring. As increasingly more absorbing fine mode pollutants are added to the dust aerosol at both sites, the single scattering albedo (SSA) of the mixtures at 675 nm through 1020 nm decrease as the fine mode fraction of AOD increases, while the 440 nm SSA is relatively constant. Additionally we compare multi-year data from Ilorin, Nigeria where desert dust from the Sahara and Sahel mix with fine mode biomass-burning aerosols. The volume size distribution retrievals from this site often shows tri-modality (third mode centered at 0.6 micron radius), which suggests a different particle source than found for most other arid region AERONET sites, which typically have bi-modal distributions. Comparison of mid-visible single scattering albedo obtained from in situ aircraft measurements during DABEX to multi-year means from the Ilorin site AERONET retrievals show close agreement (within 0.03 or less) over a wide range of Angstrom exponent (0.3 to 1.5). Observed differences in the spectral SSA as a function of fine mode fraction of the optical depth between all three sites are discussed and occur due to differences in absorption for both modes and also due to fine mode particle size dynamics.

  3. Monosized aggregates -- A new model

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.

    1997-08-01

    For applications requiring colloidal particles, it is desirable that they be monosized to better control the structure and the properties. In a number of systems, the monosized particles come together to form aggregates that are also monosized. A model is presented here to explain the formation of these monosized aggregates. This is of particular importance in the fields of ceramics, catalysis, pigments, pharmacy, photographic emulsions, etc.

  4. Preparation and Physicochemical and Pharmacokinetic Characterization of Ginkgo Lactone Nanosuspensions for Antiplatelet Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Rui, Tian-Qi; Zhang, Liang; Qiao, Hong-Zhi; Huang, Ping; Qian, Shuai; Li, Jun-Song; Chen, Zhi-Peng; Fu, Ting-Ming; Di, Liu-Qing; Cai, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of nanosuspensions (NSs) in improving the dissolution and absorption of poorly water-soluble ginkgo lactones (GLs), including ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide C. Liquid GL-NSs were prepared by a combined bottom-up and top-down approach with response surface methodology design, followed by freeze-drying solidification. Physicochemical characterization of the prepared freeze-dried GL-NSs was performed by photon correlation spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, and ginkgolide C in freeze-dried GL-NSs were evaluated with GLs coarse powder as control. Their inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation were also comparatively analyzed. GLs existed in an amorphous state in the prepared freeze-dried GL-NSs. The particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, and redispersibility index of freeze-dried GL-NSs were around 286 nm, 0.26, -25.19 mV, and 112%, respectively. The particle size reduction resulted in much more rapid and complete dissolution of ginkgolides from GL-NSs than coarse powder. Comparison with GLs coarse powder, freeze-dried GL-NSs showed a significant decreased Tmax, 2-fold higher peak concentration, and 2-fold higher area under plasma concentrations curve for 3 ginkgolides and exhibited significantly higher antiplatelet aggregation effect. PMID:26852855

  5. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  6. Coarse quantization with the fast digital shearlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Kutyniok, Gitta; Zhuang, Xiaosheng

    2011-09-01

    The fast digital shearlet transform (FDST) was recently introduced as a means to analyze natural images efficiently, owing to the fact that those are typically governed by cartoon-like structures. In this paper, we introduce and discuss a first-order hybrid sigma-delta quantization algorithm for coarsely quantizing the shearlet coefficients generated by the FDST. Radial oversampling in the frequency domain together with our choice for the quantization helps suppress the reconstruction error in a similar way as first-order sigma-delta quantization for finite frames. We provide a theoretical bound for the reconstruction error and confirm numerically that the error is in accordance with this theoretical decay.

  7. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  8. The power of coarse graining in biomolecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Lopez, Cesar A; Uusitalo, Jaakko J; de Jong, Djurre H; Gopal, Srinivasa M; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological systems is challenging because of the multitude of spatial and temporal scales involved. Replacing atomistic detail with lower resolution, coarse grained (CG), beads has opened the way to simulate large-scale biomolecular processes on time scales inaccessible to all-atom models. We provide an overview of some of the more popular CG models used in biomolecular applications to date, focusing on models that retain chemical specificity. A few state-of-the-art examples of protein folding, membrane protein gating and self-assembly, DNA hybridization, and modeling of carbohydrate fibers are used to illustrate the power and diversity of current CG modeling. PMID:25309628

  9. Coarse-Grained Models for Protein-Cell Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The physiological properties of biological soft matter are the product of collective interactions, which span many time and length scales. Recent computational modeling efforts have helped illuminate experiments that characterize the ways in which proteins modulate membrane physics. Linking these models across time and length scales in a multiscale model explains how atomistic information propagates to larger scales. This paper reviews continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods, which connect atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments with the observed microscopic or mesoscale properties of soft-matter systems essential to our understanding of cells, particularly those involved in sculpting and remodeling cell membranes. PMID:26613047

  10. Coarse fraction of soils from building rubble (WWII)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Scheytt, Traugott; Bussert, Robert; Nehls, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII are wide spread in whole Europe. The parent material for pedogenesis originates from different kinds of buildings, which where destroyed of different ways. Also the kind of sorting and disposing was varying for this material. So the most important feature of soils, resulting from building rubble of WWII, is their heterogeneity. We investigated samples of soils developed from building rubble to answer the following questions: ­ What are the amounts of coarse fraction and what are their main components? ­ What are the chemical properties and what is the crystalline mineral composition of technogenic components? ­ What is the release of ions from coarse technogenic components? We sieved and hand sorted the materials, used the X-ray diffractometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and measured the ions released in 1:2-extract. In most cases, the soils have a high amount of coarse fraction (> 2mm) (median 25% w/w, N=52). Dominating components in the coarse fraction are in the order of decreasing abundance: bricks, mortar (incl. plaster and stucco), slag, ashes and unburned coals. The analyzed components show alkalescent to alkaline pH-values. 75% of the samples show low electrical conductivities of up to 141 µS/cm. Bricks mainly consist of Si oxides, followed by oxides of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and K. X-Ray-diffractometry of bricks showed, that most common minerals are clay minerals (Kaolinit, Illit, Montmorillonit and Chlorit), Quarz, and Carbonates (Calcite and Dolomite, Siderite). Bricks contain Fe-Oxides (Hematite, Goethite), Sulphates and Sulfides (Gypsum, Pyrite, Markasite) in lower amounts. 5-20 % of the minerals are x-ray-amorphous. Mortar is characterized by a high amount of silicates (nearby 80%). The samples showed a lower percentage of Al- and Ca-compounds than bricks. Chemical composition of ashes and slag varies in wide ranges, depending on their genesis. We found mainly ashes from stove heating. They contained