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Sample records for coarse-graining protein energetics

  1. Coarse-Grain Modeling of Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical and thermal loading of energetic materials can incite responses over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales due to inherent nano- and microscale features. Many energy transfer processes within these materials are atomistically governed, yet the material response is manifested at the micro- and mesoscale. The existing state-of-the-art computational methods include continuum level approaches that rely on idealized field-based formulations that are empirically based. Our goal is to bridge the spatial and temporal modeling regimes while ensuring multiscale consistency. However, significant technical challenges exist, including that the multiscale methods linking the atomistic and microscales for molecular crystals are immature or nonexistent. To begin addressing these challenges, we have implemented a bottom-up approach for deriving microscale coarse-grain models directly from quantum mechanics-derived atomistic models. In this talk, a suite of computational tools is described for particle-based microscale simulations of the nonequilibrium response of energetic solids. Our approach builds upon recent advances both in generating coarse-grain models under high strains and in developing a variant of dissipative particle dynamics that includes chemical reactions.

  2. Insights on protein-DNA recognition by coarse grain modelling

    PubMed Central

    Poulain, Pierre; Saladin, Adrien; Hartmann, Brigitte; Prévost, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Coarse grain modelling of macromolecules is a new approach potentially well adapted to answer numerous issues, ranging from physics to biology. We propose here an original DNA coarse grain model specifically dedicated to protein–DNA docking, a crucial, but still largely unresolved, question in molecular biology. Using a representative set of protein–DNA complexes, we first show that our model is able to predict the interaction surface between the macromolecular partners taken in their bound form. In a second part, the impact of the DNA sequence and electrostatics, together with the DNA and protein conformations on docking is investigated. Our results strongly suggest that the overall DNA structure mainly contributes in discriminating the interaction site on cognate proteins. Direct electrostatic interactions between phosphate groups and amino acids side chains strengthen the binding. Overall, this work demonstrates that coarse grain modelling can reveal itself a precious auxiliary for a general and complete description and understanding of protein–DNA association mechanisms. PMID:18478582

  3. COARSE-GRAINED MODELING OF PROTEIN UNFOLDING DYNAMICS*

    PubMed Central

    DENG, MINGGE

    2014-01-01

    We present a new dynamic elastic network model (DENM) that describes the unfolding process of a force-loaded protein. The protein interaction network and its potentials are constructed based on information of its native-state structure obtained from the Protein Data Bank, with network nodes positioned at the Cα coordinates of the protein backbone. Specifically, to mimic the unfolding process, i.e., to simulate the process of overcoming the local energy barrier on the free energy landscape with force loading, the noncovalent protein network bonds (i.e., hydrogen bonds, salt bridges, hydrophobic contacts, etc.) are broken one-by-one with a certain probability, while the strong covalent bonds along the backbone (i.e., peptide bonds, disulfide bonds, etc.) are kept intact. The jumping event from local energy minima (bonds breaking rate) are chosen according to Kramer’s theory and the Bell model. Moreover, we exploit the self-similar structure of proteins at different scales to design an effective coarse-graining procedure for DENM with optimal parameter selection. The robustness of DENM is validated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation against atomistic MD simulation of force-extension processes of the Fibrinogen and Titin Immunoglobulin proteins. We observe that the native structure of the proteins determines the total unfolding dynamics (including large deviations) and not just the fluctuations around the native state. PMID:25400515

  4. Coarse-Grained Models for Protein-Cell Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The physiological properties of biological soft matter are the product of collective interactions, which span many time and length scales. Recent computational modeling efforts have helped illuminate experiments that characterize the ways in which proteins modulate membrane physics. Linking these models across time and length scales in a multiscale model explains how atomistic information propagates to larger scales. This paper reviews continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods, which connect atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments with the observed microscopic or mesoscale properties of soft-matter systems essential to our understanding of cells, particularly those involved in sculpting and remodeling cell membranes. PMID:26613047

  5. Unconstrained Structure Formation in Coarse-Grained Protein Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan

    The ability of proteins to fold into well-defined structures forms the basis of a wide variety of biochemical functions in and out of the cell membrane. Many of these processes, however, operate at time- and length-scales that are currently unattainable by all-atom computer simulations. To cope with this difficulty, increasingly more accurate and sophisticated coarse-grained models are currently being developed. In the present thesis, we introduce a solvent-free coarse-grained model for proteins. Proteins are modeled by four beads per amino acid, providing enough backbone resolution to allow for accurate sampling of local conformations. It relies on simple interactions that emphasize structure, such as hydrogen bonds and hydrophobicity. Realistic alpha/beta content is achieved by including an effective nearest-neighbor dipolar interaction. Parameters are tuned to reproduce both local conformations and tertiary structures. By studying both helical and extended conformations we make sure the force field is not biased towards any particular secondary structure. Without any further adjustments or bias a realistic oligopeptide aggregation scenario is observed. The model is subsequently applied to various biophysical problems: (i) kinetics of folding of two model peptides, (ii) large-scale amyloid-beta oligomerization, and (iii) protein folding cooperativity. The last topic---defined by the nature of the finite-size thermodynamic transition exhibited upon folding---was investigated from a microcanonical perspective: the accurate evaluation of the density of states can unambiguously characterize the nature of the transition, unlike its corresponding canonical analysis. Extending the results of lattice simulations and theoretical models, we find that it is the interplay between secondary structure and the loss of non-native tertiary contacts which determines the nature of the transition. Finally, we combine the peptide model with a high-resolution, solvent-free, lipid

  6. Polysaccharide-Protein Complexes in a Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Poma, Adolfo B; Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2015-09-10

    We construct two variants of coarse-grained models of three hexaoses: one based on the centers of mass of the monomers and the other associated with the C4 atoms. The latter is found to be better defined and more suitable for studying interactions with proteins described within α-C based models. We determine the corresponding effective stiffness constants through all-atom simulations and two statistical methods. One method is the Boltzmann inversion (BI) and the other, named energy-based (EB), involves direct monitoring of energies as a function of the variables that define the stiffness potentials. The two methods are generally consistent in their account of the stiffness. We find that the elastic constants differ between the hexaoses and are noticeably different from those determined for the crystalline cellulose Iβ. The nonbonded couplings through hydrogen bonds between different sugar molecules are modeled by the Lennard-Jones potentials and are found to be stronger than the hydrogen bonds in proteins. We observe that the EB method agrees with other theoretical and experimental determinations of the nonbonded parameters much better than BI. We then consider the hexaose-Man5B catalytic complexes and determine the contact energies between their the C4-α-C atoms. These interactions are found to be stronger than the proteinic hydrogen bonds: about four times as strong for cellohexaose and two times for mannohexaose. The fluctuational dynamics of the coarse-grained complexes are found to be compatible with previous all-atom studies by Bernardi et al. PMID:26291477

  7. Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Protein Folding and Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan; Deserno, Markus

    2009-03-01

    The complexity involved in protein structure is not only due to the rich variety of amino acids, but also the inherent weak interactions, comparable to thermal energy, and important cooperative phenomena. This presents a challenge in atomistic simulations, as it is associated with high-dimensionality and ruggedness of the energy landscape as well as long equilibration times. We have recently developed a coarse-grained (CG) implicit solvent peptide model which has been designed to reproduce key consequences of the abovementioned weak interactions. Its intermediate level of resolution, four beads per amino acid, allows for accurate sampling of local conformations by designing a force field that relies on simple interactions. A realistic ratio of α-helix to β-sheet content is achieved by mimicking a nearest-neighbor dipole interaction. We tune the model in order to fold helical proteins while systematically comparing the structure with NMR data. Very good agreement is achieved for proteins that have simple tertiary structures. We further probe the effects of cooperativity between amino acids by looking at peptide aggregation, where hydrophobic peptide fragments cooperatively form large-scale β-sheet structures. The model is able to reproduce features from atomistic simulations on a qualitative basis.

  8. Microcanonical thermostatistics of coarse-grained proteins with amyloidogenic propensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.; Rizzi, Leandro G.; Alves, Nelson A.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fibrillar aggregates seems to be a common characteristic of polypeptide chains, although the observation of these aggregates may depend on appropriate experimental conditions. Partially folded intermediates seem to have an important role in the generation of protein aggregates, and a mechanism for this fibril formation considers that these intermediates also correspond to metastable states with respect to the fibrillar ones. Here, using a coarse-grained (CG) off-lattice model, we carry out a comparative analysis of the thermodynamic aspects characterizing the folding transition with respect to the propensity for aggregation of four different systems: two isoforms of the amyloid β-protein, the Src SH3 domain, and the human prion proteins (hPrP). Microcanonical analysis of the data obtained from replica exchange method is conducted to evaluate the free-energy barrier and latent heat in these models. The simulations of the amyloid β isoforms and Src SH3 domain indicated that the folding process described by this CG model is related to a negative specific heat, a phenomenon that can only be verified in the microcanonical ensemble in first-order phase transitions. The CG simulation of the hPrP heteropolymer yielded a continuous folding transition. The absence of a free-energy barrier and latent heat favors the presence of partially unfolded conformations, and in this context, this thermodynamic aspect could explain the reason why the hPrP heteropolymer is more aggregation-prone than the other heteropolymers considered in this study. We introduced the hydrophobic radius of gyration as an order parameter and found that it can be used to obtain reliable information about the hydrophobic packing and the transition temperatures in the folding process.

  9. Microcanonical thermostatistics of coarse-grained proteins with amyloidogenic propensity.

    PubMed

    Frigori, Rafael B; Rizzi, Leandro G; Alves, Nelson A

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fibrillar aggregates seems to be a common characteristic of polypeptide chains, although the observation of these aggregates may depend on appropriate experimental conditions. Partially folded intermediates seem to have an important role in the generation of protein aggregates, and a mechanism for this fibril formation considers that these intermediates also correspond to metastable states with respect to the fibrillar ones. Here, using a coarse-grained (CG) off-lattice model, we carry out a comparative analysis of the thermodynamic aspects characterizing the folding transition with respect to the propensity for aggregation of four different systems: two isoforms of the amyloid β-protein, the Src SH3 domain, and the human prion proteins (hPrP). Microcanonical analysis of the data obtained from replica exchange method is conducted to evaluate the free-energy barrier and latent heat in these models. The simulations of the amyloid β isoforms and Src SH3 domain indicated that the folding process described by this CG model is related to a negative specific heat, a phenomenon that can only be verified in the microcanonical ensemble in first-order phase transitions. The CG simulation of the hPrP heteropolymer yielded a continuous folding transition. The absence of a free-energy barrier and latent heat favors the presence of partially unfolded conformations, and in this context, this thermodynamic aspect could explain the reason why the hPrP heteropolymer is more aggregation-prone than the other heteropolymers considered in this study. We introduced the hydrophobic radius of gyration as an order parameter and found that it can be used to obtain reliable information about the hydrophobic packing and the transition temperatures in the folding process. PMID:23298062

  10. Coarse-graining of proteins based on elastic network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitskiy, Anton V.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2013-08-01

    To simulate molecular processes on biologically relevant length- and timescales, coarse-grained (CG) models of biomolecular systems with tens to even hundreds of residues per CG site are required. One possible way to build such models is explored in this article: an elastic network model (ENM) is employed to define the CG variables. Free energy surfaces are approximated by Taylor series, with the coefficients found by force-matching. CG potentials are shown to undergo renormalization due to roughness of the energy landscape and smoothing of it under coarse-graining. In the case study of hen egg-white lysozyme, the entropy factor is shown to be of critical importance for maintaining the native structure, and a relationship between the proposed ENM-mode-based CG models and traditional CG-bead-based models is discussed. The proposed approach uncovers the renormalizable character of CG models and offers new opportunities for automated and computationally efficient studies of complex free energy surfaces.

  11. Effects of Surface Water on Protein Dynamics Studied by a Novel Coarse-Grained Normal Mode Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) has received much attention as a direct approach to extract the collective motions of macromolecules. However, the stringent requirement of computational resources by classical all-atom NMA limits the size of the macromolecules to which the method is normally applied. We implemented a novel coarse-grained normal mode approach based on partitioning the all-atom Hessian matrix into relevant and nonrelevant parts. It is interesting to note that, using classical all-atom NMA results as a reference, we found that this method generates more accurate results than do other coarse-grained approaches, including elastic network model and block normal mode approaches. Moreover, this new method is effective in incorporating the energetic contributions from the nonrelevant atoms, including surface water molecules, into the coarse-grained protein motions. The importance of such improvements is demonstrated by the effect of surface water to shift vibrational modes to higher frequencies and by an increase in overlap of the coarse-grained eigenvector space (the motion directions) with that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of solvated protein in a water box. These results not only confirm the quality of our method but also point out the importance of incorporating surface structural water in studying protein dynamics. PMID:18212016

  12. Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay–Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gay–Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay–Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library), as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER, and CHARMM force fields), while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10–200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of nonbonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero/homodimers (such as peptide–peptide, peptide–water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems. PMID:24659927

  13. Coarse-Grained Model for Colloidal Protein Interactions, B22, and Protein Cluster Formation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marco A.; Sahin, Eric; Robinson, Anne S.; Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semi-quantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22). Based on earlier work, this CG model treats proteins as rigid bodies composed of one bead per amino acid, with each amino acid having specific parameters for its size, hydrophobicity, and charge. The net interactions are a combination of steric repulsions, short-range attractions, and screened long-range charge-charge interactions. Model parametrization was done by fitting simulation results against experimental values of the B22 as a function of solution ionic strength for α-chymotrypsinogen A and γD-crystallin (gD-Crys). The CG model is applied to characterize the pairwise interactions and dimerization of gD-Crys and the dependance on temperature, protein concentration, and ionic strength. The results illustrate that at experimentally relevant conditions where stable dimers do not form, the entropic contributions are predominant in the free-energy of protein cluster formation and colloidal protein interactions, arguing against interpretations that treat B22 primarily from energetic considerations alone. Additionally, the results suggest that electrostatic interactions help to modulate the population of the different stable configurations for protein nearest-neighbor pairs, while short-range attractions determine the relative orientations of proteins within these configurations. Finally, simulation results are combined with Principal Component Analysis to identify those amino-acids / surface patches that form inter-protein contacts

  14. Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Protein-Lipid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Spijker, Peter; van Hoof, Bram; Debertrand, Michel; Markvoort, Albert J.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hilbers, Peter A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many biological cellular processes occur at the micro- or millisecond time scale. With traditional all-atom molecular modeling techniques it is difficult to investigate the dynamics of long time scales or large systems, such as protein aggregation or activation. Coarse graining (CG) can be used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in such a system, and reduce the computational complexity. In this paper the first version of a coarse grained model for transmembrane proteins is presented. This model differs from other coarse grained protein models due to the introduction of a novel angle potential as well as a hydrogen bonding potential. These new potentials are used to stabilize the backbone. The model has been validated by investigating the adaptation of the hydrophobic mismatch induced by the insertion of WALP-peptides into a lipid membrane, showing that the first step in the adaptation is an increase in the membrane thickness, followed by a tilting of the peptide. PMID:20640160

  15. Simulation of Coarse-Grained Protein-Protein Interactions with Graphics Processing Units.

    PubMed

    Tunbridge, Ian; Best, Robert B; Gain, James; Kuttel, Michelle M

    2010-11-01

    We report a hybrid parallel central and graphics processing units (CPU-GPU) implementation of a coarse-grained model for replica exchange Monte Carlo (REMC) simulations of protein assemblies. We describe the design, optimization, validation, and benchmarking of our algorithms, particularly the parallelization strategy, which is specific to the requirements of GPU hardware. Performance evaluation of our hybrid implementation shows scaled speedup as compared to a single-core CPU; reference simulations of small 100 residue proteins have a modest speedup of 4, while large simulations with thousands of residues are up to 1400 times faster. Importantly, the combination of coarse-grained models with highly parallel GPU hardware vastly increases the length- and time-scales accessible for protein simulation, making it possible to simulate much larger systems of interacting proteins than have previously been attempted. As a first step toward the simulation of the assembly of an entire viral capsid, we have demonstrated that the chosen coarse-grained model, together with REMC sampling, is capable of identifying the correctly bound structure, for a pair of fragments from the human hepatitis B virus capsid. Our parallel solution can easily be generalized to other interaction functions and other types of macromolecules and has implications for the parallelization of similar N-body problems that require random access lookups. PMID:26617104

  16. Coarse-grained model for colloidal protein interactions, B(22), and protein cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marco A; Sahin, Erinc; Robinson, Anne S; Roberts, Christopher J

    2013-12-19

    Reversible protein cluster formation is an important initial step in the processes of native and non-native protein aggregation, but involves relatively long time and length scales for detailed atomistic simulations and extensive mapping of free energy landscapes. A coarse-grained (CG) model is presented to semiquantitatively characterize the thermodynamics and key configurations involved in the landscape for protein oligomerization, as well as experimental measures of interactions such as the osmotic second virial coefficient (B22). Based on earlier work (Grüenberger et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 763), this CG model treats proteins as rigid bodies composed of one bead per amino acid, with each amino acid having specific parameters for its size, hydrophobicity, and charge. The net interactions are a combination of steric repulsions, short-range attractions, and screened long-range charge-charge interactions. Model parametrization was done by fitting simulation results against experimental value of B22 as a function of solution ionic strength for α-chymotrypsinogen A and γD-Crystallin (gD-Crys). The CG model is applied to characterize the pairwise interactions and dimerization of gD-Crys and the dependence on temperature, protein concentration, and ionic strength. The results illustrate that at experimentally relevant conditions where stable dimers do not form, the entropic contributions are predominant in the free-energy of protein cluster formation and colloidal protein interactions, arguing against interpretations that treat B22 primarily from energetic considerations alone. Additionally, the results suggest that electrostatic interactions help to modulate the population of the different stable configurations for protein nearest-neighbor pairs, while short-range attractions determine the relative orientations of proteins within these configurations. Finally, simulation results are combined with Principal Component Analysis to identify those amino

  17. Hierarchical coarse-graining strategy for protein-membrane systems to access mesoscopic scales

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary S.; Lyman, Edward

    2014-01-01

    An overall multiscale simulation strategy for large scale coarse-grain simulations of membrane protein systems is presented. The protein is modeled as a heterogeneous elastic network, while the lipids are modeled using the hybrid analytic-systematic (HAS) methodology, where in both cases atomistic level information obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is used to parameterize the model. A feature of this approach is that from the outset liposome length scales are employed in the simulation (i.e., on the order of ½ a million lipids plus protein). A route to develop highly coarse-grained models from molecular-scale information is proposed and results for N-BAR domain protein remodeling of a liposome are presented. PMID:20158037

  18. Folding of small knotted proteins: Insights from a mean field coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Saeed; Potestio, Raffaello

    2015-12-28

    A small but relevant number of proteins whose native structure is known features nontrivial topology, i.e., they are knotted. Understanding the process of folding from a swollen unknotted state to the biologically relevant native conformation is, for these proteins, particularly difficult, due to their rate-limiting topological entanglement. To shed some light into this conundrum, we introduced a structure-based coarse-grained model of the protein, where the information about the folded conformation is encoded in bonded angular interactions only, which do not favor the formation of native contacts. A stochastic search scheme in parameter space is employed to identify a set of interactions that maximizes the probability to attain the knotted state. The optimal knotting pathways of the two smallest knotted proteins, obtained through this approach, are consistent with the results derived by means of coarse-grained as well as full atomistic simulations.

  19. A Generic Force Field for Protein Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfeng; Bai, Fang; Li, Honglin; Wang, Xicheng

    2012-01-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) force fields have become promising tools for studies of protein behavior, but the balance of speed and accuracy is still a challenge in the research of protein coarse graining methodology. In this work, 20 CG beads have been designed based on the structures of amino acid residues, with which an amino acid can be represented by one or two beads, and a CG solvent model with five water molecules was adopted to ensure the consistence with the protein CG beads. The internal interactions in protein were classified according to the types of the interacting CG beads, and adequate potential functions were chosen and systematically parameterized to fit the energy distributions. The proposed CG force field has been tested on eight proteins, and each protein was simulated for 1000 ns. Even without any extra structure knowledge of the simulated proteins, the Cα root mean square deviations (RMSDs) with respect to their experimental structures are close to those of relatively short time all atom molecular dynamics simulations. However, our coarse grained force field will require further refinement to improve agreement with and persistence of native-like structures. In addition, the root mean square fluctuations (RMSFs) relative to the average structures derived from the simulations show that the conformational fluctuations of the proteins can be sampled. PMID:23203075

  20. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Heme Proteins: Validation and Study of Large Conformational Transitions.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Claudia L; Petruk, Ariel; Bringas, Mauro; Estrin, Dario A; Roitberg, Adrian E; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-07-12

    Heme proteins are ubiquitous in nature and perform many diverse functions in all kingdoms of life. Many of these functions are related to large-scale conformational transitions and allosteric processes. Sampling of these large conformational changes is computationally very challenging. In this context, coarse-grain simulations emerge as an efficient approach to explore the conformational landscape. In this work, we present a coarse-grained model of the heme group and thoroughly validate this model in different benchmark examples, which include the monomeric heme proteins myoglobin and neuroglobin and the tetrameric human hemoglobin where we evaluated the method's ability to explore conformational changes (as the formation of hexacoordinated species) and allosteric transitions (as the well-known R → T transition). The obtained results are compared with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, the results indicate that this approach conserves the essential dynamical information on different allosteric processes. PMID:27267322

  1. REACH coarse-grained biomolecular simulation: transferability between different protein structural classes.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-08-01

    Coarse graining of protein interactions provides a means of simulating large biological systems. The REACH (Realistic Extension Algorithm via Covariance Hessian) coarse-graining method, in which the force constants of a residue-scale elastic network model are calculated from the variance-covariance matrix obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, involves direct mapping between scales without the need for iterative optimization. Here, the transferability of the REACH force field is examined between protein molecules of different structural classes. As test cases, myoglobin (all alpha), plastocyanin (all beta), and dihydrofolate reductase (alpha/beta) are taken. The force constants derived are found to be closely similar in all three proteins. An MD version of REACH is presented, and low-temperature coarse-grained (CG) REACH MD simulations of the three proteins are compared with atomistic MD results. The mean-square fluctuations of the atomistic MD are well reproduced by the CGMD. Model functions for the CG interactions, derived by averaging over the three proteins, are also shown to produce fluctuations in good agreement with the atomistic MD. The results indicate that, similarly to the use of atomistic force fields, it is now possible to use a single, generic REACH force field for all protein studies, without having first to derive parameters from atomistic MD simulation for each individual system studied. The REACH method is thus likely to be a reliable way of determining spatiotemporal motion of a variety of proteins without the need for expensive computation of long atomistic MD simulations. PMID:18469078

  2. A Coarse-Grained Protein Model in a Water-like Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Rossky, Peter J.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-05-01

    Simulations employing an explicit atom description of proteins in solvent can be computationally expensive. On the other hand, coarse-grained protein models in implicit solvent miss essential features of the hydrophobic effect, especially its temperature dependence, and have limited ability to capture the kinetics of protein folding. We propose a free space two-letter protein (``H-P'') model in a simple, but qualitatively accurate description for water, the Jagla model, which coarse-grains water into an isotropically interacting sphere. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we design protein-like sequences that can undergo a collapse, exposing the ``Jagla-philic'' monomers to the solvent, while maintaining a ``hydrophobic'' core. This protein-like model manifests heat and cold denaturation in a manner that is reminiscent of proteins. While this protein-like model lacks the details that would introduce secondary structure formation, we believe that these ideas represent a first step in developing a useful, but computationally expedient, means of modeling proteins.

  3. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  4. Necessity of high-resolution for coarse-grained modeling of flexible proteins.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiguang; Chen, Jianhan

    2016-07-01

    The popular MARTINI coarse-grained (CG) force field requires the protein structure to be fixed, and is unsuitable for simulating dynamic processes such as protein folding. Here, we examine the feasibility of developing a flexible protein model within the MARTINI framework. The results demonstrate that the MARTINI CG scheme does not properly describe the volume and packing of protein backbone and side chains and leads to excessive collapse without structural restraints in explicit CG water. Combining atomistic protein representation with the MARTINI CG solvent, such as in the PACE model, dramatically improves description of flexible protein conformations. Yet, the CG solvent is insufficient to capture the conformational dependence of protein-solvent interactions, and PACE is unable to properly model context dependent conformational transitions. Taken together, high physical resolution at or near the atomistic level is likely necessary for flexible protein models with explicit, microscopic solvents, and the coarse-graining needs to focus on possible simplification in interaction potentials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27130454

  5. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes. PMID:25043724

  6. Distributions of experimental protein structures on coarse-grained free energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Kannan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yuan; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting conformational changes of proteins is needed in order to fully comprehend functional mechanisms. With the large number of available structures in sets of related proteins, it is now possible to directly visualize the clusters of conformations and their conformational transitions through the use of principal component analysis. The most striking observation about the distributions of the structures along the principal components is their highly non-uniform distributions. In this work, we use principal component analysis of experimental structures of 50 diverse proteins to extract the most important directions of their motions, sample structures along these directions, and estimate their free energy landscapes by combining knowledge-based potentials and entropy computed from elastic network models. When these resulting motions are visualized upon their coarse-grained free energy landscapes, the basis for conformational pathways becomes readily apparent. Using three well-studied proteins, T4 lysozyme, serum albumin, and sarco-endoplasmic reticular Ca2+ adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA), as examples, we show that such free energy landscapes of conformational changes provide meaningful insights into the functional dynamics and suggest transition pathways between different conformational states. As a further example, we also show that Monte Carlo simulations on the coarse-grained landscape of HIV-1 protease can directly yield pathways for force-driven conformational changes.

  7. Coarse-grained model of adsorption of blood plasma proteins onto nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hender; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for evaluation of interactions of globular proteins with nanoparticles (NPs). The protein molecules are represented by one bead per aminoacid and the nanoparticle by a homogeneous sphere that interacts with the aminoacids via a central force that depends on the nanoparticle size. The proposed methodology is used to predict the adsorption energies for six common human blood plasma proteins on hydrophobic charged or neutral nanoparticles of different sizes as well as the preferred orientation of the molecules upon adsorption. Our approach allows one to rank the proteins by their binding affinity to the nanoparticle, which can be used for predicting the composition of the NP-protein corona. The predicted ranking is in good agreement with known experimental data for protein adsorption on surfaces.

  8. Membrane-Protein Interactions in a Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    West, Beate; Brown, Frank L.H.; Schmid, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study membrane-protein interactions and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions by Monte Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers with cylindrical hydrophobic inclusions. The strength of the hydrophobic force and the hydrophobic thickness of the proteins are systematically varied. The results are compared with analytical predictions of two popular analytical theories: The Landau-de Gennes theory and the elastic theory. The elastic theory provides an excellent description of the fluctuation spectra of pure membranes and successfully reproduces the deformation profiles of membranes around single proteins. However, its prediction for the potential of mean force between proteins is not compatible with the simulation data for large distances. The simulations show that the lipid-mediated interactions are governed by five competing factors: direct interactions; lipid-induced depletion interactions; lipid bridging; lipid packing; and a smooth long-range contribution. The mechanisms leading to hydrophobic mismatch interactions are critically analyzed. PMID:18835907

  9. A polarizable coarse-grained protein model for dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peter, Emanuel K; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor V

    2015-10-01

    We present a new coarse-grained polarizable protein model for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. This method allows large timesteps in particle-based systems and speeds up sampling by many orders of magnitude. Our new model is based on the electrostatic polarization of the protein backbone and a detailed representation of the sidechains in combination with a polarizable water model. We define our model parameters using the experimental structures of two proteins, TrpZip2 and TrpCage. Backmapping and subsequent short replica-exchange molecular dynamics runs verify our approach and show convergence to the experimental structures on the atomistic level. We validate our model on five different proteins: GB1, the WW-domain, the B-domain of Protein A, the peripheral binding subunit and villin headpiece. PMID:26339692

  10. Proteins at air-water interfaces: a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Allan, Daniel B; Leheny, Robert L; Reich, Daniel H

    2014-11-01

    We present a coarse-grained model to describe the adsorption and deformation of proteins at an air-water interface. The interface is introduced empirically in the form of a localized field that couples to a hydropathy scale of amino acids. We consider three kinds of proteins: protein G, egg-white lysozyme, and hydrophobin. We characterize the nature of the deformation and the orientation of the proteins induced by their proximity to and association with the interface. We also study protein diffusion in the layer formed at the interface and show that the diffusion slows with increasing concentration in a manner similar to that for a colloidal suspension approaching the glass transition. PMID:25310625

  11. Protein Simulations in Fluids: Coupling the OPEP Coarse-Grained Force Field with Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-04-14

    A novel simulation framework that integrates the OPEP coarse-grained (CG) model for proteins with the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methodology to account for the fluid solvent at mesoscale level is presented. OPEP is a very efficient, water-free and electrostatic-free force field that reproduces at quasi-atomistic detail processes like peptide folding, structural rearrangements, and aggregation dynamics. The LB method is based on the kinetic description of the solvent in order to solve the fluid mechanics under a wide range of conditions, with the further advantage of being highly scalable on parallel architectures. The capabilities of the approach are presented, and it is shown that the strategy is effective in exploring the role of hydrodynamics on protein relaxation and peptide aggregation. The end result is a strategy for modeling systems of thousands of proteins, such as in the case of dense protein suspensions. The future perspectives of the multiscale approach are also discussed. PMID:26574390

  12. Coarse-Grained Antibody Models for "Weak" Protein-Protein Interactions from Low to High Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Calero-Rubio, Cesar; Saluja, Atul; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-07-14

    So-called "weak" protein-protein interactions are important for the control of solution properties and stability at elevated protein concentrations (c2) but are not practical to capture in atomistic simulations. This report focuses on a series of coarse-grained models for predicting second osmotic virial coefficients (B22) and high-concentration Rayleigh scattering (osmotic compressibility) as a function of c2 for monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that are of interest in biotechnology. B22 and molecular volume along with c2-dependent osmotic compressibility were calculated for a series of models with increasing structural detail. Models were refined to include contributions from sterics, short-ranged van der Waals and hydrophobic attractions, screened electrostatics, and the flexibility of the mAb hinge region. The results highlight shortcomings for spherical models of MAbs and a useful balance between numerical accuracy and computational burden offered by models based on 6 or 12 spherical, partly overlapping domains. The results provide bounds for realistic values of effective charges on variable domains in order for MAbs to be stable in solution and more generally illustrate semiquantitative bounds for the space of model parameters that can reproduce experimental behavior and provide a basis for future development of computationally efficient and accurate CG mAb models to predict both low- and high-c2 behavior. PMID:27314827

  13. Coarse-grained modeling of protein second osmotic virial coefficients: sterics and short-ranged attractions.

    PubMed

    Grünberger, Alexander; Lai, Pin-Kuang; Blanco, Marco A; Roberts, Christopher J

    2013-01-24

    A series of coarse-grained models, with different levels of structural resolution, were tested to calculate the steric contributions to protein osmotic second virial coefficients (B(22,S)) for proteins ranging from small single-domain molecules to large multidomain molecules, using the recently developed Mayer sampling method. B(22,S) was compared for different levels of coarse-graining: four-beads-per-amino-acid (4bAA), one-bead-per-amino-acid (1bAA), one-sphere-per-domain (1sD), and one-sphere-per-protein (1sP). Values for the 1bAA and 4bAA models were quantitatively indistinguishable for both spherical and nonspherical proteins, and the agreement with values from all-atom models improved with increasing protein size, making the CG approach attractive for large proteins of biotechnological interest. Interestingly, in the absence of detailed structural information, the hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) along with a simple 1sP approximation provided reasonably accurate values for B(22,S) for both globular and highly asymmetric protein structures, while other 1sP approximations gave poorer agreement; this helps to justify the currently empirical practice of estimating B(22,S) from R(h) for large proteins such as antibodies. The results also indicate that either 1bAA or 4bAA CG models may be good starting points for incorporating short-range attractions. Comparison of gD-crystallin B(22) values including both sterics and short-range attractions shows that 1bAA and 4bAA models give equivalent results when properly scaled to account for differences in the number of surface beads in the two CG descriptions. This provides a basis for future work that will also incorporate long-ranged electrostatic attractions and repulsions. PMID:23245189

  14. Cooperativity, Local-Nonlocal Coupling, and Nonnative Interactions: Principles of Protein Folding from Coarse-Grained Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hue Sun; Zhang, Zhuqing; Wallin, Stefan; Liu, Zhirong

    2011-05-01

    Coarse-grained, self-contained polymer models are powerful tools in the study of protein folding. They are also essential to assess predictions from less rigorous theoretical approaches that lack an explicit-chain representation. Here we review advances in coarse-grained modeling of cooperative protein folding, noting in particular that the Levinthal paradox was raised in response to the experimental discovery of two-state-like folding in the late 1960s, rather than to the problem of conformational search per se. Comparisons between theory and experiment indicate a prominent role of desolvation barriers in cooperative folding, which likely emerges generally from a coupling between local conformational preferences and nonlocal packing interactions. Many of these principles have been elucidated by native-centric models, wherein nonnative interactions may be treated perturbatively. We discuss these developments as well as recent applications of coarse-grained chain modeling to knotted proteins and to intrinsically disordered proteins.

  15. Cooperativity, local-nonlocal coupling, and nonnative interactions: principles of protein folding from coarse-grained models.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hue Sun; Zhang, Zhuqing; Wallin, Stefan; Liu, Zhirong

    2011-01-01

    Coarse-grained, self-contained polymer models are powerful tools in the study of protein folding. They are also essential to assess predictions from less rigorous theoretical approaches that lack an explicit-chain representation. Here we review advances in coarse-grained modeling of cooperative protein folding, noting in particular that the Levinthal paradox was raised in response to the experimental discovery of two-state-like folding in the late 1960s, rather than to the problem of conformational search per se. Comparisons between theory and experiment indicate a prominent role of desolvation barriers in cooperative folding, which likely emerges generally from a coupling between local conformational preferences and nonlocal packing interactions. Many of these principles have been elucidated by native-centric models, wherein nonnative interactions may be treated perturbatively. We discuss these developments as well as recent applications of coarse-grained chain modeling to knotted proteins and to intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:21453060

  16. An Anisotropic Coarse-Grained Model for Proteins Based On Gay-Berne and Electric Multipole Potentials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hujun; Li, Yan; Ren, Pengyu; Zhang, Dinglin; Li, Guohui

    2014-02-10

    Gay-Berne anisotropic potential has been widely used to evaluate the non-bonded interactions between coarse-grained particles being described as elliptical rigid bodies. In this paper, we are presenting a coarse-grained model for twenty kinds of amino acids and proteins, based on the anisotropic Gay-Berne and point electric multipole (EMP) potentials. We demonstrate that the anisotropic coarse-grained model, namely GBEMP model, is able to reproduce many key features observed from experimental protein structures (Dunbrack Library) as well as from atomistic force field simulations (using AMOEBA, AMBER and CHARMM force fields) while saving the computational cost by a factor of about 10~200 depending on specific cases and atomistic models. More importantly, unlike other coarse-grained approaches, our framework is based on the fundamental intermolecular forces with explicit treatment of electrostatic and repulsion-dispersion forces. As a result, the coarse-grained protein model presented an accurate description of non-bonded interactions (particularly electrostatic component) between hetero-/homo-dimers (such as peptide-peptide, peptide-water). In addition, the encouraging performance of the model was reflected by the excellent correlation between GBEMP and AMOEBA models in the calculations of the dipole moment of peptides. In brief, the GBEMP model given here is general and transferable, suitable for simulating complex biomolecular systems. PMID:24659927

  17. PACSAB: Coarse-Grained Force Field for the Study of Protein-Protein Interactions and Conformational Sampling in Multiprotein Systems.

    PubMed

    Emperador, Agustí; Sfriso, Pedro; Villarreal, Marcos Ariel; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of proteins are usually performed on a single molecule, and coarse-grained protein models are calibrated using single-molecule simulations, therefore ignoring intermolecular interactions. We present here a new coarse-grained force field for the study of many protein systems. The force field, which is implemented in the context of the discrete molecular dynamics algorithm, is able to reproduce the properties of folded and unfolded proteins, in both isolation, complexed forming well-defined quaternary structures, or aggregated, thanks to its proper evaluation of protein-protein interactions. The accuracy and computational efficiency of the method makes it a universal tool for the study of the structure, dynamics, and association/dissociation of proteins. PMID:26597989

  18. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Frank C; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  19. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-Grained Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) G-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the G-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG G model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  20. Combining coarse-grained nonbonded and atomistic bonded interactions for protein modeling.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid coarse-grained (CG) and atomistic (AT) model for protein simulations and rapid searching and refinement of peptide-protein complexes has been developed. In contrast to other hybrid models that typically represent spatially separate parts of a protein by either a CG or an AT force field model, the present approach simultaneously represents the protein by an AT (united atom) and a CG model. The interactions of the protein main chain are described based on the united atom force field allowing a realistic representation of protein secondary structures. In addition, the AT description of all other bonded interactions keeps the protein compatible with a realistic bonded geometry. Nonbonded interactions between side chains and side chains and main chain are calculated at the level of a CG model using a knowledge-based potential. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations on several test proteins resulted in trajectories in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental structures. Applications to the refinement of docked peptide-protein complexes resulted in improved complex structures. Application to the rapid refinement of docked protein-protein complex is also possible but requires further optimization of force field parameters. PMID:22911567

  1. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-01

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  2. CAMELOT: A machine learning approach for coarse-grained simulations of aggregation of block-copolymeric protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ruff, Kiersten M.; Harmon, Tyler S.; Pappu, Rohit V.

    2015-12-28

    We report the development and deployment of a coarse-graining method that is well suited for computer simulations of aggregation and phase separation of protein sequences with block-copolymeric architectures. Our algorithm, named CAMELOT for Coarse-grained simulations Aided by MachinE Learning Optimization and Training, leverages information from converged all atom simulations that is used to determine a suitable resolution and parameterize the coarse-grained model. To parameterize a system-specific coarse-grained model, we use a combination of Boltzmann inversion, non-linear regression, and a Gaussian process Bayesian optimization approach. The accuracy of the coarse-grained model is demonstrated through direct comparisons to results from all atom simulations. We demonstrate the utility of our coarse-graining approach using the block-copolymeric sequence from the exon 1 encoded sequence of the huntingtin protein. This sequence comprises of 17 residues from the N-terminal end of huntingtin (N17) followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract. Simulations based on the CAMELOT approach are used to show that the adsorption and unfolding of the wild type N17 and its sequence variants on the surface of polyQ tracts engender a patchy colloid like architecture that promotes the formation of linear aggregates. These results provide a plausible explanation for experimental observations, which show that N17 accelerates the formation of linear aggregates in block-copolymeric N17-polyQ sequences. The CAMELOT approach is versatile and is generalizable for simulating the aggregation and phase behavior of a range of block-copolymeric protein sequences.

  3. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations of protein translocation through nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Helms, Volkhard; Geyer, Tihamér

    2012-10-01

    A crucial process in biological cells is the translocation of newly synthesized proteins across cell membranes via integral membrane protein pores termed translocons. Recent improved techniques now allow producing artificial membranes with pores of similar dimensions of a few nm as the translocon system. For the translocon system, the protein has to be unfolded, whereas the artificial pores are wide enough so that small proteins can pass through even when folded. To study how proteins permeate through such membrane pores, we used coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations where the proteins were modeled as single beads or bead-spring polymers for both folded and unfolded states. The pores were modeled as cylindrical holes through the membrane with various radii and lengths. Diffusion was driven by a concentration gradient created across the porous membrane. Our results for both folded and unfolded configurations show the expected reciprocal relation between the flow rate and the pore length in agreement with an analytical solution derived by Brunn et al. [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 37, 311 (1984)], 10.1093/qjmam/37.2.311. Furthermore, we find that the geometric constriction by the narrow pore leads to an accumulation of proteins at the pore entrance, which in turn compensates for the reduced diffusivity of the proteins inside the pore.

  4. A coarse-grained α-carbon protein model with anisotropic hydrogen-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Eng-Hui; Fawzi, Nicolas Lux; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We develop a sequence based α-carbon model to incorporate a mean field estimate of the orientation dependence of the polypeptide chain that gives rise to specific hydrogen bond pairing to stabilize α-helices and β-sheets. We illustrate the success of the new protein model in capturing thermodynamic measures and folding mechanism of proteins L and G. Compared to our previous coarse-grained model, the new model shows greater folding cooperativity and improvements in designability of protein sequences, as well as predicting correct trends for kinetic rates and mechanism for proteins L and G. We believe the model is broadly applicable to other protein folding and protein–protein co-assembly processes, and does not require experimental input beyond the topology description of the native state. Even without tertiary topology information, it can also serve as a mid-resolution protein model for more exhaustive conformational search strategies that can bridge back down to atomic descriptions of the polypeptide chain. PMID:17879350

  5. THE OPEP COARSE-GRAINED PROTEIN MODEL: FROM SINGLE MOLECULES, AMYLOID FORMATION, ROLE OF MACROMOLECULAR CROWDING AND HYDRODYNAMICS TO RNA/DNA COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Fabio; Melchionna, Simone; Tuffery, Pierre; Pasquali, Samuela; Mousseau, Normand; Cragnolini, Tristan; Chebaro, Yassmine; Saint-Pierre, Jean-Francois; Kalimeri, Maria; Barducci, Alessandro; Laurin, Yohan; Tek, Alex; Baaden, Marc; Nguyen, Phuong Hoang; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The OPEP coarse-grained protein model has been applied to a wide range of applications since its first release 15 years ago. The model, which combines energetic and structural accuracy and chemical specificity, allows studying single protein properties, DNA/RNA complexes, amyloid fibril formation and protein suspensions in a crowded environment. Here we first review the current state of the model and the most exciting applications using advanced conformational sampling methods. We then present the current limitations and a perspective on the on-going developments. PMID:24759934

  6. Protein secondary-structure description with a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R; Hinsen, Konrad

    2015-07-01

    A coarse-grained geometrical model for protein secondary-structure description and analysis is presented which uses only the positions of the C(α) atoms. A space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation is constructed and the folding of the protein backbone is described by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive C(α) positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe database of protein structures, thresholds are derived for the screw parameters of secondary-structure elements and demonstrate that the latter can be reliably assigned on the basis of a C(α) model. For this purpose, a comparative study with the widely used DSSP (Define Secondary Structure of Proteins) algorithm was performed and it was shown that the parameter distribution corresponding to the ensemble of all pure C(α) structures in the RCSB Protein Data Bank matches that of the ASTRAL database. It is expected that this approach will be useful in the development of structure-refinement techniques for low-resolution data. PMID:26143913

  7. PaLaCe: A Coarse-Grain Protein Model for Studying Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard; Ceres, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    We present a coarse-grain protein model PaLaCe (Pasi-Lavery-Ceres) that has been developed principally to allow fast computational studies of protein mechanics and to clarify the links between mechanics and function. PaLaCe uses a two-tier protein representation with one to three pseudoatoms representing each amino acid for the main nonbonded interactions, combined with atomic-scale peptide groups and some side chain atoms to allow the explicit representation of backbone hydrogen bonds and to simplify the treatment of bonded interactions. The PaLaCe force field is composed of physics-based terms, parametrized using Boltzmann inversion of conformational probability distributions derived from a protein structure data set, and iteratively refined to reproduce the experimental distributions. PaLaCe has been implemented in the MMTK simulation package and can be used for energy minimization, normal mode calculations, and molecular or stochastic dynamics. We present simulations with PaLaCe that test its ability to maintain stable structures for folded proteins, reproduce their dynamic fluctuations, and correctly model large-scale, force-induced conformational changes. PMID:26589071

  8. Prediction and validation of protein intermediate states from structurally rich ensembles and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Laura; Yoluk, Ozge; Carrillo, Oliver; Orozco, Modesto; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Protein conformational changes are at the heart of cell functions, from signalling to ion transport. However, the transient nature of the intermediates along transition pathways hampers their experimental detection, making the underlying mechanisms elusive. Here we retrieve dynamic information on the actual transition routes from principal component analysis (PCA) of structurally-rich ensembles and, in combination with coarse-grained simulations, explore the conformational landscapes of five well-studied proteins. Modelling them as elastic networks in a hybrid elastic-network Brownian dynamics simulation (eBDIMS), we generate trajectories connecting stable end-states that spontaneously sample the crystallographic motions, predicting the structures of known intermediates along the paths. We also show that the explored non-linear routes can delimit the lowest energy passages between end-states sampled by atomistic molecular dynamics. The integrative methodology presented here provides a powerful framework to extract and expand dynamic pathway information from the Protein Data Bank, as well as to validate sampling methods in general. PMID:27578633

  9. Multiscale Simulations of Protein Landscapes: Using Coarse Grained Models as Reference Potentials to Full Explicit Models

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Benjamin M.; Roca, Maite; Chu, Zhen T.; Vicatos, Spyridon; Kilshtain, Alexandra Vardi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating the free energy landscape of proteins and the corresponding functional aspects presents a major challenge for computer simulation approaches. This challenge is due to the complexity of the landscape and the enormous computer time needed for converging simulations. The use of simplified coarse grained (CG) folding models offers an effective way of sampling the landscape but such a treatment, however, may not give the correct description of the effect of the actual protein residues. A general way around this problem that has been put forward in our early work (Fan et al, Theor Chem Acc (1999) 103:77-80) uses the CG model as a reference potential for free energy calculations of different properties of the explicit model. This method is refined and extended here, focusing on improving the electrostatic treatment and on demonstrating key applications. This application includes: evaluation of changes of folding energy upon mutations, calculations of transition states binding free energies (which are crucial for rational enzyme design), evaluation of catalytic landscape and simulation of the time dependent responses to pH changes. Furthermore, the general potential of our approach in overcoming major challenges in studies of structure function correlation in proteins is discussed. PMID:20052756

  10. A coarse grained protein model with internal degrees of freedom. Application to α-synuclein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Wim J.

    2016-02-01

    Particles in simulations are traditionally endowed with fixed interactions. While this is appropriate for particles representing atoms or molecules, objects with significant internal dynamics—like sequences of amino acids or even an entire protein—are poorly modelled by invariable particles. We develop a highly coarse grained polymorph patchy particle with the ultimate aim of simulating proteins as chains of particles at the secondary structure level. Conformational changes, e.g., a transition between disordered and β-sheet states, are accommodated by internal coordinates that determine the shape and interaction characteristics of the particles. The internal coordinates, as well as the particle positions and orientations, are propagated by Brownian Dynamics in response to their local environment. As an example of the potential offered by polymorph particles, we model the amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, as a single particle with two internal states. The simulations yield oligomers of particles in the disordered state and fibrils of particles in the "misfolded" cross-β-sheet state. The aggregation dynamics is complex, as aggregates can form by a direct nucleation-and-growth mechanism and by two-step-nucleation through conversions between the two cluster types. The aggregation dynamics is complex, with fibrils formed by direct nucleation-and-growth, by two-step-nucleation through the conversion of an oligomer and by auto-catalysis of this conversion.

  11. Validating a Coarse-Grained Potential Energy Function through Protein Loop Modelling

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, James T.; Kelley, Lawrence A.; Freemont, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) methods for sampling protein conformational space have the potential to increase computational efficiency by reducing the degrees of freedom. The gain in computational efficiency of CG methods often comes at the expense of non-protein like local conformational features. This could cause problems when transitioning to full atom models in a hierarchical framework. Here, a CG potential energy function was validated by applying it to the problem of loop prediction. A novel method to sample the conformational space of backbone atoms was benchmarked using a standard test set consisting of 351 distinct loops. This method used a sequence-independent CG potential energy function representing the protein using -carbon positions only and sampling conformations with a Monte Carlo simulated annealing based protocol. Backbone atoms were added using a method previously described and then gradient minimised in the Rosetta force field. Despite the CG potential energy function being sequence-independent, the method performed similarly to methods that explicitly use either fragments of known protein backbones with similar sequences or residue-specific /-maps to restrict the search space. The method was also able to predict with sub-Angstrom accuracy two out of seven loops from recently solved crystal structures of proteins with low sequence and structure similarity to previously deposited structures in the PDB. The ability to sample realistic loop conformations directly from a potential energy function enables the incorporation of additional geometric restraints and the use of more advanced sampling methods in a way that is not possible to do easily with fragment replacement methods and also enable multi-scale simulations for protein design and protein structure prediction. These restraints could be derived from experimental data or could be design restraints in the case of computational protein design. C++ source code is available for download from http

  12. Multi-scale morphology in self-assembly of peptides to proteins via a coarse-grain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2015-03-01

    Self-organizing structures of short peptides (6-7 residues) and proteins (136 residues) are studied by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. Peptides and proteins are described by coarse-grained chains of residues whose interactions are described by a knowledge-based residue-residue interaction potential that captures the compositional specificity. Large-scale computer simulations are performed to study the structural evolution e.g. aggregation, network, etc. at a range of temperatures and concentrations. A number of local and global physical quantities including structure factor are examined. We find that the residue interactions, concentration, and size of chains are very important in modulating the structure of emerging morphologies in the specified temperature range. Estimates are provided for the effective (fractal) dimension of the assembly over various length scales as a function of temperature. This work is supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory.

  13. Investigation of protein folding by coarse-grained molecular dynamics with the UNRES force field

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Senet, Patrick; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations offer a dramatic extension of the time-scale of simulations compared to all-atom approaches. In this article, we describe the use of the physics-based united-residue (UNRES) force field, developed in our laboratory, in protein-structure simulations. We demonstrate that this force field offers about a 4000-times extension of the simulation time scale; this feature arises both from averaging out the fast-moving degrees of freedom and reduction of the cost of energy and force calculations compared to all-atom approaches with explicit solvent. With massively parallel computers, microsecond folding simulation times of proteins containing about 1000 residues can be obtained in days. A straightforward application of canonical UNRES/MD simulations, demonstrated with the example of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB code: 1BDD, a three-α-helix bundle), discerns the folding mechanism and determines kinetic parameters by parallel simulations of several hundred or more trajectories. Use of generalized-ensemble techniques, of which the multiplexed replica exchange method proved to be the most effective, enables us to compute thermodynamics of folding and carry out fully physics-based prediction of protein structure, in which the predicted structure is determined as a mean over the most populated ensemble below the folding-transition temperature. By using principal component analysis of the UNRES folding trajectories of the formin-binding protein WW domain (PDB code: 1E0L; a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet) and 1BDD, we identified representative structures along the folding pathways and demonstrated that only a few (low-indexed) principal components can capture the main structural features of a protein-folding trajectory; the potentials of mean force calculated along these essential modes exhibit multiple minima, as opposed to those along the remaining modes which are unimodal. In addition, a

  14. Sliding of Proteins Non-specifically Bound to DNA: Brownian Dynamics Studies with Coarse-Grained Protein and DNA Models

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    DNA binding proteins efficiently search for their cognitive sites on long genomic DNA by combining 3D diffusion and 1D diffusion (sliding) along the DNA. Recent experimental results and theoretical analyses revealed that the proteins show a rotation-coupled sliding along DNA helical pitch. Here, we performed Brownian dynamics simulations using newly developed coarse-grained protein and DNA models for evaluating how hydrodynamic interactions between the protein and DNA molecules, binding affinity of the protein to DNA, and DNA fluctuations affect the one dimensional diffusion of the protein on the DNA. Our results indicate that intermolecular hydrodynamic interactions reduce 1D diffusivity by 30%. On the other hand, structural fluctuations of DNA give rise to steric collisions between the CG-proteins and DNA, resulting in faster 1D sliding of the protein. Proteins with low binding affinities consistent with experimental estimates of non-specific DNA binding show hopping along the CG-DNA. This hopping significantly increases sliding speed. These simulation studies provide additional insights into the mechanism of how DNA binding proteins find their target sites on the genome. PMID:25504215

  15. Coarse-grained modeling of the intrinsically disordered protein Histatin 5 in solution: Monte Carlo simulations in combination with SAXS.

    PubMed

    Cragnell, Carolina; Durand, Dominique; Cabane, Bernard; Skepö, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and coarse-grained modeling have been used to analyze Histatin 5, an unstructured short cationic salivary peptide known to have anticandidical properties. The calculated scattering functions have been compared with intensity curves and the distance distribution function P(r) obtained from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), at both high and low salt concentrations. The aim was to achieve a molecular understanding and a physico-chemical insight of the obtained SAXS results and to gain information of the conformational changes of Histatin 5 due to altering salt content, charge distribution, and net charge. From a modeling perspective, the accuracy of the electrostatic interactions are of special interest. The used coarse-grained model was based on the primitive model in which charged hard spheres differing in charge and in size represent the ionic particles, and the solvent only enters the model through its relative permittivity. The Hamiltonian of the model comprises three different contributions: (i) excluded volumes, (ii) electrostatic, and (iii) van der Waals interactions. Even though the model can be considered as gross omitting all atomistic details, a great correspondence is obtained with the experimental results. Proteins 2016; 84:777-791. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914439

  16. Modeling protein conformational transitions by a combination of coarse-grained normal mode analysis and robotics-inspired methods

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obtaining atomic-scale information about large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins is a challenging problem for both experimental and computational methods. Such information is, however, important for understanding the mechanisms of interaction of many proteins. Methods This paper presents a computationally efficient approach, combining methods originating from robotics and computational biophysics, to model protein conformational transitions. The ability of normal mode analysis to predict directions of collective, large-amplitude motions is applied to bias the conformational exploration performed by a motion planning algorithm. To reduce the dimension of the problem, normal modes are computed for a coarse-grained elastic network model built on short fragments of three residues. Nevertheless, the validity of intermediate conformations is checked using the all-atom model, which is accurately reconstructed from the coarse-grained one using closed-form inverse kinematics. Results Tests on a set of ten proteins demonstrate the ability of the method to model conformational transitions of proteins within a few hours of computing time on a single processor. These results also show that the computing time scales linearly with the protein size, independently of the protein topology. Further experiments on adenylate kinase show that main features of the transition between the open and closed conformations of this protein are well captured in the computed path. Conclusions The proposed method enables the simulation of large-amplitude conformational transitions in proteins using very few computational resources. The resulting paths are a first approximation that can directly provide important information on the molecular mechanisms involved in the conformational transition. This approximation can be subsequently refined and analyzed using state-of-the-art energy models and molecular modeling methods. PMID:24564964

  17. Elastic deformation and failure in protein filament bundles: atomistic simulations and coarse-grained modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, N. A.

    2008-01-01

    The synthetic peptide RAD16-II has shown promise in tissue engineering and drug delivery. It has been studied as a vehicle for cell delivery and controlled release of IGF-1 to repair infarcted cardiac tissue, and as a scaffold to promote capillary formation for an in vitro model of angiogenesis. The structure of RAD16-II is hierarchical, with monomers forming long β-sheets that pair together to form filaments; filaments form bundles approximately 30–60 nm in diameter; branching networks of filament bundles form macroscopic gels. We investigate the mechanics of shearing between the two β-sheets constituting one filament, and between cohered filaments of RAD16-II. This shear loading is found in filament bundle bending or in tensile loading of fibers composed of partial-length filaments. Molecular dynamics simulations show that time to failure is a stochastic function of applied shear stress, and that for a given loading time behavior is elastic for sufficiently small shear loads. We propose a coarse-grained model based on Langevin dynamics that matches molecular dynamics results and facilities extending simulations in space and time. The model treats a filament as an elastic string of particles, each having potential energy that is a periodic function of its position relative to the neighboring filament. With insight from these simulations, we discuss strategies for strengthening RAD16-II and similar materials. PMID:18440063

  18. Structure and dynamics of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 (consisting of 326 residues) plays a critical role in viral assembly and its functions such as regulation of viral transcription, packaging, and budding of mature virions into the plasma membrane of infected cells. How does the protein VP40 go through structural evolution during the viral life cycle remains an open question? Using a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation we investigate the structural evolution of VP40 as a function of temperature with the input of a knowledge-based residue-residue interaction. A number local and global physical quantities (e.g. mobility profile, contact map, radius of gyration, structure factor) are analyzed with our large-scale simulations. Our preliminary data show that the structure of the protein evolves through different state with well-defined morphologies which can be identified and quantified via a detailed analysis of structure factor.

  19. SIRAH: a structurally unbiased coarse-grained force field for proteins with aqueous solvation and long-range electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Darré, Leonardo; Machado, Matías Rodrigo; Brandner, Astrid Febe; González, Humberto Carlos; Ferreira, Sebastián; Pantano, Sergio

    2015-02-10

    Modeling of macromolecular structures and interactions represents an important challenge for computational biology, involving different time and length scales. However, this task can be facilitated through the use of coarse-grained (CG) models, which reduce the number of degrees of freedom and allow efficient exploration of complex conformational spaces. This article presents a new CG protein model named SIRAH, developed to work with explicit solvent and to capture sequence, temperature, and ionic strength effects in a topologically unbiased manner. SIRAH is implemented in GROMACS, and interactions are calculated using a standard pairwise Hamiltonian for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We present a set of simulations that test the capability of SIRAH to produce a qualitatively correct solvation on different amino acids, hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions, and long-range electrostatic recognition leading to spontaneous association of unstructured peptides and stable structures of single polypeptides and protein-protein complexes. PMID:26575407

  20. Coarse-Grained Description of Protein Internal Dynamics: An Optimal Strategy for Decomposing Proteins in Rigid Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Potestio, R.; Pontiggia, F.; Micheletti, C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of accurately describing the internal dynamics of proteins, in terms of movements of a few approximately-rigid subparts, is an appealing biophysical problem with important implications for the analysis and interpretation of data from experiments or numerical simulations. The problem is tackled here by means of a novel variational approach that exploits information about equilibrium fluctuations of interresidues distances, provided, e.g., by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations or coarse-grained models. No contiguity in primary sequence or in space is enforced a priori for amino acids grouped in the same rigid unit. The identification of the rigid protein moduli, or dynamical domains, provides valuable insight into functionally oriented aspects of protein internal dynamics. To illustrate this point, we first discuss the decomposition of adenylate kinase and HIV-1 protease and then extend the investigation to several representatives of the hydrolase enzymatic class. The known catalytic site of these enzymes is found to be preferentially located close to the boundary separating the two primary dynamical subdomains. PMID:19527659

  1. Tunable Coarse Graining for Monte Carlo Simulations of Proteins via Smoothed Energy Tables: Direct and Exchange Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many commonly used coarse-grained models for proteins are based on simplified interaction sites and consequently may suffer from significant limitations, such as the inability to properly model protein secondary structure without the addition of restraints. Recent work on a benzene fluid (LettieriS.; ZuckermanD. M.J. Comput. Chem.2012, 33, 268−27522120971) suggested an alternative strategy of tabulating and smoothing fully atomistic orientation-dependent interactions among rigid molecules or fragments. Here we report our initial efforts to apply this approach to the polar and covalent interactions intrinsic to polypeptides. We divide proteins into nearly rigid fragments, construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the atomistic interaction energies between those fragments, and apply potential energy smoothing techniques to those tables. The amount of smoothing can be adjusted to give coarse-grained models that range from the underlying atomistic force field all the way to a bead-like coarse-grained model. For a moderate amount of smoothing, the method is able to preserve about 70–90% of the α-helical structure while providing a factor of 3–10 improvement in sampling per unit computation time (depending on how sampling is measured). For a greater amount of smoothing, multiple folding–unfolding transitions of the peptide were observed, along with a factor of 10–100 improvement in sampling per unit computation time, although the time spent in the unfolded state was increased compared with less smoothed simulations. For a β hairpin, secondary structure is also preserved, albeit for a narrower range of the smoothing parameter and, consequently, for a more modest improvement in sampling. We have also applied the new method in a “resolution exchange” setting, in which each replica runs a Monte Carlo simulation with a different degree of smoothing. We obtain exchange rates that compare favorably to our previous efforts at resolution exchange

  2. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-05-07

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD.

  3. Discriminating binding mechanisms of an intrinsically disordered protein via a multi-state coarse-grained model

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Michael; Best, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins undergo a conformational transition upon binding to their cognate binding partner, with intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) providing an extreme example in which a folding transition occurs. However, it is often not clear whether this occurs via an “induced fit” or “conformational selection” mechanism, or via some intermediate scenario. In the first case, transient encounters with the binding partner favour transitions to the bound structure before the two proteins dissociate, while in the second the bound structure must be selected from a subset of unbound structures which are in the correct state for binding, because transient encounters of the incorrect conformation with the binding partner are most likely to result in dissociation. A particularly interesting situation involves those intrinsically disordered proteins which can bind to different binding partners in different conformations. We have devised a multi-state coarse-grained simulation model which is able to capture the binding of IDPs in alternate conformations, and by applying it to the binding of nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) to either ACTR or IRF-3 we are able to determine the binding mechanism. By all measures, the binding of NCBD to either binding partner appears to occur via an induced fit mechanism. Nonetheless, we also show how a scenario closer to conformational selection could arise by choosing an alternative non-binding structure for NCBD. PMID:24811666

  4. Computational Calculation Of The Ionization Energies Of The Human Prion Protein By The Coarse-grain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Justin; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The causes of the misfolding of prion protein -i.e. the transformation of PrPC to PrPSc - have not been clearly elucidated. Many studies have focused on identifying possible chemical conditions, such as pH, temperature and chemical denaturation, that may trigger the pathological transformation of prion proteins (Weiwei Tao, Gwonchan Yoon, Penghui Cao, `` β-sheet-like formation during the mechanical unfolding of prion protein'', The Journal of Chemical Physics, 2015, 143, 125101). Here, we attempt to calculate the ionization energies of the prion protein, which will be able to shed light onto the possible causes of the misfolding. We plan on using the coarse-grain method which allows for a more feasible calculation time by means of approximation. We believe that by being able to approximate the ionization potential, particularly that of the regions known to form stable β-strands of the PrPSc form, the possible sources of denaturation, be it chemical or mechanical, may be narrowed down.

  5. AWSEM-MD: Protein Structure Prediction Using Coarse-grained Physical Potentials and Bioinformatically Based Local Structure Biasing

    PubMed Central

    Davtyan, Aram; Schafer, Nicholas P.; Zheng, Weihua; Clementi, Cecilia; Wolynes, Peter G.; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure and Energy Model (AWSEM) is a coarse-grained protein force field. AWSEM contains physically motivated terms, such as hydrogen bonding, as well as a bioinformatically based local structure biasing term, which efficiently takes into account many-body effects that are modulated by the local sequence. When combined with appropriate local or global alignments to choose memories, AWSEM can be used to perform de novo protein structure prediction. Herein we present structure prediction results for a particular choice of local sequence alignment method based on short residue sequences called fragments. We demonstrate the model’s structure prediction capabilities for three levels of global homology between the target sequence and those proteins used for local structure biasing, all of which assume that the structure of the target sequence is not known. When there are no homologs in the database of structures used for local structure biasing, AWSEM calculations produce structural predictions that are somewhat improved compared with prior works using related approaches. The inclusion of a small number of structures from homologous sequences improves structure prediction only marginally but when the fragment search is restricted to only homologous sequences, AWSEM can perform high resolution structure prediction and can be used for kinetics and dynamics studies. PMID:22545654

  6. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  7. Efficient Parameter Estimation of Generalizable Coarse-Grained Protein Force Fields Using Contrastive Divergence: A Maximum Likelihood Approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Maximum Likelihood (ML) optimization schemes are widely used for parameter inference. They maximize the likelihood of some experimentally observed data, with respect to the model parameters iteratively, following the gradient of the logarithm of the likelihood. Here, we employ a ML inference scheme to infer a generalizable, physics-based coarse-grained protein model (which includes Go̅-like biasing terms to stabilize secondary structure elements in room-temperature simulations), using native conformations of a training set of proteins as the observed data. Contrastive divergence, a novel statistical machine learning technique, is used to efficiently approximate the direction of the gradient ascent, which enables the use of a large training set of proteins. Unlike previous work, the generalizability of the protein model allows the folding of peptides and a protein (protein G) which are not part of the training set. We compare the same force field with different van der Waals (vdW) potential forms: a hard cutoff model, and a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential with vdW parameters inferred or adopted from the CHARMM or AMBER force fields. Simulations of peptides and protein G show that the LJ model with inferred parameters outperforms the hard cutoff potential, which is consistent with previous observations. Simulations using the LJ potential with inferred vdW parameters also outperforms the protein models with adopted vdW parameter values, demonstrating that model parameters generally cannot be used with force fields with different energy functions. The software is available at https://sites.google.com/site/crankite/. PMID:24683370

  8. Tabulation as a high-resolution alternative to coarse-graining protein interactions: Initial application to virus capsid subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, Justin; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional coarse-graining based on a reduced number of interaction sites often entails a significant sacrifice of chemical accuracy. As an alternative, we present a method for simulating large systems composed of interacting macromolecules using an energy tabulation strategy previously devised for small rigid molecules or molecular fragments [S. Lettieri and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Comput. Chem. 33, 268-275 (2012); J. Spiriti and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 5161-5177 (2014)]. We treat proteins as rigid and construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the interaction energy between them. Arbitrarily detailed interactions may be incorporated into the tables, but as a proof-of-principle, we tabulate a simple α-carbon Gō-like model for interactions between dimeric subunits of the hepatitis B viral capsid. This model is significantly more structurally realistic than previous models used in capsid assembly studies. We are able to increase the speed of Monte Carlo simulations by a factor of up to 6700 compared to simulations without tables, with only minimal further loss in accuracy. To obtain further enhancement of sampling, we combine tabulation with the weighted ensemble (WE) method, in which multiple parallel simulations are occasionally replicated or pruned in order to sample targeted regions of a reaction coordinate space. In the initial study reported here, WE is able to yield pathways of the final ˜25% of the assembly process.

  9. Contact prediction in protein modeling: Scoring, folding and refinement of coarse-grained models

    PubMed Central

    Latek, Dorota; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Background Several different methods for contact prediction succeeded within the Sixth Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP6). The most relevant were non-local contact predictions for targets from the most difficult categories: fold recognition-analogy and new fold. Such contacts could provide valuable structural information in case a template structure cannot be found in the PDB. Results We described comprehensive tests of the effectiveness of contact data in various aspects of de novo modeling with CABS, an algorithm which was used successfully in CASP6 by the Kolinski-Bujnicki group. We used the predicted contacts in a simple scoring function for the post-simulation ranking of protein models and as a soft bias in the folding simulations and in the fold-refinement procedure. The latter approach turned out to be the most successful. The CABS force field used in the Replica Exchange Monte Carlo simulations cooperated with the true contacts and discriminated the false ones, which resulted in an improvement of the majority of Kolinski-Bujnicki's protein models. In the modeling we tested different sets of predicted contact data submitted to the CASP6 server. According to our results, the best performing were the contacts with the accuracy balanced with the coverage, obtained either from the best two predictors only or by a consensus from as many predictors as possible. Conclusion Our tests have shown that theoretically predicted contacts can be very beneficial for protein structure prediction. Depending on the protein modeling method, a contact data set applied should be prepared with differently balanced coverage and accuracy of predicted contacts. Namely, high coverage of contact data is important for the model ranking and high accuracy for the folding simulations. PMID:18694501

  10. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Ghulam; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2015-12-01

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  11. On the application of the MARTINI coarse-grained model to immersion of a protein in a phospholipid bilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Ghulam E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org; Nandekar, Prajwal P.; Yu, Xiaofeng; Wade, Rebecca C. E-mail: rebecca.wade@h-its.org

    2015-12-28

    An important step in the simulation of a membrane protein in a phospholipid bilayer is the correct immersion of the protein in the bilayer. Crystal structures are determined without the bilayer. Particularly for proteins with monotopic domains, it can be unclear how deeply and in which orientation the protein is being inserted in the membrane. We have previously developed a procedure combining coarse-grain (CG) with all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to insert and simulate a cytochrome P450 (CYP) possessing an N-terminal transmembrane helix connected by a flexible linker region to a globular domain that dips into the membrane. The CG simulations provide a computationally efficient means to explore different orientations and conformations of the CYP in the membrane. Converged configurations obtained in the CG simulations are then refined in AA simulations. Here, we tested different variants of the MARTINI CG model, differing in the water model, the treatment of long-range non-bonded interactions, and the implementation (GROMACS 4.5.5 vs 5.0.4), for this purpose. We examined the behavior of the models for simulating a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in water and for the immersion of CYP3A4 in a POPC bilayer, and compared the CG-MD results with the previously reported experimental and simulation results. We also tested the methodology on a set of four other CYPs. Finally, we propose an optimized protocol for modeling such protein-membrane systems that provides the most plausible configurations and is computationally efficient; this incorporates the standard non-polar water model and the GROMACS 5.0.4 implementation with a reaction field treatment of long-range interactions.

  12. Coarse graining in micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, G; Koch, R H

    2003-05-23

    Numerical solutions of the micromagnetic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations provide valuable information at low temperatures (T), but produce egregious errors at higher T. For example, Curie temperatures are often overestimated by an order of magnitude. We show that these errors result from the use of block or coarse-grained variables, without a concomitant renormalization of the system parameters to account for the block size. Renormalization solves the problem of the Curie-point anomaly and improves the accuracy of more complicated micromagnetic simulations, even at low T. PMID:12785922

  13. A new coarse-grained model for E. coli cytoplasm: accurate calculation of the diffusion coefficient of proteins and observation of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Sabeeha; McClendon, Christopher L; Hsu, Monica T; Jacobson, Matthew P; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained model of the E. coli cytoplasm is developed by describing the proteins of the cytoplasm as flexible units consisting of one or more spheres that follow Brownian dynamics (BD), with hydrodynamic interactions (HI) accounted for by a mean-field approach. Extensive BD simulations were performed to calculate the diffusion coefficients of three different proteins in the cellular environment. The results are in close agreement with experimental or previously simulated values, where available. Control simulations without HI showed that use of HI is essential to obtain accurate diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion inside the crowded cellular medium was investigated with Fractional Brownian motion analysis, and found to be present in this model. By running a series of control simulations in which various forces were removed systematically, it was found that repulsive interactions (volume exclusion) are the main cause for anomalous diffusion, with a secondary contribution from HI. PMID:25180859

  14. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  15. Coarse-graining in peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics that treats discontinuous media, including the evolution of discontinuities due to fracture, on the same mathematical basis as classically smooth media. A recent advance in the linearized peridynamic theory permits the reduction of the number of degrees of freedom modeled within a body. Under equilibrium conditions, this coarse graining method exactly reproduces the internal forces on the coarsened degrees of freedom, including the effect of the omitted material that is no longer explicitly modeled. The method applies to heterogeneous as well as homogeneous media and accounts for defects in the material. The coarse graining procedure can be repeated over and over, resulting in a hierarchically coarsened description that, at each stage, continues to reproduce the exact internal forces present in the original, detailed model. Each coarsening step results in reduced computational cost. This talk will describe the new peridynamic coarsening method and show computational examples.

  16. Electrostatic Interaction between RNA and Protein Capsid in CCMV Simulated by a Coarse-grain RNA model and a Monte Carlo Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deqiang; Konecny, Robert; Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Although many viruses have been crystallized and the protein capsid structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography, the nucleic acids often can not be resolved. This is especially true for RNA viruses. The lack of information about the conformation of DNA/RNA greatly hinders our understanding of the assembly mechanism of various viruses. Here we combine a coarse-grain model and a Monte Carlo method to simulate the distribution of viral RNA inside the capsid of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV). Our results show that there is very strong interaction between the N-terminal residues of the capsid proteins, which are highly positive-charged, and the viral RNA. Without these residues, the binding energy disfavors the binding of RNA by the capsid. The RNA forms a shell close to the capsid with the highest densities associated with the capsid dimers. These high-density regions are connected to each other in the shape of a continuous net of triangles. The overall icosahedral shape of the net overlaps with the capsid subunit icosahedral organization. Medium density of RNA is found under the pentamers of the capsid. These findings are consistent with experimental observations. PMID:15386271

  17. Thermal response of proteins (histone H2AX, H3.1) by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation with a knowledge-based phenomenological potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Miriam; Heermann, Dieter; Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2012-02-01

    Using a coarse-grained bond fluctuating model, we investigate structure and dynamics of two histones, H2AX (143 residues) and H3.1 (136 residues) as a function of temperature (T). A knowledged based contact matrix is used as an input for a phenomenological residue-residue interaction in a generalized Lennard-Jones potential. Metropolis algorithm is used to execute stochastic movement of each residue. A number of local and global physical quantities are analyzed. Despite unique energy and mobility profiles of its residues in a specific sequence, the histone H3.1 appears to undergo a structural transformation from a random coil to a globular conformation on reducing the temperature. The radius of gyration of the histone H2AX, in contrast, exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on temperature with a maximum at a characteristic temperature (Tc) where crossover occurs from a positive (stretching below Tc) to negative (contraction above Tc) thermal response on increasing T. Multi-scale structures of the proteins are examined by a detailed analysis of their structure functions.

  18. Equilibration of complexes of DNA and H-NS proteins on charged surfaces: A coarse-grained model point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyeux, Marc

    2014-09-01

    The Histone-like Nucleoid Structuring protein (H-NS) is a nucleoid-associated protein, which is involved in both gene regulation and DNA compaction. Although it is a key player in genome organization by forming bridges between DNA duplexes, the precise structure of complexes of DNA and H-NS proteins is still not well understood. In particular, it is not clear whether the structure of DNA/H-NS complexes in the living cell is similar to that of complexes deposited on mica surfaces, which may be observed by AFM microscopy. A coarse-grained model, which helps getting more insight into this question, is described and analyzed in the present paper. This model is able of describing both the bridging of bacterial DNA by H-NS in the bulk and the deposition and equilibration of the complex on a charged surface. Simulations performed with the model reveal that a slight attraction between DNA and the charged surface is sufficient to let DNA/H-NS complexes reorganize from 3D coils to planar plasmids bridged by H-NS proteins similar to those observed by AFM microscopy. They furthermore highlight the antagonistic effects of the interactions between DNA and the surface. Indeed, increasing these interactions slows down the equilibration of naked plasmids on the surface but, on the other hand, enables a faster equilibration of DNA/H-NS complexes. Based on the distribution of the lifetimes of H-NS bridges and the time evolution of the number of trans-binding protein dimers during equilibration of the complexes on the surface, it is argued that the decrease of the equilibration time of the complex upon increase of the interaction strength between DNA and the surface is ascribable to the associated decrease of the probability to form new bridges between DNA and the proteins.

  19. A Coarse-Grained Elastic Network Atom Contact Model and Its Use in the Simulation of Protein Dynamics and the Prediction of the Effect of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, Vincent; Najmanovich, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) methods are widely used to study dynamic aspects of protein structures. Two critical components of NMA methods are coarse-graining in the level of simplification used to represent protein structures and the choice of potential energy functional form. There is a trade-off between speed and accuracy in different choices. In one extreme one finds accurate but slow molecular-dynamics based methods with all-atom representations and detailed atom potentials. On the other extreme, fast elastic network model (ENM) methods with Cα−only representations and simplified potentials that based on geometry alone, thus oblivious to protein sequence. Here we present ENCoM, an Elastic Network Contact Model that employs a potential energy function that includes a pairwise atom-type non-bonded interaction term and thus makes it possible to consider the effect of the specific nature of amino-acids on dynamics within the context of NMA. ENCoM is as fast as existing ENM methods and outperforms such methods in the generation of conformational ensembles. Here we introduce a new application for NMA methods with the use of ENCoM in the prediction of the effect of mutations on protein stability. While existing methods are based on machine learning or enthalpic considerations, the use of ENCoM, based on vibrational normal modes, is based on entropic considerations. This represents a novel area of application for NMA methods and a novel approach for the prediction of the effect of mutations. We compare ENCoM to a large number of methods in terms of accuracy and self-consistency. We show that the accuracy of ENCoM is comparable to that of the best existing methods. We show that existing methods are biased towards the prediction of destabilizing mutations and that ENCoM is less biased at predicting stabilizing mutations. PMID:24762569

  20. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines

    PubMed Central

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  1. Coarse-Grained Simulations of Topology-Dependent Mechanisms of Protein Unfolding and Translocation Mediated by ClpY ATPase Nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Kravats, Andrea N; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Stan, George

    2016-01-01

    Clp ATPases are powerful ring shaped nanomachines which participate in the degradation pathway of the protein quality control system, coupling the energy from ATP hydrolysis to threading substrate proteins (SP) through their narrow central pore. Repetitive cycles of sequential intra-ring ATP hydrolysis events induce axial excursions of diaphragm-forming central pore loops that effect the application of mechanical forces onto SPs to promote unfolding and translocation. We perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of the ClpY ATPase-SP system to elucidate the molecular details of unfolding and translocation of an α/β model protein. We contrast this mechanism with our previous studies which used an all-α SP. We find conserved aspects of unfolding and translocation mechanisms by allosteric ClpY, including unfolding initiated at the tagged C-terminus and translocation via a power stroke mechanism. Topology-specific aspects include the time scales, the rate limiting steps in the degradation pathway, the effect of force directionality, and the translocase efficacy. Mechanisms of ClpY-assisted unfolding and translocation are distinct from those resulting from non-allosteric mechanical pulling. Bulk unfolding simulations, which mimic Atomic Force Microscopy-type pulling, reveal multiple unfolding pathways initiated at the C-terminus, N-terminus, or simultaneously from both termini. In a non-allosteric ClpY ATPase pore, mechanical pulling with constant velocity yields larger effective forces for SP unfolding, while pulling with constant force results in simultaneous unfolding and translocation. PMID:26734937

  2. Coarse-graining stiff bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Español, P.; de la Torre, J. A.; Ferrario, M.; Ciccotti, G.

    2011-11-01

    The method of constraints in molecular dynamics is useful because it avoids the resolution of high frequency motions with very small time steps. However, the price to pay is that both the dynamics and the statistics of a constrained system differ from those of the unconstrained one. Instead of using constraints, we propose to dispose of high frequency motions by a coarse-graining procedure in which fast variables are eliminated. These fast variables are thus modeled as friction and thermal fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology with a simple model case, a diatomic molecule in a monoatomic solvent, in which the bond between the atoms of a diatomic molecule is stiff. Although the example is very simple and does not display the interesting effects of "wrong" statistics of the constrained system (i.e. the well-known issue connected to the Fixman potential), it is well suited to give the proof of concept of the whole procedure.

  3. Coarse-grained modeling of DNA curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Gordon S.; Hinckley, Daniel M.; Lequieu, Joshua P.; Whitmer, Jonathan K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins occurs over a wide range of length scales, and depends critically on its local structure. In particular, recent experimental work suggests that the intrinsic curvature of DNA plays a significant role on its protein-binding properties. In this work, we present a coarse grained model of DNA that is capable of describing base-pairing, hybridization, major and minor groove widths, and local curvature. The model represents an extension of the recently proposed 3SPN.2 description of DNA [D. M. Hinckley, G. S. Freeman, J. K. Whitmer, and J. J. de Pablo, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144903 (2013)], into which sequence-dependent shape and mechanical properties are incorporated. The proposed model is validated against experimental data including melting temperatures, local flexibilities, dsDNA persistence lengths, and minor groove width profiles.

  4. Impact into Coarse Grained Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M.; Crawford, D. A.

    2005-01-01

    Several experimental studies [1,2,3] indicate that differences in the grain size of the target relative to the projectile could influence the cratering process. Impacts into coarse sand grains of size comparable to the projectile show some discrepancies with existing relationships for crater growth [e.g. 4]. Similarly, targets of ne grained, uniform in diameter glass spheres show differences in crater depth, transient crater diameter, and volume of ejecta excavated as a function of grain size [2,3]. The purpose of this work is to continue investigating how the relative grain size may influence early time coupling between a projectile and target, with implications for subsequent ejecta excavation and crater growth. In previous efforts we used numerical techniques to focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media emphasizing the influence of relative grain size on crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, target strength, and crater shape [5,6,7]. In this study, we use experimental techniques - in part as a reality check for the numerical studies - to report on how coarse grained targets might influence ejecta excavation and crater shape. This body of work possesses important implications for ejecta excavation and cratering efficiency on asteroids that may possess rubble pile-like structures, and on planets that may possess either pre-fractured surfaces or large-scale heterogeneities in shock impedance.

  5. Coarse-grained computer simulation of dynamics in thylakoid membranes: methods and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Anna R.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2013-01-01

    Coarse-grained simulation is a powerful and well-established suite of computational methods for studying structure and dynamics in nanoscale biophysical systems. As our understanding of the plant photosynthetic apparatus has become increasingly nuanced, opportunities have arisen for coarse-grained simulation to complement experiment by testing hypotheses and making predictions. Here, we give an overview of best practices in coarse-grained simulation, with a focus on techniques and results that are applicable to the plant thylakoid membrane–protein system. We also discuss current research topics for which coarse-grained simulation has the potential to play a key role in advancing the field. PMID:24478781

  6. Coarse-graining methods for computational biology.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Marissa G; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Connecting the molecular world to biology requires understanding how molecular-scale dynamics propagate upward in scale to define the function of biological structures. To address this challenge, multiscale approaches, including coarse-graining methods, become necessary. We discuss here the theoretical underpinnings and history of coarse-graining and summarize the state of the field, organizing key methodologies based on an emerging paradigm for multiscale theory and modeling of biomolecular systems. This framework involves an integrated, iterative approach to couple information from different scales. The primary steps, which coincide with key areas of method development, include developing first-pass coarse-grained models guided by experimental results, performing numerous large-scale coarse-grained simulations, identifying important interactions that drive emergent behaviors, and finally reconnecting to the molecular scale by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations guided by the coarse-grained results. The coarse-grained modeling can then be extended and refined, with the entire loop repeated iteratively if necessary. PMID:23451897

  7. Thermodynamically Consistent Coarse-Graining of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenza, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of macromolecular liquids, melts and mixtures, bridge an extensive range of length- and time-scales. For these systems, the computational limitations of the atomistic description prevent the study of the properties of interest and coarse-grained models remain the only viable approach. In coarse-grained models, structural and thermodynamic consistency across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. This talk presents a coarse-graining approach that conserves structural and thermodynamic quantities independent of the extent of coarse-graining, and describes a model for the reconstruction of the dynamics measured in mesoscale simulations of the coarse-grained system. Some of the general challenges of preserving structural and thermodynamic consistency in coarse-grained models are discussed together with the conditions by which the problem is lessened. This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CHE-1362500.

  8. Quasiclassical coarse graining and thermodynamic entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Gell-Mann, Murray; Hartle, James B.

    2007-08-15

    Our everyday descriptions of the universe are highly coarse grained, following only a tiny fraction of the variables necessary for a perfectly fine-grained description. Coarse graining in classical physics is made natural by our limited powers of observation and computation. But in the modern quantum mechanics of closed systems, some measure of coarse graining is inescapable because there are no nontrivial, probabilistic, fine-grained descriptions. This essay explores the consequences of that fact. Quantum theory allows for various coarse-grained descriptions, some of which are mutually incompatible. For most purposes, however, we are interested in the small subset of 'quasiclassical descriptions' defined by ranges of values of averages over small volumes of densities of conserved quantities such as energy and momentum and approximately conserved quantities such as baryon number. The near-conservation of these quasiclassical quantities results in approximate decoherence, predictability, and local equilibrium, leading to closed sets of equations of motion. In any description, information is sacrificed through the coarse graining that yields decoherence and gives rise to probabilities for histories. In quasiclassical descriptions, further information is sacrificed in exhibiting the emergent regularities summarized by classical equations of motion. An appropriate entropy measures the loss of information. For a 'quasiclassical realm' this is connected with the usual thermodynamic entropy as obtained from statistical mechanics. It was low for the initial state of our universe and has been increasing since.

  9. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  10. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  11. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  12. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking

    PubMed Central

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4–6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  13. Coarse-Grained Model of SNARE-Mediated Docking.

    PubMed

    Fortoul, Nicole; Singh, Pankaj; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Bykhovskaia, Maria; Jagota, Anand

    2015-05-01

    Synaptic transmission requires that vesicles filled with neurotransmitter molecules be docked to the plasma membrane by the SNARE protein complex. The SNARE complex applies attractive forces to overcome the long-range repulsion between the vesicle and membrane. To understand how the balance between the attractive and repulsive forces defines the equilibrium docked state we have developed a model that combines the mechanics of vesicle/membrane deformation with an apparently new coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex. The coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex is calibrated by comparison with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations as well as by force measurements in laser tweezer experiments. The model for vesicle/membrane interactions includes the forces produced by membrane deformation and hydration or electrostatic repulsion. Combining these two parts, the coarse-grained model of the SNARE complex with membrane mechanics, we study how the equilibrium docked state varies with the number of SNARE complexes. We find that a single SNARE complex is able to bring a typical synaptic vesicle to within a distance of ∼ 3 nm from the membrane. Further addition of SNARE complexes shortens this distance, but an overdocked state of >4-6 SNAREs actually increases the equilibrium distance. PMID:25954883

  14. Coarse-graining Landau-Lifshitz damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuebing; Visscher, P. B.

    2001-06-01

    High speed switching in magnetic materials is usually studied with the Landau-Lifshitz (LL) equation, which describes damping through a phenomenological coefficient. The results of micromagnetic calculations based on the LL equation have been observed to depend strongly on the cell size. We take a coarse-graining or renormalization-group approach to this cell size dependence: from a simulation using cell size L, we look at the dynamics of a cell of size 2L and determine an effective damping coefficient that describes the larger-scale dynamics. This can be thought of as a Green-Kubo calculation of the effective damping coefficient. In principle, this makes it possible to coarse grain from the atomic scale to determine the micromagnetic damping coefficient.

  15. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  16. Critical time scale of coarse-graining entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jang-il

    2016-04-01

    We study coarse-grained entropy production in an asymmetric random walk system on a periodic one-dimensional lattice. In coarse-grained systems, the original dynamics are unavoidably destroyed, but the coarse-grained entropy production is not hidden below the critical time-scale separation. The hidden entropy production is rapidly increasing near the critical time-scale separation.

  17. The power of coarse graining in biomolecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Lopez, Cesar A; Uusitalo, Jaakko J; de Jong, Djurre H; Gopal, Srinivasa M; Periole, Xavier; Marrink, Siewert J

    2014-01-01

    Computational modeling of biological systems is challenging because of the multitude of spatial and temporal scales involved. Replacing atomistic detail with lower resolution, coarse grained (CG), beads has opened the way to simulate large-scale biomolecular processes on time scales inaccessible to all-atom models. We provide an overview of some of the more popular CG models used in biomolecular applications to date, focusing on models that retain chemical specificity. A few state-of-the-art examples of protein folding, membrane protein gating and self-assembly, DNA hybridization, and modeling of carbohydrate fibers are used to illustrate the power and diversity of current CG modeling. PMID:25309628

  18. Coarse grained open system quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Thanopulos, Ioannis; Brumer, Paul; Shapiro, Moshe

    2008-11-21

    We show that the quantum dynamics of a system comprised of a subspace Q coupled to a larger subspace P can be recast as a reduced set of 'coarse grained' ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. These equations can be solved by a single diagonalization of a general complex matrix. The method makes no assumptions about the strength of the couplings between the Q and the P subspaces, nor is there any limitation on the initial population in P. The utility of the method is demonstrated via computations in three following areas: molecular compounds, photonic materials, and condensed phases.

  19. Coarse-grained modelling of surface nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfils, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscale gaseous objects that form on hydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. Understanding nanobubble formation and stability remains challenging due to the lack of appropriate theoretical framework and adequate modelling. Here we present a non-equilibrium coarse-grained model for nanobubbles at hydrophobic surfaces. The model is based on a lattice-gas model that has been proposed to understand the hydrophobic effect to which dynamical properties are added. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the model to reproduce the basic features of stable surface nanobubbles, which, thereby, supports the dynamical origin of these objects.

  20. Coarse-grained modelling of supercoiled RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matek, Christian; Šulc, Petr; Randisi, Ferdinando; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.

  1. Coarse-grained distributions and superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2006-01-01

    We show an interesting connection between non-standard (non-Boltzmannian) distribution functions arising in the theory of violent relaxation for collisionless stellar systems [D. Lynden-Bell, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 136 (1967) 101.] and the notion of superstatistics recently introduced by [Beck and Cohen Physica A 322 (2003) 267]. The common link between these two theories is the emergence of coarse-grained distributions arising out of fine-grained distributions. The coarse-grained distribution functions are written as a superposition of Boltzmann factors weighted by a non-universal function. Even more general distributions can arise in case of incomplete violent relaxation (non-ergodicity). They are stable stationary solutions of the Vlasov equation. We also discuss analogies and differences between the statistical equilibrium state of a multi-components self-gravitating system and the metaequilibrium (or quasi-equilibrium) states of a collisionless stellar system. Finally, we stress the important distinction between entropies, generalized entropies, relative entropies and H-functions. We discuss applications of these ideas in two-dimensional turbulence and for other systems with long-range interactions.

  2. A coarse-grained model of microtubule self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Chola; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Microtubules play critical roles in cell structures and functions. They also serve as a model system to stimulate the next-generation smart, dynamic materials. A deep understanding of their self-assembly process and biomechanical properties will not only help elucidate how microtubules perform biological functions, but also lead to exciting insight on how microtubule dynamics can be altered or even controlled for specific purposes such as suppressing the division of cancer cells. Combining all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the essential dynamics coarse-graining method, we construct a coarse-grained (CG) model of the tubulin protein, which is the building block of microtubules. In the CG model a tubulin dimer is represented as an elastic network of CG sites, the locations of which are determined by examining the protein dynamics of the tubulin and identifying the essential dynamic domains. Atomistic MD modeling is employed to directly compute the tubulin bond energies in the surface lattice of a microtubule, which are used to parameterize the interactions between CG building blocks. The CG model is then used to study the self-assembly pathways, kinetics, dynamics, and nanomechanics of microtubules.

  3. Minimizing memory as an objective for coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Dama, James F.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Voth, Gregory A.; Weare, Jonathan; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2013-03-01

    Coarse-graining a molecular model is the process of integrating over degrees of freedom to obtain a reduced representation. This process typically involves two separate but related steps, selection of the coordinates comprising the reduced system and modeling their interactions. Both the coordinate selection and the modeling procedure present challenges. Here, we focus on the former. Typically, one seeks to integrate over the fast degrees of freedom and retain the slow degrees of freedom. Failure to separate timescales results in memory. With this motivation, we introduce a heuristic measure of memory and show that it can be used to compare competing coordinate selections for a given modeling procedure. We numerically explore the utility of this heuristic for three systems of increasing complexity. The first example is a four-particle linear model, which is exactly solvable. The second example is a sixteen-particle nonlinear model; this system has interactions that are characteristic of molecular force fields but is still sufficiently simple to permit exhaustive numerical treatment. The third example is an atomic-resolution representation of a protein, the class of models most often treated by relevant coarse-graining approaches; we specifically study an actin monomer. In all three cases, we find that the heuristic suggests coordinate selections that are physically intuitive and reflect molecular structure. The memory heuristic can thus serve as an objective codification of expert knowledge and a guide to sites within a model that requires further attention.

  4. Simulating the entropic collapse of coarse-grained chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, Tyler N; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W; Harden, James L; Slater, Gary W

    2015-02-17

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  5. Simulating the Entropic Collapse of Coarse-Grained Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Bertrand, Martin; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Harden, James L.; Slater, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Depletion forces play a role in the compaction and decompaction of chromosomal material in simple cells, but it has remained debatable whether they are sufficient to account for chromosomal collapse. We present coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, which reveal that depletion-induced attraction is sufficient to cause the collapse of a flexible chain of large structural monomers immersed in a bath of smaller depletants. These simulations use an explicit coarse-grained computational model that treats both the supercoiled DNA structural monomers and the smaller protein crowding agents as combinatorial, truncated Lennard-Jones spheres. By presenting a simple theoretical model, we quantitatively cast the action of depletants on supercoiled bacterial DNA as an effective solvent quality. The rapid collapse of the simulated flexible chromosome at the predicted volume fraction of depletants is a continuous phase transition. Additional physical effects to such simple chromosome models, such as enthalpic interactions between structural monomers or chain rigidity, are required if the collapse is to be a first-order phase transition. PMID:25692586

  6. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L.; Song, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations—how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models. PMID:26473491

  7. Biomembranes in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2015-08-01

    The architecture of biological membranes is tightly coupled to the localization, organization, and function of membrane proteins. The organelle-specific distribution of lipids allows for the formation of functional microdomains (also called rafts) that facilitate the segregation and aggregation of membrane proteins and thus shape their function. Molecular dynamics simulations enable to directly access the formation, structure, and dynamics of membrane microdomains at the molecular scale and the specific interactions among lipids and proteins on timescales from picoseconds to microseconds. This review focuses on the latest developments of biomembrane force fields for both atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the different levels of coarsening of biomolecular structures. It also briefly introduces scale-bridging methods applicable to biomembrane studies, and highlights selected recent applications.

  8. Investigating the impact of representation upon coarse-grained models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Thomas; Shell, M. Scott; Noid, William

    The first step in building a coarse-grained (CG) model is choosing a representation or `mapping' of the original system at a reduced resolution. In practice, the mapping is often chosen on the basis of `physical intuition.' Consequently this crucial step would greatly benefit from the development of systematic and principled methodologies. Accordingly, we have studied the relationship between the mapping and the resulting CG model. As a starting point, we have analytically derived, as a function of the CG mapping, the exact many-body potential of mean force (PMF) for the simple Gaussian Network Model (GNM) of protein fluctuations. We use this as a simple model for investigating the effect of the CG mapping upon the information loss and quality of the CG model. Moreover, by considering the GNM's for different proteins, we investigate the significance of high resolution structural features for the quality of the CG model. We acknowledge support from the NSF, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and KITP.

  9. Coarse grained dynamics in the glass phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smessaert, Anton; Rottler, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Atomic scale dynamics in glasses is dominated by extended periods of localized vibration, where the crowded surroundings of a particle act as a cage. Collective motion is necessary to escape the cage, and the succession of particle jumps or hops leads to diffusion. Each jump is an elementary relaxation event since the local structure is stable until a jump occurs. The link between local dynamics and structural properties has become of increasing interest in recent years. Aging of the mechanical response has been tied to a power-law distribution of persistence times in the cages, and concentration of hops into dynamical heterogeneities (DH) was observed in granular media and simulations of supercooled liquids in 2D. These studies were limited to small systems or hop detection in subsets, because of the post processing requirements. We present results based on a new algorithm that allows us to detect the hops of all particles during a molecular dynamics simulation. This complete coarse-grained ``map'' of the dynamics allows us to directly investigate temporal and spatial correlations between relaxation events. Furthermore, we can readily identify DH using a cluster algorithm and we explore the impact of aging and deformation on the size and shape of DH.

  10. Coarse-grained models for biological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhe; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2011-03-01

    The large timescales and length-scales of interest in biophysics preclude atomistic study of many systems and processes. One appealing approach is to use coarse-grained (CG) models where several atoms are grouped into a single CG site. In this work we describe a new CG force field for lipids, surfactants, and amino acids. The topology of CG sites is the same as in the MARTINI force field, but the new model is compatible with a recently developed CG electrostatic water (Big Multiple Water, BMW) model. The model not only gives correct structural, elastic properties and phase behavior for lipid and surfactants, but also reproduces electrostatic properties at water-membrane interface that agree with experiment and atomistic simulations, including the potential of mean force for charged amino acid residuals at membrane. Consequently, the model predicts stable attachment of cationic peptides (i.e., poly-Arg) on lipid bilayer surface, which is not shown in previous models with non-electrostatic water.

  11. Mesoscopic coarse-grained simulations of lysozyme adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gaobo; Liu, Jie; Zhou, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Coarse-grained simulations are adopted to study the adsorption behavior of lysozyme on different (hydrophobic, neutral hydrophilic, zwitterionic, negatively charged, and positively charged) surfaces at the mesoscopic microsecond time scale (1.2 μs). Simulation results indicate the following: (i) the conformation change of lysozyme on the hydrophobic surface is bigger than any other studied surfaces; (ii) the active sites of lysozyme are faced to the hydrophobic surface with a "top end-on" orientation, while they are exposed to the liquid phase on the hydrophilic surface with a "back-on" orientation; (iii) the neutral hydrophilic surface can induce the adsorption of lysozyme, while the nonspecific protein adsorption can be resisted by the zwitterionic surface; (iv) when the solution ionic strength is low, lysozyme can anchor on the negatively charged surface easily but cannot adsorb on the positively charged surface; (v) when the solution ionic strength is high, the positively charged lysozyme can also adsorb on the like-charged surface; (vi) the major positive potential center of lysozyme, especially the residue ARG128, plays a vital role in leading the adsorption of lysozyme on charged surfaces; (vii) when the ionic strength is high, a counterion layer is formed above the positively charged surface, which is the key factor why lysozyme can adsorb on a like-charged surface. The coarse-grained method based on the MARTINI force field for proteins and the BMW water model could provide an efficient way to understand protein interfacial adsorption behavior at a greater length scale and time scale. PMID:24785197

  12. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  13. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamic cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staar, P.; Jiang, M.; Hähner, U. R.; Schulthess, T. C.; Maier, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) and its DCA+ extension use coarse-graining of the momentum space to reduce the complexity of quantum many-body problems, thereby mapping the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. While it gives a more localized self-energy for a given cluster size, we show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which converge to the results obtained from the standard coarse-graining with increasing cluster size. Most importantly, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem of the underlying quantum Monte Carlo cluster solver and thus allows for calculations on larger clusters. This enables the treatment of correlations longer ranged than those accessible with the standard coarse-graining and thus can allow for the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. As a demonstration, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the extended DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes for which the results can be fit with a Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law.

  14. Coarse-grained mechanics of viral shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Gibbons, Melissa M.

    2008-03-01

    We present an approach for creating three-dimensional finite element models of viral capsids from atomic-level structural data (X-ray or cryo-EM). The models capture heterogeneous geometric features and are used in conjunction with three-dimensional nonlinear continuum elasticity to simulate nanoindentation experiments as performed using atomic force microscopy. The method is extremely flexible; able to capture varying levels of detail in the three-dimensional structure. Nanoindentation simulations are presented for several viruses: Hepatitis B, CCMV, HK97, and φ29. In addition to purely continuum elastic models a multiscale technique is developed that combines finite-element kinematics with MD energetics such that large-scale deformations are facilitated by a reduction in degrees of freedom. Simulations of these capsid deformation experiments provide a testing ground for the techniques, as well as insight into the strength-determining mechanisms of capsid deformation. These methods can be extended as a framework for modeling other proteins and macromolecular structures in cell biology.

  15. Entrainment of coarse grains using a discrete particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Arnold, Roger B. Jr.

    2014-10-06

    Conventional bedload transport models and incipient motion theories relying on a time-averaged boundary shear stress are incapable of accounting for the effects of fluctuating near-bed velocity in turbulent flow and are therefore prone to significant errors. Impulse, the product of an instantaneous force magnitude and its duration, has been recently proposed as an appropriate criterion for quantifying the effects of flow turbulence in removing coarse grains from the bed surface. Here, a discrete particle model (DPM) is used to examine the effects of impulse, representing a single idealized turbulent event, on particle entrainment. The results are classified according to the degree of grain movement into the following categories: motion prior to entrainment, initial dislodgement, and energetic displacement. The results indicate that in all three cases the degree of particle motion depends on both the force magnitude and the duration of its application and suggest that the effects of turbulence must be adequately accounted for in order to develop a more accurate method of determining incipient motion. DPM is capable of simulating the dynamics of grain entrainment and is an appropriate tool for further study of the fundamental mechanisms of sediment transport.

  16. Improving the treatment of coarse-grain electrostatics: CVCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ceres, N.; Lavery, R.

    2015-12-28

    We propose an analytic approach for calculating the electrostatic energy of proteins or protein complexes in aqueous solution. This method, termed CVCEL (Circular Variance Continuum ELectrostatics), is fitted to Poisson calculations and is able to reproduce the corresponding energies for different choices of solute dielectric constant. CVCEL thus treats both solute charge interactions and charge self-energies, and it can also deal with salt solutions. Electrostatic damping notably depends on the degree of solvent exposure of the charges, quantified here in terms of circular variance, a measure that reflects the vectorial distribution of the neighbors around a given center. CVCEL energies can be calculated rapidly and have simple analytical derivatives. This approach avoids the need for calculating effective atomic volumes or Born radii. After describing how the method was developed, we present test results for coarse-grain proteins of different shapes and sizes, using different internal dielectric constants and different salt concentrations and also compare the results with those from simple distance-dependent models. We also show that the CVCEL approach can be used successfully to calculate the changes in electrostatic energy associated with changes in protein conformation or with protein-protein binding.

  17. Improving the treatment of coarse-grain electrostatics: CVCEL.

    PubMed

    Ceres, N; Lavery, R

    2015-12-28

    We propose an analytic approach for calculating the electrostatic energy of proteins or protein complexes in aqueous solution. This method, termed CVCEL (Circular Variance Continuum ELectrostatics), is fitted to Poisson calculations and is able to reproduce the corresponding energies for different choices of solute dielectric constant. CVCEL thus treats both solute charge interactions and charge self-energies, and it can also deal with salt solutions. Electrostatic damping notably depends on the degree of solvent exposure of the charges, quantified here in terms of circular variance, a measure that reflects the vectorial distribution of the neighbors around a given center. CVCEL energies can be calculated rapidly and have simple analytical derivatives. This approach avoids the need for calculating effective atomic volumes or Born radii. After describing how the method was developed, we present test results for coarse-grain proteins of different shapes and sizes, using different internal dielectric constants and different salt concentrations and also compare the results with those from simple distance-dependent models. We also show that the CVCEL approach can be used successfully to calculate the changes in electrostatic energy associated with changes in protein conformation or with protein-protein binding. PMID:26723603

  18. Interlaced coarse-graining for the dynamical cluster approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehner, Urs; Staar, Peter; Jiang, Mi; Maier, Thomas; Schulthess, Thomas

    The negative sign problem remains a challenging limiting factor in quantum Monte Carlo simulations of strongly correlated fermionic many-body systems. The dynamical cluster approximation (DCA) makes this problem less severe by coarse-graining the momentum space to map the bulk lattice to a cluster embedded in a dynamical mean-field host. Here, we introduce a new form of an interlaced coarse-graining and compare it with the traditional coarse-graining. We show that it leads to more controlled results with weaker cluster shape and smoother cluster size dependence, which with increasing cluster size converge to the results obtained using the standard coarse-graining. In addition, the new coarse-graining reduces the severity of the fermionic sign problem. Therefore, it enables calculations on much larger clusters and can allow the evaluation of the exact infinite cluster size result via finite size scaling. To demonstrate this, we study the hole-doped two-dimensional Hubbard model and show that the interlaced coarse-graining in combination with the DCA+ algorithm permits the determination of the superconducting Tc on cluster sizes, for which the results can be fitted with the Kosterlitz-Thouless scaling law. This research used resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) awarded by the INCITE program, and of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center. OLCF is a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of allosteric cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two Ca2+ ions to each domain of Calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding are treated implicitly within the grand canonical ensemble. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energies to the open and closed ensembles accurately describes the simulated binding thermodynamics. The simulations predict that the two domains of CaM have distinct binding affinity and cooperativity. In particular, the C-terminal domain binds Ca2+ with higher affinity and greater cooperativity than the N-terminal domain. From a structural point of view, the affinity of an individual binding loop depends sensitively on the loop's structural compatibility with the ligand in the bound ensemble, as well as the conformational flexibility of the binding site in the unbound ensemble.

  20. Coarse-grained force field; general folding theory

    PubMed Central

    Liwo, Adam; He, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    We review the coarse-grained UNited RESidue (UNRES) force field for the simulations of protein structure and dynamics, which is being developed in our laboratory over the last several years. UNRES is a physics-based force field, the prototype of which is defined as a potential of mean force of polypeptide chains in water, where all the degrees of freedom except the coordinates of α-carbon atoms and side-chain centers have been integrated out. We describe the initial implementation of UNRES to protein-structure prediction formulated as a search for the global minimum of the potential-energy function and its subsequent molecular dynamics and extensions of molecular-dynamics implementation, which enabled us to study protein-folding pathways and thermodynamics, as well as to reformulate the protein-structure prediction problem as a search for the conformational ensemble with the lowest free energy at temperatures below the folding-transition temperature. Applications of UNRES to study biological problems are also described. PMID:21643583

  1. Wavelets as basis functions to represent the coarse-graining potential in multiscale coarse graining approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiolo, M.; Vancheri, A.; Krause, R.; Danani, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we apply Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) to develop sparse but accurate representations for the Multiscale Coarse-Graining (MSCG) approximation to the many-body potential of mean force. We rigorously framed the MSCG method into MRA so that all the instruments of this theory become available together with a multitude of new basis functions, namely the wavelets. The coarse-grained (CG) force field is hierarchically decomposed at different resolution levels enabling to choose the most appropriate wavelet family for each physical interaction without requiring an a priori knowledge of the details localization. The representation of the CG potential in this new efficient orthonormal basis leads to a compression of the signal information in few large expansion coefficients. The multiresolution property of the wavelet transform allows to isolate and remove the noise from the CG force-field reconstruction by thresholding the basis function coefficients from each frequency band independently. We discuss the implementation of our wavelet-based MSCG approach and demonstrate its accuracy using two different condensed-phase systems, i.e. liquid water and methanol. Simulations of liquid argon have also been performed using a one-to-one mapping between atomistic and CG sites. The latter model allows to verify the accuracy of the method and to test different choices of wavelet families. Furthermore, the results of the computer simulations show that the efficiency and sparsity of the representation of the CG force field can be traced back to the mathematical properties of the chosen family of wavelets. This result is in agreement with what is known from the theory of multiresolution analysis of signals.

  2. Symmetry-adapted digital modeling III. Coarse-grained icosahedral viruses.

    PubMed

    Janner, A

    2016-05-01

    Considered is the coarse-grained modeling of icosahedral viruses in terms of a three-dimensional lattice (the digital modeling lattice) selected among the projected points in space of a six-dimensional icosahedral lattice. Backbone atomic positions (Cα's for the residues of the capsid and phosphorus atoms P for the genome nucleotides) are then indexed by their nearest lattice point. This leads to a fine-grained lattice point characterization of the full viral chains in the backbone approximation (denoted as digital modeling). Coarse-grained models then follow by a proper selection of the indexed backbone positions, where for each chain one can choose the desired coarseness. This approach is applied to three viruses, the Satellite tobacco mosaic virus, the bacteriophage MS2 and the Pariacoto virus, on the basis of structural data from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. In each case the various stages of the procedure are illustrated for a given coarse-grained model and the corresponding indexed positions are listed. Alternative coarse-grained models have been derived and compared. Comments on related results and approaches, found among the very large set of publications in this field, conclude this article. PMID:27126109

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanopatterning with multivalent inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Thompson, Damien

    2008-06-01

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) model is developed to study the multivalent, or multisite, binding of small functionalized dendrimer molecules to β-cyclodextrin-terminated self-assembled monolayers, the so-called ``molecular printboards'' used to print ``ink'' molecules on surfaces with a high degree of positional control and specificity. Some current and future bionanotechnology applications are in the creation of nanoparticle assemblies, directed protein assembly, platforms for biosensing, and cell:surface attachment. The coarse-grained model allows us to probe up to microsecond timescales and model ink diffusion, crucial for the application of the printboard in, for example, medical diagnostics. Recent all-atom MD simulations identified and quantified the molecular strain limiting the stability of nanopatterns created with small dendrimer inks, and explained the different patterns obtained experimentally with different dendrimer inks. In the present work, the all-atom simulations are ``scaled up'' to longer timescales via coarse graining, without incurring significant additional computational expense, and, crucially, without significant loss in atom-scale detail, the coarse-grained MD simulations yielding properties similar to those obtained from the all-atom simulations. The anchoring of the ink molecules to the monolayer is of multivalent nature and the degree of multivalency shows a sharp dependence on temperature, control of temperature thus providing a further operational ``switch'' for directed molecular assembly. The computational protocol developed can, in principle, be extended to model any multivalent assembly, for example, virus-cell complexation.

  4. Coarse-Grain Model Simulations of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Heterogeneous Materials.

    PubMed

    Brennan, John K; Lísal, Martin; Moore, Joshua D; Izvekov, Sergei; Schweigert, Igor V; Larentzos, James P

    2014-06-19

    A suite of computational tools is described for particle-based mesoscale simulations of the nonequilibrium dynamics of energetic solids, including mechanical deformation, phase transitions, and chemical reactivity triggered by shock or thermal loading. The method builds upon our recent advances both in generating coarse-grain models under high strains and in developing a variant of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) that includes chemical reactions. To describe chemical reactivity, a coarse-grain particle equation-of-state was introduced into the constant-energy DPD variant that rigorously treats complex chemical reactions and the associated chemical energy release. As illustration of these developments, we present simulations of shock compression of an RDX crystal and its thermal decomposition under high temperatures. We also discuss our current efforts toward a highly scalable domain-decomposition implementation that extends applicability to micrometer-size simulations. With appropriate parametrization, the method is applicable to other materials whose dynamic response is driven by microstructural heterogeneities. PMID:26270506

  5. Energy-conserving coarse-graining of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Serrano, Mar; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2016-05-25

    Coarse-graining (CG) of complex molecules is a method to reach time scales that would be impossible to access through brute force molecular simulations. In this paper, we formulate a coarse-grained model for complex molecules using first principles caculations that ensures energy conservation. Each molecule is described in a coarse way by a thermal blob characterized by the position and momentum of the center of mass of the molecule, together with its internal energy as an additional degree of freedom. This level of description gives rise to an entropy-based framework instead of the usual one based on the configurational free energy (i.e. potential of mean force). The resulting dynamic equations, which account for an appropriate description of heat transfer at the coarse-grained level, have the structure of the dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (DPDE) model but with a clear microscopic underpinning. Under suitable approximations, we provide explicit microscopic expressions for each component (entropy, mean force, friction and conductivity coefficients) appearing in the coarse-grained model. These quantities can be computed directly using MD simulations. The proposed non-isothermal coarse-grained model is thermodynamically consistent and opens up a first principles CG strategy for the study of energy transport issues that are not accessible using current isothermal models. PMID:27127809

  6. Bayesian parametrization of coarse-grain dissipative dynamics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequidt, Alain; Solano Canchaya, Jose G.

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new bottom-up method for the optimization of dissipative coarse-grain models. The method is based on Bayesian optimization of the likelihood to reproduce a coarse-grained reference trajectory obtained from analysis of a higher resolution molecular dynamics trajectory. This new method is related to force matching techniques, but using the total force on each grain averaged on a coarse time step instead of instantaneous forces. It has the advantage of not being limited to pairwise short-range interactions in the coarse-grain model and also yields an estimation of the friction parameter controlling the dynamics. The theory supporting the method is exposed in a practical perspective, with an analytical solution for the optimal set of parameters. The method was first validated by using it on a system with a known optimum. The new method was then tested on a simple system: n-pentane. The local molecular structure of the optimized model is in excellent agreement with the reference system. An extension of the method allows to get also an excellent agreement for the equilibrium density. As for the dynamic properties, they are also very satisfactory, but more sensitive to the choice of the coarse-grain representation. The quality of the final force field depends on the definition of the coarse grain degrees of freedom and interactions. We consider this method as a serious alternative to other methods like iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and Green-Kubo formulae.

  7. Gene expression dynamics with stochastic bursts: Construction and exact results for a coarse-grained model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen Ting; Doering, Charles R.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical framework to analyze the dynamics of gene expression with stochastic bursts. Beginning with an individual-based model which fully accounts for the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein populations, we propose an expansion of the master equation for the joint process. The resulting coarse-grained model reduces the dimensionality of the system, describing only the protein population while fully accounting for the effects of discrete and fluctuating mRNA population. Closed form expressions for the stationary distribution of the protein population and mean first-passage times of the coarse-grained model are derived and large-scale Monte Carlo simulations show that the analysis accurately describes the individual-based process accounting for mRNA population, in contrast to the failure of commonly proposed diffusion-type models.

  8. Coarse-grained dynamics of alignment in animal group models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Sung Joon; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Yannis

    2006-03-01

    Coordinated motion in animal groups, such as bird flocks and fish schools, and their models gives rise to remarkable coherent structures. Using equation-free computational tools we explore the coarse-grained dynamics of a model for the orientational movement decision in animal groups, consisting of a small number of informed "leaders" and a large number of uninformed, nonidentical ``followers.'' The direction in which each group member is headed is characterized by a phase angle of a limit-cycle oscillator, whose dynamics are nonlinearly coupled with those of all the other group members. We identify a small number of proper coarse-grained variables (using uncertainty quantification methods) that describe the collective dynamics, and perform coarse projective integration and equation-free bifurcation analysis of the coarse-grained model behavior in these variables.

  9. Coarse-grained interaction potentials for anisotropic molecules.

    PubMed

    Babadi, M; Everaers, R; Ejtehadi, M R

    2006-05-01

    We have proposed an efficient parametrization method for a recent variant of the Gay Berne potential for dissimilar and biaxial particles [Phys. Rev. E 67, 041710 (2003)] and demonstrated it for a set of small organic molecules. Compared with the previously proposed coarse-grained models, the new potential exhibits a superior performance in close contact and large distant interactions. The repercussions of thermal vibrations and elasticity have been studied through a statistical method. The study justifies that the potential of mean force is representable with the same functional form, extending the application of this coarse-grained description to a broader range of molecules. Moreover, the advantage of employing coarse-grained models over truncated atomistic summations with large distance cutoffs has been briefly studied. PMID:16689591

  10. A Transferable Coarse-Grained Model for Hydrogen Bonding Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Golubkov, Pavel A.; Wu, Johnny C.; Ren, Pengyu

    2008-01-01

    We present here a recent development of a generalized coarse-grained model for use in molecular simulations. In this model, interactions between coarse-grained particles consist of both van der Waals and explicit electrostatic components. As a result, the coarse-grained model offers the transferability that is lacked by most current effectivepotential based approaches. The previous center-of-mass framework1 is generalized here to include arbitrary off-center interaction sites for both Gay-Berne and multipoles. The new model has been applied to molecular dynamic simulations of neat methanol liquid. By placing a single point multipole at the oxygen atom rather than at the center of mass of methanol, there is a significant improvement in the ability to capture hydrogen-bonding. The critical issue of transferability of the coarse-grained model is verified on methanol-water mixtures, using parameters derived from neat liquids without any modification. The mixture density and internal energy from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations show good agreement with experimental measurements, on a par with what has been obtained from more detailed atomic models. By mapping the dynamics trajectory from the coarse-grained simulation into the all-atom counterpart, we are able to investigate atomic .level structure and interaction. Atomic radial distribution functions of neat methanol, neat water and mixtures compare favorably to experimental measurements. Furthermore, hydrogen-bonded 6- and 7-molecule chains of water and methanol observed in the mixture are in agreement with previous atomic simulations. PMID:18688358

  11. The multiscale coarse-graining method. II. Numerical implementation for coarse-grained molecular models

    PubMed Central

    Noid, W. G.; Liu, Pu; Wang, Yanting; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Ayton, Gary S.; Izvekov, Sergei; Andersen, Hans C.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    The multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method [S. Izvekov and G. A. Voth, J. Phys. Chem. B 109, 2469 (2005);J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134105 (2005)] employs a variational principle to determine an interaction potential for a CG model from simulations of an atomically detailed model of the same system. The companion paper proved that, if no restrictions regarding the form of the CG interaction potential are introduced and if the equilibrium distribution of the atomistic model has been adequately sampled, then the MS-CG variational principle determines the exact many-body potential of mean force (PMF) governing the equilibrium distribution of CG sites generated by the atomistic model. In practice, though, CG force fields are not completely flexible, but only include particular types of interactions between CG sites, e.g., nonbonded forces between pairs of sites. If the CG force field depends linearly on the force field parameters, then the vector valued functions that relate the CG forces to these parameters determine a set of basis vectors that span a vector subspace of CG force fields. The companion paper introduced a distance metric for the vector space of CG force fields and proved that the MS-CG variational principle determines the CG force force field that is within that vector subspace and that is closest to the force field determined by the many-body PMF. The present paper applies the MS-CG variational principle for parametrizing molecular CG force fields and derives a linear least squares problem for the parameter set determining the optimal approximation to this many-body PMF. Linear systems of equations for these CG force field parameters are derived and analyzed in terms of equilibrium structural correlation functions. Numerical calculations for a one-site CG model of methanol and a molecular CG model of the EMIM+∕NO3− ionic liquid are provided to illustrate the method. PMID:18601325

  12. Development and application of coarse-grained models for lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    I'll discuss a number of topics that represent our efforts in developing reliable molecular models for describing chemical and physical processes involving biomembranes. This is an exciting yet challenging research area because of the multiple length and time scales that are present in the relevant problems. Accordingly, we attempt to (1) understand the value and limitation of popular coarse-grained (CG) models for lipid membranes with either a particle or continuum representation; (2) develop new CG models that are appropriate for the particular problem of interest. As specific examples, I'll discuss (1) a comparison of atomistic, MARTINI (a particle based CG model) and continuum descriptions of a membrane fusion pore; (2) the development of a modified MARTINI model (BMW-MARTINI) that features a reliable description of membrane/water interfacial electrostatics and its application to cell-penetration peptides and membrane-bending proteins. Motivated specifically by the recent studies of Wong and co-workers, we compare the self-assembly behaviors of lipids with cationic peptides that include either Arg residues or a combination of Lys and hydrophobic residues; in particular, we attempt to reveal factors that stabilize the cubic ``double diamond'' Pn3m phase over the inverted hexagonal HII phase. For example, to explicitly test the importance of the bidentate hydrogen-bonding capability of Arg to the stabilization of negative Gaussian curvature, we also compare results using variants of the BMW-MARTINI model that treat the side chain of Arg with different levels of details. Collectively, the results suggest that both the bidentate feature of Arg and the overall electrostatic properties of cationic peptides are important to the self-assembly behavior of these peptides with lipids. The results are expected to have general implications to the mechanism of peptides and proteins that stimulate pore formation in biomembranes. Work in collaboration with Zhe Wu, Leili Zhang

  13. Multiscale coarse graining of liquid-state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Voth, Gregory A.

    2005-10-01

    A methodology is described to systematically derive coarse-grained (CG) force fields for molecular liquids from the underlying atomistic-scale forces. The coarse graining of an interparticle force field is accomplished by the application of a force-matching method to the trajectories and forces obtained from the atomistic trajectory and force data for the CG sites of the targeted system. The CG sites can be associated with the centers of mass of atomic groups because of the simplicity in the evaluation of forces acting on these sites from the atomistic data. The resulting system is called a multiscale coarse-grained (MS-CG) representation. The MS-CG method for liquids is applied here to water and methanol. For both liquids one-site and two-site CG representations without an explicit treatment of the long-ranged electrostatics have been derived. In addition, for water a two-site model having the explicit long-ranged electrostatics has been developed. To improve the thermodynamic properties (e.g., pressure and density) for the MS-CG models, the constraint for the instantaneous virial was included into the force-match procedure. The performance of the resulting models was evaluated against the underlying atomistic simulations and experiment. In contrast with existing approaches for coarse graining of liquid systems, the MS-CG approach is general, relies only on the interatomic interactions in the reference atomistic system.

  14. Quantum particles from coarse grained classical probabilities in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterich, C.

    2010-07-15

    Quantum particles can be obtained from a classical probability distribution in phase space by a suitable coarse graining, whereby simultaneous classical information about position and momentum can be lost. For a suitable time evolution of the classical probabilities and choice of observables all features of a quantum particle in a potential follow from classical statistics. This includes interference, tunneling and the uncertainty relation.

  15. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  16. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  17. 7 CFR 457.113 - Coarse grains crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Grains Crop Provisions 1. Definitions Coarse grains. Corn, grain sorghum, and soybeans. Grain sorghum... cash grain price per bushel for the U.S. No. 2 yellow corn, U.S. No. 2 grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1... yellow corn and grain sorghum, or U.S. No. 1 grade for soybeans. Factors not associated with...

  18. Coarse-Grained and Atomistic Modeling of Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    A coarse-grained model for a set of three polyimide isomers is developed. Each polyimide is comprised of BPDA (3,3,4,4' - biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride) and one of three APB isomers: 1,3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene, 1,4-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene or 1,3-bis(3-aminophenoxy)benzene. The coarse-grained model is constructed as a series of linked vectors following the contour of the polymer backbone. Beads located at the midpoint of each vector define centers for long range interaction energy between monomer subunits. A bulk simulation of each coarse-grained polyimide model is performed with a dynamic Monte Carlo procedure. These coarsegrained models are then reverse-mapped to fully atomistic models. The coarse-grained models show the expected trends in decreasing chain dimensions with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit, although these differences were minor due to the relatively short chains simulated here. Considerable differences are seen among the dynamic Monte Carlo properties of the three polyimide isomers. Decreasing relaxation times are seen with increasing meta linkage in the APB section of the repeat unit.

  19. Coarse-Grained Clustering Dynamics of Heterogeneously Coupled Neurons.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Joon; Cook, Katherine A; Rajendran, Karthikeyan; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G; Cisternas, Jaime; Laing, Carlo R

    2015-12-01

    The formation of oscillating phase clusters in a network of identical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is studied, along with their dynamic behavior. The neurons are synaptically coupled in an all-to-all manner, yet the synaptic coupling characteristic time is heterogeneous across the connections. In a network of N neurons where this heterogeneity is characterized by a prescribed random variable, the oscillatory single-cluster state can transition-through [Formula: see text] (possibly perturbed) period-doubling and subsequent bifurcations-to a variety of multiple-cluster states. The clustering dynamic behavior is computationally studied both at the detailed and the coarse-grained levels, and a numerical approach that can enable studying the coarse-grained dynamics in a network of arbitrarily large size is suggested. Among a number of cluster states formed, double clusters, composed of nearly equal sub-network sizes are seen to be stable; interestingly, the heterogeneity parameter in each of the double-cluster components tends to be consistent with the random variable over the entire network: Given a double-cluster state, permuting the dynamical variables of the neurons can lead to a combinatorially large number of different, yet similar "fine" states that appear practically identical at the coarse-grained level. For weak heterogeneity we find that correlations rapidly develop, within each cluster, between the neuron's "identity" (its own value of the heterogeneity parameter) and its dynamical state. For single- and double-cluster states we demonstrate an effective coarse-graining approach that uses the Polynomial Chaos expansion to succinctly describe the dynamics by these quickly established "identity-state" correlations. This coarse-graining approach is utilized, within the equation-free framework, to perform efficient computations of the neuron ensemble dynamics. PMID:26458901

  20. Quantitative comparison of alternative methods for coarse-graining biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Gregory R.; Meng, Luming; Huang, Xuhui

    2013-01-01

    Markov models and master equations are a powerful means of modeling dynamic processes like protein conformational changes. However, these models are often difficult to understand because of the enormous number of components and connections between them. Therefore, a variety of methods have been developed to facilitate understanding by coarse-graining these complex models. Here, we employ Bayesian model comparison to determine which of these coarse-graining methods provides the models that are most faithful to the original set of states. We find that the Bayesian agglomerative clustering engine and the hierarchical Nyström expansion graph (HNEG) typically provide the best performance. Surprisingly, the original Perron cluster cluster analysis (PCCA) method often provides the next best results, outperforming the newer PCCA+ method and the most probable paths algorithm. We also show that the differences between the models are qualitatively significant, rather than being minor shifts in the boundaries between states. The performance of the methods correlates well with the entropy of the resulting coarse-grainings, suggesting that finding states with more similar populations (i.e., avoiding low population states that may just be noise) gives better results. PMID:24089717

  1. Quantitative comparison of alternative methods for coarse-graining biological networks.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Gregory R; Meng, Luming; Huang, Xuhui

    2013-09-28

    Markov models and master equations are a powerful means of modeling dynamic processes like protein conformational changes. However, these models are often difficult to understand because of the enormous number of components and connections between them. Therefore, a variety of methods have been developed to facilitate understanding by coarse-graining these complex models. Here, we employ Bayesian model comparison to determine which of these coarse-graining methods provides the models that are most faithful to the original set of states. We find that the Bayesian agglomerative clustering engine and the hierarchical Nyström expansion graph (HNEG) typically provide the best performance. Surprisingly, the original Perron cluster cluster analysis (PCCA) method often provides the next best results, outperforming the newer PCCA+ method and the most probable paths algorithm. We also show that the differences between the models are qualitatively significant, rather than being minor shifts in the boundaries between states. The performance of the methods correlates well with the entropy of the resulting coarse-grainings, suggesting that finding states with more similar populations (i.e., avoiding low population states that may just be noise) gives better results. PMID:24089717

  2. Quantitative comparison of alternative methods for coarse-graining biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Gregory R.; Meng, Luming; Huang, Xuhui

    2013-09-01

    Markov models and master equations are a powerful means of modeling dynamic processes like protein conformational changes. However, these models are often difficult to understand because of the enormous number of components and connections between them. Therefore, a variety of methods have been developed to facilitate understanding by coarse-graining these complex models. Here, we employ Bayesian model comparison to determine which of these coarse-graining methods provides the models that are most faithful to the original set of states. We find that the Bayesian agglomerative clustering engine and the hierarchical Nyström expansion graph (HNEG) typically provide the best performance. Surprisingly, the original Perron cluster cluster analysis (PCCA) method often provides the next best results, outperforming the newer PCCA+ method and the most probable paths algorithm. We also show that the differences between the models are qualitatively significant, rather than being minor shifts in the boundaries between states. The performance of the methods correlates well with the entropy of the resulting coarse-grainings, suggesting that finding states with more similar populations (i.e., avoiding low population states that may just be noise) gives better results.

  3. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Petr; Romano, Flavio; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  4. A nucleotide-level coarse-grained model of RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Šulc, Petr; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Louis, Ard A.; Romano, Flavio; Doye, Jonathan P. K.

    2014-06-21

    We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.

  5. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics: Dissipation Due to Internal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2001-12-21

    We describe progress on the issue of pathological elastic wave reflection in atomistic and multiscale simulation. First we briefly review Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD). Originally CGMD was formulated as a Hamiltonian system in which energy is conserved. This formulation is useful for many applications, but recently CGMD has been extended to include generalized Langevin forces. Here we describe how Langevin dynamics arise naturally in CGMD, and we examine the implication for elastic wave scattering.

  6. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  7. The Theory of Ultra-Coarse-Graining. 2. Numerical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Davtyan, Aram; Dama, James F; Sinitskiy, Anton V; Voth, Gregory A

    2014-12-01

    The increasing interest in the modeling of complex macromolecular systems in recent years has spurred the development of numerous coarse-graining (CG) techniques. However, many of the CG models are constructed assuming that all details beneath the resolution of CG degrees of freedom are fast and average out, which sets limits on the resolution of feasible coarse-grainings and on the range of applications of the CG models. Ultra-coarse-graining (UCG) makes it possible to construct models at any desired resolution while accounting for discrete conformational or chemical changes within the CG sites that can modulate the interactions between them. Here, we discuss the UCG methodology and its numerical implementation. We pay particular attention to the numerical mechanism for including state transitions between different conformations within CG sites because this has not been discussed previously. Using a simple example of 1,2-dichloroethane, we demonstrate the ability of the UCG model to reproduce the multiconfigurational behavior of this molecular liquid, even when each molecule is modeled with only one CG site. The methodology can also be applied to other molecular liquids and macromolecular systems with time scale separation between conformational transitions and other intramolecular motions and rotations. PMID:26583210

  8. Coarse graining of force fields for metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dürholt, Johannes P; Galvelis, Raimondas; Schmid, Rochus

    2016-03-14

    We have adapted our genetic algorithm based optimization approach, originally developed to generate force field parameters from quantum mechanic reference data, to derive a first coarse grained force field for a MOF, taking the atomistic MOF-FF as a reference. On the example of the copper paddle-wheel based HKUST-1, a maximally coarse grained model, using a single bead for each three and four coordinated vertex, was developed as a proof of concept. By adding non-bonded interactions with a modified Buckingham potential, the resulting MOF-FF-CGNB is able to predict local deformation energies of the building blocks as well as bulk properties like the tbovs.pto energy difference or elastic constants in a semi-quantitative way. As expected, the negative thermal expansion of HKUST-1 is not reproduced by the maximally coarse grained model. At the expense of atomic resolution, substantially larger systems (up to tens of nanometers in size) can be simulated with respect to structural and mechanical properties, bridging the gap to the mesoscale. As an example the deformation of the [111] surface of HKUST-1 by a "tip" could be computed without artifacts from periodic images. PMID:26732756

  9. Coarse-graining stochastic biochemical networks: adiabaticity and fast simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Hengartner, Nick

    2008-01-01

    We propose a universal approach for analysis and fast simulations of stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics networks, which rests on elimination of fast chemical species without a loss of information about mesoscoplc, non-Poissonian fluctuations of the slow ones. Our approach, which is similar to the Born-Oppenhelmer approximation in quantum mechanics, follows from the stochastic path Integral representation of the cumulant generating function of reaction events. In applications with a small number of chemIcal reactions, It produces analytical expressions for cumulants of chemical fluxes between the slow variables. This allows for a low-dimensional, Interpretable representation and can be used for coarse-grained numerical simulation schemes with a small computational complexity and yet high accuracy. As an example, we derive the coarse-grained description for a chain of biochemical reactions, and show that the coarse-grained and the microscopic simulations are in an agreement, but the coarse-gralned simulations are three orders of magnitude faster.

  10. Moving Beyond Watson-Crick Models of Coarse Grained DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Kevin; Linak, Margaret; Tourdot, Richard

    2012-02-01

    DNA structure possesses several levels of complexity, ranging from the sequence of bases (primary structure) to base pairing (secondary structure) to its three-dimensional shape (tertiary structure) and can produce a wide variety of conformations in addition to canonical double stranded DNA. By including non-Watson-Crick interactions in a coarse-grained model, we developed a system that not only can capture the traditional B-form double helix, but also can adopt a wide variety of other DNA conformations. In our experimentally parameterized, coarse-grained DNA model we are able to reproduce the microscopic features of double-stranded DNA without the need for explicit constraints and capture experimental melting curves for a number of short DNA hairpins. We demonstrate the utility of the model by simulating more complex tertiary structures such as the folding of the thrombin aptamer, which includes G-quartets, and strand invasion during triplex formation. Our results highlight the importance of non-canonical interactions in DNA coarse- grained models.

  11. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  12. Coarse-grained models for aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsong; Mondal, Jagannath; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-01-01

    A new coarse-grained force field is developed for polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water. The force field is based on the MARTINI model but with the big multipole water (BMW) model for the solvent. The polymer force field is reparameterized using the MARTINI protocol. The new force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in simulations of short chains with the MARTINI force field; these conformations are not observed in atomistic simulations. We also investigate the effect of using parameters for the end-group that are different from those for the repeat units, with the MARTINI and BMW/MARTINI models. We find that the new BMW/MARTINI force field removes the ring-like conformations seen in the MARTINI models and has more accurate predictions for the density of neat PEG. However, solvent-separated-pairs between chain ends and slow dynamics of the PEG reflect its own artifacts. We also carry out fine-grained simulations of PEG with bundled water clusters and show that the water bundling can lead to ring-like conformations of the polymer molecules. The simulations emphasize the pitfalls of coarse-graining several molecules into one site and suggest that polymer-solvent systems might be a stringent test for coarse-grained force fields. PMID:24350686

  13. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films withmore » up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  14. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  15. Coarse-graining the electrostatic potential via distributed multipole expansions

    PubMed Central

    Gramada, Apostol; Bourne, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Multipole expansions offer a natural path to coarse-graining the electrostatic potential. However, the validity of the expansion is restricted to regions outside a spherical enclosure of the distribution of charge and, therefore, not suitable for most applications that demand accurate representation at arbitrary positions around the molecule. We propose and demonstrate a distributed multipole expansion approach that resolves this limitation. We also provide a practical algorithm for the computational implementation of this approach. The method allows the partitioning of the charge distribution into subsystems so that the multipole expansion of each component of the partition, and therefore of their superposition, is valid outside an enclosing surface of the molecule of arbitrary shape. The complexity of the resulting coarse-grained model of electrostatic potential is dictated by the area of the molecular surface and therefore, for a typical three-dimensional molecule, it scale as N2/3 with N, the number of charges in the system. This makes the method especially useful for coarse-grained studies of biological systems consisting of many large macromolecules provided that the configuration of the individual molecules can be approximated as fixed. PMID:21572587

  16. Optimization of Analytical Potentials for Coarse-Grained Biopolymer Models.

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Maccari, Giuseppe; Spampinato, Giulia Lia Beatrice; Tozzini, Valentina

    2016-08-25

    The increasing trend in the recent literature on coarse grained (CG) models testifies their impact in the study of complex systems. However, the CG model landscape is variegated: even considering a given resolution level, the force fields are very heterogeneous and optimized with very different parametrization procedures. Along the road for standardization of CG models for biopolymers, here we describe a strategy to aid building and optimization of statistics based analytical force fields and its implementation in the software package AsParaGS (Assisted Parameterization platform for coarse Grained modelS). Our method is based on the use and optimization of analytical potentials, optimized by targeting internal variables statistical distributions by means of the combination of different algorithms (i.e., relative entropy driven stochastic exploration of the parameter space and iterative Boltzmann inversion). This allows designing a custom model that endows the force field terms with a physically sound meaning. Furthermore, the level of transferability and accuracy can be tuned through the choice of statistical data set composition. The method-illustrated by means of applications to helical polypeptides-also involves the analysis of two and three variable distributions, and allows handling issues related to the FF term correlations. AsParaGS is interfaced with general-purpose molecular dynamics codes and currently implements the "minimalist" subclass of CG models (i.e., one bead per amino acid, Cα based). Extensions to nucleic acids and different levels of coarse graining are in the course. PMID:27150459

  17. The multiscale coarse-graining method. XI. Accurate interactions based on the centers of charge of coarse-grained sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-12-28

    It is essential to be able to systematically construct coarse-grained (CG) models that can efficiently and accurately reproduce key properties of higher-resolution models such as all-atom. To fulfill this goal, a mapping operator is needed to transform the higher-resolution configuration to a CG configuration. Certain mapping operators, however, may lose information related to the underlying electrostatic properties. In this paper, a new mapping operator based on the centers of charge of CG sites is proposed to address this issue. Four example systems are chosen to demonstrate this concept. Within the multiscale coarse-graining framework, CG models that use this mapping operator are found to better reproduce the structural correlations of atomistic models. The present work also demonstrates the flexibility of the mapping operator and the robustness of the force matching method. For instance, important functional groups can be isolated and emphasized in the CG model.

  18. Combining a polarizable force-field and a coarse-grained polarizable solvent model. II. Accounting for hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Masella, Michel; Borgis, Daniel; Cuniasse, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    A revised and improved version of our efficient polarizable force-field/coarse grained solvent combined approach (Masella, Borgis, and Cuniasse, J. Comput. Chem. 2008, 29, 1707) is described. The polarizable pseudo-particle solvent model represents the macroscopic solvent polarization by induced dipoles placed on mobile pseudo-particles. In this study, we propose a new formulation of the energy term handling the nonelectrostatic interactions among the pseudo-particles. This term is now able to reproduce the energetic and structural response of liquid water due to the presence of a hydrophobic spherical cavity. Accordingly, the parameters of the energy term handling the nonpolar solute/solvent interactions have been refined to reproduce the free-solvation energy of small solutes, based on a standard thermodynamic integration scheme. The reliability of this new approach has been checked for the properties of solvated methane and of the solvated methane dimer, as well as by performing 10 × 20 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories for three solvated proteins. A long-time stability of the protein structures along the trajectories is observed. Moreover, our method still provides a measure of the protein solvation thermodynamic at the same accuracy as standard Poisson-Boltzman continuum methods. These results show the relevance of our approach and its applicability to massively coupled MD schemes to accurately and intensively explore solvated macromolecule potential energy surfaces. PMID:21647929

  19. Application of information theory to a three-body coarse-grained representation of proteins in the PDB: insights into the structural and evolutionary roles of residues in protein structure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jared J; Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Lill, Markus A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge-based methods for analyzing protein structures, such as statistical potentials, primarily consider the distances between pairs of bodies (atoms or groups of atoms). Considerations of several bodies simultaneously are generally used to characterize bonded structural elements or those in close contact with each other, but historically do not consider atoms that are not in direct contact with each other. In this report, we introduce an information-theoretic method for detecting and quantifying distance-dependent through-space multibody relationships between the sidechains of three residues. The technique introduced is capable of producing convergent and consistent results when applied to a sufficiently large database of randomly chosen, experimentally solved protein structures. The results of our study can be shown to reproduce established physico-chemical properties of residues as well as more recently discovered properties and interactions. These results offer insight into the numerous roles that residues play in protein structure, as well as relationships between residue function, protein structure, and evolution. The techniques and insights presented in this work should be useful in the future development of novel knowledge-based tools for the evaluation of protein structure. PMID:25269778

  20. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  1. Multiscale design of coarse-grained elastic network-based potentials for the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fossépré, Mathieu; Leherte, Laurence; Laaksonen, Aatto; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in computer modeling, most biological processes are still out of reach when using all-atom (AA) models. Coarse-grained (CG) models allow classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to be accelerated. Although simplification of spatial resolution at different levels is often investigated, simplification of the CG potential in itself has been less common. CG potentials are often similar to AA potentials. In this work, we consider the design and reliability of purely mechanical CG models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this sense, CG force fields (FF) consist of a set of holonomic constraints guided by an elastic network model (ENM). Even though ENMs are used widely to perform normal mode analysis (NMA), they are not often implemented as a single FF in the context of MD simulations. In this work, various ENM-like potentials were investigated by varying their force constant schemes and connectivity patterns. A method was established to systematically parameterize ENM-like potentials at different spatial resolutions by using AA data. To do so, new descriptors were introduced. The choice of conformation descriptors that also include flexibility information is important for a reliable parameterization of ENMs with different degrees of sensitivity. Hence, ENM-like potentials, with specific parameters, can be sufficient to accurately reproduce AA MD simulations of μOR at highly coarse-grained resolutions. Therefore, the essence of the flexibility properties of μOR can be captured with simple models at different CG spatial resolutions, opening the way to mechanical approaches to understanding GPCR functions. Graphical Abstract All atom structure, residue interaction network and coarse-grained elastic network models of the μ opioid receptor (μOR). PMID:27566318

  2. Coarse-graining the structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rojas, J; Calvo, F; Wales, D J

    2016-05-18

    Clusters of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are essential components of soot and may concentrate a significant fraction of carbon matter in the interstellar medium. In this contribution, coarse-grained potentials are parameterized using all-atom reference data to model PAH molecules, such as coronene (C24H12) or circumcoronene (C54H18), and their aggregates. Low-energy structures of pure coronene or circumcoronene clusters obtained using basin-hopping global optimization are found to agree with atomistic results, and consist of finite 1D columnar motifs, sometimes juxtaposed in larger clusters. The structures are only weakly perturbed when quadrupolar interactions are included. π-Stacking also dominates in binary coronene/circumcoronene aggregates, although intriguing motifs are predicted in which one or more molecules are sandwiched between the other PAH species. The coarse-grained model is also extended to account for interaction with a flat graphitic substrate. In this case, binding is stronger with the substrate than with other molecules, and the PAHs are predicted to arrange into a flat triangular monolayer. PMID:27055581

  3. Effective mobility of dislocations from systematic coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, M.; Hütter, M.; Geers, MGD

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of large amounts of dislocations governs the plastic response of crystalline materials. In this contribution we discuss the relation between the mobility of discrete dislocations and the resulting flow rule for coarse-grained dislocation densities. The mobilities used in literature on these levels are quite different, for example in terms of their intrinsic the stress dependence. To establish the relation across the scales, we have derived the macroscopic evolution equations of dislocation densities from the equations of motion of individual dislocations by means of systematic coarse-graining. From this, we can identify a memory kernel relating the driving force and the flux of dislocations. This kernel can be considered as an effective macroscopic mobility with two contributions; a direct contribution related to the overdamped motion of individual dislocations, and an emergent contribution that arises from time correlations of fluctuations in the Peach-Koehler force. Scaling analysis shows that the latter contribution is dominant for dislocations in metals at room temperature. We also discuss several concerns related to the separation of timescales.

  4. Deformation Behaviour of Coarse Grain Alumina under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Satish

    2013-06-01

    To develop better understanding of the shock wave induced deformation behavior of coarse grain alumina ceramics, and for measurement of its Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), in-situ and recovery gas gun experiments have been carried out on coarse grain alumina (grain size ~ 10 μm), prepared in the form of discs (>99.9% TMD) by pressure-less sintering of alpha alumina powder at 1583 K. The HEL value of 1.9 GPa has been determined from the kink in the pressure history recorded using piezoresistance gauge and also from the free surface velocity history of the sample shocked to 9 GPa. The nano-indentation measurements on the alumina samples shocked to 6.5 GPa showed hardness value 15% lower than 21.3 GPa for unshocked alumina, and strong Indentation Size Effect (ISE); the hardness value was still lower and the ISE was stronger for the sample shocked to 12 GPa. The XRD measurements showed reduced particle size and increased microstrains in the shocked alumina fragments. SEM, FESEM and TEM measurements on shock treated samples showed presence of grain localized micro- and nano-scale deformations, micro-cleavages, grain-boundary microcracks, extensive shear induced deformations, and localized micro-fractures, etc. These observations led to the development of a qualitative model for the damage initiation and its subsequent growth mechanisms in shocked alumina. The work performed in collaboration with K.D. Joshi of BARC and A.K. Mukhopadhyay of CGCRI.

  5. Effective surface coverage of coarse-grained soft matter.

    PubMed

    Craven, Galen T; Popov, Alexander V; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2014-12-11

    The surface coverage of coarse-grained macromolecules bound to a solid substrate is not simply proportional to the two-dimensional number density because macromolecules can overlap. As a function of the overlap probability δ, we have developed analytical formulas and computational models capable of characterizing this nonlinear relationship. For simplicity, we ignore site-site interactions that would be induced by length-scale mismatches between binding sites and the radius of gyration of the incident coarse-grained macromolecular species. The interactions between macromolecules are modeled with a finite bounded potential that allows multiple macromolecules to occupy the same binding site. The softness of the bounded potential is thereby reduced to the single parameter δ. Through variation of this parameter, completely hard (δ = 0) and completely soft (δ = 1) behavior can be bridged. For soft macromolecular interactions (δ > 0), multiple occupancy reduces the fraction of sites ϕ occupied on the substrate. We derive the exact transition probability between sequential configurations and use this probability to predict ϕ and the distribution of occupied sites. Due to the complexity of the exact ϕ expressions and their analytical intractability at the thermodynamic limit, we apply a simplified mean-field (MF) expression for ϕ. The MF model is found to be in excellent agreement with the exact result. Both the exact and MF models are applied to an example dynamical system with multibody interactions governed by a stochastic bounded potential. Both models show agreement with results measured from simulation. PMID:25059882

  6. Million atom DFT calculations using coarse graining and petascale computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Don; Odbadrakh, Kh.; Samolyuk, G. D.; Stoller, R. E.; Zhang, X. G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2014-03-01

    Researchers performing classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) on defect structures often find it necessary to use millions of atoms in their models. It would be useful to perform density functional calculations on these large configurations in order to observe electron-based properties such as local charge and spin and the Helmann-Feynman forces on the atoms. The great number of atoms usually requires that a subset be ``carved'' from the configuration and terminated in a less that satisfactory manner, e.g. free space or inappropriate periodic boundary conditions. Coarse graining based on the Locally Self-consistent Multiple Scattering method (LSMS) and petascale computing can circumvent this problem by treating the whole system but dividing the atoms into two groups. In Coarse Grained LSMS (CG-LSMS) one group of atoms has its charge and scattering determined prescriptively based on neighboring atoms while the remaining group of atoms have their charge and scattering determined according to DFT as implemented in the LSMS. The method will be demonstrated for a one-million-atom model of a displacement cascade in Fe for which 24,130 atoms are treated with full DFT and the remaining atoms are treated prescriptively. Work supported as part of Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, used Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, Oak Ridge National Lab, of DOE Office of Science.

  7. An exactly solvable coarse-grained model for species diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suweis, Samir; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos

    2012-07-01

    We present novel analytical results concerning ecosystem species diversity that stem from a proposed coarse-grained neutral model based on birth-death processes. The relevance of the problem lies in the urgency for understanding and synthesizing both theoretical results from ecological neutral theory and empirical evidence on species diversity preservation. The neutral model of biodiversity deals with ecosystems at the same trophic level, where per capita vital rates are assumed to be species independent. Closed-form analytical solutions for the neutral theory are obtained within a coarse-grained model, where the only input is the species persistence time distribution. Our results pertain to: the probability distribution function of the number of species in the ecosystem, both in transient and in stationary states; the n-point connected time correlation function; and the survival probability, defined as the distribution of time spans to local extinction for a species randomly sampled from the community. Analytical predictions are also tested on empirical data from an estuarine fish ecosystem. We find that emerging properties of the ecosystem are very robust and do not depend on specific details of the model, with implications for biodiversity and conservation biology.

  8. A quantitative coarse-grain model for lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Mario; Haubertin, David Y; Sanderson, Wendy E; Essex, Jonathan W

    2008-01-24

    A simplified particle-based computer model for hydrated phospholipid bilayers has been developed and applied to quantitatively predict the major physical features of fluid-phase biomembranes. Compared with available coarse-grain methods, three novel aspects are introduced. First, the main electrostatic features of the system are incorporated explicitly via charges and dipoles. Second, water is accurately (yet efficiently) described, on an individual level, by the soft sticky dipole model. Third, hydrocarbon tails are modeled using the anisotropic Gay-Berne potential. Simulations are conducted by rigid-body molecular dynamics. Our technique proves 2 orders of magnitude less demanding of computational resources than traditional atomic-level methodology. Self-assembled bilayers quantitatively reproduce experimental observables such as electron density, compressibility moduli, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and water permeability. The lateral pressure profile has been calculated, along with the elastic curvature constants of the Helfrich expression for the membrane bending energy; results are consistent with experimental estimates and atomic-level simulation data. Several of the results presented have been obtained for the first time using a coarse-grain method. Our model is also directly compatible with atomic-level force fields, allowing mixed systems to be simulated in a multiscale fashion. PMID:18085766

  9. Coarse Graining to Investigate Membrane Induced Peptide Folding of Anticancer Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Sai; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    Information about membrane induced peptide folding mechanisms using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge due to time and length scale issues.We recently developed a low resolution Water Explicit Polarizable PROtein coarse-grained Model by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside protein backbone beads.These two dummy particles represent a fluctuating dipole,thus introducing structural polarization into the coarse-grained model.With this model,we were able to achieve significant α- β secondary structure content de novo,without any added bias.We extended the model to zwitterionic and anionic lipids,by adding oppositely charged dummy particles inside polar beads, to capture the ability of the head group region to form hydrogen bonds.We use zwitterionic POPC and anionic POPS as our model lipids, and a cationic anticancer peptide,SVS1,as our model peptide.We have characterized the driving forces for SVS1 folding on lipid bilayers with varying anionic and zwitterionic lipid compositions.Based on our results, dipolar interactions between peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilize folded conformations.Cooperativity in folding is induced by both intra peptide and membrane-peptide interaction.

  10. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-28

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730-3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile. PMID:26723605

  11. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-01

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730-3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  12. Systematic hierarchical coarse-graining with the inverse Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Naômé, Aymeric; Vercauteren, Daniel P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2015-12-28

    We outline our coarse-graining strategy for linking micro- and mesoscales of soft matter and biological systems. The method is based on effective pairwise interaction potentials obtained in detailed ab initio or classical atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, which can be used in simulations at less accurate level after scaling up the size. The effective potentials are obtained by applying the inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method [A. P. Lyubartsev and A. Laaksonen, Phys. Rev. E 52(4), 3730–3737 (1995)] on a chosen subset of degrees of freedom described in terms of radial distribution functions. An in-house software package MagiC is developed to obtain the effective potentials for arbitrary molecular systems. In this work we compute effective potentials to model DNA-protein interactions (bacterial LiaR regulator bound to a 26 base pairs DNA fragment) at physiological salt concentration at a coarse-grained (CG) level. Normally the IMC CG pair-potentials are used directly as look-up tables but here we have fitted them to five Gaussians and a repulsive wall. Results show stable association between DNA and the model protein as well as similar position fluctuation profile.

  13. Shock Simulations of Single-Site Coarse-Grain RDX using the Dissipative Particle Dynamics Method with Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Michael; Lisal, Martin; Schweigert, Igor; Larentzos, James; Brennan, John

    2015-06-01

    In discrete particle simulations, when an atomistic model is coarse-grained, a trade-off is made: a boost in computational speed for a reduction in accuracy. Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) methods help to recover accuracy in viscous and thermal properties, while giving back a small amount of computational speed. One of the most notable extensions of DPD has been the introduction of chemical reactivity, called DPD-RX. Today, pairing the current evolution of DPD-RX with a coarse-grained potential and its chemical decomposition reactions allows for the simulation of the shock behavior of energetic materials at a timescale faster than an atomistic counterpart. In 2007, Maillet et al. introduced implicit chemical reactivity in DPD through the concept of particle reactors and simulated the decomposition of liquid nitromethane. We have recently extended the DPD-RX method and have applied it to solid hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) under shock conditions using a recently developed single-site coarse-grain model and a reduced RDX decomposition mechanism. A description of the methods used to simulate RDX and its tranition to hot product gases within DPD-RX will be presented. Additionally, examples of the effect of microstructure on shock behavior will be shown. Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited.

  14. A coarse grained stochastic particle interacting system for tropical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, B.

    2012-12-01

    Climate models (GCMs) fail to represent adequately the variability associated with organized convection in the tropics. This deficiency is believed to hinder medium and long range weather forecasts, over weeks to months. GCMs use very complex sub-grid models, known as cumulus parameterizations, to represent the effects of clouds and convection as well as other unresolved processes. Cumulus parameterizations are intrinsically deterministic and are typically based on the quasi-equilibrium theory, which assumes that convection instantaneously consumes the atmospheric instability produced by radiation. In this talk, I will discuss a stochastic model for organized tropical convection based on a particle interacting system defined on a microscopic lattice. An order parameter is assumed to take the values 0,1,2,3 at a any given lattice site according to whether it is a clear site or it is occupied by a cloud of a one of the three types: congestus, deep, or stratiform, following intuitive rules motivated by recent satellite observations and various field campaigns conducted over the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific. The microscopic Markov process is coarse-grained systematically to obtain a multidimensional birth-death process with immigration, following earlier work done by Katsoulakis, Majda, and Vlachos (JCP 2003) for the case of the Ising model where the order parameter takes the values 0 and 1. The coarse grained birth-death process is a stochastic model, intermediate between the microscopic lattice model and the deterministic mean field limit, that is used to represent the sub-grid scale variability of the underlying physical process (here the cloud cover) with a negligible computational overhead and yet permits both local interactions between lattice sites and two-way interactions between the cloud cover and the large-scale climate dynamics. The new systematic coarse-graining, developed here for the multivalued order parameter, provides a unifying framework

  15. Aggregation of alpha-synuclein by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Barry; Pandey, Ras

    Alpha-synuclein, an intrinsic protein abundant in neurons, is believed to be a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Alzheimer, Parkinson's disease). Abnormal aggregation of ASN leads to Lewy bodies with specific morphologies. We investigate the self-organizing structures in a crowded environment of ASN proteins by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. ASN is a chain of 140 residues. Structure detail of residues is neglected but its specificity is captured via unique knowledge-based residue-residue interactions. Large-scale simulations are performed to analyze a number local and global physical quantities (e.g. mobility profile, contact map, radius of gyration, structure factor) as a function of temperature and protein concentration. Trend in multi-scale structural variations of the protein in a crowded environment is compared with that of a free protein chain.

  16. A Coarse-Grained Model for Simulating Chitosan Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    Hydrogels are biologically-derived materials composed of water-filled cross-linking polymer chains. It has widely been used as biodegradable material and has many applications in medical devices. The chitosan hydrogel is stimuli-responsive for undergoing pH-sensitive self-assembly process, allowing programmable tuning of the chitosan deposition through electric pulse. To explore the self-assembly mechanism of chitosan hydroge, we have developed an explicit-solvent coarse-grained chitosan model that has roots in the MARTINI force field, and the pH change is modeled by protonating chitosan chains using the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. The mechanism of hydrogel network formation will be presented. The self-assembled polymer network qualitatively reproduce many experimental observables such as the pH-dependent strain-stress curve, bulk moduli, and structure factor. Our model is also capable of simulating other similar polyelectrolyte polymer systems.

  17. Supramolecular polymerization: a coarse grained molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Bejagam, Karteek K; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-04-30

    A coarse-grained (CG) force field to model the self-assembly of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) class of compounds in nonpolar solvents has been developed. The model includes an intrinsic point dipole embedded on one of the CG beads so as to impart a macrodipole moment to the oligomer, one of its characteristic feature. Chemical specificity has been preserved by benchmarking against results, including dimerization and solvation free energies, obtained from an all-atom representation. Starting from a well-dispersed configuration in n-nonane, BTA molecules self-assemble to form one-dimensional stacks. Free energy (FE) changes for the various manner in which short oligomers can exchange between the assembled and the dispersed states have been calculated. These calculations show BTA to self-assemble via a downhill cooperative mechanism with a nucleus size of three. PMID:25853485

  18. Coarse-grained kinetic equations for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The nonequilibrium density matrix method is employed to derive a master equation for the averaged state populations of an open quantum system subjected to an external high frequency stochastic field. It is shown that if the characteristic time τstoch of the stochastic process is much lower than the characteristic time τsteady of the establishment of the system steady state populations, then on the time scale Δ t ˜ τsteady, the evolution of the system populations can be described by the coarse-grained kinetic equations with the averaged transition rates. As an example, the exact averaging is carried out for the dichotomous Markov process of the kangaroo type.

  19. Coarse-grained theory of a realistic tetrahedral liquid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procaccia, I.; Regev, I.

    2012-02-01

    Tetrahedral liquids such as water and silica-melt show unusual thermodynamic behavior such as a density maximum and an increase in specific heat when cooled to low temperatures. Previous work had shown that Monte Carlo and mean-field solutions of a lattice model can exhibit these anomalous properties with or without a phase transition, depending on the values of the different terms in the Hamiltonian. Here we use a somewhat different approach, where we start from a very popular empirical model of tetrahedral liquids —the Stillinger-Weber model— and construct a coarse-grained theory which directly quantifies the local structure of the liquid as a function of volume and temperature. We compare the theory to molecular-dynamics simulations and show that the theory can rationalize the simulation results and the anomalous behavior.

  20. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Mucus Barrier Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gniewek, Pawel; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    We designed a simple coarse-grained model of the glycocalyx layer, or adhesive mucus layer (AML), covered by mucus gel (luminal mucus layer) using a polymer lattice model and stochastic sampling (replica exchange Monte Carlo) for canonical ensemble simulations. We assumed that mucin MUC16 is responsible for the structural properties of the AML. Other mucins that are much smaller in size and less relevant for layer structure formation were not included. We further assumed that the system was in quasi-equilibrium. For systems with surface coverage and concentrations of model mucins mimicking physiological conditions, we determined the equilibrium distribution of inert nanoparticles within the mucus layers using an efficient replica exchange Monte Carlo sampling procedure. The results show that the two mucus layers penetrate each other only marginally, and the bilayer imposes a strong barrier for nanoparticles, with the AML layer playing a crucial role in the mucus barrier. PMID:22339855

  1. A coarse-grained model to study calcium activation of the cardiac thin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is one of the most common heart disease caused by genetic mutations. Cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation involve regulation of crossbridge binding to the cardiac thin filament, which regulates actomyosin interactions through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cardiac troponin (cTn) and tropomyosin (Tm). An atomistic model of cTn complex interacting with Tm has been studied by our group. A more realistic model requires the inclusion of the dynamics of actin filament, which is almost 6 times larger than cTn and Tm in terms of atom numbers, and extensive sampling of the model becomes very resource-demanding. By using physics-based protein united-residue force field, we introduce a coarse-grained model to study the calcium activation of the thin filament resulting from cTn's allosteric regulation of Tm dynamics on actin. The time scale is much longer than that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation because of the reduction of the degrees of freedom. The coarse-grained model is a good template for studying cardiac thin filament mutations that cause FHC, and reduces the cost of computational resources.

  2. Multiscale coarse-grained modelling of chromatin components: DNA and the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Lyubartsev, Alexander P

    2016-06-01

    To model large biomolecular systems, such as cell and organelles an atomistic description is not currently achievable and is not generally practical. Therefore, simplified coarse-grained (CG) modelling becomes a necessity. One of the most important cellular components is chromatin, a large DNA-protein complex where DNA is highly compacted. Recent progress in coarse graining modelling of the major chromatin components, double helical DNA and the nucleosome core particle (NCP) is presented. First, general principles and approaches allowing rigorous bottom-to-top generation of interaction potentials in the CG models are presented. Then, recent CG models of DNA are reviewed and their adequacy is benchmarked against experimental data on the salt dependence of DNA flexibility (persistence length). Furthermore, a few recent CG models of the NCP are described and their application for studying salt-dependent NCP-NCP interaction is discussed. An example of a multiscale approach to CG modelling of chromatin is presented where interactions and self-assembly of thousands of NCPs in solution are observed. PMID:26956528

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW Coarse-grained models to study dynamics of nanoscale biomolecules and their applications to the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trylska, Joanna

    2010-11-01

    Biopolymers are of dynamic nature and undergo functional motions spanning a large spectrum of timescales. To study the internal dynamics of nano-sized molecular complexes that exceed hundred thousands of atoms with atomic detail is computationally inefficient. Therefore, to achieve both the spatial and temporal scales of biological interest coarse-grained models of macromolecules are often used. By uniting groups of atoms into single interacting centers one decreases the resolution of the system and gets rid of the irrelevant degrees of freedom. This simplification, even though it requires parameterization, makes the studies of biomolecular dynamics computationally tractable and allows us to reach beyond the microsecond time frame. Here, I review the coarse-grained models of macromolecules composed of proteins and nucleic acids. I give examples of one-bead models that were developed to investigate the internal dynamics and focus on their applications to the ribosome—the nanoscale protein synthesis machine.

  4. Relative Entropy and Optimization-Driven Coarse-Graining Methods in VOTCA

    PubMed Central

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Jochum, Mara N.; Koschke, Konstantin; Aluru, N. R.; Rühle, Victor; Junghans, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent advances of the VOTCA package for systematic coarse-graining. Two methods have been implemented, namely the downhill simplex optimization and the relative entropy minimization. We illustrate the new methods by coarse-graining SPC/E bulk water and more complex water-methanol mixture systems. The CG potentials obtained from both methods are then evaluated by comparing the pair distributions from the coarse-grained to the reference atomistic simulations. In addition to the newly implemented methods, we have also added a parallel analysis framework to improve the computational efficiency of the coarse-graining process. PMID:26192992

  5. Relative entropy and optimization-driven coarse-graining methods in VOTCA

    SciTech Connect

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Jochum, Mara N.; Koschke, Konstantin; Aluru, N. R.; Rühle, Victor; Junghans, Christoph; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-07-20

    We discuss recent advances of the VOTCA package for systematic coarse-graining. Two methods have been implemented, namely the downhill simplex optimization and the relative entropy minimization. We illustrate the new methods by coarse-graining SPC/E bulk water and more complex water-methanol mixture systems. The CG potentials obtained from both methods are then evaluated by comparing the pair distributions from the coarse-grained to the reference atomistic simulations.We have also added a parallel analysis framework to improve the computational efficiency of the coarse-graining process.

  6. Classical predictability and coarse-grained evolution of the quantum baker's map

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, Artur; Soklakov, Andrei N.; Schack, Ruediger

    2006-06-15

    We investigate how classical predictability of the coarse-grained evolution of the quantum baker's map depends on the character of the coarse-graining. Our analysis extends earlier work by Brun and Hartle [Phys. Rev. D 60, 123503 (1999)] to the case of a chaotic map. To quantify predictability, we compare the rate of entropy increase for a family of coarse-grainings in the decoherent histories formalism. We find that the rate of entropy increase is dominated by the number of scales characterizing the coarse-graining.

  7. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-06-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation.

  8. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  9. Perspective: Coarse-grained models for biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noid, W. G.

    2013-09-01

    By focusing on essential features, while averaging over less important details, coarse-grained (CG) models provide significant computational and conceptual advantages with respect to more detailed models. Consequently, despite dramatic advances in computational methodologies and resources, CG models enjoy surging popularity and are becoming increasingly equal partners to atomically detailed models. This perspective surveys the rapidly developing landscape of CG models for biomolecular systems. In particular, this review seeks to provide a balanced, coherent, and unified presentation of several distinct approaches for developing CG models, including top-down, network-based, native-centric, knowledge-based, and bottom-up modeling strategies. The review summarizes their basic philosophies, theoretical foundations, typical applications, and recent developments. Additionally, the review identifies fundamental inter-relationships among the diverse approaches and discusses outstanding challenges in the field. When carefully applied and assessed, current CG models provide highly efficient means for investigating the biological consequences of basic physicochemical principles. Moreover, rigorous bottom-up approaches hold great promise for further improving the accuracy and scope of CG models for biomolecular systems.

  10. Coarse-Grained Molecular Models of Water: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Kevin R.; McCabe, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) models have proven to be very effective tools in the study of phenomena or systems that involve large time- and length-scales. By decreasing the degrees of freedom in the system and using softer interactions than seen in atomistic models, larger timesteps can be used and much longer simulation times can be studied. CG simulations are widely used to study systems of biological importance that are beyond the reach of atomistic simulation, necessitating a computationally efficient and accurate CG model for water. In this review, we discuss the methods used for developing CG water models and the relative advantages and disadvantages of the resulting models. In general, CG water models differ with regards to how many waters each CG group or bead represents, whether analytical or tabular potentials have been used to describe the interactions, and how the model incorporates electrostatic interactions. Finally, how the models are parameterized depends on their application, so, while some are fitted to experimental properties such as surface tension and density, others are fitted to radial distribution functions extracted from atomistic simulations. PMID:22904601

  11. Coarse-grained potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Wanlin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-11-01

    We develop the coarse-grained (CG) potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in CNT bundles and buckypaper for the study of the static and dynamic behaviors. The explicit expressions of the CG stretching, bending and torsion potentials for the nanotubes are obtained by the stick-spiral and the beam models, respectively. The non-bonded CG potentials between two different CG beads are derived from analytical results based on the cohesive energy between two parallel and crossing SWCNTs from the van der Waals interactions. We show that the CG model is applicable to large deformations of complex CNT systems by combining the bonded potentials with non-bonded potentials. Checking against full atom molecular dynamics calculations and our analytical results shows that the present CG potentials have high accuracy. The established CG potentials are used to study the mechanical properties of the CNT bundles and buckypaper efficiently at minor computational cost, which shows great potential for the design of micro- and nanomechanical devices and systems.

  12. Anatomy of an Allende coarse-grained inclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gorsey, A.; Armstrong, J. T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1985-11-01

    The petrology, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of a coarse-grained calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion from Allende are studied. The inclusion consists of a spinel-fassaite-melilite core surrounded by a melilite mantle. The zoning, chemical variation between crystals, and concentration of molecules in the melilite and fassaite of the spinel-free island, spinel-rich area, and melilite mantle are examined. The possible formation of the inclusion by gas-solid condensation, crystallization from a homogeneous refractory silicate melt, and evaporative loss due to distillation is analyzed. These processes, however, do not explain the textural relations and mineral chemistries of the spinel-free island, spinel-rich areas, and melilite mantle. The formation of the inclusion by spinel-free islands forming by crystallization from a spinel deficient liquid, the capture of solid clasts and Fremdlinge in a more refractory spinel-saturated liquid, and formation of the outer melilite veneer mantle from two refractory liquid layers is proposed.

  13. Coarse grained molecular simulations of melting kinetics of DPPC vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolling-Patel, Lara A.; Kindt, James T.

    2015-03-01

    Phase transitions in unilamellar vesicles are of particular interest as the increase in permeability of lipid bilayers around the main phase transition temperature makes them candidates for drug encapsulation and temperature-responsive delivery. We study the transition between the gel and fluid phases of a unilamellar vesicle of MARTINI coarse grain DPPC lipids with a diameter of 40 nm following temperature jumps from 280 K to temperatures near the transition temperature of 295 K. At 290 K and 295 K vesicles show single exponential melting kinetics in qualitative agreement with the early stages of melting measured in IR temperature-jump experiments. These trajectories exhibit partial melting over 500 ns, accompanied by a decrease in the number of gel domains from 8 domains in the initial faceted structure to 5 and 3 respectively. Melting at 295 K results in a shape change to an asymmetric structure that appears to be transforming into an oblate solid. Complete melting is seen for temperature jumps to 300 K and 310 K, in which cases vesicles undergo shape transitions into prolate dumbbell shapes. The shape changes that accompany the phase transition indicate that the phase transition kinetics are correlated to changes in curvature. NSF CHE-1213904.

  14. Coarse-Grained Model for Water Involving a Virtual Site.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingsen; Shen, Hujun

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose a new coarse-grained (CG) model for water by combining the features of two popular CG water models (BMW and MARTINI models) as well as by adopting a topology similar to that of the TIP4P water model. In this CG model, a CG unit, representing four real water molecules, consists of a virtual site, two positively charged particles, and a van der Waals (vdW) interaction center. Distance constraint is applied to the bonds formed between the vdW interaction center and the positively charged particles. The virtual site, which carries a negative charge, is determined by the locations of the two positively charged particles and the vdW interaction center. For the new CG model of water, we coined the name "CAVS" (charge is attached to a virtual site) due to the involvment of the virtual site. After being tested in molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of bulk water at various time steps, under different temperatures and in different salt (NaCl) concentrations, the CAVS model offers encouraging predictions for some bulk properties of water (such as density, dielectric constant, etc.) when compared to experimental ones. PMID:26747089

  15. Cellulose microfibril formation within a coarse grained molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nili, Abdolmadjid; Shklyaev, Oleg; Crespi, Vincent; Zhao, Zhen; Zhong, Linghao; CLSF Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose in biomass is mostly in the form of crystalline microfibrils composed of 18 to 36 parallel chains of polymerized glucose monomers. A single chain is produced by cellular machinery (CesA) located on the preliminary cell wall membrane. Information about the nucleation stage can address important questions about intermediate region between cell wall and the fully formed crystalline microfibrils. Very little is known about the transition from isolated chains to protofibrils up to a full microfibril, in contrast to a large body of studies on both CesA and the final crystalline microfibril. In addition to major experimental challenges in studying this transient regime, the length and time scales of microfibril nucleation are inaccessible to atomistic molecular dynamics. We have developed a novel coarse grained model for cellulose microfibrils which accounts for anisotropic interchain interactions. The model allows us to study nucleation, kinetics, and growth of cellulose chains/protofibrils/microfibrils. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences as part of The Center for LignoCellulose Structure and Formation, an Energy Frontier Research Center.

  16. Coarse-grained, foldable, physical model of the polypeptide chain

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Promita; Zuckermann, Ronald N.

    2013-01-01

    Although nonflexible, scaled molecular models like Pauling–Corey’s and its descendants have made significant contributions in structural biology research and pedagogy, recent technical advances in 3D printing and electronics make it possible to go one step further in designing physical models of biomacromolecules: to make them conformationally dynamic. We report here the design, construction, and validation of a flexible, scaled, physical model of the polypeptide chain, which accurately reproduces the bond rotational degrees of freedom in the peptide backbone. The coarse-grained backbone model consists of repeating amide and α-carbon units, connected by mechanical bonds (corresponding to φ and ψ) that include realistic barriers to rotation that closely approximate those found at the molecular scale. Longer-range hydrogen-bonding interactions are also incorporated, allowing the chain to readily fold into stable secondary structures. The model is easily constructed with readily obtainable parts and promises to be a tremendous educational aid to the intuitive understanding of chain folding as the basis for macromolecular structure. Furthermore, this physical model can serve as the basis for linking tangible biomacromolecular models directly to the vast array of existing computational tools to provide an enhanced and interactive human–computer interface. PMID:23898168

  17. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-05-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies.

  18. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Grime, John M A; Dama, James F; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K; Woodward, Cora L; Jensen, Grant J; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies. PMID:27174390

  19. Coarse-grained simulation reveals key features of HIV-1 capsid self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Grime, John M. A.; Dama, James F.; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Woodward, Cora L.; Jensen, Grant J.; Yeager, Mark; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    The maturation of HIV-1 viral particles is essential for viral infectivity. During maturation, many copies of the capsid protein (CA) self-assemble into a capsid shell to enclose the viral RNA. The mechanistic details of the initiation and early stages of capsid assembly remain to be delineated. We present coarse-grained simulations of capsid assembly under various conditions, considering not only capsid lattice self-assembly but also the potential disassembly of capsid upon delivery to the cytoplasm of a target cell. The effects of CA concentration, molecular crowding, and the conformational variability of CA are described, with results indicating that capsid nucleation and growth is a multi-stage process requiring well-defined metastable intermediates. Generation of the mature capsid lattice is sensitive to local conditions, with relatively subtle changes in CA concentration and molecular crowding influencing self-assembly and the ensemble of structural morphologies. PMID:27174390

  20. Coarse-grained DNA modeling: Hybridization and ionic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckley, Daniel M.

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a biopolymer of enormous significance in living systems. The utility of DNA in such systems is derived from the programmable nature of DNA and its unique mechanical properties. Recently, material scientists have harnessed these properties in order to create systems that spontaneous self-assemble on the nanoscale. Both biologists and material scientists are hindered by an incomplete understanding of the physical interactions that together govern DNA's behavior. Computer simulations, especially those at the coarse-grained (CG) level, can potentially complete this understanding by resolving details indiscernible with current experimental techniques. In this thesis, we advance the state-of-the-art of DNA CG simulations by first reviewing the relevant theory and the evolution of CG DNA models since their inception. Then we present 3SPN.2, an improved CG model for DNA that should provide new insights into biological and nanotechnological systems which incorporate DNA. We perform forward flux sampling simulations in order to examine the effect of sequence, oligomer length, and ionic strength on DNA oligomer hybridization. Due to the limitations inherent in continuum treatments of electrostatic interactions in biological systems, we generate a CG model of biological ions for use with 3SPN.2 and other CG models. Lastly, we illustrate the potential of 3SPN.2 and CG ions by using the models in simulations of viral capsid packaging experiments. The models and results described in this thesis will be useful in future modeling efforts that seek to identify the fundamental physics that govern behavior such as nucleosome positioning, DNA hybridization, and DNA nanoassembly.

  1. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be provided by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.

  2. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be providedmore » by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.« less

  3. First-principle approach to rescale the dynamics of simulated coarse-grained macromolecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimov, I.; Guenza, M. G.

    2011-09-01

    We present a detailed derivation and testing of our approach to rescale the dynamics of mesoscale simulations of coarse-grained polymer melts (I. Y. Lyubimov, J. McCarty, A. Clark, and M. G. Guenza, J. Chem. Phys.JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.3450301 132, 224903 (2010)). Starting from the first-principle Liouville equation and applying the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator technique, we derive the generalized Langevin equations (GLEs) for the coarse-grained representations of the liquid. The chosen slow variables in the projection operators define the length scale of coarse graining. Each polymer is represented at two levels of coarse graining: monomeric as a bead-and-spring model and molecular as a soft colloid. In the long-time regime where the center-of-mass follows Brownian motion and the internal dynamics is completely relaxed, the two descriptions must be equivalent. By enforcing this formal relation we derive from the GLEs the analytical rescaling factors to be applied to dynamical data in the coarse-grained representation to recover the monomeric description. Change in entropy and change in friction are the two corrections to be accounted for to compensate the effects of coarse graining on the polymer dynamics. The solution of the memory functions in the coarse-grained representations provides the dynamical rescaling of the friction coefficient. The calculation of the internal degrees of freedom provides the correction of the change in entropy due to coarse graining. The resulting rescaling formalism is a function of the coarse-grained model and thermodynamic parameters of the system simulated. The rescaled dynamics obtained from mesoscale simulations of polyethylene, represented as soft-colloidal particles, by applying our rescaling approach shows a good agreement with data of translational diffusion measured experimentally and from simulations. The proposed method is used to predict self-diffusion coefficients of new polyethylene samples.

  4. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  5. Majorization approach to entropic uncertainty relations for coarse-grained observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnicki, Łukasz

    2015-03-01

    We improve the entropic uncertainty relations for position and momentum coarse-grained measurements. We derive the continuous, coarse-grained counterparts of the discrete uncertainty relations based on the concept of majorization. The entropic inequalities obtained involve two Rényi entropies of the same order, and thus go beyond the standard scenario with conjugated parameters. In a special case describing the sum of two Shannon entropies, the majorization-based bounds significantly outperform the currently known results in the regime of larger coarse graining, and might thus be useful for entanglement detection in continuous variables.

  6. Coarse graining the distribution function of cold dark matter - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.

    2004-12-01

    We study analytically the coarse- and fine-grained distribution function (DF) established by the self-similar infall of collisionless matter. We find this function explicitly for isotropic and spherically symmetric systems in terms of cosmological initial conditions. The coarse-grained function is structureless and steady but the familiar phase-space sheet substructure is recovered in the fine-grained limit. By breaking the self-similarity of the halo infall we are able to argue for a central density flattening. In addition there will be an edge steepening. The best-fitting analytic density function is likely to be provided by a high-order polytrope fit smoothly to an outer power law of index -3 for isolated systems. There may be a transition to a -4 power law in the outer regions of tidally truncated systems. As we find that the central flattening is progressive in time, dynamically young systems such as galaxy clusters may well possess a Navarro, Frenk and White type density profile, while primordial dwarf galaxies, for example, are expected to have cores. This progressive flattening is expected to end either in the non-singular isothermal sphere, or in the non-singular metastable polytropic cores; as the DFs associated with each of these arise naturally in the bulk halo during the infall. We suggest, based on previous studies of the evolution of de-stabilized polytropes, that a collisionless system may pass through a family of polytropes of increasing order, finally approaching the limit of the non-singular isothermal sphere, if the `violent' collective relaxation is frequently re-excited by `merger' events. Thus central dominant (cD) galaxies, and indeed all bright galaxies that have grown in this fashion, should be in polytropic states. Our results suggest that no physics beyond that of wave-particle scattering is necessary to explain the nature of dark matter density profiles. However, this may be assisted by the scattering of particles from the centre of the

  7. Membrane pore formation in atomistic and coarse-grained simulations.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Sonja A; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-10-01

    Biological cells and their organelles are protected by ultra thin membranes. These membranes accomplish a broad variety of important tasks like separating the cell content from the outer environment, they are the site for cell-cell interactions and many enzymatic reactions, and control the in- and efflux of metabolites. For certain physiological functions e.g. in the fusion of membranes and also in a number of biotechnological applications like gene transfection the membrane integrity needs to be compromised to allow for instance for the exchange of polar molecules across the membrane barrier. Mechanisms enabling the transport of molecules across the membrane involve membrane proteins that form specific pores or act as transporters, but also so-called lipid pores induced by external fields, stress, or peptides. Recent progress in the simulation field enabled to closely mimic pore formation as supposed to occur in vivo or in vitro. Here, we review different simulation-based approaches in the study of membrane pores with a focus on lipid pore properties such as their size and energetics, poration mechanisms based on the application of external fields, charge imbalances, or surface tension, and on pores that are induced by small molecules, peptides, and lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26748016

  8. Coarse-grained description of polymer blends as chains of interacting soft particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, Kevin; Guenza, Marina

    We present an analytic pair potential in a coarse grain description of a polymer blend where each chain is represented as a chain of soft-colloidal particles. This coarse grain model is based on integral theory that can represent the chains at variable levels.The particles have soft repulsion at separation less than the size of each coarse grain unit and a long repulsive tail with small attractive portion. While the short range pieces of the potential dominates the liquid structure, the long range tail dominate the thermodynamics of the system. So an accurate potential in both the short and long range distances is need to keep give correct structure and thermodynamical properties in the coarse grain description.

  9. Impact of coarse-grained measurement with finite range on continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Yu, Song; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-03-01

    In continuous-variable quantum key distribution, detectors are necessarily coarse grained and of finite range. We analyze the impact of both features and demonstrate that while coarse graining adds a fixed error to the estimated excess noise, finite range degrades the estimation accuracy of both transmission and excess noise. Moreover, the inaccurate estimation due to finite range may results in secret key rate underestimation, even misjudgment of security. To compensate these consequences, tuning the modulation variance is a possible way.

  10. Systematic and Simulation-Free Coarse-Graining of Polymer Melts using Soft Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Full atomistic simulations of multi-chain systems are not feasible at present due to their formidable computational requirements. Molecular simulations with coarse-grained models have to be used instead, where each segment represents, for example, the center-of-mass of a group of atoms or real monomers. While atoms interact with hard excluded-volume interactions (e.g., the Lennard-Jones potential) and cannot overlap, the coarse-grained segments can certainly overlap and should therefore interact with soft potentials that allow complete particle overlapping. Coarse-grained models, however, reduce the chain conformational entropy, which plays an essential role in the behavior of polymeric systems. In this work, we use integral-equation theories, instead of molecular simulations, to perform both the structure-based and relative-entropy-based coarse-graining of homopolymer melts, and systematically examine how the coarse-grained soft potential varies with N (the number of segments on each chain) and how well the coarse-grained models reproduce both the structural and thermodynamic properties of the original system. This provides us with a quantitative basis for choosing small N-values that can still capture the chain conformational entropy, a characteristics of polymers.

  11. Systematic coarse-graining of the wormlike chain model for dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslover, Elena; Spakowitz, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    One of the key goals of macromolecular modeling is to elucidate how macroscale physical properties arise from the microscale behavior of the polymer constituents. For many biological and industrial applications, a direct simulation approach is impractical due to to the wide range of length and time scales that must be spanned by the model, necessitating physically sound and practically relevant procedures for coarse-graining polymer systems. We present a highly general systematic coarse-graining procedure that maps any detailed polymer model onto effective elastic-chain models at intermediate and large length scales, and we specifically focus on the wormlike chain model of semiflexible polymers. Our approach defines a continuous flow of coarse-grained models starting from the wormlike chain model, proceeding through an intermediate-scale stretchable, shearable wormlike chain, and finally resolving to a Gaussian chain at the longest lengths. Using Brownian dynamic simulations of our coarse grained polymer, we show that this approach to coarse graining the wormlike chain model captures analytical predictions for stress relaxation in a semiflexible polymer. Since we can arbitrarily coarse grain the polymer in these dynamic simulations, our approach greatly accelerates simulations.

  12. YUP: A Molecular Simulation Program for Coarse-Grained and Multi-Scaled Models.

    PubMed

    Tan, Robert K Z; Petrov, Anton S; Harvey, Stephen C

    2006-05-01

    Coarse-grained models can be very different from all-atom models and are highly varied. Each class of model is assembled very differently and some models need customized versions of the standard molecular mechanics methods. The most flexible way to meet these diverse needs is to provide access to internal data structures and a programming language to manipulate these structures. We have created YUP, a general-purpose program for coarse-grained and multi-scaled models. YUP extends the Python programming language by adding new data types. We have then used the extended language to implement three classes of coarse-grained models. The coarse-grained RNA model type is an unusual non-linear polymer and the assembly was easily handled with a simple program. The molecular dynamics algorithm had to be extended for a coarse-grained DNA model so that it could detect a failure that is invisible to a standard implementation. A third model type took advantage of access to the force field to simulate the packing of DNA in viral capsid. We find that objects are easy to modify, extend and redeploy. Thus, new classes of coarse-grained models can be implemented easily. PMID:22844233

  13. Toward a Coarse Graining/All Atoms Force Field (CG/AA) from a Multiscale Optimization Method: An Application to the MCM-41 Mesoporous Silicates.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, A; Morineau, D; Lefort, R; Malfreyt, P

    2010-10-12

    Many interesting physical phenomena occur on length and time scales that are not accessible by atomistic molecular simulations. By introducing a coarse graining of the degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models allow ther study of larger scale systems for longer times. Coarse-grained force fields have been mostly derived for large molecules, including polymeric materials and proteins. By contrast, there exist no satisfactory CG potentials for mesostructured porous solid materials in the literature. This issue has become critical among a growing number of studies on confinement effects on fluid properties, which require both long time and large scale simulations and the conservation of a sufficient level of atomistic description to account for interfacial phenomena. In this paper, we present a general multiscale procedure to derive a hybrid coarse grained/all atoms force field CG/AA model for mesoporous systems. The method is applied to mesostructured MCM-41 molecular sieves, while the parameters of the mesoscopic interaction potentials are obtained and validated from the computation of the adsorption isotherm of methanol by grand canonical molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:26616783

  14. All-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of the SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-07-01

    The SNARE complex, consisting of three proteins (VAMP2, syntaxin, and SNAP-25), is thought to drive membrane fusion by assembling into a four-helix bundle through a zippering process. In support of the above zippering model, a recent single-molecule optical tweezers experiment by Gao et al. revealed a sequential unzipping of SNARE along VAMP2 in the order of the linker domain → the C-terminal domain → the N-terminal domain. To offer detailed structural insights to this unzipping process, we have performed all-atom and coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics (sMD) simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of SNARE using different models and force fields. Our findings are summarized as follows: First, the sMD simulations based on either an all-atom force field (with an implicit solvent model) or a coarse-grained Go model were unable to capture the forced unfolding pathway of SNARE as observed by Gao et al., which may be attributed to insufficient simulation time and inaccurate force fields. Second, the sMD simulations based on a reparameterized coarse-grained model (i.e., modified elastic network model) were able to predict a sequential unzipping of SNARE in good agreement with the findings by Gao et al. The key to this success is to reparameterize the intrahelix and interhelix nonbonded force constants against the pair-wise residue-residue distance fluctuations collected from all-atom MD simulations of SNARE. Therefore, our finding supports the importance of accurately describing the inherent dynamics/flexibility of SNARE (in the absence of force), in order to correctly simulate its unfolding behaviors under force. This study has established a useful computational framework for future studies of the zippering function of SNARE and its perturbations by point mutations with amino-acid level of details, and more generally the forced unfolding pathways of other helix bundle proteins. PMID:24403006

  15. Calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomic systems: application to semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Kathryn; Oden, J. Tinsley

    2014-07-01

    Coarse-grained models of atomic systems, created by aggregating groups of atoms into molecules to reduce the number of degrees of freedom, have been used for decades in important scientific and technological applications. In recent years, interest in developing a more rigorous theory for coarse graining and in assessing the predictivity of coarse-grained models has arisen. In this work, Bayesian methods for the calibration and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems in thermodynamic equilibrium are developed. For specificity, only configurational models of systems in canonical ensembles are considered. Among major challenges in validating coarse-grained models are (1) the development of validation processes that lead to information essential in establishing confidence in the model's ability predict key quantities of interest and (2), above all, the determination of the coarse-grained model itself; that is, the characterization of the molecular architecture, the choice of interaction potentials and thus parameters, which best fit available data. The all-atom model is treated as the "ground truth," and it provides the basis with respect to which properties of the coarse-grained model are compared. This base all-atom model is characterized by an appropriate statistical mechanics framework in this work by canonical ensembles involving only configurational energies. The all-atom model thus supplies data for Bayesian calibration and validation methods for the molecular model. To address the first challenge, we develop priors based on the maximum entropy principle and likelihood functions based on Gaussian approximations of the uncertainties in the parameter-to-observation error. To address challenge (2), we introduce the notion of model plausibilities as a means for model selection. This methodology provides a powerful approach toward constructing coarse-grained models which are most plausible for given all-atom data. We demonstrate the theory and

  16. A coarse-grained model for the simulations of biomolecular interactions in cellular environments

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Wu, Yinghao

    2014-02-07

    The interactions of bio-molecules constitute the key steps of cellular functions. However, in vivo binding properties differ significantly from their in vitro measurements due to the heterogeneity of cellular environments. Here we introduce a coarse-grained model based on rigid-body representation to study how factors such as cellular crowding and membrane confinement affect molecular binding. The macroscopic parameters such as the equilibrium constant and the kinetic rate constant are calibrated by adjusting the microscopic coefficients used in the numerical simulations. By changing these model parameters that are experimentally approachable, we are able to study the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of molecular binding, as well as the effects caused by specific cellular environments. We investigate the volumetric effects of crowded intracellular space on bio-molecular diffusion and diffusion-limited reactions. Furthermore, the binding constants of membrane proteins are currently difficult to measure. We provide quantitative estimations about how the binding of membrane proteins deviates from soluble proteins under different degrees of membrane confinements. The simulation results provide biological insights to the functions of membrane receptors on cell surfaces. Overall, our studies establish a connection between the details of molecular interactions and the heterogeneity of cellular environments.

  17. Membrane Association of the Diphtheria Toxin Translocation Domain Studied by Coarse-Grained Simulations and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Canales, Jose C; Vargas-Uribe, Mauricio; Ladokhin, Alexey S; Kurnikova, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain inserts in lipid bilayers upon acidification of the environment. Computational and experimental studies have suggested that low pH triggers a conformational change of the T-domain in solution preceding membrane binding. The refolded membrane-competent state was modeled to be compact and mostly retain globular structure. In the present work, we investigate how this refolded state interacts with membrane interfaces in the early steps of T-domain's membrane association. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations suggest two distinct membrane-bound conformations of the T-domain in the presence of bilayers composed of a mixture of zwitteronic and anionic phospholipids (POPC:POPG with a 1:3 molar ratio). Both membrane-bound conformations show a common near parallel orientation of hydrophobic helices TH8-TH9 relative to the membrane plane. The most frequently observed membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by electrostatic interactions between the N-terminal segment of the protein and the membrane interface. The second membrane-bound conformation is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions between protein residues and lipid acyl chains, which facilitate deeper protein insertion in the membrane interface. A theoretical estimate of a free energy of binding of a membrane-competent T-domain to the membrane is provided. PMID:25650178

  18. Thermodynamic and structural signatures of water-driven methane-methane attraction in coarse-grained mW water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Molinero, Valeria

    2013-08-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are responsible for water-driven processes such as protein folding and self-assembly of biomolecules. Microscopic theories and molecular simulations have been used to study association of a pair of methanes in water, the paradigmatic example of hydrophobic attraction, and determined that entropy is the driving force for the association of the methane pair, while the enthalpy disfavors it. An open question is to which extent coarse-grained water models can still produce correct thermodynamic and structural signatures of hydrophobic interaction. In this work, we investigate the hydrophobic interaction between a methane pair in water at temperatures from 260 to 340 K through molecular dynamics simulations with the coarse-grained monatomic water model mW. We find that the coarse-grained model correctly represents the free energy of association of the methane pair, the temperature dependence of free energy, and the positive change in entropy and enthalpy upon association. We investigate the relationship between thermodynamic signatures and structural order of water through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the density, energy, and tetrahedral order parameter Qt of water. The simulations reveal an enhancement of tetrahedral order in the region between the first and second hydration shells of the methane molecules. The increase in tetrahedral order, however, is far from what would be expected for a clathrate-like or ice-like shell around the solutes. This work shows that the mW water model reproduces the key signatures of hydrophobic interaction without long ranged electrostatics or the need to be re-parameterized for different thermodynamic states. These characteristics, and its hundred-fold increase in efficiency with respect to atomistic models, make mW a promising water model for studying water-driven hydrophobic processes in more complex systems.

  19. Improved Coarse-Grained Modeling of Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Michael D.; Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-24

    In mammalian cells cholesterol is essential for membrane function, but in excess can be cytototoxic. The cellular response to acute cholesterol loading involves biophysical-based mechanisms that regulate cholesterol levels, through modulation of the “activity” or accessibility of cholesterol to extra-membrane acceptors. Experiments and united atom (UA) simulations show that at high concentrations of cholesterol, lipid bilayers thin significantly and cholesterol availability to external acceptors increases substantially. Such cholesterol activation is critical to its trafficking within cells. Here we aim to reduce the computational cost to enable simulation of large and complex systems involved in cholesterol regulation, such as those including oxysterols and cholesterol-sensing proteins. To accomplish this, we have modified the published MARTINI coarse-grained force field to improve its predictions of cholesterol-induced changes in both macroscopic and microscopic properties of membranes. Most notably, MARTINI fails to capture both the (macroscopic) area condensation and membrane thickening seen at less than 30% cholesterol and the thinning seen above 40% cholesterol. The thinning at high concentration is critical to cholesterol activation. Microscopic properties of interest include cholesterol-cholesterol radial distribution functions (RDFs), tilt angle, and accessible surface area. First, we develop an “angle-corrected” model wherein we modify the coarse-grained bond angle potentials based on atomistic simulations. This modification significantly improves prediction of macroscopic properties, most notably the thickening/thinning behavior, and also slightly improves microscopic property prediction relative to MARTINI. Second, we add to the angle correction a “volume correction” by also adjusting phospholipid bond lengths to achieve a more accurate volume per molecule. The angle + volume correction substantially further improves the quantitative

  20. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munafò, A.; Panesi, M.; Magin, T. E.

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N2-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N2 molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models.

  1. Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model for internal energy excitation and dissociation in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Munafò, A; Panesi, M; Magin, T E

    2014-02-01

    A Boltzmann rovibrational collisional coarse-grained model is proposed to reduce a detailed kinetic mechanism database developed at NASA Ames Research Center for internal energy transfer and dissociation in N(2)-N interactions. The coarse-grained model is constructed by lumping the rovibrational energy levels of the N(2) molecule into energy bins. The population of the levels within each bin is assumed to follow a Boltzmann distribution at the local translational temperature. Excitation and dissociation rate coefficients for the energy bins are obtained by averaging the elementary rate coefficients. The energy bins are treated as separate species, thus allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. The proposed coarse-grained model is applied to the study of nonequilibrium flows behind normal shock waves and within converging-diverging nozzles. In both cases, the flow is assumed inviscid and steady. Computational results are compared with those obtained by direct solution of the master equation for the rovibrational collisional model and a more conventional multitemperature model. It is found that the proposed coarse-grained model is able to accurately resolve the nonequilibrium dynamics of internal energy excitation and dissociation-recombination processes with only 20 energy bins. Furthermore, the proposed coarse-grained model provides a superior description of the nonequilibrium phenomena occurring in shock heated and nozzle flows when compared with the conventional multitemperature models. PMID:25353565

  2. A general method for spatially coarse-graining Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations onto a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Seider, Warren D.; Sinno, Talid

    2013-03-01

    A recently introduced method for coarse-graining standard continuous Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of atomic or molecular fluids onto a rigid lattice of variable scale [X. Liu, W. D. Seider, and T. Sinno, Phys. Rev. E 86, 026708 (2012)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.026708 is further analyzed and extended. The coarse-grained Metropolis Monte Carlo technique is demonstrated to be highly consistent with the underlying full-resolution problem using a series of detailed comparisons, including vapor-liquid equilibrium phase envelopes and spatial density distributions for the Lennard-Jones argon and simple point charge water models. In addition, the principal computational bottleneck associated with computing a coarse-grained interaction function for evolving particle positions on the discretized domain is addressed by the introduction of new closure approximations. In particular, it is shown that the coarse-grained potential, which is generally a function of temperature and coarse-graining level, can be computed at multiple temperatures and scales using a single set of free energy calculations. The computational performance of the method relative to standard Monte Carlo simulation is also discussed.

  3. Effective rates from thermodynamically consistent coarse-graining of models for molecular motors with probe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Eva; Seifert, Udo

    2015-02-01

    Many single-molecule experiments for molecular motors comprise not only the motor but also large probe particles coupled to it. The theoretical analysis of these assays, however, often takes into account only the degrees of freedom representing the motor. We present a coarse-graining method that maps a model comprising two coupled degrees of freedom which represent motor and probe particle to such an effective one-particle model by eliminating the dynamics of the probe particle in a thermodynamically and dynamically consistent way. The coarse-grained rates obey a local detailed balance condition and reproduce the net currents. Moreover, the average entropy production as well as the thermodynamic efficiency is invariant under this coarse-graining procedure. Our analysis reveals that only by assuming unrealistically fast probe particles, the coarse-grained transition rates coincide with the transition rates of the traditionally used one-particle motor models. Additionally, we find that for multicyclic motors the stall force can depend on the probe size. We apply this coarse-graining method to specific case studies of the F1-ATPase and the kinesin motor.

  4. Optimization of an Elastic Network Augmented Coarse Grained Model to Study CCMV Capsid Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Globisch, Christoph; Krishnamani, Venkatramanan; Deserno, Markus; Peter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The major protective coat of most viruses is a highly symmetric protein capsid that forms spontaneously from many copies of identical proteins. Structural and mechanical properties of such capsids, as well as their self-assembly process, have been studied experimentally and theoretically, including modeling efforts by computer simulations on various scales. Atomistic models include specific details of local protein binding but are limited in system size and accessible time, while coarse grained (CG) models do get access to longer time and length scales but often lack the specific local interactions. Multi-scale models aim at bridging this gap by systematically connecting different levels of resolution. Here, a CG model for CCMV (Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus), a virus with an icosahedral shell of 180 identical protein monomers, is developed, where parameters are derived from atomistic simulations of capsid protein dimers in aqueous solution. In particular, a new method is introduced to combine the MARTINI CG model with a supportive elastic network based on structural fluctuations of individual monomers. In the parametrization process, both network connectivity and strength are optimized. This elastic-network optimized CG model, which solely relies on atomistic data of small units (dimers), is able to correctly predict inter-protein conformational flexibility and properties of larger capsid fragments of 20 and more subunits. Furthermore, it is shown that this CG model reproduces experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) indentation measurements of the entire viral capsid. Thus it is shown that one obvious goal for hierarchical modeling, namely predicting mechanical properties of larger protein complexes from models that are carefully parametrized on elastic properties of smaller units, is achievable. PMID:23613730

  5. Modeling the Self-Assembly and Stability of DHPC Micelles Using Atomic Resolution and Coarse Grained MD Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Johan F; Vestergaard, Mikkel; Schiøtt, Birgit; Thøgersen, Lea

    2012-05-01

    Membrane mimics such as micelles and bicelles are widely used in experiments involving membrane proteins. With the aim of being able to carry out molecular dynamics simulations in environments comparable to experimental conditions, we set out to test the ability of both coarse grained and atomistic resolution force fields to model the experimentally observed behavior of the lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), which is a widely used lipid for biophysical characterization of membrane proteins. It becomes clear from our results that a satisfactory modeling of DHPC aggregates in solution poses different demands to the force field than do the modeling of bilayers. First, the representation of the short tailed lipid DHPC in the coarse grained force field MARTINI is assessed with the intend of successfully self-assemble micelles with structural characteristics comparable to experimental data. Then, the use of the recently presented polarizable water model in MARTINI is shown to be essential for producing micelles that are structurally in accordance with experiments. For the atomistic representations of DHPC micelles in solution the GROMOS96 force field with lipid parameters by A. Kukol fails to maintain stable micelles, whereas the most recent CHARMM36 lipid parameters and GROMOS96 with the so-called Berger lipid parameters both succeed in this regard. PMID:26593649

  6. Supramolecular assembly of a biomineralizing antimicrobial peptide in coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Eby, D Matthew; Johnson, Glenn R; Farmer, Barry L; Pandey, Ras B

    2011-01-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the self-organizing behavior of the biomineralizing peptide KSL (KKVVFKVKFK) in the presence of phosphate. Originally identified as an antimicrobial peptide, KSL also directs the formation of biosilica through a hypothetical supramolecular template that requires phosphate for assembly. Specificity of each residue and the interactions between the peptide and phosphate are considered in a coarse-grained model. Both local and global physical quantities are calculated as the constituents execute their stochastic motion in the presence and absence of phosphate. Ordered peptide aggregates develop after simulations reach thermodynamic equilibrium, wherein phosphates form bridging ligands with lysines and are found interdigitated between peptide molecules. Results demonstrate that interactions between the lysines and phosphate drive self-organization into lower energy conformations of interconnected peptide scaffolds that resemble the supramolecular structures of polypeptide- and polyamine-mediated silica condensation systems. Furthermore, the specific phosphate-peptide organization appears to mimic the zwitterionic structure of native silaffins (scaffold proteins of diatom shells), suggesting a similar template organization for silica deposition between the in vitro KSL and silaffin systems. PMID:21072418

  7. Vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism: Coarse-grained models and their relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-03-01

    A theoretical description of vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism is presented by using a coarse-grained model based on a distributed charge and multipole interaction theory. Solvatochromic frequency shift has been described by considering the interaction between distributed charges of a solute and electrostatic potential due to distributed charges of solvent molecules. Another approach was based on the expansion of the solvatochromic frequency shift in terms of solvent electric field and its gradient at distributed sites on solute. The relationship between these two approaches is elucidated and their validities are discussed. It is also shown that the distributed charge and multipole model for solvatochromism developed here can be used to describe vibrational Stark effects on frequency and transition dipole moment. The relationship between the vibrational Stark tuning rate and the parameters obtained from recent vibrational solvatochromism studies is clarified and used to determine the vibrational Stark tuning rates of a few stretching modes, which are then directly compared with experimentally measured values. We anticipate that the present theoretical model can be used to study a variety of vibrational solvatochromic and electrochromic phenomena and to extract critical information on local electrostatic environment around a small IR probe in solution or protein from linear and nonlinear IR spectroscopic studies.

  8. Dry Martini, a coarse-grained force field for lipid membrane simulations with implicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Arnarez, Clément; Uusitalo, Jaakko J; Masman, Marcelo F; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; de Jong, Djurre H; Melo, Manuel N; Periole, Xavier; de Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J

    2015-01-13

    Coarse-grained (CG) models allow simulation of larger systems for longer times by decreasing the number of degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models. Here we introduce an implicit-solvent version of the popular CG Martini model, nicknamed "Dry" Martini. To account for the omitted solvent degrees of freedom, the nonbonded interaction matrix underlying the Martini force field was reparametrized. The Dry Martini force field reproduces relatively well a variety of lipid membrane properties such as area per lipid, bilayer thickness, bending modulus, and coexistence of liquid-ordered and disordered domains. Furthermore, we show that the new model can be applied to study membrane fusion and tether formation, with results similar to those of the standard Martini model. Membrane proteins can also be included, but less quantitative results are obtained. The absence of water in Dry Martini leads to a significant speedup for large systems, opening the way to the study of complex multicomponent membranes containing millions of lipids. PMID:26574224

  9. Comparing allosteric transitions in the domains of calmodulin through coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+-binding protein consisting of two structurally similar domains with distinct stabilities, binding affinities, and flexibilities. We present coarse grained simulations that suggest that the mechanism for the domain's allosteric transitions between the open and closed conformations depends on subtle differences in the folded state topology of the two domains. Throughout a wide temperature range, the simulated transition mechanism of the N-terminal domain (nCaM) follows a two-state transition mechanism while domain opening in the C-terminal domain (cCaM) involves unfolding and refolding of the tertiary structure. The appearance of the unfolded intermediate occurs at a higher temperature in nCaM than it does in cCaM consistent with nCaM's higher thermal stability. Under approximate physiological conditions, the simulated unfolded state population of cCaM accounts for 10% of the population with nearly all of the sampled transitions (approximately 95%) unfolding and refolding during the conformational change. Transient unfolding significantly slows the domain opening and closing rates of cCaM, which can potentially influence its Ca2+-binding mechanism.

  10. Equation of state for a coarse-grained DPPC monolayer at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhangale, Parag S.; Gaver, Donald P., III

    Pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, secreted by the type II epithelial cells in the lungs, is crucial to reducing the effort required for breathing. A lack of adequate amounts of pulmonary surfactant in underdeveloped lungs of premature infants results in infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) is the approved method of mitigating the effects of RDS. The development of new SRT regimens requires a fundamental understanding of the links between surfactant biochemistry and functionality. We use a coarse-grained (CG) model to predict the surface pressure-surface concentration relationship (equation of state) for pure DPPC, which is a major component of endogenous and synthetic pulmonary surfactant mixtures. We show that the model can be efficiently used to predict the equation of state in excellent agreement with experimental results. We also study the structure of the monolayer as a function of the surface tension of the system. We show that a decrease in the applied surface tension results in an increase in order in the head group region and a decrease in order in the tail region of DPPC. This technique may be useful in the prediction of equations of state for surfactant replacements.

  11. Spreading of a Unilamellar Liposome on Charged Substrates: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Simulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xian; Lu, Diannan; Wu, Jianzhong; Liu, Zheng

    2016-04-19

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are able to accommodate membrane proteins useful for diverse biomimetic applications. Although liposome spreading represents a common procedure for preparation of SLBs, the underlying mechanism is not yet fully understood, particularly from a molecular perspective. The present study examines the effects of the substrate charge on unilamellar liposome spreading on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations for a coarse-grained model of the solvent and lipid molecules. Liposome transformation into a lipid bilayer of different microscopic structures suggests three types of kinetic pathways depending on the substrate charge density, that is, top-receding, parachute, and parachute with wormholes. Each pathway leads to a unique distribution of the lipid molecules and thereby distinctive properties of SLBs. An increase of the substrate charge density results in a magnified asymmetry of the SLBs in terms of the ratio of charged lipids, parallel surface movements, and the distribution of lipid molecules. While the lipid mobility in the proximal layer is strongly correlated with the substrate potential, the dynamics of lipid molecules in the distal monolayer is similar to that of a freestanding lipid bilayer. For liposome spreading on a highly charged surface, wormhole formation promotes lipid exchange between the SLB monolayers thus reduces the asymmetry on the number density of lipid molecules, the lipid order parameter, and the monolayer thickness. The simulation results reveal the important regulatory role of electrostatic interactions on liposome spreading and the properties of SLBs. PMID:27019394

  12. Curvature Generation and Pressure Profile Modulation in Membrane by Lysolipids: Insights from Coarse-Grained Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Cui, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although many membrane additives are known to modulate the activities of membrane proteins via perturbing the properties of lipid membrane, the underlying mechanism is often not precisely understood. In this study, we investigate the impact of asymmetrically incorporating single-tailed lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into a membrane bilayer using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Using a simple computational protocol designed to approximately mimic a micropipette setting, we show that asymmetric incorporation of LPC can lead to significant curvature in a bilayer. Detailed analysis of geometrical and mechanical properties (pressure profile) of the resulting mound structure indicates that the degree of pressure profile perturbation is determined not by the local curvature per se but by the packing of lipid headgroups (i.e., area-per-lipid). The findings help provide a concrete basis for understanding the activation mechanism of mechanosensitive channels by asymmetric incorporation of LPC into membrane patches in patch-clamp experiments. The calculated local pressure profiles are valuable to the construction of realistic membrane models for the analysis of mechanosensation in a continuum mechanics framework. PMID:19843459

  13. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, István A.; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-01-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form. PMID:26348923

  14. Systematic coarse graining flowing polymer melts: thermodynamically guided simulations and resulting constitutive model.

    PubMed

    Iig, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Complex fluids, such as polymers, colloids, liquid-crystals etc., show intriguing viscoelastic properties, due to the complicated interplay between flow-induced structure formation and dynamical behavior. Starting from microscopic models of complex fluids, a systematic coarse-graining method is presented that allows us to derive closed-form and thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations for such fluids. Essential ingredients of the proposed approach are thermodynamically guided simulations within a consistent coarse-graining scheme. In addition to this new type of multiscale simulations, we reconstruct the building blocks that constitute the thermodynamically consistent coarse-grained model. We illustrate the method for low-molecular polymer melts, which are subject to different imposed flow fields like planar shear and different elongational flows. The constitutive equation for general flow conditions we obtain shows rheological behavior including shear thinning, normal stress differences, and elongational viscosities in good agreement with reference results. PMID:21678766

  15. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, István A.; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-09-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form.

  16. Bottom-up coarse-graining of a simple graphene model: the blob picture.

    PubMed

    Kauzlarić, David; Meier, Julia T; Español, Pep; Succi, Sauro; Greiner, Andreas; Korvink, Jan G

    2011-02-14

    The coarse-graining of a simple all-atom 2D microscopic model of graphene, in terms of "blobs" described by center of mass variables, is presented. The equations of motion of the coarse-grained variables take the form of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The coarse-grained conservative forces and the friction of the DPD model are obtained via a bottom-up procedure from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The separation of timescales for blobs of 24 and 96 carbon atoms is sufficiently pronounced for the Markovian assumption, inherent to the DPD model, to provide satisfactory results. In particular, the MD velocity autocorrelation function of the blobs is well reproduced by the DPD model, provided that the effect of friction and noise is taken into account. However, DPD cross-correlations between neighbor blobs show appreciable discrepancies with respect to the MD results. Possible extensions to mend these discrepancies are briefly outlined. PMID:21322660

  17. Multiscale dynamics of semiflexible polymers from a universal coarse-graining procedure.

    PubMed

    Koslover, Elena F; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Simulating the dynamics of a semiflexible polymer across time and length scales that bridge the rigid and flexible regimes requires a physically sound method for generating coarse-grained representations of the polymer. Here, we study the dynamic behavior of the discrete stretchable, shearable wormlike chain model, which can be used to coarse-grain a continuous semi-elastic chain at an arbitrary discretization. We show that the dynamics of this universal model match those of the wormlike chain at length scales above the discretization length. The evolution of the stress correlation, as probed through Brownian dynamics simulations, is found to reproduce the predicted behavior in both the rigid and flexible regimes, spanning over six orders of magnitude in time scales. The coarse-graining approach employed here thus enables dynamic simulation of semiflexible polymers at lengths and times that were previously inaccessible with conventional methods. PMID:25122407

  18. Multiscale dynamics of semiflexible polymers from a universal coarse-graining procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslover, Elena F.; Spakowitz, Andrew J.

    2014-07-01

    Simulating the dynamics of a semiflexible polymer across time and length scales that bridge the rigid and flexible regimes requires a physically sound method for generating coarse-grained representations of the polymer. Here, we study the dynamic behavior of the discrete stretchable, shearable wormlike chain model, which can be used to coarse-grain a continuous semi-elastic chain at an arbitrary discretization. We show that the dynamics of this universal model match those of the wormlike chain at length scales above the discretization length. The evolution of the stress correlation, as probed through Brownian dynamics simulations, is found to reproduce the predicted behavior in both the rigid and flexible regimes, spanning over six orders of magnitude in time scales. The coarse-graining approach employed here thus enables dynamic simulation of semiflexible polymers at lengths and times that were previously inaccessible with conventional methods.

  19. A Hybrid Coarse-graining Approach for Lipid Bilayers at Large Length and Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Gary S.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    A hybrid analytic-systematic (HAS) coarse-grained (CG) lipid model is developed and employed in a large-scale simulation of a liposome. The methodology is termed hybrid analyticsystematic as one component of the interaction between CG sites is variationally determined from the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) methodology, while the remaining component utilizes an analytic potential. The systematic component models the in-plane center of mass interaction of the lipids as determined from an atomistic-level MD simulation of a bilayer. The analytic component is based on the well known Gay-Berne ellipsoid of revolution liquid crystal model, and is designed to model the highly anisotropic interactions at a highly coarse-grained level. The HAS CG approach is the first step in an “aggressive” CG methodology designed to model multi-component biological membranes at very large length and timescales. PMID:19281167

  20. Hybrid coarse-graining approach for lipid bilayers at large length and time scales.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Gary S; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid analytic-systematic (HAS) coarse-grained (CG) lipid model is developed and employed in a large-scale simulation of a liposome. The methodology is termed hybrid analytic-systematic because one component of the interaction between CG sites is variationally determined from the multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) methodology, whereas the remaining component utilizes an analytic potential. The systematic component models the in-plane center-of-mass interaction of the lipids as determined from an atomistic-level MD simulation of a bilayer. The analytic component is based on the well-known Gay-Berne ellipsoid-of-revolution liquid-crystal model and is designed to model the highly anisotropic interactions at a highly coarse-grained level. The HAS CG approach is the first step in an "aggressive" CG methodology designed to model multicomponent biological membranes at very large length and time scales. PMID:19281167

  1. Systematic and simulation-free coarse graining of homopolymer melts: A structure-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We propose a systematic and simulation-free strategy for coarse graining of homopolymer melts, where each chain of Nm monomers is uniformly divided into N segments, with the spatial position of each segment corresponding to the center-of-mass of its monomers. We use integral-equation theories suitable for the study of equilibrium properties of polymers, instead of many-chain molecular simulations, to obtain the structural and thermodynamic properties of both original and coarse-grained (CG) systems, and quantitatively examine how the effective pair potentials between CG segments and the thermodynamic properties of CG systems vary with N. Our systematic and simulation-free strategy is much faster than those using many-chain simulations, thus effectively solving the transferability problem in coarse graining, and provides the quantitative basis for choosing the appropriate N-values. It also avoids the problems caused by finite-size effects and statistical uncertainties in many-chain simulations. Taking the simple hard-core Gaussian thread model [K. S. Schweizer and J. G. Curro, Chem. Phys. 149, 105 (1990)] as the original system, we demonstrate our strategy applied to structure-based coarse graining, which is quite general and versatile, and compare in detail the various integral-equation theories and closures for coarse graining. Our numerical results show that the effective CG potentials for various N and closures can be collapsed approximately onto the same curve, and that structure-based coarse graining cannot give thermodynamic consistency between original and CG systems at any N < Nm.

  2. Systematic and simulation-free coarse graining of homopolymer melts: A structure-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-02-07

    We propose a systematic and simulation-free strategy for coarse graining of homopolymer melts, where each chain of N{sub m} monomers is uniformly divided into N segments, with the spatial position of each segment corresponding to the center-of-mass of its monomers. We use integral-equation theories suitable for the study of equilibrium properties of polymers, instead of many-chain molecular simulations, to obtain the structural and thermodynamic properties of both original and coarse-grained (CG) systems, and quantitatively examine how the effective pair potentials between CG segments and the thermodynamic properties of CG systems vary with N. Our systematic and simulation-free strategy is much faster than those using many-chain simulations, thus effectively solving the transferability problem in coarse graining, and provides the quantitative basis for choosing the appropriate N-values. It also avoids the problems caused by finite-size effects and statistical uncertainties in many-chain simulations. Taking the simple hard-core Gaussian thread model [K. S. Schweizer and J. G. Curro, Chem. Phys. 149, 105 (1990)] as the original system, we demonstrate our strategy applied to structure-based coarse graining, which is quite general and versatile, and compare in detail the various integral-equation theories and closures for coarse graining. Our numerical results show that the effective CG potentials for various N and closures can be collapsed approximately onto the same curve, and that structure-based coarse graining cannot give thermodynamic consistency between original and CG systems at any N < N{sub m}.

  3. A transferable coarse-grained model for hydrogen-bonding liquids.

    PubMed

    Golubkov, Pavel A; Wu, Johnny C; Ren, Pengyu

    2008-04-21

    We present here a recent development of a generalized coarse-grained model for use in molecular simulations. In this model, interactions between coarse-grained particles consist of both van der Waals and explicit electrostatic components. As a result, the coarse-grained model offers the transferability that is lacked by most current effective-potential based approaches. The previous center-of-mass framework (P. A. Golubkov and P. Ren, J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 125, 64103) is generalized here to include arbitrary off-center interaction sites for both Gay-Berne and multipoles. The new model has been applied to molecular dynamic simulations of neat methanol liquid. By placing a single point multipole at the oxygen atom rather than at the center of mass of methanol, there is a significant improvement in the ability to capture hydrogen-bonding. The critical issue of transferability of the coarse-grained model is verified on methanol-water mixtures, using parameters derived from neat liquids without any modification. The mixture density and internal energy from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations show good agreement with experimental measurements, on a par with what has been obtained from more detailed atomic models. By mapping the dynamics trajectory from the coarse-grained simulation into the all-atom counterpart, we are able to investigate atomic-level structure and interaction. Atomic radial distribution functions of neat methanol, neat water and mixtures compare favorably to experimental measurements. Furthermore, hydrogen-bonded 6- and 7-molecule chains of water and methanol observed in the mixture are in agreement with previous atomic simulations. PMID:18688358

  4. Peroxidised phospholipid bilayers: insight from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yachong; Baulin, Vladimir A; Thalmann, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    An original coarse-grained model for peroxidised phospholipids is presented, based on the MARTINI lipid force field. This model results from a combination of thermodynamic modelling and structural information on the area per lipid, which have been made available recently. The resulting coarse-grained lipid molecules form stable bilayers, and a set of elastic coefficients (compressibility and bending moduli) is obtained. We compare the compressibility coefficient to the experimental values [Weber et al., Soft Matter, 2014, 10, 4241]. Predictions for the mechanical properties, membrane thickness and lateral distribution of hydroperoxide groups in the phospholipid bilayer are presented. PMID:26462464

  5. Formational Mechanisms and Morphology of Windblown Coarse-Grained Sand Ripples at White Sands, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glade, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse-grained ripples, also known as "megaripples," are large sand ripples found in both aeolian and aquatic environments on Earth, and are common on Mars. The formation and morphology of coarse-grained ripples are not as well understood as more common splash ripples. Current understanding suggests that formative wind speeds are above the saltation threshold for the fine grains, but below this threshold for coarse grains found on the crests, such that they creep. Based on this idea, we hypothesize that wind speeds above this coarse-grain saltation threshold will destroy the ripples. We further hypothesize that these ripples do not have an equilibrium size; rather, their size is related to the persistence of formative winds in a given direction. To test this model, we studied windblown coarse-grained ripples in White Sands, New Mexico. Terrestrial LiDAR was used to obtain high resolution ripple morphology and migration over a three month period. Wind velocity profiles and concurrent saltating grain size data were collected during a wind storm to directly relate modes of transport to particle size and wind stress. These local data were used to calibrate wind records from a nearby meteorological station to estimate local fluid stress using a long-term record. LiDAR data indicate that these ripples were destroyed and reoriented between March and June 2013, while the wind record shows that the coarse-grain saltation threshold was indeed exceeded during this time. Morphological analysis indicates that the lee slope of these ripples is set by saltation impact - similar to splash ripples - but that height, wavelength and stoss slope are not related to instantaneous transport conditions. The historical wind record also shows that the range of wind directions decreases rapidly with increasing speed, restricting strong winds to a narrow range of direction. From these results we explore the idea that coarse-grained ripples are typically larger and less frequently destroyed

  6. The impact of resolution upon entropy and information in coarse-grained models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Thomas T.; Shell, M. Scott; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    By eliminating unnecessary degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models tremendously facilitate numerical calculations and theoretical analyses of complex phenomena. However, their success critically depends upon the representation of the system and the effective potential that governs the CG degrees of freedom. This work investigates the relationship between the CG representation and the many-body potential of mean force (PMF), W, which is the appropriate effective potential for a CG model that exactly preserves the structural and thermodynamic properties of a given high resolution model. In particular, we investigate the entropic component of the PMF and its dependence upon the CG resolution. This entropic component, SW, is a configuration-dependent relative entropy that determines the temperature dependence of W. As a direct consequence of eliminating high resolution details from the CG model, the coarsening process transfers configurational entropy and information from the configuration space into SW. In order to further investigate these general results, we consider the popular Gaussian Network Model (GNM) for protein conformational fluctuations. We analytically derive the exact PMF for the GNM as a function of the CG representation. In the case of the GNM, -TSW is a positive, configuration-independent term that depends upon the temperature, the complexity of the protein interaction network, and the details of the CG representation. This entropic term demonstrates similar behavior for seven model proteins and also suggests, in each case, that certain resolutions provide a more efficient description of protein fluctuations. These results may provide general insight into the role of resolution for determining the information content, thermodynamic properties, and transferability of CG models. Ultimately, they may lead to a rigorous and systematic framework for optimizing the representation of CG models.

  7. A Coarse Grained Model for a Lipid Membrane with Physiological Composition and Leaflet Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Satyan; Kim, Brian N.; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Lindau, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The resemblance of lipid membrane models to physiological membranes determines how well molecular dynamics (MD) simulations imitate the dynamic behavior of cell membranes and membrane proteins. Physiological lipid membranes are composed of multiple types of phospholipids, and the leaflet compositions are generally asymmetric. Here we describe an approach for self-assembly of a Coarse-Grained (CG) membrane model with physiological composition and leaflet asymmetry using the MARTINI force field. An initial set-up of two boxes with different types of lipids according to the leaflet asymmetry of mammalian cell membranes stacked with 0.5 nm overlap, reliably resulted in the self-assembly of bilayer membranes with leaflet asymmetry resembling that of physiological mammalian cell membranes. Self-assembly in the presence of a fragment of the plasma membrane protein syntaxin 1A led to spontaneous specific positioning of phosphatidylionositol(4,5)bisphosphate at a positively charged stretch of syntaxin consistent with experimental data. An analogous approach choosing an initial set-up with two concentric shells filled with different lipid types results in successful assembly of a spherical vesicle with asymmetric leaflet composition. Self-assembly of the vesicle in the presence of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin 2 revealed the correct position of the synaptobrevin transmembrane domain. This is the first CG MD method to form a membrane with physiological lipid composition as well as leaflet asymmetry by self-assembly and will enable unbiased studies of the incorporation and dynamics of membrane proteins in more realistic CG membrane models. PMID:26659855

  8. The impact of resolution upon entropy and information in coarse-grained models

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Thomas T.; Shell, M. Scott; Noid, W. G.

    2015-12-28

    By eliminating unnecessary degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models tremendously facilitate numerical calculations and theoretical analyses of complex phenomena. However, their success critically depends upon the representation of the system and the effective potential that governs the CG degrees of freedom. This work investigates the relationship between the CG representation and the many-body potential of mean force (PMF), W, which is the appropriate effective potential for a CG model that exactly preserves the structural and thermodynamic properties of a given high resolution model. In particular, we investigate the entropic component of the PMF and its dependence upon the CG resolution. This entropic component, S{sub W}, is a configuration-dependent relative entropy that determines the temperature dependence of W. As a direct consequence of eliminating high resolution details from the CG model, the coarsening process transfers configurational entropy and information from the configuration space into S{sub W}. In order to further investigate these general results, we consider the popular Gaussian Network Model (GNM) for protein conformational fluctuations. We analytically derive the exact PMF for the GNM as a function of the CG representation. In the case of the GNM, −TS{sub W} is a positive, configuration-independent term that depends upon the temperature, the complexity of the protein interaction network, and the details of the CG representation. This entropic term demonstrates similar behavior for seven model proteins and also suggests, in each case, that certain resolutions provide a more efficient description of protein fluctuations. These results may provide general insight into the role of resolution for determining the information content, thermodynamic properties, and transferability of CG models. Ultimately, they may lead to a rigorous and systematic framework for optimizing the representation of CG models.

  9. Probing the structural dynamics of the SNARE recycling machine based on coarse-grained modeling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Membrane fusion in eukaryotes is driven by the formation of a four-helix bundle by three SNARE proteins. To recycle the SNARE proteins, they must be disassembled by the ATPase NSF and four SNAP proteins which together form a 20S supercomplex. Recently, the first high-resolution structures of the NSF (in both ATP and ADP state) and 20S (in four distinct states termed I, II, IIIa, and IIIb) were solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), which have paved the way for structure-driven studies of the SNARE recycling mechanism. To probe the structural dynamics of SNARE disassembly at amino-acid level of details, a systematic coarse-grained modeling based on an elastic network model and related analyses were performed. Our normal mode analysis of NSF, SNARE, and 20S predicted key modes of collective motions that partially account for the observed structural changes, and illuminated how the SNARE complex can be effectively destabilized by untwisting and bending motions of the SNARE complex driven by the amino-terminal domains of NSF in state II. Our flexibility analysis identified regions with high/low flexibility that coincide with key functional sites (such as the NSF-SNAPs-SNARE binding sites). A subset of hotspot residues that control the above collective motions, which will make promising targets for future mutagenesis studies were also identified. Finally, the conformational changes in 20S as induced by the transition of NSF from ATP to ADP state were modeled, and a concerted untwisting motion of SNARE/SNAPs and a sideway flip of two amino-terminal domains were observed. In sum, the findings have offered new structural and dynamic details relevant to the SNARE disassembly mechanism, and will guide future functional studies of the SNARE recycling machinery. Proteins 2016; 84:1055-1066. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090373

  10. Key intermolecular interactions in the E. coli 70S ribosome revealed by coarse-grained analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Voth, Gregory A

    2011-10-26

    The ribosome is a very large complex that consists of many RNA and protein molecules and plays a central role in protein biosynthesis in all organisms. Extensive interactions between different molecules are critical to ribosomal functional dynamics. In this work, intermolecular interactions in the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome are investigated by coarse-grained (CG) analysis. CG models are defined to preserve dynamic domains in RNAs and proteins and to capture functional motions in the ribosome, and then the CG sites are connected by harmonic springs, and spring constants are obtained by matching the computed fluctuations to those of an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Those spring constants indicate how strong the interactions are between the ribosomal components, and they are in good agreement with various experimental data. Nearly all the bridges between the small and large ribosomal subunits are indicated by CG interactions with large spring constants. The head of the small subunit is very mobile because it has minimal CG interactions with the rest of the subunit; however, a large number of small subunit proteins bind to maintain the internal structure of the head. The results show a clear connection between the intermolecular interactions and the structural and functional properties of the ribosome because of the reduced complexity in domain-based CG models. The present approach also provides a useful strategy to map interactions between molecules within large biomolecular complexes since it is not straightforward to investigate these by either atomistic MD simulations or residue-based elastic network models. PMID:21910449