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Sample records for coatings sam hpcrm

  1. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  2. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  3. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  4. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  5. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Lee, Chuck; Farmer, Joseph; Day, Dan; Wall, Mark; Saw, Cheng; Boussoufi, Moe; Liu, Ben; Egbert, Harold; Branagan, Dan; D'Amato, Andy

    2007-07-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{sup TM}, Metamic{sup TM}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion- Resistant Material (HPCRM){sup [1]} can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous - an essential property for corrosion resistance - and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison. (authors)

  6. EFFECTS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON OF SAM-COATED ELECTRODES USING FERRYICYANIDE AS THE REDOX INDICATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical responses on self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated polycrystalline gold electrodes were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry with a three electrode system. Experimental results show potential in the application of pyrene-imprinted SAM...

  7. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J; Lee, C; Day, D; Wall, M; Saw, C; MoberlyChan, W; Farmer, J; Boussoufl, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H; Branagan, D; D'Amato, A

    2006-11-13

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). Neutron multiplication and the potential for criticality are enhanced by the presence of a moderator during cask loading in water, water incursion in accidents conditions during spent fuel storage or transport. To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{trademark}, Metamic{trademark}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant material (HPCRM) can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous--an essential property for corrosion resistance--and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison.

  8. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  9. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  10. Anodic Behavior of SAM2X5 Material Applied as Amorphous Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C; Day, S D; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys are desirable industrial materials since they are highly resistant to corrosion and possess enhanced hardness for wear resistance. The amorphous materials can be produced from the melt as powder and later spray deposited as coatings on large engineering structures. As a laboratory experiment, SAM2X5 powder was coated on electrochemical specimens of 304SS for testing. Results show that the coated specimens did not perform satisfactorily during the laboratory testing. This is because of partial devitrification during the deposition of the powder on the small specimen substrates.

  11. SALT FOG TEST OF SAM2X5 COATED STAINLESS STEEL CYLINDER

    SciTech Connect

    Aprigliano, L F; Rebak, R B; Choi, J; Lian, T; Day, S D

    2007-04-23

    A salt fog test of an iron-based amorphous metal, SAM2X5, coated Type 316L stainless steel (SS316L) cylinder was made. The cylinder was 30-inch diameter by 88-inch long, and 3/8-inch thick. One end was welded shut with a SS316L end cap before coating. The body of the cylinder and the end cap were both coated. The cylinder was coated with SAM2X5 by the HVOF thermal spray process. The coating thickness was 0.015-inch to 0.019-inch thick. The cylinder was tested in a horizontal position. Also included in the test for reference purposes were five coupons (2-inch x 2-inch x 1/8-inch) of uncoated Type 1018 carbon steel (1018CS). The test used an abbreviated form of GM 9540P. Each cycle was 6 hours in duration and the cylinder and reference samples were exposed to a total of eight cycles. The cylinder was in relatively good condition after the test. Along the body of the cylinder only two pinpoint spot sized signs of rust were seen. The 1018CS reference specimens were extensively rusted.

  12. Atomistic characterization of SAM coatings as gate insulators in Si-based FET devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2014-06-01

    Many nano-material systems are currently under consideration as possible candidates for gate dielectric insulators in both metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSFET) and organic (OFET) field-effect transistors. In this contribution, the possibility of employing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hydroxylated octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) chains on a (111) Si substrate as gate dielectrics is discussed; in particular ab initio theoretical simulations have been employed to study the structural properties, work function modifications, and the insulating properties of OTS thin film coatings on Si substrates.

  13. Atomistic characterization of SAM coatings as gate insulators in Si-based FET devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2014-06-19

    Many nano-material systems are currently under consideration as possible candidates for gate dielectric insulators in both metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOSFET) and organic (OFET) field-effect transistors. In this contribution, the possibility of employing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of hydroxylated octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) chains on a (111) Si substrate as gate dielectrics is discussed; in particular ab initio theoretical simulations have been employed to study the structural properties, work function modifications, and the insulating properties of OTS thin film coatings on Si substrates.

  14. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  15. Shear-Induced Detachment of Polystyrene Beads from SAM-Coated Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwun Lun; Rosenhahn, Axel; Thelen, Richard; Grunze, Michael; Lobban, Matthew; Karahka, Markus Leopold; Kreuzer, H Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    In this work we experimentally and theoretically analyze the detachment of microscopic polystyrene beads from different self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces in a shear flow in order to develop a mechanistic model for the removal of cells from surfaces. The detachment of the beads from the surface is treated as a thermally activated process applying an Arrhenius Ansatz to determine the activation barrier and attempt frequency of the rate determing step in bead removal. The statistical analysis of the experimental shear detachment data obtained in phosphate-buffered saline buffer results in an activation energy around 20 kJ/mol, which is orders of magnitude lower than the adhesion energy measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The same order of magnitude for the adhesion energy measured by AFM is derived from ab initio calculations of the van der Waals interaction energy between the polystyrene beads and the SAM-covered gold surface. We conclude that the rate determing step for detachment of the beads is the initiation of rolling on the surface (overcoming static friction) and not physical detachment, i.e., lifting the particle off the surface. PMID:26401759

  16. DOE-DARPA High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM), Annual HPCRM Team Meeting & Technical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Brown, B; Bayles, B; Lemieux, T; Choi, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Branagan, D; Blue, C; Peter, B; Beardsley, B; Graeve, O; Aprigliano, L; Yang, N; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Lewandowski, J; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-21

    The overall goal is to develop high-performance corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous-metal coatings for prolonged trouble-free use in very aggressive environments: seawater & hot geothermal brines. The specific technical objectives are: (1) Synthesize Fe-based amorphous-metal coating with corrosion resistance comparable/superior to Ni-based Alloy C-22; (2) Establish processing parameter windows for applying and controlling coating attributes (porosity, density, bonding); (3) Assess possible cost savings through substitution of Fe-based material for more expensive Ni-based Alloy C-22; (4) Demonstrate practical fabrication processes; (5) Produce quality materials and data with complete traceability for nuclear applications; and (6) Develop, validate and calibrate computational models to enable life prediction and process design.

  17. Heterotypic Sam-Sam association between Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam: binding affinity and structural insights

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Flavia A.; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina L.; Pedone, Emilia M.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Arap3 is a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase effector protein that plays a role as GTP-ase activator (GAP) for Arf6 and RhoA. Arap3 contains a sterile alpha motif (Sam) domain that presents high sequence homology with the Sam domain of the EphA2-receptor (EphA2-Sam); both Arap3-Sam and EphA2-Sam are able to associate with the Sam domain of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 (Ship2-Sam). Recently, we have reported on a novel interaction between the first Sam domain of Odin (Odin-Sam1), a protein belonging to the ANKS (ANKyrin repeat and Sam domain containing) family, and EphA2-Sam. In the current work we apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to characterize the association between Arap3-Sam and Odin-Sam1. We show that these two Sam domains interact with low micromolar affinity. Moreover, by means of molecular docking techniques, supported by NMR data, we demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 and Arap3-Sam may bind with a topology that is common to several Sam-Sam complexes. The unveiled structural details form the basis for the design of potential peptide-antagonists, that could be used as chemical tools to investigate functional aspects related to heterotypic Arap3-Sam associations. PMID:23239578

  18. Synthia Tonn, SAM Engineer

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a suite of instruments developed for use on the Mars Science Laboratory, designed to help find out whether or not Mars ever supported life. This video profiles ...

  19. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  20. Common themes and differences in SAM recognition among SAM riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Price, Ian R.; Grigg, Jason C.; Ke, Ailong

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of short cis-acting RNA elements termed riboswitches has caused a paradigm shift in our understanding of genetic regulatory mechanisms. The three distinct superfamilies of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) riboswitches are the most commonly found riboswitch classes in nature. These RNAs represent three independent evolutionary solutions to achieve specific SAM recognition. This review summarizes research on 1) modes of gene regulatory mechanisms, 2) common themes and differences in ligand recognition, and 3) ligand-induced conformational dynamics among SAM riboswitch families. The body of work on the SAM riboswitch families constitutes a useful primer to the topic of gene regulatory RNAs as a whole. PMID:24863160

  1. Faces of Marshall: Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Engineer Sam Ortega tells his story of how he came to work as an engineer at Marshall and how sewing a...

  2. SAM II Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    ... Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, which flew on board the Nimbus-7 ... Spatial Resolution:  The altitude profiles of aerosol extinction have a 1 km vertical resolution. Temporal ...

  3. Comparing Surfaces and Engineered Interfaces using Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) and Injected SAMs Silanes

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Mark J.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to show a comparison between property changes by formation of a self-assembled monolayer on the surface of PPG synthetic precipitated silica, which is a technique developed at PNNL, and by adding the SAMs silane chemical directly into the mixing bowl. These coatings have the potential to greatly increase the bond strength and enhance other properties between the particle and the rubber matrix of a rubber compound. Tensile testing measured peak stress and elongation at break. The increase in tensile strength shows how well the polymer-filler interfacial adhesion is doing. The study used five different SAM systems with a sulfur cured styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) tire rubber formulation. The three propylsilanes were propyl triethoxysilane, allyl triethoxysilane and 3-mercaptopropyl triethoxysilane. Five combinations of silanes were used in this study. The application of the silanes were 100% propyl triethoxy silane (100% Alkyl); a 10/90 mixture of allyl and propyl triethoxy silanes (10% vinyl/90% alkyl); a 50/50 mixture of the allyl and propyl (50% vinyl/50% alkyl); a 10/90mixture of 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane and propyl trimethoxysilane (10% mercaptan/90% alkyl) and lastly a 50/50 3-mercaptopropyl and propylsilanes (50% mercaptan/alkyl). The data not only shows improvement with SAMs, the peak stress data (ultimate strength) shows that the by changing the amount of silane content can change the physical properties

  4. SAM 2 data user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Osborn, M. T.; Mcmaster, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    This document is intended to serve as a guide to the use of the data products from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) 2 experiment for scientific investigations of polar stratospheric aerosols. Included is a detailed description of the Beta and Aerosol Number Density Archive Tape (BANAT), which is the SAM 2 data product containing the aerosol extinction data available for these investigations. Also included are brief descriptions of the instrument operation, data collection, processing and validation, and some of the scientific analyses conducted to date.

  5. SAM II Data and Information (ASCII)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-01

    SAM II (ASCII) Data and Information Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, ... Parameters:  Aerosols Order Data:  ASDC Order Tool:  Order Data Guide Documents:  ...

  6. SAM Overview: The Habitability of Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Featuring an interview with Paul Mahaffy, SAM's Principal Investigator, this video gives a general overview of SAM's mission aboard the Mars Science Laboratory, otherwise known as the Curiosity rover.

  7. Long-Term Corrosion Tests of Prototypical SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R H; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P D; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-05-10

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  8. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on MIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Finkelstein, Robert; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 3 (September 1996 to January 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 11 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-81. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE) and Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-81 operations, a Progress engine burn, attitude control thruster operation, and crew exercise. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  9. Selective Plasma Deposition of Fluorocarbon Films on SAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crain, Mark M., III; Walsh, Kevin M.; Cohn, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    A dry plasma process has been demonstrated to be useful for the selective modification of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates. These SAMs are used, during the fabrication of semiconductor electronic devices, as etch masks on gold layers that are destined to be patterned and incorporated into the devices. The selective modification involves the formation of fluorocarbon films that render the SAMs more effective in protecting the masked areas of the gold against etching by a potassium iodide (KI) solution. This modification can be utilized, not only in the fabrication of single electronic devices but also in the fabrication of integrated circuits, microelectromechanical systems, and circuit boards. In the steps that precede the dry plasma process, a silicon mold in the desired pattern is fabricated by standard photolithographic techniques. A stamp is then made by casting polydimethylsiloxane (commonly known as silicone rubber) in the mold. The stamp is coated with an alkanethiol solution, then the stamp is pressed on the gold layer of a device to be fabricated in order to deposit the alkanethiol to form an alkanethiolate SAM in the desired pattern (see figure). Next, the workpiece is exposed to a radio-frequency plasma generated from a mixture of CF4 and H2 gases. After this plasma treatment, the SAM is found to be modified, while the exposed areas of gold remain unchanged. This dry plasma process offers the potential for forming masks superior to those formed in a prior wet etching process. Among the advantages over the wet etching process are greater selectivity, fewer pin holes in the masks, and less nonuniformity of the masks. The fluorocarbon films formed in this way may also be useful as intermediate layers for subsequent fabrication steps and as dielectric layers to be incorporated into finished products.

  10. Sam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    1988-01-01

    A father writes about his six-year-old son born with hydrocephalus. He describes such day-to-day experiences as going to a baseball game and the grocery store, reactions of friends and strangers to his son's social interactions, and a special day at preschool. The boy's medical treatment, including surgeries, are also described. (VW)

  11. Sam37 is crucial for formation of the mitochondrial TOM–SAM supercomplex, thereby promoting β-barrel biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Ellenrieder, Lars; Qiu, Jian; Bohnert, Maria; Zufall, Nicole; van der Laan, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial β-barrel proteins requires two preprotein translocases, the general translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM and SAM form a supercomplex that promotes transfer of β-barrel precursors. The SAM core complex contains the channel protein Sam50, which cooperates with Sam35 in precursor recognition, and the peripheral membrane protein Sam37. The molecular function of Sam37 has been unknown. We report that Sam37 is crucial for formation of the TOM–SAM supercomplex. Sam37 interacts with the receptor domain of Tom22 on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane and links TOM and SAM complexes. Sam37 thus promotes efficient transfer of β-barrel precursors to the SAM complex. We conclude that Sam37 functions as a coupling factor of the translocase supercomplex of the mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:26416958

  12. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  13. SAM -- A Spectral Extraction Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. R.

    In this note a description is given of SAM, a package written at RGO for the extraction of spectra from two dimensional data frames. The need to extract spectra from two dimensional frames in an optimal manner (e.g. one in which the signal to noise ratio was maximised) was the primary reason for the writing of the package. The programs were originally written with FOS, ISIS and IDS in mind, but contain nothing which is instrument specific and hence should be applicable to any two dimensional spectral data frame.

  14. NES Live Video Chat: Engineer Sam Ortega

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NES project invited all K-12 students to participate in a one-hour-long NASA video webchat on April 19, 2011 with NASA engineer Sam Ortega. Ortega answered questions about building and testing ...

  15. STS-134 Crew Talks With Sam Ting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The STS-134 crew talks with Sam Ting, principal investigator for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, following the installation of the particle physics detector on the International Space Station duri...

  16. Stay lean without dieting: Lose Sam68.

    PubMed

    Huot, Marc-Étienne; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-10-01

    Alternative splicing is well known to be tissue-specific. Although several genes have been shown to undergo alternative splicing in adipocytes, little is known about the mechanism that regulates alternative splicing during adipogenesis. We recently reported that Sam68(-/-) mice exhibit a lean phenotype and are protected against diet-induced obesity. Our genome-wide exon array analysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) from wild-type and Sam68(-/-) mice revealed that Sam68 deficiency leads to an abnormal splicing of the mTOR gene. This has been shown to reduce the overall mTOR protein content and activity during in vitro adipose differentiation. In Sam68(-/-) mice, this situation leads to an increased energy expenditure, decreased adipogenesis and WAT formation. PMID:23700540

  17. Sam Donaldson: Tips from A Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... little bit about the disease now and the survivability of various forms and stages. Klose: Do you ... More "Understanding Cancer" Articles Understanding Cancer / Cancer Today / Survivability and Hope / Sam Donaldson: Tips From a Cancer ...

  18. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV), revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution. PMID:21711703

  19. Functionalisation of gold surfaces with thiolate SAMs: Topography/bioactivity relationship A combined FT-RAIRS, AFM and QCM investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, E.; Gu, C.; Boujday, S.; Salmain, M.; Herry, J. M.; Pradier, C. M.

    2007-09-01

    Immobilisation of rabbit immunoglobulin G (rIgG) was performed by affinity binding to protein A (PrA) covalently bound to three different thiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), (i) a mixed SAM of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and mercaptohexanol (C6OH) at a molar ratio of 1-3, (ii) a pure SAM of MUA and (iii) a pure SAM of cystamine (CA). A comparative study of anti-rIgG recognition process on these three surfaces was achieved in order to assess the influence of the attachment layer topography and composition upon the sensor quality. Functionalised gold-coated surfaces were characterised by three complementary analytical techniques, namely atomic force microscopy (AFM), polarization modulation-reflection-adsorption infrared spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). PM-RAIRS and AFM revealed that the three SAMs were formed on the gold surfaces. AFM observations made it clear that the thiolate and PrA layers were rather homogeneous in the case of pure MUA and CA SAMs, as compared to the MUA/C6OH mixed SAM on which PrA aggregates were observed. Though the highest amount of antibody was bound to the PrA on CA layer, higher anti-rIgG over IgG ratios were measured on the less dense layers of antibody.

  20. Sam, Brookhaven, and the Physical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Sam Goudsmit came to Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1948, just after the first year of operation of the new institution, and after a year of his postwar appointment as Professor of Physics at Northwestern University. He was named an associate editor of the Physical Review at that time, under the then Managing Editor John T. Tate of the University of Minnesota. Tate had been Editor since 1926, and had presided over the growth of Physical Review to leadership of publication in the world of physics. Tate died in 1950, and after a search under an interim Editor Sam was, in 1951, named Managing Editor. In 1952 he became Chair of the Brookhaven Physics Department, founded Physical Review Letters, and served as department chair until 1960, when he stepped down but remained an Associate Chair. I will discuss my own interactions with Sam during this later period, when I learned of his many faceted talents and accomplishments.

  1. Validation of SAM 2 and SAGE satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P.-H.; Farrukh, U. O.; Yue, G. K.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a validation study of data obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) and Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement II (SAM II) satellite experiments. The study includes the entire SAGE I data set (February 1979 - November 1981) and the first four and one-half years of SAM II data (October 1978 - February 1983). These data sets have been validated by their use in the analysis of dynamical, physical and chemical processes in the stratosphere. They have been compared with other existing data sets and the SAGE I and SAM II data sets intercompared where possible. The study has shown the data to be of great value in the study of the climatological behavior of stratospheric aerosols and ozone. Several scientific publications and user-oriented data summaries have appeared as a result of the work carried out under this contract.

  2. Structural basis for diversity in the SAM clan of riboswitches

    PubMed Central

    Trausch, Jeremiah J.; Xu, Zhenjiang; Edwards, Andrea L.; Reyes, Francis E.; Ross, Phillip E.; Knight, Rob; Batey, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, sulfur metabolism is regulated in part by seven known families of riboswitches that bind S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). Direct binding of SAM to these mRNA regulatory elements governs a downstream secondary structural switch that communicates with the transcriptional and/or translational expression machinery. The most widely distributed SAM-binding riboswitches belong to the SAM clan, comprising three families that share a common SAM-binding core but differ radically in their peripheral architecture. Although the structure of the SAM-I member of this clan has been extensively studied, how the alternative peripheral architecture of the other families supports the common SAM-binding core remains unknown. We have therefore solved the X-ray structure of a member of the SAM-I/IV family containing the alternative “PK-2” subdomain shared with the SAM-IV family. This structure reveals that this subdomain forms extensive interactions with the helix housing the SAM-binding pocket, including a highly unusual mode of helix packing in which two helices pack in a perpendicular fashion. Biochemical and genetic analysis of this RNA reveals that SAM binding induces many of these interactions, including stabilization of a pseudoknot that is part of the regulatory switch. Despite strong structural similarity between the cores of SAM-I and SAM-I/IV members, a phylogenetic analysis of sequences does not indicate that they derive from a common ancestor. PMID:24753586

  3. Structural Basis for Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Grove, Tyler L.; McLaughlin, Monica I.; Yennawar, Neela H.; Booker, Squire J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-02

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes RlmN and Cfr methylate 23S ribosomal RNA, modifying the C2 or C8 position of adenosine 2503. The methyl groups are installed by a two-step sequence involving initial methylation of a conserved Cys residue (RlmN Cys{sup 355}) by SAM. Methyl transfer to the substrate requires reductive cleavage of a second equivalent of SAM. Crystal structures of RlmN and RlmN with SAM show that a single molecule of SAM coordinates the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Residue Cys{sup 355} is S-methylated and located proximal to the SAM methyl group, suggesting the SAM that is involved in the initial methyl transfer binds at the same site. Thus, RlmN accomplishes its complex reaction with structural economy, harnessing the two most important reactivities of SAM within a single site.

  4. 77 FR 50493 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration, DOE. ACTION: Notice of proposed extension. SUMMARY: The current Sam Rayburn Dam Project rate was... cost recovery criteria. In accordance with Southwestern's isolated project rate adjustment...

  5. Sam's Journey to "Reach for the Stars"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences as a parent of a child with Down syndrome. Although her son Sam's first years were filled with numerous hospitalizations and visits to pediatricians, which she feared would further delay his development, she soon discovered an organization known as the National Association of Child Development…

  6. 78 FR 62627 - Sam Rayburn Dam Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy Deputy Secretary has approved and placed into effect on an interim basis Rate Order No. SWPA-67, which increases the power rate for the Sam Rayburn Dam (Rayburn) project pursuant to the Rayburn rate schedule (SRD-13) to supersede the existing rate...

  7. Emerging themes in radical SAM chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes in the radical SAM (RS) superfamily catalyze a wide variety of reactions through unique radical chemistry. The characteristic markers of the superfamily include a [4Fe–4S] cluster coordinated to the protein via a cysteine triad motif, typically CX3CX2C, with the fourth iron coordinated by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The SAM serves as a precursor for a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, the central intermediate in nearly all RS enzymes studied to date. The SAM-bound [4Fe–4S] cluster is located within a partial or full triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel where the radical chemistry occurs protected from the surroundings. In addition to the TIM barrel and a RS [4Fe–4S] cluster, many members of the superfamily contain additional domains and/or additional Fe–S clusters. Recently characterized superfamily members are providing new examples of the remarkable range of reactions that can be catalyzed, as well as new structural and mechanistic insights into these fascinating reactions. PMID:23141873

  8. EFFECTS OF CYANOPHAGE SAM-1 UPON 'MICROCYSTIS AERUGINOSA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanophage SAM-1, which infects Synechoccus cedrorum, Anacystis nidulans and certain strains of Microcystis aeruginosa has been isolated from sewage. The host range of cyanophage SAM-1 differs from those of other reported cyanophages. Phage SAM-1 stocks are rapidly inactivated at...

  9. Expanding Radical SAM Chemistry by Using Radical Addition Reactions and SAM Analogues.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Xie, Liqi; Lu, Haojie; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-09-19

    Radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster to bind SAM and reductively cleave its carbon-sulfur bond to produce a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. In almost all cases, the dAdo radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrates or from enzymes, thereby initiating a highly diverse array of reactions. Herein, we report a change of the dAdo radical-based chemistry from hydrogen abstraction to radical addition in the reaction of the radical SAM enzyme NosL. This change was achieved by using a substrate analogue containing an olefin moiety. We also showed that two SAM analogues containing different nucleoside functionalities initiate the radical-based reactions with high efficiencies. The radical adduct with the olefin produced in the reaction was found to undergo two divergent reactions, and the mechanistic insights into this process were investigated in detail. Our study demonstrates a promising strategy in expanding radical SAM chemistry, providing an effective way to access nucleoside-containing compounds by using radical SAM-dependent reactions. PMID:27573794

  10. SAM-based Cell Transfer to Photopatterned Hydrogels for Microengineering Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Sadr, Nasser; Zhu, Mojun; Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Yang, Yunzhi; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in tissue engineering is to reproduce the native 3D microvascular architecture fundamental for in vivo functions. Current approaches still lack a network of perfusable vessels with native 3D structural organization. Here we present a new method combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based cell transfer and gelatin methacrylate hydrogel photopatterning techniques for microengineering vascular structures. Human umbilical vein cell (HUVEC) transfer from oligopeptide SAM-coated surfaces to the hydrogel revealed two SAM desorption mechanisms: photoinduced and electrochemically triggered. The former, occurs concomitantly to hydrogel photocrosslinking, and resulted in efficient (>97%) monolayer transfer. The latter, prompted by additional potential application, preserved cell morphology and maintained high transfer efficiency of VE-cadherin positive monolayers over longer culture periods. This approach was also applied to transfer HUVECs to 3D geometrically defined vascular-like structures in hydrogels, which were then maintained in perfusion culture for 15 days. As a step toward more complex constructs, a cell-laden hydrogel layer was photopatterned around the endothelialized channel to mimic the vascular smooth muscle structure of distal arterioles. This study shows that the coupling of the SAM-based cell transfer and hydrogel photocrosslinking could potentially open up new avenues in engineering more complex, vascularized tissue constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. PMID:21802723

  11. Hydrogen transfer in SAM-mediated enzymatic radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Hioe, Johnny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-12-14

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays an essential role in a variety of enzyme-mediated radical reactions. One-electron reduction of SAM is currently believed to generate the C5'-desoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the actual substrate in a catalytic or a non-catalytic fashion. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental bond dissociation energy (BDE) data, the energetics of these radical processes have now been quantified. SAM-derived radicals are found to react with their respective substrates in an exothermic fashion in enzymes using SAM in a stoichiometric (non-catalytic) way. In contrast, the catalytic use of SAM appears to be linked to a sequence of moderately endothermic and exothermic reaction steps. The use of SAM in spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) appears to fit neither of these general categories and appears to constitute the first example of a SAM-initiated radical reaction propagated independently of the cofactor. PMID:23139189

  12. System Advisor Model, SAM 2014.1.14: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.; Freeman, J.; Neises, T.; Wagner, M.; Ferguson, T.; Gilman, P.; Janzou, S.

    2014-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2013.9.20, released on September 9, 2013. SAM is a computer model that calculates performance and financial metrics of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of photovoltaic, concentrating solar power, solar water heating, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financial structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). SAM's advanced simulation options facilitate parametric and sensitivity analyses, and statistical analysis capabilities are available for Monte Carlo simulation and weather variability (P50/P90) studies. SAM can also read input variables from Microsoft Excel worksheets. For software developers, the SAM software development kit (SDK) makes it possible to use SAM simulation modules in their applications written in C/C++, C#, Java, Python, and MATLAB. NREL provides both SAM and the SDK as free downloads at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  13. MMW, IR, and SAM signature collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstetter, Fred; Ward, Mary E.

    2002-08-01

    During the development of smart weapon's seeker/sensors, it is imperative to collect high quality signatures of the targets the system is intended to engage. These signatures are used to support algorithm development so the system can find and engage the targets of interest in the specific kill area on the target. Englin AFB FL is the AF development center for munitions; and in support of the development effort, the 46th Test Wing (46 TW) has initiated significant improvements in collection capabilities for signatures in the MMW, Infrared and Seismic, Acoustic and Magnetic (SAM) spectrum. Additionally, the Joint Munitions Test and Evaluation program office maintains a fleet of foreign ground vehicle targets used for such signature collection including items such as tanks, SCUD missile launchers, air defense units such as SA-06, SA-8, SA-13, and associated ground support trucks and general purpose vehicles. The major test facility includes a 300 ft tower used for mounting the instrumentation suite that currently includes, 10, 35 and 94 GHz MMW and 2-5(mu) and 8-12(mu) IR instrumentation systems. This facility has undergone major improvements in terms of background signature reduction, construction of a high bay building to house the turntable on which the targets are mounted, and an additional in- ground stationary turntable primarily for IR signature collection. Our experience using this facility to collect signatures for the smart weapons development community has confirmed a significant improvement in quality and efficiency. The need for the stationary turntable signature collection capability was driven by the requirements of the IR community who are interested in collecting signatures in clutter. This tends to be contrary to the MMW community that desires minimum background clutter. The resulting location, adjacent to the MMW tower, allows variations in the type and amount of clutter background that could be incorporated and also provides maximum utilization of

  14. Public Data at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, C.; Le Brun, V.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.; Roehlly, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Modern large observational programs produce important amounts of data from various origins, and need high level data-quality control, fast data access via easy-to-use graphic interfaces, as well as possibility to cross-correlate informations coming from different observations. The Centre de donneS Astrophysique de Marseille (CeSAM) has for mission to provide support to the teams in charge of the observational programs (specifications, software development and infrastructures), to produce and give the final data by proposing tools increasing their scientific value. We present here the various datasets hosted by the CeSAM under the ANIS environment. Even if mainly oriented towards large spectro-photometric extragalactic samples, we host as well an exoplanet transit database, or resolved galaxy data. The main datasets are those from the VVDS final release (45000 spectra), the Herschel extragalactic surveys (HerMES, HRS, GOODS-Herschel, VNGS), the CFHTLS-WIDE photometric redshifts catalog (17 millions objects), or the HST-COSMOS information system, that allows request from any of the 6 and access to the corresponding values in the other catalogs.

  15. Multiple polymer architectures of human Polyhomeotic homolog 3 (PHC3) SAM

    PubMed Central

    Nanyes, David R.; Junco, Sarah E.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Robinson, Angela K.; Patterson, Nicolle L.; Shivarajpur, Ambika; Halloran, Jonathan; Hale, Seth M.; Kaur, Yogeet; Hart, P. John; Kim, Chongwoo A.

    2014-01-01

    The self-association of sterile alpha motifs (SAMs) into a helical polymer architecture is a critical functional component of many different and diverse array of proteins. For the Drosophila Polycomb group (PcG) protein Polyhomeotic (Ph), its SAM polymerization serves as the structural foundation to cluster multiple PcG complexes, helping to maintain a silenced chromatin state. Ph SAM shares 64% sequence identity with its human ortholog, PHC3 SAM, and both SAMs polymerize. However, in the context of their larger protein regions, PHC3 SAM forms longer polymers compared to Ph SAM. Motivated to establish the precise structural basis for the differences, if any, between Ph and PHC3 SAM, we determined the crystal structure of the PHC3 SAM polymer. PHC3 SAM utilizes the same SAM-SAM interaction as the Ph SAM six-fold repeat polymer. Yet, PHC3 SAM polymerizes utilizing just five SAMs per turn of the helical polymer rather than the typical six per turn observed for all SAM polymers reported to date. Structural analysis suggested that malleability of the PHC3 SAM would allow formation of not just the five-fold repeat structure but possibly others. Indeed, a second PHC3 SAM polymer in a different crystal form forms a six-fold repeat polymer. These results suggest that the polymers formed by PHC3 SAM, and likely others, are quite dynamic. The functional consequence of the variable PHC3 SAM polymers may be to create different chromatin architectures. PMID:25044168

  16. Low temperature solution deposition of calcium phosphate coatings for orthopedic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Graff, G.L.

    1994-04-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings were grown from aqueous solution onto a derivatized self-assmebled monolayer (SAM) which was covalently bound to a titanium metal substrate. The SAM molecules provided an idea connection between the metal surface and the calcium phosphate coating. The trichlorosilane terminus of the SAM molecule insured covalent attachment to the surface, while the functionalized ``tail`` induced heterogeneous nucleation of the calcium phosphate coating from supersaturated solutions. This low temperature process allowed for uniform coatings to be produced onto complex-shaped and/or microporous surfaces and provided better control of phase purity.

  17. Inhibition of Sam68 triggers adipose tissue browning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junlan; Cheng, Min; Boriboun, Chan; Ardehali, Mariam M; Jiang, Changfei; Liu, Qinghua; Han, Shuling; Goukassian, David A; Tang, Yao-Liang; Zhao, Ting C; Zhao, Ming; Cai, Lu; Richard, Stéphane; Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; molecular mechanisms that promote energy expenditure can be utilized for effective therapy. Src-associated in mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) is potentially significant, because knockout (KO) of Sam68 leads to markedly reduced adiposity. In the present study, we sought to determine the mechanism by which Sam68 regulates adiposity and energy homeostasis. We first found that Sam68 KO mice have a significantly reduced body weight as compared to controls, and the difference is explained entirely by decreased adiposity. Interestingly, these effects were not mediated by a difference in food intake; rather, they were associated with enhanced physical activity. When they were fed a high-fat diet, Sam68 KO mice gained much less body weight and fat mass than their WT littermates did, and they displayed an improved glucose and insulin tolerance. In Sam68 KO mice, the brown adipose tissue (BAT), inguinal, and epididymal depots were smaller, and their adipocytes were less hypertrophied as compared to their WT littermates. The BAT of Sam68 KO mice exhibited reduced lipid stores and expressed higher levels of Ucp1 and key thermogenic and fatty acid oxidation genes. Similarly, depots of inguinal and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) in Sam68 KO mice appeared browner, their multilocular Ucp1-positive cells were much more abundant, and the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16, and Ppargc1a genes was greater as compared to WT controls, which suggests that the loss of Sam68 also promotes WAT browning. Furthermore, in all of the fat depots of the Sam68 KO mice, the expression of M2 macrophage markers was up-regulated, and that of M1 markers was down-regulated. Thus, Sam68 plays a crucial role in controlling thermogenesis and may be targeted to combat obesity and associated disorders. PMID:25934704

  18. Inhibition of Sam68 triggers adipose tissue browning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junlan; Cheng, Min; Boriboun, Chan; Ardehali, Mariam Mina; Jiang, Changfei; Liu, Qinghua; Han, Shuling; Goukassian, David A.; Tang, Yao-Liang; Zhao, Ting C.; Zhao, Ming; Cai, Lu; Richard, Stéphane; Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; molecular mechanisms promoting energy expenditure may be utilized for effective therapy. Src-associated-in-mitosis-of-68kDa (Sam68) is potentially significant because knockout (KO) of Sam68 leads to markedly-reduced adiposity. Here we sought to determine the mechanism by which Sam68 regulates adiposity and energy homeostasis. We firstly found in Sam68-KO mice a significantly-reduced body weight with the difference explained entirely by decreased adiposity. Interestingly, these effects were not mediated by a difference in food intake, but rather associated with enhanced physical activity. When fed high-fat diet, Sam68-KO mice gained much lesser body weight and fat mass as compared to wild-type (WT) littermates and displayed an improved glucose and insulin tolerance. The brown adipose tissue (BAT), inguinal and epididymal depots are smaller and their adipocytes less hypertrophy in Sam68-KO mice than in WT littermates. The BAT of Sam68-KO mice exhibited reduced lipid stores and expressed higher levels of Ucp1 and key thermogenic and fatty-acid-oxidation genes. Similarly, depots of inguinal and epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT) in Sam68-KO mice appeared browner, their multilocular Ucp1-positive cells were much more abundant, and the expression of Ucp1, Cidea, Prdm16 and Ppargc1a genes was greater as compared to WT controls, suggesting that loss of Sam68 also promotes WAT browning. Furthermore, in all fat depots of Sam68-KO mice, the expression of M2 macrophage markers were upregulated and M1 markers downregulated. Thus Sam68 plays a crucial role in the control of thermogenesis and may be targeted to combat obesity and associated disorders. PMID:25934704

  19. Using SAM Assessment and Training for Office 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittle, Gary

    2005-01-01

    This presentation will demonstrate the uses of SAM 2003 from Course Technology as a skills assessment and training software that is used via the Internet. Historically, testing in computer education has taken the form of pencil and paper or standardized testing. The actual computer skills of the student have not been properly assessed. With SAM,…

  20. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  1. Structural insights into SAM domain-mediated tankyrase oligomerization.

    PubMed

    DaRosa, Paul A; Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Xu, Wenqing; Klevit, Rachel E

    2016-09-01

    Tankyrase 1 (TNKS1; a.k.a. ARTD5) and tankyrase 2 (TNKS2; a.k.a ARTD6) are highly homologous poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) that function in a wide variety of cellular processes including Wnt signaling, Src signaling, Akt signaling, Glut4 vesicle translocation, telomere length regulation, and centriole and spindle pole maturation. Tankyrase proteins include a sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain that undergoes oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. However, the SAM domains of TNKS1 and TNKS2 have not been structurally characterized and the mode of oligomerization is not yet defined. Here we model the SAM domain-mediated oligomerization of tankyrase. The structural model, supported by mutagenesis and NMR analysis, demonstrates a helical, homotypic head-to-tail polymer that facilitates TNKS self-association. Furthermore, we show that TNKS1 and TNKS2 can form (TNKS1 SAM-TNKS2 SAM) hetero-oligomeric structures mediated by their SAM domains. Though wild-type tankyrase proteins have very low solubility, model-based mutations of the SAM oligomerization interface residues allowed us to obtain soluble TNKS proteins. These structural insights will be invaluable for the functional and biophysical characterization of TNKS1/2, including the role of TNKS oligomerization in protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and PARylation-dependent ubiquitylation. PMID:27328430

  2. SAM Gcms Chromatography Performed at Mars : Elements of Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Buch, A.; François, P.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    The characterisation of the chemical and mineralogical composition of regolith samples collected with the Curiosity rover is a primary objective of the SAM experiment. These data should provide essential clues on the past habitability of Gale crater. Interpretation of the data collected after SAM pyrolysis evolved gas analysis (EGA) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) experiments on the first soil samples collected by MSL at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater has been challenging due to the concomitant presence in the ovens of an oxychlorine phase present in the samples, and a derivatization agent coming from the SAM wet chemistry experiment (Glavin et al., 2013). Moreover, accurate identification and quantification, in the SAM EGA mode, of volatiles released from the heated sample, or generated by reactions occurring in the SAM pyrolysis oven, is also difficult for a few compounds due to evolution over similar temperature ranges and overlap of their MS signatures. Hence, the GC analyses, coupled with MS, enabled the separation and identification and quantification of most of the volatile compounds detected. These results can have been obtained through tests and calibration done with GC individual spare components and with the SAM testbed. This paper will present a view of the interpretation of the chromatograms obtained when analyzing the Rocknest and John Klein solid samples delivered to SAM, on sols 96 and 199 respectively, supported by laboratory calibrations.

  3. System Advisor Model, SAM 2011.12.2: General Description

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2012-02-01

    This document describes the capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM), Version 2011.12.2, released on December 2, 2011. SAM is software that models the cost and performance of renewable energy systems. Project developers, policy makers, equipment manufacturers, and researchers use graphs and tables of SAM results in the process of evaluating financial, technology, and incentive options for renewable energy projects. SAM simulates the performance of solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and conventional power systems. The financial model can represent financing structures for projects that either buy and sell electricity at retail rates (residential and commercial) or sell electricity at a price determined in a power purchase agreement (utility). Advanced analysis options facilitate parametric, sensitivity, and statistical analyses, and allow for interfacing SAM with Microsoft Excel or with other computer programs. SAM is available as a free download at http://sam.nrel.gov. Technical support and more information about the software are available on the website.

  4. Stability of mixed PEO-thiol SAMs for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Jans, Karolien; Bonroy, Kristien; De Palma, Randy; Reekmans, Gunter; Jans, Hilde; Laureyn, Wim; Smet, Mario; Borghs, Gustaaf; Maes, Guido

    2008-04-15

    The secret of a successful affinity biosensor partially hides in the chemical interface layer between the transducer system and the biological receptor molecules. Over the past decade, several methodologies for the construction of such interface layers have been developed on the basis of the deposition of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold. Moreover, mixed SAMs of polyethylene oxide (PEO) containing thiols have been applied for the immobilization of biological receptors. Despite the intense research in the field of thiol SAMs, relatively little is known about their biosensing properties in correlation with their long-term stability. Especially the impact of the storage conditions on their biosensing characteristics has not been reported before to our knowledge. To address these issues, we prepared mixed PEO SAMs and tested their stability and biosensing performance in several storage conditions, i.e., air, N2, ethanol, phosphate buffer, and H2O. The quality of the SAMs was monitored as a function of time using various characterization techniques such as cyclic voltammetry, contact angle, grazing angle Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, the impact of the different storage conditions on the biosensor properties was investigated using surface plasmon resonance. Via the latter technique, the receptor immobilization, the analyte recognition, and the nonspecific binding were extensively studied using the prostate specific antigen as a model system. Our experiments showed that very small structural differences in the SAM can have a great impact in their final biosensing properties. In addition it was shown that the mixed SAMs stored in air or N2 are very stable and retain their biosensor properties for at least 30 days, while ethanol appeared to be the worst storage medium due to partial oxidation of the thiol headgroup. In conclusion, care must be taken to avoid SAM degradation during storage

  5. Beta test results for the CAA mini-SAM system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.; Monagle, M.

    1997-04-01

    The mission of the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) Program is to automate methods for chemical analysis of environmental samples. To accomplish this mission, the CAA team has developed automated laboratory systems based on a plug-and-work strategy for integrating components. Realizing that standardization is the key to implementing this strategy, CAA has developed, demonstrated, and encouraged commercialization of standards for laboratory automation. While the CAA mission is driven by the analyses in support of the extensive remediation programs of the Departments of Energy and Defense, it also impacts any industry that depends upon high volumes of repetitive chemical analysis. A Standard Analysis Method (SAM) is any collection of hardware and software used to automate part or all of a method. The method automated for the Mini-SAM testing is EPA Method 3550, which outlines semivolatiles extraction by sonication. The list of semivolatiles includes the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analytes of interest. The basic building block of a SAM is the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). For the Mini-SAM test an automated sonication SLM and an automated concentration SLM were configured to perform the extraction and concentration processes. The Mini-SAM differs from the Full-SAM in that a fully automated delivery of materials, samples, and extracts is not required. The intent of the Beta Test of the Mini-SAM was threefold. Firstly, the Mini-SAM Beta Test met a milestone mandated by the Department of Energy in the course of the program effort. Secondly, the CAA Program secured an independent assessment of the equipment and its capabilities from Assagai Analytical Laboratory. Lastly, the Program captured real-world sample data. The independent assessment, coupled with CAA observation of equipment performance, was used to determine strengths and weaknesses of the Mini-SAM and to compile possible modifications for CAA engineers to address.

  6. Cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP in K-SAM exon splicing activation

    SciTech Connect

    Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Theoleyre, Sandrine; Del Gatto-Konczak, Fabienne; Breathnach, Richard . E-mail: breathna@nantes.inserm.fr

    2007-07-13

    In 293 cells, splicing of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 K-SAM alternative exon is inefficient, but can be made efficient by provoking TIA-1 binding to the U-rich IAS1 sequence downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. We show here that TIA-1 domains known to interact with U1 snRNP and to recruit it to 5' splice sites in vitro are required for TIA-1 activation of K-SAM exon splicing in vivo. We further show that tethering downstream from the K-SAM exon a fusion between the U1 snRNP component U1C and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein provokes IAS1-dependent exon splicing, and present evidence that the fusion functions after its incorporation into U1 snRNP. Our in vivo data, taken together with previous in vitro results, show that K-SAM splicing activation involves cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP to the exon's 5' splice site region.

  7. SAM 2 and SAGE data management and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Trepte, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The data management and processing supplied by ST Systems Corporation (STX) for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement 2 (SAM 2) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) experiments for the years 1983 to 1986 are described. Included are discussions of data validation, documentation, and scientific analysis, as well as the archival schedule met by the operational reduction of SAM 2 and SAGE data. Work under this contract resulted in the archiving of the first seven years of SAM 2 data and all three years of SAGE data. A list of publications and presentations supported was also included.

  8. Recent Advances in Radical SAM Enzymology: New Structures and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes catalyzes an amazingly diverse variety of reactions ranging from simple hydrogen abstraction to complicated multistep rearrangements and insertions. The reactions they catalyze are important for a broad range of biological functions, including cofactor and natural product biosynthesis, DNA repair, and tRNA modification. Generally conserved features of the radical SAM superfamily include a CX3CX2C motif that binds an [Fe4S4] cluster essential for the reductive cleavage of SAM. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the structure and mechanisms of these enzymes that, in some cases, have overturned widely accepted mechanisms. PMID:25009947

  9. Crystal structures of the SAM-III/S[subscript MK] riboswitch reveal the SAM-dependent translation inhibition mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, C.; Smith, A.M.; Fuchs, R.T.; Ding, F.; Rajashankar, K.; Henkin, T.M.; Ke, A.

    2010-01-07

    Three distinct classes of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-responsive riboswitches have been identified that regulate bacterial gene expression at the levels of transcription attenuation or translation inhibition. The SMK box (SAM-III) translational riboswitch has been identified in the SAM synthetase gene in members of the Lactobacillales. Here we report the 2.2-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Enterococcus faecalis SMK box riboswitch. The Y-shaped riboswitch organizes its conserved nucleotides around a three-way junction for SAM recognition. The Shine-Dalgarno sequence, which is sequestered by base-pairing with the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence in response to SAM binding, also directly participates in SAM recognition. The riboswitch makes extensive interactions with the adenosine and sulfonium moieties of SAM but does not appear to recognize the tail of the methionine moiety. We captured a structural snapshot of the SMK box riboswitch sampling the near-cognate ligand S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) in which SAH was found to adopt an alternative conformation and fails to make several key interactions.

  10. SAM II Data and Information (HDF-EOS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-01

    ... Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, which flew on board the Nimbus-7 ... Spatial Resolution:  The altitude profiles of aerosol extinction have a 1 km vertical resolution. Temporal ...

  11. Curiosity Shakes, Bakes, and Tastes Mars with SAM

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Curiosity rover analyzed its first solid sample of Mars with a variety of instruments, including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. Developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight ...

  12. Technical Manual for the SAM Physical Trough Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Gilman, P.

    2011-06-01

    NREL, in conjunction with Sandia National Lab and the U.S Department of Energy, developed the System Advisor Model (SAM) analysis tool for renewable energy system performance and economic analysis. This paper documents the technical background and engineering formulation for one of SAM's two parabolic trough system models in SAM. The Physical Trough model calculates performance relationships based on physical first principles where possible, allowing the modeler to predict electricity production for a wider range of component geometries than is possible in the Empirical Trough model. This document describes the major parabolic trough plant subsystems in detail including the solar field, power block, thermal storage, piping, auxiliary heating, and control systems. This model makes use of both existing subsystem performance modeling approaches, and new approaches developed specifically for SAM.

  13. In-Orbit Calibration of a SAMS Triaxial Sensor Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chestney, Louis S.; Sicker, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of in orbit calibration data collected for a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) Triaxial Sensor Head (TS H) and the methods used to process the data for bias and gravity levels.

  14. Auxiliary iron-sulfur cofactors in radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Booker, Squire J

    2015-06-01

    A vast number of enzymes are now known to belong to a superfamily known as radical SAM, which all contain a [4Fe-4S] cluster ligated by three cysteine residues. The remaining, unligated, iron ion of the cluster binds in contact with the α-amino and α-carboxylate groups of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM). This binding mode facilitates inner-sphere electron transfer from the reduced form of the cluster into the sulfur atom of SAM, resulting in a reductive cleavage of SAM to methionine and a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. The 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical then abstracts a target substrate hydrogen atom, initiating a wide variety of radical-based transformations. A subset of radical SAM enzymes contains one or more additional iron-sulfur clusters that are required for the reactions they catalyze. However, outside of a subset of sulfur insertion reactions, very little is known about the roles of these additional clusters. This review will highlight the most recent advances in the identification and characterization of radical SAM enzymes that harbor auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases. PMID:25597998

  15. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from June to November 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hrovat, Ken; Moskowitz, Milton; McPherson, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including sounding rockets, drop towers, parabolic aircraft, and Orbiter missions. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments with acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project at the NASA Lewis Research Center supports principal investigators of microgravity experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1993, a cooperative effort was started between the United States and Russia involving science utilization of the Russian Mir space station by scientists from the United States and Russia. MSAD is currently sponsoring science experiments participating in the Shuttle-Mir Science Program in cooperation with the Russians on the Mir space station. Included in the complement of MSAD experiments and equipment is a SAMS unit In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. The initial SAMS supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment from June to November 1995. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the PCG Principal Investigator's requirements. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded to support this PCG experiment. The report contains plots of the SAMS 100 Hz sensor head data as an overview of the microgravity environment, including the STS-74 Shuttle-Mir docking.

  16. SAM68: Signal Transduction and RNA Metabolism in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Frisone, Paola; Pradella, Davide; Di Matteo, Anna; Belloni, Elisa; Ghigna, Claudia; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in expression and/or activity of splicing factors as well as mutations in cis-acting splicing regulatory sequences contribute to cancer phenotypes. Genome-wide studies have revealed more than 15,000 tumor-associated splice variants derived from genes involved in almost every aspect of cancer cell biology, including proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle control, metabolism, apoptosis, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. In the past decades, several RNA binding proteins (RBPs) have been implicated in tumorigenesis. SAM68 (SRC associated in mitosis of 68 kDa) belongs to the STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA metabolism) family of RBPs. SAM68 is involved in several steps of mRNA metabolism, from transcription to alternative splicing and then to nuclear export. Moreover, SAM68 participates in signaling pathways associated with cell response to stimuli, cell cycle transitions, and viral infections. Recent evidence has linked this RBP to the onset and progression of different tumors, highlighting misregulation of SAM68-regulated splicing events as a key step in neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. Here we review recent studies on the role of SAM68 in splicing regulation and we discuss its contribution to aberrant pre-mRNA processing in cancer. PMID:26273626

  17. Ensuring GRID resource availability with the SAM framework in LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closier, J.; Paterson, S.; Santinelli, R.

    2008-07-01

    The LHCb experiment has chosen to use the SAM framework (Service Availability Monitoring Environment from EGEE-II) [1] make extensive tests of the LHCb environment at all the accessible grid resources. The availability and the proper definition of the local Computing and Storage Elements, user interfaces as well as the WLCG software environment are checked. The SAM framework is also used to pre-install the LHCb applications in the shared software area provided by each site. The deployment of the LHCb applications is based on a python tool developed inside the experiment. It is used for software management including incremental installation of interdependent packages and clean package removal. After the application software is installed a validation test of the whole MC chain is run. According to the results of the experiment specific SAM tests, the sites are (re)integrated into the LHCb production system managed by DIRAC [2]. The possibility of automated dynamic site certification using the SAM test suite is explored. This paper will describe the various ways of the LHCb use of the SAM framework. Practical experience in the recent production runs, current limitations and future developments will be presented.

  18. SAM-T08, HMM-based protein structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The SAM-T08 web server is a protein structure prediction server that provides several useful intermediate results in addition to the final predicted 3D structure: three multiple sequence alignments of putative homologs using different iterated search procedures, prediction of local structure features including various backbone and burial properties, calibrated E-values for the significance of template searches of PDB and residue–residue contact predictions. The server has been validated as part of the CASP8 assessment of structure prediction as having good performance across all classes of predictions. The SAM-T08 server is available at http://compbio.soe.ucsc.edu/SAM_T08/T08-query.html PMID:19483096

  19. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work. PMID:19449821

  20. Obituary: Sam Roweis (1972-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David

    2011-12-01

    Computer scientist and statistical astronomer Sam Roweis took his own life in New York City on 2010 January 12. He was a brilliant and accomplished researcher in the field of machine learning, and a strong advocate for the use of computational statistics for automating discovery and scientific data analysis. He made several important contributions to astronomy and was working on adaptive astronomical data analysis at the time of his death. Roweis obtained his PhD in 1999 from the California Institute of Technology, where he worked on a remarkable range of subjects, including DNA computing, modeling of dynamical systems, signal processing, and speech recognition. During this time he unified and clarified some of the most important data analysis techniques, including Principal Component Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, and Expectation Maximization. His work was aimed at making data analysis and modeling faster, but also better justified scientifically. The last years of his PhD were spent in Princeton NJ, where he came in contact with a young generation of cosmologists thinking about microwave background and large-scale structure data. In a postdoc at University College London, Roweis co-created the Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) algorithm; a simple but flexible technique for mapping a large data set onto a low-dimensional manifold. The LLE paper obtained more than 2700 citations in 9 years, launched a new sub-field of machine learning known as "manifold learning," and inspired work in data visualization, search, and applied mathematics. In 2001, Roweis took a faculty job at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department. He continued working on data analysis methods that have probabilistic interpretation and therefore scientific applicability, but at the same time have good performance on large data sets. He was awarded a Sloan Fellowship, a Canada Research Chair, and a fellowship of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, among other honors and awards

  1. The methylthiolation reaction mediated by the Radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Mohamed; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Mulliez, Etienne; Hunt, John F.; Luff, Jon D.; Forouhar, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanistic enzymology of the Radical-SAM enzymes. It is now clear that these enzymes appear to be involved in a remarkably wide range of chemically challenging reactions. This review article highlights mechanistic and structural aspects of the methylthiotransferases (MTTases) sub-class of the Radical-SAM enzymes. The mechanism of methylthio insertion, now observed to be performed by three different enzymes is an exciting unsolved problem. PMID:22178611

  2. Technoeconomic Modeling of Battery Energy Storage in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven; Nelson, Austin; Lundstrom, Blake

    2015-09-01

    Detailed comprehensive lead-acid and lithium-ion battery models have been integrated with photovoltaic models in an effort to allow System Advisor Model (SAM) to offer the ability to predict the performance and economic benefit of behind the meter storage. In a system with storage, excess PV energy can be saved until later in the day when PV production has fallen, or until times of peak demand when it is more valuable. Complex dispatch strategies can be developed to leverage storage to reduce energy consumption or power demand based on the utility rate structure. This document describes the details of the battery performance and economic models in SAM.

  3. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Methylation: A Tale of Two SAMS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Methylation is an essential and ubiquitous reaction that plays an important role in a wide range of biological processes. Most biological methylations use S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as the methyl donor and proceed via an SN2 displacement mechanism. However, researchers have discovered an increasing number of methylations that involve radical chemistry. The enzymes known to catalyze these reactions all belong to the radical SAM superfamily. This family of enzymes utilizes a specialized [4Fe-4S] cluster for reductive cleavage of SAM to yield a highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical. Radical chemistry is then imposed on a variety of organic substrates, leading to a diverse array of transformations. Until recently, researchers had not fully understood how these enzymes employ radical chemistry to mediate a methyl transfer reaction. Sequence analyses reveal that the currently identified radical SAM methyltransferases (RSMTs) can be grouped into three classes, which appear distinct in protein architecture and mechanism. Class A RSMTs mainly include the rRNA methyltransferases RlmN and Cfr from various origins. As exemplified by Escherichia coli RlmN, these proteins have a single canonical radical SAM core domain that includes an (βα)6 partial barrel most similar to that of pyruvate formate lyase-activase. The exciting recent studies on RlmN and Cfr are beginning to provide insights into the intriguing chemistry of class A RSMTs. These enzymes utilize a methylene radical generated on a unique methylated cysteine residue. However, based on the variety of substrates used by the other classes of RSMTs, alternative mechanisms are likely to be discovered. Class B RSMTs contain a proposed N-terminal cobalamin binding domain in addition to a radical SAM domain at the C-terminus. This class of proteins methylates diverse substrates at inert sp3 carbons, aromatic heterocycles, and phosphinates, possibly involving a cobalamin-mediated methyl transfer process. Class C

  4. Obituary: Sam Roweis (1972-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David

    2011-12-01

    Computer scientist and statistical astronomer Sam Roweis took his own life in New York City on 2010 January 12. He was a brilliant and accomplished researcher in the field of machine learning, and a strong advocate for the use of computational statistics for automating discovery and scientific data analysis. He made several important contributions to astronomy and was working on adaptive astronomical data analysis at the time of his death. Roweis obtained his PhD in 1999 from the California Institute of Technology, where he worked on a remarkable range of subjects, including DNA computing, modeling of dynamical systems, signal processing, and speech recognition. During this time he unified and clarified some of the most important data analysis techniques, including Principal Component Analysis, Hidden Markov Models, and Expectation Maximization. His work was aimed at making data analysis and modeling faster, but also better justified scientifically. The last years of his PhD were spent in Princeton NJ, where he came in contact with a young generation of cosmologists thinking about microwave background and large-scale structure data. In a postdoc at University College London, Roweis co-created the Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) algorithm; a simple but flexible technique for mapping a large data set onto a low-dimensional manifold. The LLE paper obtained more than 2700 citations in 9 years, launched a new sub-field of machine learning known as "manifold learning," and inspired work in data visualization, search, and applied mathematics. In 2001, Roweis took a faculty job at the University of Toronto Computer Science Department. He continued working on data analysis methods that have probabilistic interpretation and therefore scientific applicability, but at the same time have good performance on large data sets. He was awarded a Sloan Fellowship, a Canada Research Chair, and a fellowship of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, among other honors and awards

  5. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  6. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other…

  7. SAMS Acceleration Measurement on Mir From March to September 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Ken; Truong, Duc; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    During NASA Increment 2 (March to September 1996), over 15 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 55 optical disks and were returned to Earth on STS-79. During this time, SAMS data were collected in the Kristall and Kvant modules, and in the Priroda module to support the following experiments: the Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), the Technological Evaluation of the MIM (TEM), the Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), and Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-76 operations, an extravehicular activity (EVA) to install and deploy solar panels on the Kvant module, a Progress engine burn to raise Mir's altitude, and an on-orbit SAMS calibration procedure. Also included are a description of the Mir module orientations, and the panel notations within the modules. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. Variations in the acceleration environment caused by unique activities such as crew exercise and life-support fans are presented. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous mission summary reports published by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  8. Social Activity Method (SAM): A Fractal Language for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, "social activity method" (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for "modes of recontextualisation" that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity--which might be school mathematics or social research or any…

  9. Information System through ANIS at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Gimenez, S.

    2015-09-01

    ANIS (AstroNomical Information System) is a web generic tool developed at CeSAM to facilitate and standardize the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds through private and/or public dedicated Information Systems. The architecture of ANIS is composed of a database server which contains the project data, a web user interface template which provides high level services (search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces), a framework composed of several packages, and a metadata database managed by a web administration entity. The process to implement a new ANIS instance at CeSAM is easy and fast : the scientific project has to submit data or a data secure access, the CeSAM team installs the new instance (web interface template and the metadata database), and the project administrator can configure the instance with the web ANIS-administration entity. Currently, the CeSAM offers through ANIS a web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects (HeDaM, HST-COSMOS, CFHTLS-ZPhots, ExoDAT,...).

  10. Skill Acquisition Measures (SAM). Elementary Mathematics Level IV. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster City School District, PA.

    The Skill Acquisition Measures (SAM) were designed by the Lancaster (Pennsylvania) School District as criterion referenced tests for mathematics. This manual consists of copies of the student test forms for level 4, with additional information for the teacher's use. Each of the test items is presented with the correct answers and the criteria for…

  11. Yield estimation from hyperspectral imagery using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation indices (VIs) derived from remotely sensed imagery are commonly used to estimate crop yields. Spectral angle mapper (SAM) provides an alternative approach to quantifying the spectral differences among all pixels in imagery and therefore has the potential for mapping yield variability. The...

  12. 78 FR 47695 - Sam Rayburn Dam Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... September 30, 2013 (77 FR 67813, November. 14, 2012). The Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern), has prepared Current and Revised 2013 Power Repayment Studies which show the need for an... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power Administration,...

  13. 77 FR 67813 - Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... Rayburn power rate extension were announced by a Federal Register (77 FR 50493) notice published on August... published notice in the Federal Register, (77 FR 50493), of the proposed rate extension for the Rayburn... Southwestern Power Administration Sam Rayburn Dam Project Power Rate AGENCY: Southwestern Power...

  14. Skill Acquisition Measures (SAM). Elementary Mathematics Level V. Teacher's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster City School District, PA.

    The Skill Acquisition Measures (SAM) were designed by the Lancaster (Pennsylvania) School District as criterion referenced tests for mathematics. This manual consists of copies of the student test forms for level 5, with additional information for the teacher's use. Each of the test items is presented with the correct answers and the criteria for…

  15. Dynamics within alkylsiloxane SAMs studied by sensitive dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Mary; Stevens, Derrick; Bochinski, Jason; Clarke, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) are a ubiquitous tool in modern research and their static structure has been extensively studied. Fewer investigations have addressed dynamics within these systems; however, such motions within SAMs will affect surface properties such as friction and blocking ability (permeability). In this study, sensitive, dielectric spectroscopy over a broad temperature range (4-400 K) has been employed to study relaxations within planar alkylsiloxane SAMs[1] . Highly disordered SAMs of varying density were grown by vapor deposition. Two dielectric relaxations were observed. The first, a polyethylene-like relaxation similar to that previously reported in phase-segregated alkyl side-chain polymers, is observed for all films with alkyl chains containing four or more carbons. This is an interacting or glassy relaxation. The second motion, which is observable only at high film densities, is a local mode, which follows an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and has been previously assigned to a sub-chain rotation. [1] M.C. Scott, D.R. Stevens, J.R. Bochinski, L.I. Clarke, ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/nn800543j.

  16. MSL SAM-like Analyses of Hawaiian Altered Basaltic Materials: Implications for Analyses by the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Knudson, C. A.; Rogers, D.; Glotch, T. D.; Sutter, B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Downs, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Samples of basaltic materials were collected during several traverses of the Kau Desert on the leeward side of the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, conducted by the Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration (RIS4E) team, a node of the Solar System Exploration and Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program. Some of these samples had been exposed to circumneutral to slightly acidic alteration conditions from exposure to fog/rain, and acidic fog/rain, while others had been exposed to more acidic conditions due to proximity to fumaroles. The samples consisted of basalts with coatings, sands and soils, and ash, and were collected using organically clean protocols to enable investigation of organic chemistry and organic-mineral associations, in addition to mineralogy. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover has analyzed basaltic materials inferred to have been altered under conditions ranging from circumneutral to acidic, but several aspects of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite results are still being investigated and analyses of relevant terrestrial analogs can play an important role in interpretation of the data. For example, all materials analyzed to date have a significant amorphous component. Comparisons of the mineralogy obtained with the MSL CheMin instrument and volatiles evolved during SAM analyses indicate that, by mass balance, some portion of the volatiles, such as SO2 and H2O, are likely associated with this component. Many of the RIS4E samples also have a significant amorphous component, and field x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data indicate differences in the chemistry of this material in samples exposed to different alteration conditions. Preliminary SAM-like analyses indicate that the amorphous materials in some of these samples evolve volatiles such as H2O and SO2 during heating. Here we will discuss these results, and others, obtained through SAM-like analyses of selected samples.

  17. Fabrication of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and inorganic micropattern on flexible polymer substrate.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Junhui; Zhu, Peixin; Masuda, Yoshitake; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2004-04-13

    By grafting (aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as the buffer layer on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surface, the SAMs ofoctadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS), phenyltrichlorosilane (PTCS), vinyltrichlorosilane (VTCS), andp-tolyltrichlorosilane (TTCS) were fabricated on the flexible polymer substrate. The properties of SAMs were accurately controlled by adjusting the immersing time of substrates in the solutions and the concentration of the solutions. The SAMs acted as templates, and TiO2 micropattern was successfully deposited on OTS, TTCS, and PTCS SAMs. PMID:15875858

  18. 78 FR 3024 - Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, MS; Intent To Prepare a Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, MS; Intent To Prepare a... conservation plan (CCP) and associated National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Sam D. Hamilton... information to: Mr. Steve Reagan, Project Leader, Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee NWR, 2970 Bluff Lake...

  19. Chemoenzymatic synthesis and utilization of a SAM analog with an isomorphic nucleobase.

    PubMed

    Vranken, C; Fin, A; Tufar, P; Hofkens, J; Burkart, M D; Tor, Y

    2016-07-14

    SalL, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of SAM from l-methionine and 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyoadenosine, is shown to accept 5'-chloro-5'-deoxythienoadenosine as a substrate and facilitate the synthesis of a synthetic SAM analog with an unnatural nucleobase. This synthetic cofactor is demonstrated to replace SAM in the DNA methylation reaction with M.TaqI. PMID:27270873

  20. [Preliminary study on autoregulation of samR involved in development and differentiation of Streptomyces ansochromogenes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-ling; Yang, Hai-hua; Tan, Hua-rong

    2005-02-01

    The previous result showed that samR plays an important role in the development progress of Streptomyces ansochromogenes. It was reported that the differentiation progress of S. ansochromogenes was accelerated by a recombinant plasmid containing an extra copy of samR gene. However, the differentiation progress of S. ansochromogenes was not further accelerated by a multicopy plasmid containing samR gene. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that SamR binds to its own promoter region specifically. All these results hint that samR is an autoregulatory gene in Streptomyces ansochromogenes. PMID:15847153

  1. Summary Status of the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), September 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was developed to measure the microgravity acceleration environment to which NASA science payloads are exposed during microgravity science missions on the shuttle. Six flight units have been fabricated to date. The inaugural flight of a SAMS unit was on STS-40 in June 1991 as part of the First Spacelab Life Sciences mission. Since that time, SAMS has flown on six additional missions and gathered eighteen gigabytes of data representing sixty-eight days of microgravity environment. The SAMS units have been flown in the shuttle middeck and cargo bay, in the Spacelab module, and in the Spacehab module. This paper summarizes the missions and experiments which SAMS has supported. The quantity of data and the utilization of the SAMS data is described. Future activities are briefly described for the SAMS project and the Microgravity Measurement and Analysis project (MMAP) to support science experiments and scientists with microgravity environment measurement and analysis.

  2. First use of SAM onboard calibration gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malespin, C.; Trainer, M. G.; Manning, H. L.; Franz, H. B.; Conrad, P. G.; Raaen, E.; Webster, C. R.; Flesch, G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Wong, M. H.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument (Mahaffy et al 2012) suite on Curiosity completed its first measurement of the onboard calibration gas cell on MSL Mission Sol 1042. The cell consists of a gas mixture of four primary gases, along with trace fluorinated hydrocarbon high mass calibrants. The mix is comprised of approximately 25% CO2, N2, Xe and Ar, where the 129Xe has been given a three times enrichment relative to terrestrial xenon in order to distinguish it isotopically from Martian atmospheric Xe. Analysis of the calibration cell is intended to identify changes in instrument performance between pre-launch calibrations and operations on Mars, for any of the three main subsystems in SAM: the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), and Gas Chromatograph (GC). Here we present the experimental approach, results, and implications for instrument performance after almost three years of measurements on Mars.

  3. AstroNomical Information System at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, S.; Moreau, C.; Agneray, F.; Roehlly, Y.

    2014-05-01

    AstroNomical Information System (ANIS), developed by the Centre de donnéeS Astrophysique de Marseille (CeSAM), is a generic tool aimed at facilitating and homogenizing the implementation of astronomical data of various kinds and in dedicated Information Systems. ANIS provides high level services like: search, extract and display imaging and spectroscopic data using a combination of criteria, an object list, a sql query module or a cone search interfaces, as well as download of catalogs and complete datasets. With ANIS, the CeSAM offers web access to VO compliant Information Systems for different projects VVDS, HeDAM, ExoDat, HST-COSMOS, etc.), including ancillary data that are cross-matched before ingestion.

  4. Thiostrepton tryptophan methyltransferase expands the chemistry of radical SAM enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Stéphane; Guillot, Alain; Benjdia, Alhosna; Sandström, Corine; Langella, Philippe; Berteau, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Methylation is among the most widespread chemical modifications encountered in biomolecules and has a pivotal role in many major biological processes. In the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic thiostrepton A, we identified what is to our knowledge the first tryptophan methyltransferase. We show that it uses unprecedented chemistry to methylate inactivated sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, despite being predicted to be a radical SAM enzyme. PMID:23064318

  5. GLAO4ELT: trade study and SAM experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, A.

    2011-09-01

    It is expected that a large fraction of wave-front distortions at ELTs will be anisoplanatic, being produced jointly by near-ground and dome turbulence, wind buffeting, flexures, and vibrations. We compare various strategies for sensing this "ground" component using (i) several sodium LGSs, (ii) one or several Rayleigh LGSs and (ii) NGSs in a wide field. The experience gained so far with the RLGS GLAO system SAM at 4-m telescope will be presented and discussed.

  6. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  7. The ALICE Glance Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins Silva, H.; Abreu Da Silva, I.; Ronchetti, F.; Telesca, A.; Maidantchik, C.

    2015-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is an experiment at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider) studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma. The experiment operation requires a 24 hours a day and 7 days a week shift crew at the experimental site, composed by the ALICE collaboration members. Shift duties are calculated for each institute according to their correlated members. In order to ensure the full coverage of the experiment operation as well as its good quality, the ALICE Shift Accounting Management System (SAMS) is used to manage the shift bookings as well as the needed training. ALICE SAMS is the result of a joint effort between the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and the ALICE Collaboration. The Glance technology, developed by the UFRJ and the ATLAS experiment, sits at the basis of the system as an intermediate layer isolating the particularities of the databases. In this paper, we describe the ALICE SAMS development process and functionalities. The database has been modelled according to the collaboration needs and is fully integrated with the ALICE Collaboration repository to access members information and respectively roles and activities. Run, period and training coordinators can manage their subsystem operation and ensure an efficient personnel management. Members of the ALICE collaboration can book shifts and on-call according to pre-defined rights. ALICE SAMS features a user profile containing all the statistics and user contact information as well as the Institutes profile. Both the user and institute profiles are public (within the scope of the collaboration) and show the credit balance in real time. A shift calendar allows the Run Coordinator to plan data taking periods in terms of which subsystems shifts are enabled or disabled and on-call responsible people and slots. An overview display presents the shift crew present in the control room and allows the Run Coordination team to confirm the presence

  8. Genetic characterization of senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains are unique and appropriate models for genetic studies on aging because the SAMP strains have an "accelerated senescence" phenotype for which the SAMR strains are controls, and each SAMP strain has a strain-specific age-associated disorder. Furthermore, because they have gone through sufficient generations of sister-brother mating, they can be considered inbred strains, which can be analyzed genetically. There are now 11 SAMP strains and 3 SAMR strains descended from the progenitor litters. Analysis with the Gompertz function shows that the SAMP strains have the same initial mortality rate (IMR) as the SAMR strains but a shorter mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), presumably due to genes that accelerated the rate of senescence in the SAMP strains. This accelerated senescence may also occur in cultured fibroblast-like cells. We performed molecular genetic characterization of all the SAM strains to acquire a base of genetic information from which we could develop hypotheses on the mechanism of development of SAM strains and genetic factors that contribute to accelerated senescence. PMID:9088910

  9. Mechanistic Enzymology of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    DesII is a member of the radical SAM family of enzymes that catalyzes radical-mediated transformations of TDP-4-amino-4,6-didexoy-D-glucose as well as other sugar nucleotide diphosphates. Like nearly all radical SAM enzymes, the reactions begin with the reductive homolysis of SAM to produce a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical which is followed by regiospecific hydrogen atom abstraction from the substrate. What happens next, however, depends on the nature of the substrate radical so produced. In the case of the biosynthetically relevant substrate, a radical-mediated deamination ensues; however, when this amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl, one instead observes dehydrogenation. The factors that govern the fate of the initially generated substrate radical as well as the mechanistic details underlying these transformations have been a key focus of research into the chemistry of DesII. This review will discuss recent discoveries pertaining to the enzymology of DesII, how it may relate to understanding other radical-mediated lyases and dehydrogenases and the working hypotheses currently being investigated regarding the mechanism of DesII catalysis.

  10. CE-SAM: a conversational interface for ISR mission support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocaro, Diego; Parizas, Christos; Preece, Alun; Braines, Dave; Mott, David; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.

    2013-05-01

    There is considerable interest in natural language conversational interfaces. These allow for complex user interactions with systems, such as fulfilling information requirements in dynamic environments, without requiring extensive training or a technical background (e.g. in formal query languages or schemas). To leverage the advantages of conversational interactions we propose CE-SAM (Controlled English Sensor Assignment to Missions), a system that guides users through refining and satisfying their information needs in the context of Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations. The rapidly-increasing availability of sensing assets and other information sources poses substantial challenges to effective ISR resource management. In a coalition context, the problem is even more complex, because assets may be "owned" by different partners. We show how CE-SAM allows a user to refine and relate their ISR information needs to pre-existing concepts in an ISR knowledge base, via conversational interaction implemented on a tablet device. The knowledge base is represented using Controlled English (CE) - a form of controlled natural language that is both human-readable and machine processable (i.e. can be used to implement automated reasoning). Users interact with the CE-SAM conversational interface using natural language, which the system converts to CE for feeding-back to the user for confirmation (e.g. to reduce misunderstanding). We show that this process not only allows users to access the assets that can support their mission needs, but also assists them in extending the CE knowledge base with new concepts.

  11. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  12. The SAMS: Smartphone Addiction Management System and verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Choi, Samwook; Choi, Wanbok

    2014-01-01

    While the popularity of smartphones has given enormous convenience to our lives, their pathological use has created a new mental health concern among the community. Hence, intensive research is being conducted on the etiology and treatment of the condition. However, the traditional clinical approach based surveys and interviews has serious limitations: health professionals cannot perform continual assessment and intervention for the affected group and the subjectivity of assessment is questionable. To cope with these limitations, a comprehensive ICT (Information and Communications Technology) system called SAMS (Smartphone Addiction Management System) is developed for objective assessment and intervention. The SAMS system consists of an Android smartphone application and a web application server. The SAMS client monitors the user's application usage together with GPS location and Internet access location, and transmits the data to the SAMS server. The SAMS server stores the usage data and performs key statistical data analysis and usage intervention according to the clinicians' decision. To verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed system, a comparison study with survey-based screening with the K-SAS (Korean Smartphone Addiction Scale) as well as self-field trials is performed. The comparison study is done using usage data from 14 users who are 19 to 50 year old adults that left at least 1 week usage logs and completed the survey questionnaires. The field trial fully verified the accuracy of the time, location, and Internet access information in the usage measurement and the reliability of the system operation over more than 2 weeks. The comparison study showed that daily use count has a strong correlation with K-SAS scores, whereas daily use times do not strongly correlate for potentially addicted users. The correlation coefficients of count and times with total K-SAS score are CC = 0.62 and CC =0.07, respectively, and the t-test analysis for the

  13. The Improvement of SAM Accumulation by Integrating the Endogenous Methionine Adenosyltransferase Gene SAM2 in Genome of the Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weijun; Shi, Feng; Hang, Baojian; Huang, Lei; Cai, Jin; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-03-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) plays important roles in trans-methylation, trans-sulfuration, and polyamine synthesis in all living cells, and it is also an effective cure for liver disease, depressive syndromes, and osteoarthritis. The increased demands of SAM in pharmaceuticals industry have aroused lots of attempts to improve its production. In this study, a multiple-copy integrative plasmid pYMIKP-SAM2 was introduced into the chromosome of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain ZJU001 to construct the recombined strain R1-ZJU001. Further studies showed that the recombinant yeast exhibited higher enzymatic activity of methionine adenosyltransferase and improved its SAM biosynthesis. With a three-phase fed-batch strategy in 15-liter bench-top fermentor, 8.81 g/L SAM was achieved after 52 h cultivation of R1-ZJU001, about 27.1 % increase over its parent strain ZJU001, whereas the SAM content was also improved from 64.6 mg/g DCW to 91.0 mg/g DCW. Our results shall provide insights into the metabolic engineering of SAM pathway in yeast for improved productivity of SAM and subsequent industrial applications. PMID:26728652

  14. Systematic biochemical characterization of the SAM domains in Eph receptor family from Mus Musculus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Li, Qingxia; Zheng, Yunhua; Li, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2016-05-13

    The Eph receptor family is the largest subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases and well-known for their pivotal roles in axon guidance, synaptogenesis, artery/venous differentiation and tumorigenesis, etc. Activation of the Eph receptor needs multimerization of the receptors. The intracellular C-terminal SAM domain of Eph receptor was reported to mediate self-association of Eph receptors via the homo SAM-SAM interaction. In this study, we systematically expressed and purified the SAM domain proteins of all fourteen Eph receptors of Mus musculus in Escherichia coli. The FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) results showed the recombinant SAM domains were highly homogeneous. Using CD (circular dichroism) spectrometry, we found that the secondary structure of all the SAM domains was typically alpha helical folded and remarkably similar. The thermo-stability tests showed that they were quite stable in solution. SEC-MALS (size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle light scattering) results illustrated 200 μM Eph SAM domains behaved as good monomers in the size-exclusion chromatography. More importantly, DLS (dynamic light scattering) results revealed the overwhelming majority of SAM domains was not multimerized in solution either at 200 μM or 2000 μM protein concentration, which indicating the SAM domain alone was not sufficient to mediate the polymerization of Eph receptor. In summary, our studies provided the systematic biochemical characterizations of the Eph receptor SAM domains and implied their roles in Eph receptor mediated signaling pathways. PMID:27086853

  15. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  16. The Vesicle Protein SAM-4 Regulates the Processivity of Synaptic Vesicle Transport

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qun; Ahlawat, Shikha; Schaefer, Anneliese; Mahoney, Tim; Koushika, Sandhya P.; Nonet, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal transport of synaptic vesicles (SVs) is a KIF1A/UNC-104 mediated process critical for synapse development and maintenance yet little is known of how SV transport is regulated. Using C. elegans as an in vivo model, we identified SAM-4 as a novel conserved vesicular component regulating SV transport. Processivity, but not velocity, of SV transport was reduced in sam-4 mutants. sam-4 displayed strong genetic interactions with mutations in the cargo binding but not the motor domain of unc-104. Gain-of-function mutations in the unc-104 motor domain, identified in this study, suppress the sam-4 defects by increasing processivity of the SV transport. Genetic analyses suggest that SAM-4, SYD-2/liprin-α and the KIF1A/UNC-104 motor function in the same pathway to regulate SV transport. Our data support a model in which the SV protein SAM-4 regulates the processivity of SV transport. PMID:25329901

  17. GABAergic inhibition shapes SAM responses in rat auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Cai, R; Caspary, D M

    2015-07-23

    Auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body [MGB]) receives ascending inhibitory GABAergic inputs from inferior colliculus (IC) and descending GABAergic projections from the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) with both inputs postulated to play a role in shaping temporal responses. Previous studies suggested that enhanced processing of temporally rich stimuli occurs at the level of MGB, with our recent study demonstrating enhanced GABA sensitivity in MGB compared to IC. The present study used sinusoidal amplitude-modulated (SAM) stimuli to generate modulation transfer functions (MTFs), to examine the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping the response properties of MGB single units in anesthetized rats. Rate MTFs (rMTFs) were parsed into "bandpass (BP)", "mixed (Mixed)", "highpass (HP)" or "atypical" response types, with most units showing the Mixed response type. GABAA receptor blockade with iontophoretic application of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) antagonist gabazine (GBZ) selectively altered the response properties of most MGB neurons examined. Mixed and HP units showed significant GABAAR-mediated SAM-evoked rate response changes at higher modulation frequencies (fms), which were also altered by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor blockade (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5). BP units, and the lower arm of Mixed units responded to GABAAR blockade with increased responses to SAM stimuli at or near the rate best modulation frequency (rBMF). The ability of GABA circuits to shape responses at higher modulation frequencies is an emergent property of MGB units, not observed at lower levels of the auditory pathway and may reflect activation of MGB NMDA receptors (Rabang and Bartlett, 2011; Rabang et al., 2012). Together, GABAARs exert selective rate control over selected fms, generally without changing the units' response type. These results showed that coding of modulated stimuli at the level of auditory thalamus is at least, in part, strongly controlled by GABA

  18. Introducing the aerosol-climate model MAECHAM5-SAM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, R.; Timmreck, C.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-04-01

    We are presenting a new global aerosol model MAECHAM5-SAM2 to study the aerosol dynamics in the UTLS under background and volcanic conditions. The microphysical core modul SAM2 treats the formation, the evolution and the transport of stratospheric sulphuric acid aerosol. The aerosol size distribution and the weight percentage of the sulphuric acid solution is calculated dependent on the concentrations of H2SO4 and H2O, their vapor pressures, the atmospheric temperature and pressure. The fixed sectional method is used to resolve an aerosol distribution between 1 nm and 2.6 micron in particle radius. Homogeneous nucleation, condensation and evaporation, coagulation, water-vapor growth, sedimentation and sulphur chemistry are included. The module is applied in the middle-atmosphere MAECHAM5 model, resolving the atmosphere up to 0.01 hPa (~80 km) in 39 layers. It is shown here that MAECHAM5-SAM2 well represents in-situ measured size distributions of stratospheric background aerosol in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes. Distinct differences can be seen when derived integrated aerosol parameters (surface area, effective radius) are compared with aerosol climatologies based on the SAGE II satellite instrument (derived by the University of Oxford and the NASA AMES laboratory). The bias between the model and the SAGE II data increases as the moment of the aerosol size distribution decreases. Thus the modeled effective radius show the strongest bias, followed by the aerosol surface area density. Correspondingly less biased are the higher moments volume area density and the mass density of the global stratospheric aerosol coverage. This finding supports the key finding No. 2 of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (2006), where it was shown that during periods of very low aerosol load in the stratosphere, the consistency between in-situ and satellite measurements, which exist in a volcanically perturbed stratosphere, breaks down and significant

  19. Paramagnetic Intermediates Generated by Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus A [4Fe–4S]+ cluster reduces a bound S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) molecule, cleaving it into methionine and a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•). This step initiates the varied chemistry catalyzed by each of the so-called radical SAM enzymes. The strongly oxidizing 5′-dA• is quenched by abstracting a H-atom from a target species. In some cases, this species is an exogenous molecule of substrate, for example, l-tyrosine in the [FeFe] hydrogenase maturase, HydG. In other cases, the target is a proteinaceous residue as in all the glycyl radical forming enzymes. The generation of this initial radical species and the subsequent chemistry involving downstream radical intermediates is meticulously controlled by the enzyme so as to prevent unwanted reactions. But the manner in which this control is exerted is unknown. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable tool used to gain insight into these mechanisms. In this Account, we summarize efforts to trap such radical intermediates in radical SAM enzymes and highlight four examples in which EPR spectroscopic results have shed significant light on the corresponding mechanism. For lysine 2,3-aminomutase, nearly each possible intermediate, from an analogue of the initial 5′-dA• to the product radical l-β-lysine, has been explored. A paramagnetic intermediate observed in biotin synthase is shown to involve an auxiliary [FeS] cluster whose bridging sulfide is a co-substrate for the final step in the biosynthesis of vitamin B7. In HydG, the l-tyrosine substrate is converted in unprecedented fashion to a 4-oxidobenzyl radical on the way to generating CO and CN– ligands for the [FeFe] cluster of hydrogenase. And finally, EPR has confirmed a mechanistic proposal for the antibiotic resistance protein Cfr, which methylates the unactivated sp2-hybridized C8-carbon of an adenosine base of 23S ribosomal RNA. These four systems provide just a brief survey of the ever-growing set

  20. Uranium from phosphoric acid: IMC`s Uncle Sam Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    This article discusses uranium recovery from phosphoric acid, proven to be a viable technology by several U.S. producers since 1978. This technology has accounted for 12.8% of U.S. uranium production during this time: a total of almost 40 Mlb equivalent U3O8. Of the several producers, only the Uncle Sam plant of IMC-Agrico has operated continuously during the period, and that plant is the longest-lived uranium production facility operating in the United States. The basis for the process is reviewed, including geological aspects, mining and recovery of phosphorite, phosphoric acid production, and uranium recovery. Licensing of such facilities is also discussed.

  1. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  2. The nuclear protein Sam68 is cleaved by the FMDV 3C protease redistributing Sam68 to the cytoplasm during FMDV infection of host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Paul; Schafer, Elizabeth A.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2012-03-30

    Picornavirus infection can lead to disruption of nuclear pore traffic, shut-off of cell translation machinery, and cleavage of proteins involved in cellular signal transduction and the innate response to infection. Here, we demonstrated that the FMDV 3C{sup pro} induced the cleavage of nuclear RNA-binding protein Sam68 C-terminus containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Consequently, it stimulated the redistribution of Sam68 to the cytoplasm. The siRNA knockdown of Sam68 resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in viral titers, which prompted us to study the effect of Sam68 on FMDV post-entry events. Interestingly, Sam68 interacts with the internal ribosomal entry site within the 5 Prime non-translated region of the FMDV genome, and Sam68 knockdown decreased FMDV IRES-driven activity in vitro suggesting that it could modulate translation of the viral genome. The results uncover a novel role for Sam68 in the context of picornaviruses and the proteolysis of a new cellular target of the FMDV 3C{sup pro}.

  3. A polymer-free Paclitaxel eluting coronary stent: effects of solvents, drug concentrations and coating methods.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Sujan; Gallo, Annemarie; Mani, Gopinath

    2014-06-01

    Some polymer coatings used in drug-eluting stents (DES) cause adverse reactions. Hence, the use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as a polymer-free platform to deliver an anti-proliferative drug (paclitaxel-PAT) from 2D metal substrates was previously demonstrated. In this study, we optimized the PAT coating on SAMs coated 3D coronary stents. For the optimization process, we investigated the effects of solvents (ethanol, DMSO, and their mixtures), drug concentrations (2, 3, 4, 8, and 12 mg/mL) in the coating solution, and coating methods (dip and spray) on PAT deposition. A solvent mixture of 75:25 v/v Et-OH:DMSO was determined to be the best for obtaining smooth and homogenous PAT coating. PAT coated stents prepared using 8 mg/mL and 3 mg/mL concentrations of PAT by dip and spray coating methods, respectively, were optimal in terms of carrying adequate drug doses (0.35 µg/mm(2) for dipping and 0.76 µg/mm(2) for spraying) as well as negligible defects observed in the coating. PAT was successfully released from SAMs coated stents in a biphasic manner with an initial burst followed by a sustained release for up to 10 weeks. Thus, this study sheds light on the effects of solvents, drug concentrations, and coating methods on preparing a polymer-free DES. PMID:24705673

  4. The first year: Development of a LANDSAT capability at Sam Houston State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounds, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Problems encountered in initiating a LANDSAT data processing capability at Sam Houston State University are discussed. Computer requirements, financing, and academic and administrative support are addressed.

  5. Sam68 is cleaved by caspases under apoptotic cell death induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Choi, Moo Hyun; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2015-03-01

    The RNA-binding protein Sam68, a mitotic substrate of tyrosine kinases, has been reported to participate in the cell cycle, apoptosis, and signaling. In particular, overexpression of Sam68 protein is known to suppress cell growth and cell cycle progression in NIH3T3 cells. Although Sam68 is involved in many cellular activities, the function of Sam68, especially in response to apoptotic stimulation, is not well understood. In this study, we found that Sam68 protein is cleaved in immune cells undergoing apoptosis induced by γ-radiation. Moreover, we found that Sam68 cleavage was induced by apoptotic stimuli containing γ-radiation in a caspase-dependent manner. In particular, we showed that activated casepase-3, 7, 8 and 9 can directly cleave Sam68 protein through in vitro protease cleavage assay. Finally, we found that the knockdown of Sam68 attenuated γ-radiation-induced cell death and growth suppression. Conclusively, the cleavage of Sam68 is a new indicator for the cell damaging effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:25666188

  6. SAM-2 ground-truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement-2 (SAM 2) sensor on the Nimbus G satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Pepin, T. J.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SAM-2 will fly aboard the Nimbus-G satellite for launch in the fall of 1978 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol extinction in high latitude bands. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. The SAM-2 expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of polar stratospheric aerosols are used in the SAM-2 and correlative sensor analyses.

  7. Tertiary contacts control switching of the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hennelly, Scott P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2011-03-01

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by sensing small molecules through changes in secondary structure. While secondary structure and ligand interactions are thought to control switching, the exact mechanism of control is unknown. Using a novel two-piece assay that competes the anti-terminator against the aptamer, we directly monitor the process of switching. We find that the stabilization of key tertiary contacts controls both aptamer domain collapse and the switching of the SAM-I riboswitch from the aptamer to the expression platform conformation. Our experiments demonstrate that SAM binding induces structural alterations that indirectly stabilize the aptamer domain, preventing switching toward the expression platform conformer. These results, combined with a variety of structural probing experiments performed in this study, show that the collapse and stabilization of the aptamer domain are cooperative, relying on the sum of key tertiary contacts and the bimodal stability of the kink-turn motif for function. Here, ligand binding serves to shift the equilibrium of aptamer domain structures from a more open toward a more stable collapsed form by stabilizing tertiary interactions. Our data show that the thermodynamic landscape for riboswitch operation is finely balanced to allow large conformational rearrangements to be controlled by small molecule interactions. PMID:21097777

  8. Tertiary contacts control switching of the SAM-I riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hennelly, Scott P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2011-01-01

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNAs that control gene expression by sensing small molecules through changes in secondary structure. While secondary structure and ligand interactions are thought to control switching, the exact mechanism of control is unknown. Using a novel two-piece assay that competes the anti-terminator against the aptamer, we directly monitor the process of switching. We find that the stabilization of key tertiary contacts controls both aptamer domain collapse and the switching of the SAM-I riboswitch from the aptamer to the expression platform conformation. Our experiments demonstrate that SAM binding induces structural alterations that indirectly stabilize the aptamer domain, preventing switching toward the expression platform conformer. These results, combined with a variety of structural probing experiments performed in this study, show that the collapse and stabilization of the aptamer domain are cooperative, relying on the sum of key tertiary contacts and the bimodal stability of the kink-turn motif for function. Here, ligand binding serves to shift the equilibrium of aptamer domain structures from a more open toward a more stable collapsed form by stabilizing tertiary interactions. Our data show that the thermodynamic landscape for riboswitch operation is finely balanced to allow large conformational rearrangements to be controlled by small molecule interactions. PMID:21097777

  9. Redox regulation in shoot growth, SAM maintenance and flowering.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Jos Hm; Foyer, Christine H; van Dongen, Joost T

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and associated reduction/oxidation (redox) controls involving glutathione, glutaredoxins and thioredoxins play key roles in the regulation of plant growth and development. While many questions remain concerning redox functions in the shoot apical meristem (SAM), accumulating evidence suggests that redox master switches integrate major hormone signals and transcriptional networks in the SAM, and so regulate organ growth, polarity and floral development. Auxin-induced activation of plasma-membrane located NADPH-oxidases and mitochondrial respiratory bioenergetics are likely regulators of the ROS bursts that drive the cell cycle in proliferating regions, with other hormones such as jasmonic acid playing propagating or antagonistic roles in gene regulation. Moreover, the activation of oxygen production by photosynthesis and oxygen-dependent N-end rule controls are linked to the transition from cell proliferation to cell expansion and differentiation. While much remains to be understood, the nexus of available redox controls provides a key underpinning mechanism linking hormonal controls, energy metabolism and bioenergetics to plant growth and development. PMID:26799134

  10. SOLUTION STRUCTURE OF THE FIRST SAM DOMAIN OF ODIN AND BINDING STUDIES WITH THE EPHA2 RECEPTOR

    PubMed Central

    Mercurio, Flavia Anna; Marasco, Daniela; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia Maria; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Leone, Marilisa

    2012-01-01

    The EphA2 receptor plays key roles in many physiological and pathological events including cancer. The process of receptor endocytosis and the consequent degradation have lately attracted attention as possible means of overcoming the negative outcomes of EphA2 in cancer cells and decreasing tumor malignancy. A recent study indicates that Sam (Sterile Alpha Motif) domains of Odin, a member of the ANKS (Ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain-containing) family of proteins, are important to regulate EphA2 endocytosis. Odin contains two tandem Sam domains (Odin-Sam1 and Sam2). Herein we report on the NMR solution structure of Odin-Sam1; through a variety of assays (employing NMR, SPR and ITC techniques), we clearly demonstrate that Odin-Sam1 binds to the Sam domain of EphA2 in the low micromolar range. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments and molecular modeling studies point out that the two Sam domains interact with a head to tail topology characteristic of several Sam-Sam complexes. This binding mode is similar to that we have previously proposed for the association between the Sam domains of the lipid phosphatase Ship2 and EphA2. This work further validates structural elements relevant for the heterotypic Sam-Sam interactions of EphA2 and provides novel insights for the design of potential therapeutic compounds that can modulate receptor endocytosis. PMID:22332920

  11. Sam68 Regulates S6K1 Alternative Splicing during Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    The requirement for alternative splicing during adipogenesis is poorly understood. The Sam68 RNA binding protein is a known regulator of alternative splicing, and mice deficient for Sam68 exhibit adipogenesis defects due to defective mTOR signaling. Sam68 null preadipocytes were monitored for alternative splicing imbalances in components of the mTOR signaling pathway. Herein, we report that Sam68 regulates isoform expression of the ribosomal S6 kinase gene (Rps6kb1). Sam68-deficient adipocytes express Rps6kb1-002 and its encoded p31S6K1 protein, in contrast to wild-type adipocytes that do not express this isoform. Sam68 binds an RNA sequence encoded by Rps6kb1 intron 6 and prevents serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)-mediated alternative splicing of Rps6kb1-002, as assessed by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and minigene assays. Depletion of p31S6K1 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) partially restored adipogenesis of Sam68-deficient preadipocytes. The ectopic expression of p31S6K1 in wild-type 3T3-L1 cells resulted in adipogenesis differentiation defects, showing that p31S6K1 is an inhibitor of adipogenesis. Our findings indicate that Sam68 is required to prevent the expression of p31S6K1 in adipocytes for adipogenesis to occur. PMID:25776557

  12. Regioselective patterning of multiple SAMs and applications in surface-guided smart microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanzhao; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Xinxin

    2014-12-24

    A top-down nanofabrication technology is developed to integrate multiple SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) into regioselective patterns. With ultraviolet light exposure through regioselectively hollowed hard mask, an existing SAM at designated microregions can be removed and a dissimilar kind of SAM can be regrown there. By repeating the photolithography-like process cycle, diverse kinds of SAM building blocks can be laid out as a desired pattern in one microfluidic channel. In order to ensure high quality of the surface modifications, the SAMs are vapor-phase deposited before the channel is closed by a bonding process. For the first time the technique makes it possible to integrate three or more kinds of SAMs in one microchannel. The technique is very useful for multiplex surface functionalization of microfluidic chips where different segments of a microfluidic channel need to be individually modified with different SAMs or into arrayed pattern for surface-guided fluidic properties like hydrophobicity/philicity and/or oleophobicity/philicity, etc. The technique has been well validated by experimental demonstration of various surface-directed flow-guiding functions. By modifying a microchannel surface into an arrayed pattern of multi-SAM "two-tone" stripe array, surface-guiding-induced 3D swirling flow is generated in a microfluidic channel that experimentally exhibits quick oil/water mixing and high-efficiency oil-to-water chemical extraction. PMID:25438296

  13. Overview of SAM results obtained at Gale Crater during the 180 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Conrad, P.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J.; Eigenbrode, J.; Farley, K.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H.; Freissinet, C.; Galvin, D.; Gorevan, S.; Harpold, D.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jones, J.; Lefavor, M.; Leshin, L.; Lyness, E.; Malespin, C.; Manning, H.; Martin, D.; McAdam, A.; McKay, C.; Miller, K.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Niles, P.; Nolan, T.; Owen, T.; Pavolv, A.; Prats, B.; Pepin, R.; Raaen, E.; Raulin, F.; Steele, A.; Stern, J.; Squyres, S.; Sutter, B.; Summons, R. E.; Szopa, C.; Tan, F.; Teinturier, S.; Trainer, M.; Wong, M.; Wray, J.

    2013-09-01

    During the first 180 sols of Curiosity's landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 2/7/2013) SAM sampled the atmosphere more than a dozen times, the dusty sandpile named Rocknest and a basin site named John Klein on the floor of Gale crater. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and its tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in SAM EEProm, the high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to often optimize experiments based on prior runs. SAM and its Experiment Sequences exercised during the First 120 Sols: The SAM instruments, its gas processing system (GPS) and its sample manipulation system (SMS) have been already described [1]. During the first few weeks of the landed mission SAM carried out a variety of instrument health checks and then began a series of atmospheric experiments to measure atmospheric composition and isotope ratios. From sol 56 to 102 Curiosity lingered at Rocknest to clean out the surfaces of the sample processing system by scooping several times into this fine grained material, vibrating to abrade possible contamination from surfaces, and then discarding before delivery of sample to SAM from the 5th scoop.

  14. 77 FR 19691 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman... Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... associated funerary objects may contact the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of...

  15. Unanticipated coordination of tris buffer to the Radical SAM cluster of the RimO methylthiotransferase.

    PubMed

    Molle, Thibaut; Clémancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Kathirvelu, Velavan; Sicoli, Giuseppe; Forouhar, Farhad; Mulliez, Etienne; Gambarelli, Serge; Atta, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Radical SAM enzymes generally contain a [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) (RS cluster) cluster bound to the protein via the three cysteines of a canonical motif CxxxCxxC. The non-cysteinyl iron is used to coordinate SAM via its amino-carboxylate moiety. The coordination-induced proximity between the cluster acting as an electron donor and the adenosyl-sulfonium bond of SAM allows for the homolytic cleavage of the latter leading to the formation of the reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical used for substrate activation. Most of the structures of Radical SAM enzymes have been obtained in the presence of SAM, and therefore, little is known about the situation when SAM is not present. In this report, we show that RimO, a methylthiotransferase belonging to the radical SAM superfamily, binds a Tris molecule in the absence of SAM leading to specific spectroscopic signatures both in Mössbauer and pulsed EPR spectroscopies. These data provide a cautionary note for researchers who work with coordinative unsaturated iron sulfur clusters. PMID:27259294

  16. Winning Attitude & Dedication to Physical Therapy Keep Sam Schmidt on Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Nikki Prevenslik

    2006-01-01

    This article relates how Sam Schmidt returned to living a productive life after an accident left him with spinal cord injury. Schmidt was a former Indy Racing League driver who founded Sam Schmidt Motorsports after his accident in 2000. Schmidt's car hit the wall as he exited turn two during a practice session at Walt Disney World Speedway in…

  17. Radical SAM catalysis via an organometallic intermediate with an Fe-[5'-C]-deoxyadenosyl bond.

    PubMed

    Horitani, Masaki; Shisler, Krista; Broderick, William E; Hutcheson, Rachel U; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Marts, Amy R; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-05-13

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to cleave SAM to initiate diverse radical reactions. These reactions are thought to involve the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate, which has not yet been detected. We used rapid freeze-quenching to trap a catalytically competent intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by the radical SAM enzyme pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme. Characterization of the intermediate by electron paramagnetic resonance and (13)C, (57)Fe electron nuclear double-resonance spectroscopies reveals that it contains an organometallic center in which the 5' carbon of a SAM-derived deoxyadenosyl moiety forms a bond with the unique iron site of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. Discovery of this intermediate extends the list of enzymatic bioorganometallic centers to the radical SAM enzymes, the largest enzyme superfamily known, and reveals intriguing parallels to B12 radical enzymes. PMID:27174986

  18. Understanding the Electronic Structure of Metal/SAM/Organic−Semiconductor Heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Computational modeling is used to describe the mechanisms governing energy level alignment between an organic semiconductor (OSC) and a metal covered by various self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). In particular, we address the question to what extent and under what circumstances SAM-induced work-function modifications lead to an actual change of the barriers for electron and hole injection from the metal into the OSC layer. Depending on the nature of the SAM, we observe clear transitions between Fermi level pinning and vacuum-level alignment regimes. Surprisingly, although in most cases the pinning occurs only when the metal is present, it is not related to charge transfer between the electrode and the organic layer. Instead, charge rearrangements at the interface between the SAM and the OSC are observed, accompanied by a polarization of the SAM. PMID:19891441

  19. S.A.M., the Italian Martian Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletta, G.; Ferri, F.; Fanti, G.; D'Alessandro, M.; Bertoloni, G.; Pavarin, D.; Bettanini, C.; Cozza, P.; Pretto, P.; Bianchini, G.; Debei, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Martian Environment Simulator (SAM “Simulatore di Ambiente Marziano”) is a interdisciplinary project of Astrobiology done at University of Padua. The research is aimed to the study of the survival of the microorganisms exposed to the “extreme” planetary environment. The facility has been designed in order to simulate Mars’ environmental conditions in terms of atmospheric pressure, temperature cycles and UV radiation dose. The bacterial cells, contained into dedicated capsules, will be exposed to thermal cycles simulating diurnal and seasonal Martian cycles. The metabolism of the different biological samples will be analysed at different phases of the experiment, to study their survival and eventual activity of protein synthesis (mortality, mutations and capability of DNA reparing). We describe the experimental facility and provide the perspectives of the biological experiments we will perform in order to provide hints on the possibility of life on Mars either autochthonous or imported from Earth.

  20. A Spatial Analysis and Modeling System (SAMS) for environment management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetina, Fran; Hill, John; Chan, Paul; Jaske, Robert; Rochon, Gilbert

    1993-01-01

    This is a proposal to develop a uniform global environmental data gathering and distribution system to support the calibration and validation of remotely sensed data. SAMS is based on an enhanced version of FEMA's Integrated Emergency Management Information Systems and the Department of Defense's Air land Battlefield Environment Software Systems. This system consists of state-of-the-art graphics and visualization techniques, simulation models, database management and expert systems for conducting environmental and disaster preparedness studies. This software package will be integrated into various Landsat and UNEP-GRID stations which are planned to become direct readout stations during the EOS (Earth Observing System) timeframe. This system would be implemented as a pilot program to support the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). This will be a joint NASA-FEMA-University-Industry project.

  1. A Spatial Analysis and Modeling System (SAMS) for environment management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, Charles H.; Stetina, Fran; Hill, John; Chan, Paul; Jaske, Robert; Rochon, Gilbert

    1992-01-01

    This is a proposal to develop a uniform global environmental data gathering and distribution system to support the calibration and validation of remotely sensed data. SAMS is based on an enhanced version of FE MA's Integrated Emergency Management Information Systems and the Department of Defense's Air Land Battlefield Environment Software Systems. This system consists of state-of-the-art graphics and visualization techniques, simulation models, database management and expert systems for conducting environmental and disaster preparedness studies. This software package will be integrated into various Landsat and UNEP-GRID stations which are planned to become direct readout stations during the EOS timeframe. This system would be implemented as a pilot program to support the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). This will be a joint NASA-FEMA-University-Industry project.

  2. Presentation on a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Theodore L.

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the Space Acceleration Measurement Systems (SAMS) project is to provide an acceleration measurement system capable of serving a wide variety of space experiments. The design of the system being developed under this project takes into consideration requirements for experiments located in the middeck, in the orbiter bay, and in Spacelab. In addition to measuring, conditioning, and recording accelerations, the system will be capable of performing complex calculations and interactive control. The main components consist of a remote triaxial optical storage device. In operation, the triaxial sensor head produces output signals in response to acceleration inputs. These signals are preamplified, filtered and converted into digital data which is then transferred to optical memory. The system design is modular, facilitating both software and hardware upgrading as technology advances. Two complete acceleration measurement flight systems will be build and tested under this project.

  3. Economic Analysis Case Studies of Battery Energy Storage with SAM

    SciTech Connect

    DiOrio, Nicholas; Dobos, Aron; Janzou, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Interest in energy storage has continued to increase as states like California have introduced mandates and subsidies to spur adoption. This energy storage includes customer sited behind-the-meter storage coupled with photovoltaics (PV). This paper presents case study results from California and Tennessee, which were performed to assess the economic benefit of customer-installed systems. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued. Different dispatch strategies, including manual scheduling and automated peak-shaving were explored to determine ideal ways to use the storage system to increase the system value and mitigate demand charges. Incentives, complex electric tariffs, and site specific load and PV data were used to perform detailed analysis. The analysis was performed using the free, publically available System Advisor Model (SAM) tool. We find that installation of photovoltaics with a lithium-ion battery system priced at $300/kWh in Los Angeles under a high demand charge utility rate structure and dispatched using perfect day-ahead forecasting yields a positive net-present value, while all other scenarios cost the customer more than the savings accrued.

  4. Photon multiplication in wide-gap BAM and SAM aluminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, Aleksandr; Lushchik, Cheslav; Feldbach, Eduard; Kudryavtseva, Irina; Liblik, Peeter; Maaroos, Aarne; Nagirnyi, Vitali; Savikhin, Fjodor; Vasil'chenko, Eugeni

    2005-08-01

    Processes of various intrinsic and impurity luminescence excitation by 4-32 eV photons or 18 and 300 keV electrons have been studied in pure and doped BaMgAl10O17 (BAM) and SrMgAl10O17 (SAM) phosphors at 6-300 K. In BAM:Eu (l0%), the quantum yield of Eu2+ center emission is QY = 1 in the region of exciting photon energies of hνec = 7-12 eV, the value of QY reaches 2 at 14-21 eV and sharply increases at hνec = 22-32 eV, where secondary electron-hole pairs are created by hot conduction electrons. The processes connected with the rise of QY for various types of emission in the region of 14-21 eV have been thoroughly studied for BAM and SAM phosphors. It has been suggested that such exciting photons cause the ionization of oxygen ions and form hot valence holes, the energy of which is partially used for the excitation of Eu2+ ions (4f7→4f65d1 transitions) due to nonradiative Auger transitions. The intensity of the Eu2+ emission increases after a single nanosecond electron pulse with a rise time of 50-150 ns. This rise is connected with the energy transfer from spinel blocks to Eu2+ ions located at cation planes of the β-alumina-type materials.

  5. Social activity method (SAM): A fractal language for mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Paul

    2013-09-01

    In this paper I shall present and develop my organisational language, social activity method (SAM), and illustrate some of its applications. I shall introduce a new scheme for modes of recontextualisation that enables the analysis of the ways in which one activity - which might be school mathematics or social research or any empirically observed regularity of practice - recontextualises the practice of another and I shall also present, deploy, and develop an existing scheme - domains of action - in an analysis of school mathematics examination papers and in the structuring of what I refer to as the esoteric domain. This domain is here conceived as a hybrid domain of, first, linguistic and extralinguistic resources that are unambiguously mathematical in terms of both expression and content and, second, pedagogic theory - often tacit - that enables the mathematical gaze onto other practices and so recontextualises them. A second and more general theme that runs through the paper is the claim that there is nothing that is beyond semiosis, that there is nothing to which we have direct access, unmediated by interpretation. This state of affairs has implications for mathematics education. Specifically, insofar as an individual's mathematical semiotic system is under continuous development - the curriculum never being graspable all at once - understanding - as a stable semiotic moment - of any aspect or object of mathematics is always localised to the individual and is at best transient, and the sequencing of such moments may well also be more individualised than consistent in some correspondence with the sequencing of the curriculum. This being the case, a concentration on understanding as a goal may well serve to inhibit the pragmatic acquisition and deployment of mathematical technologies, which should be the principal aim of mathematics teaching and learning. The paper is primarily concerned with mathematics education. SAM, however, is a language that is available for

  6. Examination of in-service coating degradation in gas turbine blades using a small punch testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, J.; Bloomer, T.E.; Gold, C.R.; Sugita, Y.; Ito, M.; Sakurai, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes examination of in-service coating degradation in land based gas turbine blades by means of a small punch testing (SP) method and scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). SP tests on coated specimens with unpolished surfaces indicated large variations of the mechanical properties because of the surface roughness and curvature in gas turbine blades. SP tests on polished specimens better characterized the mechanical degradation of blade coatings. The coated specimens greatly softened and the room temperature ductility of the coatings and substrates tended to decrease with increasing operation time. The ductile-brittle transition temperature of the coatings shifted to higher temperatures during the blade operation. From SAM analyses on fracture surfaces of unused and used blades, it has been shown that oxidation and sulfidation near the coating surface, which control the fracture properties, result from high temperature environmental attack.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Studies of Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAM) Silica-SAM-Water Interface Probed With Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth

    2010-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is a successful and widely used technique for the study of surfaces and surface phenomena. We present a novel technique using second harmonic generation from oriented water molecules in the Gouy-Chapman diffuse layer at the alkylsiloxane and biomolecular self assembled monolayer (SAM) interface with water to measure distance between the solid surface and the average location of the oriented water in the diffuse layer. Distances of one nanometer can be distinguished. This in situ probe is applicable for organic adsorbates which in general will push the diffuse layer away from the solid surface. The organic layer thickness can be used to obtain the adsorption fraction. From this and an understanding of the likely chemistry, the orientation of the molecules can be inferred. We have demonstrated this technique on three molecular systems: hydrophobic self assembled monolayers of methoxysilane molecules of varying hydrocarbon chain length, self assembled monolayers of streptavidin glycoproteins and the combined streptavidin-biotinylated antibody monolayer.

  8. Streptomyces serine protease (SAM-P20): recombinant production, characterization, and interaction with endogenous protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, S; Suzuki, M; Kojima, S; Miura, K; Momose, H

    1995-01-01

    Previously, we isolated a candidate for an endogenous target enzyme(s) of the Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor (SSI), termed SAM-P20, from a non-SSI-producing mutant strain (S. Taguchi, A. Odaka, Y. Watanabe, and H. Momose, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:180-186, 1995). In this study, in order to investigate the detailed enzymatic properties of this protease, an overproduction system of recombinant SAM-P20 was established in Streptomyces coelicolor with the SSI gene promoter. The recombinant SAM-P20 was purified by salting out and by two successive ion-exchange chromatographies to give a homogeneous band by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Partial peptide mapping and amino acid composition analysis revealed that the recombinant SAM-P20 was identical to natural SAM-P20. From the results for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity, SAM-P20 could be categorized as a chymotrypsin-like protease with an arginine-cleavable activity, i.e., a serine protease with broad substrate specificity. For proteolytic activity, the optimal pH was 10.0 and the optimal temperature was shifted from 50 to 80 degrees C by the addition of 10 mM calcium ion. The strong stoichiometric inhibition of SAM-P20 activity by SSI dimer protein occurred in a subunit molar ratio of these two proteins of about 1, and an inhibitor constant of SSI toward SAM-P20 was estimated to be 8.0 x 10(-10) M. The complex formation of SAM-P20 and SSI was monitored by analytical gel filtration, and a complex composed of two molecules of SAM-P20 and one dimer molecule of SSI was detected, in addition to a complex of one molecule of SAM-P20 bound to one dimer molecule of SSI. The reactive site of SSI toward SAM-P20 was identified as Met-73-Val-74 by sequence analysis of the modified form of SSI, which was produced by the acidification of the complex of SSI and SAM-P20. This reactive site is the same that toward an exogenous target enzyme, subtilisin BPN'. PMID:7592444

  9. The nuclear protein Sam68 is recruited to the cytoplasmic stress granules during enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Ning; Li, Pengfei; Pan, Ziye; Ding, Yun; Zou, Dehua; Li, Liyang; Xiao, Lijie; Shen, Binglei; Liu, Shuxia; Cao, Hongwei; Cui, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study found that the nuclear protein, 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis protein (Sam68), is translocated to the cytoplasm and forms punctate pattern during enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection [Virus Research, 180 (2014), 1-11]. However, the exact function of this punctate pattern in cytoplasm during EV71 infection remains unknown. In this study, we firstly have examined this punctate pattern of Sam68 re-localization in the cytoplasm, and observed the obvious recruitments of Sam68 to the EV71-induced stress granules (SGs). Sam68, belongs to the KH domain family of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), was then confirmed that its KH domain was essential for this recruitment. Nevertheless, Knockdown of Sam68 expression using ShRNA had no effects on SGs assembly, indicating that Sam68 is not a constitutive component of the SGs during EV71 infection. Lastly, we investigated the importance of microtubulin transport to SGs aggregation, and revealed that microtubule depolymerization inhibited SGs formation, suggesting that EV71-induced SGs move throughout the cytoplasm in a microtubule-dependent manner. Taken together, these results illuminated that EV71 infections can induce SGs formation, and Sam68, as a SGs component, migrates alone with SGs dependent on intact microtubule upon the viral infections. These findings may provide novel underlying mechanism for delineating the role of SGs during EV71 infection. PMID:27057671

  10. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from November 1995 to March 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors science experiments on a variety of microgravity carriers, including Orbiter missions and Russia's Mir space station. The MSAD sponsors the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LERC) to support these science experiments by providing acceleration measurements to characterize the microgravity environment to which the experiments were exposed. The LeRC Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project supports principal investigations of microgravity science experiments as they evaluate the effects of varying acceleration levels on their experiments. In 1994, a SAMS unit was installed on the Mir space station. In a manner similar to Orbiter mission support, the SAMS unit supports science experiments from the U.S. and Russia by measuring the microgravity environment during experiment operations. Previous reports have summarized the SAMS data acquired during the period from September 1994 to November 1995. During the time period from November 1995 to March 1996, the primary SAMS-supported experiment was a Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment. SAMS data were obtained during the PCG operations on Mir in accordance with the requirements specified by the PCG Principal Investigator. Also included in this data are mission events of interest, such as the undocking of STS-74 from Mir (November 1995) and the docking of Atlantis (STS-76) to Mir in March 1996. This report presents an overview of the SAMS data recorded in the interval from November 1995 to March 1996.

  11. Sam68 Mediates the Activation of Insulin and Leptin Signalling in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Vilariño-García, Teresa; de la Cruz, Luis; Virizuela, Juan A.; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer development in postmenopausal women. High insulin and leptin levels seem to have a role modulating the growth of these tumours. Sam68 is an RNA-binding protein with signalling functions that has been found to be overexpressed in breast cancer. Moreover, Sam68 may be recruited to insulin and leptin signalling pathways, mediating its effects on survival, growth and proliferation in different cellular types. We aimed to study the expression of Sam68 and its phosphorylation level upon insulin and leptin stimulation, and the role of Sam68 in the proliferative effect and signalling pathways that are activated by insulin or leptin in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. In the human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and BT-474, Sam68 protein quantity and gene expression were increased upon leptin or insulin stimulation, as it was checked by qPCR and immunoblot. Moreover, both insulin and leptin stimulation promoted an increase in Sam68 tyrosine phosphorylation and negatively regulated its RNA binding capacity. siRNA was used to downregulate Sam68 expression, which resulted in lower proliferative effects of both insulin and leptin, as well as a lower activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways promoted by both hormones. These effects may be partly explained by the decrease in IRS-1 expression by down-regulation of Sam68. These results suggest the participation of Sam68 in both leptin and insulin receptor signaling in human breast cancer cells, mediating the trophic effects of these hormones in proliferation and cellular growth. PMID:27415018

  12. Denitrification of the polar winter stratosphere - Implications of SAM II cloud formation temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Toon, O. B.

    1990-01-01

    The SAM II extinction profiles and the associated temperature profiles are used to determine the amount of denitrification of the winter polar stratospheres. Clear evidence of the denitrification process in the Antarctic data is seen. There are indications in the Arctic data that denitrification mechanisms may be at work there also. At the latitudes observed by the SAM II satellite system, denitrification begins before the formation of extensive ice clouds and may be due to sedimentation of nitric acid particles. However, the possibility of dinitrification by type II PSCs at latitudes not observed by SAM II cannot be excluded.

  13. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  14. Self-Cleaning Features of Plasma-Treated Surfaces with Self-Assembled Monolayer Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang‑Joon; Paik, Bu‑Geun; Kim, Guk‑Bae; Jang, Young‑Gil

    2006-02-01

    A biomimic surface was coated onto a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate. The coated PTFE surface was found to have nanoscale roughness and high hydrophobicity. In the first preparation step, the PTFE surface was modified by plasma etching. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) was then deposited onto the modified surface with a thickness of a 2-3 nm. This surface was found to have self-cleaning features similar to those of a lotus leaf. The self-cleaning features were confirmed by comparing the contact and sliding angles of the original PTFE surface, a PTFE surface plasma treated, and a PTFE surface plasma treated and SAM coated. The PTFE surface treated with plasma and SAM coated had an increased contact angle and a decreased sliding angle compared with the other surfaces. It also exhibited increased stability and slow aging. The quantity of oxygen-containing groups that can be greatly influenced by plasma treatment, SAM coating, and aging, seems to play an important role in surface modification.

  15. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other extralist and prior-list intrusions. The authors developed the theory by simulating recall of such lists, using factorial combinations of semantic mechanisms operating at encoding, retrieval, or both stages. During encoding, unstudied words' associations to list context were strengthened in proportion to their strength of semantic association either to each studied word or to all co-rehearsed words. During retrieval, words received preference in proportion to their strength of semantic association to the most recently recalled single word or multiple words. The authors simulated all intrusion types and veridical recall for lists varying in semantic association strength among studied and critical words from the same and different lists. Multiplicative semantic encoding and retrieval mechanisms performed well in combination. Using such combined mechanisms, the authors also simulated several core findings from the Deese–Roediger–McDermott paradigm literature, including developmental patterns, specific list effects, association strength effects, and true–false correlations. These results challenge existing false-memory theories. PMID:17907869

  16. OARE and SAMS on STS-94/MSL-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskowitz, Milton; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; Tschen, Peter; DeLombard, Richard; Nati, Maurizio

    1998-01-01

    Four microgravity acceleration measurement instruments were included on MSL-1 to measure the accelerations and vibrations to which science experiments were exposed during their operation on the mission. The data were processed and presented to the principal investigators in a variety of formats to aid their assessment of the microgravity environment during their experiment operations. Two accelerometer systems managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supported the MSL-1 mission: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). In addition, the Microgravity Measurement Assembly (MMA) and the Quasi- Steady Acceleration Measurement (QSAM) system, both sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division, collected acceleration data as a part of the MSL-1 mission. The NIMA was funded and designed by the European Space Agency in the Netherlands (ESA/ESTEC), and the QSAM system was funded and designed by the German Space Agency (DLR). The Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) supports Principal Investigators (PIs) of the Microgravity science community as they evaluate the effects of acceleration on their experiments. PIMS primary responsibility is to support NASA-sponsored investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation. A mission summary report was prepared and published by PIMS in order to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide for evaluating the acceleration environment during the MSL-1 mission.

  17. Recursive SAM-based band selection for hyperspectral anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuanlei; Liu, Daizhi; Yi, Shihua

    2010-10-01

    Band selection has been widely used in hyperspectral image processing for dimension reduction. In this paper, a recursive SAM-based band selection (RSAM-BBS) method is proposed. Once two initial bands are given, RSAM-BBS is performed in a sequential manner, and at each step the band that can best describe the spectral separation of two hyperspectral signatures is added to the bands already selected until the spectral angle reaches its maximum. In order to demonstrate the utility of the proposed band selection method, an anomaly detection algorithm is developed, which first extracts the anomalous target spectrum from the original image using automatic target detection and classification algorithm (ATDCA), followed by maximum spectral screening (MSS) to estimate the background average spectrum, then implements RSAM-BBS to select bands that participate in the subsequent adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) target detection. As shown in the experimental result on the AVIRIS dataset, less than five bands selected by the RSAM-BBS can achieve comparable detection performance using the full bands.

  18. ExoDat Information System at CeSAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agneray, F.; Moreau, C.; Chabaud, P.; Damiani, C.; Deleuil, M.

    2014-05-01

    CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary transits) is a space based mission led by French space agency (CNES) in association with French and international laboratories. One of CoRoT's goal is to detect exoplanets by the transit method. The Exoplanet Database (Exodat) is a VO compliant information system for the CoRoT exoplanet program. The main functions of ExoDat are to provide a source catalog for the observation fields and targets selection; to characterize the CoRoT targets (spectral type, variability , contamination...);and to support follow up programs. ExoDat is built using the AstroNomical Information System (ANIS) developed by the CeSAM (Centre de donneeS Astrophysique de Marseille). It offers download of observation catalogs and additional services like: search, extract and display data by using a combination of criteria, object list, and cone-search interfaces. Web services have been developed to provide easy access for user's softwares and pipelines.

  19. Conformational Heterogeneity of the SAM-I Riboswitch Transcriptional ON State: A Chaperone-like Role for S-adenosylmethionine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-ela, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here we explore the mechanism for tuning of SAM-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand— S-adenosyl methionine (SAM). SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine and SAM, etc. We use base pair probability predictions to examine the secondary structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several “decoy” base pairing interactions involving 5’ riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound “transcription OFF” state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3’ truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway toward the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths are crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism. PMID:22425639

  20. Self-organizing map (SOM) of space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A; Smith, A D

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data have been classified using self-organizing map (SOM) networks without any supervision; i.e., no a priori knowledge is assumed regarding input patterns belonging to a certain class. Input patterns are created on the basis of power spectral densities of SAMS data. Results for SAMS data from STS-50 and STS-57 missions are presented. Following issues are discussed in details: impact of number of neurons, global ordering of SOM weight vectors, effectiveness of a SOM in data classification, and effects of shifting time windows in the generation of input patterns. The concept of 'cascade of SOM networks' is also developed and tested. It has been found that a SOM network can successfully classify SAMS data obtained during STS-50 and STS-57 missions. PMID:11543426

  1. Introduction to the Thematic Minireview Series on Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    In the early days, radical enzyme reactions that use S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) coordinated to an Fe-S cluster, which Perry Frey described as a “poor man's coenzyme B12,” were believed to be relatively rare chemical curiosities. Today, bioinformatics analyses have revealed the wide prevalence and sheer numbers of radical SAM enzymes, conferring superfamily status. In this thematic minireview series, the JBC presents six articles on radical SAM enzymes that accomplish wide-ranging chemical transformations. We learn that despite the diversity of the reactions catalyzed, family members share some common structural and mechanistic themes. Still in its infancy, continued explorations promise to be fertile grounds for discoveries that will undoubtedly further broaden our understanding of the catalytic repertoire and deepen our understanding of the chemical strategies used by radical SAM enzymes. PMID:25477525

  2. Self-organizing map (SOM) of space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, A.; Smith, A. D.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, space acceleration measurement system (SAMS) data have been classified using self-organizing map (SOM) networks without any supervision; i.e., no a priori knowledge is assumed regarding input patterns belonging to a certain class. Input patterns are created on the basis of power spectral densities of SAMS data. Results for SAMS data from STS-50 and STS-57 missions are presented. Following issues are discussed in details: impact of number of neurons, global ordering of SOM weight vectors, effectiveness of a SOM in data classification, and effects of shifting time windows in the generation of input patterns. The concept of 'cascade of SOM networks' is also developed and tested. It has been found that a SOM network can successfully classify SAMS data obtained during STS-50 and STS-57 missions.

  3. Development of and flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Finley, Brian D.; Baugher, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the development of and the flight results from the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) flight units used in the Orbiter middeck, Spacelab module, and the Orbitercargo bay. The SAMS units are general purpose microgravity accelerometers designed to support a variety of science experiments with microgravity acceleration measurements. A total of six flight units have been fabricated; four for use in the Orbiter middeck and Spacelab module, and two for use in the Orbiter cargo bay. The design of the units is briefly described. The initial two flights of SAMS units on STS-40 (June 1991) and STS-43 (August 1991) resulted in 371 megabytes and 2.6 gigabytes of data respectively. Analytical techniques developed to examine this quantity of acceleration data are described and sample plots of analyzed data are illustrated. Future missions for the SAMS units are listed.

  4. Tandem SAM Domain Structure of Human Caskin1: A Presynaptic, Self-Assembling Scaffold for CASK

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Knight, Mary Jane; Pennella, Mario A.; Ear, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    The synaptic scaffolding proteins CASK and Caskin1 are part of the fibrous mesh of proteins that organize the active zones of neural synapses. CASK binds to a region of Caskin1 called the CASK interaction domain (CID). Adjacent to the CID, Caskin1 contains two tandem sterile a motif (SAM) domains. Many SAM domains form polymers so they are good candidates for forming the fibrous structures seen in the active zone. We show here that the SAM domains of Caskin1 form a new type of SAM helical polymer. The Caskin1 polymer interface exhibits a remarkable segregation of charged residues, resulting in a high sensitivity to ionic strength in vitro. The Caskin1 polymers can be decorated with CASK proteins, illustrating how these proteins may work together to organize the cytomatrix in active zones.

  5. Tandem SAM Domain Structure of Human Caskin1: A Presynaptic, Self-Assembling Scaffold for CASK

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Knight, Mary Jane; Pennella, Mario A.; Ear, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Bowie, James U.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The synaptic scaffolding proteins CASK and Caskin1 are part of the fibrous mesh of proteins that organize the active zones of neural synapses. CASK binds to a region of Caskin1 called the CASK interaction domain (CID). Adjacent to the CID, Caskin1 contains two tandem sterile alpha motif (SAM) domains. Many SAM domains form polymers so they are good candidates for forming the fibrous structures seen in the active zone. We show here that the SAM domains of Caskin1 form a new type of SAM helical polymer. The Caskin1 polymer interface exhibits a remarkable segregation of charge residues, resulting in a high sensitivity to ionic strength in vitro. The Caskin1 polymers can be decorated with CASK proteins, illustrating how these proteins may work together to organize the cytomatrix in active zones. PMID:22153505

  6. SAmBA: an interactive software for optimizing the design of biological macromolecules crystallization experiments.

    PubMed

    Audic, S; Lopez, F; Claverie, J M; Poirot, O; Abergel, C

    1997-10-01

    SAmBA is a new software for the design of minimal experimental protocols using the notion of orthogonal arrays of strength 2. The main application of SAmBA is the search of protein crystallization conditions. Given a user input defining the relevant effectors/variables (e.g., pH, temperature, salts) and states (e.g., pH: 5, 6, 7 and 8), this software proposes an optimal set of experiments in which all tested variables and the pairwise interactions between them are symmetrically sampled. No a priori restrictions on the number and range of experimental variables is imposed. SAmBA consists of two complementary programs, SAm and BA, using a simulated annealing approach and a backtracking algorithm, respectively. The software is freely available as C code or as an interactive JAVA applet at http:/(/)igs-server.cnrs-mrs.fr. PMID:9329089

  7. Radical SAM enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of purine-based natural products

    PubMed Central

    Bandarian, Vahe

    2013-01-01

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a widely distributed group of iron-sulfur containing proteins that exploit the reactivity of the high energy intermediate, 5’-deoxyadenosyl radical, which is produced by reductive cleavage of SAM, to carry-out complex radical-mediated transformations. The reactions catalyzed by radical SAM enzymes range from simple group migrations to complex reactions in protein and RNA modification. This review will highlight three radical SAM enzymes that catalyze reactions involving modified guanosines in the biosynthesis pathways of the hypermodified tRNA base wybutosine; secondary metabolites of 7-deazapurine structure, including the hypermodified tRNA base queuosine; and the redox cofactor F420. PMID:22902275

  8. Radical SAM enzymes in the biosynthesis of sugar-containing natural products.

    PubMed

    Ruszczycky, Mark W; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2012-11-01

    Carbohydrates play a key role in the biological activity of numerous natural products. In many instances their biosynthesis requires radical mediated rearrangements, some of which are catalyzed by radical SAM enzymes. BtrN is one such enzyme responsible for the dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol in the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine. DesII is another example that catalyzes a deamination reaction necessary for the net C4 deoxygenation of a glucose derivative en route to desosamine formation. BtrN and DesII represent the two most extensively characterized radical SAM enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the biosynthetic roles of these two enzymes, their mechanisms of catalysis, the questions that have arisen during these investigations and the insight they can offer for furthering our understanding of radical SAM enzymology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology. PMID:22172915

  9. Radical SAM enzymes in the biosynthesis of sugar-containing natural products☆

    PubMed Central

    Ruszczycky, Mark W.; Ogasawara, Yasushi; Liu, Hung-wen

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a key role in the biological activity of numerous natural products. In many instances their biosynthesis requires radical mediated rearrangements, some of which are catalyzed by radical SAM enzymes. BtrN is one such enzyme responsible for the dehydrogenation of a secondary alcohol in the biosynthesis of 2-deoxystreptamine. DesII is another example that catalyzes a deamination reaction necessary for the net C4 deoxygenation of a glucose derivative en route to desosamine formation. BtrN and DesII represent the two most extensively characterized radical SAM enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis. In this review, we summarize the biosynthetic roles of these two enzymes, their mechanisms of catalysis, the questions that have arisen during these investigations and the insight they can offer for furthering our understanding of radical SAM enzymology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology. PMID:22172915

  10. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Bacillus subtilis on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiger, Lauren; Pasquale, Rose; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Bacillus subtilis is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic variants B. anthracis and B. cereus. Further as a study for bio-machine interfacing systems. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured B. subtilis were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 5 Log/ml B. subtilis solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  11. Surface adhesion and confinement variation of Staphylococcus aurius on SAM surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amroski, Alicia; Olsen, Morgan; Calabrese, Joseph; Senevirathne, Reshani; Senevirathne, Indrajith

    2012-02-01

    Controlled surface adhesion of non - pathogenic gram positive strain, Staphylococcus aureus is interesting as a model system due to possible development of respective biosensors for prevention and detection of the pathogenic strain methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and further as a study for bio-machine interfacing. Self Assembled Monolayers (SAM) with engineered surfaces of linear thiols on Au(111) were used as the substrate. Sub cultured S. aureus were used for the analysis. The SAM layered surfaces were dipped in 2 -- 4 Log/ml S. aureus solution. Subsequent surface adhesion at different bacterial dilutions on surfaces will be discussed, and correlated with quantitative and qualitative adhesion properties of bacteria on the engineered SAM surfaces. The bacteria adhered SAM surfaces were investigated using intermittent contact, noncontact, lateral force and contact modes of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM).

  12. Bringing a Chemical Laboratory Named Sam to Mars on the 2011 Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Bleacher, L.; Jones, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Manning, H. L.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Sam Team

    2010-12-01

    Introduction: An important goal of upcoming missions to Mars is to understand if life could have developed there. The task of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite of instruments [1] and the other Curiosity investigations [2] is to move us steadily toward that goal with an assessment of the habitability of our neighboring planet through a series of chemical and geological measurements. SAM is designed to search for organic compounds and inorganic volatiles and measure isotope ratios. Other instruments on Curiosity will provide elemental analysis and identify minerals. SAM will analyze both atmospheric samples and gases evolved from powdered rocks that may have formed billions of years ago with Curiosity providing access to interesting sites scouted by orbiting cameras and spectrometers. SAM Instrument Suite: SAM’s instruments are a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), a 6-column Gas Chromatograph (GC), and a 2-channel Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). SAM can identify organic compounds in Mars rocks to sub-ppb sensitivity and secure precise isotope ratios for C, H, and O in carbon dioxide and water and measure trace levels of methane and its carbon 13 isotope. The SAM gas processing system consists of valves, heaters, pressure sensors, gas scrubbers and getters, traps, and gas tanks used for calibration or combustion experiments [2]. A variety of calibrant compounds interior and exterior to SAM will allow the science and engineering teams to assess SAM’s performance. SAM has been calibrated and tested in a Mars-like environment. Keeping Educators and the Public Informed: The Education and Public Outreach (EPO) goals of the SAM team are to make this complex chemical laboratory and its data widely available to educators, students, and the public. Formal education activities include developing templates for professional development workshops for educators to teach them about SAM and Curiosity, incorporating data into Mars Student Data Teams, and writing articles

  13. Identification of trans-acting factors regulating SamDC expression in Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Supratim; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Sengupta, Dibyendu N.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Identification of cis elements responsible for SamDC expression by in silico analysis. • qPCR analysis of SamDC expression to abiotic and biotic stress treatments. • Detection of SamDC regulators using identified cis-elements as probe by EMSA. • Southwestern Blot analysis to predict the size of the trans-acting factors. - Abstract: Abiotic stress affects the growth and productivity of crop plants; to cope with the adverse environmental conditions, plants have developed efficient defense machinery comprising of antioxidants like phenolics and flavonoids, and osmolytes like polyamines. SamDC is a key enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In our present communication we have done in silico analysis of the promoter region of SamDC to look for the presence of different cis-regulatory elements contributing to its expression. Based on the presence of different cis-regulatory elements we completed comparative analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice lamina of IR-29 and Nonabokra by qPCR in response to the abiotic stress treatments of salinity, drought, cold and the biotic stress treatments of ABA and light. Additionally, to explore the role of the cis-regulatory elements in regulating the expression of SamDC gene in plants we comparatively analyzed the binding of rice nuclear proteins prepared from IR-29 and Nonabokra undergoing various stress treatments. The intensity of the complex formed was low and inducible in IR-29 in contrast to Nonabokra. Southwestern blot analysis helped in predicting the size of the trans-acting factors binding to these cis-elements. To our knowledge this is the first report on the comprehensive analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice and identification of the trans-acting factors regulating its expression.

  14. Nanoparticle-based solution deposition of gold films supporting bioresistant SAMs.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Byrska, Marta; Mahmud, Goher; Huda, Sabil; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2009-02-17

    Thin films of gold on glass are prepared by solution deposition of functionalized gold nanoparticles followed by thermal treatment. The processed films adhere strongly to glass without any adhesion layers and can be micropatterned/microetched without delamination from the substrate. The formation of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol) alkane thiols (EG SAMs) renders the films resistant to cell adhesion and allows for cell patterning. PMID:19170541

  15. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Leshin, L. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navvaro-Gonzales, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precise measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta(sup 13)C) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (deltaD) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx.550 C and above approx.550 C. The combustion experiment on SAM, if properly designed and executed, has the potential to answer multiple questions regarding the origins of volatiles seen thus far in SAM evolved gas analysis (EGA) on Mars. Constraints imposed by SAM and MSL time and power resources, as well as SAM consumables (oxygen gas), will limit the number of SAM combustion experiments, so it is imperative to design an experiment targeting the most pressing science questions. Low temperature combustion experiments will primarily target the quantification of carbon (and nitrogen) contributed by SAM wet chemistry reagants MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) and DMF (Dimethylformamide), which have been identified in the background of blank and sample runs and may adsorb to the sample while the cup is in the Sample Manipulation System (SMS). In addition, differences between the sample and "blank" may yield information regarding abundance and delta(sup 13)C of bulk (both organic and inorganic) martian carbon. High temperature combustion experiments primarily aim to detect refractory organic matter, if present in Cumberland fines, as well as address the question of quantification and deltaD value of water evolution associated with hydroxyl hydrogen in clay minerals.

  16. Genetic typing of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) strains with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xia, C; Higuchi, K; Shimizu, M; Matsushita, T; Kogishi, K; Wang, J; Chiba, T; Festing, M F; Hosokawa, M

    1999-03-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) strains constitute a murine model of accelerated senescence originating from the ancestral AKR/J strains and consist of nine senescence-prone (SAMP) strains and four senescence-resistant (SAMR) strains. The chromosomes (Chrs) of the SAM strains were typed with 581 microsatellite markers amplified by PCR, and the fundamental genetic information of the SAM strains was obtained. One-third of the examined markers displayed polymorphism among the strains, and only two alleles were detected in almost all loci among the SAM and AKR/J strains. However, in 12 loci (5.6% of total 215 polymorphic markers), the third allele was detected among the SAM strains. The genetic typing and developmental history suggested that the SAM strains were related inbred strains developed by the accidental crossing between the AKR/J strain and other unknown strain(s). Comparison of the distribution of the loci in the SAMP and the SAMR series revealed notable differences in the four regions on Chrs 4, 14, 16, and 17. This indicated that some of these chromosomal sites might contain the genes responsible for accelerated senescence in the SAMP series. PMID:10051317

  17. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM): a novel framework for cancer survivorship

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM). SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Methods Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Results Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate) or security. Conclusion SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. PMID:20565745

  18. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active sitemore » metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.« less

  19. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  20. Discrimination between closely related cellular metabolites by the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Montange, Rebecca K; Mondragón, Estefanía; van Tyne, Daria; Garst, Andrew D; Ceres, Pablo; Batey, Robert T

    2010-02-26

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-A X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA-ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-A improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH. PMID:20006621

  1. Discrimination between Closely Related Cellular Metabolites by the SAM-I Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Montange, R.; Mondragon, E; van Tyne, D; Garst, A; Ceres, P; Batey, R

    2010-01-01

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA-ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-{angstrom} improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH.

  2. Discrimination between Closely Related Cellular Metabolites by the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Montange, Rebecca K.; Mondragón, Estefanía; van Tyne, Daria; Garst, Andrew D.; Ceres, Pablo; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    The SAM-I riboswitch is a cis-acting element of genetic control found in bacterial mRNAs that specifically binds S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). We previously determined the 2.9-Å X-ray crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of this RNA element, revealing details of RNA–ligand recognition. To improve this structure, variations were made to the RNA sequence to alter lattice contacts, resulting in a 0.5-Å improvement in crystallographic resolution and allowing for a more accurate refinement of the crystallographic model. The basis for SAM specificity was addressed by a structural analysis of the RNA complexed to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) and sinefungin and by measuring the affinity of SAM and SAH for a series of mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data illustrate the importance of two universally conserved base pairs in the RNA that form electrostatic interactions with the positively charged sulfonium group of SAM, thereby providing a basis for discrimination between SAM and SAH. PMID:20006621

  3. Alternative function for the mitochondrial SAM complex in biogenesis of alpha-helical TOM proteins.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Diana; Guiard, Bernard; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-12-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains two preprotein translocases: the general translocase of outer membrane (TOM) and the beta-barrel-specific sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). TOM functions as the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded proteins. The channel-forming Tom40 is a beta-barrel protein, whereas all Tom receptors and small Tom proteins are membrane anchored by a transmembrane alpha-helical segment in their N- or C-terminal portion. Synthesis of Tom precursors takes place in the cytosol, and their import occurs via preexisting TOM complexes. The precursor of Tom40 is then transferred to SAM for membrane insertion and assembly. Unexpectedly, we find that the biogenesis of alpha-helical Tom proteins with a membrane anchor in the C-terminal portion is SAM dependent. Each SAM protein is necessary for efficient membrane integration of the receptor Tom22, whereas assembly of the small Tom proteins depends on Sam37. Thus, the substrate specificity of SAM is not restricted to beta-barrel proteins but also includes the majority of alpha-helical Tom proteins. PMID:18039934

  4. A Role for the GSG Domain in Localizing Sam68 to Novel Nuclear Structures in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Boisvert, François-Michel; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Richard, Stéphane

    1999-01-01

    The GSG (GRP33, Sam68, GLD-1) domain is a protein module found in an expanding family of RNA-binding proteins. The numerous missense mutations identified genetically in the GSG domain support its physiological role. Although the exact function of the GSG domain is not known, it has been shown to be required for RNA binding and oligomerization. Here it is shown that the Sam68 GSG domain plays a role in protein localization. We show that Sam68 concentrates into novel nuclear structures that are predominantly found in transformed cells. These Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) are distinct from coiled bodies, gems, and promyelocytic nuclear bodies. Electron microscopic studies show that SNBs are distinct structures that are enriched in phosphorus and nitrogen, indicating the presence of nucleic acids. A GFP-Sam68 fusion protein had a similar localization as endogenous Sam68 in HeLa cells, diffusely nuclear with two to five SNBs. Two other GSG proteins, the Sam68-like mammalian proteins SLM-1 and SLM-2, colocalized with endogenous Sam68 in SNBs. Different GSG domain missense mutations were investigated for Sam68 protein localization. Six separate classes of cellular patterns were obtained, including exclusive SNB localization and association with microtubules. These findings demonstrate that the GSG domain is involved in protein localization and define a new compartment for Sam68, SLM-1, and SLM-2 in cancer cell lines. PMID:10473643

  5. Characterization of the SAM domain of the PKD-related protein ANKS6 and its interaction with ANKS3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common genetic disorder leading to end-stage renal failure in humans. In the PKD/Mhm(cy/+) rat model of ADPKD, the point mutation R823W in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain of the protein ANKS6 is responsible for disease. SAM domains are known protein-protein interaction domains, capable of binding each other to form polymers and heterodimers. Despite its physiological importance, little is known about the function of ANKS6 and how the R823W point mutation leads to PKD. Recent work has revealed that ANKS6 interacts with a related protein called ANKS3. Both ANKS6 and ANKS3 have a similar domain structure, with ankyrin repeats at the N-terminus and a SAM domain at the C-terminus. Results The SAM domain of ANKS3 is identified as a direct binding partner of the ANKS6 SAM domain. We find that ANKS3-SAM polymerizes and ANKS6-SAM can bind to one end of the polymer. We present crystal structures of both the ANKS3-SAM polymer and the ANKS3-SAM/ANKS6-SAM complex, revealing the molecular details of their association. We also learn how the R823W mutation disrupts ANKS6 function by dramatically destabilizing the SAM domain such that the interaction with ANKS3-SAM is lost. Conclusions ANKS3 is a direct interacting partner of ANKS6. By structurally and biochemically characterizing the interaction between the ANKS3 and ANKS6 SAM domains, our work provides a basis for future investigation of how the interaction between these proteins mediates kidney function. PMID:24998259

  6. SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Phyllosilicate Minerals and Applications to SAM Analyses of the Sheepbed Mudstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, B.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming , D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Atreya, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    While in Yellowknife Bay, the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover collected two drilled samples, John Klein (hereafter "JK") and Cumberland ("CB"), from the Sheepbed mudstone, as well as a scooped sample from the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN"). These samples were sieved by Curiosity's sample processing system and then several subsamples of these materials were delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite and the CheMin X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument. CheMin provided the first in situ X-ray diffraction-based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., Fe-saponite) and comprise 20 wt% of the mudstone samples [1]. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry analyses of JK and CB subsamples, as well as RN subsamples, detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases evolved during pyrolysis. The identity of evolved gases and temperature( s) of evolution can augment mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or those phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here we will focus on the SAM H2O data, in the context of CheMin analyses, and comparisons to laboratory SAM-like analyses of several phyllosilicate minerals including smectites.

  7. Probing the nature and resistance of the molecule-electrode contact in SAM-based junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wan, Albert; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-07-01

    It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible.It is challenging to quantify the contact resistance and to determine the nature of the molecule-electrode contacts in molecular two-terminal junctions. Here we show that potentiodynamic and temperature dependent impedance measurements give insights into the nature of the SAM-electrode interface and other bottlenecks of charge transport (the capacitance of the SAM (CSAM) and the resistance of the SAM (RSAM)), unlike DC methods, independently of each other. We found that the resistance of the top-electrode-SAM contact for junctions with the form of AgTS-SCn//GaOx/EGaIn with n = 10, 12, 14, 16 or 18 is bias and temperature independent and hence Ohmic (non-rectifying) in nature, and is orders of magnitude smaller than RSAM. The CSAM and RSAM are independent of the temperature, indicating that the mechanism of charge transport in these SAM-based junctions is coherent tunneling and the charge carrier trapping at the interfaces is negligible. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedure, Nyquist

  8. Organosilane self-assembled layers (SAMs) and hybrid silicate magnesium-rich primers for the corrosion protection of aluminum alloy 2024 T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duhua

    Although current chromate coatings function very well in corrosion protection for aircraft alloys, such as aluminum alloy 2024 T3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is planning to totally ban the use of chromates as coating materials in the next decade or so because of their extremely toxic effect. For this purpose, both self-assembled layers and silicate magnesium-rich primers were tested to provide the corrosion protection for aluminum alloy. The long-term goal of this research is to develop a coating system to replace the current chromate coating for aircraft corrosion protection. Aluminum alloy 2024 T3 substrates were modified with self-assembled monolayer or multilayer thin films from different alkylsilane compounds. Mono-functional silanes, such as octadecyltrichlorosilane (C18SiCl3), can form a mixed hydrophobic monolayer or multilayer thin film on the aluminum oxide surface to provide a barrier to water and other electrolytes, so the corrosion resistance of the SAMs modified surface was increased significantly. On the other hand, the bi-functional silane self-assembly could attach the aluminum surface through the silicon headgroup while using its functional tailgroup to chemically bond the polymer coating, thus improving the adhesion between the aluminum substrate and coating substantially, and seems to contribute more to corrosion protection of aluminum substrate. Organosilanes were also combined with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in propel ratios to form a sol-gel binder to make silicate magnesium-rich primers. Analogue to the inorganic zinc-rich coatings, the silicate magnesium-rich primers also showed excellent adhesion and solvent resistance. The sacrificial magnesium pigments and the chemically inert silicate binder both contribute to the anti-corrosion properties. Future studies will be focused on the formula optimization for better toughness, chemical resistance and anticorrosion performance.

  9. Aluminide coatings

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  10. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  11. SAM Sample preparation and its impact on the detection of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Belmahdi, Imene; François, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; navarro, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Pinnick, Veronica; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The wet chemistry experiments on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] experiment in the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission supports extraction of polar organic compounds from solid samples that improves their detection either by increasing the release of chemical species from solid sample matrices, or by changing their chemical structure to make compounds more amenable to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The wet chemistry approach provides an alternative to the nominal inert-thermal desorption/pyrolysis analytical protocol used by SAM [1] that is more aptly suited for polar components. SAM, includes two different wet chemistry experiments: MTBSTFA derivatization [2-3] and TMAH thermochemolysis [4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA products in the SAM evolved gas analysis and GCMS experiments, and the implications of this detection. Solid sample were heated up to approximately 840°C at a rate of 35°C/min under He flow. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (Tenax®) over a specific temperature range. Adsorbed volatiles on the GC injection trap (IT) were then released into the GC column (CLP-MXT 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm) by rapidly heating the IT to 300°C. Then, in order better understand the part of compounds detected coming from internal reaction we have performed several lab experiments to mimic the SAM device. We have investigated the thermal degradation of Tenax®, and possible interaction with MTBSTFA and perchlorate in the SAM trap (Tenax®) to better constrain interpretations of SAM results on Mars. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Buch, A. et al. (2009) J chrom. A, 43, 143-151. [3] Stalport, F. et al. (2012) Planet. Space Sci. 67: 1-13 [4] Geffroy-Rodier, C. et al. (2009) JAAP, 85, 454-459. Acknowledgements: SAM-GC team acknowledges support from the French Space Agency

  12. Characterization of Weathering Degradation in Aircraft Polymeric Coatings Using NDE Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, V. A.; Hoffmann, J. P.; Johnson, J. A.

    2003-03-01

    This paper discusses the current progress in a study of nondestructive inspection methods for monitoring epoxy primer coating degradation under simulated weathering conditions. Characterization of the chemical changes in the coating will be conducted using attenuated total reflection (ATR) — Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and IR microscopy. The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods used to monitor the physical degradation of the polymeric coating include: white light interference microscopy (WLIM), nanoindentation, and scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The microscopic images obtained using the NDE methods will be correlated with the measured physical and chemical changes. Artificial weathering of the coated samples was conducted using simulated sunlight exposure (Xenon are lamps), combined with heat and humidity.

  13. Identification of trans-acting factors regulating SamDC expression in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Basu, Supratim; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2014-03-01

    Abiotic stress affects the growth and productivity of crop plants; to cope with the adverse environmental conditions, plants have developed efficient defense machinery comprising of antioxidants like phenolics and flavonoids, and osmolytes like polyamines. SamDC is a key enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway in plants. In our present communication we have done in silico analysis of the promoter region of SamDC to look for the presence of different cis-regulatory elements contributing to its expression. Based on the presence of different cis-regulatory elements we completed comparative analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice lamina of IR-29 and Nonabokra by qPCR in response to the abiotic stress treatments of salinity, drought, cold and the biotic stress treatments of ABA and light. Additionally, to explore the role of the cis-regulatory elements in regulating the expression of SamDC gene in plants we comparatively analyzed the binding of rice nuclear proteins prepared from IR-29 and Nonabokra undergoing various stress treatments. The intensity of the complex formed was low and inducible in IR-29 in contrast to Nonabokra. Southwestern blot analysis helped in predicting the size of the trans-acting factors binding to these cis-elements. To our knowledge this is the first report on the comprehensive analysis of SamDC gene expression in rice and identification of the trans-acting factors regulating its expression. PMID:24530223

  14. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a novel murine model of senescence.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T; Hosokawa, M; Higuchi, K

    1997-01-01

    The Senescence-Accelerated Mouse (SAM) has been under development by our research team at Kyoto University since 1970 through the selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson Laboratory in 1968, based on a graded score for senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotype. At present, there are 12 lines of SAM: nine senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) including SAMP1, SAMP2, SAMP3, SAMP6, SAMP7, SAMP8, SAMP9, SAMP10, and SAMP11; and three senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) including SAMR1, SAMR4, and SAMR5. Data from survival curves, Gompertzian function, and grading score of senescence, together with growth patterns of body weight of these SAMP and SAMR, revealed that the characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP mice is "accelerated senescence;" early onset and irreversible advance of senescence manifested by several signs and gross lesions such as the loss of normal behavior, various skin lesions, increased lordokyphosis, etc., after a period of normal development. In the course of SAM development, it became evident that SAMP strains manifest various pathologic phenotypes that are characteristic enough to differentiate the SAM strains. The genetic background and significance of SAM development are discussed. PMID:9088907

  15. Carbon–sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon–sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5‧-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate.

  16. SAM-FS: LSC's New Solaris-Based Storage Management Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, Kent

    1996-01-01

    SAM-FS is a full featured hierarchical storage management (HSM) device that operates as a file system on Solaris-based machines. The SAM-FS file system provides the user with all of the standard UNIX system utilities and calls, and adds some new commands, i.e. archive, release, stage, sls, sfind, and a family of maintenance commands. The system also offers enhancements such as high performance virtual disk read and write, control of the disk through an extent array, and the ability to dynamically allocate block size. SAM-FS provides 'archive sets' which are groupings of data to be copied to secondary storage. In practice, as soon as a file is written to disk, SAM-FS will make copies onto secondary media. SAM-FS is a scalable storage management system. The system can manage millions of files per system, though this is limited today by the speed of UNIX and its utilities. In the future, a new search algorithm will be implemented that will remove logical and performance restrictions on the number of files managed.

  17. Characterization of a S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-accumulating strain of Scheffersomyces stipitis.

    PubMed

    Križanović, Stela; Butorac, Ana; Mrvčić, Jasna; Krpan, Maja; Cindrić, Mario; Bačun-Družina, Višnja; Stanzer, Damir

    2015-06-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) is an important molecule in the cellular metabolism of mammals. In this study, we examined several of the physiological characteristics of a SAM-accumulating strain of the yeast Scheffersomyces stipitis (M12), including SAM production, ergosterol content, and ethanol tolerance. S. stipitis M12 accumulated up to 52.48 mg SAM/g dry cell weight. Proteome analyses showed that the disruption of C-24 methylation in ergosterol biosynthesis, a step mediated by C-24 sterol methyltransferase (Erg6p), results in greater SAM accumulation by S. stipitis M12 compared to the wild-type strain. A comparative proteome-wide analysis identified 25 proteins that were differentially expressed by S. stipitis M12. These proteins are involved in ribosome biogenesis, translation, the stress response, ubiquitin-dependent catabolic processes, the cell cycle, ethanol tolerance, posttranslational modification, peroxisomal membrane stability, epigenetic regulation, the actin cytoskeleton and cell morphology, iron and copper homeostasis, cell signaling, and energy metabolism. PMID:26496619

  18. Oxygen Attachment on Alkanethiolate SAMs Induced by Low-Energy Electron Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Sylvain; Bass, Andrew D.; Steffenhagen, Marie; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of 18O2 with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of 1-dodecanethiol, 1-octadecanethiol, 1-butanethiol, and benzyl mercaptan chemisorbed on gold, were studied by the electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anionic fragments over the incident electron energy range 2–20 eV. Dosing the SAMs with 18O2 at 50 K, results in the ESD of 18O− and 18OH−. Electron irradiation of samples prior to 18O2 deposition demonstrates that intensity of subsequent 18O− and 18OH− desorption signals increase with electron fluence and that absent electron pre-irradiation, no 18O− and 18OH− ESD signals are observed, since oxygen is unable to bind to the SAMs. A minimum incident electron energy of 6–7 eV is required to initiate the binding of 18O2 to the SAMs. O2 binding is proposed to proceed by the formation of CHx−1• radicals via resonant dissociative electron attachment and non-resonant C–H dissociation processes. The weaker signals of 18O− and 18OH− from short-chain SAMs are related to the latter’s resistance to electron induced damage, due to the charge-image dipole quenching and electron delocalization. Comparison between the present results and those for DNA oligonucleotides self-assembled on Au [Mirsaleh-Kohan, N. et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 235104] indicates that the oxygen binding mechanism is common to both systems. PMID:23537075

  19. Application of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) model to dithiophosphate and dithiocarbamate engine wear inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Jiang, S.; Cagin, T.; Yamaguchi, E.S.; Frazier, R.; Ho, A.; Tang, Y.; Goddard, W.A. III

    2000-03-23

    In previous studies of dithiophosphate [TP=S{sub 2}P(OR){sub 2}] wear inhibitors bound to an oxidized iron surface, it was found that the cohesive energy of the self-assembled monolayers (SAM) for DTP molecules with various organic R groups correlate with the wear inhibition observed in full engine experiments. In this paper the calculations are expanded to consider dynamics at 500 K and the SAM model is used to predict new candidates for wear inhibitors. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that the SAM has one DTP per two surface Fe sites of iron oxide. At this coverage the cohesive energy of the SAM at 500 K is in the sequence 2-alkyl > 1-alkyl > aryl, which again correlates with wear inhibitor performance in engine wear tests. Dithiocarbamates are selected as the best candidate to supplement DTP.A number of possible alkyl substitutions for DTC were considered. The SAM model suggests that iC{sub 5} and nC{sub 3} are the best candidates, followed closely by iC{sub 3}.

  20. Carbon-sulfur bond-forming reaction catalysed by the radical SAM enzyme HydE.

    PubMed

    Rohac, Roman; Amara, Patricia; Benjdia, Alhosna; Martin, Lydie; Ruffié, Pauline; Favier, Adrien; Berteau, Olivier; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Nicolet, Yvain

    2016-05-01

    Carbon-sulfur bond formation at aliphatic positions is a challenging reaction that is performed efficiently by radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Here we report that 1,3-thiazolidines can act as ligands and substrates for the radical SAM enzyme HydE, which is involved in the assembly of the active site of [FeFe]-hydrogenase. Using X-ray crystallography, in vitro assays and NMR spectroscopy we identified a radical-based reaction mechanism that is best described as the formation of a C-centred radical that concomitantly attacks the sulfur atom of a thioether. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a radical SAM enzyme that reacts directly on a sulfur atom instead of abstracting a hydrogen atom. Using theoretical calculations based on our high-resolution structures we followed the evolution of the electronic structure from SAM through to the formation of S-adenosyl-L-cysteine. Our results suggest that, at least in this case, the widely proposed and highly reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical species that triggers the reaction in radical SAM enzymes is not an isolable intermediate. PMID:27102684

  1. XPS and ToF-SIMS Investigation of α-Helical and β-Strand Peptide Adsorption onto SAMs

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Julia S.; Collier, Galen; Latour, Robert A.; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.

    2009-01-01

    14-mer α-helix and a 15-mer β-strand oligopeptides composed of leucine (L) and lysine (K) were used to investigate peptide adsorption and orientation onto well-defined methyl and carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). XPS showed both peptides reached monolayer thickness on both SAMs, but significantly higher solution concentrations were required to reach this coverage on the methyl SAMs. This shows that the peptides adsorb more strongly onto the carboxyl-terminated SAMs. The excess oxygen detected by XPS and the H3O+ signal detected by ToF-SIMS for the SAMs with adsorbed peptides indicated that water molecules are associated with the adsorbed peptides, even under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Changes in the amount of L and K fragments detected by ToF-SIMS indicate the β-strand oriented differently on the two SAMs. The L side-chains were preferentially associated with the methyl-terminated SAM and the K side-chains were preferentially associated with the carboxyl SAM. In contrast, little change in the ToF-SIMS K/L ratio was observed for the α-helix peptide absorbed on the two SAMs, indicating ToF-SIMS was not as sensitive to orientation of the α-helix peptide. PMID:19891457

  2. Antibody binding to p-Si using LANL SAM chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Aaron S

    2010-12-06

    This NMSBA-sponsored project involves the attachment of antibodies to polymeric silicon (p-Si) surfaces, with the ultimate goal of attaching antibodies to nanowires for Vista Therapeutics, Inc. (Santa Fe, NM). This presentation describes the functionalization of p-Si surfaces. the activation of terminal carboxylates on these surfaces, the conjugation of antibodies, and the analyses undertaken at each step. The results of this work show that antibody conjugation is possible on p-Si coatings using the well-known EDC/NHS activation chemistry.

  3. Nonlinear optical studies of self-assembled monolayers (SAM) silica-SAM-water interface probed with second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth Edward

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is a successful and widely used technique for the study of surfaces and surface phenomena. We present a novel technique using second harmonic generation from oriented water molecules in the Gouy-Chapman diffuse layer at the alkylsiloxane and biomolecular self assembled monolayer (SAM) interface with water to measure distance between the solid surface and the average location of the oriented water in the diffuse layer. This distance is manifest in the SHG angular dependence profile from the relative phases of the second harmonic light generated at the diffuse layer and at the solid surface. Distances of one nanometer can be distinguished. Values for the diffuse layer potential, diffuse layer decay length, magnitude and phase of the nonlinear susceptibility were obtained. This in situ probe is universally applicable for organic adsorbates which in general will push the diffuse layer away from the solid surface. The organic layer thickness can be used to obtain the adsorption fraction. From this and an understanding of the likely chemistry, the orientation of the molecules can be inferred. We have demonstrated this technique on three molecular systems: hydrophobic self assembled monolayers of methoxysilane molecules of varying hydrocarbon chain length, self assembled monolayers of streptavidin glycoproteins and the combined streptavidin-biotinylated antibody monolayer. In the methoxysilane monolayers a relationship between hydrophobicity and molecular orientation was observed. The thickness of the streptavidin monolayer was determined to be 5.6 nm. This is strikingly close to the length of the of the streptavidin molecule which implies a close packed monolayer of streptavidin molecules. The average height of the antibodies was determined to be 10.9 nm or about two thirds the height of an antibody molecule. This too confirms a monolayer and allows for good approximation of surface coverage. This method does nothing to disturb or alter

  4. A Bifunctional Thioether Linked Coumarin Appended Calix[4]arene Acquires Selectivity Toward Cu(2+) Sensing on Going from Solution to SAM on Gold.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Kushal; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2016-02-10

    A bifunctional calix[4]arene molecule bearing coumarin moiety on the lower rim and thioether moiety on the upper rim (L1), has been synthesized and well characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR and mass spectrometry. Suitably functionalized coumarin moieties are well suited for selective recognition of various cations and anions. Among the 10 different metal ions studied, only Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) exhibit appreciable changes in the absorption spectra owing to the availability of functional moieties present at both the lower as well as the upper rim of free L1 in acetonitrile solution. To bring better selectivity, we blocked one of these functional moieties by coating on to a surface so that only the other one is exposed to the environment for sensing. Such a study carried out in the present case using the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of L1 on Au(111) resulted in selective sensing of Cu(2+) over several other metal ions as studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The SAM of L1 on Au(111) was confirmed by different techniques, such as grazing incidence FT-IR, contact angle measurement, cyclic voltammetry and scanning tunneling microscopy. Thus, L1 is proven to be a suitable sensor for Cu(2+) when attached to gold surface. PMID:26771103

  5. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a biogerontological resource in aging research.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1999-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM), consisting of 14 senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) and 4 senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) has been under development since 1970 through the selective inbreeding of AKR/J strain mice donated by the Jackson laboratory in 1968, based on the data of the grading score of senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotypes. The characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP and SAMR mice is accelerated senescence and normal aging, respectively. Furthermore, SAMP and SAMR strains manifest various pathobiological phenotypes which include such neurobiological phenotypes as deficits in learning and memory, emotional disorders, abnormal circadian rhythms, brain atrophy, hearing impairment, etc., and are often characteristic enough to differentiate the strains. Various efforts are currently being made using the SAM model to clarify the underlying mechanisms in accelerated senescence as well as the etiopathogenic mechanisms in age-associated pathobiologies. Genetic background and significance of SAM development are discussed. PMID:10537019

  6. Distributed processing and analysis of physics data in the D0 SAM system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Igor V. Terekhov

    2001-08-30

    SAM (Sequential Access through Meta-data) is the data access system for the D0 high energy physics (HEP) experiment at Fermilab. The system is being developed and used to handle the Petabyte-scale experiment data. The D0 applications, like virtually all HEP applications, are data-intensive, which poses special problems for the data management and job control facilities in the distributed environment. The fundamental problem is to bring the user applications and the data together, and SAM attacks the problems from both sides. First, we describe how the system moves the data through the distributed disk cache. Second, we describe how SAM interacts with the batch system to synchronize parallel user jobs with the data availability. All the design solutions herein have been implemented in a real system that handles the mission-critical data of the D0 experiment; thus, we present our work from the standpoint of real experience.

  7. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  8. The crystal structure of a novel SAM-dependent methyltransferase PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Xu, X.; Pavlova, M.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Savchenko, A.; Christendat, D.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Toronto; Univ. Health Network

    2005-01-01

    The S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases represent a diverse and biologically important class of enzymes. These enzymes utilize the ubiquitous methyl donor SAM as a cofactor to methylate proteins, small molecules, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here we present the crystal structure of PH1915 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a predicted SAM-dependent methyltransferase. This protein belongs to the Cluster of Orthologous Group 1092, and the presented crystal structure is the first representative structure of this protein family. Based on sequence and 3D structure analysis, we have made valuable functional insights that will facilitate further studies for characterizing this group of proteins. Specifically, we propose that PH1915 and its orthologs are rRNA- or tRNA-specific methyltransferases.

  9. SPASM and Twitch Domains in S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) Radical Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Grell, Tsehai A. J.; Goldman, Peter J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM, also known as AdoMet) radical enzymes use SAM and a [4Fe-4S] cluster to catalyze a diverse array of reactions. They adopt a partial triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold with N- and C-terminal extensions that tailor the structure of the enzyme to its specific function. One extension, termed a SPASM domain, binds two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters and is present within peptide-modifying enzymes. The first structure of a SPASM-containing enzyme, anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), revealed unexpected similarities to two non-SPASM proteins, butirosin biosynthetic enzyme 2-deoxy-scyllo-inosamine dehydrogenase (BtrN) and molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic enzyme (MoaA). The latter two enzymes bind one auxiliary cluster and exhibit a partial SPASM motif, coined a Twitch domain. Here we review the structure and function of auxiliary cluster domains within the SAM radical enzyme superfamily. PMID:25477505

  10. The survey of autobiographical memory (SAM): a novel measure of trait mnemonics in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Daniela J; Williams, Lynne J; Abdi, Hervé; Levine, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Compared to the abundance of laboratory-based memory tasks, few measures exist to assess self-reported memory function. This need is particularly important for naturalistic mnemonic capacities, such as autobiographical memory (recall of events and facts from one's past), because it is difficult to reliably assess in the laboratory. Furthermore, naturalistic mnemonic capacities may show stable individual differences that evade the constraints of laboratory testing. The Survey of Autobiographical Memory (SAM) was designed to assess such trait mnemonics, or the dimensional characterization of self-reported mnemonic characteristics. The SAM comprises items assessing self-reported episodic autobiographical, semantic, and spatial memory, as well as future prospection. In a large sample of healthy young adults, the latent dimensional structure of the SAM was characterized with multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). This analysis revealed dimensions corresponding to general mnemonic abilities (i.e., good vs poor memory across subtypes), spatial memory, and future prospection. While episodic and semantic items did not separate in this data-driven analysis, these categories did show expected dissociations in relation to depression history and to laboratory-based measures of recollection. Remote spatial memory as assessed by the SAM showed the expected advantage for males over females. Spatial memory was also related to autobiographical memory performance. Brief versions of the SAM are provided for efficient research applications. Individual differences in memory function are likely related to other health-related factors, including personality, psychopathology, dementia risk, brain structure and function, and genotype. In conjunction with laboratory or performance based assessments, the SAM can provide a useful measure of naturalistic self-report trait mnemonics for probing these relationships. PMID:23063319

  11. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOνA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-01

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this paper we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  12. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOvA experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-23

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we havemore » adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this study we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.« less

  13. Searching for Reduced Carbon on the Surface of Mars: The SAM Combustion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Webster, C. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brunner, A. E.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; Graham, H. V.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.; Trainer, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The search for reduced carbon has been a major focus of past and present missions to Mars. Thermal evolved gas analysis was used by the Viking and Phoenix landers and is currently in use by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) to characterize volatiles evolved from solid samples, including those associated with reduced organic species. SAM has the additional capability to perform a combustion experiment, in which a sample of Mars regolith is heated in the presence of oxygen and the composition of the evolved gases is measured using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS) [1]. Organics detection on the Martian surface has been complicated by oxidation and destruction during heating by soil oxidants [2], including oxychlorine compounds, and terrestrial organics in the SAM background contributed by one of the SAM wet chemistry reagents MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tertbutyldimethylsilyl- trifluoroacetamide) [3,4]. Thermal Evolved Gas Analysis (TEGA) results from Phoenix show a mid temperature CO2 release between 400 C - 680 C speculated to be carbonate, CO2 adsorbed to grains, or combustion of organics by soil oxidants [5]. Low temperature CO2 evolutions (approx. 200 C - 400 C) were also present at all three sites in Gale Crater where SAM Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) was performed, and potential sources include combustion of terrestrial organics from SAM, as well as combustion and/or decarboxylation either indigenous martian or exogenous organic carbon [4,6]. By performing an experiment to intentionally combust all reduced materials in the sample, we hope to compare the bulk abundance of CO2 and other oxidized species evolved by combustion to that evolved during an EGA experiment to estimate how much CO2 could be contributed by reduced carbon sources. In addition, C, O, and H isotopic compositions of CO2 and H2O measured by TLS can contribute information regarding the potential sources of these

  14. Sam68 modulates apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells via mediating NF-κB activation in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ji; Zhao, Weijuan; Miao, Xianjing; Li, Liren; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-07-01

    Sam68 (Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 KDa), also known as KHDRBS1 (KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1), belongs to the prototypic member of the signal transduction activator of RNA (STAR) family of RNA-binding proteins. Sam68 is implicated in various cellular processes including RNA metabolism, apoptosis, signal transduction. Previous researches demonstrated that Sam68 regulated nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) to induce inflammation. However, the expression and biological functions of Sam68 in ulcerative colitis (UC) are not clear. In this study, we reported for the first time that Sam68 was up-regulated in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of patients with UC. In DSS-induced mouse colitis model, we observed the overexpression of Sam68 accompanied with increased levels of IEC apoptotic markers (active caspase-3 and cleaved PARP) and NF-κB activation indicators (p-p65 and p-IκB) in colitis IECs. Co-localization of Sam68 with active caspase-3 (and p-p65) in IECs of the DSS-induced colitis group further indicated the possible involvement of NF-κB-mediated IEC apoptosis. Applying TNF-α-treated HT-29 cells as an in vitro IEC inflammation model, we confirmed the positive correlation amomg Sam68, NF-κB activation and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation assay identified nuclear translocation and physical interaction of Sam68 and NF-κB subunits in TNF-α-treated HT-29 cells. Besides, depletion of Sam68 by RNA interference greatly alleviated NF-κB activation and apoptosis in TNF-α-treated HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results indicated that Sam68 modulates apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells via mediating NF-κB activation in UC. PMID:27235792

  15. The Combustion Experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Malespin, C. A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Graham, H. V.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Fuentes, J.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Steele, A.

    2014-01-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure composition of the evolved gases using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometry (TLS). QMS will enable detection of combustion products such as CO, CO2, NO, and other oxidized species, while TLS will enable precision measurements of the abundance and carbon isotopic composition (delta C-13) of the evolved CO2 and hydrogen isotopic composition (delta D) of H2O. SAM will perform a two-step combustion to isolate combustible materials below approx. 550 C and above approx. 550 C.

  16. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL).

    PubMed

    Li, Lei

    2012-11-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores' extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the CS bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5'-deoxyadenosyl (5'-dA) radical. This 5'-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in Bacillus subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5'-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. This article is part of a Special Issue

  17. Unsupervised classification of Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) data using ART2-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. D.; Sinha, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) has been developed by NASA to monitor the microgravity acceleration environment aboard the space shuttle. The amount of data collected by a SAMS unit during a shuttle mission is in the several gigabytes range. Adaptive Resonance Theory 2-A (ART2-A), an unsupervised neural network, has been used to cluster these data and to develop cause and effect relationships among disturbances and the acceleration environment. Using input patterns formed on the basis of power spectral densities (psd), data collected from two missions, STS-050 and STS-057, have been clustered.

  18. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate on self- assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Graff, G.L.; Fryxell, G.E.; Rieke, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A physical chemical approach was used to study calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleation and growth on various organic interfaces. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs), containing derivatized organic functional groups, were designed to mimic various amino acid residues present in both urine and stone matrix macromolecules. Derivatized surfaces include SAMs with terminal methyl, bromo, imidazole, and thiazolidine-carboxylic acid functional groups. Pronounced differences in COM deposition were observed for the various interfaces with the imidazole and thiazolidine surfaces having the greatest effect and the methyl and bromo groups having little or no nucleating potential.

  19. Distributed data access and resource management in the D0 SAM system

    SciTech Connect

    Igor V Terekhov; Ruth Pordes; Victoria White et al.

    2001-06-26

    SAM (Sequential Access through Meta-data) is the data access and job management system for the D0 high energy physics experiment at Fermilab. The SAM system is being developed and used to handle the Petabyte-scale experiment data, accessed by hundreds of D0 collaborators scattered around the world. In this paper, we present solutions to some of the distributed data processing problems from the perspective of real experience dealing with mission-critical data. We concentrate on the distributed disk caching, resource management and job control. The system has elements of the Grid Computing and has features applicable to data-intensive computing in general.

  20. Mineral classification map using MF and SAM techniques: A case study in the Nohwa Island, Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Sun; Yoon, Wang-Jung

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this study is to map pyprophyllite distribution at surface of the Nohwa deposit, Korea by using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) data. For this, combined Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), and Matched Filtering (MF) technique based on mathematical algorithm was applied. The regional distribution of high-grade and low-grade pyrophyllite in the Nohwa deposit area could be differentiated by this method. The results of this study show that ASTER data analysis using combination of SAM and MF techniques will assist in exploration of pyrophyllite at the exposed surface.

  1. Refined NMR structure of a heterodimeric SAM:SAM complex. Characterization and manipulation of the EhpA2 interface leads to discovery of new cellular functions of SHIP2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H. J.; Hota, P. K.; Chugha, P.; Guo, H.; Miao, H.; Zhang, L.; Kim, S. J.; Stetzig, L.

    2012-01-01

    The sterile alpha motif (SAM) for protein-protein interactions is encountered in over 200 proteins, but the structural bases for its interactions is just becoming clear. Here we solved the structure of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM:SAM heterodimeric complex by use of NMR restraints from chemical shift perturbations, NOE and RDC experiments. Specific contacts between the protein surfaces differ significantly from a previous model and from other SAM:SAM complexes. Molecular dynamics and docking simulations indicate fluctuations in the complex towards alternate, higher energy conformations. The interface suggests that EphA family members bind to SHIP2 SAM whereas EphB members may not; correspondingly we demonstrate binding of EphA1 but not of EphB2 to SHIP2 SAM. A variant of EphB2 SAM was designed that binds SHIP2. Functional characterization of a mutant EphA2 compromised in SHIP2 binding reveals two previously unrecognized functions of SHIP2 in suppressing ligand-induced activation of EphA2 and in promoting chemotactic cell migration in coordination with the receptor. PMID:22244754

  2. Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A black chrome coating, originally developed for spacecraft solar cells, led to the development of an efficient flat plate solar collector. The coating, called Chromonyx, helps the collector absorb more heat. Olympic Solar Corporation was formed to electroplate the collector. The coating technique allows 95% of the sun's energy to be utilized. The process is widely used.

  3. Thioether bond formation by SPASM domain radical SAM enzymes: Cα H-atom abstraction in subtilosin A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Lefranc, Benjamin; Vaudry, Hubert; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    AlbA is a radical SAM enzyme catalyzing the formation of three unusual thioether bonds in the antibiotic subtilosin A. We demonstrate here that AlbA catalyzes direct Cα H-atom abstraction and likely contains three essential [4Fe-4S] centers. This leads us to propose novel mechanistic perspectives for thioether bond catalysis by radical SAM enzymes. PMID:27087315

  4. Organic chemistry on surfaces: Direct cyclopropanation by dihalocarbene addition to vinyl terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs).

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, Malgorzata; O'Hagan, David; Hähner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    C11-Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silica surfaces are successfully modified in C-C bond forming reactions with dihalocarbenes to generate SAMs, terminated with dihalo- (fluoro, chloro, bromo) cyclopropane motifs with about 30% surface coverage. PMID:25550756

  5. Organic chemistry on surfaces: Direct cyclopropanation by dihalocarbene addition to vinyl terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    PubMed Central

    Adamkiewicz, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Summary C11-Vinyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silica surfaces are successfully modified in C–C bond forming reactions with dihalocarbenes to generate SAMs, terminated with dihalo- (fluoro, chloro, bromo) cyclopropane motifs with about 30% surface coverage. PMID:25550756

  6. Analysis of the interactions between host factor Sam68 and viral elements during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear protein Src-associated protein of 68 kDa in mitosis (Sam68) is known to bind RNA and be involved in cellular processes triggered in response to environmental stresses, including virus infection. Interestingly, Sam68, is a multi-functional protein implicated in the life cycle of retroviru...

  7. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  8. Mechanistic Diversity of Radical S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent Methylation*

    PubMed Central

    Bauerle, Matthew R.; Schwalm, Erica L.; Booker, Squire J.

    2015-01-01

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use the oxidizing power of a 5′-deoxyadenosyl 5′-radical to initiate an amazing array of transformations, usually through the abstraction of a target substrate hydrogen atom. A common reaction of radical SAM (RS) enzymes is the methylation of unactivated carbon or phosphorous atoms found in numerous primary and secondary metabolites, as well as in proteins, sugars, lipids, and RNA. However, neither the chemical mechanisms by which these unactivated atoms obtain methyl groups nor the actual methyl donors are conserved. In fact, RS methylases have been grouped into three classes based on protein architecture, cofactor requirement, and predicted mechanism of catalysis. Class A methylases use two cysteine residues to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers. Class B methylases require a cobalamin cofactor to methylate both sp2-hybridized and sp3-hybridized carbon centers as well as phosphinate phosphorous atoms. Class C methylases share significant sequence homology with the RS enzyme, HemN, and may bind two SAM molecules simultaneously to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers. Lastly, we describe a new class of recently discovered RS methylases. These Class D methylases, unlike Class A, B, and C enzymes, which use SAM as the source of the donated methyl carbon, are proposed to methylate sp2-hybridized carbon centers using methylenetetrahydrofolate as the source of the appended methyl carbon. PMID:25477520

  9. Mechanistic diversity of radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methylation.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, Matthew R; Schwalm, Erica L; Booker, Squire J

    2015-02-13

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use the oxidizing power of a 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical to initiate an amazing array of transformations, usually through the abstraction of a target substrate hydrogen atom. A common reaction of radical SAM (RS) enzymes is the methylation of unactivated carbon or phosphorous atoms found in numerous primary and secondary metabolites, as well as in proteins, sugars, lipids, and RNA. However, neither the chemical mechanisms by which these unactivated atoms obtain methyl groups nor the actual methyl donors are conserved. In fact, RS methylases have been grouped into three classes based on protein architecture, cofactor requirement, and predicted mechanism of catalysis. Class A methylases use two cysteine residues to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers. Class B methylases require a cobalamin cofactor to methylate both sp(2)-hybridized and sp(3)-hybridized carbon centers as well as phosphinate phosphorous atoms. Class C methylases share significant sequence homology with the RS enzyme, HemN, and may bind two SAM molecules simultaneously to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers. Lastly, we describe a new class of recently discovered RS methylases. These Class D methylases, unlike Class A, B, and C enzymes, which use SAM as the source of the donated methyl carbon, are proposed to methylate sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers using methylenetetrahydrofolate as the source of the appended methyl carbon. PMID:25477520

  10. A Normalizing Approach to Cognitive Therapy for Intrusive Obsessional and Psychotic Phenomena: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Anthony P.

    2005-01-01

    The case of Sam is conceptualized using a normalizing cognitive approach, which assumes that the cultural acceptability of his appraisals distinguishes them as psychotic. The treatment approach that is based upon such a case formulation involves the evaluation of such distressing appraisals and the generation of alternative explanations.…

  11. [Anti-aging studies on the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) strains].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryoya

    2010-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse (SAM), a murine model of accelerated senescence, was established by Toshio Takeda and colleagues. SAM consists of series of SAMP (prone) and SAMR (resistant) lines. All SAMP lines (from SAMP1 to SAMP11) are characterized by accelerated accumulation of senile features, earlier onset and faster progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes, such as amyloidosis, impaired immune response, senile osteoporosis and deficits in learning and memory. These SAMP lines are useful for evaluation of putative anti-aging therapies. For example, SAMP1 line is used to study the anti-aging effect of the antioxidant containing foods and various anti-oxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, vitamin C, lycopene. SAMP8 line exhibiting an early onset of impaired learning and memory is often used for test strategies for therapeutic intervention of dementia of early onset. SAMP6 is used as an animal model for developing new strategies for the treatment of osteoporosis in humans. Various lines of SAM (P1, P6, P8, P10 and R1) are now commercially available for research. In this review, I will briefly introduce various usages of SAM in anti-aging research. PMID:20046059

  12. Treating Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Schizophrenia: The Case of Sam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peasley-Miklus, Catherine; Massie, Elise; Baslett, Gaston; Carmin, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the case of Sam, a 22-year-old male with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia. The patient's background, the development and characteristics of his OCD and schizophrenia, and the history of what became a rather complicated treatment are described. In addition, four problem areas of therapy are identified.

  13. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  14. Construct Validation of the Louisiana School Analysis Model (SAM) Instructional Staff Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray-Clark, Nikki; Bates, Reid

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Louisiana SAM Instructional Staff Questionnaire, a key component of the Louisiana School Analysis Model. The model was designed as a comprehensive evaluation tool for schools. Principle axis factoring with oblique rotation was used to uncover the underlying structure of the SISQ. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. 19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  16. 75 FR 4579 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Tugboat MR SAM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Tugboat MR SAM AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard announces that a Certificate of Alternative Compliance was... of Alternative Compliance was issued on December 11, 2009. ADDRESSES: The docket for this notice...

  17. A novel function for Sam68: Enhancement of HIV-1 RNA 3′ end processing

    PubMed Central

    MCLAREN, MEREDITH; ASAI, KENGO; COCHRANE, ALAN

    2004-01-01

    Both cis elements and host cell proteins can significantly affect HIV-1 RNA processing and viral gene expression. Previously, we determined that the exon splicing silencer (ESS3) within the terminal exon of HIV-1 not only reduces use of the adjacent 3′ splice site but also prevents Rev-induced export of the unspliced viral RNA to the cytoplasm. In this report, we demonstrate that loss of unspliced viral RNA export is correlated with the inhibition of 3′ end processing by the ESS3. Furthermore, we find that the host factor Sam68, a stimulator of HIV-1 protein expression, is able to reverse the block to viral RNA export mediated by the ESS3. The reversal is associated with a stimulation of 3′ end processing of the unspliced viral RNA. Our findings identify a novel activity for the ESS3 and Sam68 in regulating HIV-1 RNA polyadenylation. Furthermore, the observations provide an explanation for how Sam68, an exclusively nuclear protein, modulates cytoplasmic utilization of the affected RNAs. Our finding that Sam68 is also able to enhance 3′ end processing of a heterologous RNA raises the possibility that it may play a similar role in regulating host gene expression. PMID:15208447

  18. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 1: The Evolution of the SAM Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  19. 14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) TURN-SPAN AND LOCKING MECHANISM - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  20. 17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  1. 12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) SOUTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  2. 15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) PIVOT PIER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  3. 16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF TURN-SPAN MECHANISM. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  4. 13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. (4'X5' image enlarged from 2 1/4' negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) NORTH SIDE ELEVATION. - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  5. Halomethane production in plants: Structure of the biosynthetic SAM-dependent halide methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana**

    PubMed Central

    Schmidberger, Jason W.; James, Agata B.; Edwards, Robert; Naismith, James H.; O’Hagan, David

    2012-01-01

    A product structure of the halomethane producing enzyme in plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) is reported and a model for presentation of chloride/bromide ion to the methyl group of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) is presented to rationalise nucleophilic halide attack for halomethane production, gaseous natural products that are produced globally. PMID:20376845

  6. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  7. SamACO: variable sampling ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous optimization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Jun; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung; Li, Yun; Liu, Ou

    2010-12-01

    An ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm offers algorithmic techniques for optimization by simulating the foraging behavior of a group of ants to perform incremental solution constructions and to realize a pheromone laying-and-following mechanism. Although ACO is first designed for solving discrete (combinatorial) optimization problems, the ACO procedure is also applicable to continuous optimization. This paper presents a new way of extending ACO to solving continuous optimization problems by focusing on continuous variable sampling as a key to transforming ACO from discrete optimization to continuous optimization. The proposed SamACO algorithm consists of three major steps, i.e., the generation of candidate variable values for selection, the ants' solution construction, and the pheromone update process. The distinct characteristics of SamACO are the cooperation of a novel sampling method for discretizing the continuous search space and an efficient incremental solution construction method based on the sampled values. The performance of SamACO is tested using continuous numerical functions with unimodal and multimodal features. Compared with some state-of-the-art algorithms, including traditional ant-based algorithms and representative computational intelligence algorithms for continuous optimization, the performance of SamACO is seen competitive and promising. PMID:20371409

  8. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  9. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  10. SAM68 is a physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Vittoria; Pelosi, Laura; Bustamante, Maria Blaire; Nobili, Annalisa; Berardinelli, Maria Grazia; D’Amelio, Marcello; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by loss of motor neurons in patients with null mutations in the SMN1 gene. The almost identical SMN2 gene is unable to compensate for this deficiency because of the skipping of exon 7 during pre–messenger RNA (mRNA) processing. Although several splicing factors can modulate SMN2 splicing in vitro, the physiological regulators of this disease-causing event are unknown. We found that knockout of the splicing factor SAM68 partially rescued body weight and viability of SMAΔ7 mice. Ablation of SAM68 function promoted SMN2 splicing and expression in SMAΔ7 mice, correlating with amelioration of SMA-related defects in motor neurons and skeletal muscles. Mechanistically, SAM68 binds to SMN2 pre-mRNA, favoring recruitment of the splicing repressor hnRNP A1 and interfering with that of U2AF65 at the 3′ splice site of exon 7. These findings identify SAM68 as the first physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in an SMA mouse model. PMID:26438828

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THE PRECISION AND ACCURACY OF SAM AND MFC MICROCOSMS EXPOSED TO TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of 30 mixed flank culture (MFC) and four standardized aquatic microcosm (SAM) microcosm experiments were used to describe the precision and accuracy of these two protocols. oefficients of variation (CV) for chemicals measurements (DO,pH) were generally less than 7%, f...

  12. Skills, Activities, Matrixing System: Project SAMS. A Curriculum Process for Students with Profound Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.; And Others

    Project SAMS (Skills, Activities, Matrixing System) was designed to develop and validate a curriculum process for educating students with profound disabilities. Central to the 3-year curriculum process was matrixing, or integrating, basic developmental skills across multiple functional, age-appropriate, and integrated activities. Components…

  13. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic.

    PubMed

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C S; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2015-12-14

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ∼80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic. PMID:26537895

  14. USE OF SPECTRAL ANGLE MAPPER (SAM) AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY FOR YIELD ESTIMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation indices (VIs) derived from remotely sensed imagery are commonly used to estimate crop yields. Spectral angle mapper (SAM) provides an alternative approach to quantifying the spectral differences among all pixels in imagery and therefore has the potential for mapping yield variability. The...

  15. The formation of ACC and competition between polyamines and ethylene for SAM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene biosynthesis involves the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) by ACC synthase (ACS). ACC is then converted to ethylene. The genes that encode enzymes in this pathway all belong to a family of genes. Differential transcriptional regulation ...

  16. Mechanism elucidation of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the C-S bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in B. subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5′-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:22197590

  17. Analysis of chlorocarbon compounds identified in the SAM Investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freissinet, Caroline; Mahaffy, P.; Glavin, D.; Buch, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Martin, M.; Miller, K.; Steele, A.; Szopa, C.; SAM; MSL science Team

    2013-10-01

    The gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) mode of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment was designed for the separation and identification of the chemical components of the gases released from a solid sample or trapped from the atmosphere. Gases from solid samples are either produced by heating a cell from ambient to >800-1100oC (EGA mode) or by wet chemistry extraction and reactions (not yet employed on Mars). Prior to EGA analysis of portions of the first 3 solid samples (Rocknest, John Klein and Cumberland) collected by MSL and delivered to SAM, an internal SAM blank run was carried out with an empty quartz cup. These blank analyses are required to understand the background signal intrinsic to the GCMS and its gas manifolds and traps. Several peaks have been identified as part of SAM background, some of them below the nmol level, which attests of the sensitivity of the instrument and as-designed performance of the GCMS. The origin of each peak has been investigated, and two major contributors are revealed; residual vapor from one of the chemicals used for SAM wet chemistry experiment: N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), and the Tenax from the hydrocarbon trap. Supporting lab experiments are in progress to understand the reaction pathways of the molecules identified in the SAM background. These experiments help elucidate which molecules may be interpreted as indigenous to Mars. Of the three solid samples analyzed on 11 runs, it was possible to detect and identify several chlorinated compounds including several chlorohydrocarbons. The chlorine is likely derived from the decomposition of martian perchlorates or other indigenous Cl-containing species while the origin of the carbon is presently under investigation for each detected molecule. To date, a subset these molecules have been identified in lab studies and a terrestrial contribution to the observed products are more easily explained. The combined results from SAM and

  18. Chemical and biological reduction of the radical SAM enzyme CPH4 synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bruender, Nathan A.; Young, Anthony P.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2016-01-01

    The radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a large and growing group of enzymes that carry out complex radical-mediated transformations. A one-electron reduction of SAM via the +1 state of the cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster generates a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. The [4Fe-4S] cluster must be reduced from its resting +2 to the catalytically active +1 oxidation state by an electron. In practice, dithionite or the Escherichia coli flavodoxin (EcFldA)/ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP+ oxidoreductase (Fpr)/NADPH system is used. Herein, we present a systematic investigation of the reductive activation of the radical SAM enzyme CDG synthase (BsQueE) from Bacillus subtilis comparing biological and chemical reductants. These data show that either of the flavodoxin homologs encoded by the B. subtilis genome, BsYkuN or BsYkuP, as well as a series of small molecule redox mediators, support BsQueE activity. With dithionite as a reductant, activity of BsQueE is ~75-fold greater in the presence of BsYkuN and BsYkuP compared to dithionite alone. By contrast, EcFldA supports turnover to ~10-fold greater levels than dithionite alone under the same conditions. Comparing the ratio of the rate of turnover to the apparent binding constant for the flavodoxin homologs reveals 10- and 240-fold preference for BsYkuN over BsYkuP and EcFldA respectively. The differential activation of the enzyme cannot be explained by the abortive cleavage of SAM. We conclude from these observations that the differential activation of BsQueE by Fld homologs may reside in the details of the interaction between the flavodoxin and the radical SAM enzyme. PMID:25933252

  19. Chemical and Biological Reduction of the Radical SAM Enzyme CPH4 Synthase.

    PubMed

    Bruender, Nathan A; Young, Anthony P; Bandarian, Vahe

    2015-05-12

    The radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) superfamily is a large and growing group of enzymes that conduct complex radical-mediated transformations. A one-electron reduction of SAM via the +1 state of the cubane [4Fe-4S] cluster generates a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, which initiates turnover. The [4Fe-4S] cluster must be reduced from its resting +2 state to the catalytically active +1 oxidation state by an electron. In practice, dithionite or the Escherichia coli flavodoxin (EcFldA)/ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Fpr)/NADPH system is used. Herein, we present a systematic investigation of the reductive activation of the radical SAM enzyme CDG synthase (BsQueE) from Bacillus subtilis comparing biological and chemical reductants. These data show that either of the flavodoxin homologues encoded by the B. subtilis genome, BsYkuN or BsYkuP, as well as a series of small molecule redox mediators, supports BsQueE activity. With dithionite as a reductant, the activity of BsQueE is ~75-fold greater in the presence of BsYkuN and BsYkuP compared to that in the presence of dithionite alone. By contrast, EcFldA supports turnover to ~10-fold greater levels than dithionite alone under the same conditions. Comparing the ratio of the rate of turnover to the apparent binding constant for the flavodoxin homologues reveals 10- and 240-fold preferences for BsYkuN over BsYkuP and EcFldA, respectively. The differential activation of the enzyme cannot be explained by the abortive cleavage of SAM. We conclude from these observations that the differential activation of BsQueE by Fld homologues may reside in the details of the interaction between the flavodoxin and the radical SAM enzyme. PMID:25933252

  20. Determination of the Possible Source of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected By SAM during MSL Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Szopa, C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Francois, P.; Coll, P. J.; Miller, K.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McAdam, A.; Teinturier, S.; Bonnet, J. Y.; Summons, R. E.; Millan, M.; Dequaire, T.; Cabane, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The SAM GC-MS instrument on the Curiosity rover allows to analyze volatile compounds from the atmosphere or volatile compounds from the Martian regolith and refractory compounds in the regolith after sample treatment using wet chemistry. One portion of the wet chemistry experiment is composed of MTBSTFA (N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (dimethylformamide). Abundant chlorinated hydrocarbons have been detected with SAM when analyzing samples collected in several sites explored by Curiosity rover. Some of these chlorohydrocarbons are produced during pyrolysis by the reaction of Martian oxychlorine compounds in the samples with terrestrial carbon from a derivatization agent (MTBSTFA) used in SAM (1, 2). Chlorobenzene cannot be formed by the direct reaction of MTBSTFA and DMF when heated in the presence of fused silica and perchlorates under SAM-like conditions (1)) therefore two other reaction pathways for chlorobenzene were proposed : (1) reactions between the volatile thermal degradation products of perchlorates (e.g. O2, Cl2 and HCl) and Tenax® and (2) the interaction of perchlorates with organic material from the martian regolith such as benzenecarboxylates (3, 4). This study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation by looking for: (1) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® (which is part of the SAM hydrocarbon trap) and perchlorates, (2) also between some soil sample and perchlorates in the presence or absence of MTBSTFA and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. References: 1. D. P. Glavin et al.(2013) JGR 118, 1955-1973. 2. L. a Leshin et al. (2013) Science 341, 1238937. 3. C. Freissinet et al. (2014) LPSC XXXXV Abstract 2796. 4. D. Glavin et al. (2014) LPSC XXXV Abstract #1157.

  1. Molecular Cloning, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the SAMS Gene during Adventitious Root Development in IBA-Induced Tetraploid Black Locust

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Jine; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Zhao, Zhong; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor for ethylene and polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we report the isolation of the 1498 bp full-length cDNA sequence encoding tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SAMS (TrbSAMS), which contains an open reading frame of 1179 bp encoding 392 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of TrbSAMS has more than 94% sequence identity to SAMSs from other plants, with a closer phylogenetic relationship to SAMSs from legumes than to SAMS from other plants. The TrbSAMS monomer consists of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the TrbSAMS protein localizes mainly to in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-treated cuttings showed higher levels of TrbSAMS transcript than untreated control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. TrbSAMS and its downstream genes showed differential expression in shoots, leaves, bark, and roots, with the highest expression observed in bark. IBA-treated cuttings also showed higher SAMS activity than control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. These results indicate that TrbSAMS might play an important role in the regulation of IBA-induced adventitious root development in tetraploid black locust cuttings. PMID:25285660

  2. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the SAMS gene during adventitious root development in IBA-induced tetraploid black locust.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jine; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Chunxia; Meng, Sen; Zhao, Zhong; Xu, Xuexuan

    2014-01-01

    S-Adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) catalyzes the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor for ethylene and polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we report the isolation of the 1498 bp full-length cDNA sequence encoding tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SAMS (TrbSAMS), which contains an open reading frame of 1179 bp encoding 392 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of TrbSAMS has more than 94% sequence identity to SAMSs from other plants, with a closer phylogenetic relationship to SAMSs from legumes than to SAMS from other plants. The TrbSAMS monomer consists of N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that the TrbSAMS protein localizes mainly to in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-treated cuttings showed higher levels of TrbSAMS transcript than untreated control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. TrbSAMS and its downstream genes showed differential expression in shoots, leaves, bark, and roots, with the highest expression observed in bark. IBA-treated cuttings also showed higher SAMS activity than control cuttings during root primordium and adventitious root formation. These results indicate that TrbSAMS might play an important role in the regulation of IBA-induced adventitious root development in tetraploid black locust cuttings. PMID:25285660

  3. The growth-suppressive function of the polycomb group protein polyhomeotic is mediated by polymerization of its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Angela K; Leal, Belinda Z; Chadwell, Linda V; Wang, Renjing; Ilangovan, Udayar; Kaur, Yogeet; Junco, Sarah E; Schirf, Virgil; Osmulski, Pawel A; Gaczynska, Maria; Hinck, Andrew P; Demeler, Borries; McEwen, Donald G; Kim, Chongwoo A

    2012-03-16

    Polyhomeotic (Ph), a member of the Polycomb Group (PcG), is a gene silencer critical for proper development. We present a previously unrecognized way of controlling Ph function through modulation of its sterile alpha motif (SAM) polymerization leading to the identification of a novel target for tuning the activities of proteins. SAM domain containing proteins have been shown to require SAM polymerization for proper function. However, the role of the Ph SAM polymer in PcG-mediated gene silencing was uncertain. Here, we first show that Ph SAM polymerization is indeed required for its gene silencing function. Interestingly, the unstructured linker sequence N-terminal to Ph SAM can shorten the length of polymers compared with when Ph SAM is individually isolated. Substituting the native linker with a random, unstructured sequence (RLink) can still limit polymerization, but not as well as the native linker. Consequently, the increased polymeric Ph RLink exhibits better gene silencing ability. In the Drosophila wing disc, Ph RLink expression suppresses growth compared with no effect for wild-type Ph, and opposite to the overgrowth phenotype observed for polymer-deficient Ph mutants. These data provide the first demonstration that the inherent activity of a protein containing a polymeric SAM can be enhanced by increasing SAM polymerization. Because the SAM linker had not been previously considered important for the function of SAM-containing proteins, our finding opens numerous opportunities to manipulate linker sequences of hundreds of polymeric SAM proteins to regulate a diverse array of intracellular functions. PMID:22275371

  4. Insertion shuttle with carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayer coatings for implanting flexible polymer neural probes in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating microscale microelectrodes made from flexible polymers tend to bend or deflect and may fail to reach their target location. The development of flexible neural probes requires methods for reliable and controlled insertion into the brain. Previous approaches for implanting flexible probes into the cortex required modifications that negate the flexibility, limit the functionality, or restrict the design of the probe. This study investigated the use of an electronegative self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a coating on a stiff insertion shuttle to carry a polymer probe into the cerebral cortex, and then the detachment of the shuttle from the probe by altering the shuttle’s hydrophobicity. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyimide probes were inserted into an agarose in vitro brain model using silicon insertion shuttles. The silicon shuttles were coated with a carboxyl terminal SAM. The precision of insertion using the shuttle was measured by the percentage displacement of the probe upon shuttle removal after the probe was fully inserted. The average relative displacement of polyimide probes inserted with SAM-coated shuttles was (1.0 ± 0.66)% of the total insertion depth compared to (26.5 ± 3.7)% for uncoated silicon shuttles. The average relative displacement of PDMS probes was (2.1 ± 1.1)% of the insertion depth compared to 100% (complete removal) for uncoated silicon shuttles. SAM-coated shuttles were further validated through their use to reliably insert PDMS probes in the cerebral cortex of rodents. This study found that SAM-coated silicon shuttles are a viable method for accurately and precisely inserting flexible neural probes in the brain. PMID:19666051

  5. Insertion shuttle with carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayer coatings for implanting flexible polymer neural probes in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Kipke, Daryl R

    2009-11-15

    Penetrating microscale microelectrodes made from flexible polymers tend to bend or deflect and may fail to reach their target location. The development of flexible neural probes requires methods for reliable and controlled insertion into the brain. Previous approaches for implanting flexible probes into the cortex required modifications that negate the flexibility, limit the functionality, or restrict the design of the probe. This study investigated the use of an electronegative self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a coating on a stiff insertion shuttle to carry a polymer probe into the cerebral cortex, and then the detachment of the shuttle from the probe by altering the shuttle's hydrophobicity. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyimide probes were inserted into an agarose in vitro brain model using silicon insertion shuttles. The silicon shuttles were coated with a carboxyl terminal SAM. The precision of insertion using the shuttle was measured by the percentage displacement of the probe upon shuttle removal after the probe was fully inserted. The average relative displacement of polyimide probes inserted with SAM-coated shuttles was (1.0+/-0.66)% of the total insertion depth compared to (26.5+/-3.7)% for uncoated silicon shuttles. The average relative displacement of PDMS probes was (2.1+/-1.1)% of the insertion depth compared to 100% (complete removal) for uncoated silicon shuttles. SAM-coated shuttles were further validated through their use to reliably insert PDMS probes in the cerebral cortex of rodents. This study found that SAM-coated silicon shuttles are a viable method for accurately and precisely inserting flexible neural probes in the brain. PMID:19666051

  6. Stability of phosphonic self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloy under oxidative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhure, Rahul; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.; Bonner, Carl; Hall, Felicia; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-04-01

    Cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have been widely used in the biomedical arena for cardiovascular, orthopedic and dental applications. Surface modification of the alloy allows us to tailor the interfacial properties to address critical challenges of Co-Cr alloy in medical applications. Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) of Octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) have been used to form thin films on the oxide layer of the Co-Cr alloy surface by solution deposition technique. The SAMs formed were investigated for their stability to oxidative conditions of ambient laboratory environment over periods of 1, 3, 7 and 14 days. The samples were then characterized for their stability using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. Detailed high energy XPS elemental scans confirmed the presence of the phosphonic monolayer after oxidative exposure which suggested that the SAMs were firmly attached to the oxide layer of Co-Cr alloy. AFM images gave topographical data of the surface and showed islands of SAMs on Co-Cr alloy surface, before and after SAM formation and also over the duration of the oxidative exposure. Contact angle measurements confirmed the hydrophobicity of the surface over 14 days. Thus the SAMs were found to be stable for the duration of the study. These SAMs could be subsequently tailored by modifying the terminal functional groups and could be used for various potential biomedical applications such as drug delivery, biocompatibility and tissue integration.

  7. Direct Patterning of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) on GaAs Surfaces via Dip-Pen Nanolithography (DPN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Peng; Keiper, Timothy; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid structures of functional molecules and solid-state (SS) materials have attracted extensive interest in surface nanoscience and molecular electronics. The formation and micro/nano patterning of organic SAMs on SS surfaces are a key step in fabricating such devices. Here we report realization of high quality MHA SAMs on GaAs and direct formation of micro/nanoscale patterns of MHA SAM on the surface by micro-contact printing (μ CP) and DPN. The process begins with the preparation of an oxide-free surface of GaAs, for which we employed treatment by an ammonium polysulfide ((NH4)2 Sx) solution. The treatment strips native oxides from GaAs creating an atomic layer of sulfur covalently bonded to the fresh surface. Formation of high-quality SAMs of thiol molecules on GaAs then proceeds through exchange of the sulfur and the thiol terminal of the molecules. The effects of the sulfur-passivation and formation of MHA SAM on the treated surface were confirmed by XPS, HRTEM, and DPN. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first realization of direct DPN of nanoscale organic SAM on a semiconductor free of surface oxide. We further evidence the utility of the hybrid platform by demonstrating directed self-assembly of Au nanoparticles onto MHA/ODT SAM templates on GaAs.

  8. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15018.001 PMID:27458801

  9. Sam68/KHDRBS1 is critical for colon tumorigenesis by regulating genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Sun, Xin; Wier, Eric M; Hodgson, Andrea; Liu, Yue; Sears, Cynthia L; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated transcription is an important mediator for cellular responses to DNA damage. Genotoxic agents trigger a 'nuclear-to-cytoplasmic' NF-κB activation signaling pathway; however, the early nuclear signaling cascade linking DNA damage and NF-κB activation is poorly understood. Here we report that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa/KH domain containing, RNA binding, signal transduction associated 1 (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is a key NF-κB regulator in genotoxic stress-initiated signaling pathway. Sam68 deficiency abolishes DNA damage-stimulated polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR) production and the PAR-dependent NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes. Sam68 deleted cells are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA damaging agents. Upregulated Sam68 coincides with elevated PAR production and NF-κB-mediated anti-apoptotic transcription in human and mouse colon cancer. Knockdown of Sam68 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis and genetic deletion of Sam68 dampens colon tumor burden in mice. Together our data reveal a novel function of Sam68 in the genotoxic stress-initiated nuclear signaling, which is crucial for colon tumorigenesis. PMID:27458801

  10. Analogue Experiments Identify Possible Precursor Compounds for Chlorohydrocarbons Detected in SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, aboard the Curiosity Rover, has conducted multiple analyses of scooped and drilled samples and has identified a suite of chlorohydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene (Glavin et al., 2013; Leshin et al., 2013). These compounds were identified after samples were pyrolysed at temperatures up to ~835°C through a combination of Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). Since these chlorinated species were well above the background levels determined by empty cup blanks analyzed prior to solid sample analyses, thermal degradation of oxychlorine phases, such as perchlorate, present in the Martian soil, are the most likely source of chlorine needed to generate these chlorohydrocarbons. Laboratory analogue experiments show that terrestrial organics internal to SAM, such as N-methyl-N(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a derivatization agent, can react with perchlorates to produce all of the chlorohydrocarbons detected by SAM. However, in pyrolysis-trap-GCMS laboratory experiments with MTBSTFA, C4 compounds are the predominant chlorohydrocarbon observed, whereas on SAM the C1 chlorohydrocarbons dominate (Glavin et al., 2013). This, in addition to the previous identification of chloromethane and dichloromethane by the 1976 Viking missions (Biemann et al., 1977), suggest that there could be another, possibly Martian, source of organic carbon contributing to the formation of the C1 chlorohydrocarbons, or other components of the solid samples analyzed by SAM are having a catalytic effect on chlorohydrocarbon generation. Laboratory analogue experiments investigated a suite of organic compounds that have the potential to accumulate on Mars (Benner et al., 2000) and thus serve as sources of carbon for the formation of chlorohydrocarbons detected by the SAM and

  11. Morbus Coats

    PubMed Central

    Förl, B.; Schmack, I.; Grossniklaus, H.E.; Rohrschneider, K.

    2010-01-01

    Der fortgeschrittene Morbus Coats stellt im Kleinkindalter eine der schwierigsten Differenzialdiagnosen zum Retinoblastom dar. Wir beschreiben die klinischen und histologischen Befunde zweier Jungen im Alter von 9 und 21 Monaten mit einseitiger Leukokorie. Trotz umfassender Diagnostik mittels Narkoseuntersuchung, MRT und Ultraschall konnte ein Retinoblastom nicht sicher ausgeschlossen werden, und es erfolgte eine Enukleation. Histologisch wurde die Diagnose eines Morbus Coats gesichert. Da eine differenzialdiagnostische Abgrenzung zwischen Morbus Coats und Retinoblastom schwierig sein kann, halten wir in zweifelhaften Fällen auch angesichts der eingeschränkten Visusprognose und potenzieller Sekundärkomplikationen beim fortgeschrittenen Morbus Coats eine Enukleation für indiziert. PMID:18299842

  12. Optimization of SAM-based multilayer SERS substrates for intracellular analyses: the effect of terminating functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klutse, Charles K.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2011-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has become an attractive analytical tool for intracellular analyses due to its minimally invasive nature and molecular specificity. However, highly reproducible and optimized SERS substrates have been seen as a key to developing SERS as a reliable analytical methodology. This research focuses on optimizing self assembled monolayer (SAM)-based multilayer SERS substrates for a wide range of applications, including ultratrace detection of biomolecules within individual living cells. Multilayer SERS substrates are comprised of alternating layers of metal film and dielectric spacer cast on a monolayer of nanostructures. Using these substrates, varying degrees of SERS enhancement factors (EF) have been achieved, some as large as 10-fold relative to optimized single film over nanostructures substrates. To gain a mechanistic understanding of multilayered SERS enhancements, SAMs have been used to systematically vary spacer thickness. The results revealed spacer-dependent SERS EFs. To further the understanding of multilayer SERS enhancement, this work discusses the use of terminating functional groups in the optimization of SAM multilayer SERS substrates. SAMs having various functional groups were used as dielectric spacers to systematically vary the dielectric constant. To investigate the effect of the pH on the uniformity of the SAMs and their multilayer SERS enhancement, SAMs were formed in alkylthiol solutions of different pH and the subsequent SERS enhancement were evaluated. It was found that using alklythiol SAMs with appropriate terminating functional groups the SAM multilayer can achieve SERS EFs ranging between 108 and1010 and the substrates yielded highly reproducible SERS signals. The effect of the pH on the SERS enhancement is selective on the type of the terminating functional group of the alkylthiol used for SAM formation.

  13. Early Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    The goals of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission (1, 2) are to explore the potential of the Gale Crater landing site to support life either in the distant past or the present. The contribution of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) in this exploration of habitability is (A) to search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (B) to determine the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (C) to measure the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. While prime exploration targets of MSL's Curiosity Rover are the layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater the initial exploration of region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and the early part of the mission has been spent both commissioning the 10 Curiosity instruments and the Rover subsystems and making first time measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. SAM is located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover next to the XRD/XRF CheMin instrument. A variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and CheMin. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC). These are coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. Early results from SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents showing Ar approximately equal to N2; an upper limit of 3.5 ppb for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios showing both heavier than terrestrial averages

  14. Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Investigation: Overview of Results from the First 120 Sols on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Benna, M.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A. E.; Buch, A.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P. G.; Coscia, D.; Dobson, N.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Flesch, G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Gorevan, S.; Glavin, D. P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Harpold, D. N.; Hengemihle, J.; Jaeger, F.

    2013-01-01

    During the first 120 sols of Curiosity s landed mission on Mars (8/6/2012 to 12/7/2012) SAM sampled the atmosphere 9 times and an eolian bedform named Rocknest 4 times. The atmospheric experiments utilized SAM s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) while the solid sample experiments also utilized the gas chromatograph (GC). Although a number of core experiments were pre-programmed and stored in EEProm, a high level SAM scripting language enabled the team to optimize experiments based on prior runs.

  15. Evolved Gas Analyses of Sedimentary Materials in Gale Crater, Mars: Results of the Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument from Yellowknife Bay to the Stimson Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; McAdam, A. C.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover has analyzed 10 samples from Gale Crater. All SAM evolved gas analyses have yielded a multitude of volatiles (e.g, H2O, SO2, H2S, CO2, CO, NO, O2, HC1). The objectives of this work are to 1) Characterize the evolved H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2 gas traces of sediments analyzed by SAM through sol 1178, 2) Constrain sediment mineralogy/composition based on SAM evolved gas analysis (SAM-EGA), and 3) Discuss the implications of these results releative to understanding the geochemical history of Gale Crater.

  16. Coatings Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coatings Guide is a free online information resource that focuses on alternative, low-emission coatings for metal, plastic, and architectural substrates. Developed cooperatively by the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development and Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Interna...

  17. Expression of potato S-adenosyl-L-methionine synthase (SbSAMS) gene altered developmental characteristics and stress responses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Hee; Kim, Sang Hyon; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2015-02-01

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) synthase (SAMS) catalyze the biosynthesis of SAM, which is a precursor for ethylene and polyamines, and a methyl donor for a number of biomolecules. A full-length cDNA of SAMS from Solanum brevidens was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana to study its physiological function. RT-PCR analysis showed that SbSAMS expression was enhanced significantly in S. brevidens leaves upon treatment with salt, mannitol, ethephon, IAA and ABA. The transgenic SbSAMS overexpression lines accumulated higher levels S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAHC) and ethylene concomitantly with increased SAM level. Expression levels of genes related to ethylene biosynthesis such as ACC synthase, but not polyamine biosynthesis genes were enhanced in SbSAMS overexpressing Arabidopsis lines. In addition, ABA responsive, wound and pathogen-inducible genes were upregulated in SbSAMS transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines exhibited higher salt and drought stress tolerance compared to those of vector control. Based on these results we conclude that SbSAMS is expressed under abiotic stress to produce SAM as a broad-spectrum signal molecule to upregulate stress-related genes including ethylene and ABA biosynthetic pathway genes responsible for ABA, pathogen and wound responses. PMID:25559387

  18. Structure-guided design of fluorescent S-adenosylmethionine analogs for a high-throughput screen to target SAM-I riboswitch RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Scott F.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many classes of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-binding RNAs and proteins are of interest as potential drug targets in diverse therapeutic areas, from infectious diseases to cancer. In the former case, the SAM-I riboswitch is an attractive target because this structured RNA element is found only in bacterial mRNAs and regulates multiple genes in several human pathogens. Here we describe the synthesis of stable and fluorescent analogs of SAM in which the fluorophore is introduced through a functionalizable linker to the ribose. A Cy5-labeled SAM analog was shown to bind several SAM-I riboswitches via in-line probing and fluorescence polarization (FP) assays, including one from Staphylococcus aureus that controls the expression of SAM synthetase in this organism. A fluorescent ligand displacement assay was developed and validated for high-throughput screening of compounds to target the SAM-I riboswitch class. PMID:24560607

  19. The Use of Nucleosome Substrates Improves Binding of SAM Analogs to SETD8.

    PubMed

    Strelow, John M; Xiao, Min; Cavitt, Rachel N; Fite, Nathan C; Margolis, Brandon J; Park, Kyu-Jin

    2016-09-01

    SETD8 is the methyltransferase responsible for monomethylation of lysine at position 20 of the N-terminus of histone H4 (H4K20). This activity has been implicated in both DNA damage and cell cycle progression. Existing biochemical assays have utilized truncated enzymes containing the SET domain of SETD8 and peptide substrates. In this report, we present the development of a mechanistically balanced biochemical assay using full-length SETD8 and a recombinant nucleosome substrate. This improves the binding of SAM, SAH, and sinefungin by up to 10,000-fold. A small collection of inhibitors structurally related to SAM were screened and 40 compounds were identified that only inhibit SETD8 when a nucleosome substrate is used. PMID:27369108

  20. Wide Range Vacuum Pumps for the SAM Instrument on the MSL Curiosity Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Paul; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Farley, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Creare Incorporated and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center developed and space qualified two wide range pumps (WRPs) that were included in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. This instrument was subsequently integrated into the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity Rover," launched aboard an Atlas V rocket in 2011, and landed on August 6, 2012, in the Gale Crater on Mars. The pumps have now operated for more than 18 months in the Gale Crater and have been evacuating the key components of the SAM instrument: a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and six gas chromatograph columns. In this paper, we describe the main design challenges and the ways in which they were solved. This includes the custom design of a miniaturized, high-speed motor to drive the turbo drag pump rotor, analysis of rotor dynamics for super critical operation, and bearing/lubricant design/selection.

  1. Arrays of high quality SAM-based junctions and their application in molecular diode based logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Albert; Suchand Sangeeth, C. S.; Wang, Lejia; Yuan, Li; Jiang, Li; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS bottom-electrodes, which are ultra-flat with large grains, free from potential contamination of photoresist residues, and do not have electrode-edges where the molecules are unable to pack well. We formed tunneling junctions with n-alkanethiolate SAMs in yields of ~80%, with good reproducibility and electrical stability. Temperature dependent J(V) measurements indicated that the mechanism of charge transport across the junction is coherent tunneling. To demonstrate the usefulness of these junctions, we formed molecular diodes based on SAMs with Fc head groups. These junctions rectify currents with a rectification ratio R of 45. These molecular diodes were incorporated in simple electronic circuitry to demonstrate molecular diode-based Boolean logic.This paper describes a method to fabricate a microfluidic top-electrode that can be utilized to generate arrays of self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions. The top-electrodes consist of a liquid-metal of GaOx/EGaIn mechanically stabilized in microchannels and through-holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); these top-electrodes form molecular junctions by directly placing them onto the SAM supported by template-stripped (TS) Ag or Au bottom-electrodes. Unlike conventional techniques to form multiple junctions, our method does not require lithography to pattern the bottom-electrode and is compatible with TS

  2. Sam the Monkey After His Ride in the Little Joe 2 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Sam, the Rhesus monkey, after his ride in the Little Joe-2 (LJ-2) spacecraft. A U.S. Navy destroyer safely recovered Sam after he experienced three minutes of weightlessness during the flight. Animals were often used during test flights for Project Mercury to help determine the effects of spaceflight and weightlessness on humans. LJ-2 was one in a series of flights that led up to the human orbital flights of NASA's Project Mercury program. The Little Joe rocket booster was developed as a cheaper, smaller, and more functional alternative to the Redstone rockets. Little Joe could be produced at one-fifth the cost of Redstone rockets and still have enough power to carry a capsule payload. Seven unmanned Little Joe rockets were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia from August 1959 to April 1961.

  3. Mechanistic study of the radical SAM-dependent amine dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xinjian; Liu, Wan-Qiu; Yuan, Shuguang; Yin, Yue; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-18

    The radical SAM enzyme NosL catalyzes the conversion of l-Trp to 3-methyl-2-indolic acid, and this reaction is initiated by the 5'-deoxyadenosyl (dAdo) radical-mediated hydrogen abstraction from the l-Trp amino group. We demonstrate here that when d-Trp was used in the NosL reaction, hydrogen abstraction occurs promiscuously at both the amino group and Cα of d-Trp. These results inspired us to establish the detailed mechanism of l-Trp amine dehydrogenation catalyzed by a NosL mutant, and to engineer a novel radical SAM-dependent l-Tyr amine dehydrogenase from the thiamine biosynthesis enzyme ThiH. PMID:27492649

  4. Parabolic Trough Reference Plant for Cost Modeling with the Solar Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C.

    2010-07-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for parabolic trough solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), assisted by WorleyParsons Group Inc., for use with NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM). This report includes an overview and explanation of the model, two summary contract reports from WorleyParsons, and an Excel spreadsheet for use with SAM. The cost study uses a reference plant with a 100-MWe capacity and six hours of thermal energy storage. Wet-cooling and dry-cooling configurations are considered. The spreadsheet includes capital and operating cost by component to allow users to estimate the impact of changes in component costs.

  5. Equatorial semiannual oscillation in zonally averaged temperature observed by the Nimbus 7 SAMS and LIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Dunkerton, Timothy J.

    1988-01-01

    Zonally averaged equatorial temperatures obtained aboard Nimbus 7 by the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) are compared to comparable data obtained from the limb IR monitor of the stratosphere. The SAMS data are shown to confirm the seasonal asymmetry in semiannual wind regimes previously noted in rocketsonde observations near the equator. Two explanations for the asymmetry are considered: (1) an improved Kelvin and gravity wave transmissivity in stronger equatorial easterlies (resulting from planetary Rossby wave momentum transport), implying stronger westerly mean flow acceleration in the first cycle than in the second; and (2) evidence of strong polar-tropical coupling in the northern winter indicating that mean meridional circulations are present on a global scale.

  6. Tribological properties of self-assembled monolayers of catecholic imidazolium and the spin-coated films of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianxi; Li, Jinlong; Yu, Bo; Ma, Baodong; Zhu, Yangwen; Song, Xinwang; Cao, Xulong; Yang, Wu; Zhou, Feng

    2011-09-20

    A novel compound of an imidazolium type of ionic liquid (IL) containing a biomimetic catecholic functional group normally seen in mussel adhesive proteins was synthesized. The IL can be immobilized on a silicon surface and a variety of other engineering material surfaces via the catecholic anchor, allowing the tribological protection of these substrates for engineering applications. The surface wetting and adhesive properties and the tribological property of the synthesized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are successfully modulated by altering the counteranions. The chemical composition and wettability of the IL SAMs were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The adhesive and friction forces were measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) on the nanometer scale. IL composite films were prepared by spin coating thin IL films on top of the SAMs. The macrotribological properties of these IL composite films were investigated with a pin-on-disk tribometer. The results indicate that the presence of IL SAMs on a surface can improve the wettability of spin-coated ionic liquids and thus the film quality and the tribological properties. These films registered a reduced friction coefficient and a significantly enhanced durability and load-carrying capacity. The tribological properties of the composite films are better than those of pure IL films because the presence of the monolayers improves the adhesion and compatibility of spin-coated IL films with substrates. PMID:21834561

  7. 18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE) APPROACH SPAN FENDER. DOLPHIN LOCATED AT RIGHT. NAVIGATIONAL LIGHT LOCATED ON TOP OF FENDER - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  8. 20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. (4"X5" image enlarged from 2 1/4" negative) Sam Fowler, Photographer, February 1998 VIEW OF GEORGIA DOT BRIDGE NO. 051-00025D-01986N (JAMES P. HOULIHAN BRIDGE). DETAIL OF FENDER SYSTEM FOR TURN-SPAN PIVOT PIER. OPERATOR'S HOUSE LOCATED ON UPPER SECTION OF TRUSS - Georgia DOT Bridge No. 051-00025D-01986N, US 17 & State Route 25 Spanning Savannah River, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, GA

  9. Parabolic Trough Collector Cost Update for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, Parthiv; Turchi, Craig S.

    2015-11-01

    This report updates the baseline cost for parabolic trough solar fields in the United States within NREL's System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM, available at no cost at https://sam.nrel.gov/, is a performance and financial model designed to facilitate decision making for people involved in the renewable energy industry. SAM is the primary tool used by NREL and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for estimating the performance and cost of concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies and projects. The study performed a bottom-up build and cost estimate for two state-of-the-art parabolic trough designs -- the SkyTrough and the Ultimate Trough. The SkyTrough analysis estimated the potential installed cost for a solar field of 1500 SCAs as $170/m2 +/- $6/m2. The investigation found that SkyTrough installed costs were sensitive to factors such as raw aluminum alloy cost and production volume. For example, in the case of the SkyTrough, the installed cost would rise to nearly $210/m2 if the aluminum alloy cost was $1.70/lb instead of $1.03/lb. Accordingly, one must be aware of fluctuations in the relevant commodities markets to track system cost over time. The estimated installed cost for the Ultimate Trough was only slightly higher at $178/m2, which includes an assembly facility of $11.6 million amortized over the required production volume. Considering the size and overall cost of a 700 SCA Ultimate Trough solar field, two parallel production lines in a fully covered assembly facility, each with the specific torque box, module and mirror jigs, would be justified for a full CSP plant.

  10. SAM II aerosol profile measurements, Poker Flat, Alaska; July 16-19, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Grams, G. W.; Herman, B. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Russell, P. B.; Swissler, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    SAM II satellite measurements during the July 1979 Poker Flat mission, yielded an aerosol extinction coefficient of 0.0004/km at 1.0 micron wavelength, in the region of the stratospheric aerosol mixing ratio peak (12-16 km). The stratospheric aerosol optical depth for these data, calculated from the tropopause through 30 km, is approximately 0.001. These results are consistent with the average 1979 summertime values found throughout the Arctic.

  11. SAMMate: a GUI tool for processing short read alignments in SAM/BAM format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology generates tens of millions of short reads for each DNA/RNA sample. A key step in NGS data analysis is the short read alignment of the generated sequences to a reference genome. Although storing alignment information in the Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM) or Binary SAM (BAM) format is now standard, biomedical researchers still have difficulty accessing this information. Results We have developed a Graphical User Interface (GUI) software tool named SAMMate. SAMMate allows biomedical researchers to quickly process SAM/BAM files and is compatible with both single-end and paired-end sequencing technologies. SAMMate also automates some standard procedures in DNA-seq and RNA-seq data analysis. Using either standard or customized annotation files, SAMMate allows users to accurately calculate the short read coverage of genomic intervals. In particular, for RNA-seq data SAMMate can accurately calculate the gene expression abundance scores for customized genomic intervals using short reads originating from both exons and exon-exon junctions. Furthermore, SAMMate can quickly calculate a whole-genome signal map at base-wise resolution allowing researchers to solve an array of bioinformatics problems. Finally, SAMMate can export both a wiggle file for alignment visualization in the UCSC genome browser and an alignment statistics report. The biological impact of these features is demonstrated via several case studies that predict miRNA targets using short read alignment information files. Conclusions With just a few mouse clicks, SAMMate will provide biomedical researchers easy access to important alignment information stored in SAM/BAM files. Our software is constantly updated and will greatly facilitate the downstream analysis of NGS data. Both the source code and the GUI executable are freely available under the GNU General Public License at http://sammate.sourceforge.net. PMID:21232146

  12. Sarm1-mediated axon degeneration requires both SAM and TIR interactions.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Sasaki, Yo; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-08-14

    Axon degeneration is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that eliminates damaged or unneeded axons. Manipulation of this poorly understood pathway may allow treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. In an RNAi-based screen performed in cultured mouse DRG neurons, we observed strong suppression of injury-induced axon degeneration upon knockdown of Sarm1 [SARM (sterile α-motif-containing and armadillo-motif containing protein)]. We find that a SARM-dependent degeneration program is engaged by disparate neuronal insults: SARM ablation blocks axon degeneration induced by axotomy or vincristine treatment, while SARM acts in parallel with a soma-derived caspase-dependent pathway following trophic withdrawal. SARM is a multidomain protein that associates with neuronal mitochondria. Deletion of the N-terminal mitochondrial localization sequence disrupts SARM mitochondrial localization in neurons but does not alter its ability to promote axon degeneration. In contrast, mutation of either the SAM (sterile α motif) or TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor) domains abolishes the ability of SARM to promote axonal degeneration, while a SARM mutant containing only these domains elicits axon degeneration and nonapoptotic neuronal death even in the absence of injury. Protein-protein interaction studies demonstrate that the SAM domains are necessary and sufficient to mediate SARM-SARM binding. SARM mutants lacking a TIR domain bind full-length SARM and exhibit strong dominant-negative activity. These results indicate that SARM plays an integral role in the dismantling of injured axons and support a model in which SAM-mediated multimerization is necessary for TIR-dependent engagement of a downstream destruction pathway. These findings suggest that inhibitors of SAM and TIR interactions represent therapeutic candidates for blocking pathological axon loss and neuronal cell death. PMID:23946415

  13. In Situ Assessment of Habitability with the SAM Suite Investigation on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Webster, C. R.; Conrad, P. G.

    2009-09-01

    The 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is designed to quantitatively assess a local region on Mars as a potential habitat for present or past life. With a substantially more comprehensive measurement capability that any other Mars rover, to date, its science goals are (1) to assess past or present biological potential of a target environment, (2) to characterize geology and geochemistry at the MSL landing site, and (3) to investigate planetary processes that influence habitability. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Suite consists of a gas chromatograph (GC), a mass spectrometer (MS), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS) and supporting sample manipulation and gas processing systems. SAM will implement a sensitive search for organic molecules and carry out chemical and isotopic analysis of martian volatiles while MSL contact and remote surface and subsurface survey instruments establish geological context. Mineralogy measurements are made by a companion XRD/XRF instrument in the MSL Analytical Laboratory on identically processed samples. SAM is designed to analyze either the atmospheric composition or gases extracted from solid phase samples such as rocks and fines. For example, one of the core SAM experiment sequences heats a small powdered sample of a Mars rock or soil from ambient to 1300 K in a controlled manner while continuously monitoring evolved gases. This is followed by GCMS analysis of organics which have been trapped out of the gas stream. The general chemical survey is enhanced by a specific search for molecular classes that may be relevant to life including atmospheric methane and its carbon isotope with the TLS and complex organics with the GCMS.

  14. Conformational heterogeneity of the SAM-I riboswitch transcriptional ON state: a chaperone-like role for S-adenosyl methionine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Joohyun; Jha, Shantenu; Aboul-Ela, Fareed

    2012-05-18

    Riboswitches are promising targets for the design of novel antibiotics and engineering of portable genetic regulatory elements. There is evidence that variability in riboswitch properties allows tuning of expression for genes involved in different stages of biosynthetic pathways by mechanisms that are not currently understood. Here, we explore the mechanism for tuning of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-I riboswitch folding. Most SAM-I riboswitches function at the transcriptional level by sensing the cognate ligand SAM. SAM-I riboswitches orchestrate the biosynthetic pathways of cysteine, methionine, SAM, and so forth. We use base-pair probability predictions to examine the secondary-structure folding landscape of several SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We predict different folding behaviors for different SAM-I riboswitch sequences. We identify several "decoy" base-pairing interactions involving 5' riboswitch residues that can compete with the formation of a P1 helix, a component of the ligand-bound "transcription OFF" state, in the absence of SAM. We hypothesize that blockage of these interactions through SAM contacts contributes to stabilization of the OFF state in the presence of ligand. We also probe folding patterns for a SAM-I riboswitch RNA using constructs with different 3' truncation points experimentally. Folding was monitored through fluorescence, susceptibility to base-catalyzed cleavage, nuclear magnetic resonance, and indirectly through SAM binding. We identify key decision windows at which SAM can affect the folding pathway towards the OFF state. The presence of decoy conformations and differential sensitivities to SAM at different transcript lengths is crucial for SAM-I riboswitches to modulate gene expression in the context of global cellular metabolism. PMID:22425639

  15. Major Volatiles from MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses: Yellowknife Bay Through Lower Mount Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Niles, P. B.; Stern, J. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; McKay, C. P.; Wilhelm, M. B.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of <150 µm fines from five sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform ("RN") and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). One was drilled from the Windjana ("WJ") site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation investigated on route to Mount Sharp. Another was drilled from the Confidence Hills ("CH") site on a sandstone of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp (Pahrump Hills). Outcrops are sedimentary rocks that are largely of fluvial or lacustrine origin, with minor aeolian deposits.. SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases, including organic fragments. The identity and evolution temperature (T) of evolved gases can support CheMin mineral detection and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases or phases difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). They can also give constraints on sample organic chemistry. Here, we discuss trends in major evolved volatiles from SAM EGA analyses to date.

  16. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir From January to May 1997 (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFT), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine burn, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  17. Evolution of SAM in an enhanced model for Monitoring WLCG services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collados, David; Shade, John; Traylen (Cern, Steve; Imamagic (Srce, Emir

    2010-04-01

    It is four years now since the first prototypes of tools and tests started to monitor the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) services. One of these tools is the Service Availability Monitoring (SAM) framework, which superseded the SFT tool, and has become a keystone for the monthly WLCG availability and reliability computations. During this time, the grid has evolved into a robust, production-level infrastructure, in no small part thanks to the extensive monitoring infrastructure which includes testing, visualization and reporting. Experience gained with monitoring has led to emerging grid monitoring standards, and provided valuable input for the Operations Automation Strategy aimed at the regionalization of monitoring services. This change in scope, together with an ever-increasing number of services and infrastructures, make enhancements in the architecture of existing monitoring tools a necessity. This paper describes the present architecture of SAM, an enhanced and distributed model for monitoring WLCG services, and the required changes in SAM to adopt this new model inside the EGEE-III project.

  18. Experience producing simulated events for the DZero experiment on the SAM-Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Garzoglio, G.; Terekhov, I.; Snow, J.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    Most of the simulated events for the DZero experiment at Fermilab have been historically produced by the ''remote'' collaborating institutions. One of the principal challenges reported concerns the maintenance of the local software infrastructure, which is generally different from site to site. As the understanding of the distributed computing community over distributively owned and shared resources progresses, the adoption of grid technologies to address the production of Monte Carlo events for high energy physics experiments becomes increasingly interesting. SAM-Grid is a software system developed at Fermilab, which integrates standard grid technologies for job and information management with SAM, the data handling system of the DZero and CDF experiments. During the past few months, this grid system has been tailored for the Monte Carlo production of DZero. Since the initial phase of deployment, this experience has exposed an interesting series of requirements to the SAM-Grid services, the standard middleware, the resources and their management and to the analysis framework of the experiment. As of today, the inefficiency due to the grid infrastructure has been reduced to as little as 1%. In this paper, we present our statistics and the ''lessons learned'' in running large high energy physics applications on a grid infrastructure.

  19. SAM 2 Measurements of the Polar Stratospheric Aerosol, volume 2. April 1979 to October 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Steele, H. M.; Hamill, P.

    1982-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is abroad the Earth orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft proving extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosol with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles for the time and place of each SAM II measurement (April 29, 1979, to October 27, 1979) is presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time were plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths were calculated. Seasonal variations and variations in space (altitude and longitude) for both polar regions are easily seen. Typical values of aerosol extinction at the SAM II wavelength of 1.0 micron for the time priod were 1 to 3 x 10 to the -4th power km -1 in the main stratospheric aerosol layer. Optical depths for the stratosphere were about 0.002. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter at various times and locations. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the second 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is presented.

  20. Technical report: Reliability and validity of the iSAM 9000 isokinetic dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Orri, Julia C; Darden, Gibson F

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the mechanical reliability and validity of the INRTEK iSAM 9000 isokinetic dynamometer, and compared the obtained torque values of the prototype device with those from a traditional device. Sixty volunteers (40 men and 20 women) were tested at 60 degrees per second for shoulder, knee, and trunk flexion, and extension on both the Cybex 6000 and a new isokinetic dynamometer (iSAM 9000). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and standard errors of measurement (SEM) revealed a high level of reproducibility and precision in the device's torque measurements (ICC range = 0.94-0.98; SEM range = 5.2-29.7). Pearson r values revealed very high relationships between the two instruments (set 1: r = 0.84-0.93; set 2: r = 0.87-0.93; P < 0.05). Significantly higher peak torque for both sets of left and right knee flexion and extension, right shoulder extension and trunk extension was found for the iSAM 9000 compared to the Cybex 6000 (P < 0.05). The strong ICCs and small SEMs support the device's mechanical reliability and validity. The high correlation coefficients between the prototype dynamometer and the Cybex 6000 support the new device's validity in the measurement of isokinetic torque. The findings of this study will be used to refine the next generation of the INRTEK isokinetic device with respect to test protocols and the reliability of measuring human muscle performance. PMID:18296991

  1. Integration, Validation, and Application of a PV Snow Coverage Model in SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, David; Freeman, Janine

    2015-09-01

    Due to the increasing deployment of PV systems in snowy climates, there is significant interest in a method capable of estimating PV losses resulting from snow coverage that has been verified for a wide variety of system designs and locations. A scattering of independent snow coverage models have been developed over the last 15 years; however, there has been very little effort spent on verifying these models beyond the system design and location on which they were based. Moreover, none of the major PV modeling software products have incorporated any of these models into their workflow. In response to this deficiency, we have integrated the methodology of the snow model developed in the paper by Marion et al. [1] into the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) System Advisor Model (SAM). In this work we describe how the snow model is implemented in SAM and discuss our demonstration of the model's effectiveness at reducing error in annual estimations for two PV arrays. Following this, we use this new functionality in conjunction with a long term historical dataset to estimate average snow losses across the United States for a typical PV system design. The open availability of the snow loss estimation capability in SAM to the PV modeling community, coupled with our results of the nation-wide study, will better equip the industry to accurately estimate PV energy production in areas affected by snowfall.

  2. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  3. Mitofilin and CHCHD6 physically interact with Sam50 to sustain cristae structure.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chengli; Wu, Zhifei; Huang, Lei; Wang, Yajie; Xue, Jie; Chen, Si; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Song, Zhiyin; Chen, Shi

    2015-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) invaginates to form cristae and the maintenance of cristae depends on the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex. Mitofilin and CHCHD6, which physically interact, are two components of the MICOS. In this study, we performed immunoprecipitation experiments with Mitofilin and CHCHD6 antibodies and identified a complex containing Mitofilin, Sam50, and CHCHD 3 and 6. Using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), we generated knockdown/knockout clones of Mitofilin and CHCHD6. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that vesicle-like cristae morphology appeared in cell lines lacking Mitofilin, and mitochondria exhibited lower cristae density in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that knockdown of Mitofilin, but not knockout of CHCHD6, affected their binding partners that control cristae morphology. We also demonstrated that Mitofilin and CHCHD6 directly interacted with Sam50. Additionally, we observed that Mitofilin-knockdown cells showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular ATP content, which were minimally affected in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Taken together, we conclude that the integrity of MICOS and its efficient interaction with Sam50 are indispensable for cristae organization, which is relevant to mitochondrial function. PMID:26530328

  4. Mitofilin and CHCHD6 physically interact with Sam50 to sustain cristae structure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chengli; Wu, Zhifei; Huang, Lei; Wang, Yajie; Xue, Jie; Chen, Si; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Song, Zhiyin; Chen, Shi

    2015-01-01

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) invaginates to form cristae and the maintenance of cristae depends on the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex. Mitofilin and CHCHD6, which physically interact, are two components of the MICOS. In this study, we performed immunoprecipitation experiments with Mitofilin and CHCHD6 antibodies and identified a complex containing Mitofilin, Sam50, and CHCHD 3 and 6. Using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), we generated knockdown/knockout clones of Mitofilin and CHCHD6. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that vesicle-like cristae morphology appeared in cell lines lacking Mitofilin, and mitochondria exhibited lower cristae density in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that knockdown of Mitofilin, but not knockout of CHCHD6, affected their binding partners that control cristae morphology. We also demonstrated that Mitofilin and CHCHD6 directly interacted with Sam50. Additionally, we observed that Mitofilin-knockdown cells showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular ATP content, which were minimally affected in CHCHD6-knockout cells. Taken together, we conclude that the integrity of MICOS and its efficient interaction with Sam50 are indispensable for cristae organization, which is relevant to mitochondrial function. PMID:26530328

  5. Regulatory Aspects of Coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a history of the development and uses of edible coating regulations, detailed chapters on coating caracteristics, determination of coating properties, methods for making coatings, and discription of coating film formers (polysaccharieds, lipids, resins, proteins). The chapter also...

  6. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. IMPORTANCE The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection

  7. Evidence for perchlorates and the origin of chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by SAM at the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-10-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (< 150 µm), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of ~50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of ~0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the Martian regolith.

  8. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  9. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ameron International Protective Coatings Group developed a special coating for NASA that would withstand the high temperatures generated by the Space Shuttle rocket engines. The coating remains intact for at least 10 minutes, and insulates the launch pad so that it does not exceed 150 degrees and buckle. The NASA formulation was from Ameron's Engineered Siloxane (PSX) chemistry, which employs an inorganic silicon-oxygen structure which the company states is stronger and more reliable than organic polymers. Some of Ameron's PSX product line is based on the NASA technology, used for everything from industrial equipment to bridges.

  10. Sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H. D.

    1980-03-01

    Thermal spraying is shown to be an efficient means for the protection of surface areas against elevated temperature, wear, corrosion, hot gas corrosion, and erosion in structural aircraft components. Particularly in jet engines, numerous parts are coated by flame, detonation, or plasma spraying techniques. The applied methods of flame, detonation, and plasma spraying are explained, as well as electric arc spraying. Possibilities for spray coatings which meet aircraft service requirements are discussed, as well as methods for quality control, especially nondestructive test methods. In particular, coating characteristics and properties obtained by different spray methods are described, and special attention is paid to low pressure plasma spraying.

  11. Sum-frequency generation analyses of the structure of water at amphoteric SAM-liquid water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kouji; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Gemmei-Ide, Makoto; Kitano, Hiromi; Noguchi, Hidenori; Uosaki, Kohei

    2014-09-01

    Surfaces of both a cover glass and the flat plane of a semi-cylindrical quartz prism were modified with a mixture of positively and negatively charged silane coupling reagents (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(trihydroxysilyl)propylmethylphosphonate (THPMP), respectively). The glass surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) prepared at a mixing ratio of APTES:THPMP=4:6 was electrically almost neutral and was resistant to non-specific adsorption of proteins, whereas fibroblasts gradually adhered to an amphoteric (mixed) SAM surface probably due to its stiffness, though the number of adhered cells was relatively small. Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra indicated that total intensity of the OH stretching region (3000-3600cm(-1)) for the amphoteric SAM-modified quartz immersed in liquid water was smaller than those for the positively and negatively charged SAM-modified quartz prisms and a bare quartz prism in contact with liquid water. These results suggested that water molecules at the interface of water and an amphoteric SAM-modified quartz prism are not strongly oriented in comparison with those at the interface of a lopsidedly charged SAM-modified quartz prism and bare quartz. The importance of charge neutralization for the anti-biofouling properties of solid materials was strongly suggested. PMID:25001187

  12. The Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) for OSI - Experiences from IFE14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Sick, Benjamin; Häge, Martin; Blake, Thomas; Labak, Peter; Joswig, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    An on-site inspection (OSI) is the third of four elements of the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The sole purpose of an OSI is to confirm whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of the treaty and to gather any facts which might assist in identifying any possible violator. It thus constitutes the final verification measure under the CTBT if all other available measures are not able to confirm the nature of a suspicious event. The Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) carried out the Integrated Field Exercise 2014 (IFE14) in the Dead Sea Area of Jordan from 3 November to 9. December 2014. It was a fictitious OSI whose aim was to test the inspection capabilities in an integrated manner. The technologies allowed during an OSI are listed in the Treaty. The aim of the Seismic Aftershock Monitoring System (SAMS) is to detect and localize aftershocks of low magnitudes of the triggering event or collapses of underground cavities. The locations of these events are expected in the vicinity of a possible previous explosion and help to narrow down the search area within an inspection area (IA) of an OSI. The success of SAMS depends on the main elements, hardware, software, deployment strategy, the search logic and not least the effective use of personnel. All elements of SAMS were tested and improved during the Built-Up Exercises (BUE) which took place in Austria and Hungary. IFE14 provided more realistic climatic and hazardous terrain conditions with limited resources. Significant variations in topography of the IA of IFE14 in the mountainous Dead Sea Area of Jordan led to considerable challenges which were not expected from experiences encountered during BUE. The SAMS uses mini arrays with an aperture of about 100 meters and with a total of 4 elements. The station network deployed during IFE14 and results of the data analysis will be presented. Possible aftershocks of

  13. Detecting Complex Organic Compounds Using the SAM Wet Chemistry Experiment on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freissinet, C.; Buch, A.; Glavin, D. P.; Brault, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Kashyap, S.; Martin, M. G.; Miller, K.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The search for organic molecules on Mars can provide important first clues of abiotic chemistry and/or extinct or extant biota on the planet. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is currently the most relevant space-compatible analytical tool for the detection of organic compounds. Nevertheless, GC separation is intrinsically restricted to volatile molecules, and many molecules of astrobiological interest are chromatographically refractory or polar. To analyze these organics such as amino acids, nucleobases and carboxylic acids in the Martian regolith, an additional derivatization step is required to transform them into volatile derivatives that are amenable to GC analysis. As part of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment onboard Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, a single-step protocol of extraction and chemical derivatization with the silylating reagent N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) has been developed to reach a wide range of astrobiology-relevant refractory organic molecules (Mahaffy et al. 2012; Stalport et al. 2012). Seven cups in the SAM instrument are devoted to MTBSTFA derivatization. However, this chemical reaction adds a protective silyl group in place of each labile hydrogen, which makes the molecule non-identifiable in common mass spectra libraries. Therefore, we have created an extended library of mass spectra of MTBSTFA derivatized compounds of interest, considering their potential occurrence in Mars soils. We then looked specifically for MTBSTFA derivatized compounds using the existing and the newly created library, in various Mars analog soils. To enable a more accurate interpretation of the in situ derivatization GC-MS results that will be obtained by SAM, the lab experiments were performed as close as possible to the SAM flight instrument experimental conditions. Our first derivatization experiments display promising results, the laboratory system permitting an extraction and detection

  14. First results from the CheMin, DAN and SAM instruments on Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, D. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2012-12-01

    One of the principal goals of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity is to identify and characterize the early habitable environments of Mars, as recorded in the stratified rocks and soil of Gale crater. The suite of instruments aboard Curiosity will make measurements useful for determining the presence and lateral/vertical distribution of hydrated phases, the mineralogy and "preservation potential" of sediments and rocks, and the identity and isotopic composition of organic and other carbon containing molecules, should such be present. Three of Curiosity's instruments, DAN ("Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons," a soil hydrogen detector), CheMin ("Chemistry and Mineralogy," a mineralogy instrument) and SAM ("Surface Analysis at Mars," an organic molecule and isotopic analysis instrument) are uniquely suited to this purpose. DAN consists of a pulsed neutron generator and neutron detector that will measure the hydrogen content (i.e., hydrated phases, water ice) in the upper meter of the soil. Both passive and active measurements will be obtained, resulting in a meter-scale resolution transect map of near-surface hydrogen along the path of the rover. These measurements will provide context for the mineralogical and organic measurements of drilled and scooped samples analyzed by CheMin and SAM. CheMin, a powder X-ray Diffraction (pXRD) instrument, will determine the mineralogy of scooped soils and powders obtained from drilled rocks. Hydrated minerals will be identified, along with whole-rock mineralogy for characterizing the environment of formation and preservation potential for organic molecules. SAM consists of a sample handling system, a gas chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, and a tunable laser spectrometer. SAM will accept the same powdered rock and soil samples as CheMin, and will measure and identify organic carbon in these samples as well as evolved inorganic gases such as CO2, CH4, and H2O. Isotopic composition of noble gases and several light elements are

  15. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Brunner, Anna; Archer, Paul Douglas; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Atreya, Sushil K.

    2013-01-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise approx 20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000 C and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures < 500 C, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near approx 750 C. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the approx 20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection

  16. Evidence for Smectite Clays from MSL SAM Analyses of Mudstone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Franz, H.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Stern, J. C.; Brunner, A.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Atreya, S. K.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drilled samples of mudstone from the Sheepbed unit at Yellowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL instruments including the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments in MSL's Analytical Laboratory. CheMin analyses revealed the first in situ X-ray diffraction based evidence of clay minerals on Mars, which are likely trioctahedral smectites (e.g., saponite) and comprise ~20% of the mudstone sample (e.g., Bristow et al., this meeting). SAM analyses, which heated the mudstone samples to 1000oC and monitored volatiles evolved to perform in situ evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS), resulted in a H2O trace exhibiting a wide evolution at temperatures <500oC, and an evolution peak at higher temperatures near ~750oC. The low temperature H2O evolution has many potential contributors, including adsorbed H2O, smectite interlayer H2O, and structural H2O/OH from bassanite and akaganeite (identified by CheMin) and H2O/OH from amorphous phases in the sample. The high temperature H2O is consistent with the evolution of H2O from the dehydroxylation of the smectite clay mineral. Comparison to EGA-MS data collected under SAM-like conditions on a variety of clay mineral reference materials indicate that a trioctahedral smectite, such as saponite, is most consistent with the high temperature H2O evolution observed. There may also be SAM EGA-MS evidence for a small high temperature H2O evolution from scoop samples from the Yellowknife Bay Rocknest sand shadow bedform. As in the mudstone samples, this evolution may indicate the detection of smectite clays, and the idea that minor clays may be present in Rocknest materials that could be expected to be at least partially derived from local sources is reasonable. But, because smectite clays were not definitively observed in CheMin analyses of Rocknest materials, they must be present at much lower abundances than the ~20% observed in the mudstone samples. This potential detection underscores the

  17. Versatile Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A radome at Logan Airport and a large parabolic antenna at the Wang Building in Massachusetts are protected from weather, corrosion and ultraviolet radiation by a coating, specially designed for antennas and radomes, known as CRC Weathertite 6000. The CRC 6000 line that emerged from Boyd Coatings Research Co., Inc. is a solid dispersion of fluorocarbon polymer and polyurethane that yields a tough, durable film with superior ultraviolet resistance and the ability to repel water and ice over a long term. Additionally, it provides resistance to corrosion, abrasion, chemical attacks and impacts. Material can be used on a variety of substrates, such as fiberglass, wood, plastic and concrete in addition to steel and aluminum. In addition Boyd Coatings sees CRC 6000 applicability as an anti-icing system coated on the leading edge of aircraft wings.

  18. Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Inorganic Coatings, Inc.'s K-Zinc 531 protective coating is water-based non-toxic, non-flammable and has no organic emissions. High ratio silicate formula bonds to steel, and in 30 minutes, creates a very hard ceramic finish with superior adhesion and abrasion resistance. Improved technology allows application over a minimal commercial sandblast, fast drying in high humidity conditions and compatibility with both solvent and water-based topcoats. Coating is easy to apply and provides long term protection with a single application. Zinc rich coating with water-based potassium silicate binder offers cost advantages in materials, labor hours per application, and fewer applications over a given time span.

  19. CHF Enhancement by Vessel Coating for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Fan-Bill Cheung; Joy L. Rempe

    2004-06-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is a key severe accident management (SAM) strategy that has been adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One viable means for IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident. As part of a joint Korean – United States International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (K-INERI), an experimental study has been conducted to investigate the viability of using an appropriate vessel coating to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) limits during ERVC. Toward this end, transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB (Subscale Boundary Layer Boiling) facility at Penn State using test vessels with micro-porous aluminum coatings. Local boiling curves and CHF limits were obtained in these experiments. When compared to the corresponding data without coatings, substantial enhancement in the local CHF limits for the case with surface coatings was observed. Results of the steady state boiling experiments showed that micro-porous aluminum coatings were very durable. Even after many cycles of steady state boiling, the vessel coatings remained rather intact, with no apparent changes in color or structure. Moreover, the heat transfer performance of the coatings was found to be highly desirable with an appreciable CHF enhancement in all locations on the vessel outer surface but with very little effect of aging.

  20. Application of three-dimensionally area-selective atomic layer deposition for selectively coating the vertical surfaces of standing nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenjing; Zhang, Kenan; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Tiaoxing; Sun, Yan; Chen, Xin; Dai, Ning

    2014-01-01

    We describe a strategy for selectively coating the vertical surfaces of standing nanopillars using area-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD). Hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are utilised to selectively inhibit the coating of oxides on the modified horizontal regions to ensure that only the vertical surfaces of vertical standing nanorods are coated using ALD processes. This method makes it possible to fabricate vertical nanodevices using a simple process of depositing oxide layer on a vertical surface, and can also be applied to the area-selective surface passivation of other standing structures. PMID:24662775

  1. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Four individual sample portions from a single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit were sieved ( 150 m) and delivered to the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of 0.01 to 2.3 nanomole.The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N- (tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical that leaked from a derivatization cup inside SAM.The best candidate for the oxychloride phase in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated species measured by SAM, although other chlorine bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory pyrolysis experiments suggest that reaction of martian chlorine with organic carbon from MTBSTFA can explain the presence of the chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene also detected by SAM.However, we cannot exclude the possibility that traces of organic carbon of either martian or exogenous origin contributed to some of the chloromethanes measured by SAM. Although the alteration history and exposure age of the Rocknest deposit is unknown, it is possible that oxidative degradation of complex organic matter by ionizing radiation or other chemical processes in Rocknest has occurred.

  2. Formation and Stability of Phenylphosphonic Acid Monolayers on ZnO: Comparison of In Situ and Ex Situ SAM Preparation.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Alexandra; Klöffel, Tobias; Meyer, Bernd; Witte, Gregor

    2016-05-24

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) enable an electronic interface tailoring of conductive metal oxides and offer an alternative to common transparent electrodes in optoelectronic devices. Here, the influence of surface orientation and pretreatment on the formation and stability of SAMs has been studied for the case of phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) on ZnO single crystals. Using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, the thermal stability and orientational ordering of PPA-SAMs on the polar and mixed-terminated ZnO surfaces were analyzed. On all surfaces, PPA-SAMs remain stable up to 550 K, while at higher temperatures a C-P bond cleavage and dissociative desorption takes place yielding two distinct desorption peaks. Based on DFT calculations, these desorption channels are attributed to protonated and deprotonated chemisorbed PPA molecules, which can be related to tri- and bidentate species, hence allowing to determine their relative abundance from the intensity ratio. Beside immersion, an alternative monolayer preparation based on vacuum deposition in combination with controlled desorption of excess multilayers is demonstrated. This enables a SAM preparation on bare ZnO surfaces without any precoating due to exposure to ambient air, which is further compared with SAM formation on intentionally hydroxylated substrates. Corresponding TDS data indicate that initial hydroxylation favors the formation of tridentate and deprotonated bidentate, while the OMBD preparation on bare surfaces yields a larger fraction of protonated bidentate species. The orientation of PPA molecules adopted in the SAMs was determined from the dichroism of K-edge NEXAFS measurements and reveals an almost upright orientation for the deprotonated species, while a slight tilting is obtained for monolayer films with a large fraction of protonated

  3. Loving Sam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasky, Kathryn

    1998-01-01

    Describes how the author came to love Mark Twain's writings, taught "Huckleberry Finn" and other of Twain's writings to a ninth-grade class in a Hasidic Jewish Academy, and learned to really love Samuel Clemens. Describes how this love inspired the author to write two books celebrating what she has valued most in 40 years of reading Mark Twain.…

  4. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  5. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  6. Dipolar SAMs Reduce Charge Carrier Injection Barriers in n-Channel Organic Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Jesper, Malte; Alt, Milan; Schinke, Janusz; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Angelova, Iva; Rohnacher, Valentina; Pucci, Annemarie; Lemmer, Uli; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Glaser, Tobias; Mankel, Eric; Lovrincic, Robert; Golling, Florian; Hamburger, Manuel; Bunz, Uwe H F

    2015-09-22

    In this work we examine small conjugated molecules bearing a thiol headgroup as self assembled monolayers (SAM). Functional groups in the SAM-active molecule shift the work function of gold to n-channel semiconductor regimes and improve the wettability of the surface. We examine the effect of the presence of methylene linkers on the orientation of the molecule within the SAM. 3,4,5-Trimethoxythiophenol (TMP-SH) and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylthiol (TMP-CH2-SH) were first subjected to computational analysis, predicting work function shifts of -430 and -310 meV. Contact angle measurements show an increase in the wetting envelope compared to that of pristine gold. Infrared (IR) measurements show tilt angles of 22 and 63°, with the methylene-linked molecule (TMP-CH2-SH) attaining a flatter orientation. The actual work function shift as measured with photoemission spectroscopy (XPS/UPS) is even larger, -600 and -430 meV, respectively. The contact resistance between gold electrodes and poly[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene) (Polyera Aktive Ink, N2200) in n-type OFETs is demonstrated to decrease by 3 orders of magnitude due to the use of TMP-SH and TMP-CH2-SH. The effective mobility was enhanced by two orders of magnitude, significantly decreasing the contact resistance to match the mobilities reported for N2200 with optimized electrodes. PMID:26315142

  7. [Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): with special reference to age-associated pathologies and their modulation].

    PubMed

    Takeda, T

    1996-07-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) has been under development by our research team at Kyoto University since 1970 through selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson Laboratory in 1968, based on the data of the grading score of senescence, life span, and pathologic phenotypes. At present, there are 12 lines of SAM; the 9 senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) include SAMP1, SAMP2, SAMP3, SAMP6, SAMP7, SAMP8, SAMP9, SAMP10 and SAMP11, and the 3 senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR) SAMR1, SANR4 and SAMR5. Data from survival curves, the Gompertzian function and the grading score of senescence, together with growth patterns of body weight of these SAMP and SAMR mice revealed that the characteristic feature of aging common to all SAMP mice is "accelerated senescence": early onset and irreversible advance of senescence manifested by several signs and gross lesions such as the loss of normal behavior, various skin lesions, increased lordokyphosis, etc., after a period of normal development. Routine postmortem examinations and the pathobiological features revealed by systematically designed studies have shown several pathologic phenotypes, which are often characteristic enough to differentiate among the various SAM strains: senile amyloidosis in SAMP1, -P2, -P7, -P9, -P10 and -P11, secondary amyloidosis in SAMP2 and -P6, contracted kidney in SAMP1, -P2, -P10, -P11, immunoblastic lymphoma in SAMR1 and -R4, histiocytic sarcoma in SAMR1 and -R4, ovarian cysts in SAMR1, impaired immune response in SAMP1, -P2 and -P8, hyperinflation of the lungs in SAMP1, hearing impairment in SAMP1, degenerative temporomandibular joint disease in SAMP3, senile osteoporosis in SAMP6, deficits in learning and memory in SAMP8 and -P10, emotional disorders in SAMP8 and -P10, cataracts in SAMP9, and brain atrophy in SAMP10. These are all age-associated pathologies, the incidence and severity of which increase with advancing age. The SAM model in which these

  8. Combustion of organic matter in Mars analogs using SAM-like techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Steele, A.

    2012-12-01

    The combustion experiment on the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on Curiosity will heat a sample of Mars regolith in the presence of oxygen and measure the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of the evolved CO2 using the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). The degree to which the δ13C of the sample is representative of any organic carbon present depends on a) whether complete combustion has been achieved, and b) the simultaneous presence of inorganic, or mineralogical carbon in the sample, and our ability to quantify its contribution to the bulk δ13C. To optimize and characterize combustion of a variety of organic molecules in a range of rock matrices, combustion experiments simulating those to be performed on SAM were conducted at NASA Goddard. CO2 gas generated by heating Mars analogs in a SAM-like oven in the presence of oxygen on a laboratory breadboard was captured and analyzed via IRMS for δ13C. These values were compared to bulk and total organic carbon (TOC) abundance and δ13C values using commercial flash combustion EA- IRMS techniques to determine whether quantitative conversion of reduced carbon to CO2 was achieved. Factors contributing to incomplete combustion and isotopic fractionation include structural complexity of reduced organics, their thermal decomposition temperatures, and mineral-organic associations. An additional consideration must be made for unintentional combustion by oxidizing salts (perchlorates), which may partially or totally oxidize reduced organic compounds to CO2, depending on soil perchlorate concentration, sample matrix, and how refractory the organics are. Thus, to investigate the oxidizing potential of a salt known to exist on the Martian surface, laboratory breadboard experiments heating simple and complex organics in the presence of Mg perchlorate were performed using a SAM-like oven coupled to a Hiden Mass Spectrometer and gas collection manifold. Samples were heated in the absence and presence of Mg perchlorate to

  9. Forest Classification Accuracy as Influenced by Multispectral Scanner Spatial Resolution. [Sam Houston National Forest, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Sadowski, F. E.; Sarno, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A supervised classification within two separate ground areas of the Sam Houston National Forest was carried out for two sq meters spatial resolution MSS data. Data were progressively coarsened to simulate five additional cases of spatial resolution ranging up to 64 sq meters. Similar processing and analysis of all spatial resolutions enabled evaluations of the effect of spatial resolution on classification accuracy for various levels of detail and the effects on area proportion estimation for very general forest features. For very coarse resolutions, a subset of spectral channels which simulated the proposed thematic mapper channels was used to study classification accuracy.

  10. [Research on identification of cabbages and weeds combining spectral imaging technology and SAM taxonomy].

    PubMed

    Zu, Qin; Zhang, Shui-fa; Cao, Yang; Zhao, Hui-yi; Dang, Chang-qing

    2015-02-01

    Weeds automatic identification is the key technique and also the bottleneck for implementation of variable spraying and precision pesticide. Therefore, accurate, rapid and non-destructive automatic identification of weeds has become a very important research direction for precision agriculture. Hyperspectral imaging system was used to capture the hyperspectral images of cabbage seedlings and five kinds of weeds such as pigweed, barnyard grass, goosegrass, crabgrass and setaria with the wavelength ranging from 1000 to 2500 nm. In ENVI, by utilizing the MNF rotation to implement the noise reduction and de-correlation of hyperspectral data and reduce the band dimensions from 256 to 11, and extracting the region of interest to get the spectral library as standard spectra, finally, using the SAM taxonomy to identify cabbages and weeds, the classification effect was good when the spectral angle threshold was set as 0. 1 radians. In HSI Analyzer, after selecting the training pixels to obtain the standard spectrum, the SAM taxonomy was used to distinguish weeds from cabbages. Furthermore, in order to measure the recognition accuracy of weeds quantificationally, the statistical data of the weeds and non-weeds were obtained by comparing the SAM classification image with the best classification effects to the manual classification image. The experimental results demonstrated that, when the parameters were set as 5-point smoothing, 0-order derivative and 7-degree spectral angle, the best classification result was acquired and the recognition rate of weeds, non-weeds and overall samples was 80%, 97.3% and 96.8% respectively. The method that combined the spectral imaging technology and the SAM taxonomy together took full advantage of fusion information of spectrum and image. By applying the spatial classification algorithms to establishing training sets for spectral identification, checking the similarity among spectral vectors in the pixel level, integrating the advantages of

  11. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with Previous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalex, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul; Conrad, Pamela; Martin-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John

    2013-01-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 percent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests <0.1 percent perchlorate and ppm levels of organic carbon at landing site 1 and 2 [2]. The suggestion of perchlorate in the Viking sites [2] has been challenged on the grounds that the detected compounds (CH3Cl and CH2Cl2) were carried from Earth [4]. Recently the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. The samples analyzed were portioned from the fifth scoop at this location. The samples were heated to 835C at 35C/min with a He flow. The SAM QMS detected a major oxygen release (300-500C) [5], coupled with the release of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and chloromethylpropene) detected both by SAM QMS and GC-MS derived from known Earth organic contaminants in the instrument [6]. Calcium perchlorate appears to be the best candidate for evolved O2 in the Rocknest samples at this time but other Cl species (e.g., chlorates) are possible and must be evaluated. The potential detection of perchlorates in Rocknest material adds weight to the argument that both Viking Landers measured signatures of

  12. Mitochondrial Sorting and Assembly Machinery Subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans: Insight into the Roles of Mitochondria in Fitness, Cell Wall Integrity, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yue; Jelicic, Branka; Pettolino, Filomena; Perry, Andrew; Lo, Tricia L.; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Bantun, Farkad; Beilharz, Traude H.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Djordjevic, Julianne T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial functions impinge on cell wall integrity, drug tolerance, and virulence of human fungal pathogens. However, the mechanistic aspects of these processes are poorly understood. We focused on the mitochondrial outer membrane SAM (Sorting and Assembly Machinery) complex subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans. Inactivation of SAM37 in C. albicans leads to a large reduction in fitness, a phenotype not conserved with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data indicate that slow growth of the sam37ΔΔ mutant results from mitochondrial DNA loss, a new function for Sam37 in C. albicans, and from reduced activity of the essential SAM complex subunit Sam35. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was hypersensitive to drugs that target the cell wall and displayed altered cell wall structure, supporting a role for Sam37 in cell wall integrity in C. albicans. The sensitivity of the mutant to membrane-targeting antifungals was not significantly altered. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was avirulent in the mouse model, and bioinformatics showed that the fungal Sam37 proteins are distant from their animal counterparts and could thus represent potential drug targets. Our study provides the first direct evidence for a link between mitochondrial function and cell wall integrity in C. albicans and is further relevant for understanding mitochondrial function in fitness, antifungal drug tolerance, and virulence of this major pathogen. Beyond the relevance to fungal pathogenesis, this work also provides new insight into the mitochondrial and cellular roles of the SAM complex in fungi. PMID:22286093

  13. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  14. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  15. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions. PMID:17241003

  16. MetaSAMS--a novel software platform for taxonomic classification, functional annotation and comparative analysis of metagenome datasets.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Martha; Bekel, Thomas; Ander, Christina; Pühler, Alfred; Rupp, Oliver; Stoye, Jens; Schlüter, Andreas; Goesmann, Alexander

    2013-08-20

    Metagenomics aims at exploring microbial communities concerning their composition and functioning. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies for the analysis of environmental DNA-preparations can generate large sets of metagenome sequence data which have to be analyzed by means of bioinformatics tools to unveil the taxonomic composition of the analyzed community as well as the repertoire of genes and gene functions. A bioinformatics software platform is required that allows the automated taxonomic and functional analysis and interpretation of metagenome datasets without manual effort. To address current demands in metagenome data analyses, the novel platform MetaSAMS was developed. MetaSAMS automatically accomplishes the tasks necessary for analyzing the composition and functional repertoire of a given microbial community from metagenome sequence data by implementing two software pipelines: (i) the first pipeline consists of three different classifiers performing the taxonomic profiling of metagenome sequences and (ii) the second functional pipeline accomplishes region predictions on assembled contigs and assigns functional information to predicted coding sequences. Moreover, MetaSAMS provides tools for statistical and comparative analyses based on the taxonomic and functional annotations. The capabilities of MetaSAMS are demonstrated for two metagenome datasets obtained from a biogas-producing microbial community of a production-scale biogas plant. The MetaSAMS web interface is available at https://metasams.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de. PMID:23026555

  17. Selection and Characteristics of Fermented Salted Seafood (jeotgal)-Originated Strains with Excellent S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) Production and Probiotics Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study is executed to develop probiotics which produce S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), a methyl group donor of the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate methylation reaction within the animal cell. SAM is an essential substance for the synthesis, activation, and metabolism of hormones, neurotransmitters, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and cell membranes of animals. The SAM is also known as a nutritional supplement to improve brain functions of the human. In this study, the SAM-producing strains are identified in 18 types of salted fish, and then, the strains with excellent SAM productions are being identified, with 1 strain in the Enterococcus genus and 9 strains in the Bacillus genus. Strains with a large amount of SAM production include the lactic acid bacteria such as En. faecium and En. durans, En. sanguinicola, as well as various strains in the Bacil-lus genus. The SAM-overproducing strains show antibacterial activities with certain harmful microbes in addition to the weak acid resistances and strong bile resistances, indicating characteristics of probiotics. It is possible that the jeotgal-originated beneficial strains with overproducing SAM can be commercially utilized in order to manufacture SAM enriched foods. PMID:26760747

  18. Selection and Characteristics of Fermented Salted Seafood (jeotgal)-Originated Strains with Excellent S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) Production and Probiotics Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Park, Sunhyun; Lee, Ran-Sook; Lim, Sang-Dong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Myung-Ki

    2014-01-01

    This study is executed to develop probiotics which produce S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), a methyl group donor of the 5-methyltetrahydrofolate methylation reaction within the animal cell. SAM is an essential substance for the synthesis, activation, and metabolism of hormones, neurotransmitters, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and cell membranes of animals. The SAM is also known as a nutritional supplement to improve brain functions of the human. In this study, the SAM-producing strains are identified in 18 types of salted fish, and then, the strains with excellent SAM productions are being identified, with 1 strain in the Enterococcus genus and 9 strains in the Bacillus genus. Strains with a large amount of SAM production include the lactic acid bacteria such as En. faecium and En. durans, En. sanguinicola, as well as various strains in the Bacil-lus genus. The SAM-overproducing strains show antibacterial activities with certain harmful microbes in addition to the weak acid resistances and strong bile resistances, indicating characteristics of probiotics. It is possible that the jeotgal-originated beneficial strains with overproducing SAM can be commercially utilized in order to manufacture SAM enriched foods. PMID:26760747

  19. Photosystem I assembly on chemically tailored SAM/ Au substrates for bio-hybrid device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dibyendu; Khomami, Bamin

    2011-03-01

    Photosystem I (PS I), a supra-molecular protein complex and a biological photodiode responsible for driving natural photosynthesis mechanism, charge separates upon exposure to light. Effective use of the photo-electrochemical activities of PS I for future bio-hybrid electronic devices requires controlled attachment of these proteins onto organic/ inorganic substrates. Our results indicate that various experimental parameters alter the surface topography of PS I deposited from colloidal aqueous buffer suspensions onto OH-terminated alkanethiolate SAM /Au substrates, thereby resulting in complex columnar structures that affect the electron capture pathway of PS I. Specifically, solution phase characterizations indicate that specific detergents used for PS I stabilization in buffer solutions drive the unique colloidal chemistry to tune protein-protein interactions and prevent aggregation, thereby allowing us to tailor the morphology of surface immobilized PS I. We present surface topographical, adsorption, and electrochemical characterizations of PSI /SAM/Au substrates to elucidate protein-surface attachment dynamics and its effect on the photo-activated electronic activities of surface immobilized PS I. Sustainable Energy Education and Research Center (SEERC).

  20. Two Fe-S clusters catalyse sulfur insertion by Radical-SAM methylthiotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Forouhar, Farhad; Arragain, Simon; Atta, Mohamed; Gambarelli, Serge; Mouesca, Jean-Marie; Hussain, Munif; Xiao, Rong; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2014-01-01

    How living organisms create carbon-sulfur bonds during biosynthesis of critical sulphur-containing compounds is still poorly understood. The methylthiotransferases MiaB and RimO catalyze sulfur insertion into tRNAs and ribosomal protein S12, respectively. Both belong to a sub-group of Radical-SAM enzymes that bear two [4Fe-4S] clusters. One cluster binds S-Adenosylmethionine and generates an Ado• radical via a well- established mechanism. However, the precise role of the second cluster is unclear. For some sulfur-inserting Radical-SAM enzymes, this cluster has been proposed to act as a sacrificial source of sulfur for the reaction. In this paper, we report parallel enzymological, spectroscopic and crystallographic investigations of RimO and MiaB, which provide the first evidence that these enzymes are true catalysts and support a new sulfation mechanism involving activation of an exogenous sulfur co-substrate at an exchangeable coordination site on the second cluster, which remains intact during the reaction. PMID:23542644

  1. SAM 2 measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 9: October 1982 - April 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmaster, L. R.; Powell, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor aboard Nimbus 7 is providing 1.0 micron extinction measurements of Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages including corresponding temperature profiles provided by NOAA for the time and place of each SAM II measurement are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted, and aerosol optical depths are calculated for each week. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Arctic are unusually large due to the presence of material from the El Chichon volcano eruption in the Spring of 1982. For example, the optical depth peaked at 0.068, more than 50 times background values. Typical values of aerosol extinction and stratospheric optical depth in the Antarctic varied considerably during this period due to the transport and arrival of the material from the El Chichon eruption. For example, the stratospheric optical depth varied from 0.002 in October 1982, to 0.021 in January 1983. Polar stratospheric clouds were observed during the Arctic winter, as expected. A representative sample is provided of the ninth 6-month period of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies.

  2. Unliganded EphA3 dimerization promoted by the SAM domain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deo R.; Cao, QingQing; King, Christopher; Salotto, Matt; Ahmed, Fozia; Zhou, Xiang Yang; Pasquale, Elena B.; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma A3 (EphA3) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) regulates morphogenesis during development and is overexpressed and mutated in a variety of cancers. EphA3 activation is believed to follow a ‘seeding mechanism’ model, in which ligand binding to the monomeric receptor acts as a trigger for signal-productive receptor clustering. We study EphA3 lateral interactions on the surface of live cells and we demonstrate that EphA3 forms dimers in the absence of ligand binding. We further show that these dimers are stabilized by interactions involving the EphA3 sterile α-motif (SAM) domain. The discovery of unliganded EphA3 dimers challenges the current understanding of the chain of EphA3 activation events and suggests that EphA3 may follow the ‘pre-formed dimer’ model of activation known to be relevant for other receptor tyrosine kinases. The present work also establishes a new role for the SAM domain in promoting Eph receptor lateral interactions and signalling on the cell surface. PMID:26232493

  3. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir from May 1997 to June 1998 (NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1999-01-01

    During NASA Increments 5, 6, and 7 (May 1997 to June 1998), about eight gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station Mir. The data were recorded on twenty-seven optical disks which were returned to Earth on Orbiter missions STS-86, STS-89, and STS-91. During these increments, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support various microgravity experiments. This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity acceleration environment to which the experiments were exposed. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous Mir increment summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services project.

  4. Toward a prediction of the redox properties of electroactive SAMs: a free energy calculation by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Gaëlle; Goujon, Florent; Bonal, Christine; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2010-10-14

    We report free energy calculations of FcC(6)S-/C(4)S-Au and FcC(6)S-/C(12)S-Au binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed by one ferrocenylhexanethiolate chain and alkylthiolate chains. We demonstrate that the free energy perturbation methods are able to reproduce the positive shift of the redox potential when the coadsorbed butanethiolate C(4)S chains are replaced by dodecanethiolate C(12)S chains. The different contributions to the Ewald summation involved in the perturbation process are thoroughly described. We complete the study by a microscopic description of the binary SAMs before and after oxidation. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations evidence that the formation of the ion-pair between the ferricinium and a single perchlorate anion of the supporting electrolyte is more favored in FcC(6)S-/C(12)S-Au SAM. PMID:20860387

  5. Wet Chemistry on SAM: How it Helps to Detect Organics on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Arnaud; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, Cyril; Glavin, Danny; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Eigenbrode, Jen; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jen; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Dworkin, Jason; Mahaffy, Paul; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars with wet chemistry. This analytical technique modifies organic components in such a way that improves their detection, either by releasing the compounds from sample matrices, or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter effect is particularly important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, onboards two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization [1-2] and thermochemolysis [3-4]. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment in SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in the first SAM analyzes, and the implications of this detection. Chemical derivatization of polar molecular compounds is achieved by the MTBSTFA (N-Methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide) / DMF (Dimethylformamide) silylation reaction in order to transform refractory polar compounds into a more volatile form that can be analyzed and detected by GCMS. The first samples of Martian soil (Rocknest, Gale crater) have been analyzed by evolved gas analysis (EGA) and via GC using thermal conductivity (TCD) and MS detection. The samples have been heated up to approximately 840°C with a heating rate of 35°C/min under He flow. The evolved gas was analyzed directly by the QMS in EGA mode. For GC analyses, the majority of the gas released was trapped on a hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax TA, Carbosieve G) over a specific temperature range. Trapped volatiles were then released by heating the trap to ~300 °C and sent to the GC under He flow. The first results obtained when running an analysis with an empty cup (no solid sample) showed the presence of MTBSTFA in the system. MTBSTFA was first detected in the EGA-QMS analysis blank then by GC-TCD-QMS analysis. This means that MTBSTFA is part

  6. Data handling with SAM and art at the NOvA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Davies, G. S.; Illingworth, R.; Mayer, N.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.; Rocco, D.; Zirnstein, J.

    2015-12-23

    During operations, NOvA produces between 5,000 and 7,000 raw files per day with peaks in excess of 12,000. These files must be processed in several stages to produce fully calibrated and reconstructed analysis files. In addition, many simulated neutrino interactions must be produced and processed through the same stages as data. To accommodate the large volume of data and Monte Carlo, production must be possible both on the Fermilab grid and on off-site farms, such as the ones accessible through the Open Science Grid. To handle the challenge of cataloging these files and to facilitate their off-line processing, we have adopted the SAM system developed at Fermilab. SAM indexes files according to metadata, keeps track of each file's physical locations, provides dataset management facilities, and facilitates data transfer to off-site grids. To integrate SAM with Fermilab's art software framework and the NOvA production workflow, we have developed methods to embed metadata into our configuration files, art files, and standalone ROOT files. A module in the art framework propagates the embedded information from configuration files into art files, and from input art files to output art files, allowing us to maintain a complete processing history within our files. Embedding metadata in configuration files also allows configuration files indexed in SAM to be used as inputs to Monte Carlo production jobs. Further, SAM keeps track of the input files used to create each output file. Parentage information enables the construction of self-draining datasets which have become the primary production paradigm used at NOvA. In this study we will present an overview of SAM at NOvA and how it has transformed the file production framework used by the experiment.

  7. Hierarchical Storage Management at the NASA Center for Computational Sciences: From UniTree to SAM-QFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmon, Ellen; Tarshish, Adina; Palm, Nancy; Patel, Sanjay; Saletta, Marty; Vanderlan, Ed; Rouch, Mike; Burns, Lisa; Duffy, Daniel; Caine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the data management issues associated with a large center like the NCCS and how these issues are addressed. More specifically, the focus of this paper is on the recent transition from a legacy UniTree (Legato) system to a SAM-QFS (Sun) system. Therefore, this paper will describe the motivations, from both a hardware and software perspective, for migrating from one system to another. Coupled with the migration from UniTree into SAM-QFS, the complete mass storage environment was upgraded to provide high availability, redundancy, and enhanced performance. This paper will describe the resulting solution and lessons learned throughout the migration process.

  8. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  9. Variability in AIRS-retrieved cloud amount and thermodynamic phase over west versus east Antarctica influenced by the SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Kahn, Brian H.; Lazzara, Matthew A.; Rowe, Penny; Walden, Von P.

    2015-02-01

    In a sample of summertime cloud retrievals from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), a positive Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index polarity is associated with greater cloud frequency and larger effective cloud fraction over West Antarctica compared with a negative SAM index polarity. The opposite result appears over the high East Antarctic Plateau. Comparing AIRS-retrieved cloud fraction with Antarctic Automatic Weather Station 2 m air temperature data, a positive and significant correlation is found over most of West Antarctica, signifying a longwave heating effect of clouds. Over East Antarctica correlations between Sun elevation and 2 m air temperature are strongest, consistent with lower cloud amount.

  10. Engine Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperature of turbine engines reduces fuel consumption and increases engine efficiency. However, engine components must be protected from excessive heat. Lewis Research Center has successfully developed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which are deposited on the components. They insulate, offer oxidation and corrosion resistance and increase adherence. Surface temperatures can be reduced by 200 degrees centigrade or more. G. E. Aircraft Engines, a Lewis contractor, now uses a TBC based on the one developed at Lewis, on production engines. The system, which consists of a bond and a top coat extends component life from 1.3 to 2 times. The company is also testing TBCs on components that operate at higher temperatures.

  11. COATING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  12. MSL SAM-Like Evolved Gas Analyses of Si-rich Amorphous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, Amy; Knudson, Christine; Sutter, Brad; Andrejkovicova, Slavka; Archer, P. Douglas; Franz, Heather; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Morris, Richard; Ming, Douglas; Sun, Vivian; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Chemical and mineralogical analyses of several samples from Murray Formation mudstones and Stimson Formation sandstones by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) revealed the presence of Si-rich amorphous or poorly ordered materials. It is possible to identify the presence of high-SiO2 vs. lower SiO2 amorphous materials (e.g., basaltic glasses), based on the position of the resulting wide diffraction features in XRD patterns from the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument, but it is not possible to distinguish between several candidate high-SiO2 amorphous materials such as opal-A or rhyolitic glass. In the Buckskin (BS) sample from the upper Murray Formation, and the Big Sky (BY) and Greenhorn (GH) samples from the Stimson Formation, analyses by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument showed very broad H2O evolutions during sample heating at temperatures >450-500degC which had not been observed from previous samples. BS also had a significant broad evolution <450-500degC. We have undertaken a laboratory study targeted at understanding if the data from SAM can be used to place constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases. SAM-like evolved gas analyses have been performed on several opal and rhyolitic glass samples. Opal-A samples exhibited wide <500degC H2O evolutions, with lesser H2O evolved above 500degC. H2O evolution traces from rhyolitic glasses varied, having either two broad H2O peaks, <300degC and >500degC, or a broad peak centered around 400degC. For samples that produced two evolutions, the lower temperature peak is more intense than the higher temperature peak, a trend also exhibited by opal-A. This trend is consistent with data from BS, but does not seem consistent with data from BY and GH which evolved most of their H2O >500degC. It may be that dehydration of opal-A and/or rhyolitic glass can result in some preferential loss of lower temperature H2O, to produce traces that more closely resemble BY and GH. This is currently under investigation

  13. Jeffries Matusita-Spectral Angle Mapper (JM-SAM) spectral matching for species level mapping at Bhitarkanika, Muthupet and Pichavaram mangroves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padma, S.; Sanjeevi, S.

    2014-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral matching algorithm by integrating the stochastic Jeffries-Matusita measure (JM) and the deterministic Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), to accurately map the species and the associated landcover types of the mangroves of east coast of India using hyperspectral satellite images. The JM-SAM algorithm signifies the combination of a qualitative distance measure (JM) and a quantitative angle measure (SAM). The spectral capabilities of both the measures are orthogonally projected using the tangent and sine functions to result in the combined algorithm. The developed JM-SAM algorithm is implemented to discriminate the mangrove species and the landcover classes of Pichavaram (Tamil Nadu), Muthupet (Tamil Nadu) and Bhitarkanika (Odisha) mangrove forests along the Eastern Indian coast using the Hyperion image dat asets that contain 242 bands. The developed algorithm is extended in a supervised framework for accurate classification of the Hyperion image. The pixel-level matching performance of the developed algorithm is assessed by the Relative Spectral Discriminatory Probability (RSDPB) and Relative Spectral Discriminatory Entropy (RSDE) measures. From the values of RSDPB and RSDE, it is inferred that hybrid JM-SAM matching measure results in improved discriminability of the mangrove species and the associated landcover types than the individual SAM and JM algorithms. This performance is reflected in the classification accuracies of species and landcover map of Pichavaram mangrove ecosystem. Thus, the JM-SAM (TAN) matching algorithm yielded an accuracy better than SAM and JM measures at an average difference of 13.49 %, 7.21 % respectively, followed by JM-SAM (SIN) at 12.06%, 5.78% respectively. Similarly, in the case of Muthupet, JM-SAM (TAN) yielded an increased accuracy than SAM and JM measures at an average difference of 12.5 %, 9.72 % respectively, followed by JM-SAM (SIN) at 8.34 %, 5.55% respectively. For Bhitarkanika, the combined

  14. Ozone Oxidation of Self-Assembled Monolayers on SiOx-Coated Zinc Selenide Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, T. M.; Ryder, O. S.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Airborne particles are important for visibility, human health, climate, and atmospheric reactions. Atmospheric particles contain a significant fraction of organics and such compounds present on airborne particles are susceptible to oxidation by atmospheric oxidants, such as OH, ozone, halogen atoms, and nitrogen trioxide. Oxidized organics associated with airborne particles are thought to be polar, hygroscopic species with enhanced cloud-nucleating properties. Oxide layers on silicon, or SiO2-coated substrates, act as models of environmentally relevant surfaces such as dust particles upon which organics adsorb. We have shown previously that ozone oxidation of unsaturated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on silicon attenuated total reflectance (ATR) crystals leads to the formation of carbonyl groups and micron-sized, hydrophobic organic aggregates surrounded by carbon depleted substrate that do not have increased water uptake as previously assumed. Reported here are further ATR-FTIR studies of the oxidation of alkene SAMs on ZnSe and SiO2-coated ZnSe. These substrates have the advantage that they transmit below 1500 cm-1, allowing detection of additional product species. These experiments show that the loss of C=C and formation of carbonyl groups is also accompanied by formation of a peak at 1110 cm-1, attributed to the secondary ozonide. Details concerning the products and mechanism of ozonolysis of alkene SAMs on surfaces based on these new data are presented and the implications for the oxidation of alkenes on airborne dust particles are discussed.

  15. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in the First Drilled Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzales, R.; Freissinet, C.; McKay, C. P.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Buch, A.; Brunner, A. E.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D.; Steele, A.; Sutter, B.; Szopa, C.; Wray, J. J.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials at Yellowknife Bay in Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include NO, HCN, ClCN, CH3CN, and TFMA (trifluoro-N-methyl-acetamide). Confirmation of indigenous Martian N-bearing compounds requires quantifying N contribution from the terrestrial derivatization reagents (e.g. N-methyl-N-tertbutyldimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, MTBSTFA and dimethylformamide, DMF) carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. Nitrogen species detected in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate, a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples.

  16. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in the First Drilled Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P.; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Buch, Arnaud; Coll, Patrice; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Franz, Heather B.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Ming, Douglas W.; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril; Wray, James J.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    The Sampl;e Analysis at Mars (sam) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials from the three sites at Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include No, HCN, ClCN, and TFMA ((trifluoro-N-methyl-acetamide), Confirmation of indigenous Martian nitrogen-bearing compounds requires quantifying N contribution from the terrestrial derivatization reagents carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. Nitrogen species detected in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples.

  17. EEAP boiler and chiller study at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-18

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at Fort Sam Houston (FSH) in San Antonio, Texas, between November 28, 1994 and June 15, 1995. The site survey, data collection and analysis was performed by John Carter, E.I.T, Tom Holthaus, P.E., Walter H. Williams III, P.E., and C.A. Pieper, P.E.. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were limited to central boiler and chiller plant systems serving specific building groups at FSH.

  18. SAM managed cache and processing for clusters in a worldwide grid-enabled system

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Baranovski et al.

    2002-07-17

    SAM has been developed within the Computing Division at Fermilab as a versatile, distributed, data management system. One of its many features is its ability to control processing and manage a distributed cache within a cluster of compute servers. Requirements, concepts, and features of this system are described and issues involved in interfacing it to several batch systems are discussed. The system is used within the Dzero experimental collaboration to distribute hundreds of Terabytes of data for processing and analysis around the world. Several hardware configurations deployed at Fermilab are described. Data is currently disseminated using this system to over two dozen sites worldwide, and this number will grow to nearly one hundred in the coming years. The planned design evolution to accommodate this growth is discussed, and the transition of the system to grid standard middleware is described.

  19. Re-engineering SAM or Changing the Engine in the Train While it is Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, R.; Mengel, M.; Norman, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few years at Fermilab we re-architect-ed our SAM1[1] family of data catalog and file transfer tools - including major changes - while continuing to transfer over 1 Pb/month of data to multiple existing experiments and bring new experiments on board. This work was done with less than 3 FTE-years of effort, and the changes made include major ones, such as changing interprocess communication protocols, migrating database back-ends, removing and replacing major components, and supporting new file delivery methods. This paper will summarize the approaches we have used to do this, including using design patterns like the Facade, Adapter, and Command patterns, and assisting experiments one at a time with client migration. This process has allowed us to modernize our infrastructure with reasonable costs in both calendar time and developer effort, while continuing to provide the operating service to our customers with minimal interruptions.

  20. Granular statistical mechanics - Building on the legacy of Sir Sam Edwards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    When Sir Sam Edwards laid down the foundations for the statistical mechanics of jammed granular materials he opened a new field in soft condensed matter and many followed. In this presentation we review briefly the Edwards formalism and some of its less discussed consequences. We point out that the formalism is useful for other classes of systems - cellular and porous materials. A certain shortcoming of the original formalism is then discussed and a modification to overcome it is proposed. Finally, a derivation of an equation of state with the new formalism is presented; the equation of state is analogous to the PVT relation for thermal gases, relating the volume, the boundary stress and measures of the structural and stress fluctuations. NUDT, Changsha, China, Imperial College London, UK, Cambridge University, UK.

  1. MSL/SAM Measurements of Volatile Isotopes, and their Implications for Atmospheric Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Sushil K.; Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Christopher; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela; Franz, Heather; Grotzinger, John; Jones, John; Leshin, Laurie; Malespin, Charles; Manning, Heidi; Navarro-Gonzalez, Raphael; Owen, Tobias; Pepin, Robert; Schwenzer, Susanne; Trainer, Melissa

    2014-05-01

    High precision measurements of the isotopes of carbon and oxygen in CO2, hydrogen in H2O, nitrogen in N2, and argon in the martian atmosphere have been made by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity Rover [1,2,3,4]. The resulting values in per mil are 46 for δ13C (relative to VPDB reference standard), 48 for δ18O (VSMOW), 5880 for δD (VSMOW), 572 for δ15N (relative to earth atmosphere), and 4.2 for 36Ar/38Ar (or δ38Ar=310 relative to sun reference standard). The observed enrichment of the heavier isotope over the lighter isotope means that loss to space rather than loss to the surface dominates the isotopic composition in the martian atmosphere. Vertical mixing transports the volatiles from the surface up to the upper atmosphere. While eddy diffusion and molecular diffusion control the distribution of the noble gases, photochemistry also plays a significant role in the distribution of the other volatiles as they diffuse to the upper atmosphere. The above SAM data on the isotopic ratios of carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and argon implies a massive loss of the atmosphere from Mars in the past four billion years. Only hydrogen (hence water) is likely to escape thermally due to the low exospheric temperature of Mars. However, the lack of intrinsic magnetic field on Mars allows solar wind to interact directly with the atmosphere, thus opening up a myriad of possibilities for escape of volatiles from Mars. One such mechanism studied by the ion mass analyzer instrument on Mars Express finds that at current rate of erosion by solar wind, Mars may have lost between 0.2 and 4 millibar of the CO2 atmosphere in the past 3.5 billion years [5]. However, these authors [5] stress that other mechanisms including photochemical, sputtering and cold plasma escape may result in up to 1000 times greater rate of atmospheric loss based on models. Any fractionation in the isotopes of the heavy noble gas, xenon, would have occurred prior to approximately 4 Ga

  2. C–H Methylation of Heteroarenes Inspired by Radical SAM Methyl Transferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A practical C–H functionalization method for the methylation of heteroarenes is presented. Inspiration from Nature’s methylating agent, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), allowed for the design and development of zinc bis(phenylsulfonylmethanesulfinate), or PSMS. The action of PSMS on a heteroarene generates a (phenylsulfonyl)methylated intermediate that can be easily separated from unreacted starting material. This intermediate can then be desulfonylated to the methylated product or elaborated to a deuteriomethylated product, and can divergently access medicinally important motifs. This mild, operationally simple protocol that can be conducted in open air at room temperature is compatible with sensitive functional groups for the late-stage functionalization of pharmacologically relevant substrates. PMID:24611732

  3. High-latitude stratospheric aerosols measured by the SAM II satellite system in 1978 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Grams, G. W.; Hamill, P.; Steele, H. M.; Swissler, T. J.; Herman, B. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Russell, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Results of the first year of data collection by the SAM (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement) II satellite system are presented. Almost 10,000 profiles of stratospheric aerosol extinction in the Arctic and Antarctic regions are used to construct plots of weekly averaged aerosol extinction versus altitude and time and stratospheric optical depth versus time. Corresponding temperature fields are presented. These data show striking similarities in the aerosol behavior for corresponding seasons. Wintertime polar stratospheric clouds that are strongly correlated with temperature are documented. They are much more prevalent in the Antarctic stratosphere during the cold austral winter and increase the stratospheric optical depths by as much as an order of magnitude for a period of about 2 months. These clouds might represent a sink for stratospheric water vapor and must be considered in the radiative budget for this region and time.

  4. SAGE and SAM II measurements of global stratospheric aerosol optical depth and mass loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Several volcanic eruptions between November 1979 and April 1981 have injected material into the stratosphere. The SAGE and SAM II satellite systems have measured, with global coverage, the 1-micron extinction produced by this material, and examples of the data product are shown in the form of global maps of stratospheric optical depth and altitude-latitude plots of zonal mean extinction. These data, and that for the volcanically quiet period in early 1979, have been used to determine the changes in the total stratospheric mass loading. Estimates have also been made of the contribution to the total aerosol mass from each eruption. It has been found that between 1979 and mid-1981, the total stratospheric aerosol mass increased from a background level of approximately 570,000 metric tons to a peak of approximately 1,300,000 metric tons.

  5. SAGE I and SAM II measurements of 1 micron aerosol extinction in the free troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Farrukh, U. O.; Wang, P. H.; Deepak, A.

    1988-01-01

    The SAGE-I and SAM-II satellite sensors were designed to measure, with global coverage, the 1 micron extinction produced by the stratospheric aerosol. In the absence of high altitude clouds, similar measurements may be made for the free tropospheric aerosol. Median extinction values at middle and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, for altitudes between 5 and 10 km, are found to be one-half to one order of magnitude greater than values at corresponding latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, a seasonal increase by a factor of 1.5-2 was observed in both hemispheres, in 1979-80, in local spring and summer. Following major volcanic eruptions, a long-lived enhancement of the aerosol extinction is observed for altitudes above 5 km.

  6. Soil Moisture Monitoring Using GNSS-R Signals; First Experimental Results with the SAM Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido, A.; Martin-Puig, C.; Felip, D.; Garcia, M.; Caparrini, M.; Farres, E.; Ruffini, G.

    2009-04-01

    is the most sensitive band to soil volumetric water content, i.e. soil moisture. Secondly, variations on thermal background do not contaminate GNSS-R signals as they do for other remote sensing techniques, such as radiometry. Finally, GNSS scatterometry from space has a potential higher spatial resolution than microwave radiometry, due to the highly stable carrier and code modulations of the incident signals which enables the use of Delay Doppler Mapping. However, in order to be able to obtain accurate SM estimates there are several effects that need to be taken into consideration. Some of those are mainly due to diffuse scattering effects over the soil surface, for instance effects due to surface roughness, vegetation canopy, and noise. This paper reviews the theoretical approach for SM retrieval using GNSS-R, and focuses on the description of the development of an innovative GNSS-R system for soil moisture retrieval (named SAM). The validation campaigns performed with the SAM sensor, together with the results obtained are presented in the paper, which is finalized with the conclusions achieved and the ideas for future work on GNSS-R based sensors. AKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to thank the European Space Agency for partially funding the SAM system development in the framework of the GSTP program, and Tragsatec for their collaboration in the acquisition of ground truth data and satellite imagery processing used for the SAM instrument validation. REFERENCES [1] A. Kavak, G. Xu, W.J. Vogel, GPS Multipath Fade Meassurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties, University of Texas, Austin, 1998. [2] D. Masters, V. Zavorotny, S. Katzberg, W. Emery GPS Signal Scattering from Land for Moisture Content Determination IGARSS Proceedings, July 24-28, 2000.

  7. Stereochemical Course of the Reaction Catalyzed by RimO, a Radical SAM Methylthiotransferase.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Bradley J; Booker, Squire J

    2016-03-01

    RimO is a member of the growing radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes, which use a reduced [4Fe-4S] cluster to effect reductive cleavage of the 5' C-S bond of SAM to form a 5'-deoxyadenosyl 5'-radical (5'-dA(•)) intermediate. RimO uses this potent oxidant to catalyze the attachment of a methylthio group (-SCH3) to C3 of aspartate 89 of protein S12, one of 21 proteins that compose the 30S subunit of the bacterial ribosome. However, the exact mechanism by which this transformation takes place has remained elusive. Herein, we describe the stereochemical course of the RimO reaction. Using peptide mimics of the S12 protein bearing deuterium at the 3 pro-R or 3 pro-S positions of the target aspartyl residue, we show that RimO from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) catalyzes abstraction of the pro-S hydrogen atom, as evidenced by the transfer of deuterium into 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-dAH). The observed kinetic isotope effect on H atom versus D atom abstraction is ∼1.9, suggesting that this step is at least partially rate determining. We also demonstrate that Bt RimO can utilize the flavodoxin/flavodoxin oxidoreductase/NADPH reducing system from Escherichia coli as a source of requisite electrons. Use of this in vivo reducing system decreases, but does not eliminate, formation of 5'-dAH in excess of methylthiolated product. PMID:26871608

  8. Optimisation and Characterisation of Anti-Fouling Ternary SAM Layers for Impedance-Based Aptasensors.

    PubMed

    Miodek, Anna; Regan, Edward M; Bhalla, Nikhil; Hopkins, Neal A E; Goodchild, Sarah A; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    An aptasensor with enhanced anti-fouling properties has been developed. As a case study, the aptasensor was designed with specificity for human thrombin. The sensing platform was developed on screen printed electrodes and is composed of a self-assembled monolayer made from a ternary mixture of 15-base thiolated DNA aptamers specific for human thrombin co-immobilised with 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) and further passivated with 1-mercapto-6-hexanol (MCH). HDT binds to the surface by two of its thiol groups forming alkyl chain bridges and this architecture protects from non-specific attachment of molecules to the electrode surface. Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), the aptasensor is able to detect human thrombin as variations in charge transfer resistance (Rct) upon protein binding. After exposure to a high concentration of non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) solution, no changes in the Rct value were observed, highlighting the bio-fouling resistance of the surface generated. In this paper, we present the optimisation and characterisation of the aptasensor based on the ternary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) layer. We show that anti-fouling properties depend on the type of gold surface used for biosensor construction, which was also confirmed by contact angle measurements. We further studied the ratio between aptamers and HDT, which can determine the specificity and selectivity of the sensing layer. We also report the influence of buffer pH and temperature used for incubation of electrodes with proteins on detection and anti-fouling properties. Finally, the stability of the aptasensor was studied by storage of modified electrodes for up to 28 days in different buffers and atmospheric conditions. Aptasensors based on ternary SAM layers are highly promising for clinical applications for detection of a range of proteins in real biological samples. PMID:26426017

  9. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biogenesis: Demonstration that PqqE from Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Radical SAM Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Wecksler, Stephen R.; Stoll, Stefan; Tran, Ha; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Wu, Shu-pao; King, David; Britt, R. David; Klinman, Judith P.

    2009-01-01

    Biogenesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in Klebsiella pneumoniae requires the expression of six genes (pqqA-F). One of these genes (pqqE) encodes a 43 kDa protein (PqqE) that plays a role in the initial steps in PQQ formation (Veletrop et al. (1995) J. Bacteriol. 177, 5088-5098). PqqE contains two highly conserved cysteine motifs at the N and C-termini, with the N-terminal motif comprised of a consensus sequence of CX3CX2C that is unique to a family of proteins known as radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzymes (Sofia et al. (2001) Nucleic Acids Res. 29, 1097-1106). PqqE from K. pneumoniae was cloned into E. coli and expressed as the native protein and with an N-terminal His6-tag. Anaerobic expression and purification of the His6-tag PqqE results in an enzyme with a brownish-red hue indicative of Fe-S cluster formation. Spectroscopic and physical analyses indicate that PqqE contains a mixture of Fe-S clusters, with the predominant form of the enzyme containing two [4Fe-4S] clusters. PqqE isolated anaerobically yields active enzyme capable of cleaving SAM to methionine and 5′-deoxyadenosine in an uncoupled reaction (kobs = 0.011 ± 0.001 min-1). In this reaction, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical either abstracts a hydrogen atom from a solvent accessible position in the enzyme or obtains a proton and electron from buffer. The putative PQQ substrate PqqA has not yet been shown to be modified by PqqE, implying either that PqqA must be modified before becoming the substrate for PqqE and/or that another protein in the biosynthetic pathway is critical for the initial steps in PQQ biogenesis. PMID:19746930

  10. Investigating the Origin of Chlorohydrocarbons Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument at Rocknest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D.; Archer, D.; Brunner, A.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Conrad, P.; Coscia, D.; Dworkin J.; Eigenbrode, J.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin, M.; McKay, C.; Miller, K.; Ming, D.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Szopa, C.; Teinturier, S.

    2013-01-01

    The search for organic compounds on Mars, including molecules of either abiotic or biological origin is one of the key goals of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Previously the Viking and Phoenix Lander missions searched for organic compounds, but did not find any definitive evidence of martian organic material in the soils. The Viking pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments did not detect any organic compounds of martian or exogenous origin above a level of a few parts-per-billion (ppb) in the near surface regolith at either landing site [1]. Viking did detect chloromethane and dichloromethane at pmol levels (up to 40 ppb) after heating the soil samples up to 500 C (Table 1), although it was originally argued that the chlorohydrocarbons were derived from cleaning solvents used on the instrument hardware, and not from the soil samples themselves [1]. More recently, it was suggested that the chlorohydrocarbons detected by Viking may have been formed by oxidation of indigenous organic matter during pyrolysis of the soil in the presence of perchlorates [2]. Although it is unknown if the Viking soils contained perchlorates, Phoenix did reveal relatively high concentrations (0.6 wt%) of perchlorate salt in the icy regolith [3], therefore, it is possible that the chlorohydrocarbons detected by Viking were produced, at least partially, during the experiments [2,4]. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL analyzed the organic composition of the soil at Rocknest in Gale Crater using a combination of pyrolysis evolved gas analysis (EGA) and GCMS. One empty cup procedural blank followed by multiple EGA-GCMS analyses of the Rocknest soil were carried out. Here we will discuss the results from these SAM measurements at Rocknest and the steps taken to determine the source of the chlorohydrocarbons.

  11. Optimisation and Characterisation of Anti-Fouling Ternary SAM Layers for Impedance-Based Aptasensors

    PubMed Central

    Miodek, Anna; Regan, Edward M.; Bhalla, Nikhil; Hopkins, Neal A.E.; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Estrela, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    An aptasensor with enhanced anti-fouling properties has been developed. As a case study, the aptasensor was designed with specificity for human thrombin. The sensing platform was developed on screen printed electrodes and is composed of a self-assembled monolayer made from a ternary mixture of 15-base thiolated DNA aptamers specific for human thrombin co-immobilised with 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) and further passivated with 1-mercapto-6-hexanol (MCH). HDT binds to the surface by two of its thiol groups forming alkyl chain bridges and this architecture protects from non-specific attachment of molecules to the electrode surface. Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), the aptasensor is able to detect human thrombin as variations in charge transfer resistance (Rct) upon protein binding. After exposure to a high concentration of non-specific Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) solution, no changes in the Rct value were observed, highlighting the bio-fouling resistance of the surface generated. In this paper, we present the optimisation and characterisation of the aptasensor based on the ternary self-assembled monolayer (SAM) layer. We show that anti-fouling properties depend on the type of gold surface used for biosensor construction, which was also confirmed by contact angle measurements. We further studied the ratio between aptamers and HDT, which can determine the specificity and selectivity of the sensing layer. We also report the influence of buffer pH and temperature used for incubation of electrodes with proteins on detection and anti-fouling properties. Finally, the stability of the aptasensor was studied by storage of modified electrodes for up to 28 days in different buffers and atmospheric conditions. Aptasensors based on ternary SAM layers are highly promising for clinical applications for detection of a range of proteins in real biological samples. PMID:26426017

  12. A novel Streptomyces gene, samR, with different effects on differentiation of Streptomyces ansochromogenes and Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huarong; Tian, Yuqing; Yang, Haihua; Liu, Gang; Nie, Liping

    2002-03-01

    A 1.4-kb DNA fragment from Streptomyces ansochromogenes accelerated mycelium formation of S. ansochromogenes when present on a multicopy plasmid. The DNA fragment contains one complete open reading frame, designated samR, encoding a protein with 213 amino acids that contains a likely DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif close to its N-terminus. The deduced SamR protein resembles the product of the hppR gene, which is involved in the regulation of catabolism of 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl) propionate in Rhodococcus globerulus. A samR disruption mutant was constructed that presented a bald phenotype and failed to form aerial hyphae and spores. We suggest that samR plays an important role in the emergence of aerial hyphae from substrate mycelium. An almost identical gene of Streptomyces coelicolor was also subjected to gene disruption. Surprisingly, the mutant was able to develop an aerial mycelium, but it remained white and deficient in sporulation instead of forming gray spores. PMID:11907684

  13. An Annotated Bibliography of Theses: The College of Criminal Justice, Sam Houston State University, 1965-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grande, Peter J.; Wood, Richard J.

    A description of Sam Houston University and the College of Criminal Justice introduces this annotated bibliography, which provides a single comprehensive listing of the master's degree theses written by students in the criminal justice program from its establishment in 1965 through 1990. Several 1991 theses are included although their call numbers…

  14. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 2: The Feasibility of a Randomized Control Trial of the SAM Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  15. Isothiourea-Mediated Organocatalytic Michael Addition-Lactonization on a Surface: Modification of SAMs on Silicon Oxide Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ross; Parkin, John D; Smith, Andrew D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Tailoring the functionality of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be achieved either by depositing prefunctionalized molecules with the appropriate terminal groups or by chemical modification of an existing SAM in situ. The latter approach is particularly advantageous to allow for diversity of surface functionalization from a single SAM and if the incorporation of bulky groups is desired. In the present study an organocatalytic isothiourea-mediated Michael addition-lactonization process analogous to a previously reported study in solution is presented. An achiral isothiourea, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrimido[2,1-b]benzothiazole (DHPB), promotes the intermolecular Michael addition-lactonization of a trifluoromethylenone terminated SAM and a variety of arylacetic acids affording C(6)-trifluoromethyldihydropyranones tethered to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry analysis were conducted to confirm the presence of the substituted dihydropyranone. A model study of this approach was also performed in solution to probe the reaction diastereoselectivity as it cannot be measured directly on the surface. PMID:27015037

  16. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Composition of Yellowknife Bay Sediments: Measurements by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Archer, P. D.; Brunner, A. E.; Grotzinger,J. P.; Jones, J. H.; Leshin, L. A.; Miller, K.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Niles, P. B.; Owen, T. C.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Since landing at Gale Crater in Au-gust 2012, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instru-ment suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) “Curiosity” rover has analyzed solid samples from the martian regolith in three locations, beginning with a scoop of aeolian deposits from the Rocknest (RN) sand shadow. Curiosity subsequently traveled to Yellowknife Bay, where SAM analyzed samples from two separate holes drilled into the Sheepbed Mudstone, designated John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples revealed the presence of H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phas-es, in most cases at abundances below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. In the absence of definitive mineralogical identification by CheMin, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases through examination of tem-peratures at which gases are evolved from solid sam-ples. In addition, the isotopic composition of these gas-es may be used to identify possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. Here we report C and S isotope ratios for CO2 and SO2 evolved from the JK and CB mudstone samples as measured with SAM’s quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw com-parisons to RN.

  17. Orbital dependent ultrafast charge transfer dynamics of ferrocenyl-functionalized SAMs on gold studied by core-hole clock spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liang; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Li; Nerngchamnong, Nisachol; Feng, Yuan-Ping; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Qi, Dong-Chen; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the charge transport properties in general of different molecular components in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is of importance for the rational design of SAM molecular structures for molecular electronics. In this study, we study an important aspect of the charge transport properties, i.e. the charge transfer (CT) dynamics between the active molecular component (in this case, the ferrocenyl moieties of a ferrocenyl-n-alkanethiol SAM) and the electrode using synchrotron-based core-hole clock (CHC) spectroscopy. The characteristic CT times are found to depend strongly on the character of the ferrocenyl-derived molecular orbitals (MOs) which mediate the CT process. Furthermore, by systemically shifting the position of the ferrocenyl moiety in the SAM, it is found that the CT characteristics of the ferrocenyl MOs display distinct dependence on its distance to the electrode. These results demonstrate experimentally that the efficiency and rate of charge transport through the molecular backbone can be modulated by resonant injection of charge carriers into specific MOs.

  18. An analytical approach to air defense: cost, effectiveness and SWOT analysis of employing fighter aircraft and modern SAM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kus, Orcun; Kocaman, Ibrahim; Topcu, Yucel; Karaca, Volkan

    2012-05-01

    The problem of defending a specific airspace is among the main issues a military commander to solve. Proper protection of own airspace is crucial for mission success at the battlefield. The military doctrines of most world armed forces involve two main options of defending the airspace. One of them is utilizing formations of fighter aircraft, which is a flexible choice. The second option is deploying modern SAM (Surface to Air Missile) systems, which is more expansive. On the other hand the decision makers are to cope with miscellaneous restrictions such as the budgeting problems. This study defines air defense concept according to modern air warfare doctrine. It considers an air defense scenario over an arbitrary airspace and compares the performance and cost-effectiveness of employing fighter aircraft and SAM systems. It also presents SWOT (Strenghts - Weakness - Opportunities - Threats) analyses of air defense by fighter aircraft and by modern SAMs and tries to point out whichever option is better. We conclude that deploying SAMs has important advantages over using fighter aircraft by means of interception capacity within a given time period and is cost-effective.

  19. A Sophomore-to-Junior Mentoring Program that Works: The SAM Program at the University of Texas Pan American

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Maria Elena

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to increase the retention rates of college sophomores in a Hispanic Serving Institution in south Texas, university administrators created and implemented a successful peer mentoring model, the Sophomore Academic Mentoring (SAM) Program. Results suggest that the program has contributed to an increase in retention for second year,…

  20. Boron (B) deprivation increases plasma homocysteine and decreases liver S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diverse effects of B deprivation suggest that B affects a biomolecule involved in a variety of biochemical reactions. An experiment was conducted to determine whether dietary B affects the liver concentration of SAM, a frequently used enzyme substrate, especially for methylation reactions that y...

  1. Detection of Organic Constituents Including Chloromethylpropene in the Analyses of the ROCKNEST Drift by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Summons, R. E.; Mahaffy, P.; Archer, D.; Brunner, A.; Conrad, P.; Freissinet, C.; Martin, M.; McKay, C.; Hurowitz, J.; Evans, J.; Anderson, M.; Jandura, L.; Brown, K.; Logan C.; Kuhn, S.; Anderson, R.; Beegle, L.; Blakkolb, B.; Katz, I.; Limonadi, D.; Rainen, R.; Umland, J.

    2013-01-01

    key challenge in assessing the habitability of martian environments is the detection of organic matter - a requirement of all life as we know it. The Curiosity rover, which landed on August 6, 2012 in Gale Crater of Mars, includes the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite capable of in situ analysis of gaseous organic components thermally evolved from sediment samples collected, sieved, and delivered by the MSL rover. On Sol 94, SAM received its first solid sample: scooped sediment from Rocknest that was sieved to <150 m particle size. Multiple 10-40 mg portions of the scoop #5 sample were delivered to SAM for analyses. Prior to their introduction, a blank (empty cup) analysis was performed. This blank served 1) to clean the analytical instrument of SAMinternal materials that accumulated in the gas processing system since integration into the rover, and 2) to characterize the background signatures of SAM. Both the blank and the Rocknest samples showed the presence of hydrocarbon components.

  2. "Extraordinary Understandings" of Composition at the University of Chicago: Frederick Champion Ward, Kenneth Burke, and Henry W. Sams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, James P.

    2007-01-01

    While Richard Weaver, R. S. Crane, Richard McKeon, and Robert Streeter have been most identified with rhetoric at the University of Chicago and its institutional return in the 1950s, the archival record demonstrates that Frederick Champion Ward, dean of the undergraduate "College" from 1947 to 1954, and Henry W. Sams, director of English in the…

  3. Response of sea surface fugacity of CO2 to the SAM shift south of Tasmania: Regional differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Gao, Libao; Cai, Wei-Jun; Yu, Weidong; Wei, Meng

    2015-05-01

    Using observational data collected south of Tasmania during 14 austral summer cruises during 1993-2011, we examined the response of sea surface fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) shift, which occurred around 2000. In the southern part of the Southern Ocean (SO) or the Polar Zone (PZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), fCO2 increased faster at the sea surface than in the atmosphere before the SAM shift, but not after the shift. In the northern part of the SO or the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), however, surface fCO2 increased faster than atmospheric fCO2 both before and after the shift. The SAM shift had an important influence on the surface fCO2 trend in the PZ and PFZ but not in the SAZ, which we attribute to differences in regional oceanographic processes (upwelling versus nonupwelling). The SAM shift may have reversed the negative trend of SO CO2 uptake.

  4. Thermal radiative properties: Coatings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    This volume consists, for the most part, of a presentation of numerical data compiled over the years in a most comprehensive manner on coatings for all applications, in particular, thermal control. After a moderately detailed discussion of the theoretical nature of the thermal radiative properties of coatings, together with an overview of predictive procedures and recognized experimental techniques, extensive numerical data on the thermal radiative properties of pigmented, contact, and conversion coatings are presented. These data cover metallic and nonmetallic pigmented coatings, enamels, metallic and nonmetallic contact coatings, antireflection coatings, resin coatings, metallic black coatings, and anodized and oxidized conversion coatings.

  5. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P.; Archer, Paul Douglas; Buch, Arnaud; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel Patrick; Ming, Douglas W/; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril; Wray, James J.; Conrad, Pamela Gales; Mahaffay, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials from three sites at Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include NO, HCN, ClCN, CH3CN, and TFMA (trifluoro-Nmethyl-acetamide). On Earth, nitrogen is a crucial bio-element, and nitrogen availability controls productivity in many environments. Nitrogen has also recently been detected in the form of CN in inclusions in the Martian meteorite Tissint, and isotopically heavy nitrogen (delta N-15 approx +100per mille) has been measured during stepped combustion experiments in several SNC meteorites. The detection of nitrogen-bearing compounds in Martian regolith would have important implications for the habitability of ancient Mars. However, confirmation of indigenous Martian nitrogen bearing compounds will require ruling out their formation from the terrestrial derivatization reagents (e.g. N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide, MTBSTFA and dimethylformamide, DMF) carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. The nitrogen species we detect in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate, a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples. However, this does not preclude a Martian origin for some of these compounds, which are present in nanomolar concentrations in SAM evolved gas analyses. Analysis of SAM data and laboratory breadboard tests are underway to determine whether nitrogen species are present at higher concentrations than can be accounted for by maximum estimates of nitrogen contribution from MTBSTFA and DMF. In addition, methods are currently being developed to use GC Column 6, (functionally similar to a commercial Q-Bond column), to separate and identify

  6. Detection and Quantification of Nitrogen Compounds in Martian Solid Samples by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Freissinet, C.; McKay, C. P.; Archer, P. D.; Buch, A.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Glavin, D. P.; Ming, D. W.; Steele, A.; Szopa, C.; Wray, J. J.; Conrad, P. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected both reduced and oxidized nitrogen-bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of surface materials from three sites at Gale Crater. Preliminary detections of nitrogen species include NO, HCN, ClCN, CH3CN, and TFMA (trifluoro-N-methyl-acetamide). On Earth, nitrogen is a crucial bio-element, and nitrogen availability controls productivity in many environments. Nitrogen has also recently been detected in the form of CN in inclusions in the Martian meteorite Tissint, and isotopically heavy nitrogen (δ15N ~ +100‰) has been measured during stepped combustion experiments in several SNC meteorites. The detection of nitrogen-bearing compounds in Martian regolith would have important implications for the habitability of ancient Mars. However, confirmation of indigenous Martian nitrogen-bearing compounds will require ruling out their formation from the terrestrial derivatization reagents (e.g. N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide, MTBSTFA and dimethylformamide, DMF) carried for SAM's wet chemistry experiment that contribute to the SAM background. The nitrogen species we detect in the SAM solid sample analyses can also be produced during laboratory pyrolysis experiments where these reagents are heated in the presence of perchlorate, a compound that has also been identified by SAM in Mars solid samples. However, this does not preclude a Martian origin for some of these compounds, which are present in nanomolar concentrations in SAM evolved gas analyses. Analysis of SAM data and laboratory breadboard tests are underway to determine whether nitrogen species are present at higher concentrations than can be accounted for by maximum estimates of nitrogen contribution from MTBSTFA and DMF. In addition, methods are currently being developed to use GC Column 6, (functionally similar to a commercial Q-Bond column), to separate and identify unretained compounds

  7. Gas-Chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity - the 359 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Cyril; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Mahaffy, Paul; Buch, Arnaud; Goutail, Jean Pierre; Cabane, Michel; Glavin, Daniel; Correia, Jean-Jacques; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; Meftah, Mustapha; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Brunner, Anna; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Millan, Maeva; Pascalin

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments, SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of windblown dust and sand collected at the Rocknest site, while the second site analyzed was a basin called “Yellowknife Bay” where two holes were drilled (John Klein & Cumberland) and analysis showed these sites to be a fluvio-lacustrine sediment.. For their analysis, these samples were subjected to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 850°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of a thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10mol). His channel is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species, as this last instrument does not have linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument first show that the performances of SAM-GC is representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, and also that results are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions (middle of the 70’s). Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, both by allowing the

  8. Depletion of SAM50 Specifically Targets BCR-ABL-Expressing Leukemic Stem and Progenitor Cells by Interfering with Mitochondrial Functions.

    PubMed

    Capala, Marta E; Pruis, Maurien; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-03-01

    A high proliferation rate of malignant cells requires an increased energy production, both by anaerobic glucose metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, increased levels of mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote survival of transformed cells and contribute to the disease progression both in solid tumors and leukemia. Consequently, interfering with mitochondrial metabolism has been used as a strategy to specifically target leukemic cells. SAM50 is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein involved in the formation of mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex. Although the importance of SAM50 in maintaining MIB integrity and in the assembly of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes has been described, its specific role in the normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells remains unknown. We observed that human leukemic cells display a specific dependency on SAM50 expression, as downregulation of SAM50 in BCR-ABL-expressing, but not normal CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) caused a significant decrease in growth, colony formation, and replating capacity. Mitochondrial functions of BCR-ABL-expressing HSPCs were compromised, as seen by a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration. This effect of SAM50 downregulation was recapitulated in normal HSPCs exposed to cytokine-rich culture conditions that stimulate proliferation. Both oncogene-transduced and cytokine-stimulated HSPCs showed increased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS levels compared to their normal counterparts. Therefore, we postulate that human leukemic HSPCs are highly dependent on the proper functioning of mitochondria and that disruption of mitochondrial integrity may aid in targeting leukemic cells. PMID:26855047

  9. A Highly Coupled Network of Tertiary Interactions in the SAM-I Riboswitch and Their Role in Regulatory Tuning.

    PubMed

    Wostenberg, Christopher; Ceres, Pablo; Polaski, Jacob T; Batey, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    RNA folding in vivo is significantly influenced by transcription, which is not necessarily recapitulated by Mg(2+)-induced folding of the corresponding full-length RNA in vitro. Riboswitches that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level are an ideal system for investigating this aspect of RNA folding as ligand-dependent termination is obligatorily co-transcriptional, providing a clear readout of the folding outcome. The folding of representative members of the SAM-I family of riboswitches has been extensively analyzed using approaches focusing almost exclusively upon Mg(2+) and/or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-induced folding of full-length transcripts of the ligand binding domain. To relate these findings to co-transcriptional regulatory activity, we have investigated a set of structure-guided mutations of conserved tertiary architectural elements of the ligand binding domain using an in vitro single-turnover transcriptional termination assay, complemented with phylogenetic analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry data. This analysis revealed a conserved internal loop adjacent to the SAM binding site that significantly affects ligand binding and regulatory activity. Conversely, most single point mutations throughout key conserved features in peripheral tertiary architecture supporting the SAM binding pocket have relatively little impact on riboswitch activity. Instead, a secondary structural element in the peripheral subdomain appears to be the key determinant in observed differences in regulatory properties across the SAM-I family. These data reveal a highly coupled network of tertiary interactions that promote high-fidelity co-transcriptional folding of the riboswitch but are only indirectly linked to regulatory tuning. PMID:26343759

  10. The SAM domains of Anks family proteins are critically involved in modulating the degradation of EphA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Lee, Haeryung; Kim, Yujin; Yoo, Sooyeon; Park, Eunjeong; Park, Soochul

    2010-04-01

    We recently reported that the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of Anks family proteins binds to EphA8, thereby positively regulating EphA8-mediated signaling pathways. In the current study, we identified a potential role for the SAM domains of Anks family proteins in EphA signaling. We found that SAM domains of Anks family proteins directly bind to ubiquitin, suggesting that Anks proteins regulate the degradation of ubiquitinated EphA receptors. Consistent with the role of Cbl ubiquitin ligases in the degradation of Eph receptors, our results revealed that the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl induced the ubiquitination and degradation of EphA8 upon ligand binding. Ubiquitinated EphA8 also bound to the SAM domains of Odin, a member of the Anks family proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of wild-type Odin protected EphA8 and EphA2 from undergoing degradation following ligand stimulation and promoted EphA-mediated inhibition of cell migration. In contrast, a SAM domain deletion mutant of Odin strongly impaired the function of endogenous Odin, suggesting that the mutant functions in a dominant-negative manner. An analysis of Odin-deficient primary embryonic fibroblasts indicated that Odin levels play a critical role in regulating the stability of EphA2 in response to ligand stimulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that the SAM domains of Anks family proteins play a pivotal role in enhancing the stability of EphA receptors by modulating the ubiquitination process. PMID:20100865

  11. The SAM Domains of Anks Family Proteins Are Critically Involved in Modulating the Degradation of EphA Receptors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jieun; Lee, Haeryung; Kim, Yujin; Yoo, Sooyeon; Park, Eunjeong; Park, Soochul

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of Anks family proteins binds to EphA8, thereby positively regulating EphA8-mediated signaling pathways. In the current study, we identified a potential role for the SAM domains of Anks family proteins in EphA signaling. We found that SAM domains of Anks family proteins directly bind to ubiquitin, suggesting that Anks proteins regulate the degradation of ubiquitinated EphA receptors. Consistent with the role of Cbl ubiquitin ligases in the degradation of Eph receptors, our results revealed that the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl induced the ubiquitination and degradation of EphA8 upon ligand binding. Ubiquitinated EphA8 also bound to the SAM domains of Odin, a member of the Anks family proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of wild-type Odin protected EphA8 and EphA2 from undergoing degradation following ligand stimulation and promoted EphA-mediated inhibition of cell migration. In contrast, a SAM domain deletion mutant of Odin strongly impaired the function of endogenous Odin, suggesting that the mutant functions in a dominant-negative manner. An analysis of Odin-deficient primary embryonic fibroblasts indicated that Odin levels play a critical role in regulating the stability of EphA2 in response to ligand stimulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that the SAM domains of Anks family proteins play a pivotal role in enhancing the stability of EphA receptors by modulating the ubiquitination process. PMID:20100865

  12. The expression platform and the aptamer: cooperativity between Mg2+ and ligand in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hennelly, Scott P; Novikova, Irina V; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-02-01

    Riboswitch operation involves the complex interplay between the aptamer domain and the expression platform. During transcription, these two domains compete against each other for shared sequence. In this study, we explore the cooperative effects of ligand binding and Magnesium interactions in the SAM-I riboswitch in the context of aptamer collapse and anti-terminator formation. Overall, our studies show the apo-aptamer acts as (i) a pre-organized aptamer competent to bind ligand and undergo structural collapse and (ii) a conformation that is more accessible to anti-terminator formation. We show that both Mg(2+) ions and SAM are required for a collapse transition to occur. We then use competition between the aptamer and expression platform for shared sequence to characterize the stability of the collapsed aptamer. We find that SAM and Mg(2+) interactions in the aptamer are highly cooperative in maintaining switch polarity (i.e. aptamer 'off-state' versus anti-terminator 'on-state'). We further show that the aptamer off-state is preferentially stabilized by Mg(2+) and similar divalent ions. Furthermore, the functional switching assay was used to select for phosphorothioate interference, and identifies potential magnesium chelation sites while characterizing their coordinated role with SAM in aptamer stabilization. In addition, we find that Mg(2+) interactions with the apo-aptamer are required for the full formation of the anti-terminator structure, and that higher concentrations of Mg(2+) (>4 mM) shift the equilibrium toward the anti-terminator on-state even in the presence of SAM. PMID:23258703

  13. The expression platform and the aptamer: cooperativity between Mg2+ and ligand in the SAM-I riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hennelly, Scott P.; Novikova, Irina V.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitch operation involves the complex interplay between the aptamer domain and the expression platform. During transcription, these two domains compete against each other for shared sequence. In this study, we explore the cooperative effects of ligand binding and Magnesium interactions in the SAM-I riboswitch in the context of aptamer collapse and anti-terminator formation. Overall, our studies show the apo-aptamer acts as (i) a pre-organized aptamer competent to bind ligand and undergo structural collapse and (ii) a conformation that is more accessible to anti-terminator formation. We show that both Mg2+ ions and SAM are required for a collapse transition to occur. We then use competition between the aptamer and expression platform for shared sequence to characterize the stability of the collapsed aptamer. We find that SAM and Mg2+ interactions in the aptamer are highly cooperative in maintaining switch polarity (i.e. aptamer ‘off-state’ versus anti-terminator ‘on-state’). We further show that the aptamer off-state is preferentially stabilized by Mg2+ and similar divalent ions. Furthermore, the functional switching assay was used to select for phosphorothioate interference, and identifies potential magnesium chelation sites while characterizing their coordinated role with SAM in aptamer stabilization. In addition, we find that Mg2+ interactions with the apo-aptamer are required for the full formation of the anti-terminator structure, and that higher concentrations of Mg2+ (>4 mM) shift the equilibrium toward the anti-terminator on-state even in the presence of SAM. PMID:23258703

  14. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  15. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  16. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  17. Effect of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), an allosteric activator of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and bioenergetics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Coletta, Ciro; Asimakopoulou, Antonia; Szczesny, Bartosz; Chao, Celia; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Hellmich, Mark R.; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Recent data show that colon cancer cells selectively overexpress cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), which produces hydrogen sulfide (H2S), to maintain cellular bioenergetics, support tumor growth and stimulate angiogenesis and vasorelaxation in the tumor microenvironment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of the allosteric CBS activator S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) on the proliferation and bioenergetics of the CBS-expressing colon cancer cell line HCT116. The non-transformed, non-tumorigenic colon epithelial cell line NCM356 was used as control. For assessment of cell proliferation, the xCELLigence system was used. Bioenergetic function was measured by Extracellular Flux Analysis. Experiments using human recombinant CBS or HCT116 homogenates complemented the cell-based studies. SAM markedly enhanced CBS-mediated H2S production in vitro, especially when a combination of cysteine and homocysteine was used as substrates. Addition of SAM (0.1 – 3 mM) to HCT116 cells induced a concentration-dependent increase H2S production. SAM exerted time-and concentration-dependent modulatory effects on cell proliferation. At 0.1–1 mM SAM increased HCT116 proliferation between 0–12 h, while the highest SAM concentration (3 mM) inhibited proliferation. Over a longer time period (12–24 h), only the lowest concentration of SAM used (0.1 mM) stimulated cell proliferation; higher SAM concentrations produced a concentration-dependent inhibition. The short-term stimulatory effects of SAM were attenuated by the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) or by stable silencing of CBS. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of SAM on cell proliferation was unaffected by CBS inhibition or CBS silencing. In contrast to HCT116 cells, the lower rate of proliferation of the low-CBS expressor NCM356 cells was unaffected by SAM. Short-term (1h) exposure of HCT116 cells to SAM induced a concentration-dependent increase in oxygen consumption and bioenergetic function at

  18. Sam68 affects cell proliferation and apoptosis of human adult T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via AKT/mTOR signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Li, Yuanye; Cheng, Jingying; Chen, Long; Xu, Hua; Li, Qinghua; Pang, Tianxiang

    2016-07-01

    Sam68 (Src associated in mitosis, 68kDa) belongs to the signal,transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family and its function has been linked to the onset and progression of many tumors. However, the role of Sam68 in T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how Sam68 involved in T-ALL. Our results showed high expression of Sam68 in adult T-ALL cases, Jurkat and CCRF-CEM cell lines. Knockdown of Sam68 repressed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, induced S arrest along with upregulation of p21, Bad, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, PARP and downregulation of CDK2 and Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the data indicated that the expression change of Sam68 went with the changes of AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in T-ALL cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that Sam68 possibly participated in the progresses of T-ALL at least partially via AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27107742

  19. The Chemistry of Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, James R.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of natural and synthetic polymeric "coatings" are reviewed, including examples and uses of such coatings as cellulose nitrate lacquers (for automobile paints), polyethylene, and others. (JN)

  20. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose

  1. Detection of Reduced Nitrogen Compounds at Rocknest Using the Sample Analysis At Mars (SAM) Instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, J. C.; Steele, A.; Brunner, A.; Coll, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D.; Jones, J. H.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; McKay, C.; Wray, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected nitrogen-bearing compounds during the pyrolysis of Rocknest material at Gale Crater. Hydrogen cyanide and acetonitrile were identified by the quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) both in direct evolved gas analysis (EGA). SAM carried out four separate analyses from Rocknest Scoop 5. A significant low temperature release was present in Rocknest runs 1-4, while a smaller high temperature release was also seen in Rocknest runs 1-3. Here we evaluate whether these compounds are indigenous to Mars or a pyrolysis product resulting from known terrestrial materials that are part of the SAM derivatization.

  2. The Search for Nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer C.; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Chirstopher P.; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; McAdam, Amy; Franz, Heather; Coll, Partice J.; Glavin, Daniel Patrick; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Wong, Mike; Atreya, Sushiil K.; Wray, James J.; Steele, Andrew; Prats, Benito D.; Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Teinturier, Samuel; Buch, Arnaud; Leshin, Laurie A.; Ming, Douglas W.; Conrad, Pamela Gales; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Grotzinger, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as N2 but it was lost by sputtering and photochemical loss to space, impact erosion, and chemical oxidation to nitrates. A nitrogen cycle may exist on Mars where nitrates, produced early in Mars' history, may have been later decomposed back into N2 by the current impact flux. Nitrates are a fundamental source of nitrogen for terrestrial microorganisms, and they have evolved metabolic pathways to perform both oxidation and reduction to drive a complete biological nitrogen cycle. Therefore, the characterization of nitrogen in Martian soils is important to assess habitability of the Martian environment, particularly with respect to the presence of nitrates. The only previous mission that was designed to search for soil nitrates was the Phoenix mission but N-containing species were not detected by TEGA or the MECA WCL. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in Nakhla meteorites, and if nitrogen was oxidized on Mars, this has important implications for the habitability potential of Mars. Here we report the results from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite aboard the Curiosity rover during the first year of surface operations in Gale Crater. Samples from the Rocknest aeolian deposit and sedimentary rocks (John Klein) were heated to approx 835degC under helium flow and the evolved gases were analyzed by MS and GC-MS. Two and possibly three peaks may be associated with the release of m/z 30 at temperatures ranging from 180degC to 500degC. M/z 30 has been tentatively identified as NO; other plausible contributions include CH2O and an isotopologue of CO, 12C18O. NO, CH2O, and CO may be reaction products of reagents (MTBSTFA/DMF) carried from Earth for the wet chemical derivatization experiments with SAM and/or derived from indigenous soil nitrogenated organics. Laboratory analyses indicate that it is also possible that <550degC evolved NO is produced via reaction of HCl with

  3. Intercomparison of nitrogen-containing species in Nimbus 7 LIMS and SAMS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, C.H.; Guthrie, P.D.; Kaye, J.A.

    1987-01-20

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) distributions were derived with a two-dimensional time-dependent model using N/sub 2/O, CH/sub 4/, and temperature measurements from the stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) along with H/sub 2/O measurements from the limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere (LIMS) and O/sub 3/ measurements from the solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument. All three instruments (SAMS, LIMS, and SBUV) were aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite. The computed NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ were compared with LIMS NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ measurements. Calculated NO/sub 2/ is lower than the LIMS NO/sub 2/ in much of the lower stratosphere by about a factor of 4 or more. Differences in the upper stratosphere between derived NO/sub 2/ and LIMS NO/sub 2/ are within the photochemical uncertainties of the computation. Derived NO/sub 2/ is much larger than LIMS NO/sub 2/ at high latitudes in the upper stratosphere in December, indicating that dynamics and/or photochemistry in the atmosphere are different from those used in the model. Derived HNO/sub 3/ is in fairly good agreement with LIMS HNO/sub 3/ in the upper stratosphere. Derived and LIMS HNO/sub 3/ gradually become more different through the middle stratosphere and reach a fairly substantial disagreement in the lower stratosphere. The high-latitude maxima observed in LIMS HNO/sub 3/ are present at lower altitudes and at higher concentrations than those derived in the model computations. More significantly, the derived HNO/sub 3/ at polar latitudes is highest in the summer while LIMS HNO/sub 3/ is highest in the winter. Disagreements in the lower stratosphere between the computed and LIMS NO/sub 2/ and HNO/sub 3/ can only be reduced if two changes are made in the model computations: (1) additional lower stratospheric sources of odd nitrogen (other than N/sub 2/O+O(/sup 1/D)) are included and (2) a modified chemistry to allow the formation of HNO/sub 3/ at the expense of N/sub 2

  4. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  5. Sulphur-bearing Compounds Detected by MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analysis of Materials from Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D. Jr.; Sutter, B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Brunner, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Steele, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) analysed several subsamples of sample fines (<150 µm) from three sites in Yellowknife Bay, an aeolian bedform termed Rocknest (hereafter "RN") and two samples drilled from the Sheepbed mudstone at sites named John Klein ("JK") and Cumberland ("CB"). SAM's evolved gas analysis (EGA) mass spectrometry detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, OCS, CS2 and other trace gases. The identity of evolved gases and temperature (T) of evolution can support mineral detection by CheMin and place constraints on trace volatile-bearing phases present below the CheMin detection limit or difficult to characterize with XRD (e.g., X-ray amorphous phases). Here, we focus on potential constraints on phases that evolved SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 during thermal analysis.

  6. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  7. An intact SAM-dependent methyltransferase fold is encoded by the human endothelin-converting enzyme-2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, W.; Wu, H.; Dombrovsky, L.; Zeng, H.; Loppnau, P.; Zhu, H.; Plotnikov, A.N.; Bochkarev, A.

    2010-08-17

    A recent survey of protein expression patterns in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has identified ece2 (chromosome: 3; Locations: 3q27.1) as the most significantly downregulated gene within the tested group. ece2 encodes endothelin-converting enzyme ECE2, a metalloprotease with a role in neuropeptide processing. Deficiency in the highly homologous ECE1 has earlier been linked to increased levels of AD-related {beta}-amyloid peptide in mice, consistent with a role for ECE in the degradation of that peptide. Initially, ECE2 was presumed to resemble ECE1, in that it comprises a single transmembrane region of {approx}20 residues flanked by a small amino-terminal cytosolic segment and a carboxy-terminal lumenar peptidase domain. The carboxy-terminal domain has significant sequence similarity to both neutral endopeptidase, for which an X-ray structure has been determined, and Kell blood group protein. After their initial discovery, multiple isoforms of ECE1 and ECE2 were discovered, generated by alternative splicing of multiple exons. The originally described ece2 transcript, RefSeq NM{_}174046, contains the amino-terminal cytosolic portion followed by the transmembrane region and peptidase domain (Fig. 1, isoform B). Another ece2 transcript, available from the Mammalian Gene Collection under MGC2408 (Fig. 1, isoform C), RefSeq accession NM{_}032331, is predicted to be translated into a 255 residue peptide with low but detectable sequence similarity to known S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases (SAM-MTs), such as the hypothetical protein TT1324 from Thermus thermophilis, PDB code 2GS9, which shares 30% amino acid sequence identity with ECE2 over 138 residues of the sequence. Intriguingly, another 'elongated' ece2 transcript (Fig. 1, isoform A) (RefSeq NM{_}014693) contains an amino-terminal portion of the putative SAM-MT domain, the transmembrane domain, and the protease domain. This suggests the possibility for coexistence of the putative SAM

  8. Benchmark Simulations of the Thermal-Hydraulic Responses during EBR-II Inherent Safety Tests using SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Rui; Sumner, Tyler S.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced system analysis tool SAM is being developed for fast-running, improved-fidelity, and wholeplant transient analyses at Argonne National Laboratory under DOE-NE’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. As an important part of code development, companion validation activities are being conducted to ensure the performance and validity of the SAM code. This paper presents the benchmark simulations of two EBR-II tests, SHRT-45R and BOP- 302R, whose data are available through the support of DOE-NE’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program. The code predictions of major primary coolant system parameter are compared with the test results. Additionally, the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code simulation results are also included for a code-to-code comparison.

  9. Gas-chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples at Rocknest site with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Coscia, David; Buch, Aranaud; Teinturier, Samuel; Navarro-gonzalez, Rafael; Gaboriaud, Alain; Mahaffy, Paul; MSL science Team

    2013-04-01

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of sand collected at the Rocknest site. For their analysis, these samples were submitted to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 900°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10 mol). It is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species as this last instrument has not a linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument for the analysis of Rocknest soil first show that the performances of SAM-GC are representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, as well as they are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions. Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, either by allowing the quantification of the major species detected (as water), or by providing a chromatographic signal well resolved temporally which can be used to improve the QMS signal treatment. In the frame of research of organics, the SAM

  10. Detection of Nitric Oxide by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Implications for the Presence of Nitrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J.; Freissinet, C.; Franz, H. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L..; McKay, C. P.; Coll, P.; Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; McAdam, A.; Cabane, M.; Ming, D. W.; Glavin, D.; Leshin, L.; Wong, M.; Atreya, S.; Wray, J. J.; Steele, A.; Buch, A.; Prats, B. D.; Szopa, C.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; Conrad, P.; Owen, T. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of the Mars Science Laboratory is to determine whether the planet ever had environmental conditions able to support microbial life. Nitrogen is a fundamental element for life, and is present in structural (e.g., proteins), catalytic (e.g., enzymes and ribozymes), energy transfer (e.g., ATP) and information storage (RNA and DNA) biomolecules. Planetary models suggest that molecular nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere, but was rapidly lost to space by photochemistry, sputtering impact erosion, and oxidized and deposited to the surface as nitrate. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen to terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of nitrates in soils and rocks is important to assess the habitability of a Martian environment. SAM is capable of detecting nitrates by their thermal decomposition into nitric oxide, NO. Here we analyze the release of NO from soils and rocks examined by the SAM instrument at Gale crater, and discuss its origin.

  11. EEAP boiler and chiller study II at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-31

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at Fort Sam Houston (FSH) in San Antonio, Texas, between September 28, 1995 and May 31, 1996. The site survey, data collection and analysis was performed by John Carter, E.I.T, Chris Pieper, P.E., and M. A. Shafiq, P.E. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were limited to central boiler and chiller plant systems serving specific building groups at FSH. This study is the second phase of a Boiler/Chiller study completed by Huitt-Zollars, Inc. for The Corp of Engineers on September 18, 1995. In addition to the work that was accomplished in that project, additional buildings for three of the areas analyzed previously andtwo new areas have been added to the Scope of Work for this phase. Therefore, much of the same data that was gathered for the first phase will again be used in this second phase to identify ECO`s.

  12. SAM II measurements of the polar stratospheric aerosol. Volume 6: April to October 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Brandl, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II sensor is aboard the Earth-orbiting Nimbus 7 spacecraft providing extinction measurements of the Antarctic and Arctic stratospheric aerosols with a vertical resolution of 1 km. Representative examples and weekly averages of these aerosol data and corresponding temperature profiles (Apr. 1981 to Oct. 1981) are presented. Contours of aerosol extinction as a function of altitude and longitude or time are plotted and weekly aerosol optical depths are calculated. Stratospheric optical depths are 0.002 to 0.003 for the Antarctic region and 0.006 to 0.007 at the beginning to 0.003 to 0.004 at the end of the time period for the Arctic region. Polar stratospheric clouds at altitudes between the tropopause and 20 km were observed during the Antarctic winter. A ready-to-use format containing a representative sample of the sixth 6 months of data to be used in atmospheric and climatic studies is reported.

  13. When do defectless alkanethiol SAMs in ionic liquids become penetrable? A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Kislenko, Sergey A; Nikitina, Victoria A; Nazmutdinov, Renat R

    2015-12-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to address the permeability of defectless alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on charged and uncharged Au(111) surfaces in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim][BF4]) room-temperature ionic liquid (IL). We demonstrate that ionic permeation into the monolayer does not start until a critical surface charge density value is attained (both for positive and negative surface charges). The free energy barrier for the permeation of IL components is shown to include nearly equal contributions from ion desolvation and the channel formation in the dense monolayer. Long chain alkanethiols (hexadecanethiol SC16H33) exhibit superior barrier properties as compared with short chain alkanethiols (hexanethiol SC6H13) due to the dense packing of alkanethiol chains in highly ordered zigzag conformation oriented at the same tilt angle. Computed critical charge densities correspond to the electrode potential values beyond the limits of the monolayer stability, which might indicate the impermeability of the defectless monolayer towards the IL components. Experimental findings on increased interfacial capacitance are interpreted, therefore as some manifestation of the monolayer defectiveness occurring in real electrochemical systems. The potential of the mean force is constructed for a typical redox probe ferrocene/ferrocenium (Fc/Fc(+)) as well, to investigate a possible permeation of the solute from the IL into the SC6H13 monolayer. PMID:26568158

  14. Reconstitution of ThiC in thiamine pyrimidine biosynthesis expands the radical SAM superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Li, Yue; Zhang, Yang; Grove, Tyler L.; Lee, Michael; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2009-01-15

    4-Amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate (HMP-P) synthase catalyzes a complex rearrangement of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) to form HMP-P, the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine phosphate. We determined the three-dimensional structures of HMP-P synthase and its complexes with the product HMP-P and a substrate analog imidazole ribotide. The structure of HMP-P synthase reveals a homodimer in which each protomer comprises three domains: an N-terminal domain with a novel fold, a central ({beta}{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and a disordered C-terminal domain that contains a conserved CX{sub 2}CX{sub 4}C motif, which is suggestive of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Biochemical studies have confirmed that HMP-P synthase is iron sulfur cluster-dependent, that it is a new member of the radical SAM superfamily and that HMP-P and 5{prime}-deoxyadenosine are products of the reaction. Moessbauer and EPR spectroscopy confirm the presence of one [4Fe-4S] cluster. Structural comparisons reveal that HMP-P synthase is homologous to a group of adenosylcobalamin radical enzymes. This similarity supports an evolutionary relationship between these two superfamilies.

  15. Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) experiment data user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Rodgers, C. D.; Nutter, S. T.; Oslik, N.

    1989-01-01

    The Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) aboard Nimbus-7 observes infrared radiation from the atmospheric limb. Global upper atmosphere temperature profiles and vertical concentrations of H2O, NO, N2O, CH4 and CO2 are derived from these measurements. The status of all channels was carefully monitored. Temperature and composition were retrieved from the measurements by linearizing the direct equation about an a priori profile and using an optimum statistical estimator to find the most likely solution. The derived temperature and composition profiles are archived on two tape products whose file structure and record formats are described in detail. The gridded retrieved temperature tape (GRID-T) contains daily day and night average temperatures at 62 pressure levels in a 2.5 degree latitude by 10 degree longitude grid extending from 67.5 degrees N to 50 degrees S. The zonal mean methane and nitrous oxide composition tape (ZMT-G) contains zonal mean day and night average CH4 and N2O mixing ratios at 31 pressure levels for 2.5 degrees latitude zones extending from 67.5 degrees N to 50 degrees S.

  16. Mechanistic Studies of the Radical SAM Enzyme DesII with TDP-d-Fucose**

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yeonjin; Ruszczycky, Mark W.; Choi, Sei-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    DesII is a radical SAM enzyme that catalyzes the C4-deamination of TDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose via a C3 radical intermediate. However, if the C4 amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl (TDP-quinovose), the hydroxyl at C3 is oxidized to a ketone with no C4-dehydration. It is hypothesized that hyperconjugation between the C4 C–N/O bond and the partially filled p-orbital at C3 of the radical intermediate modulates the degree to which elimination competes with dehydrogenation. To investigate this hypothesis, the reaction of DesII with the C4-epimer of TDP-quinovose (TDP-fucose) was examined. The majority of the reaction results in the formation of TDP-6-deoxygulose and likely regeneration of TDP-fucose. The remainder of the substrate radical partitions roughly equally between C3-dehydrogenation and C4-dehydration. Thus, changing the stereochemistry at C4 permits a more balanced competition between elimination and dehydrogenation. PMID:25418063

  17. Possible Detection of Nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Stern, J.; Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; McAdam, A.; Franz, H. B.; McKay, C. P.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Ming, D. W.; Brunner, A. E.; Glavin, D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Jones, J. H.; Freissinet, C.; Leshin, L.; Wong, M.; Atreya, S.; Wray, J. J.; Steele, A.; Buch, A.; Prats, B. D.; Szopa, C.; Conrad, P.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as dinitrogen (N2). However, it has been lost by sputtering and photochemical loss to space [1, 2], impact erosion [3], and chemical oxidation to nitrates [4]. Nitrates, produced early in Mars history, are later decomposed back into N2 by the current impact flux [5], making possible a nitrogen cycle on Mars. It is estimated that a layer of about 3 m of pure NaNO3 should be distributed globally on Mars [5]. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen to terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of soil nitrates is important to assess habitability in the Martian environment. The only previous mission that was designed to search for soil nitrates was the Phoenix mission but was unable to detect evolved N-containing species by TEGA and the MECA WCL [6]. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in the Nakhla meteorite [7]. The purpose of this work is to determine if nitrates were detected in first solid sample (Rocknest) in Gale Crater examined by the SAM instrument.

  18. An intercomparison of nitrogen-containing species in Nimbus 7 LIMS and SAMS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Guthrie, Paul D.; Kaye, Jack A.

    1987-01-01

    Odd-nitrogen chemistry and transport are analyzed using a two-dimensional model and Nimbus 7 data. The Nimbus 7 data include: measurements of O3, NO2, HNO3, H2O, and temperature by the LIMS instrument; N2O, CH4, and temperature measurements by the SAMS instrument; and O3 data from the SBUV instrument. The characteristics of the two-dimensional model used in the study, a modified Guthrie et al. (1984) model, are described. NO2 and HNO3 are calculated using the two-dimensional model, and the computed data are compared with the LIMS NO2 and HNO3 measurements. The model uncertainties are computed based on the photochemical equilibrium assumption, and the role of stratospheric dynamics in determining NO2 and HNO3 is discussed. It is observed that there is good correlation between the LIMS and model data in the upper stratosphere; however, the data do not correspond in the lower stratosphere. The effect of nitrogen sources, such as lightning, on the stratospheric odd nitrogen distribution is examined.

  19. Sam Ho on health system quality and population medicine. Interview by Nancy Houyoux.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sam

    2003-01-01

    As PacifiCare Health Systems' senior vice president and chief medical officer, Dr. Sam Ho is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and programs to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of healthcare services throughout the company. Dr. Ho is responsible for all initiatives related to quality assessment and improvement, medical management, disease management, informatics, report cards, clinical product development, e-health, and healthcare liaison with public policy, government affairs, industry relations, media relations, provider network management, and sales and marketing. Since joining PacifiCare in its California MCO in October 1994, he has spearheaded companywide quality initiatives and improvement in population health outcomes, and developed the QUALITY INDEX profile of medical groups, a consumer-focused report card of provider performance. He also led efforts to achieve systemwide accreditation by the National Committee for Quality Assurance in all markets and Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) score improvements. Previously he served as deputy director of health, medical director, and county health officer for the San Francisco Department of Public Health. He has held faculty appointments at the Schools of both Medicine and Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco. The Honolulu native received his BA in sociology from Northwestern University in 1972 with Phi Beta Kappa honors and his MD from Tufts University School of Medicine in 1976. Dr. Ho completed his residency in family practice at the University of California, San Francisco, and has since maintained board certification with the American Board of Family Practice. PMID:14671853

  20. Multi-layer coatings

    DOEpatents

    Maghsoodi, Sina; Brophy, Brenor L.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.; Gonsalves, Peter R.

    2016-06-28

    Disclosed herein are coating materials and methods for applying a top-layer coating that is durable, abrasion resistant, highly transparent, hydrophobic, low-friction, moisture-sealing, anti-soiling, and self-cleaning to an existing conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating. The top coat imparts superior durability performance and new properties to the under-laying conventional high temperature anti-reflective coating without reducing the anti-reflectiveness of the coating. Methods and data for optimizing the relative thickness of the under-layer high temperature anti-reflective coating and the top-layer thickness for optimizing optical performance are also disclosed.

  1. A study on the formation and thermal stability of 11-MUA SAMs on Au(111)/mica and on polycrystalline gold foils.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Johanna; Frank, Paul; Griesser, Thomas; Trimmel, Gregor; Schennach, Robert; Gilli, Eduard; Winkler, Adolf

    2009-02-01

    In this article we present a comprehensive study of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation on gold surfaces. The SAMs were prepared in ethanolic solution, utilizing two different substrates: Au(111)/mica and polycrystalline gold foils. Several experimental methods (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy) reveal a well-defined SAM. The main focus of this work, however, was to test the stability of these SAMs by thermal desorption spectroscopy. The spectra show different desorption peaks indicating different adsorption states and/or decomposition products on the surface. The assumed monolayer peak, which can be attributed to desorption of the intact molecule, is detected at 550 K. Further desorption peaks can be found, which result, e.g., from cracking of the S-C bond on the surface, depending on the substrate quality and on the residence time under ambient conditions. PMID:19119802

  2. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) with special references to neurodegeneration models, SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strains, a group of related inbred strains consisting of senescence-prone inbred strains (SAMP) and senescence-resistant inbred strains (SAMR), have been successfully developed by selective inbreeding of the AKR/J strain of mice donated by the Jackson laboratory in 1968. The characteristic feature of aging common to the SAMP and SAMR is accelerated senescence and normal aging, respectively. Furthermore, SAMP and SAMR strains of mice manifest various pathobiological phenotypes spontaneously. Among SAMP strains, SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice show age-related behavioral deterioration such as deficits in learning and memory, emotional disorders (reduced anxiety-like behavior and depressive behavior) and altered circadian rhythm associated with certain pathological, biochemical and pharmacological changes. Here, the previous and recent literature on SAM mice are reviewed with an emphasis on SAMP8 and SAMP10 mice. A spontaneous model like SAM with distinct advantages over the gene-modified model is hoped by investigators to be used more widely as a biogerontological resource to explore the etiopathogenesis of accelerated senescence and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19199030

  3. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) as an animal model of senile dementia: pharmacological, neurochemical and molecular biological approach.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Y; Nomura, Y

    1998-12-01

    To elucidate the fundamental mechanism of age-related deficiencies of learning and to develop effective drugs for intervention in age-related diseases such as learning dysfunctions, pertinent animal models that have characteristics closely similar to human dysfunctions should be established. SAM (senescence-accelerated mouse) has been established as a murine model of the SAM strains, groups of related inbred strains including nine strains of accelerated senescence-prone, short-lived mice (SAMP) and three strains of accelerated senescence-resistant, long-lived mice (SAMR). SAMP-strain mice show relatively strain-specific age-associated phenotypic pathologies such as shortened life span and early manifestation of senescence. Among the SAMP-strain mice, SAMP8 mice show an age-related deterioration in learning ability. Here, the neuropathological, neurochemical and pharmacological features of SAM are reported, especially for SAMP8. Moreover, the effects of several drugs on the biochemical and behavioral alterations in SAMP8 and the etiologic manifestation of accelerated senescence are also discussed. PMID:9920195

  4. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68

    PubMed Central

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N.; Grellscheid, Sushma N.; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N. Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C.; Elliott, David J.; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  5. Exploration of the Habitability of Mars with the SAM Suite Investigation on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Cabane, M.; Webster, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with a substantially larger payload capability that any other Mars rover, to date, is designed to quantitatively assess a local region on Mars as a potential habitat for present or past life. Its goals are (1) to assess past or present biological potential of a target environment, (2) to characterize geology and geochemistry at the MSL landing site, and (3) to investigate planetary processes that influence habitability. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Suite, in its final stages of integration and test, enables a sensitive search for organic molecules and chemical and isotopic analysis of martian volatiles. MSL contact and remote surface and subsurface survey Instruments establish context for these measurements and facilitate sample identification and selection. The SAM instruments are a gas chromatograph (GC), a mass spectrometer (MS), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS). These together with supporting sample manipulation and gas processing devices are designed to analyze either the atmospheric composition or gases extracted from solid phase samples such as rocks and fines. For example, one of the core SAM experiment sequences heats a small powdered sample of a Mars rock or soil from ambient to -1300 K in a controlled manner while continuously monitoring evolved gases. This is followed by GCMS analysis of released organics. The general chemical survey is complemented by a specific search for molecular classes that may be relevant to life including atmospheric methane and its carbon isotope with the TLS and biomarkers with the GCMS.

  6. HPA and SAM axis responses as correlates of self- vs parental ratings of anxiety in boys with an Autistic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F; Sweeney, John A; McFarlane, James R

    2014-03-29

    Anxiety and Autistic Disorder (AD) are both neurological conditions and both disorders share some features that make it difficult to precisely allocate specific symptoms to each disorder. HPA and SAM axis activities have been conclusively associated with anxiety, and may provide a method of validating anxiety rating scale assessments given by parents and their children with AD about those children. Data from HPA axis (salivary cortisol) and SAM axis (salivary alpha amylase) responses were collected from a sample of 32 high-functioning boys (M age=11yr) with an Autistic Disorder (AD) and were compared with the boys' and their mothers' ratings of the boys' anxiety. There was a significant difference between the self-ratings given by the boys and ratings given about them by their mothers. Further, only the boys' self-ratings of their anxiety significantly predicted the HPA axis responses and neither were significantly related to SAM axis responses. Some boys showed cortisol responses which were similar to that previously reported in children who had suffered chronic and severe anxiety arising from stressful social interactions. As well as suggesting that some boys with an AD can provide valid self-assessments of their anxiety, these data also point to the presence of very high levels of chronic HPA-axis arousal and consequent chronic anxiety in these boys. PMID:24412722

  7. Structural basis of RNA recognition and dimerization by the STAR proteins T-STAR and Sam68.

    PubMed

    Feracci, Mikael; Foot, Jaelle N; Grellscheid, Sushma N; Danilenko, Marina; Stehle, Ralf; Gonchar, Oksana; Kang, Hyun-Seo; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Meyer, N Helge; Liu, Yilei; Lahat, Albert; Sattler, Michael; Eperon, Ian C; Elliott, David J; Dominguez, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Sam68 and T-STAR are members of the STAR family of proteins that directly link signal transduction with post-transcriptional gene regulation. Sam68 controls the alternative splicing of many oncogenic proteins. T-STAR is a tissue-specific paralogue that regulates the alternative splicing of neuronal pre-mRNAs. STAR proteins differ from most splicing factors, in that they contain a single RNA-binding domain. Their specificity of RNA recognition is thought to arise from their property to homodimerize, but how dimerization influences their function remains unknown. Here, we establish at atomic resolution how T-STAR and Sam68 bind to RNA, revealing an unexpected mode of dimerization different from other members of the STAR family. We further demonstrate that this unique dimerization interface is crucial for their biological activity in splicing regulation, and suggest that the increased RNA affinity through dimer formation is a crucial parameter enabling these proteins to select their functional targets within the transcriptome. PMID:26758068

  8. Coating life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Gedwill, Michael A.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation combines both experimental studies and numerical modeling to predict coating life in an oxidizing environment. The experimental work provides both input to and verification of two numerical models. The coatings being examined are an aluminide coating on Udimet 700 (U-700), a low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS) Ni-18Co-17Cr-24Al-0.2Y overlay coating also on U- 700, and bulk deposits of the LPPS NiCoCrAlY coating.

  9. Tribology and hydrophobicity of a biocompatible GPTMS/PFPE coating on Ti6Al4V surfaces.

    PubMed

    Panjwani, Bharat; Sinha, Sujeet K

    2012-11-01

    Tribological properties of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) coated 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS) SAMs (self-assembled monolayers) onto Ti6Al4V alloy substrate were studied using ball-on-disk experiments. GPTMS SAMs deposition onto a Ti6Al4V alloy surface was carried out using solution phase method. Ultra-thin layer of PFPE was dip-coated onto SAMs modified specimens. Tribological tests were carried out at 0.2 N normal load and rotational speed of 200 rpm using track radius of 2 mm. Wear track and counterface surface conditions were investigated using optical microscopy. PFPE modified specimens were baked at 150 °C for 1h to investigate the effect of thermal treatment on tribological properties. Surface characterization tests such as contact angle measurement, AFM morphology and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were carried out for differently modified specimens. PFPE overcoat meets the requirements of cytotoxicity test using the ISO 10993-5 elution method. PFPE top layer lowered the coefficient of friction and increased wear durability for different specimens (with and without GPTMS intermediate layer). PFPE overcoat onto GPTMS showed significant increase in the wear resistance compared with overcoat onto bare Ti6Al4V specimens. The observed improvement in the tribological properties can be attributed to the change in the interaction of PFPE molecules with the substrate surface due to the GPTMS intermediate layer. PMID:23032430

  10. Bio-functional nano-coatings on metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mahapatro, Anil

    2015-10-01

    Metals and their alloys have been widely used in all aspects of science, engineering and medicine. Metals in biomedical devices are used due to their inertness and structural functions. They are generally preferred over polymers or ceramics and are especially desirable in applications where the implants are subjected to static, dynamic or cyclic loads that require a combination of strength and ductility. In biomedicine, the choice of a specific biomaterial is governed by many factors that include biocompatibility, corrosion resistance, controlled degradability, modulus of elasticity, fatigue strength and many other application specific criterions. Nanotechnology is driving newer demands and requirements for better performance of existing materials and presents an opportunity for surface modification of metals in response to demands on the surface of metals for their biomedical applications. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are nanosized coatings that present a flexible method of carrying out surface modification of biomaterials to tailor its surface properties for specific end applications. These nanocoatings can serve primary functions such as surface coverage, etch protection and anti-corrosion along with a host of other secondary chemical functions such as drug delivery and biocompatibility. We present a brief introduction to surface modification of biomaterials and their alloys followed by a detailed description of organic nanocoatings based on self-assembled monolayers and their biomedical applications including patterning techniques and biological applications of patterned SAMs. PMID:26117759

  11. Detection of influenza virus by a biosensor based on the method combining electrochemiluminescence on binary SAMs modified Au electrode with an immunoliposome encapsulating Ru (II) complex.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yumi; Ohgi, Takayuki; Mitoma, Yoshiharu; Hifumi, Emi; Egashira, Naoyoshi

    2016-09-01

    Recently, point of care testing (POCT) used for diagnosis of influenza infection has a problem showing false negative diagnosis because of the low sensitivity. We would like to report detection of influenza virus A (H1N1) by an immunosensor based on electrochemiluminescence (ECL) that uses an immunoliposome encapsulating tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) complex. By using the sensor, we could detect the virus that competed with hemagglutinin (HA) peptide immobilized on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in immunoreaction of the antibody bound on the surface of liposome. The HA peptide was 19 mer (TGLRNGITNKVNSVIEKAA). We demonstrated great improvement of sensitivity and accuracy by introducing binary SAMs instead of mono SAMs. The binary SAMs was prepared from 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid and 1-hexanethiol. Use of the binary SAMs enabled to increase the SAMs coverage on Au electrode; the fact was confirmed by observation of the cathodic desorption currents. By using such an electrode, first the detection method of BSA was optimized to lower ECL background signal. Then we applied the method to the detection of influenza virus. We could successfully detect the virus with higher sensitivity compared with that by POCT and ELISA. The detection range was from a concentration of 2.7 × 10(2) to 2.7 × 10(3) PFU/mL. PMID:27173395

  12. Flow coating apparatus and method of coating

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumanthu, Ramasubrahmaniam; Neyman, Patrick; MacDonald, Niles; Brophy, Brenor; Kopczynski, Kevin; Nair, Wood

    2014-03-11

    Disclosed is a flow coating apparatus, comprising a slot that can dispense a coating material in an approximately uniform manner along a distribution blade that increases uniformity by means of surface tension and transfers the uniform flow of coating material onto an inclined substrate such as for example glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed is a method of flow coating a substrate using the apparatus such that the substrate is positioned correctly relative to the distribution blade, a pre-wetting step is completed where both the blade and substrate are completed wetted with a pre-wet solution prior to dispensing of the coating material onto the distribution blade from the slot and hence onto the substrate. Thereafter the substrate is removed from the distribution blade and allowed to dry, thereby forming a coating.

  13. Gas-Chromatographic analysis of Mars soil samples with the SAM instrument onboard Curiosity - the 180 first sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Coscia, D.; Buch, A.; Teinturier, S.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Goutail, J.-P.; Montaron, C.; Rigal, J.-B.; Poinsignon, P.; Guerrini, V.; Clerc, M.-S.; Meftah, M.; Soldani, L.; Mettetal, F.; Jerôme, M.; Philippon, C.; Galic, A.; Sablairolles, J.; Triqueneaux, S.; Chazot, D.; Toffolo, B.; Rakoto, F. Y.; Gaboriaud, A.; Mahaffy, P.

    2013-09-01

    Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal/chemical treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. The first soil samples analyzed with SAM were composed of sand collected at the Rocknest site, when the second site analyzed was a basin called "Yellowkive Bay". For their analysis, these samples were submitted to a pyrolysis at temperatures reaching about 900°C. For SAM-GC and GCMS analyses, different fractions of pyrolysates were collected at different temperature in the ambient-900°C range in order to discriminate potential different volatile fractions present in the solid sample. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was used as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. This channel is also equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) capable to detect the most abundant species (with abundances down to approximately 10-10 mol). It is thus complementary to the mass spectrometer detection for quantification of such species as this last instrument has not a linear response in this domain of high abundance, whereas it is significantly more sensitive than the TCD. The results obtained with this instrument first show that the performances of SAM-GC are representative of those obtained during calibrations of the instrument in laboratory, as well as they are repeatable. Hence, the instrument performs nominally, making it the first GCMS running successfully on Mars since the Viking missions. Moreover, the complementarity of GC towards MS is also shown, either by allowing the quantification ofthe major species detected (as water), or by providing a chromatographic signal well resolved temporally which can be used to improve the QMS signal treatment. In the frame of

  14. Corrosion Characterization of Iron-Based High-Performance Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Aprigliano, L F; Yang, N; Perepezko, J H; Beardsley, M B

    2005-03-21

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. One of these compositions, SAM1651, is discussed in detail to illustrate the promise of this general class of materials.

  15. Apparatus for coating powders

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Kerns, John A.; Alford, Craig S.; McKernan, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

  16. Coated laser mirror and method of coating

    SciTech Connect

    Shuskus, A.J.; Cowher, M.E.

    1984-04-24

    A method of applying an intermediate bond coat on a laser mirror substrate is described comprising surface polishing the mirror substrate followed by depositing a layer of amorphous silicon, amorphous germanium, or mixtures thereof on the mirror surface, and polishing the thus coated mirror surface to a substantially void-free surface finish. Laser mirror substrates such as graphite fiber reinforced glass, molybdenum and silicon carbide coated by such process are also described.

  17. [Effect of epitalon and melatonin on life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in senescence accelerated mice (SAM)].

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V N; Popovich, I G; Zabezhinskiĭ, M A; Rozenfel'd, S V; Khavinson, V Kh; Semenchenko, A V; Iashin, A I

    2005-01-01

    Female senescence accelerated mice SAMP-1. (prone) and SAMR-1 (resistant) were exposed 5 times a week monthly to melatonin (with drinking water 20mg/ml during the night hours) or to s.c. injections of epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) at a single dose 1mkg/mouse. Control mice were intact or exposed to injection of 0.1 ml normal saline. The body weight and temperature, food consumption, estrous function were monitored regularly. The life span and tumor incidence were evaluated as well. As age advanced, the weight increased whereas food consumption and body temperature did not change. There was no significant substrain difference in these parameters. Exposure to melatonin or epitalon also failed to influence those indices. As age advanced, the incidence of irregular estrous cycles increased both in SAMP-1 and SAMR-1, whereas the treatment with both melatonin and epitalon prevented such disturbances. SAMP-1 revealed some features of accelerated aging as compared to SAMR-1. The mean life span of the 10% of the last survivors among treated SAMP-1 was shorter than that of SAMR-1, aging rate increased and mortality doubling time decreased. There was a direct correlation between body mass of the two substrains at the age of 3 and 12 months matched by body mass increase and longer life span. Melatonin or epitalon treatment was followed by longer mean and maximum survival in the 10% of the last survivors among SAMP-1. Melatonin involved decreased aging rate and increased mortality doubling time. Malignant lymphomas predominated in SAM without any significant difference in frequency between the substrains. While melatonin failed to influence tumor incidence or term of detection in SAMP-1, neither did epitalon affect frequency. However, it was followed by longer survival in tumor-free animals. No link between melatonin or epitalon treatment, on the one hand, and carcinogenesis, on the other, was reported in SAMR-1. PMID:15909815

  18. Behavioral assessment of the senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM P8 and R1).

    PubMed

    Markowska, A L; Spangler, E L; Ingram, D K

    1998-04-01

    Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM P8 and R1) were behaviorally assessed in a cross-sectional study at 4 and 15 months of age. Behavioral measures included memory (place discrimination and repeated acquisition in a water maze), sensorimotor performance (turning in an alley, traversing bridges, wire rod hanging, and falls from a wire screen), psychomotor performance (open-field exploration), and emotionality (entries in a plus maze, grooming, and defecation in a plus maze and in an open field). In the water maze, aged P8 mice were impaired in place discrimination and in repeated acquisition tasks, demonstrating evidence of an age-related decline in spatial memory processing abilities. The demonstration of this impairment, however, was complicated by noncognitive factors, such as the tendency of many older P8 mice to float. Sensorimotor skill impairment was accelerated with age in P8 mice, but not in R1 mice, and this impairment was present despite the lack of age-related changes in body weight in P8 mice. Although P8 and R1 mice were not different in general activity at old age, P8 mice were substantially more hyperactive in an open field and in the plus maze than R1 mice when compared at young age. Independent of age, P8 mice demonstrated a reduction of anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze. Taken as a whole, the data suggest that although age-related behavioral alterations occur in the P8 mice, some of these changes are evident at 4 months of age. Thus, the behavioral abnormalities that exist not only represent an accelerated aging phenomenon but may also be considered a developmental pathology. PMID:9661977

  19. Magnesium Fluctuations Modulate RNA Dynamics in the SAM-I Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ryan L.; Noel, Jeffrey K.; Mohanty, Udayan; Whitford, Paul C.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Onuchic, José N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments demonstrate that Mg2+ is crucial for structure and function of RNA systems, yet the detailed molecular mechanism of Mg2+ action on RNA is not well understood. We investigate the interplay between RNA and Mg2+ at atomic resolution through ten 2 microsecond explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the SAM-I riboswitch with varying ion concentrations. The structure, including three stemloops, is very stable on this timescale. Simulations reveal that outer sphere coordinated Mg2+ ions fluctuate on the same time scale as the RNA, and that their dynamics couple. Locally, Mg2+ association affects RNA conformation through tertiary bridging interactions; globally, increasing Mg2+ concentration slows RNA fluctuations. Outer sphere Mg2+ ions responsible for these effects account for 80% of Mg2+ in our simulations. These ions are transiently bound to the RNA, maintaining interactions, but shuttled from site to site. Outer sphere Mg2+ are separated from the RNA by a single hydration shell, occupying a thin layer 3-5Å from the RNA. Distribution functions reveal outer sphere Mg2+ are positioned by electronegative atoms, hydration layers, and have a preference for the major groove. Diffusion analysis suggests transient outer sphere Mg2+ dynamics are glassy. Since outer sphere Mg2+ ions account for most of the Mg2+ in our simulations, these ions may change the paradigm of Mg2+-RNA interactions. Rather than a few inner sphere ions anchoring the RNA structure surrounded by a continuum of diffuse ions, we observe a layer of outer sphere coordinated Mg2+ that is transiently bound but strongly coupled to the RNA. PMID:22612276

  20. Magnesium fluctuations modulate RNA dynamics in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ryan L; Noel, Jeffrey K; Mohanty, Udayan; Whitford, Paul C; Hennelly, Scott P; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2012-07-25

    Experiments demonstrate that Mg(2+) is crucial for structure and function of RNA systems, yet the detailed molecular mechanism of Mg(2+) action on RNA is not well understood. We investigate the interplay between RNA and Mg(2+) at atomic resolution through ten 2-μs explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the SAM-I riboswitch with varying ion concentrations. The structure, including three stemloops, is very stable on this time scale. Simulations reveal that outer-sphere coordinated Mg(2+) ions fluctuate on the same time scale as the RNA, and that their dynamics couple. Locally, Mg(2+) association affects RNA conformation through tertiary bridging interactions; globally, increasing Mg(2+) concentration slows RNA fluctuations. Outer-sphere Mg(2+) ions responsible for these effects account for 80% of Mg(2+) in our simulations. These ions are transiently bound to the RNA, maintaining interactions, but shuttled from site to site. Outer-sphere Mg(2+) are separated from the RNA by a single hydration shell, occupying a thin layer 3-5 Å from the RNA. Distribution functions reveal that outer-sphere Mg(2+) are positioned by electronegative atoms, hydration layers, and a preference for the major groove. Diffusion analysis suggests transient outer-sphere Mg(2+) dynamics are glassy. Since outer-sphere Mg(2+) ions account for most of the Mg(2+) in our simulations, these ions may change the paradigm of Mg(2+)-RNA interactions. Rather than a few inner-sphere ions anchoring the RNA structure surrounded by a continuum of diffuse ions, we observe a layer of outer-sphere coordinated Mg(2+) that is transiently bound but strongly coupled to the RNA. PMID:22612276

  1. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  2. Elaboration of composite and chemically heterogeneous icephobic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianpour, Faranak

    consequence of HCs preparation, via different methods, was observed in low contact angle hysteresis (CAH) values. The prepared HCs by self assembled monolayers ( SAMs), nanoparticles and "masked" plasma sputtering methods resulted in reducing the ice adhesion strength by factors of ~ 3, ~ 1.7 and ~ 1.3 times, respectively, compared to a polished aluminum sample. The durability of coatings was studied under accelerated aging conditions such as UV degradation, several icing/de-icing cycles and immersion in distilled water and different pH solutions. Consequently, based on results obtained it was observed that the HCs are more stable under accelerated aging conditions compared to homogeneous coatings.

  3. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  4. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature oxidation resistant, thermal barrier coating system is disclosed for a nickel cobalt, or iron base alloy substrate. An inner metal bond coating contacts the substrate, and a thermal barrier coating covers the bond coating. NiCrAlR, FeCrAlR, and CoCrAlR alloys are satisfactory as bond coating compositions where R=Y or Yb. These alloys contain, by weight, 24.9-36.7% chromium, 5.4-18.5% aluminum, and 0.05 to 1.55% yttrium or 0.05 to 0.53% ytterbium. The coatings containing ytterbium are preferred over those containing yttrium. An outer thermal barrier coating of partial stabilized zirconium oxide (zirconia) which is between 6% and 8%, by weight, of yttrium oxide (yttria) covers the bond coating. Partial stabilization provides a material with superior durability. Partially stabilized zirconia consists of mixtures of cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phases.

  5. ORGANIC COATING REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cleaner coating removal technologies are developing rapidly to meet a variety of industrial needs to replace solvent strippers having toxic properties. his guide describes cleaner technologies that can be used to reduce waste in coating removal operations. nformation is presented...

  6. The Investigation of Perchlorate/Iron Phase Mixtures as A Possible Source of Oxygen Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Morris, R. V.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Freissinet C.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Paz-Zorzano, Maria; Stern, J. C.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected O2 and HCl gas releases from the Rocknest (RN) eolian bedform and the John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) drill hole materials in Gale Crater. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have also been detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS). These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) suggesting perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of individual per-chlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory suggested perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of pure perchlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. Analog laboratory analysis of iron mineralogy detected in Gale materials that was physically mixed with Ca- and Mg-perchlorate has been shown to catalyze lower O2 release temperatures and approach some SAM O2 release data. Instead of physical mixtures used in previous work, the work presented here utilized perchlorate solutions added to Fe phases. This technique allowed for perchlorate to come in closer contact with the Fe-phase and may more closely mimic Mars conditions where humidity can increase enough to cause deliquescence of the highly hygroscopic perchlorate phases. The objective of this work is to: 1) Utilize a laboratory SAM analog instrument to evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Mg- and Ca-perchlorates solutions applied to Fephases detetected in Gale Crate; and 2) Determine if perchlorate solutions can provide improved matches with the SAM O2 temperature release profiles.

  7. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Calcite Under Reduced Operating Pressures: Implications for the 2011 MSL Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V. Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is scheduled for launch in 2011. The science objectives for MSL are to assess the past or present biological potential, to characterize the geology, and to investigate other planetary processes that influence habitability at the landing site. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is a key instrument on the MSL payload that will explore the potential habitability at the landing site [1]. In addition to searching for organic compounds, SAM will have the capability to characterized evolved gases as a function of increasing temperature and provide information on the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases such as carbonates, sulfates, phyllosilicates, and Fe-oxyhydroxides. The operating conditions in SAM ovens will be maintained at 30 mb pressure with a He carrier gas flowing at 1 sccm. We have previously characterized the thermal and evolved gas behaviors of volatile-bearing species under reduced pressure conditions that simulated operating conditions of the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) that was onboard the 2007 Mars Phoenix Scout Mission [e.g., 2-8]. TEGA ovens operated at 12 mb pressure with a N2 carrier gas flowing at 0.04 sccm. Another key difference between SAM and TEGA is that TEGA was able to perform differential scanning calorimetry whereas SAM only has a pyrolysis oven. The operating conditions for TEGA and SAM have several key parameter differences including operating pressure (12 vs 30 mb), carrier gas (N2 vs. He), and carrier gas flow rate (0.04 vs 1 sccm). The objectives of this study are to characterize the thermal and evolved gas analysis of calcite under SAM operating conditions and then compare it to calcite thermal and evolved gas analysis under TEGA operating conditions.

  8. METHOD FOR TESTING COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.; Newton, A.S.

    1958-09-01

    A method is described for detecting pin hole imperfections in coatings on uranium-metal objects. Such coated objects are contacted with a heated atmosphere of gaseous hydrogen and imperfections present in the coatings will allow the uranlum to react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride. Since uranium hydride is less dense than uranium metal it will swell, causing enlargement of the coating defeot and rendering it visible.

  9. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  10. Ceramic with zircon coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An article comprises a silicon-containing substrate and a zircon coating. The article can comprise a silicon carbide/silicon (SiC/Si) substrate, a zircon (ZrSiO.sub.4) intermediate coating and an external environmental/thermal barrier coating.

  11. Spin coating of electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Maclay, G. Jordan

    1989-01-01

    Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

  12. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  13. Identification of an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) dependent arsenic methyltransferase in Danio rerio

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Mohamad; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Packianathan, Charles; Qin, Jie; Hallauer, Janell; McDermott, Joseph R.; Yang, Hung-Chi; Tsai, Kan-Jen; Liu, Zijuan

    2012-07-15

    Arsenic methylation is an important cellular metabolic process that modulates arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. Biomethylation of arsenic produces a series of mono-, di- and tri-methylated arsenic metabolites that can be detected in tissues and excretions. Here we report that zebrafish exposed to arsenite (As{sup III}) produces organic arsenicals, including MMA{sup III}, MMA{sup V} and DMA{sup V} with characteristic tissue ratios, demonstrating that an arsenic methylation pathway exists in zebrafish. In mammals, cellular inorganic arsenic is methylated by a SAM-dependent arsenic methyltransferase, AS3MT. A zebrafish arsenic methyltransferase homolog, As3mt, was identified by sequence alignment. Western blotting analysis showed that As3mt was universally expressed in zebrafish tissues. Prominent expression in liver and intestine correlated with methylated arsenic metabolites detected in those tissues. As3mt was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli for in vitro functional studies. Our results demonstrated that As3mt methylated As{sup III} to DMA{sup V} as an end product and produced MMA{sup III} and MMA{sup V} as intermediates. The activity of As3mt was inhibited by elevated concentrations of the substrate As{sup III} as well as the metalloid selenite, which is a well-known antagonistic micronutrient of arsenic toxicity. The activity As3mt was abolished by substitution of either Cys160 or Cys210, which corresponds to conserved cysteine residues in AS3MT homologs, suggesting that they are involved in catalysis. Expression in zebrafish of an enzyme that has a similar function to human and rodent orthologs in catalyzing intracellular arsenic biomethylation validates the applicability of zebrafish as a valuable vertebrate model for understanding arsenic-associated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish methylated As{sup III} to MMA{sup III}, MMA{sup V} and DMA{sup V}. ► A zebrafish arsenic methyltransferase (As3mt) was purified in E. coli.

  14. Potential precursor compounds for chlorohydrocarbons detected in Gale Crater, Mars, by the SAM instrument suite on the Curiosity Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel P.; Kotrc, Benjamin; Francois, Pascaline; Summons, Roger E.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of chlorinated organic compounds in near-surface sedimentary rocks by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite aboard the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover represents an important step toward characterizing habitable environments on Mars. However, this discovery also raises questions about the identity and source of their precursor compounds and the processes by which they become chlorinated. Here we present the results of analog experiments, conducted under conditions similar to SAM gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses, in which we pyrolyzed potential precursor compounds in the presence of various Cl salts and Fe oxides that have been identified in Martian sediments. While chloromethanes could not be unambiguously identified, 1,2-dichloropropane (1,2-DCP), which is one of the chlorinated compounds identified in SAM data, is formed from the chlorination of aliphatic precursors. Additionally, propanol produced more 1,2-DCP than nonfunctionalized aliphatics such as propane or hexanes. Chlorinated benzenes ranging from chlorobenzene to hexachlorobenzene were identified in experiments with benzene carboxylic acids but not with benzene or toluene. Lastly, the distribution of chlorinated benzenes depended on both the substrate species and the nature and concentration of the Cl salt. Ca and Mg perchlorate, both of which release O2 in addition to Cl2 and HCl upon pyrolysis, formed less chlorobenzene relative to the sum of all chlorinated benzenes than in experiments with ferric chloride. FeCl3, a Lewis acid, catalyzes chlorination but does not aid combustion. Accordingly, both the precursor chemistry and sample mineralogy exert important controls on the distribution of chlorinated organics.

  15. Evaluating auditory stream segregation of SAM tone sequences by subjective and objective psychoacoustical tasks, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Brechmann, André; Klump, Georg M.; Deike, Susann

    2014-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation refers to a segregated percept of signal streams with different acoustic features. Different approaches have been pursued in studies of stream segregation. In psychoacoustics, stream segregation has mostly been investigated with a subjective task asking the subjects to report their percept. Few studies have applied an objective task in which stream segregation is evaluated indirectly by determining thresholds for a percept that depends on whether auditory streams are segregated or not. Furthermore, both perceptual measures and physiological measures of brain activity have been employed but only little is known about their relation. How the results from different tasks and measures are related is evaluated in the present study using examples relying on the ABA- stimulation paradigm that apply the same stimuli. We presented A and B signals that were sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones providing purely temporal, spectral or both types of cues to evaluate perceptual stream segregation and its physiological correlate. Which types of cues are most prominent was determined by the choice of carrier and modulation frequencies (fmod) of the signals. In the subjective task subjects reported their percept and in the objective task we measured their sensitivity for detecting time-shifts of B signals in an ABA- sequence. As a further measure of processes underlying stream segregation we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). SAM tone parameters were chosen to evoke an integrated (1-stream), a segregated (2-stream), or an ambiguous percept by adjusting the fmod difference between A and B tones (Δfmod). The results of both psychoacoustical tasks are significantly correlated. BOLD responses in fMRI depend on Δfmod between A and B SAM tones. The effect of Δfmod, however, differs between auditory cortex and frontal regions suggesting differences in representation related to the degree of perceptual ambiguity of the sequences

  16. Ligand-Induced Stabilization of a Duplex-like Architecture Is Crucial for the Switching Mechanism of the SAM-III Riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Gorle; Srinivasan, Harini; Nanda, Shivani; Priyakumar, U Deva

    2016-06-21

    Riboswitches are structured RNA motifs that control gene expression by sensing the concentrations of specific metabolites and make up a promising new class of antibiotic targets. S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM)-III riboswitch, mainly found in lactic acid bacteria, is involved in regulating methionine and SAM biosynthetic pathways. SAM-III riboswitch regulates the gene expression by switching the translation process on and off with respect to the absence and presence of the SAM ligand, respectively. In this study, an attempt is made to understand the key conformational transitions involved in ligand binding using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed in an explicit solvent environment. G26 is found to recognize the SAM ligand by forming hydrogen bonds, whereas the absence of the ligand leads to opening of the binding pocket. Consistent with experimental results, the absence of the SAM ligand weakens the base pairing interactions between the nucleobases that are part of the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) and anti-Shine-Dalgarno (aSD) sequences, which in turn facilitates recognition of the SD sequence by ribosomes. Detailed analysis reveals that a duplex-like structure formed by nucleotides from different parts of the RNA and the adenine base of the ligand is crucial for the stability of the completely folded state in the presence of the ligand. Previous experimental studies have shown that the SAM-III riboswitch exists in equilibrium between the unfolded and partially folded states in the absence of the ligand, which completely folds upon binding of the ligand. Comparison of the results presented here to the available experimental data indicates the structures obtained using the MD simulations resemble the partially folded state. Thus, this study provides a detailed understanding of the fully and partially folded structures of the SAM-III riboswitch in the presence and absence of the ligand, respectively. This study hypothesizes a dual role for the SAM ligand

  17. Search for nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Freissinet, Caroline; Franz, Heather; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; McAdam, Amy; Cabane, Michel; Ming, Douglas; Glavin, Daniel; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Leshin, Laurie; Wong, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Wray, James; Steele, Andrew; Buch, Arnaud; Prats, Benito

    2014-05-01

    One of the main goals of the Mars Science Laboratory is to determine whether the planet ever had environmental conditions capable of supporting microbial life. Nitrogen is a fundamental element for life, and is present in structural (e.g., proteins), catalytic (e.g., enzymes and ribozymes), energy transfer (e.g., ATP) and information storage (RNA and DNA) bio-molecules. Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as dinitrogen (N2). However, a fraction of N2 has been lost to space by sputtering and photochemical processes [1, 2], impact erosion [3], and chemical oxidation to nitrates [4, 5]. Nitrates produced early in Mars' history by photochemistry may later decompose back into N2 by the current impact flux [6]. It is estimated that the Martian surface could contain soil nitrates at levels of 0.3 wt.% N, if mixed homogenously [6], or a layer of pure NaNO3 of about 3 m thickness [5] distributed globally. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen for terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of soil nitrates is important to assess habitability in the Martian environment. The only previous attempt to search for soil nitrates was by TEGA and the MECA WCL on the Phoenix mission but no evolved N-containing species were detected [7]. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in two Martian meteorites: Nakhla [8] and EETA79001 [9]. SAM is capable of detecting nitrates by their thermal decomposition into nitric oxide, NO. SAM analyzed samples from Rocknest soil and two drill holes located at John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) mudstones in the Sheepbed member of the Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. There appear to be several peaks associated with the release of m/z 30 in the temperature range from 150° C to 600° C. m/z 30 can be attributed to nitric oxide; however, other possible chemical interferences may be present and are assessed. The origin of nitric oxide is discussed and its thermal evolution is

  18. Search for nitrates on Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael

    One of the main goals of the Mars Science Laboratory is to determine whether the planet ever had environmental conditions capable of supporting microbial life. Nitrogen is a fundamental element for life, and is present in structural (e.g., proteins), catalytic (e.g., enzymes and ribozymes), energy transfer (e.g., ATP) and information storage (RNA and DNA) bio-molecules. Planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early Martian atmosphere as dinitrogen (N _{2}). However, a fraction of N _{2} has been lost to space by sputtering and photochemical processes [1, 2], impact erosion [3], and chemical oxidation to nitrates [4, 5]. Nitrates produced early in Mars’ history by photochemistry may later decompose back into N _{2} by the current impact flux [6]. It is estimated that the Martian surface could contain soil nitrates at levels of 0.3 wt.% N, if mixed homogenously [6], or a layer of pure NaNO _{3} of about 3 m thickness [5] distributed globally. Nitrates are a fundamental source for nitrogen for terrestrial microorganisms. Therefore, the detection of soil nitrates is important to assess habitability in the Martian environment. The only previous attempt to search for soil nitrates was by TEGA and the MECA WCL on the Phoenix mission but no evolved N-containing species were detected [7]. Nitrates have been tentatively identified in two Martian meteorites: Nakhla [8] and EETA79001 [9]. SAM is capable of detecting nitrates by their thermal decomposition into nitric oxide, NO. SAM analyzed samples from Rocknest soil and two drill holes located at John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) mudstones in the Sheepbed member of the Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale Crater. There appear to be several peaks associated with the release of m/z 30 in the temperature range from 150(°) °C to 600(°) °C. M/z 30 can be attributed to nitric oxide; however, other possible chemical interferences may be present, such as ethane (C _{2}H _{6}), formaldehyde (HCHO), diazene (N

  19. Thermal barrier coating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, S.; Leibert, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A coating system which contains a bond coating and a thermal barrier coating is applied to metal surfaces such as turbine blades and provides both low thermal conductivity and improved adherence when exposed to high temperature gases or liquids. The bond coating contains NiCrAlY and the thermal barrier coating contains a reflective oxide. The reflective oxides ZrO2-Y2O3 and ZrO2-MgO have demonstrated significant utility in high temperature turbine applications.

  20. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  1. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  2. Antibacterial polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mollye C.; Allen, Ashley N.; Barnhart, Meghan; Tucker, Mark David; Hibbs, Michael R.

    2009-09-01

    A series of poly(sulfone)s with quaternary ammonium groups and another series with aldehyde groups are synthesized and tested for biocidal activity against vegetative bacteria and spores, respectively. The polymers are sprayed onto substrates as coatings which are then exposed to aqueous suspensions of organisms. The coatings are inherently biocidal and do not release any agents into the environment. The coatings adhere well to both glass and CARC-coated coupons and they exhibit significant biotoxicity. The most effective quaternary ammonium polymers kills 99.9% of both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and the best aldehyde coating kills 81% of the spores on its surface.

  3. Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In order to reduce heat transfer between a hot gas heat source and a metallic engine component, a thermal insulating layer of material is placed between them. This thermal barrier coating is applied by plasma spray processing the thin films. The coating has been successfully employed in aerospace applications for many years. Lewis Research Center, a leader in the development engine components coating technology, has assisted Caterpillar, Inc. in applying ceramic thermal barrier coatings on engines. Because these large engines use heavy fuels containing vanadium, engine valve life is sharply decreased. The barrier coating controls temperatures, extends valve life and reduces operating cost. Additional applications are currently under development.

  4. Lubricant Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    "Peen Plating," a NASA developed process for applying molybdenum disulfide, is the key element of Techniblast Co.'s SURFGUARD process for applying high strength solid lubricants. The process requires two machines -- one for cleaning and one for coating. The cleaning step allows the coating to be bonded directly to the substrate to provide a better "anchor." The coating machine applies a half a micron thick coating. Then, a blast gun, using various pressures to vary peening intensities for different applications, fires high velocity "media" -- peening hammers -- ranging from plastic pellets to steel shot. Techniblast was assisted by Rural Enterprises, Inc. Coating service can be performed at either Techniblast's or a customer's facility.

  5. Coating Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hot-section gas-turbine components typically require some form of coating for oxidation and corrosion protection. Efficient use of coatings requires reliable and accurate predictions of the protective life of the coating. Currently engine inspections and component replacements are often made on a conservative basis. As a result, there is a constant need to improve and develop the life-prediction capability of metallic coatings for use in various service environments. The purpose of this present work is aimed at developing of an improved methodology for predicting metallic coating lives in an oxidizing environment and in a corrosive environment.

  6. A Standard Analysis Method (SAM) for the automated analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils using the chemical analysis automation (CAA) paradigm: Validation and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rzeszutko, C.; Johnson, C.R.; Monagle, M.; Klatt, L.N.

    1997-11-01

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program is developing a standardized modular automation strategy for chemical analysis. In this automation concept, analytical chemistry is performed with modular building blocks that correspond to individual elements of the steps in the analytical process. With a standardized set of behaviors and interactions, these blocks can be assembled in a plug-and-play manner into a complete analysis system. These building blocks, which are referred to as Standard laboratory Modules (SLM), interface to a host control system that orchestrates the entire analytical process, from sample preparation through data interpretation. The integrated system is called a Standard Analysis Method (SAM). A SAM for the automated determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils, assembled in a mobile laboratory, is undergoing extensive testing and validation. The SAM consists of the following SLMs: a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentration, a column clean-up, a gas chromatography, a PCB data-interpretation module, a robot, and a human-computer interface. The SAM is configured to meet the requirements specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) SW-846 methods 3541/3620A/8082 for the analysis of PCBs in soils. The PCB SAM will be described along with the developmental test plan. Performance data obtained during developmental testing will also be discussed.

  7. Methyl group balance in brain and liver: role of choline on increased S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) demand by chronic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Rosalva; Santoyo, Martha E; Cruz, Daniela; Delgado, Juan Manuel; Zarazúa, Sergio; Jiménez-Capdeville, María E

    2012-11-30

    Arsenic toxicity has been related to its interference with one carbon metabolism, where a high demand of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) for arsenic methylation as well as a failure of its regeneration would compromise the availability of methyl groups for diverse cellular functions. Since exposed animals show disturbances of methylated products such as methylated arginines, myelin and axon membranes, this work investigates whether alterations of SAM, choline and phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the brain of arsenic exposed rats are associated with myelin alterations and myelin basic protein (MBP) immunoreactivity. Also these metabolites, morphologic and biochemical markers of methyl group alterations were analyzed in the liver, the main site of arsenic methylation. In adult, life-long arsenic exposed rats through drinking water (3 ppm), no changes of SAM, choline and PC concentrations where found in the brain, but SAM and PC were severely decreased in liver accompanied by a significant increase of choline. These results suggest that choline plays an important role as methyl donor in arsenic exposure, which could underlie hepatic affections observed when arsenic exposure is combined with other environmental factors. Also, important myelin and nerve fiber alterations, accompanied by a 75% decrease of MBP immunoreactivity were not associated with a SAM deficit in the brain. PMID:23085348

  8. TNF-α produced by SEC2 mutant (SAM-3)-activated human T cells induces apoptosis of HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojun; Xu, Mingkai; Song, Yubo; Su, Zhencheng; Zhang, Huiwen; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins C2 (SEC2) is a classical model of superantigens (SAg), which has the powerful ability to activate T cells as well as induce massive cytokine production. This property makes SEC2 and its mutants well concerned as a potential new immune-regulatory agent for cancer therapy. We previously constructed a SEC2 mutant named SAM-3, which had prominently antitumor activity in BALB/c mice model. But, the underlying molecular mechanism for stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and antitumor effect on human tumor cells induced by SAM-3 is not clear. Here, we showed that SAM-3 could activate human TCR Vβ 12, 13A, 14, 15, 17, and 20 CD8(+) subgroup T cells, which secreted the cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, and exhibit stimulation activity in a dose-dependent manner. TNF-α secreted from activated T cells could induce apoptosis and G1-phase arrest and lead to the antitumor effect in HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, SAM-3 upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) mRNA and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8. We also found that the antitumor activity and activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8 were decreased when the neutralizing TNF-α monoclonal antibody presented. These data suggest that TNF-α secreted by SAM-3-activated T cells is an important factor in inducing apoptosis in HepG2 cells. PMID:26536876

  9. Mutation of the Salt Bridge-forming Residues in the ETV6-SAM Domain Interface Blocks ETV6-NTRK3-induced Cellular Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Cetinbas, Naniye; Huang-Hobbs, Helen; Tognon, Cristina; Leprivier, Gabriel; An, Jianghong; McKinney, Steven; Bowden, Mary; Chow, Connie; Gleave, Martin; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Sorensen, Poul H.

    2013-01-01

    The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) chimeric oncogene is expressed in diverse tumor types. EN is generated by a t(12;15) translocation, which fuses the N-terminal SAM (sterile α-motif) domain of the ETV6 (or TEL) transcription factor to the C-terminal PTK (protein-tyrosine kinase) domain of the neurotrophin-3 receptor NTRK3. SAM domain-mediated polymerization of EN leads to constitutive activation of the PTK domain and constitutive signaling of the Ras-MAPK and PI3K-Akt pathways, which are essential for EN oncogenesis. Here we show through complementary biophysical and cellular biological techniques that mutation of Lys-99, which participates in a salt bridge at the SAM polymer interface, reduces self-association of the isolated SAM domain as well as high molecular mass complex formation of EN and abrogates the transformation activity of EN. We also show that mutation of Asp-101, the intermolecular salt bridge partner of Lys-99, similarly blocks transformation of NIH3T3 cells by EN, reduces EN tyrosine phosphorylation, inhibits Akt and Mek1/2 signaling downstream of EN, and abolishes tumor formation in nude mice. In contrast, mutations of Glu-100 and Arg-103, residues in the vicinity of the interdomain Lys-99–Asp-101 salt bridge, have little or no effect on these oncogenic characteristics of EN. Our results underscore the importance of specific electrostatic interactions for SAM polymerization and EN transformation. PMID:23798677

  10. Isotopic Composition of Carbon Dioxide Released from Confidence Hills Sediment as Measured by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J.; Archer, P., Jr.; Conrad, P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Jones, J.; Ming, D.; McAdam, A.; Morris, R.; Navarro-Gozalez, R.; Owen, T.; Steele, A.; Summons, R.; Sutter, B.; Webster, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2014, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity" rover drilled into the sediment at the base of Mount Sharp in a location namsed Cionfidence Hills (CH). CH marked the fifth sample pocessed by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite since Curiosity arrived in Gale Crater, with previous analyses performed at Rocknest (RN), John Klein (JK), Cumberland (CB), and Windjana (WJ). Evolved gas analysis (EGA) of all samples has indicated H2O as well as O-, C- and S-bearing phases in the samples, often at abundances that would be below the detection limit of the CheMin instrument. By examining the temperatures at which gases are evolved from samples, SAM EGA data can help provide clues to the mineralogy of volatile-bearing phases when their identities are unclear to CheMin. SAM may also detect gases evolved from amorphous material in solid samples, which is not suitable for analysis by CheMin. Finally, the isotopic composition of these gases may suggest possible formation scenarios and relationships between phases. We will discuss C isotope ratios of CO2 evolved from the CH sample as measured with SAM's quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and draw comparisons to samples previously analyzed by SAM.

  11. Spectroscopic Characterization and Mechanistic Investigation of P-Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme from the Marine Bacterium Shewanella denitrificans OS217

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kylie D.; Wang, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Natural products containing carbon-phosphorus bonds elicit important bioactivity in many organisms. L-phosphinothricin contains the only known naturally-occurring carbon-phosphorus-carbon bond linkage. In actinomycetes, the cobalamin-dependent radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) methyltransferase PhpK catalyzes the formation of the second C-P bond to generate the complete C-P-C linkage in phosphinothricin. Here we use electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to characterize and demonstrate the activity of a cobalamin-dependent radical SAM methyltransferase denoted SD_1168 from Shewanella denitrificans OS217, a marine bacterium that has not been reported to synthesize phosphinothricin. Recombinant, refolded, and reconstituted SD_1168 binds a four-iron, four-sulfur cluster that interacts with SAM and cobalamin. In the presence of SAM, a reductant, and methylcobalamin, SD_1168 surprisingly catalyzes the P-methylation of N-acetyl-demethylphosphinothricin and demethylphosphinothricin to produce N-acetyl-phosphinothricin and phosphinothricin, respectively. In addition, this enzyme is active in the absence of methylcobalamin if the strong reductant titanium (III) citrate and hydroxocobalamin are provided. When incubated with [methyl-13C] cobalamin and titanium citrate, both [methyl-13C] and unlabeled N-acetylphosphinothricin are produced. Our results suggest that SD_1168 catalyzes P-methylation using radical SAM-dependent chemistry with cobalamin as a coenzyme. In light of recent genomic information, the discovery of this P-methyltransferase suggests that S. denitrificans produces a phosphinate natural product. PMID:25224746

  12. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  13. Coatings for directional eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, J. R.; Jackson, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the development of an environmentally stable coating for a very high strength, directionally solidified eutectic alloy designated NiTaC-13. Three duplex (two-layer) coatings survived 3,000 hours on a cyclic oxidation test (1,100 C to 90 C). These coatings were fabricated by first depositing a layer of NiCrAl(Y) by vacuum evaporation from an electron beam heated source, followed by depositing an aluminizing overlayer. The alloy after exposure with these coatings was denuded of carbide fibers at the substrate/coating interface. It was demonstrated that TaC fiber denudation can be greatly retarded by applying a carbon-bearing coating. The coating was applied by thermal spraying followed by aluminization. Specimens coated with NiCrAlCY+Al survived over 2,000 hours in the cyclic oxidation test with essentially no TaC denudation. Coating ductility was studied for coated and heat-treated bars, and stress rupture life at 871 C and 1,100 C was determined for coated and cycled bars.

  14. Coated Aerogel Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  15. Strain isolated ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolokan, R. P.; Brady, J. B.; Jarrabet, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are used in gas turbine engines to improve component temperature capability and cooling air efficiency. A compliant metal fiber strain isolator between a plasma sprayed ceramic coating and a metal substrate improves ceramic durability while allowing thicker coatings for better insulation. Development of strain isolated coatings has concentrated on design and fabrication of coatings and coating evaluation via thermal shock testing. In thermal shock testing, five types of failure are possible: buckling failure im compression on heat up, bimetal type failure, isothermal expansion mismatch failure, mudflat cracking during cool down, and long term fatigue. A primary failure mode for thermally cycled coatings is designated bimetal type failure. Bimetal failure is tensile failure in the ceramic near the ceramic-metal interface. One of the significant benefits of the strain isolator is an insulating layer protecting the metal substrate from heat deformation and thereby preventing bimetal type failure.

  16. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  17. The Sam68 nuclear body is composed of two RNase-sensitive substructures joined by the adaptor HNRNPL.

    PubMed

    Mannen, Taro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo; Goshima, Naoki; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian cell nucleus contains membraneless suborganelles referred to as nuclear bodies (NBs). Some NBs are formed with an architectural RNA (arcRNA) as the structural core. Here, we searched for new NBs that are built on unidentified arcRNAs by screening for ribonuclease (RNase)-sensitive NBs using 32,651 fluorescently tagged human cDNA clones. We identified 32 tagged proteins that required RNA for their localization in distinct nuclear foci. Among them, seven RNA-binding proteins commonly localized in the Sam68 nuclear body (SNB), which was disrupted by RNase treatment. Knockdown of each SNB protein revealed that SNBs are composed of two distinct RNase-sensitive substructures. One substructure is present as a distinct NB, termed the DBC1 body, in certain conditions, and the more dynamic substructure including Sam68 joins to form the intact SNB. HNRNPL acts as the adaptor to combine the two substructures and form the intact SNB through the interaction of two sets of RNA recognition motifs with the putative arcRNAs in the respective substructures. PMID:27377249

  18. Mars Atmospheric Composition, Isotope Ratios and Seasonal Variations: Overview and Updates of the SAM Measurements at Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We will summarize the in situ measurements of atmospheric composition and the isotopic ratios of D/H in water, C-13/C-12, O-18/O-16, O-17 / O-16, and C-13 O-18 / C-12 O-16 in carbon dioxide, and Ar-38 / Ar-36, Kr-x / Kr-84, and N-15 / N-14 made in the martian atmosphere at Gale Crater from the Curiosity Rover using the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)'s Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS). With data over 700 sols since the Curiosity landing, we will discuss evidence and implications for changes on seasonal and other timescales. We will also present results for continued methane and methane enrichment experiments over this time period. Comparison between our measurements in the modern atmosphere and those of martian meteorites like ALH 84001 implies that the martian reservoirs of CO2 and H2O were largely established approximately 4 billion years ago, but that atmospheric loss or surface interaction may be still ongoing.

  19. Effects of the rate of releases from Sam Rayburn Reservoir on the Aeration Capacity of the Angelina River, eastern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, Jack; Goss, Richard L.; Rathbun, Ira G.

    1980-01-01

    A three-phase study was conducted during July and August 1979 to determine the effects of varying release rates through the power-outlet works at Sam Rayburn Reservoir, eastern Texas, on aeration capacity of a 14-mile reach of the Angelina River below Sam Rayburn Dam. The dominant factors that affected the aeration capacity during the study time were time of travel and the dissolved-oxygen deficit of the releases. Aeration was low throughout the study but increased in response to increases in the dissolved-oxygen deficit and the duration of time that the releases were exposed to the atmosphere (time of travel). The average concentration of dissolved oxygen sustained by release of 8,800 cubic feet per second decreased from 5.0 milligrams per liter at a site near the power outlet to 4.8 milligrams per liter at a site about 14 miles downstream; the time of travel averaged about 8 hours. The average concentration of dissolved oxygen in flow sustained by releases of 2,200 cubic feet per second increased from 5.2 to 5.5 milligrams per liter; the time of travel averaged about 20 hours. (USGS)

  20. Free energy calculations in electroactive self-assembled monolayers (SAMs): impact of the chain length on the redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Gaelle; Israeli, Yael; Goujon, Florent; Limoges, Benoit; Bonal, Christine; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-10-13

    The free energy approach is used to study the effect of the relative chain length of the two constituents of electroactive self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold. In this study, the ferrocene groups are exposed to the electrolyte solution. This situation is achieved by using shorter diluent alkanethiol chains. To this end, the mixed monolayers formed by the self-assembly of 11-ferrocenylundecanethiol and butanethiol FcC(11)S/C(4)S and of 6-ferrocenylhexanethiol and butanethiol FcC(6)S/C(4)S onto a gold surface are studied. Calculation of enthalpy and entropy differences are also performed using molecular simulations. Additionally, the electrochemical signatures of these systems are determined to allow a direct comparison with our calculations. The thermodynamic properties are discussed in terms of enthalpy and entropy changes. Two effects account for the thermodynamic behavior. The first one involves the ion pairing between the ferrocenium group and the perchlorate anion. The second one concerns the desolvation of the first hydration shell of the anions. Finally, this work is also completed with a microscopic description associated with an energy characterization of these SAMs as a function of the surface coverage under conditions close to experiments. PMID:21866943

  1. Structure-Based Design of a Novel SMYD3 Inhibitor that Bridges the SAM-and MEKK2-Binding Pockets.

    PubMed

    Van Aller, Glenn S; Graves, Alan P; Elkins, Patricia A; Bonnette, William G; McDevitt, Patrick J; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S; Dean, Tony W; Su, Dai-Shi; Carpenter, Christopher L; Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-05-01

    SMYD3 is a lysine methyltransferase overexpressed in colorectal, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular tumors, and has been implicated as an oncogene in human malignancies. Methylation of MEKK2 by SMYD3 is important for regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting the possibility of selectively targeting SMYD3 in RAS-driven cancers. Structural and kinetic characterization of SMYD3 was undertaken leading to a co-crystal structure of SMYD3 with a MEKK2-peptide substrate bound, and the observation that SMYD3 follows a partially processive mechanism. These insights allowed for the design of GSK2807, a potent and selective, SAM-competitive inhibitor of SMYD3 (Ki = 14 nM). A high-resolution crystal structure reveals that GSK2807 bridges the gap between the SAM-binding pocket and the substrate lysine tunnel of SMYD3. Taken together, our data demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors of SMYD3 can be designed to prevent methylation of MEKK2 and these could have potential use as anticancer therapeutics. PMID:27066749

  2. The Detection of Evolved Oxygen from the Rocknest Eolian Bedform Material by the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) instrument at the Mars Curiosity Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Ming, D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A.; Mahaffy, P.; Stern, J.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; McKay, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected an O2 gas release from the Rocknest eolain bedform (Fig. 1). The detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander s Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) [1] suggests that perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 release detected by SAM. The perchlorate would also serve as a source of chlorine in the chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS) [2,3]. Chlorates (ClO3-) [4,5] and/or superoxides [6] may also be sources of evolved O2 from the Rocknest materials. The work objectives are to 1) evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Rocknest materials, 2) compare these O2 release temperatures with a series of perchlorates and chlorates, and 3) evaluate superoxide O2- sources and possible perchlorate interactions with other Rocknest phases during QMS analysis.

  3. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N.; Elliott, David J.; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y.; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  4. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  5. A nano-patterned self assembled monolayer (SAM) rutile titania cancer chip for rapid, low cost, highly sensitive, direct cancer analysis in MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, M; Gopal, Judy; Hasan, Nazim; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2014-12-01

    We developed a cancer chip by nano-patterning a highly sensitive SAM titanium surface capable of capturing and sensing concentrations as low as 10 cancer cells/mL from the environment by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The current approach evades any form of pretreatment and sample preparation processes; it is time saving and does not require the (expensive) conventional MALDI target plate. The home made aluminium (Al) target holder cost, on which we loaded the cancer chips for MALDI-TOF MS analysis, is about 60 USD. While the conventional stainless steel MALDI target plate is more than 700 USD. The SAM surface was an effective platform leading to on-chip direct MALDI-MS detection of cancer cells. We compared the functionality of this chip with the unmodified titanium surfaces and thermally oxidized (TO) titanium surfaces. The lowest detectable concentration of the TO chip was 10(3) cells/mL, while the lowest detectable concentration of the control or unmodified titanium chips was 10(6) cells/mL. Compared to the control surface, the SAM cancer chip showed 100,000 times of enhanced sensitivity and compared with the TO chip, 1000 times of increased sensitivity. The high sensitivity of the SAM surfaces is attributed to the presence of the rutile SAM, surface roughness and surface wettability as confirmed by AFM, XRD, contact angle microscope and FE-SEM. This study opens a new avenue for the potent application of the SAM cancer chip for direct cancer diagnosis by MALDI-TOF MS in the near future. PMID:25159382

  6. The SAM software system for modeling severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors on full-scale and analytic training simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchaya, D. Yu.; Fuks, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The architecture of the SAM software package intended for modeling beyond-design-basis accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors evolving into a severe stage with core melting and failure of the reactor pressure vessel is presented. By using the SAM software package it is possible to perform comprehensive modeling of the entire emergency process from the failure initiating event to the stage of severe accident involving meltdown of nuclear fuel, failure of the reactor pressure vessel, and escape of corium onto the concrete basement or into the corium catcher with retention of molten products in it.

  7. SAM Technical Review Committee Final Report: Summary and Key Recommendations from the Onsite TRC Meeting Held April 22-23, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, S.; Janzou, S.; Gilman, P.; Freeman, J.; Kaffine, L.

    2013-08-01

    The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a broad and robust set of models and frameworks for analyzing both system performance and system financing. It does this across a range of technologies dominated by solar technologies including photovoltaics (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program requested the SAM development team to review the photovoltaic performance modeling with the development community and specifically, with the independent engineering community. The report summarizes the major effort for this technical review committee (TRC).

  8. SAM-like Evolved Gas Analysis of Mars Analog Samples from the Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition: Implications for Analyses by the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Bristow, T.; Steele, A.; Amundsen, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expeditions (AMASE) have investigated a range of geologic settings on Svalbard, using methodologies and techniques being developed for Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on MSL consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-QMS) system represented the EGA-QMS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. Here we discuss the SAM-like EGA-QMS analyses of a selected subset of samples acquired during several field seasons, together with AMASE CheMin team results. The results enable insight into organic content, organic-mineral associations, and mineralogy. Organic materials evolved from all samples over a range of temperatures. In general, this can indicate that the organics have a range of thermal maturity and/or are bound in different ways to their matrix. Most often, organics that were outside of mineral grains were the dominant pool of organic material inferable from the EGA-QMS, but organics encapsulated within mineral grains, including possibly methane, were also inferred. Organic-mineral associations can influence organic preservation potential and detection. Constraints on these associations, and overall sample organic chemistry, enabled by our SAM-like EGA-QMS analog analyses demonstrate the potential to understand the organic chemical characteristics in materials sampled by MSL, even when utilizing EGA-QMS, the simplest type of solid sample experiment SAM will perform. Any organic chemical information inferred from EGA-QMS analysis could then also be followed by detailed SAM EGA

  9. Beam Damage of HS (CH2)15 COOH Terminated Self Assembled Monolayer (SAM) as Observed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhard, Mark H.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Baer, Donald R.

    2011-10-25

    XPS spectra of HS(CH{sub 2}){sub 15} COOH terminated a self assembled monolayer (SAM)sample was collected over a period of 242 minutes to determine specimen damage during long exposures to monochromatic Al Ka x-rays. For this COOH terminated SAM we measured the loss of oxygen as a function of time by rastering a focused 100 W, 100 um diameter x-ray beam over a 1.4 mm x 0.2 mm area of the sample.

  10. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  11. Satellite and correlative measurements of the stratospheric aerosol. III - Comparison of measurements by SAM II, SAGE, dustsondes, filters, impactors and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Swissler, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The SAM II and SAGE satellite sensors, dustsondes, impactors, a filter collector and an airborne lidar were used in a large satellite validation experiment on July 16-19, 1979, at Poker Flat, Alaska. Independent measurements of extinction profiles by SAM II and SAGE are noted to agree with each other and with those derived from the other instruments (within combined uncertainties). The wire impactor-derived results, while also consistent with the others, are coarse due to the relatively large uncertainties in impactor-derived mass, extinction, and number of particles/unit volume whose radius is greater than x microns.

  12. In situ analysis of Mars soil sample with the sam gcms instrumentation onboard Curiosity : interpretation and comparison of measurements done at Rocknest and Yelloknife bay sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, Cyril; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Buch, Arnaud; Francois, Pascaline; Millan, Maeva; Teinturier, Sammy; Navarro-Gonzales, Rafael; Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Caro; Steele, Andrew; Eigenbrode, Jen; Mahaffy, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The characterisation of the chemical and mineralogical composition of regolith samples collected with the Curiosity rover is a primary objective of the SAM experiment. These data should provide essential clues on the past habitability of Gale crater. Amongst the SAM suite of instruments [1], SAM-GC (Gas Chromatograph) is devoted to identify and quantify volatiles evolved from the thermal (heating up to about 900°C)/chemical (derivatization procedure) treatment of any soil sample collected by the Curiosity rover. With the aim to search for potential organic molecules outgassed from the samples, a SAM-GC analytical channel composed of thermal-desorption injector and a MXT-CLP chromatographic column was chosen to achieve all the measurements done up today, as it was designed for the separation of a wide range of volatile organic molecules. Three solid samples have been analyzed with GCMS, one sand sample collected at the Rocknest site, and two rock samples (John Klein and Cumberland respectively) collected at the Yellowknife Bay site using the Curiosity driller. All the measurements were successful and they produced complex chromatograms with both detectors used for SAM GC, i.e. a thermal conductivity detector and the SAM quandrupole mass spectrometer. Their interpretation already revealed the presence of an oxychlorine phase present in the sample which is at the origin of chlorohydrocarbons clearly identified [2] but this represents only a fraction of the GCMS signal recorded [3,4]. This work presents a systematic comparison of the GCMS measurements done for the different samples collected, supported by reference data obtained in laboratory with different spare models of the gas chromatograph, with the aim to bring new elements of interpretation of the SAM measurements. References: [1] Mahaffy, P. et al. (2012) Space Sci Rev, 170, 401-478. [2] Glavin, D. et al. (2013), JGR. [3] Leshin L. et al. (2013), Science, [4] Ming D. et al. (2013), Science, 32, 64

  13. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  14. Optical coating in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunner, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    A technological appraisal of the steps required to approach the goal of in-situ optical coating, cleaning and re-coating the optical elements of a remote telescope in space is reported. Emphasis is placed on the high ultraviolet throughput that a telescope using bare aluminum mirrors would offer. A preliminary design is suggested for an Orbital Coating Laboratory to answer basic technical questions.

  15. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  16. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  17. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  18. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  19. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  20. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A series of studies in which films and liquid spray-on materials were evaluated in the laboratory for transport aircraft external surface coatings are summarized. Elastomeric polyurethanes were found to best meet requirements. Two commercially available products, CAAPCO B-274 and Chemglaze M313, were subjected to further laboratory testing, airline service evaluations, and drag-measurement flight tests. It was found that these coatings were compatible with the severe operating environment of airlines and that coatings reduced airplane drag. An economic analysis indicated significant dollar benefits to airlines from application of the coatings.