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Sample records for cobalt-based oxygen evolving

  1. Nucleation, growth, and repair of a cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalyst.

    PubMed

    Surendranath, Yogesh; Lutterman, Daniel A; Liu, Yi; Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-04-11

    The mechanism of nucleation, steady-state growth, and repair is investigated for an oxygen evolving catalyst prepared by electrodeposition from Co(2+) solutions in weakly basic electrolytes (Co-OEC). Potential step chronoamperometry and atomic force microscopy reveal that nucleation of Co-OEC is progressive and reaches a saturation surface coverage of ca. 70% on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates. Steady-state electrodeposition of Co-OEC exhibits a Tafel slope approximately equal to 2.3 × RT/F. The electrochemical rate law exhibits a first order dependence on Co(2+) and inverse orders on proton (third order) and proton acceptor, methylphosphonate (first order for 1.8 mM ≤ [MeP(i)] ≤ 18 mM and second order dependence for 32 mM ≤ [MeP(i)] ≤ 180 mM). These electrokinetic studies, combined with recent XAS studies of catalyst structure, suggest a mechanism for steady state growth at intermediate MeP(i) concentration (1.8-18 mM) involving a rapid solution equilibrium between aquo Co(II) and Co(III) hydroxo species accompanied with a rapid surface equilibrium involving electrolyte dissociation and deprotonation of surface bound water. These equilibria are followed by a chemical rate-limiting step for incorporation of Co(III) into the growing cobaltate clusters comprising Co-OEC. At higher concentrations of MeP(i) ([MeP(i)] ≥ 32 mM), MePO(3)(2-) equilibrium binding to Co(II) in solution is suggested by the kinetic data. Consistent with the disparate pH profiles for oxygen evolution electrocatalysis and catalyst formation, NMR-based quantification of catalyst dissolution as a function of pH demonstrates functional stability and repair at pH values >6 whereas catalyst corrosion prevails at lower pH values. These kinetic insights provide a basis for developing and operating functional water oxidation (photo)anodes under benign pH conditions. PMID:22394103

  2. When did oxygenic photosynthesis evolve?

    PubMed

    Buick, Roger

    2008-08-27

    The atmosphere has apparently been oxygenated since the 'Great Oxidation Event' ca 2.4 Ga ago, but when the photosynthetic oxygen production began is debatable. However, geological and geochemical evidence from older sedimentary rocks indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before this oxygenation event. Fluid-inclusion oils in ca 2.45 Ga sandstones contain hydrocarbon biomarkers evidently sourced from similarly ancient kerogen, preserved without subsequent contamination, and derived from organisms producing and requiring molecular oxygen. Mo and Re abundances and sulphur isotope systematics of slightly older (2.5 Ga) kerogenous shales record a transient pulse of atmospheric oxygen. As early as ca 2.7 Ga, stromatolites and biomarkers from evaporative lake sediments deficient in exogenous reducing power strongly imply that oxygen-producing cyanobacteria had already evolved. Even at ca 3.2 Ga, thick and widespread kerogenous shales are consistent with aerobic photoautrophic marine plankton, and U-Pb data from ca 3.8 Ga metasediments suggest that this metabolism could have arisen by the start of the geological record. Hence, the hypothesis that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved well before the atmosphere became permanently oxygenated seems well supported. PMID:18468984

  3. Highly active cobalt phosphate and borate based oxygen evolving catalysts operating in neutral and natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, AJ; Surendranath, Y; Reece, SY; Nocera, DG

    2011-02-01

    A high surface area electrode is functionalized with cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalysts (Co-OEC = electrodeposited from pH 7 phosphate, Pi, pH 8.5 methylphosphonate, MePi, and pH 9.2 borate electrolyte, Bi). Co-OEC prepared from MePi and operated in Pi and Bi achieves a current density of 100 mA cm(-2) for water oxidation at 442 and 363 mV overpotential, respectively. The catalyst retains activity in near-neutral pH buffered electrolyte in natural waters such as those from the Charles River (Cambridge, MA) and seawater (Woods Hole, MA). The efficacy and ease of operation of anodes functionalized with Co-OEC at appreciable current density together with its ability to operate in near neutral pH buffered natural water sources bodes well for the translation of this catalyst to a viable renewable energy storage technology.

  4. Wrought cobalt- base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klarstrom, D. L.

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strengths and resistance to hot corrosion attack. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-so-lution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth ele-ments to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes® 230TMalloy, is discussed briefly.

  5. Homogeneously dispersed multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; García-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Yuan, Mingjian; Yassitepe, Emre; Chen, Ning; Regier, Tom; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yuhang; De Luna, Phil; Janmohamed, Alyf; Xin, Huolin L; Yang, Huagui; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Sargent, Edward H

    2016-04-15

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials substantially above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxyhydroxides materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxyhydroxides exhibit the lowest overpotential (191 millivolts) reported at 10 milliamperes per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. The catalyst shows no evidence of degradation after more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computational studies reveal a synergistic interplay between tungsten, iron, and cobalt in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER. PMID:27013427

  6. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; et al

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computationalmore » studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.« less

  7. Evolved Gas from Insulating Oil Heating under Oxygen Existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Kiwamu; Sawatsu, Takahiro

    In recent years, the superannuated transformers have been increasing. This causes such problems as requiring the maintenance of diagnosing internal abnormalities of a transformer and carrying out condition assessment. One of the ways to assess the internal condition is a gas analysis of the insulating oil. In this analysis, low-temperature overheating, the pre-phenomenon of the abnormal heating in the transformer, can be detected. Finding and dealing with this abnormality at the early stages reduce the risk of transformer failure. However, evolved gas of this analysis shows different patterns depending on the existence or non-existence of oxygen.

  8. Wrought cobalt-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1993-08-01

    Wrought cobalt-base superalloys are used extensively in gas turbine engines because of their excellent high-temperature creep and fatigue strength and resistance to hot corrosion attach. In addition, the unique character of the oxide scales that form on some of the alloys provides outstanding resistance to high-temperature sliding wear. This article provides a review of the evolutionary development of wrought cobalt-base alloys in terms of alloy design and physical metallurgy. The topics include solid-solution strengthening, carbide precipitation characteristics, and attempts to introduce age hardening. The use of PHACOMP to enhance thermal stability characteristics and the incorporation of rare-earth elements to improve oxidation resistance is also reviewed and discussed. The further development of cobalt-base superalloys has been severely hampered by past political events, which have accentuated the strategic vulnerability of cobalt as a base or as an alloying element. Consequently, alternative alloys have been developed that use little or no cobalt. One such alternative, Haynes 230 alloy, is discussed briefly.

  9. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  10. Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Marc; Gerhart, John

    1998-01-01

    Evolvability is an organism’s capacity to generate heritable phenotypic variation. Metazoan evolution is marked by great morphological and physiological diversification, although the core genetic, cell biological, and developmental processes are largely conserved. Metazoan diversification has entailed the evolution of various regulatory processes controlling the time, place, and conditions of use of the conserved core processes. These regulatory processes, and certain of the core processes, have special properties relevant to evolutionary change. The properties of versatile protein elements, weak linkage, compartmentation, redundancy, and exploratory behavior reduce the interdependence of components and confer robustness and flexibility on processes during embryonic development and in adult physiology. They also confer evolvability on the organism by reducing constraints on change and allowing the accumulation of nonlethal variation. Evolvability may have been generally selected in the course of selection for robust, flexible processes suitable for complex development and physiology and specifically selected in lineages undergoing repeated radiations. PMID:9671692

  11. Hierarchical cobalt-based hydroxide microspheres for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cui, Bai; Derr, Olivia; Yao, Zhibo; Qin, Zhaotong; Deng, Xiangyun; Li, Jianbao; Lin, Hong

    2014-02-01

    3D hierarchical cobalt hydroxide carbonate hydrate (Co(CO3)0.5(OH).0.11H2O) has been synthesized featuring a hollow urchin-like structure by a one-step hydrothermal method at modest temperature on FTO glass substrates. The functionalities of precursor surfactants were isolated and analyzed. A plausible formation mechanism of the spherical urchin-like microclusters has been furnished through time-dependent investigations. Introduction of other transitional metal doping (Cu, Ni) would give rise to a substantial morphological change associated with a surface area drop. The directly grown cobalt-based hydroxide composite electrodes were found to be capable of catalyzing oxygen evolution reaction (OER) under both neutral pH and alkaline conditions. The favorable 3D dendritic morphology and porous structure provide large surface areas and possible defect sites that are likely responsible for their robust electrochemical activity.

  12. A ligand field chemistry of oxygen generation by the oxygen-evolving complex and synthetic active sites

    PubMed Central

    Betley, Theodore A; Surendranath, Yogesh; Childress, Montana V; Alliger, Glen E; Fu, Ross; Cummins, Christopher C; Nocera, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen–oxygen bond formation and O2 generation occur from the S4 state of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Several mechanistic possibilities have been proposed for water oxidation, depending on the formal oxidation state of the Mn atoms. All fall under two general classifications: the AB mechanism in which nucleophilic oxygen (base, B) attacks electrophilic oxygen (acid, A) of the Mn4Ca cluster or the RC mechanism in which radical-like oxygen species couple within OEC. The critical intermediate in either mechanism involves a metal oxo, though the nature of this oxo for AB and RC mechanisms is disparate. In the case of the AB mechanism, assembly of an even-electron count, high-valent metal-oxo proximate to a hydroxide is needed whereas, in an RC mechanism, two odd-electron count, high-valent metal oxos are required. Thus the two mechanisms give rise to very different design criteria for functional models of the OEC active site. This discussion presents the electron counts and ligand geometries that support metal oxos for AB and RC O–O bond-forming reactions. The construction of architectures that bring two oxygen functionalities together under the purview of the AB and RC scenarios are described. PMID:17971328

  13. Mass loss and dust formation around oxygen-rich evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, F.

    2002-09-01

    This work is a study of the formation of dust around oxygen-rich evolved stars, in correlation with the physical conditions in this environment. ISO SWS and LWS spectroscopy has been analysed, and several mineral and molecular species are identified. For two evolved stars: OH/IR star OH 127.8+0.0 and planetary nebula NGC 6302, the spectral energy distribution has been fitted. Metallic iron and carbonates are identified as new dust components. In addition, the degree of crystallinity of silicates has been studied as a function of mass-loss rate. Finally, submm observations of rotational transitions of CO have been analysed to study the mass-loss history of oxygen-rich AGB stars.

  14. Evidence for an oxygen evolving iron–oxo–cerium intermediate in iron-catalysed water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Codolà, Zoel; Gómez, Laura; Kleespies, Scott T.; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The non-haem iron complex α-[FeII(CF3SO3)2(mcp)] (mcp = (N,N′-dimethyl-N,N′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-cis-diaminocyclohexane) reacts with CeIV to oxidize water to O2, representing an iron-based functional model for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Here we trap an intermediate, characterized by cryospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and formulated as [(mcp)FeIV(O) (μ-O)CeIV(NO3)3]+, the first example of a well-characterized inner-sphere complex to be formed in cerium(IV)-mediated water oxidation. The identification of this reactive FeIV–O–CeIV adduct may open new pathways to validate mechanistic notions of an analogous MnV–O–CaII unit in the oxygen evolving complex that is responsible for carrying out the key O–O bond forming step. PMID:25609387

  15. Crystallization of the oxygen-evolving reaction centre of photosystem II in nine different detergent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Adir, N

    1999-04-01

    Oxygen-evolving photosystem II reaction centres (RCII) isolated from both spinach and pea have been crystallized. A single crystal form grew from RCII monomers in the presence of nine different three-component mixtures of non-ionic detergents and heptane-1,2, 3-triol. The crystals grew as hexagonal rods with dimensions of up to 1 x 0.3 x 0.3 mm. The crystals diffracted to a maximum resolution of 6.5 A and belong to a hexagonal space group with unit-cell parameters a = 495, b = 495, c = 115 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees. The growth of a single crystal form in the presence of such a large variety of detergents suggests a very limited range of crystal lattice formation sites in the RCII complex. PMID:10089326

  16. Spectra from the IRS of Bright Oxygen-Rich Evolved Stars in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Kathleen E.; Sloan, Greg; Wood, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We have used Spitzer's Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to obtain spectra of stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The targets were chosen from the Point Source Catalog of the Mid-Course Space Experiment (MSX), which detected the 243 brightest infrared sources in the SMC. Our SMC sample of oxygen-rich evolved stars shows more dust than found in previous samples, and the dust tends to be dominated by silicates, with little contribution from alumina. Both results may arise from the selection bias in the MSX sample and our sample toward more massive stars. Additionally, several sources show peculiar spectral features such as PAHs, crystalline silicates, or both carbon-rich and silicate features. The spectrum of one source, MSX SMC 145, is a combination of an ordinary AGB star and a background galaxy at z~0.16, rather than an OH/IR star as previously suggested.

  17. Structural Coupling of Extrinsic Proteins with the Oxygen-Evolving Center in Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), which catalyzes photosynthetic water oxidation, is composed of more than 20 subunits, including membrane-intrinsic and -extrinsic proteins. The PSII extrinsic proteins shield the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster from the outside bulk solution and enhance binding of inorganic cofactors, such as Ca2+ and Cl-, in the oxygen-evolving center (OEC) of PSII. Among PSII extrinsic proteins, PsbO is commonly found in all oxygenic organisms, while PsbP and PsbQ are specific to higher plants and green algae, and PsbU, PsbV, CyanoQ, and CyanoP exist in cyanobacteria. In addition, red algae and diatoms have unique PSII extrinsic proteins, such as PsbQ′ and Psb31, suggesting functional divergence during evolution. Recent studies with reconstitution experiments combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have revealed how the individual PSII extrinsic proteins affect the structure and function of the OEC in different organisms. In this review, we summarize our recent results and discuss changes that have occurred in the structural coupling of extrinsic proteins with the OEC during evolutionary history. PMID:26904056

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Oxygen Evolving Enhancer Protein 1 Purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Young; Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jung Im; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the antioxidant activity of a protein purified from Capsosiphon fulvescens. The purification steps included sodium acetate (pH 6) extraction and diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, reversed phase Shodex C4P-50 column chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that the molecular weight of the purified protein was 33 kDa. The N-terminus and partial peptide amino acid sequence of this protein was identical to the sequence of oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE) 1 protein. The antioxidant activity of the OEE 1 was determined in vitro using a scavenging test with 4 types of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). OEE 1 had higher H2 O2 scavenging activity, which proved to be the result of enzymatic antioxidants rather than nonenzymatic antioxidants. In addition, OEE 1 showed less H2 O2 -mediated ROS formation in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that OEE 1 purified from C. fulvescens is an excellent antioxidant. PMID:25944160

  19. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry. PMID:23766513

  20. Structural Coupling of Extrinsic Proteins with the Oxygen-Evolving Center in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII), which catalyzes photosynthetic water oxidation, is composed of more than 20 subunits, including membrane-intrinsic and -extrinsic proteins. The PSII extrinsic proteins shield the catalytic Mn4CaO5 cluster from the outside bulk solution and enhance binding of inorganic cofactors, such as Ca(2+) and Cl(-), in the oxygen-evolving center (OEC) of PSII. Among PSII extrinsic proteins, PsbO is commonly found in all oxygenic organisms, while PsbP and PsbQ are specific to higher plants and green algae, and PsbU, PsbV, CyanoQ, and CyanoP exist in cyanobacteria. In addition, red algae and diatoms have unique PSII extrinsic proteins, such as PsbQ' and Psb31, suggesting functional divergence during evolution. Recent studies with reconstitution experiments combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have revealed how the individual PSII extrinsic proteins affect the structure and function of the OEC in different organisms. In this review, we summarize our recent results and discuss changes that have occurred in the structural coupling of extrinsic proteins with the OEC during evolutionary history. PMID:26904056

  1. Structural Changes of the Oxygen-evolving Complex in Photosystem II during the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry. PMID:23766513

  2. Light-induced water oxidation at silicon electrodes functionalized with a cobalt oxygen-evolving catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Pijpers, Joep J. H.; Winkler, Mark T.; Surendranath, Yogesh; Buonassisi, Tonio; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    Integrating a silicon solar cell with a recently developed cobalt-based water-splitting catalyst (Co-Pi) yields a robust, monolithic, photo-assisted anode for the solar fuels process of water splitting to O2 at neutral pH. Deposition of the Co-Pi catalyst on the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-passivated p-side of a np-Si junction enables the majority of the voltage generated by the solar cell to be utilized for driving the water-splitting reaction. Operation under neutral pH conditions fosters enhanced stability of the anode as compared to operation under alkaline conditions (pH 14) for which long-term stability is much more problematic. This demonstration of a simple, robust construct for photo-assisted water splitting is an important step towards the development of inexpensive direct solar-to-fuel energy conversion technologies. PMID:21646536

  3. Time-resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of a Cobalt-Based Hydrogen Evolution System for Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert, Carolina; Lehmann, Carl; Southworth, Stephen; Llobet, Antoni; Argonne National Laboratory Team; Institut Català d'Investigació Química Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Production of cost-effective hydrogen gas through solar power is an important challenge of the Department of Energy among other global industry initiatives. In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen evolving complex(OEC) can carry out four-electron water splitting to hydrogen with an efficiency of around 60%. Although, much progress has been carried out in determining mechanistic pathways of the OEC, biomimetic approaches have not duplicated Nature's efficiency in function. Over the past years, we have witnessed progress in developments of light harvesting modules, so called chromophore/catalytic assemblies. In spite of reportedly high catalytic activity of these systems, quantum yields of hydrogen production are below 40 % when using monochromatic light. Proper understanding of kinetics and bond making/breaking steps has to be achieved to improve efficiency of hydrogen evolution systems. This project shows the timing implementation of ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy to visualize in ``real time'' the photo-induced kinetics accompanying a sequence of redox reactions in a cobalt-based molecular photocatalytic system. Formation of a Co(I) species followed by a Co(III) hydride species all the way towards hydrogen evolution is shown through time-resolved XANES.

  4. Ultrafast Primary Reactions in the Photosystems of Oxygen-Evolving Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, A. R.

    In oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms (plants, green algae, cyanobacteria), the primary steps of photosynthesis occur in two membrane-bound protein supercomplexes, Photosystem I (PS I) and Photosystem II (PS II), located in the thylakoid membrane (c.f. Fig. 7.1) along with two other important protein complexes, the cytochrome b6/f complex and the ATP-synthase [1]. Each of the photosystems consists of a reaction center (RC) where the photoinduced early electron transfer processes occur, of a so-called core antenna consisting of chlorophyll (Chl) protein complexes responsible for light absorption and ultrafast energy transfer to the RC pigments, and additional peripheral antenna complexes of various kinds that increase the absorption cross-section. The peripheral complexes are Chl a/b-protein complexes in higher plants and green algae (LHC I or LHC II for PS I or PS II, respectively) and so-called phycobilisomes in cyanobacteria and red algae [2-4]. The structures and light-harvesting functions of these antenna systems have been extensively reviewed [2, 5-9]. Recently, X-ray structures of both PS I and PS II antenna/RC complexes have been determined, some to atomic resolution. Although many details of the pigment content and organization of the RCs and antenna systems of PS I and PS II have been known before, the high resolution structures of the integral complexes allow us for the first time to try to understand structure/function relationships in detail. This article covers our present understanding of the ultrafast energy transfer and early electron transfer processes occurring in the photosystems of oxygen-evolving organisms. The main emphasis will be on the electron transfer processes. However, in both photosystems the kinetics of the energy transfer processes in the core antennae is intimately interwoven with the kinetics of the electron transfer steps. Since both types of processes occur on a similar time scale, their kinetics cannot be considered

  5. The oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE) of photosystem II in green algae exhibits thioredoxin activity.

    PubMed

    Heide, Heinrich; Kalisz, Henryk M; Follmann, Hartmut

    2004-02-01

    A thioredoxin-like chloroplast protein of the fructosebisphosphatase-stimulating f-type, but with an unusually high molecular mass of 28 kDa has previously been identified and purified to homogeneity in a fractionation scheme for resolution of the acid- and heat-stable, regular-size (12kDa) thioredoxins of the unicellular green algae, Scenedesmus obliquus. An apparently analogous protein of 26 kDa was described in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp., but no such large thioredoxin species f exists in the thioredoxin profiles of higher plants. The structure of the 28 kDa protein, which had been envisaged to represent a precursor, or fusion product of the two more specialized, common chloroplast thioredoxins f and m has now been determined by amino acid sequencing. Although it exhibits virtually all the properties and enzyme-modulating activities of a thioredoxin proper this algal protein, surprisingly, does not belong to the thioredoxin family of small redox proteins but is identical with OEE (oxygen evolving enhancer) protein 1, an auxiliary component of the photosystem II manganese cluster. Extracts of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also contain heat-stable protein fractions of 23-26 kDa capable of specifically stimulating chloroplast fructosebisphosphatase in vitro. In contrast, OEE protein 1 from spinach is not able to modulate FbPase or NADP malate dehydrogenase from spinach chloroplasts. A dual function of the OEE protein in algal photosynthesis is envisaged. PMID:15022827

  6. Ammonia Binding in the Second Coordination Sphere of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Askerka, Mikhail; Debus, Richard J; Batista, Victor S; Brudvig, Gary W

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia binds to two sites in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PSII). The first is as a terminal ligand to Mn in the S2 state, and the second is at a site outside the OEC that is competitive with chloride. Binding of ammonia in this latter secondary site results in the S2 state S = (5)/2 spin isomer being favored over the S = (1)/2 spin isomer. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we find that ammonia binds to the secondary site in wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 PSII, but not in D2-K317A mutated PSII that does not bind chloride. By combining these results with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we propose that ammonia binds in the secondary site in competition with D1-D61 as a hydrogen bond acceptor to the OEC terminal water ligand, W1. Implications for the mechanism of ammonia binding via its primary site directly to Mn4 in the OEC are discussed. PMID:27433995

  7. Evidence for the role of cyclic electron flow in photoprotection for oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Ying-Jie; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic electron flow (CEF) alleviates PSII photo-inhibition under high light by at least two different mechanisms: one is liked to thermal energy dissipation (qE) and the other one is independent of qE. However, the latter mechanism is unclear. Because the photodamage to PSII primarily occurred at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), and the stability of OEC is dependent on proton gradient across thylakoid membrane (ΔpH), we hypothesize that the CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH can alleviate photodamage to OEC. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of antimycin A (AA), methyl viologen (MV), chloramphenicol (CM), nigericin (Nig) on PSII activity and the stability of OEC for leaves of a light-demanding tropical tree species Erythrophleum guineense by the analysis of OKJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence transient. After high light treatment, the stronger decrease in Fv/Fm in the AA-, CM-, MV-, and Nig-treated samples was accompanied with larger photo damage of OEC. The AA-treated samples significantly showed lower CEF activity than the H2O-treated samples. Although the AA-treated leaves significantly showed stronger PSII photo-inhibition and photo-damage of OEC compared to the H2O-treated leaves, the value of non-photochemical quenching did not differ between them. Therefore, CEF activity was partly inhibited in the AA-treated samples, and the stronger PSII photo-inhibition in the AA-treated leaves was independent of qE. Taking together, we propose a hypothesis that CEF-dependent generation of ΔpH under high light plays an important role in photoprotection for the OEC activity. PMID:26968082

  8. Oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: correlating structure with spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W

    2014-06-28

    Water oxidation at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) involves multiple redox states called Sn states (n = 0-4). The S1 → S2 redox transition of the OEC has been studied extensively using various forms of spectroscopy, including electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In the S2 state, two isomers of the OEC are observed by EPR: a ST = 1/2 form and a ST = 5/2 form. DFT-based structural models of the OEC have been proposed for the two spin isomers in the S2 state, but the factors that determine the stability of one form or the other are not known. Using structural information on the OEC and its surroundings, in conjunction with spectroscopic information available on the S1 → S2 transition for a variety of site-directed mutations, Ca(2+) and Cl(-) substitutions, and small molecule inhibitors, we propose that the hydrogen-bonding network encompassing D1-D61 and the OEC-bound waters plays an important role in stabilizing one spin isomer over the other. In the presence of ammonia, PSII centers can be trapped in either the ST = 5/2 form after a 200 K illumination procedure or an ammonia-altered ST = 1/2 form upon annealing at 273 K. We propose a mechanism for ammonia binding to the OEC in the S2 state that takes into account the hydrogen-binding requirements for ammonia binding and the specificity for binding of ammonia but not methylamine. A discussion regarding the possibility of spin isomers of the OEC in the S1 state, analogous to the spin isomers of the S2 state, is also presented. PMID:24700294

  9. The role of calcium in the oxygen evolving center of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (OEC) contains a cluster of four manganese atoms and requires both Ca and Cl for activity. Ca can be replaced by Sr with retention of activity. The role of Ca in the OEC has been investigated by performing Mn X-ray absorption experiments on Ca-depleted samples of photosystem II (PS II) and on PS II samples depleted of Ca and reconstituted by either Ca or Sr. Mn X-ray K-edge spectra exhibit no significant differences in oxidation state or symmetry between Ca- and Sr-reactivated preparations, but differences are observed in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The amplitude of a Fourier transform peak arising from scatterers at distances greater than 3 A is larger for samples reactivated with strontium relative to calcium. Curve-fitting analyses of the EXAFS data using FEFF 5-calculated parameters favor a model where both manganese and calcium (or strontium) scatterers contribute to the {approximately}3 {Angstrom} Fourier peak (Mn-Mn at 3.3{Angstrom} and Mn-Ca(Sr) at 3.4--3.5 {Angstrom}). Possible structural arrangements for a calcium binding site are discussed. Analysis of Mn K-edge spectra from Ca-depleted samples in the S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}, and S{sub 3} states shows an edge shift on the S{sub 1}-S{sub 2} transition, but no edge shift on the S{sub 2}-S{sub 3} transition, supporting a model where the oxidizing equivalent from the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition is stored on a ligand or nearby protein residue rather than on the Mn cluster. Parallels between Ca-depleted and native samples are discussed.

  10. In-Situ Formation of Cobalt-Phosphate Oxygen-Evolving Complex-Anchored Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanosheets for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yinyin; Lv, Hong; Tian, Yuyu; Wu, Dan; Li, Qing-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen conversion process between O2 and H2O by means of electrochemistry or photochemistry has lately received a great deal of attention. Cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst is a new type of cost-effective artificial oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) with amorphous features during photosynthesis. However, can such Co-Pi OEC also act as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in electrochemical processes? The question remains unanswered. Here for the first time we demonstrate that Co-Pi OEC does be rather active for the ORR. Particularly, Co-Pi OEC anchoring on reduced graphite oxide (rGO) nanosheet is shown to possess dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities. Differing from the generally accepted role of rGO as an “electron reservoir”, we suggest that rGO serves as “peroxide cleaner” in enhancing the electrocatalytic behaviors. The present study may bridge the gap between photochemistry and electrochemistry towards oxygen conversion. PMID:23877331

  11. In-Situ Formation of Cobalt-Phosphate Oxygen-Evolving Complex-Anchored Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanosheets for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yinyin; Lv, Hong; Tian, Yuyu; Wu, Dan; Li, Qing-Wen

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen conversion process between O2 and H2O by means of electrochemistry or photochemistry has lately received a great deal of attention. Cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst is a new type of cost-effective artificial oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) with amorphous features during photosynthesis. However, can such Co-Pi OEC also act as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in electrochemical processes? The question remains unanswered. Here for the first time we demonstrate that Co-Pi OEC does be rather active for the ORR. Particularly, Co-Pi OEC anchoring on reduced graphite oxide (rGO) nanosheet is shown to possess dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities. Differing from the generally accepted role of rGO as an ``electron reservoir'', we suggest that rGO serves as ``peroxide cleaner'' in enhancing the electrocatalytic behaviors. The present study may bridge the gap between photochemistry and electrochemistry towards oxygen conversion.

  12. In-situ formation of cobalt-phosphate oxygen-evolving complex-anchored reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yinyin; Lv, Hong; Tian, Yuyu; Wu, Dan; Li, Qing-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen conversion process between O₂ and H₂O by means of electrochemistry or photochemistry has lately received a great deal of attention. Cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) catalyst is a new type of cost-effective artificial oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) with amorphous features during photosynthesis. However, can such Co-Pi OEC also act as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in electrochemical processes? The question remains unanswered. Here for the first time we demonstrate that Co-Pi OEC does be rather active for the ORR. Particularly, Co-Pi OEC anchoring on reduced graphite oxide (rGO) nanosheet is shown to possess dramatically improved electrocatalytic activities. Differing from the generally accepted role of rGO as an "electron reservoir", we suggest that rGO serves as "peroxide cleaner" in enhancing the electrocatalytic behaviors. The present study may bridge the gap between photochemistry and electrochemistry towards oxygen conversion. PMID:23877331

  13. Structural oxidation state studies of the manganese cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, W.

    1994-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed on Photosystem II (PSII)-enriched membranes prepared from spinach to explore: (1) the correlation between structure and magnetic spin state of the Mn cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in the S{sub 2} state; and (2) the oxidation state changes of the Mn cluster in the flash-induced S-states. The structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2} state with the g{approx}4 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal (S{sub 2}-g4 state) was compared with that in the S{sub 2} state with multiline signal (S{sub 2}-MLS state) and the S{sub 1} state. The S{sub 2}-g4 state has a higher XAS inflection point energy than that of the S{sub 1} state, indicating the oxidation of Mn in the advance from the S{sub 1} to the S{sub 2}-g4 state. Differences in the edge shape and in the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) show that the structure of the Mn cluster in the S{sub 2}-g4 state is different from that in the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. In the S{sub 2}-g4 state, the second shell of backscatterers from the Mn absorber contains two Mn-Mn distances of 2.73 {angstrom} and 2.85 {angstrom}. Very little distance disorder exists in the second shell of the S{sub 1} or S{sub 2}-MLS states. The third shell of the S{sub 2}-g4 state at about 3.3 {angstrom} also contains increased heterogeneity relative to that of the S{sub 2}-MLS or the S{sub 1} state. Various S-states were prepared at room-temperature by saturating, single-turnover flashes. The flash-dependent oscillation in the amplitude of the MLS was used to characterize the S-state composition and to construct {open_quotes}pure{close_quotes} S-state Mn K-edge spectra. The edge position shifts to higher energy by 1.8 eV upon the S{sub 1} {yields} S{sub 2} transition.

  14. Isolation of photosystem II-enriched membranes and the oxygen-evolving complex subunit proteins from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Leng, Jing; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods to isolate highly active oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) membranes and core complexes from higher plants, and to purify subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The membrane samples used as the material for various in vitro studies of PSII are prepared by solubilizing thylakoid membranes with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100, and the core complexes are prepared by further solubilization of the PSII membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-DDM). The OEC subunit proteins are dissociated from the PSII-enriched membranes by alkaline or salt treatment, and are then purified by ion-exchange chromatography using an automated high performance liquid chromatography system. PMID:20960116

  15. XANES, EXAFS and Kbeta spectroscopic studies of the oxygen-evolving complex in Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Robblee, John H.

    2000-12-01

    A key question for the understanding of photosynthetic water oxidation is whether the four oxidizing equivalents necessary to oxidize water to dioxygen are accumulated on the four Mn ions of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC), or whether some ligand-centered oxidations take place before the formation and release of dioxygen during the S{sub 3} {r_arrow} [S{sub 4}] {r_arrow} S{sub 0} transition. Progress in instrumentation and flash sample preparation allowed us to apply Mn K{beta} X-ray emission spectroscopy (Kb XES) to this problem for the first time. The K{beta} XES results, in combination with Mn X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data obtained from the same set of samples, show that the S{sub 2} {r_arrow} S{sub 3} transition, in contrast to the S{sub 0} {r_arrow} S{sub 1} and S{sub 1} {r_arrow} S{sub 2} transitions, does not involve a Mn-centered oxidation. This is rationalized by manganese {mu}-oxo bridge radical formation during the S{sub 2} {r_arrow} S{sub 3} transition. Using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the local environment of the Mn atoms in the S{sub 0} state has been structurally characterized. These results show that the Mn-Mn distance in one of the di-{mu}-oxo-bridged Mn-Mn moieties increases from 2.7 {angstrom} in the S{sub 1} state to 2.85 {angstrom} in the S{sub 0} state. Furthermore, evidence is presented that shows three di-{mu}-oxo binuclear Mn{sub 2} clusters may be present in the OEC, which is contrary to the widely held theory that two such clusters are present in the OEC. The EPR properties of the S{sub 0} state have been investigated and a characteristic ''multiline'' signal in the S{sub 0} state has been discovered in the presence of methanol. This provides the first direct confirmation that the native S{sub 0} state is paramagnetic. In addition, this signal was simulated using parameters derived from three possible oxidation states of Mn in the S{sub 0

  16. BIODEGRADATION - MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION (MNA) FOR OXYGENATES: HOW IT EVOLVED, WHY IT OCCURS AND STABLE ISOTOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

  17. Hot corrosion of S-57, 1 cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    A cobalt base alloy, S-57, was hot corrosion tested in Mach 0.3 burner rig combustion gases at maximum alloy temperatures of 900 and 1000 C. Various salt concentrations were injected into the burner: 0.5, 2, 5, and 10 ppm synthetic sea salt and 4 ppm sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). S-57 underwent accelerated corrosion only under the most severe test conditions, for example, 4 ppm Na2SO4 at 900 C. The process of the accelerated corrosion was primarily sulfidation.

  18. Modelling the alumina abundance of oxygen-rich evolved stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. C.; Kemper, F.; Srinivasan, S.; McDonald, I.; Sloan, G. C.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    In order to determine the composition of the dust in the circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, we have computed a grid of MODUST radiative-transfer models for a range of dust compositions, mass-loss rates, dust-shell inner radii and stellar parameters. We compare the resulting colours with the observed oxygen-rich AGB stars from the SAGE-Spec Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) sample, finding good overall agreement for stars with a mid-infrared excess. We use these models to fit a sample of 37 O-rich AGB stars in the LMC with optically thin circumstellar envelopes, for which 5-35 μm Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra and broad-band photometry from the optical to the mid-infrared are available. From the modelling, we find mass-loss rates in the range ˜8 × 10-8-5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1, and we show that a grain mixture consisting primarily of amorphous silicates, with contributions from amorphous alumina and metallic iron, provides a good fit to the observed spectra. Furthermore, we show from dust models that the AKARI [11]-[15] versus [3.2]-[7] colour-colour diagram is able to determine the fractional abundance of alumina in O-rich AGB stars.

  19. Using cavity microelectrodes for electrochemical noise studies of oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Rosalba A; Battistel, Alberto; Ventosa, Edgar; Chen, Xingxing; Nebel, Michaela; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Cavity microelectrodes were used as a binder-free platform to evaluate oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts with respect to gas bubble formation and departure. Electrochemical noise measurements were performed by using RuO2 as a benchmark catalyst and the perovskite La0.58 Sr0.4 Fe0.8 Co0.2 O3 as a non-noble metal OER catalyst with lower intrinsic conductivity. Changes in the current during the OER originate from variations in electrolyte resistance during the formation of the gas phase and partial coverage of the active area. Fluctuations observed in current and conductance transients were used to establish the contribution from the ohmic overpotential and to determine the characteristic frequency of oxygen evolution. The proposed quantitative determination of gas bubble growth and departure opens up the route for a rational interface design by considering gas bubble growth and departure as a main contributing factor to the overall electrocatalytic activity at high current densities. PMID:25556938

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis identifies a tyrosine radical involved in the photosynthesized oxygen-evolving system

    SciTech Connect

    Debus, R.J.; Barry, B.A.; Babcock, G.T.; McIntosh, L.

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic oxygen evolution takes place in the thylakoid protein complex known as photosystem II. The reaction center core of this photosystem, where photochemistry occurs, is a heterodimer of homologous polypeptides called D1 and D2. Besides chlorophyll and quinone, photosystem II contains other organic cofactors, including two known as Z and D. Z transfers electrons from the site of water oxidation to the oxidized reaction center primary donor, P/sub 680//sup +/, while D /center dot//sup +/ gives rise to the dark-stable EPR spectrum known as signal II. D/center dot//sup +/ has recently been shown to be a tyrosine radical. Z is probably a second tyrosine located in a similar environment. Indirect evidence indicates that Z and D are associated with the D1 and E2 polypeptides, respectively. To identify the specific tyrosine residue corresponding to D, the authors have changed Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide to phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis of a psbD gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The resulting mutant grows photosynthetically, but it lacks the EPR signal of D/center dot//sup +/. The authors conclude that D is Tyr-160 of the D2 polypeptide. They suggest that the C/sub 2/ symmetry in photosystem II extends beyond P/sub 680/ to its immediate electron donor and conclude that Z is Try-161 of the D1 polypeptide.

  1. Observational Evidence for Presolar Grains around Oxygen-rich Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.; Hofmeister, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Many presolar grain types have been found in meteorites since the discovery of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the Murray meteorite. Initially these were mostly limited to carbon-rich grains. However, more recently, oxygen-rich presolar grains have been isolated: corundum (Al2O3), spinel (MgAl2O4), hibonite(CaAl12O19) and rutile (TiO2). The majority of these O-rich grains, like the SiC grains, have isotopic compositions indicative of formation around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. There is very little observational evidence for most of these presolar grains around AGB stars, and what little evidence does exist is generally misinterpreted. We present the observational evidence (or lack thereof) for these oxide grains, and discuss the discrepancies between meteoritic and astronomical results, as well as the problems of interpreting dust features in astronomical spectra. At present, the only O-rich presolar grain type for which the observational evidence is not (currently) disputed is (amorphous) Al2O3. In order to progress further in matching these presolar grains and the grains currently forming around AGBs stars we need to know more details about these grains: e.g. polytypes, the level of crystallinity/amorphousness in the grains, the size distributions, etc. With this information we place more constraints on the IR spectral feature we should be looking for. Further observational constraints are also required, such as spatial correlations between related IR spectral features.

  2. Co@Co3O4 core-shell particle encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cage hybrids as active and durable oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Wen, Lixin; Li, Feng; Yin, Guanlin; Chen, Wanmin; An, Xingcai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt-based nanomaterials are promising candidates as efficient, affordable, and sustainable alternative electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, the catalytic efficiency of traditional nanomaterials is still far below what is expected, because of their low stability in basic solutions and poor active site exposure yield. Here a unique hybrid nanomaterial comprising Co@Co3O4 core-shell nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cages on reduced graphene oxide (denoted as Co@Co3O4@NMCC/rGO) is successfully synthesized via a carbonization and subsequent oxidation strategy of a graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-organic framework (MOF). Impressively, the special carbon cage structure is very important for not only leading to a large active surface area, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, and easy release of gas bubbles, but also preventing Co@Co3O4 NPs from aggregation and peeling off during prolonged electrochemical reactions. As a result, in alkaline media, the resulting hybrid materials catalyze the OER with a low onset potential of ∼1.50 V (vs. RHE) and an over-potential of only 340 mV to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for at least 25 h. In addition, metallic Co cores in Co@Co3O4 provide an alternative way for electron transport and accelerate the OER rate. PMID:26914166

  3. Assembly of Newly Imported Oxygen-Evolving Complex Subunits in Isolated Chloroplasts: Sites of Assembly and Mechanism of Binding.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, A.; Ettinger, W. F.; Yamamoto, Y.; Theg, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the assembly of the nuclear-encoded subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) after their import into isolated intact chloroplasts. We showed that all three subunits examined (OE33, OE23, and OE17) partition between the thylakoid lumen and a site on the inner surface of the thylakoid membrane after import in a homologous system (e.g., pea or spinach subunits into pea or spinach chloroplasts, respectively). Although some interspecies protein import experiments resulted in OEC subunit binding, maize OE17 did not bind thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts isolated from peas. Newly imported OE33 and OE23 were washed from the membranes at the same concentrations of urea and NaCl as the native, indigenous proteins; this observation suggests that the former subunits are bound productively within the OEC. Inhibition of neither chloroplast protein synthesis nor light- or ATP-dependent energization of the thylakoid membrane significantly affected these assembly reactions, and we present evidence suggesting that incoming subunits actively displace those already bound to the thylakoid membrane. Transport of OE33 took place primarily in the stromal-exposed membranes and proceeded through a protease-sensitive, mature intermediate. Initial binding of OE33 to the thylakoid membrane occurred primarily in the stromal-exposed membranes, from where it migrated with measurable kinetics to the granal region. In contrast, OE23 assembly occurred in the granal membrane regions. This information is incorporated into a model of the stepwise assembly of oxygen-evolving photosystem II. PMID:12237359

  4. Multiple redox-active chlorophylls in the secondary electron-transfer pathways of oxygen-evolving photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tracewell, Cara A; Brudvig, Gary W

    2008-11-01

    Photosystem II (PS II) is unique among photosynthetic reaction centers in having secondary electron donors that compete with the primary electron donors for reduction of P680(+). We have characterized the photooxidation and dark decay of the redox-active accessory chlorophylls (Chl) and beta-carotenes (Car) in oxygen-evolving PS II core complexes by near-IR absorbance and EPR spectroscopies at cryogenic temperatures. In contrast to previous results for Mn-depleted PS II, multiple near-IR absorption bands are resolved in the light-minus-dark difference spectra of oxygen-evolving PS II core complexes including two fast-decaying bands at 793 and 814 nm and three slow-decaying bands at 810, 825, and 840 nm. We assign these bands to chlorophyll cation radicals (Chl(+)). The fast-decaying bands observed after illumination at 20 K could be generated again by reilluminating the sample. Quantization by EPR gives a yield of 0.85 radicals per PS II, and the yield of oxidized cytochrome b 559 by optical difference spectroscopy is 0.15 per PS II. Potential locations of Chl(+) and Car(+) species, and the pathways of secondary electron transfer based on the rates of their formation and decay, are discussed. This is the first evidence that Chls in the light-harvesting proteins CP43 and CP47 are oxidized by P680(+) and may have a role in Chl fluorescence quenching. We also suggest that a possible role for negatively charged lipids (phosphatidyldiacylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol identified in the PS II structure) could be to decrease the redox potential of specific Chl and Car cofactors. These results provide new insight into the alternate electron-donation pathways to P680(+). PMID:18850718

  5. Theoretical study of the multiline EPR signal from the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Bonvoisin, Jacques; Blondin, Geneviève; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Zimmermann, Jean-Luc

    1992-01-01

    The Oxygen evolving complex of plant photosystem II is made of a manganese cluster that gives rise to a low temperature EPR multiline signal in the S2 oxidation state. The origin of this EPR signal has been addressed with respect to the question of the magnetic couplings between the electron and nuclear spins of the four possible Mn ions that make up this complex. Considering Mn(III) and Mn(IV) as the only possible oxidation states present in the S2 state, and no large anisotropy of the magnetic tensors, the breadths of the EPR spectra calculated for dimers and trimers with S = ½ have been compared with that of the biological site. It is concluded that neither a dinuclear nor a trinuclear complex made of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) can be responsible for the multiline signal; but that, by contrast, a tetranuclear Mn complex can be the origin of this signal. The general shape of the experimental spectrum, its particular hyperfine pattern, the positions of most of the hyperfine lines and their relative intensities can be fit by a tetramer model described by the following six fitting parameters: g ≈ 1.987, A1 ≈ 122.4 10-4 cm-1, A2 ≈ 87.2 10-4 cm-1, A3 ≈ 81.6 10-4 cm-1, A4 ≈ 19.1 10-4 cm-1 and δH = 24.5 G. A second model described by parameters very close to those given above except for A4 ≈ 77.5 10-4 cm-1 gives an equally good fit. However, no other set of parameters gives an EPR spectrum that reproduces the hyperfine pattern of the S2 multiline signal. This demonstrates that in the S2 state of the oxygen evolving complex, the four manganese ions are organized in a magnetic tetramer. PMID:19431827

  6. Tyrosine radicals are involved in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving system

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, B.A.; Babcock, G.T.

    1987-10-01

    In addition to the reaction-center chlorophyll, at least two other organic cofactors are involved in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolution process. One of these cofactors, called Z, transfers electrons from the site of water oxidation to the reaction center of photosystem II. The other species, D, has an uncertain function but gives rise to the stable EPR signal known as signal II. Z./sup +/ and D./sup +/ have identical EPR spectra and are generally assumed to arise from species with the same chemical structure. Results from a variety of experiments have suggested that Z and D are plastoquinones or plastoquinone derivatives. In general, however, the evidence to support this assignment is indirect. To address this situation, the authors have developed more direct methods to assign the structure of the Z./sup +//D./sup +/ radicals. By selective in vivo deuteration of the methyl groups of plastoquinone in the cyanobacteria, they show that hyperfine couplings from the methyl protons cannot be responsible for the partially resolved structure seen in the D./sup +/ EPR spectrum. That is, they verify by extraction and mass spectrometry that quinones are labeled in algae fed deuterated methionine, but no change is observed in the line shape of signal II. In a second series of experiments, they found that deuteration of tyrosine does indeed narrow the D./sup +/ signal. Extraction and mass spectral analysis of the quinones in these cultures show that they are not labeled by tyrosine. These results eliminate a plastoquinone origin for D./sup +/; they conclude instead that D./sup +/, and most likely Z./sup +/, are tyrosine radicals.

  7. CARBON CHEMISTRY IN THE ENVELOPE OF VY CANIS MAJORIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OXYGEN-RICH EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ziurys, L. M.; Tenenbaum, E. D.; Pulliam, R. L.; Woolf, N. J.; Milam, S. N. E-mail: emilyt@as.arizona.edu E-mail: nwoolf@as.arizona.edu

    2009-04-20

    Observations of the carbon-bearing molecules CO, HCN, CS, HNC, CN, and HCO{sup +} have been conducted toward the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich red supergiant star, VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa), using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). CO and HCN were also observed toward the O-rich shells of NML Cyg, TX Cam, IK Tau, and W Hya. Rotational transitions of these species at 1 mm, 0.8 mm, and 0.4 mm were measured with the ARO Submillimeter Telescope, including the J = 6 {yields} 5 line of CO at 691 GHz toward TX Cam and W Hya. The ARO 12 m was used for 2 mm and 3 mm observations. Four transitions were observed for HCO{sup +} in VY CMa, the first definitive identification of this ion in a circumstellar envelope. Molecular line profiles from VY CMa are complex, indicating three separate outflows: a roughly spherical flow and separate red- and blueshifted winds, as suggested by earlier observations. Spectra from the other sources appear to trace a single outflow component. The line data were modeled with a radiative transfer code to establish molecular abundances relative to H{sub 2} and source distributions. Abundances for CO derived for these objects vary over an order of magnitude, f {approx} 0.4-5 x 10{sup -4}, with the lower values corresponding to the supergiants. For HCN, a similar range in abundance is found (f {approx} 0.9-9 x 10{sup -6}), with no obvious dependence on the mass-loss rate. In VY CMa, HCO{sup +} is present in all three outflows with f {approx} 0.4-1.6 x 10{sup -8} and a spatial extent similar to that of CO. HNC is found only in the red- and blueshifted components with [HCN]/[HNC] {approx} 150-190, while [CN]/[HCN] {approx} 0.01 in the spherical flow. All three velocity components are traced in CS, which has a confined spatial distribution and f {approx} 2-6 x 10{sup -7}. These observations suggest that carbon-bearing molecules in O-rich shells are produced by a combination of photospheric shocks and photochemistry. Shocks may play a more

  8. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed. PMID:26717045

  9. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer During the S-State Transitions of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Szejgis, Witold; Vassiliev, Serguei; Brudvig, Gary W; Bruce, Doug; Gunner, M R

    2015-06-18

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) is a unique Mn4O5Ca cluster that catalyzes water oxidation via four photoactivated electron transfer steps. As the protein influence on the redox and protonation chemistry of the OEC remains an open question, we present a classical valence model of the OEC that allows the redox state of each Mn and the protonation state of bridging μ-oxos and terminal waters to remain in equilibrium with the PSII protein throughout the redox cycle. We find that the last bridging oxygen loses its proton during the transition from S0 to S1. Two possible S2 states are found depending on the OEC geometry: S2 has Mn4(IV) with a proton lost from a terminal water (W1) trapped by the nearby D1-D61 if O5 is closer to Mn4, or Mn1(IV), with partial deprotonation of D1-H337 and D1-E329 if O5 is closer to Mn1. In S3, the OEC is Mn4(IV) with W2 deprotonated. The estimated OEC Em's range from +0.7 to +1.3 V, enabling oxidation by P680(+), the primary electron donor in PSII. In chloride-depleted PSII, the proton release increases during the S1 to S2 transition, leaving the OEC unable to properly advance through the water-splitting cycle. PMID:25575266

  10. Combinatorial Development of Water Splitting Catalysts Based on the Oxygen Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Neal

    2010-03-31

    The use of methods to create large arrays of potential catalysts for the reaction H2O ½ O2 + 2H+ on the anode of an electrolysis system were investigated. This reaction is half of the overall reaction involved in the splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen gas. This method consisted of starting with an array of electrodes and developing patterned electrochemical approaches for creating a different, defined peptide at each position in the array. Methods were also developed for measuring the rate of reaction at each point in the array. In this way, the goal was to create and then tests many thousands of possible catalysts simultaneously. This type of approach should lead to an ability to optimize catalytic activity systematically, by iteratively designing and testing new libraries of catalysts. Optimization is important to decrease energy losses (over-potentials) associated with the water splitting reaction and thus for the generation of hydrogen. Most of the efforts in this grant period were focused on developing the chemistry and analytical methods required to create pattern peptide formation either using a photolithography approach or an electrochemical approach for dictating the positions of peptide bond formation. This involved testing a large number of different reactions and conditions. We have been able to find conditions that have allowed us to pattern peptide bond formation on both glass slides using photolithographic methods and on electrode arrays made by the company Combimatrix. Part of this effort involved generating novel approaches for performing mass spectroscopy directly from the patterned arrays. We have also been able to demonstrate the ability to measure current at each electrode due to electrolysis of water. This was performed with customized instrumentation created in collaboration with Combimatrix. In addition, several different molecular designs for peptides that bound metals (primarily Mn) were developed and synthesized and metal

  11. IMPACT OF BLEACHING STRESS ON THE FUNCTION OF THE OXYGEN EVOLVING COMPLEX OF ZOOXANTHELLAE FROM SCLERACTINIAN CORALS(1).

    PubMed

    Hill, Ross; Ralph, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    Global climate change is leading to the rise of ocean temperatures and is triggering mass coral bleaching events on reefs around the world. The expulsion of the symbiotic dinoflagellate algae is believed to occur as a result of damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of these symbionts, although the specific site of initial impact is yet to be conclusively resolved. Here, the sensitivity of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) to bleaching stress was studied as well as its natural variation between seasons. The artificial electron donor, diphenyl carbazide (DPC), was added to cultured, freshly isolated and expelled (bleaching treatments only) zooxanthellae suspensions. Chl a fluorescence and oxygen production measurements showed that upon addition of DPC, no restoration of diminished photochemical efficiency occurred under control or bleaching conditions. This result was consistent between 12 h and 5 d bleaching treatments on Pocilloporadamicornis, indicating that the OEC is not the primary site of damage, and that zooxanthellae expulsion from the host is a nonselective process with respect to the functioning of the OEC. Further experiments measuring fast induction curves (FICs) revealed that in both summer and winter, the temperature when OEC function was lost occurred between 7°C and 14°C above the sea surface temperature. FIC and oxygen production measurements of P. damicornis during exposure to bleaching stress demonstrated that the thermotolerance of the OEC increased above the temperature of the bleaching treatment over a 4 h period. This finding indicates that the OEC has the capacity to acclimate between seasons and remains functional at temperatures well above bleaching thresholds. PMID:27041186

  12. Low-frequency fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the oxygen-evolving and quinone acceptor complexes in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chu, H A; Gardner, M T; O'Brien, J P; Babcock, G T

    1999-04-01

    The low-frequency (<1000 cm-1) region of the IR spectrum has the potential to provide detailed structural and mechanistic insight into the photosystem II/oxygen evolving complex (PSII/OEC). A cluster of four manganese ions forms the core of the OEC and diagnostic manganese-ligand and manganese-substrate modes are expected to occur in the 200-900 cm-1 range. However, water also absorbs IR strongly in this region, which has limited previous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the OEC to higher frequencies (>1000 cm-1). We have overcome the technical obstacles that have blocked FTIR access to low-frequency substrate, cofactor, and protein vibrational modes by using partially dehydrated samples, appropriate window materials, a wide-range MCT detector, a novel band-pass filter, and a closely regulated temperature control system. With this design, we studied PSII/OEC samples that were prepared by brief illumination of O2 evolving and Tris-washed preparations at 200 K or by a single saturating laser flash applied to O2 evolving and inhibited samples at 250 K. These protocols allowed us to isolate low-frequency modes that are specific to the QA-/QA and S2/S1 states. The high-frequency FTIR spectra recorded for these samples and parallel EPR experiments confirmed the states accessed by the trapping procedures we used. In the S2/S1 spectrum, we detect positive bands at 631 and 602 cm-1 and negative bands at 850, 679, 664, and 650 cm-1 that are specifically associated with these two S states. The possible origins of these IR bands are discussed. For the low-frequency QA-/QA difference spectrum, several modes can be assigned to ring stretching and bending modes from the neutral and anion radical states of the quinone acceptor. These results provide insight into the PSII/OEC and demonstrate the utility of FTIR techniques in accessing low-frequency modes in proteins. PMID:10194375

  13. Cryogenic Trapping and Isotope Editing Identify a Protonated Water Cluster as an Intermediate in the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanjun; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-09-01

    Internal water is known to play a catalytic role in several enzymes. In photosystem II (PSII), water is the substrate. To oxidize water, the PSII Mn4CaO5 cluster or oxygen evolving center (OEC) cycles through five oxidation states, termed Sn states. As reaction products, molecular oxygen is released, and protons are transferred through a ∼25 Å hydrogen-bonded network from the OEC to the thylakoid lumen. Previously, it was reported that a broad infrared band at 2880 cm(-1) is produced during the S1-to-S2 transition and accompanies flash-induced, S state cycling at pH 7.5. Here, we report that when the S2 state is trapped by continuous illumination under cryogenic conditions (190 K), an analogous 2740/2900 cm(-1) band is observed. The frequency depended on the sodium chloride concentration. This band is unambiguously assigned to a normal mode of water by D2(16)O and H2(18)O solvent exchange. Its large, apparent H2(18)O isotope shift, ammonia sensitivity, frequency, and intensity support assignment to a stretching vibration of a hydronium cation, H3O(+), in a small, protonated internal water cluster, nH2O(H3O(+)). Water OH stretching bands, which may be derived from the hydration shell of the hydronium ion, are also identified. Using the 2740 cm(-1) infrared marker, the results of calcium depletion and strontium reconstitution on the protonated water cluster are found to be pH dependent. This change is attributed to protonation of an amino acid side chain and a possible change in nH2O(H3O)(+) localization in the hydrogen-bonding network. These results are consistent with an internal water cluster functioning as a proton acceptor and an intermediate during the S1-to-S2 transition. Our experiments demonstrate the utility of this infrared signal as a novel functional probe in PSII. PMID:27491625

  14. Two-dimensional HYSCORE spectroscopy of superoxidized manganese catalase: a model for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Coates, Christopher S; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Whittaker, Mei M; Whittaker, James W; Lakshmi, K V

    2015-04-16

    The solar water-splitting protein complex, photosystem II (PSII), catalyzes one of the most energetically demanding reactions in Nature by using light energy to drive a catalyst capable of oxidizing water. The water oxidation reaction takes place at the tetra-nuclear manganese calcium-oxo (Mn4Ca-oxo) cluster at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. Previous studies have determined the magnetic interactions between the paramagnetic Mn4Ca-oxo cluster and its environment in the S2 state of the OEC. The assignments for the electron-nuclear magnetic interactions that were observed in these studies were facilitated by the use of synthetic dimanganese di-μ-oxo complexes. However, there is an immense need to understand the effects of the protein environment on the coordination geometry of the Mn4Ca-oxo cluster in the OEC of PSII. In the present study, we use a proteinaceous model system to examine the protein ligands that are coordinated to the dimanganese catalytic center of manganese catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum. We utilize two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (2D HYSCORE) spectroscopy to detect the weak magnetic interactions of the paramagnetic dinuclear manganese catalytic center of superoxidized manganese catalase with the nitrogen and proton atoms of the surrounding protein environment. We obtain a complete set of hyperfine interaction parameters for the protons of a water molecule that is directly coordinated to the dinuclear manganese center. We also obtain a complete set of hyperfine and quadrupolar interaction parameters for two histidine ligands as well as a coordinated azide ligand, in azide-treated superoxidized manganese catalase. On the basis of the values of the hyperfine interaction parameters of the dimanganese model, manganese catalase, and those of the S2 state of the OEC of PSII, for the first time, we discuss the impact of a proteinaceous environment on the coordination geometry of multinuclear manganese clusters

  15. Oxygen-evolving photosystem II preparation from wild type and photosystem II mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilovsky, D.L.; Boussac, A.G.P.; van Mieghem, F.J.E.; Ducruet, J.M.R.C.; Setif, P.R.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Jiujiang Yu; Vermaas, W.F.J. )

    1992-02-25

    The authors present here a simple and rapid method which allows relatively large quantities of oxygen-evolving photosystem II- (PS-II-) enriched particles to be obtained from wild-type and mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. This method is based on that of Burnap et al. but is modified so that the whole preparation, from cells to PS-II particles, is achieved in 10 h and involves only one purification step. The purified preparation exhibits a 5-6-fold increase of O{sub 2}-evolution activity on a chlorophyll basis over the thylakoids. The ratio of PS-I to PS-II is about 0.14:1 in the preparation. The secondary quinone electron acceptor, Q{sub B}, is present in this preparation as demonstrated by thermoluminescence studies. These PS-II particles are well-suited to spectroscopic studies as demonstrated by the range of EPR signals arising from components of PS-II that are easily detectable. Among the EPR signals presented are those from a formal S{sub 3}-state, attributed to an oxidized amino acid interacting magnetically with the Mn complex in Ca{sup 2+}-deficient PS-II particles, and from S{sub 2} modified by the replacement of Ca{sup 2+} by Sr{sup 2+}. Neither of these signals has been previously reported in cyanobacteria. Their detection under these conditions indicates a similar lesion caused by Ca{sup 2+} depletion in both plants and cyanobacteria. The protocol has been applied to mutants which have site-specific changes in PS-II. Data are presented on mutants have changes on the electron donor (Y160F) and electron acceptor (G215W) side of the D{sub 2} polypeptide.

  16. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Hendrik

    2001-05-16

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  17. Cobalt-based magnetic nanocomposites: fabrication, fundamentals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Tianlong; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, magnetic nanocomposites (MNC) have aroused significant scientific and technological interests because their properties strongly rely on the interplay between those of the constituent components. Here, using three types of cobalt-based MNCs, we demonstrate how their physical behaviour, including thermal, electrical and magnetic, can be strongly affected by such interplays. First, using Aucore-Coshell nanoparticles (NPs), we demonstrate that their thermal stabilities are critically dependent on various boundaries and they structurally transform from the core-shells to the peanut structures via several intermediate states by a series of energy minimizations including the grain boundaries, Co/Au interface and strain. Second, the microstructures of the MNC are co-determined by the properties of the individual components, which in turn will strongly affect their overall properties. We illustrate this by a careful study of the electron transport in cobalt/poly (3-hexylthiophene, 2, 5-diyl) (P3HT) hybrid thin films, and show that they satisfy a fluctuation-induced tunnelling model that is strongly depended on their microstructures; moreover, a magnetoresistance in these thin films was also observed. Finally, the magnetic properties and phase stability of MNCs can also be strongly altered as a result of this interplay. Three phase transformations are observed in cobalt ferrofluids for T ~ 10-300 K, namely second order magnetic phase transformations (blocked-unblocked transition) at the blocking temperature of the magnetic NP, first order magnetic and structural phase transformations at the solvent melting temperature, TM, and second order premelting transformation at TPM < T < TM. These transformations show specific magnetic signatures in field-cool and zero-field-cool magnetization measurements and are qualitatively in agreement with predictions using M-spectrum theory.

  18. Electrostatic effects on proton coupled electron transfer in oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S; Gunner, M R

    2013-05-23

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton coupled electron transfer in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced multiconformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE) model, parametrized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKa's and oxidation midpoint potentials (E(m)'s) match experimental values for eight complexes, indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKa's of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6](2+/3+) (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2](3-) (2, P = 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato), [Mn2(IV,IV)(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2](4+) (3, terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2](4+) (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKa's of μ-oxo bridges and Mn E(m)'s in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4] (5, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7), and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8). The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5 ± 0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the E(m)'s by ligand substituents, such as found in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where proton coupled electron transfer plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  19. A novel protein involved in the functional assembly of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kufryk, G I; Vermaas, W F

    2001-08-01

    Mutation of Glu69 to Gln in the D2 protein of photosystem II is known to lead to a loss of photoautotrophic growth in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. However, second-site mutants (pseudorevertants) with restored photoautotrophic growth but still maintaining the E69Q mutation in D2 are easily obtained. Using a genomic mapping technique involving functional complementation, the secondary mutation was mapped to slr0286 in two independent mutants. The mutations in Slr0286 were R42M or R394H. To study the function of Slr0286, mutants of E69Q and of the wild-type strain were made that lacked slr0286. Deletion of slr0286 did not affect photoautotrophic capacity in wild type but led to a marked decrease in the apparent affinity of Ca(2+) to its binding site at the water-splitting system of photosystem II and to a reduced heat tolerance of the oxygen-evolving system, particularly in E69Q. Moreover, a small increase in the half-time for photoactivation of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II for both wild type and the E69Q mutant was observed in the absence of Slr0286. The accumulation of photosystem II reaction centers, dark stability of the oxygen-evolving apparatus, stability of oxygen evolution, and the kinetics of charge recombination between Q(A)(-) and the donor side were not affected by deletion of slr0286. Slr0286 lacks clear functional motifs, and no homologues are apparent in other organisms, even not in other cyanobacteria. In any case, Slr0286 appears to help the functional assembly and stability of the water-splitting system of photosystem II. PMID:11478892

  20. Thermal protection of the oxygen-evolving machinery by PsbU, an extrinsic protein of photosystem II, in Synechococcus species PCC 7002.

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Y; Los, D A; Hayashi, H; Murata, N

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of oxygen is the reaction that is the most susceptible to heat in photosynthesis. We showed previously that, in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, some protein factors located on the thylakoid membranes are involved in the stabilization of this reaction against heat-induced inactivation, and we identified cytochrome C550 as one such factor (Y. Nishiyama, H. Hayashi, T. Watanabe, N. Murata [1994] Plant Physiol 105: 1313-1319). In the present study we purified another protein that appears to be essential for the stabilization of the oxygen-evolving machinery. The purified protein had an apparent molecular mass of 13 kD, and the gene encoding the 13-kD protein was cloned from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that the protein was homologous to PsbU, an extrinsic protein of the photosystem II complex, which has been found in thermophilic species of cyanobacteria. Western analysis showed that the level of PsbU in thylakoid membranes was constant, regardless of the growth temperature. Our studies indicate that PsbU, a constituent of the photosystem II complex, protects the oxygen-evolving machinery against heat-induced inactivation. PMID:9414557

  1. Photosynthesis. Electronic structure of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II prior to O-O bond formation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Retegan, Marius; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Boussac, Alain; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The photosynthetic protein complex photosystem II oxidizes water to molecular oxygen at an embedded tetramanganese-calcium cluster. Resolving the geometric and electronic structure of this cluster in its highest metastable catalytic state (designated S3) is a prerequisite for understanding the mechanism of O-O bond formation. Here, multifrequency, multidimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that all four manganese ions of the catalyst are structurally and electronically similar immediately before the final oxygen evolution step; they all exhibit a 4+ formal oxidation state and octahedral local geometry. Only one structural model derived from quantum chemical modeling is consistent with all magnetic resonance data; its formation requires the binding of an additional water molecule. O-O bond formation would then proceed by the coupling of two proximal manganese-bound oxygens in the transition state of the cofactor. PMID:25124437

  2. Structural and functional characterization of "laboratory evolved" cytochrome P450cam mutants showing enhanced naphthalene oxygenation activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Koji; Tosha, Takehiko; Yoshioka, Shiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Ishimori, Koichiro; Morishima, Isao

    2004-10-29

    To elucidate molecular mechanisms for the enhanced oxygenation activity in the three mutants of cytochrome P450cam screened by 'laboratory evolution' [Nature 399 (1999) 670], we purified the mutants and characterized their functional and structural properties. The electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra revealed that the structures of heme binding site of all purified mutants were quite similar to that of the wild-type enzyme, although the fraction of the inactivated form, called "P420," was increased. In the reaction with H(2)O(2), only trace amounts of the naphthalene hydroxylation product were detected by gas chromatography. We, therefore, conclude that the three mutants do not exhibit significant changes in the structural and functional properties from those of wild-type P450cam except for the stability of the axial ligand in the reduced form. The enhanced fluorescence in the whole-cell assay would reflect enhancement in the oxygenation activity below the detectable limit of the gas chromatography and/or contributions of other reactions catalyzed by the heme iron. PMID:15451425

  3. Cyclic axial-torsional deformation behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    Multiaxial loading, especially at elevated temperature, can cause the inelastic response of a material to differ significantly from that predicted by simple flow rules, i.e., von Mises or Tresca. To quantify some of these differences, the cyclic high-temperature, deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-based superalloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. Haynes 188 is currently used in many aerospace gas turbine and rocket engine applications, e.g., the combustor liner for the T800 turboshaft engine for the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and the liquid oxygen posts in the main injector of the space shuttle main engine. The deformation behavior of this material is assessed through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue data base has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gauge section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain, and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic, in-phase and out-of-phase, axial torsional tests. For in-phase tests three different values of the proportionality constant, lambda (ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude), are examined, viz., 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 deg with lambda = 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress

  4. Calcium EXAFS establishes the Mn-Ca cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Cinco, Roehl M.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Robblee, John H.; Yano, Junko; Pizarro, Shelly A.; Bellacchio, Emanuele; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-08-02

    The proximity of Ca to the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic water-oxidation complex is demonstrated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have collected EXAFS data at the Ca K-edge using active PS II membrane samples that contain approximately 2 Ca per 4 Mn. These samples are much less perturbed than previously investigated Sr-substituted samples, which were prepared subsequent to Ca depletion. The new Ca EXAFS clearly shows backscattering from Mn at 3.4 angstroms, a distance that agrees with that surmised from previously recorded Mn EXAFS. This result is also consistent with earlier related experiments at the Sr K-edge, using samples that contained functional Sr, that show Mn is {approx}; 3.5 angstroms distant from Sr. The totality of the evidence clearly advances the notion that the catalytic center of oxygen evolution is a Mn-Ca heteronuclear cluster.

  5. Ta and Ti Anti-passivation Interlayers for Oxygen-Evolving Anodes Produced by Cold Gas Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piercy, B.; Allen, C.; Gullá, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    Conventional electrodes for electrochemical oxygen evolution (OER) comprise titanium substrate, an anti-passivation interlayer, and a mixed metal oxide catalyst layer. We report the use of cold gas spray to deposit titanium and tantalum anti-passivation interlayers, directly on titanium, for OER applications. Accelerated electrochemical life tests show that 100% tantalum interlayers exceeded the performance of commercial state-of-the-art electrodes. Microscopy reveals that electrode failure, in the case of 100% tantalum interlayers, is primarily due to catalyst loss; in contrast, the typical failure mode for conventional electrodes of this type is passivation of the titanium substrate. These results highlight the effectiveness of cold gas spray tantalum for extending electrode lifetimes while maximizing catalyst utilization.

  6. Transport of proteins into chloroplasts. Import and maturation of precursors to the 33-, 23-, and 16-kDa proteins of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    James, H E; Bartling, D; Musgrove, J E; Kirwin, P M; Herrmann, R G; Robinson, C

    1989-11-25

    The 33-, 23-, and 16-kDa proteins of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex are synthesized as precursors in the cytoplasm and transported into the thylakoid lumen of higher plant chloroplasts. In this report we have analyzed the import and maturation of these precursors, using reconstituted protein import assays and partially purified preparations of the processing peptidases involved. Precursors of the 33- and 23-kDa proteins from Spinacia and Triticum aestivum are processed by a stromal peptidase to intermediate forms; polypeptides of similar size are observed during the transport of these precursors and possibly that of the 16-kDa protein, into isolated chloroplasts. Complete maturation of the 33- and 23-kDa proteins is carried out by a thylakoidal peptidase shown previously to be involved in plastocyanin biogenesis. The data support an import mechanism involving successive cleavages by the stromal and thylakoidal processing peptidases. PMID:2684958

  7. Nucleotide sequence of psbQ gene for 16-kDa protein of oxygen-evolving complex from Arabidopsis thaliana and regulation of its expression.

    PubMed

    Grover, M; Gaur, T; Kochhar, A; Maheshwari, S C; Tyagi, A K

    1999-06-30

    The psbQ gene encoding a 16-kDa polypeptide of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana and characterized. The gene consists of a 28 nucleotide long leader sequence, two introns and three exons encoding a 223-amino-acid precursor polypeptide. The first 75 amino acids act as a transit peptide for the translocation of the polypeptide into the thylakoid lumen. Expression studies show that the gene is light-inducible and expresses only in green tissues with high steady-state mRNA levels in leaves. Using this gene as a probe, restriction fragment length polymorphism between two ecotypes, Columbia and Estland, has also been detected. PMID:10470848

  8. {sup 35}Mn ESE-ENDOR of a mixed valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex: Comparison with the Mn cluster of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.W.; Sturgeon, B.E.; Ball, J.A.; Lorigan, G.A.; Chan, M.K.; Britt, R.D.; Klein, M.P. |; Armstrong, W.H.

    1995-11-29

    Analysis of {sup 55}Mn electron spin echo-electron nuclear double resonance (ESE-ENDOR) spectra obtained on a dinuclear mixed valence Mn(III)Mn(IV) complex [di-{mu}-oxotetrakis(2, 2`-bipyridine)dimanganese(III,IV)] (1) reveals the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupolar parameters for the spin I=5/2 {sup 55}Mn nucleus of both Mn(III) and Mn(IV) ions. The {sup 55}Mn ESE-ENDOR data obtained on the g = 2 Mn multiline EPR signal of the S{sub 2} state of the photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex demonstrate that this EPR signal cannot arise from a dinuclear Mn(III)-Mn(IV) center. The ENDOR spectra are consistent with a tetranuclear Mn cluster origin for the photosystem II multiline EPR signal. 75 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. High-spin Mn-oxo complexes and their relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex within photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Taguchi, Taketo; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Bominaar, Emile L; Yano, Junko; Hendrich, Michael P; Borovik, A S

    2015-04-28

    The structural and electronic properties of a series of manganese complexes with terminal oxido ligands are described. The complexes span three different oxidation states at the manganese center (III-V), have similar molecular structures, and contain intramolecular hydrogen-bonding networks surrounding the Mn-oxo unit. Structural studies using X-ray absorption methods indicated that each complex is mononuclear and that oxidation occurs at the manganese centers, which is also supported by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. This gives a high-spin Mn(V)-oxo complex and not a Mn(IV)-oxy radical as the most oxidized species. In addition, the EPR findings demonstrated that the Fermi contact term could experimentally substantiate the oxidation states at the manganese centers and the covalency in the metal-ligand bonding. Oxygen-17-labeled samples were used to determine spin density within the Mn-oxo unit, with the greatest delocalization occurring within the Mn(V)-oxo species (0.45 spins on the oxido ligand). The experimental results coupled with density functional theory studies show a large amount of covalency within the Mn-oxo bonds. Finally, these results are examined within the context of possible mechanisms associated with photosynthetic water oxidation; specifically, the possible identity of the proposed high valent Mn-oxo species that is postulated to form during turnover is discussed. PMID:25852147

  10. Porous cobalt-based thin film as a bifunctional catalyst for hydrogen generation and oxygen generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Fei, Huilong; Ruan, Gedeng; Tour, James M

    2015-05-27

    A mixed-phased Co-based catalyst composed of Co phosphide and Co phosphate is successfully fabricated for bifunctional water electrolysis. The highly porous morphology in this anodized film enables efficient catalytic activity toward water splitting in an extremely low loading mass. The mixed phases in the porous film afford an ability to generate both H2 and O2 in a single electrolyzer. PMID:25872881

  11. Axial and torsional fatigue behavior of a cobalt-base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop elevated temperature multiaxial fatigue life prediction models for the wrought cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188, a multiaxial fatigue data base is required. To satisfy this need, an elevated temperature experimental program on Haynes 188 consisting of axial, torsional, inphase and out of phase axial-torsional fatigue experiments was designed. Elevated temperature axial and torsional fatigue experiments were conducted under strain control on thin wall tubular specimens of Haynes 188 in air. Test results are given.

  12. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-22

    The level of nuclear plant radiation exposure due to activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. Laboratory pin-on-disc and rolling contact wear tests were used to evaluate the wear performance of several coatings. Based on the results of these tests, multilayer Cr-nitride coatings and ion nitriding are the most promising approaches.

  13. Development of wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-03-01

    The costs and hazards resulting from nuclear plant radiation exposure with activated cobalt wear debris could potentially be reduced by covering the cobalt-base materials with a wear resistant coating. However, the hardnesses of many cobalt-base wear alloys are significantly lower than conventional PVD hard coatings, and mechanical support of the hard coating is a concern. Four approaches have been taken to minimize the hardness differences between the substrate and PVD hard coating: (1) use a thin Cr-nitride hard coating with layers that are graded with respect to hardness, (2) use a thicker, multilayered coating (Cr-nitride or Zr-nitride) with graded layers, (3) use nitriding to harden the alloy subsurface followed by application of a multilayered coating of Cr-nitride, and (4) use of nitriding alone. Since little work has been done on application of PVD hard coatings to cobalt-base alloys, some details on process development and characterization of the coatings is presented. Scratch testing was used to evaluate the adhesion of the different coatings. A bench-top rolling contact test was used to evaluate the wear resistance of the coatings. The test results are discussed, and the more desirable coating approaches are identified.

  14. Thermal Decomposition of Calcium Perchlorate/Iron-Mineral Mixtures: Implications of the Evolved Oxygen from the Rocknest Eolian Deposit in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruck, A. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Mahaffy, P.

    2014-01-01

    A major oxygen release between 300 and 500 C was detected by the Mars Curiosity Rover Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument at the Rocknest eolian deposit. Thermal decomposition of perchlorate (ClO4-) salts in the Rocknest samples are a possible explanation for this evolved oxygen release. Releative to Na-, K-, Mg-, and Fe-perchlorate, the thermal decomposition of Ca-perchlorate in laboratory experiments released O2 in the temperature range (400-500degC) closest to the O2 release temperatures observed for the Rocknest material. Furthermore, calcium perchlorate could have been the source of Cl in the chlorinated-hydrocarbons species that were detected by SAM. Different components in the Martian soil could affect the decomposition temperature of calcium per-chlorate or another oxychlorine species. This interaction of the two components in the soil could result in O2 release temperatures consistent with those detected by SAM in the Rocknest materials. The decomposition temperatures of various alkali metal perchlorates are known to decrease in the presence of a catalyst. The objective of this work is to investigate catalytic interactions on calcium perchlorate from various iron-bearing minerals known to be present in the Rocknest material

  15. High-Resolution Mn EXAFS of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex inPhotosystem II: Structural Implications for the Mn4Ca Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Glatzel, Pieter; Lewis, Azul; Sauer,Kenneth; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal

    2005-09-06

    The biological generation of oxygen by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II) is one of natures most important reactions. The recent X-ray crystal structures, while limited by resolutions of 3.2 to 3.5 A, have located the electron density associated with the Mn4Ca complex within the multi-protein PS II complex. Detailed structures critically depend on input from spectroscopic techniques such as EXAFS and EPR/ENDOR, as the XRD resolution does not allow for accurate determination of the position of Mn/Ca or the bridging and terminal ligand atoms. The number and distances of Mn-Mn/Ca/ligand interactions determined from EXAFS provide important constraints for the structure of the Mn cluster. Here we present data from a high-resolution EXAFS method using a novel multi-crystal monochromator that show three short Mn-Mn distances between 2.7 and 2.8 A and hence the presence of three di-mu-oxobridged units in the Mn4Ca cluster. This result imposes clear limitations on the proposed structures based on spectroscopic and diffraction data and provides input for refining such structures.

  16. The amino-terminal conserved domain of 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase is critical for its function in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2015-01-01

    4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (HDR), also known as isoprenoid synthesis H (IspH) or lysis-tolerant B (LytB), catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The structure and reaction mechanism of IspH have been actively investigated in Escherichia coli but little is known in plants. Compared with the bacterial IspH, cyanobacterial and plant HDRs all contain an extra N-terminal conserved domain (NCD) that is essential for their function. Tyr72 in the NCD and several plant-specific residues around the central active site are critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR/IspH may be different between plants and bacteria. The E. coli IspH is an iron-sulfur protein that is sensitive to oxygen. It is possible that the cyanobacterial HDR may independently evolve from the common ancestor of prokaryotes to obtain the NCD, which may protect the enzyme from high concentration of oxygen during photosynthesis. PMID:25723575

  17. Effect of Chloride Depletion on the Magnetic Properties and the Redox Leveling of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Amin, Muhamed; Pokhrel, Ravi; Brudvig, Gary W; Badawi, Ashraf; Obayya, S S A

    2016-05-12

    Chloride is an essential cofactor in the oxygen-evolution reaction that takes place in photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) is oxidized in a linear four-step photocatalytic cycle in which chloride is required for the OEC to advance beyond the S2 state. Here, using density functional theory, we compare the energetics and spin configuration of two different states of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the S2 state: state A with Mn1(3+) and B with Mn4(3+) with and without chloride. The calculations suggest that model B with an S = 5/2 ground state occurs in the chloride-depleted PSII, which may explain the presence of the EPR signal at g = 4.1. Moreover, we use multiconformer continuum electrostatics to study the effect of chloride depletion on the redox potential associated with the S1/S2 and S2/S3 transitions. PMID:27077688

  18. Photocatalytic water oxidation by a mixed-valent Mn(III)₃Mn(IV)O₃ manganese oxo core that mimics the natural oxygen-evolving center.

    PubMed

    Al-Oweini, Rami; Sartorel, Andrea; Bassil, Bassem S; Natali, Mirco; Berardi, Serena; Scandola, Franco; Kortz, Ulrich; Bonchio, Marcella

    2014-10-13

    The functional core of oxygenic photosynthesis is in charge of catalytic water oxidation by a multi-redox Mn(III)/Mn(IV) manifold that evolves through five electronic states (S(i), where i=0-4). The synthetic model system of this catalytic cycle and of its S0→S4 intermediates is the expected turning point for artificial photosynthesis. The tetramanganese-substituted tungstosilicate [Mn(III)3Mn(IV)O3(CH3COO)3(A-α-SiW9O34)](6-)(Mn4POM) offers an unprecedented mimicry of the natural system in its reduced S0 state; it features a hybrid organic-inorganic coordination sphere and is anchored on a polyoxotungstate. Evidence for its photosynthetic properties when combined with [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and S2O8(2-) is obtained by nanosecond laser flash photolysis; its S0→S1 transition within milliseconds and multiple-hole-accumulating properties were studied. Photocatalytic oxygen evolution is achieved in a buffered medium (pH 5) with a quantum efficiency of 1.7%. PMID:25066304

  19. Facile electrospinning preparation of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers as bifunctional electrocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuang; Zuo, Pengjian; Fan, Liquan; Han, Jianan; Xiong, Yueping; Yin, Geping

    2016-04-01

    A novel electrochemical catalyst of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers (Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs) is prepared by a facile and cost-effective electrospinning technique. Excellent features of the porous carbon nanofibers with large amounts of Co atoms, N/P-doping effect, abundant pyridinic-N and Cosbnd Nx clusters as catalytic active sites, and the advantages of the structure and composition result in a high catalytic efficiency. In alkaline or acidic media, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities and kinetics for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), superior methanol tolerance and stability, and a similar four-electron pathway. In addition, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs also shows excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), offering a low onset potential of -0.216 V and a stable current density of 10 mA cm-2 at potential of -0.248 V. The mechanism of ORR and HER catalytic active site arises from the doping of N/P atoms in the Co-based CNFs, which is responsible for the excellent electrocatalytic performance. Due to the excellent catalytic efficiencies, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs act as a promising catalyst material for fuel cells and water splitting technologies.

  20. Geometric and electronic structures of the synthetic Mn4CaO4 model compound mimicking the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-04-20

    Water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) converts light energy into chemical energy with the concomitant production of molecular oxygen, both of which are indispensable for sustaining life on Earth. This reaction is catalyzed by an oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) embedded in the huge PSII complex, and its mechanism remains elusive in spite of the extensive studies of the geometric and electronic structures. In order to elucidate the water-splitting mechanism, synthetic approaches have been extensively employed to mimic the native OEC. Very recently, a synthetic complex [Mn4CaO4(Bu(t)COO)8(py)(Bu(t)COOH)2] () closely mimicking the structure of the native OEC was obtained. In this study, we extensively examined the geometric, electronic and spin structures of using the density functional theory method. Our results showed that the geometric structure of can be accurately reproduced by theoretical calculations, and revealed many similarities in the ground valence and spin states between and the native OEC. We also revealed two different valence states in the one-electron oxidized state of (corresponding to the S2 state), which lie in the lower and higher ground spin states (S = 1/2 and S = 5/2), respectively. One remarkable difference between and the native OEC is the presence of a non-negligible antiferromagnetic interaction between the Mn1 and Mn4 sites, which slightly influenced their ground spin structures (spin alignments). The major reason causing the difference can be attributed to the short Mn1-O5 and Mn1-Mn4 distances in . The introduction of the missing O4 atom and the reorientation of the Ca coordinating ligands improved the Mn1-O5 and Mn1-Mn4 distances comparable to the native OEC. These modifications will therefore be important for the synthesis of further advanced model complexes more closely mimicking the native OEC beyond . PMID:27055567

  1. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Molecular characterization of cDNA encoding oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 increased by salt treatment in the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, K; Hanagata, N; Dubinsky, Z; Baba, S; Karube, I

    2000-11-01

    Young plants of the common Okinawa mangrove species Bruguiera gymnorrhiza were transferred from freshwater to a medium with seawater salt level (500 mM NaCl). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed in the leaf extract of the plant a 33 kDa protein with pI 5.2, whose quantity increased as a result of NaCl treatment. The N-terminal amino acids sequence of this protein had a significant homology with mature region of oxygen evolving enhancer protein 1 (OEE1) precursor. The cloning of OEE1 precursor cDNA fragment was carried out by means of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using degenerated primers. Both 3'- and 5'-regions were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 322 amino acids and was 87% identical to that of Nicotiana tabacum. In B. gymnorrhiza, the predicted amino acid sequence of the mature protein starts at the residue number 85 of the open reading frame. The first 84-amino acid residues correspond to a typical transit sequence for the signal directing OEE1 to its appropriate compartment of chloroplast. The expression of OEE1 was analyzed together with other OEE subunits and D1 protein of photosystem II. The transcript levels of all the three OEEs were enhanced by NaCl treatment, but the significant increase of D1 protein was not observed. PMID:11092914

  3. The photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex protein PsbP interacts with the coat protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus and inhibits virus replication.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Kim, Bong-Suk; Hutchens-Williams, Heather M; Loesch-Fries, L Sue

    2014-10-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) coat protein (CP) is essential for many steps in virus replication from early infection to encapsidation. However, the identity and functional relevance of cellular factors that interact with CP remain unknown. In an unbiased yeast two-hybrid screen for CP-interacting Arabidopsis proteins, we identified several novel protein interactions that could potentially modulate AMV replication. In this report, we focus on one of the novel CP-binding partners, the Arabidopsis PsbP protein, which is a nuclear-encoded component of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. We validated the protein interaction in vitro with pull-down assays, in planta with bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and during virus infection by co-immunoprecipitations. CP interacted with the chloroplast-targeted PsbP in the cytosol and mutations that prevented the dimerization of CP abolished this interaction. Importantly, PsbP overexpression markedly reduced virus accumulation in infected leaves. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that AMV CP dimers interact with the chloroplast protein PsbP, suggesting a potential sequestration strategy that may preempt the generation of any PsbP-mediated antiviral state. PMID:24940990

  4. Theoretical study on OH- site and electronic spin state of oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II at the dark S1 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Makoto; Uchida, Waka; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2013-12-01

    Possible protonation and electronic-spin states of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II have been investigated by using QM(DFT-UB3LYP)/MM(Amber) calculation, in order to elucidate which OEC state satisfies the known experimental results at the dark stable state (S1), i.e. OEC involves Mn4(III2,IV4)-cluster and a S=0 state as the lowest energy electronic-spin state at S1. The configuration of Mn oxidation numbers and the lowest energy spin state within the Mn4-cluster depend on the protonation state of one oxo-anion bridging three Mn ions. When all water-ligands and oxo-bridges form H2O and O2-, respectively, the resulting OEC model involved Mn4(III2,IV2)-cluster and one S=0 state as the lowest energy spin state. To rationalize the O2--bridge model at S1 state, a new H+-release scheme during the H2O-splitting reaction is proposed.

  5. Theoretical study on OH{sup −} site and electronic spin state of oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II at the dark S{sub 1} state

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Uchida, Waka

    2013-12-10

    Possible protonation and electronic-spin states of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II have been investigated by using QM(DFT-UB3LYP)/MM(Amber) calculation, in order to elucidate which OEC state satisfies the known experimental results at the dark stable state (S{sub 1}), i.e. OEC involves Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 4})-cluster and a S=0 state as the lowest energy electronic-spin state at S{sub 1}. The configuration of Mn oxidation numbers and the lowest energy spin state within the Mn{sub 4}-cluster depend on the protonation state of one oxo-anion bridging three Mn ions. When all water-ligands and oxo-bridges form H{sub 2}O and O{sup 2−}, respectively, the resulting OEC model involved Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2})-cluster and one S=0 state as the lowest energy spin state. To rationalize the O{sup 2−}-bridge model at S{sub 1} state, a new H{sup +}-release scheme during the H{sub 2}O-splitting reaction is proposed.

  6. Characterization of fabricated cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass composites.

    PubMed

    Bafandeh, Mohammad Reza; Gharahkhani, Raziyeh; Fathi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this work, cobalt-based alloy/nano bioactive glass (NBG) composites with 10, 15 and 20wt% NBG were prepared and their bioactivity after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 to 4weeks was studied. Scanning electron microscopy images of two- step sintered composites revealed relatively dense microstructure. The results showed that density of composite samples decreased with increase in NBG amount. The microstructure analysis as well as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) revealed that small amount of calcium phosphate phases precipitates on the surface of composite samples after 1week immersion in SBF. After 2weeks immersion, considerable amounts of cauliflower-like shaped precipitations were seen on the surface of the composites. Based on EDX analysis, these precipitations were composed mainly from Ca, P and Si. The observed bands in the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of immersed composites samples for 4weeks in SBF, were characteristic bands of hydroxyapatite. Therefore it is possible to form hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of composite samples during immersion in SBF. The results indicated that prepared composites unlike cobalt-based alloy are bioactive, promising their possibility for implant applications. PMID:27612763

  7. Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. ); Linkous, C.A. )

    2000-01-01

    This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an

  8. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in sizemore » following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.« less

  9. Oxyanion Induced Variations in Domain Structure for Amorphous Cobalt Oxide Oxygen Evolving Catalysts, Resolved by X-ray Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical `artificial leaf' devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. Finally, PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity.

  10. Oxyanion induced variations in domain structure for amorphous cobalt oxide oxygen evolving catalysts, resolved by X-ray pair distribution function analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gihan; Kokhan, Oleksandr; Han, Ali; Chapman, Karena W.; Chupas, Peter J.; Du, Pingwu; Tiede, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous thin film oxygen evolving catalysts, OECs, of first-row transition metals show promise to serve as self-assembling photoanode materials in solar-driven, photoelectrochemical ‘artificial leaf’ devices. This report demonstrates the ability to use high-energy X-ray scattering and atomic pair distribution function analysis, PDF, to resolve structure in amorphous metal oxide catalyst films. The analysis is applied here to resolve domain structure differences induced by oxyanion substitution during the electrochemical assembly of amorphous cobalt oxide catalyst films, Co-OEC. PDF patterns for Co-OEC films formed using phosphate, Pi, methylphosphate, MPi, and borate, Bi, electrolyte buffers show that the resulting domains vary in size following the sequence Pi < MPi < Bi. The increases in domain size for CoMPi and CoBi were found to be correlated with increases in the contributions from bilayer and trilayer stacked domains having structures intermediate between those of the LiCoOO and CoO(OH) mineral forms. The lattice structures and offset stacking of adjacent layers in the partially stacked CoMPi and CoBi domains were best matched to those in the LiCoOO layered structure. The results demonstrate the ability of PDF analysis to elucidate features of domain size, structure, defect content and mesoscale organization for amorphous metal oxide catalysts that are not readily accessed by other X-ray techniques. PDF structure analysis is shown to provide a way to characterize domain structures in different forms of amorphous oxide catalysts, and hence provide an opportunity to investigate correlations between domain structure and catalytic activity. PMID:26634728

  11. The resistance of selected high strength alloys to embrittlement by a hydrogen environment. [iron and cobalt base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Selected high strength iron base and cobalt base alloys were resistant to degradation of mechanical properties in a one atmosphere hydrogen environment at ambient temperature. These alloys were strengthened initially by cold working which produced strain induced martensite and fcc mechanical twins in an fcc matrix. Heat treatment of the cobalt base alloy after cold working produced carbide precipitates with retention of an hcp epsilon phase which increased the yield strength level. High strength alloys can be produced which have some resistance to degradation of mechanical properties by a hydrogen environment under certain conditions.

  12. Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior and Life Prediction of a Cast Cobalt-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ho-Young; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Keun-Bong

    Co-base superalloys have been applied in the stationary components of gas turbine owing to their excellent high temperature properties. Low cycle fatigue data on ECY-768 reported in a companion paper were used to evaluate fatigue life prediction models. In this study, low cycle fatigue tests are performed as the variables of total strain range and temperatures. The relations between plastic and total strain energy densities and number of cycles to failure are examined in order to predict the low cycle fatigue life of Cobalt-based super alloy at different temperatures. The fatigue lives is evaluated using predicted by Coffin-Manson method and strain energy methods is compared with the measured fatigue lives at different temperatures. The microstructure observing was performed for how affect able to low-cycle fatigue life by increasing the temperature.

  13. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Cobalt-Based Metallic Glass Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veligatla, Medha; Das, Santanu; Lee, Won Ki; Hwang, Junyeon; Thumthan, Orathai; Hao, Yaowu; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Temperature-induced variation in magnetic properties for cobalt-based metallic glass was investigated. The formation of metastable nanocrystalline phases prior to complete devitrification and their effect on magnetic properties for Co72B19.2Si4.8Cr4 metallic glass was studied. The nature, shape, and distribution of the intermediate nanocrystalline phases were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. A drastic change in magnetic properties was found in going from a fully amorphous state to different stages of nanocrystallization. The coercivity changes from amorphous soft magnetic state ( H c ~ 0.12 Oe) to a nanocrystalline-dispersed hard magnetic state ( H c ~ 187 Oe), with no significant change in saturation magnetization. This suggests potential use in futuristic magnetic switches, fluxgate sensors, and electromagnetic shielding devices.

  14. Cobalt-Based Layered Metal-Organic Framework as an Ultrahigh Capacity Supercapacitor Electrode Material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxiu; Shi, Changdong; Zhai, Changwei; Cheng, Meiling; Liu, Qi; Wang, Guoxiu

    2016-02-24

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently received increasing interest due to their potential application in the energy storage and conversion field. Herein, cobalt-based layered MOF ({[Co(Hmt)(tfbdc)(H2O)2]·(H2O)2}n, Co-LMOF; Hmt = hexamethylenetetramine; H2tfbdc = 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoroterephthalic acid) has been evaluated as an electrode material for supercapacitors. The Co-LMOF electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance and excellent cycling stability. Its maximum specific capacitance is 2474 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1), and the specific capacitance retention is about 94.3% after 2000 cycles. The excellent electrochemical property may be ascribed to the intrinsic nature of Co-LMOF, enough space available for the storage and diffusion of the electrolyte, and the particles of nanoscale size. PMID:26829547

  15. Tuning the metal-support interaction by structural recognition of cobalt-based catalyst precursors.

    PubMed

    Larmier, Kim; Chizallet, Céline; Raybaud, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    Controlling the nature and size of cobalt(II) polynuclear precursors on γ-alumina and silica-alumina supports represents a challenge for the synthesis of optimal cobalt-based heterogeneous catalysts. By density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show how after drying the interaction of cobalt(II) precursor on γ-alumina is driven by a structural recognition phenomenon, leading to the formation of an epitaxial Co(OH)2 precipitate involving a Co-Al hydrotalcite-like interface. On a silica-alumina surface, this phenomenon is prevented due to the passivation effect of silica domains. This finding opens new routes to tune the metal-support interaction at the synthesis step of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:25906826

  16. Application of Two Cobalt-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks as Oxidative Desulfurization Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Bagheri, Minoo; Morsali, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Two new porous cobalt-based metal-organic frameworks, [Co6(oba)5(OH)2(H2O)2(DMF)4]n · 5DMF (TMU-10) and [Co3(oba)3(O) (Py)0.5] n · 4DMF · Py (TMU-12) have been synthesized by solvothermal method using a nonlinear dicarboxylate ligand. Under mild reaction conditions, these compounds exhibited good catalytic activity and reusability in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) reaction of model oil which was prepared by dissolving dibenzothiophene (DBT) in n-hexane. FT-IR and Mass analysis showed that the main product of DBT oxidation is its corresponding sulfone, which was adsorbed on the surfaces of catalysts. The activation energy was obtained as 13.4 kJ/mol. PMID:26571113

  17. Electronic Structure of the Mn[subscript 4]Ca Cluster in the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II Studied by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2007-11-12

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra simultaneously. The second energy dimension separates the pre-edge (1s to 3d) transitions from the main K-edge (1s to 4p), and thus more precise analysis is possible. The 1s2p RIXS final state electron configuration along the energy transfer axis is identical to conventional L-edge absorption spectroscopy and the RIXS spectra are therefore sensitive to the metal spin state. We have collected data from PS II samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states are small compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms. The RIXS spectra of S{sub 0} and S{sub 3

  18. Electrostatic Effects on Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Oxomanganese Complexes Inspired by the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Muhamed; Vogt, Leslie; Vassiliev, Serguei; Rivalta, Ivan; Sultan, Mohammad M.; Bruce, Doug; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.; Gunner, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of electrostatic interactions on the free energy of proton-coupled-electron-transfer (PCET) in biomimetic oxomanganese complexes inspired by the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII), are investigated. The reported study introduces an enhanced Multi-Conformer Continuum Electrostatics (MCCE) model, parameterized at the density functional theory (DFT) level with a classical valence model for the oxomanganese core. The calculated pKas and oxidation midpoint potentials (Ems) match experimental values for eight complexes indicating that purely electrostatic contributions account for most of the observed couplings between deprotonation and oxidation state transitions. We focus on pKas of terminal water ligands in [Mn(II/III)(H2O)6]2+/3+ (1), [Mn(III)(P)(H2O)2]3- (2, P = 5,10,15,20- tetrakis (2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato), [Mn(IV,IV)2(μ-O)2(terpy)2(H2O)2]4+ (3, terpy = 2,2’:6’,2”-terpyridine) and [Mn3(IV,IV,IV)(μ-O)4(phen)4(H2O)2]4+ (4, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and the pKas of μ-oxo bridges and Mn Ems in [Mn2(μ-O)2(bpy)4]2+ (5, bpy = 2,2’-bipyridyl), [Mn2(μ-O)2(salpn)2] (6, salpn= N,N′-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine), [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(Cl)-salpn)2] (7) and [Mn2(μ-O)2(3,5-di(NO2)-salpn)2] (8) which are most relevant to PCET mechanisms. The analysis of complexes 6-8 highlights the strong coupling between electron and proton transfers, with any Mn oxidation lowering the pKa of an oxo bridge by 10.5±0.9 pH units. The model also accounts for changes in the Ems due to ligand substituents, such as those in complexes 6-8, due to the electron withdrawing Cl (7) and NO2 (8). The reported study provides the foundation for analysis of electrostatic effects in other oxomanganese complexes and metalloenzymes, where PCET plays a fundamental role in redox-leveling mechanisms. PMID:23570540

  19. Single Crystal X- and Q-Band EPR Spectroscopy of a Binuclear Mn2(III,IV) Complex Relevant to the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Junko; Sauer, Kenneth; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropic g and hyperfine tensors of the Mn di-μ-oxo complex, [Mn2(III,IV)O2(phen)4](PF6)3·CH3CN, were derived by single-crystal EPR measurements at X- and Q-band frequencies. This is the first simulation of EPR parameters from single-crystal EPR spectra for multinuclear Mn complexes, which are of importance in several metalloenzymes; one of them is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II). Single-crystal [Mn2(III,IV)O2(phen)4](PF6)3·CH3CN EPR spectra showed distinct resolved 55Mn hyperfine lines in all crystal orientations, unlike single-crystal EPR spectra of other Mn2(III,IV) di-μ-oxo bridged complexes. We measured the EPR spectra in the crystal ab- and bc-planes, and from these spectra we obtained the EPR spectra of the complex along the unique a-, b-, and c-axes of the crystal. The crystal orientation was determined by X-ray diffraction and single-crystal EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. In this complex, the three crystallographic axes, a, b, and c, are parallel or nearly parallel to the principal molecular axes of Mn2(III,IV)O2(phen)4 as shown in the crystallographic data by Stebler et al. (Inorg. Chem. 1986, 25, 4743). This direct relation together with the resolved hyperfine lines significantly simplified the simulation of single-crystal spectra in the three principal directions due to the reduction of free parameters and, thus, allowed us to define the magnetic g and A tensors of the molecule with a high degree of reliability. These parameters were subsequently used to generate the solution EPR spectra at both X- and Q-bands with excellent agreement. The anisotropic g and hyperfine tensors determined by the simulation of the X- and Q-band single-crystal and solution EPR spectra are as follows: gx = 1.9887, gy = 1.9957, gz = 1.9775, and hyperfine coupling constants are AIIIx = |171| G, AIIIy = |176| G, AIIIz = |129| G, AIVx = |77| G, AIVy = |74| G, AIVz = |80| G. PMID:15198595

  20. Single crystal X- and Q-band EPR spectroscopy of a binuclear Mn(2)(III,IV) complex relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Yano, Junko; Sauer, Kenneth; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2004-06-23

    The anisotropic g and hyperfine tensors of the Mn di-micro-oxo complex, [Mn(2)(III,IV)O(2)(phen)(4)](PF(6))(3).CH(3)CN, were derived by single-crystal EPR measurements at X- and Q-band frequencies. This is the first simulation of EPR parameters from single-crystal EPR spectra for multinuclear Mn complexes, which are of importance in several metalloenzymes; one of them is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (PS II). Single-crystal [Mn(2)(III,IV)O(2)(phen)(4)](PF(6))(3).CH(3)CN EPR spectra showed distinct resolved (55)Mn hyperfine lines in all crystal orientations, unlike single-crystal EPR spectra of other Mn(2)(III,IV) di-micro-oxo bridged complexes. We measured the EPR spectra in the crystal ab- and bc-planes, and from these spectra we obtained the EPR spectra of the complex along the unique a-, b-, and c-axes of the crystal. The crystal orientation was determined by X-ray diffraction and single-crystal EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements. In this complex, the three crystallographic axes, a, b, and c, are parallel or nearly parallel to the principal molecular axes of Mn(2)(III,IV)O(2)(phen)(4) as shown in the crystallographic data by Stebler et al. (Inorg. Chem. 1986, 25, 4743). This direct relation together with the resolved hyperfine lines significantly simplified the simulation of single-crystal spectra in the three principal directions due to the reduction of free parameters and, thus, allowed us to define the magnetic g and A tensors of the molecule with a high degree of reliability. These parameters were subsequently used to generate the solution EPR spectra at both X- and Q-bands with excellent agreement. The anisotropic g and hyperfine tensors determined by the simulation of the X- and Q-band single-crystal and solution EPR spectra are as follows: g(x) = 1.9887, g(y) = 1.9957, g(z) = 1.9775, and hyperfine coupling constants are A(III)(x) = |171| G, A(III)(y) = |176| G, A(III)(z) = |129| G, A(IV)(x) = |77| G, A

  1. Network of hydrogen bonds near the oxygen-evolving Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster of photosystem II probed with FTIR difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Service, Rachel J; Hillier, Warwick; Debus, Richard J

    2014-02-18

    We previously provided experimental evidence that an extensive network of hydrogen bonds exists near the oxygen-evolving Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II and that elements of this network form part of a dominant proton-egress pathway leading from the Mn4CaO5 cluster to the thylakoid lumen. The evidence was based on (i) the elimination of the same ν(C═O) mode of a protonated carboxylate group in the S2-minus-S1 FTIR difference spectrum of wild-type PSII core complexes from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by the mutations D1-E65A, D2-E312A, and D1-E329Q and (ii) the substantial decrease in the efficiency of the S3 to S0 transition caused by the mutations D1-D61A, D1-E65A, and D2-E312A. The eliminated ν(C═O) mode corresponds to an unidentified carboxylate group whose pKa value decreases in response to the increased charge that develops on the Mn4CaO5 cluster during the S1 to S2 transition. In the current study, we have extended our work to include the ν(C═O) regions of other Sn+1-minus-Sn FTIR difference spectra and to additional mutations of residues inferred to participate in networks of hydrogen bonds near the Mn4CaO5 cluster or leading from the Mn4CaO5 cluster to the thylakoid lumen. Our data suggest that a different carboxylate group has its pKa value increased during the S2 to S3 transition and that a third carboxylate group experiences a change in its environment during the S0 to S1 transition. The pKa values that shift during the S1 to S2 and S2 to S3 transitions appear to be restored during the S3 to S0 transition. The D1-R334A mutation decreases or eliminates the same ν(C═O) modes from the S2-minus-S1 and S3-minus-S2 spectra as mutations D1-E65A, D2-E312A, and D1-E329Q and substantially decreases the efficiency of the S3 to S0 transition. We conclude that D1-R334 participates in the same dominant proton-egress pathway that was identified in our previous study. The D1-Q165E mutation leaves the ν(C═O) region of the S2-minus-S1

  2. Reaction Pathways for Oxygen Evolution Promoted by Cobalt Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Giuseppe; Giannozzi, Paolo; Bonapasta, Aldo Amore; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the water oxidation catalysis is of key relevance for the rationalization and the design of efficient oxygen evolution catalysts based on earth-abundant transition metals. Performing ab initio DFT+U molecular dynamics calculations of cluster models in explicit water solution, we provide insight into the pathways for oxygen evolution of a cobalt-based catalyst (CoCat). The fast motion of protons at the CoCat/water interface and the occurrence of cubane-like Co-oxo units at the catalyst boundaries are the keys to unlock the fast formation of O–O bonds. Along the resulting pathways, we identified the formation of Co(IV)-oxyl species as the driving ingredient for the activation of the catalytic mechanism, followed by their geminal coupling with O atoms coordinated by the same Co. Concurrent nucleophilic attack of water molecules coming directly from the water solution is discouraged by high activation barriers. The achieved results suggest also interesting similarities between the CoCat and the Mn4Ca-oxo oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. PMID:24044778

  3. Biodegradation – Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) for Oxygenates: How it Evolved, why it Occurs and Using Stable Carbon Isotopes to Predict Plume Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

  4. MNA of Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Oxygenates: Why it occurs, how it evolved, and using stable carbon isotopes to predict plume behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organisms that degrade MTBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

  5. MNA for Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Oxygenates: Why It Occurs, How It Evolved, and Using Stable Carbon Isotopes to Predict Plume Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organisms that degrade MtBE under anaerobic conditions are evolved to acquire energy for growth by using molecular hydrogen and carbonate ion to cleave methyl ether bonds. Methyl ether bonds are common in nature and the bond also occurs in MTBE. MTBE in contaminated ground...

  6. New developments in cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysis and processes

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, A.H.; Davis, B.E.; Oukaci, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Williams Companies, Inc. of Tulsa, Oklahoma, has announced a breakthrough in gas-to-liquids (GTL) technology that revolutionizes the production of transportation fuels from natural gas. Building on its twenty years of research in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) conversion technology, Williams has developed a new process that significantly outperforms existing GTL technologies for large-scale (ca. 50,000 BPSD) applications and advances the state-of the-art of converting natural gas into high quality liquid transportation fuels. By employing a new generation of cobalt-based catalysts, Williams` GasCat{sup SM} F-T process achieves high productivity, resulting in superior catalytic reactor performance compared to existing F-T techniques. The GasCat process also reduces capital requirements and operating costs by employing advanced slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) technology. Although the process is applicable to coal derived synthesis gas, GasCat has enormous implications for large remote gas reserves worldwide, due to the limited options previously available for exploiting the potential of such reservoirs. While the paper presents the details and significance of this new development as it relates to natural gas, it obviously has similar significance to the indirect liquefaction of coal.

  7. A Cobalt-based Catalyst for CO2 Hydrogenation Under Ambient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeletic, Matthew S.; Mock, Michael T.; Appel, Aaron M.; Linehan, John C.

    2013-08-07

    Due to the continually rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, research into conversion of CO2 into fuels using carbon-neutral energy is currently an important topic in catalysis. Recent research on molecular catalysts has led to improved rates of CO2 conversion to formate, but unfortunately the resulting catalysts are based on precious metals such as iridium, ruthenium and rhodium and require high temperatures and high pressures for catalytic reactivity. Using established thermodynamic properties, a cobalt-based catalyst system has been designed for the catalytic production of formate from CO2 and H2, even at room temperature and one atmosphere of pressure. Using Co(dmpe)2H (dmpe is bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) as a catalyst in tetrahydrofuran, room temperature turnover frequencies of 3,400 h-1 at 1 atm of 1:1 CO2:H2 and 74,000 h-1 at 20 atm were obtained. These results highlight the value of basic thermodynamic properties in the rational design of catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  8. The Detection of Evolved Oxygen from the Rocknest Eolian Bedform Material by the Sample Analysis at Mars(SAM) instrument at the Mars Curiosity Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Archer, D.; Ming, D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A.; Mahaffy, P.; Stern, J.; Navarro-Gonzalex, R.; McKay, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected an O2 gas release from the Rocknest eolain bedform (Fig. 1). The detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander s Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) [1] suggests that perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 release detected by SAM. The perchlorate would also serve as a source of chlorine in the chlorinated hydrocarbons detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS) [2,3]. Chlorates (ClO3-) [4,5] and/or superoxides [6] may also be sources of evolved O2 from the Rocknest materials. The work objectives are to 1) evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Rocknest materials, 2) compare these O2 release temperatures with a series of perchlorates and chlorates, and 3) evaluate superoxide O2- sources and possible perchlorate interactions with other Rocknest phases during QMS analysis.

  9. Effect of a single-amino acid substitution of the 43 kDa chlorophyll protein on the oxygen-evolving reaction of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: analysis of the Glu354Gln mutation.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Tohru; Tomo, Tatsuya; Noguchi, Takumi; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2009-07-01

    We constructed a mutant (CP43-Glu354Gln) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in which the glutamic acid at position 354 of the 43 kDa chlorophyll protein (CP43) was replaced with glutamine. To determine the effect of this mutation on the reaction processes of the Mn cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex, we mainly analyzed the spectroscopic properties, including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, of photosystem II core complexes. Mutant cells exhibited a lower oxygen-evolving activity than wild-type cells, and an altered pattern of flash-dependent delayed luminescence. This phenotype differed somewhat from an earlier report of the same mutant [Strickler, M. A., et al. (2008) Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. B 363, 1179-1187]. FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that CP43-Glu354 functions as a ligand to the Mn cluster, most likely with bridging bidentate coordination to two Mn ions in the S(1) state and chelating bidentate coordination to a single Mn ion in the S(2) state. A single water molecule was bound to the same Mn atom to which CP43-Glu354 was ligated, and this Mn atom was oxidized in the S(1)-to-S(2) transition. This is the first report on a binding site of a water molecule relevant to a specific amino acid ligand. We found that the Mn ion or ligand that is oxidized in the S(2)-to-S(3) transition was not directly coupled to CP43-Glu354. While the definitive assignment of ligation to the Mn atoms is still under debate, our identification of a novel water binding site will lead to new insights into the oxygen evolution mechanism. PMID:19466796

  10. Cyclic Axial-Torsional Deformation Behavior of a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic, high-temperature deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base super-alloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. This is accomplished through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue database has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gage section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. The fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C under axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional loads and the monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors under axial and torsional loads have been previously reported. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress ,versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain. and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional tests. For in-phase tests, three different values of the proportionality constant lambda (the ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude, are examined, viz. 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 degrees with lambda equals 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress-strain and the maximum shear stress-maximum engineering shear strain (Tresca) curves. Comparisons are also made between the hardening behaviors of cyclic axial, torsional, and combined in-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 0) and out-of-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 90') axial-torsional fatigue tests. These comparisons

  11. An Assessment of Cumulative Axial and Torsional Fatigue in a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Cumulative fatigue under axial and torsional loading conditions can include both load-order (higMow and low/high) as well as load-type sequence (axial/torsional and torsional/axial) effects. Previously reported experimental studies on a cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188 at 538 C, addressed these effects. These studies characterized the cumulative axial and torsional fatigue behavior under high amplitude followed by low amplitude (Kalluri, S. and Bonacuse, P. J., "Cumulative Axial and Torsional Fatigue: An Investigation of Load-Type Sequance Effects," in Multiaxial Fatigue and Deformation: Testing and Prediction, ASTM STP 1387, S. Kalluri, and P. J. Bonacuse, Eds., American Society for Testing and Materials, West Conshohocken, PA, 2000, pp. 281-301) and low amplitude followed by high amplitude (Bonacuse, P. and Kalluri, S. "Sequenced Axial and Torsional Cumulative Fatigue: Low Amplitude Followed by High Amplitude Loading," Biaxial/Multiaxial Fatigue and Fracture, ESIS Publication 31, A. Carpinteri, M. De Freitas, and A. Spagnoli, Eds., Elsevier, New York, 2003, pp. 165-182) conditions. In both studies, experiments with the following four load-type sequences were performed: (a) axial/axial, (b) torsional/torsional, (c) axial/torsional, and (d) torsional/axial. In this paper, the cumulative axial and torsional fatigue data generated in the two previous studies are combined to generate a comprehensive cumulative fatigue database on both the load-order and load-type sequence effects. This comprehensive database is used to examine applicability of the Palmgren-langer-Miner linear damage rule and a nonlinear damage curve approach for Haynes 188 subjected to the load-order and load-type sequencing described above. Summations of life fractions from the experiments are compared to the predictions from both the linear and nonlinear cumulative fatigue damage approaches. The significance of load-order versus load-type sequence effects for axial and torsional loading conditions

  12. Comparative coarsening kinetics of gamma prime precipitates in nickel and cobalt base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meher, Subhashish

    The increasing technological need to push service conditions of structural materials to higher temperatures has motivated the development of several alloy systems. Among them, superalloys are an excellent candidate for high temperature applications because of their ability to form coherent ordered precipitates, which enable the retention of high strength close to their melting temperature. The accelerated kinetics of solute diffusion, with or without an added component of mechanical stress, leads to coarsening of the precipitates, and results in microstructural degradation, limiting the durability of the materials. Hence, the coarsening of precipitates has been a classical research problem for these alloys in service. The prolonged hunt for an alternative of nickel base superalloys with superior traits has gained hope after the recent discovery of Co-Al-W based alloys, which readily form high temperature gamma' precipitates, similar to Ni base superalloys. In the present study, coarsening behavior of gamma' precipitates in Co-10Al-10W (at. %) has been carried out at 800°C and 900°C. This study has, for the first time, obtained critical coarsening parameters in cobalt-base alloys. Apart from this, it has incorporated atomic scale compositional information across the gamma/gamma' interfaces into classical Cahn-Hilliard model for a better model of coarsening kinetics. The coarsening study of gamma' precipitates in Ni-14Al-7 Cr (at. %) has shown the importance of temporal evolution of the compositional width of the gamma/gamma' interfaces to the coarsening kinetics of gamma' precipitates. This study has introduced a novel, reproducible characterization method of crystallographic study of ordered phase by coupling of orientation microscopy with atom probe tomography (APT). Along with the detailed analysis of field evaporation behaviors of Ni and Co superalloys in APT, the present study determines the site occupancy of various solutes within ordered gamma' precipitates

  13. Effect of autoclave heat treatments on the mechanical properties of the prealloyed powder cobalt-base alloy HS-31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Ashbrook, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The cobalt-base alloy HS-31 was atomized into powder and then consolidated by extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) in an autoclave over a range of temperatures spanning the solidus, approximately 2340 F. Extrusions were subsequently autoclaved at the same conditions. Extrusions autoclaved at 2420 F had a life of 300 hours at 1200 F and 30 hours at 1800 F at stresses that result in a 10-hour life with cast HS-31. Superior stress rupture lives of autoclaved material are probably related to the solidification structure at the grain boundaries as well as to the increased grain size.

  14. Selection of methods for etching carbides in MAR-M509 cobalt-base superalloy and acquisition of their images

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, Janusz . E-mail: janusz.szala@polsl.pl; Szczotok, Agnieszka . E-mail: agnieszka.szczotok@polsl.pl; Richter, Janusz . E-mail: janusz.richter@polsl.pl; Cwajna, Jan . E-mail: jan.cwajna@polsl.pl; Maciejny, Adolf . E-mail: adolf.maciejny@polsl.pl

    2006-06-15

    The paper summarizes results of research into conditions for selectively revealing carbides and carbide eutectics occurring in the structure of MAR-M509 cobalt-base alloy as well as conditions for their detection. Also discussed are the various conditions for acquisition and registration of structural images (by means of light and scanning electron microscopes) to ensure the selective detection of carbides and carbide eutectics. In particular, the influence of accelerating voltage on the possibility of automating the detection process is analyzed. Very good results were obtained on images registered by applying very low accelerating voltages (0.5 to 1 kV)

  15. Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy of Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH (0 < x < 0.27) Oxygen Evolving Catalyst: Kinetics of the "fast" Iron Sites.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2016-01-13

    Nickel-iron mixed metal oxyhydroxides have attracted significant attention as an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst for solar fuel renewable energy applications. Here, we performed surface-selective and time-dependent redox titrations to directly measure the surface OER kinetics of Ni(IV) and Fe(IV) in NiOOH, FeOOH, and Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH (0 < x < 0.27) electrodes. Most importantly, two types of surface sites exhibiting "fast" and "slow" kinetics were found, where the fraction of "fast" sites in Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH matched the iron atom content in the film. This finding provides experimental support to the theory-proposed model of active sites in Ni(1-x)Fe(x)OOH. The OER rate constant of the "fast" site was 1.70 s(-1) per atom. PMID:26645678

  16. On the guiding principles for lucid understanding of the damage-free S1 structure of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Suga, Michihiro; Akita, Fusamichi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2015-05-01

    Several key concepts and geometrical rules for the Mn-Mn and Mn-O distances of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) by previous and present theoretical calculations were examined for a clear understanding of the damage-free S1 structure revealed by X-ray free electron laser (XFEL). A simple equation to estimate the Mna-Mnb distance in relation to the Mna-O(5) distance was derived taking into consideration the Jahn-Teller (JT) effects for Mn centers, indicating that the XFEL structure is regarded as a slightly right-elongated quasi-central structure in contradiction to a right-opened structure proposed by the EXAFS measurements.

  17. Spermine and spermidine inhibition of photosystem II: Disassembly of the oxygen evolving complex and consequent perturbation in electron donation from TyrZ to P680+ and the quinone acceptors QA- to QB.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Rémy; Gauthier, Alain; Harnois, Johanne; Boisvert, Steve; Govindachary, Sridharan; Carpentier, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Polyamines are implicated in plant growth and stress response. However, the polyamines spermine and spermidine were shown to elicit strong inhibitory effects in photosystem II (PSII) submembrane fractions. We have studied the mechanism of this inhibitory action in detail. The inhibition of electron transport in PSII submembrane fractions treated with millimolar concentrations of spermine or spermidine led to the decline of plastoquinone reduction, which was reversed by the artificial electron donor diphenylcarbazide. The above inhibition was due to the loss of the extrinsic polypeptides associated with the oxygen evolving complex. Thermoluminescence measurements revealed that charge recombination between the quinone acceptors of PSII, QA and QB, and the S2 state of the Mn-cluster was abolished. Also, the dark decay of chlorophyll fluorescence after a single turn-over white flash was greatly retarded indicating a slower rate of QA- reoxidation. PMID:17511958

  18. Large-scale QM/MM calculations of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: Comparisons with EXAFS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale QM/MM calculations including hydrogen-bonding networks in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) were performed to elucidate the geometric structures of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the key catalytic states (Si (i = 0-3)). The optimized Mn-Mn, Ca-Mn and Mn-O distances by the large-scale QM/MM starting from the high-resolution XRD structure were consistent with those of the EXAFS experiments in the dark stable S1 state by the Berkeley and Berlin groups. The optimized geometrical parameters for other Si (i = 0, 2, 3) states were also consistent with those of EXAFS, indicating the importance of the large-scale QM/MM calculations for the PSII-OEC.

  19. Replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine affects the normal proton transfer pathways for the reduction of P680+ in oxygen-evolving photosystem II particles from Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Jeans, C; Schilstra, M J; Ray, N; Husain, S; Minagawa, J; Nugent, J H A; Klug, D R

    2002-12-31

    We have probed the electrostatics of P680(+) reduction in oxygenic photosynthesis using histidine-tagged and histidine-tagged Y(D)-less Photosystem II cores. We make two main observations: (i) that His-tagged Chlamydomonas cores show kinetics which are essentially identical to those of Photosystem II enriched thylakoid membranes from spinach; (ii) that the microsecond kinetics, previously shown to be proton/hydrogen transfer limited [Schilstra et al. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 3974-3981], are significantly different in Y(D)-less Chlamydomonas particles when compared with both the His-tagged Chlamydomonas particles and the spinach membranes. The oscillatory nature of the kinetics in both Chlamydomonas samples is normal, indicating that S-state cycling is unaffected by either the histidine-tagging or the replacement of tyrosine D with phenylalanine. We propose that the effects on the proton-coupled electron transfers of P680(+) reduction in the absence of Y(D) are likely to be due to pK shifts of residues in a hydrogen-bonded network of amino acids in the vicinity of Y(Z). Tyrosine D is 35 A from Y(Z) and yet has a significant influence on proton-coupled electron transfer events in the vicinity of Y(Z). This finding emphasizes the delicacy of the proton balance that Photosystem II has to achieve during the water splitting process. PMID:12501204

  20. Thermal cooling effects in the microstructure and properties of cast cobalt-base biomedical alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Valer, Vladimir

    Joint replacement prosthesis is widely used in the biomedical field to provide a solution for dysfunctional human body joints. The demand for orthopedic knee and hip implants motivate scientists and manufacturers to develop novel materials or to increase the life of service and efficiency of current materials. Cobalt-base alloys have been investigated by various researchers for biomedical implantations. When these alloys contain Chromium, Molybdenum, and Carbon, they exhibit good tribological and mechanical properties, as well as excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. In this study, the microstructure of cast Co-Cr-Mo-C alloy is purposely modified by inducing rapid solidification through fusion welding processes and solution annealing heat treatment (quenched in water at room temperature. In particular the effect of high cooling rates on the athermal phase transformation FCC(gamma)↔HCP(epsilon) on the alloy hardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. The Co-alloy microstructures were characterized using metallography and microscopy techniques. It was found that the as cast sample typically dendritic with dendritic grain sizes of approximately 150 microm and containing Cr-rich coarse carbide precipitates along the interdendritic boundaries. Solution annealing gives rise to a refined microstructure with grain size of 30 microm, common among Co-Cr-Mo alloys after heat treating. Alternatively, an ultrafine grain structure (between 2 and 10 microm) was developed in the fusion zone for specimens melted using Laser and TIG welding methods. When laser surface modification treatments were implemented, the developed solidification microstructure shifted from dendritic to a fine cellular morphology, with possible nanoscale carbide precipitates along the cellular boundaries. In turn, the solidified regions exhibited high hardness values (461.5HV), which exceeds by almost 110 points from the alloy in the as-cast condition. The amount of developed athermal

  1. Thermodynamic Considerations of Contamination by Alloying Elements of Remelted End-of-Life Nickel- and Cobalt-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Cobalt and nickel are high-value commodity metals and are mostly used in the form of highly alloyed materials. The alloying elements used may cause contamination problems during recycling. To ensure maximum resource efficiency, an understanding of the removability of these alloying elements and the controllability of some of the primary alloying elements is essential with respect to the recycling of end-of-life (EoL) nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys by remelting. In this study, the distribution behaviors of approximately 30 elements that are usually present in EoL nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys in the solvent metal (nickel, cobalt, or nickel-cobalt alloy), oxide slag, and gas phases during the remelting were quantitatively evaluated using a thermodynamic approach. The results showed that most of the alloying elements can be removed either in the slag phase or into the gas phase. However, the removal of copper, tin, arsenic, and antimony by remelting is difficult, and they remain as tramp elements during the recycling. On the other hand, the distribution tendencies of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten can be controlled by changing the remelting conditions. To increase the resource efficiency of recycling, preventing contamination by the tramp elements and identifying the alloying compositions of EoL superalloys are significantly essential, which will require the development of efficient prior alloy-sorting systems and advanced separation technologies.

  2. Thermodynamic Considerations of Contamination by Alloying Elements of Remelted End-of-Life Nickel- and Cobalt-Based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt and nickel are high-value commodity metals and are mostly used in the form of highly alloyed materials. The alloying elements used may cause contamination problems during recycling. To ensure maximum resource efficiency, an understanding of the removability of these alloying elements and the controllability of some of the primary alloying elements is essential with respect to the recycling of end-of-life (EoL) nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys by remelting. In this study, the distribution behaviors of approximately 30 elements that are usually present in EoL nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys in the solvent metal (nickel, cobalt, or nickel-cobalt alloy), oxide slag, and gas phases during the remelting were quantitatively evaluated using a thermodynamic approach. The results showed that most of the alloying elements can be removed either in the slag phase or into the gas phase. However, the removal of copper, tin, arsenic, and antimony by remelting is difficult, and they remain as tramp elements during the recycling. On the other hand, the distribution tendencies of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten can be controlled by changing the remelting conditions. To increase the resource efficiency of recycling, preventing contamination by the tramp elements and identifying the alloying compositions of EoL superalloys are significantly essential, which will require the development of efficient prior alloy-sorting systems and advanced separation technologies.

  3. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Speck, A. K.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Hony, S.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-06-10

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK{sub s} and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with {gamma} of -3.5, a {sub min} of 0.01 {mu}m, and a {sub 0} of 0.1 {mu}m to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be {approx}5100 L {sub sun} and {approx}36,000 L {sub sun}, respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of {approx}3 M {sub sun} and {approx}7 M {sub sun}. This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius {approx}17 and

  4. Hierarchically porous Co3O4 architectures with honeycomb-like structures for efficient oxygen generation from electrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lili; Tian, Tian; Jiang, Jing; Ai, Lunhong

    2015-10-01

    The development of efficient and cheap anode materials for the utilization in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for energy-conversion technologies. In this study, hierarchically porous Co3O4 architectures with honeycomb-like structures are synthesized by employing cobalt-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67-Co) as metal source and sacrificial template. After a simple one-step calcination process, the ZIF-67-Co precursor can be chemically transformed into the Co3O4 architectures with abundant porosity and oxygen vacancy. These easily obtained and earth-abundant Co3O4 architectures present high performance toward the electrochemical water splitting for evolving molecular oxygen, affording a small OER onset potential, large anodic current and long-term durability in 0.1 M KOH solution, which are comparable to the electroactive noble- and transition-metal oxygen evolution catalysts previously reported. These merits suggest that the ZIF-derived Co3O4 architectures are promising electrocatalysts for OER from water splitting.

  5. Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Hedgecock, Jud; Nienaber, Terry; Cooper, Bonnie; Allen, Carlton; Ming, Doug

    2000-01-01

    The Regolith Evolved Gas Analyzer (REGA) is a high-temperature furnace and mass spectrometer instrument for determining the mineralogical composition and reactivity of soil samples. REGA provides key mineralogical and reactivity data that is needed to understand the soil chemistry of an asteroid, which then aids in determining in-situ which materials should be selected for return to earth. REGA is capable of conducting a number of direct soil measurements that are unique to this instrument. These experimental measurements include: (1) Mass spectrum analysis of evolved gases from soil samples as they are heated from ambient temperature to 900 C; and (2) Identification of liberated chemicals, e.g., water, oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and fluorine. REGA would be placed on the surface of a near earth asteroid. It is an autonomous instrument that is controlled from earth but does the analysis of regolith materials automatically. The REGA instrument consists of four primary components: (1) a flight-proven mass spectrometer, (2) a high-temperature furnace, (3) a soil handling system, and (4) a microcontroller. An external arm containing a scoop or drill gathers regolith samples. A sample is placed in the inlet orifice where the finest-grained particles are sifted into a metering volume and subsequently moved into a crucible. A movable arm then places the crucible in the furnace. The furnace is closed, thereby sealing the inner volume to collect the evolved gases for analysis. Owing to the very low g forces on an asteroid compared to Mars or the moon, the sample must be moved from inlet to crucible by mechanical means rather than by gravity. As the soil sample is heated through a programmed pattern, the gases evolved at each temperature are passed through a transfer tube to the mass spectrometer for analysis and identification. Return data from the instrument will lead to new insights and discoveries including: (1) Identification of the molecular masses of all of the gases

  6. Proton-electron transport and transfer in electrocatalytic films. Application to a cobalt-based O2-evolution catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bediako, D Kwabena; Costentin, Cyrille; Jones, Evan C; Nocera, Daniel G; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2013-07-17

    Solar-driven electrochemical transformations of small molecules, such as water splitting and CO2 reduction, pertinent to modern energy challenges, require the assistance of catalysts preferably deposited on conducting or semiconducting surfaces. Understanding mechanisms and identifying the factors that control the functioning of such systems are required for rational catalyst optimization and improved performance. A methodology is proposed, in the framework of rotating disk electrode voltammetry, to analyze the current responses expected in the case of a semigeneral reaction scheme involving a proton-coupled catalytic reaction associated with proton-coupled electron hopping through the film as rate controlling factors in the case where there is no limitation by substrate diffusion. The predictions concern the current density vs overpotential (Tafel) plots and their dependence on buffer concentration (including absence of buffer), film thickness and rotation rate. The Tafel plots may have a variety of slopes (e.g., F/RT ln 10, F/2RT ln 10, 0) that may even coexist within the overpotential range of a single plot. We show that an optimal film thickness exists beyond which the activity of the film plateaus. Application to water oxidation by films of a cobalt-based oxidic catalyst provides a successful test of the applicability of the proposed methodology, which also provides further insight into the mechanism by which these cobalt-based films catalyze the oxidation of water. The exact nature of the kinetic and thermodynamic characteristics that have been derived from the analysis is discussed as well as their use in catalyst benchmarking. PMID:23822172

  7. FTIR spectra and normal-mode analysis of a tetranuclear Manganese adamantane-like complex in two electrochemically prepared oxidation states: Relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, Hendrik; Dube, Christopher E.; Armstrong, William H.; Sauer, Kenneth; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2002-03-19

    The IR spectra and normal-mode analysis of the adamantane-like compound [Mn4O6(bpea)4]n+ in two oxidation states, MnIV4 and MnIIIMnIV3, that are relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II are presented. Mn-O vibrational modes are identified with isotopic exchange, 16O->18O, of the mono-(mu)-oxo bridging atoms in the complex. IR spectra of the MnIIIMnIV3 species are obtained by electrochemical reduction of the MnIV4 species using a spectroelectrochemical cell, based on attenuated total reflection [Visser et al. Anal Chem 2001, 73, 4374-4378]. A novel method of subtraction is used to reduce background contributions from solvent and ligand modes, and the difference and double-difference spectra are used in identifying Mn-O bridging modes that are sensitive to oxidation state change. Two strong IR bands are observed for the MnIV4 species at 745 and 707 cm-1 and a weaker band at 510 cm-1. Upon reduction, the MnIIIMnIV3 species exhibits two strong IR bands at 745 and 680 cm-1, and several weaker bands are observed in the 510 - 425 cm-1 range. A normal mode analysis is performed to assign all the relevant bridging modes in the oxidized MnIV4 and reduced MnIIIMnIV3 species. The calculated force constants for the MnIV4 species are = 3.15 mdynAngstrom, = 0.55 mdyn/Angstrom, and = 0.20 mdyn/Angstrom. The force constants for the MnIIIMnIV3 species are = 3.10 mdyn/Angstrom, = 2.45 mdyn/Angstrom, = 0.40, and = 0.15 mdyn/Angstrom. This study provides insights for the identification of Mn-O modes in the IR spectra of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex during its catalytic cycle.

  8. Recent Progress in Cobalt-Based Heterogeneous Catalysts for Electrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahai; Cui, Wei; Liu, Qian; Xing, Zhicai; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2016-01-13

    Water electrolysis is considered as the most promising technology for hydrogen production. Much research has been devoted to developing efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production via the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen production via the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The optimum electrocatalysts can drive down the energy costs needed for water splitting via lowering the overpotential. A number of cobalt (Co)-based materials have been developed over past years as non-noble-metal heterogeneous electrocatalysts for HER and OER. Recent progress in this field is summarized here, especially highlighting several important bifunctional catalysts. Various approaches to improve or optimize the electrocatalysts are introduced. Finally, the current existing challenges and the future working directions for enhancing the performance of Co-implicated electrocatalysts are proposed. PMID:26551487

  9. Solid-State 55Mn NMR Spectroscopy of bis(μ-oxo)dimanganese(IV) [Mn2O2(salpn)2], a Model for the Oxygen Evolving Complex in Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Paul D.; Sears, Jesse A.; Yang, Ping; Dupuis, Michel; Boron, Ted; Pecoraro, Vince; Stich, Troy; Britt, R. David; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2010-12-01

    Given the obvious global energy needs, it has become imperative to develop a catalytic process for converting water to molecular oxygen and protons. Many have sought to understand the details of photosynthesis and in particular the water splitting reaction to help in the development of the appropriate catalysis.1-3 While the scientific community has made great strides towards this goal, it has fallen short at the critical stage of the determination of the structure associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) within photosystem II (PSII).4,5 Despite the existence of x-ray structures of PSII,6-8 the best data we have for the structure of the OEC comes from models derived from EPR and EXAFS measurements.9-14 This experimental situation has led to collaborations with theoreticians to enable the development of models for the structure of the OEC where the experimental observables (EXAFS and magnetic resonance parameters) serve as constraints to the theoretical calculations. Of particular interest to this study is the observation of the S1 state of the Kok cycle15 where the core of the OEC can be described as a tetranuclear manganese cluster composed of Mn4OxCa. The simplest model for the OEC can be thought of as two Mn-pairs and a Ca2+ where each Mn-pair is antiferromagnetically coupled to its partner. We utilize the term "pair" to describe the Mn atoms within the OEC with the same oxidation state, which for the S1 state is (Mn2(III, III) and Mn2(IV, IV)).16 It is unclear as to the degree of interaction between the pairs as well as the role of the Ca2+. At cryogenic temperatures the S1 state of the OEC is diamagnetic and in principle amenable to solid-state NMR experiments.

  10. Computational insights on crystal structures of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with either Ca²⁺ or Ca²⁺ substituted by Sr²⁺

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vogt, Leslie; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Pal, Rhitankar; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-01-15

    The oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II can function with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, but the reason for differing turnover rates remains unresolved despite reported X-ray crystal structures for both forms. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we optimize structures with each cation in both the resting state (S₁) and in a series of reduced states (S₀, S₋₁, and S-₂). Through comparison with experimental data, we determine that X-ray crystal structures with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ are most consistent with the S-₂ state, Mn₄[III,III,III,II] with O4 and O5 protonated. As expected, the QM/MM models show that Ca²⁺/Sr²⁺ substitutionmore » results in elongation of the heterocation bonds and displaces terminal waters W3 and W4. The optimized structures also show that hydrogen-bonded W5 is displaced in all S states with Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, suggesting that this water may play a critical role during water oxidation.« less

  11. Computational insights on crystal structures of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with either Ca²⁺ or Ca²⁺ substituted by Sr²⁺

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Leslie; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Pal, Rhitankar; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-01-15

    The oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II can function with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, but the reason for differing turnover rates remains unresolved despite reported X-ray crystal structures for both forms. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we optimize structures with each cation in both the resting state (S₁) and in a series of reduced states (S₀, S₋₁, and S-₂). Through comparison with experimental data, we determine that X-ray crystal structures with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ are most consistent with the S-₂ state, Mn₄[III,III,III,II] with O4 and O5 protonated. As expected, the QM/MM models show that Ca²⁺/Sr²⁺ substitution results in elongation of the heterocation bonds and displaces terminal waters W3 and W4. The optimized structures also show that hydrogen-bonded W5 is displaced in all S states with Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, suggesting that this water may play a critical role during water oxidation.

  12. Toward Models for the Full Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II by Ligand Coordination To Lower the Symmetry of the Mn3CaO4 Cubane: Demonstration That Electronic Effects Facilitate Binding of a Fifth Metal

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic model compounds have been targeted to benchmark and better understand the electronic structure, geometry, spectroscopy, and reactivity of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, a low-symmetry Mn4CaOn cluster. Herein, low-symmetry MnIV3GdO4 and MnIV3CaO4 cubanes are synthesized in a rational, stepwise fashion through desymmetrization by ligand substitution, causing significant cubane distortions. As a result of increased electron richness and desymmetrization, a specific μ3-oxo moiety of the Mn3CaO4 unit becomes more basic allowing for selective protonation. Coordination of a fifth metal ion, Ag+, to the same site gives a Mn3CaAgO4 cluster that models the topology of the OEC by displaying both a cubane motif and a “dangler” transition metal. The present synthetic strategy provides a rational roadmap for accessing more accurate models of the biological catalyst. PMID:25241826

  13. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  14. Removal of Ca2+ from the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II Has Minimal Effect on the Mn4O5 Core Structure: A Polarized Mn X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lohmiller, Thomas; Shelby, Megan L.; Long, Xi; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2015-05-19

    We studied Ca2+ -depleted and Ca2+ -reconstituted spinach photosystem II using polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy of oriented PS II preparations to investigate the structural and functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the Mn4O5Ca cluster of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Samples were prepared by low pH/citrate treatment as one-dimensionally ordered membrane layers and poised in the Ca2+ -depleted S1 (S1') and S2 (S2') states, the S2'YZ• state, at which point the catalytic cycle of water oxidation is inhibited, and the Ca2+ -reconstituted S1 state. Polarized Mn K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectra exhibit pronounced dichroism. Polarized EXAFS data of all statesmore » of Ca2+ -depleted PS II investigated show only minor changes in distances and orientations of the Mn-Mn vectors compared to the Ca2+ -containing OEC, which may be attributed to some loss of rigidity of the core structure. Thus, removal of the Ca2+ ion does not lead to fundamental distortion or rearrangement of the tetranuclear Mn cluster, which indicates that the Ca2+ ion in the OEC is not critical for structural maintenance of the cluster, at least in the S1 and S2 states, but fulfills a crucial catalytic function in the mechanism of the water oxidation reaction. On the basis of this structural information, reasons for the inhibitory effect of Ca2+ removal are discussed, attributing to the Ca2+ ion a fundamental role in organizing the surrounding (substrate) water framework and in proton-coupled electron transfer to YZ• (D1-Tyr161).« less

  15. Visible light induction of an electron paramagnetic resonance split signal in Photosystem II in the S(2) state reveals the importance of charges in the oxygen-evolving center during catalysis: a unifying model.

    PubMed

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Styring, Stenbjörn; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Ho, Felix M

    2012-03-13

    Cryogenic illumination of Photosystem II (PSII) can lead to the trapping of the metastable radical Y(Z)(•), the radical form of the redox-active tyrosine residue D1-Tyr161 (known as Y(Z)). Magnetic interaction between this radical and the CaMn(4) cluster of PSII gives rise to so-called split electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals with characteristics that are dependent on the S state. We report here the observation and characterization of a split EPR signal that can be directly induced from PSII centers in the S(2) state through visible light illumination at 10 K. We further show that the induction of this split signal takes place via a Mn-centered mechanism, in the same way as when using near-infrared light illumination [Koulougliotis, D., et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 3045-3053]. On the basis of interpretations of these results, and in combination with literature data for other split signals induced under a variety of conditions (temperature and light quality), we propose a unified model for the mechanisms of split signal induction across the four S states (S(0), S(1), S(2), and S(3)). At the heart of this model is the stability or instability of the Y(Z)(•)(D1-His190)(+) pair that would be formed during cryogenic oxidation of Y(Z). Furthermore, the model is closely related to the sequence of transfers of protons and electrons from the CaMn(4) cluster during the S cycle and further demonstrates the utility of the split signals in probing the immediate environment of the oxygen-evolving center in PSII. PMID:22352968

  16. On morphologies, microsegregation, and mechanical behavior of directionally solidified cobalt-base superalloy at medium cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shuangjie; Li, Jianguo; Liu, Zhongyuan; Shi, Zhengxing; Fu, Hengzhi

    1994-03-01

    A newly developed experimental setup that can provide a temperature gradient of 1300 K/cm has been used in the research of the morphologies, microsegregation, and mechanical behavior of directionally solidified cobalt-base superalloy (known as K10 in PR China) at medium cooling rates from 38 to 60 K/s. Experimental results show that the primary and secondary dendrite spacings of K10 become less than one-fifth and one-eighth, respectively, of those obtainable with a conventional 100 K/cm temperature gradient and a cooling rate below 1 K/s: the carbides are directionally arrayed and the carbides’ morphology changes from islands of general cast state into worms; microsegregation is almost completely eliminated; the mechanical properties, as can be expected, are greatly superior to those obtainable with 100 K/cm temperature gradient; at 1073 K, creep-rupture strength increases from 167 to 196 MPa; endurance life is raised from 10 to 30 hours; the reduction in area increases from 12 to 52 pct; and the specific elongation increases from 17 to 46 pct. And with the increase of cooling rate, there are always corresponding improvements of mechanical properties of K10. Otherwise, the fractography of superfine columnar structure samples is high-toughness transgranular fracture, with cracks originating at the edge of carbides.

  17. Magnetic and Electrical Characteristics of Cobalt-Based Amorphous Materials and Comparison to a Permalloy Type Polycrystalline Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieserman, William R.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic component designers are always looking for improved soft magnetic core materials to increase the efficiency, temperature rating and power density of transformers, motors, generators and alternators, and energy density of inductors. In this paper, we report on the experimental investigation of commercially available cobalt-based amorphous alloys which, in their processing, were subjected to two different types of magnetic field anneals: A longitudinal magnetic field anneal or a transverse magnetic field anneal. The longitudinal field annealed material investigated was Metglas 2714A. The electrical and magnetic characteristics of this material were investigated over the frequency range of 1 to 200 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 150 C for both sine and square wave voltage excitation. The specific core loss was lower for the square than the sine wave voltage excitation for the same maximum flux density, frequency and temperature. The transverse magnetic field annealed core materials include Metglas 2714AF and Vacuumschmelze 6025F. These two materials were experimentally characterized over the frequency range of 10 to 200 kHz for sine wave voltage excitation and 23 C only. A comparison of the 2174A to 2714AF found that 2714AF always had lower specific core loss than 2714A for any given magnetic flux density and frequency and the ratio of specific core loss of 2714A to 2714AF was dependent on both magnetic flux density and frequency. A comparison was also made of the 2714A, 2714AF, and 6025F materials to two different tape thicknesses of the polycrystalline Supermalloy material and the results show that 2714AF and 6025F have the lowest specific core loss at 100 kHz over the magnetic flux density range of 0.1 to 0.4 Tesla.

  18. Prokaryote and eukaryote evolvability.

    PubMed

    Poole, Anthony M; Phillips, Matthew J; Penny, David

    2003-05-01

    The concept of evolvability covers a broad spectrum of, often contradictory, ideas. At one end of the spectrum it is equivalent to the statement that evolution is possible, at the other end are untestable post hoc explanations, such as the suggestion that current evolutionary theory cannot explain the evolution of evolvability. We examine similarities and differences in eukaryote and prokaryote evolvability, and look for explanations that are compatible with a wide range of observations. Differences in genome organisation between eukaryotes and prokaryotes meets this criterion. The single origin of replication in prokaryote chromosomes (versus multiple origins in eukaryotes) accounts for many differences because the time to replicate a prokaryote genome limits its size (and the accumulation of junk DNA). Both prokaryotes and eukaryotes appear to switch from genetic stability to genetic change in response to stress. We examine a range of stress responses, and discuss how these impact on evolvability, particularly in unicellular organisms versus complex multicellular ones. Evolvability is also limited by environmental interactions (including competition) and we describe a model that places limits on potential evolvability. Examples are given of its application to predator competition and limits to lateral gene transfer. We suggest that unicellular organisms evolve largely through a process of metabolic change, resulting in biochemical diversity. Multicellular organisms evolve largely through morphological changes, not through extensive changes to cellular biochemistry. PMID:12689728

  19. REFLECTIONS ON EVOLVING CHANGE.

    PubMed

    Angood, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Physician leadership is increasingly recognized as pivotal for improved change in health care. Multi-professional care teams, education and leadership are evolving trends that are important for health care's future. PMID:27295737

  20. Evolving Digital Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Aaron P.; Ofria, Charles

    2013-01-01

    “It is hard to realize that the living world as we know it is just one among many possibilities” [1]. Evolving digital ecological networks are webs of interacting, self-replicating, and evolving computer programs (i.e., digital organisms) that experience the same major ecological interactions as biological organisms (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism). Despite being computational, these programs evolve quickly in an open-ended way, and starting from only one or two ancestral organisms, the formation of ecological networks can be observed in real-time by tracking interactions between the constantly evolving organism phenotypes. These phenotypes may be defined by combinations of logical computations (hereafter tasks) that digital organisms perform and by expressed behaviors that have evolved. The types and outcomes of interactions between phenotypes are determined by task overlap for logic-defined phenotypes and by responses to encounters in the case of behavioral phenotypes. Biologists use these evolving networks to study active and fundamental topics within evolutionary ecology (e.g., the extent to which the architecture of multispecies networks shape coevolutionary outcomes, and the processes involved). PMID:23533370

  1. Investigation of electrodeposited cobalt sulphide counter electrodes and their application in next-generation dye sensitized solar cells featuring organic dyes and cobalt-based redox electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Chaturvedi, Neha; Kumar, Anuj; Kapoor, Raman; Dutta, Viresh; Frey, Julien; Moehl, Thomas; Grätzel, Michael; Mathew, Simon; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2015-02-01

    Cobalt sulphide (CoS) films are potentiodynamically deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrates employing one, three and five sweep cycles (CoS-I, CoS-III and CoS-V respectively). Analysis of the CoS-III film by impedance spectroscopy reveals a lower charge transfer resistance (RCT) than that measured for Pt CE (0.75 Ω cm-2 and 0.85 Ω cm-2, respectively). The CoS films are used as counter electrodes (CE) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) featuring the combination of a high absorption coefficient organic dye (C218) and the cobalt-based redox electrolyte [Co(bpy)3]2/3+. DSSCs fabricated with the CoS-III CE yield the highest short-circuit current density (JSC) of 12.84 mA cm-2, open circuit voltage (VOC) of 805 mV and overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.72% under AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW cm-2). These values are comparable to the performance of an analogous cell fabricated with the Pt CE (PCE = 6.94%). Owing to relative lower cost (due to the inherit earth abundance of Co) and non-toxicity, CoS can be considered as a promising alternative to the more expensive Pt as a CE material for next-generation DSSCs that utilize organic dyes and cobalt-based redox electrolytes.

  2. Dust around main sequence and evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. J.; Heinrichsen, I.; Richards, P. J.

    Data for several main sequence and evolved stars, from the photopolarimeter on ISO (ISOPHOT), are presented. Dust shells are resolved for Y CVn and RS Lib at 60mum. Low resolution spectra from ISOPHOT are shown for several evolved stars, and compared to the spectrum of Vega (a stellar photosphere) and HD 169142 (showing emission features from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons). W Lyr shows the signature of oxygen-rich circumstellar material around 3mum, V Aql and Y CVn the signature of carbon-rich material.

  3. An Evolving Astrobiology Glossary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, K. J.; Dolci, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    One of the resources that evolved from the Bioastronomy 2007 meeting was an online interdisciplinary glossary of terms that might not be universally familiar to researchers in all sub-disciplines feeding into astrobiology. In order to facilitate comprehension of the presentations during the meeting, a database driven web tool for online glossary definitions was developed and participants were invited to contribute prior to the meeting. The glossary was downloaded and included in the conference registration materials for use at the meeting. The glossary web tool is has now been delivered to the NASA Astrobiology Institute so that it can continue to grow as an evolving resource for the astrobiology community.

  4. Effect of H{sub 2}/CO ratio on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry reactor with cobalt-based catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Inga, J.R.; Morsi, B.I.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of syngas having different H{sub 2}/CO ratios on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor with a Cobalt-based catalyst was assessed using a simple reactor model. The data and catalyst used in this model were from Bechtel studies (1990). It was found that hydrogen is likely to become the rate limiting reactant, even at relatively low catalyst activities, not because of gas-liquid mass transfer, but due to the depletion of hydrogen in the gas phase. This will reduce the H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the liquid phase which will consequently decrease the reaction rate and affect the product selectivity. The increase of catalyst concentration appeared not to affect the reactor performance, when using a syngas with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios.

  5. Analysis of thermoelectric properties of high-temperature complex alloys of nickel-base, iron-base and cobalt-base groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, R.

    1984-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties alloys of the nickel-base, iron-base, and cobalt-base groups containing from 1% to 25% 106 chromium were compared and correlated with the following material characteristics: atomic percent of the principle alloy constituent; ratio of concentration of two constituents; alloy physical property (electrical resistivity); alloy phase structure (percent precipitate or percent hardener content); alloy electronic structure (electron concentration). For solid-solution-type alloys the most consistent correlation was obtained with electron concentration, for precipitation-hardenable alloys of the nickel-base superalloy group, the thermoelectric potential correlated with hardener content in the alloy structure. For solid-solution-type alloys, no problems were found with thermoelectric stability to 1000; for precipitation-hardenable alloys, thermoelectric stability was dependent on phase stability. The effects of the compositional range of alloy constituents on temperature measurement uncertainty are discussed.

  6. Self Evolving Modular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Kazuhiro; Kawabata, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Tetsuo

    We propose a novel modular network called the Self-Evolving Modular Network (SEEM). The SEEM has a modular network architecture with a graph structure and these following advantages: (1) new modules are added incrementally to allow the network to adapt in a self-organizing manner, and (2) graph's paths are formed based on the relationships between the models represented by modules. The SEEM is expected to be applicable to evolving functions of an autonomous robot in a self-organizing manner through interaction with the robot's environment and categorizing large-scale information. This paper presents the architecture and an algorithm for the SEEM. Moreover, performance characteristic and effectiveness of the network are shown by simulations using cubic functions and a set of 3D-objects.

  7. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  8. Oxygen dynamics in photosynthetic membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Kihara, Shigeharu

    2008-03-01

    Production of oxygen by oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is expected to raise oxygen concentration within their photosynthetic membranes above normal aerobic values. These raised levels of oxygen may affect function of many proteins within photosynthetic cells. However, experiments on proteins in vitro are usually performed in aerobic (or anaerobic) conditions since the oxygen content of a membrane is not known. Using theory of diffusion and measured oxygen production rates we estimated the excess levels of oxygen in functioning photosynthetic cells. We show that for an individual photosynthetic cell suspended in water oxygen level is essentially the same as that for a non-photosynthetic sell. These data suggest that oxygen protection mechanisms may have evolved after the development of oxygenic photosynthesis in primitive bacteria and was driven by the overall rise of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. Substantially higher levels of oxygen are estimated to occur in closely packed colonies of photosynthetic bacteria and in green leafs.

  9. Submillimeter observations of evolved stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sopka, R.J.; Hildebrand, R.; Jaffe, D.T.; Gatley, I.; Roellig, T.; Werner, M.; Jura, M.; Zuckerman, B.

    1985-07-01

    Broad-band submillimeter observations of the thermal emission from evolved stars have been obtained with the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. These observations, at an effective wavelength of 400 ..mu..m, provide the most direct method for estimating the mass loss rate in dust from these stars and also help to define the long-wavelength thermal spectrum of the dust envelopes. The mass loss rates in dust that we derive range from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/ M/sub sun/ yr/sup -1/ and are compared with mass loss rates derived from molecular line observations to estimate gas-to-dust ratios in outflowing envelopes. These values are found to be generally compatible with the interstellar gas-to-dust ratio of approx.100 if submillimeter emissivities appropriate to amorphous grain structures are assumed. Our analysis of the spectrum of IRC+10216 confirms previous suggestions that the grain emissivity varies as lambda/sup -1.2/ rather than as lambda/sup -2/ for 10oxygen-rich objects indicates that our submillimeter fluxes for IRC+10011 and NML Cyg are greater than those predicted by previous modeling. This, we argue, is the result of a slower decline in grain emissivity with wavelength than is seen in published silicate grain models. We are not able to distinguish a systematic difference in the dust masses of carbon-rich and oxygen-rich envelopes. We find the largest mass loss rates in dust in the bipolar objects OH 231.8+4.2, CRL 2688, and CRL 618 and in NGC 7027 and VY CMa.

  10. Cobalt based layered perovskites as cathode material for intermediate temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosato, Renato; Cordaro, Giulio; Stucchi, Davide; Cristiani, Cinzia; Dotelli, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, the cathode is the most studied component in Intermediate Temperature-Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (IT-SOFCs). Decreasing SOFCs operating temperature implies slow oxygen reduction kinetics and large polarization losses. Double perovskites with general formula REBaCo2O5+δ are promising mixed ionic-electronic conductors, offering a remarkable enhancement of the oxygen diffusivity and surface exchange respect to disordered perovskites. In this review, more than 250 compositions investigated in the literature were analyzed. The evaluation was performed in terms of electrical conductivity, Area Specific Resistance (ASR), chemical compatibility with electrolytes and Thermal Expansion Coefficient (TEC). The most promising materials have been identified as those bearing the mid-sized rare earths (Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd). Doping strategies have been analyzed: Sr doping on A site promotes higher electrical conductivity, but worsen ASR and TECs; B-site doping (Fe, Ni, Mn) helps lowering TECs, but is detrimental for the electrochemical properties. A promising boost of the electrochemical activity is obtained by simply introducing a slight Ba under-stoichiometry. Still, the high sensitivity of the electrochemical properties against slight changes in the stoichiometry hamper a conclusive comparison of all the investigated compounds. Opportunities for an improvement of double perovskite cathodes performance is tentatively foreseen in combining together the diverse effective doping strategies.

  11. Submillimeter observations of evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopka, R. J.; Hildebrand, R.; Jaffe, D. T.; Gatley, I.; Roellig, T.

    1985-01-01

    Broadband submillimeter observations of thermal emission from several evolved stars have been obtained using the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The observations were carried out at an effective wavelength of 400 microns in order to estimate the mass loss rates in dust from the stars. Direct estimates of mass loss rates are in the range 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr. Analysis of the spectrum of IRC + 10216 confirmed previous estimates of dust grain emissivity in the range 10-1000 microns. The infrared properties of IRC + 10216 are found to be similar to the carbon rich object CRL 3068. No systematic difference was found between the dust masses of carbon rich and oxygen rich envelopes. The largest mass loss rates in dust were obtained for the bipolar objects OH 231.8 + 4.2 CRL 2688, CRL 618, and NGC 7027. It is suggested that the ratios of gas to dust, and the slopes of the far infrared to submillimeter wavelength continua of these stars objects are probably representative of amorphous rather than crystalline grains.

  12. [(H2O)(terpy)Mn(μ-O)2Mn(terpy)(OH2)](NO3)3 (terpy = 2,2′:6,2″-terpyridine) and its relevance to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II examined through pH dependent cyclic voltametry

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Clyde W.; Shinopoulos, Katherine E.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs naturally at a tetranuclear manganese center in the photosystem II protein complex. Synthetically mimicking this tetramanganese center, known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), has been an ongoing challenge of bioinorganic chemistry. Most past efforts have centered on water-oxidation catalysis using chemical oxidants. However, solar energy applications have drawn attention to electrochemical methods. In this paper, we examine the electrochemical behavior of the biomimetic water-oxidation catalyst [(H2O)(terpy)Mn(μ-O)2Mn(terpy)(H2O)](NO3)3 [terpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine] (1) in water under a variety of pH and buffered conditions and in the presence of acetate that binds to 1 in place of one of the terminal water ligands. These experiments will show that 1 not only exhibits proton-coupled electron-transfer reactivity analogous to the OEC, but also may be capable of electrochemical oxidation of water to oxygen. PMID:20372724

  13. Fat: an evolving issue

    PubMed Central

    Speakman, John R.; O’Rahilly, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary Work on obesity is evolving, and obesity is a consequence of our evolutionary history. In the space of 50 years, we have become an obese species. The reasons why can be addressed at a number of different levels. These include separating between whether the primary cause lies on the food intake or energy expenditure side of the energy balance equation, and determining how genetic and environmental effects contribute to weight variation between individuals. Opinion on whether increased food intake or decreased energy expenditure drives the obesity epidemic is still divided, but recent evidence favours the idea that food intake, rather than altered expenditure, is most important. There is more of a consensus that genetics explains most (probably around 65%) of weight variation between individuals. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have identified many polymorphisms that are linked to obesity, yet much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. Finding the causes of this unexplained variation will be an impetus of genetic and epigenetic research on obesity over the next decade. Many environmental factors – including gut microbiota, stress and endocrine disruptors – have been linked to the risk of developing obesity. A better understanding of gene-by-environment interactions will also be key to understanding obesity in the years to come. PMID:22915015

  14. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. PMID:24628672

  15. Communicability across evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindrod, Peter; Parsons, Mark C.; Higham, Desmond J.; Estrada, Ernesto

    2011-04-01

    Many natural and technological applications generate time-ordered sequences of networks, defined over a fixed set of nodes; for example, time-stamped information about “who phoned who” or “who came into contact with who” arise naturally in studies of communication and the spread of disease. Concepts and algorithms for static networks do not immediately carry through to this dynamic setting. For example, suppose A and B interact in the morning, and then B and C interact in the afternoon. Information, or disease, may then pass from A to C, but not vice versa. This subtlety is lost if we simply summarize using the daily aggregate network given by the chain A-B-C. However, using a natural definition of a walk on an evolving network, we show that classic centrality measures from the static setting can be extended in a computationally convenient manner. In particular, communicability indices can be computed to summarize the ability of each node to broadcast and receive information. The computations involve basic operations in linear algebra, and the asymmetry caused by time’s arrow is captured naturally through the noncommutativity of matrix-matrix multiplication. Illustrative examples are given for both synthetic and real-world communication data sets. We also discuss the use of the new centrality measures for real-time monitoring and prediction.

  16. Evolving synergetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  17. Evolving synergetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Arranz, Jordi; Du, Jinming; Zhou, Da; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-07-01

    Cooperators forgo their own interests to benefit others. This reduces their fitness and thus cooperators are not likely to spread based on natural selection. Nonetheless, cooperation is widespread on every level of biological organization ranging from bacterial communities to human society. Mathematical models can help to explain under which circumstances cooperation evolves. Evolutionary game theory is a powerful mathematical tool to depict the interactions between cooperators and defectors. Classical models typically involve either pairwise interactions between individuals or a linear superposition of these interactions. For interactions within groups, however, synergetic effects may arise: their outcome is not just the sum of its parts. This is because the payoffs via a single group interaction can be different from the sum of any collection of two-player interactions. Assuming that all interactions start from pairs, how can such synergetic multiplayer games emerge from simpler pairwise interactions? Here, we present a mathematical model that captures the transition from pairwise interactions to synergetic multiplayer ones. We assume that different social groups have different breaking rates. We show that non-uniform breaking rates do foster the emergence of synergy, even though individuals always interact in pairs. Our work sheds new light on the mechanisms underlying such synergetic interactions. PMID:27466437

  18. Stochastically evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Derek Y.; Hughes, Barry D.; Leong, Alex S.; Reed, William J.

    2003-12-01

    We discuss a class of models for the evolution of networks in which new nodes are recruited into the network at random times, and links between existing nodes that are not yet directly connected may also form at random times. The class contains both models that produce “small-world” networks and less tightly linked models. We produce both trees, appropriate in certain biological applications, and networks in which closed loops can appear, which model communication networks and networks of human sexual interactions. One of our models is closely related to random recursive trees, and some exact results known in that context can be exploited. The other models are more subtle and difficult to analyze. Our analysis includes a number of exact results for moments, correlations, and distributions of coordination number and network size. We report simulations and also discuss some mean-field approximations. If the system has evolved for a long time and the state of a random node (which thus has a random age) is observed, power-law distributions for properties of the system arise in some of these models.

  19. Temperature dependence of the electrode potential of a cobalt-based redox couple in ionic liquid electrolytes for thermal energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    He, Jiangjing; Al-Masri, Danah; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Pringle, Jennifer M

    2016-08-15

    Increasing the application of technologies for harvesting waste heat could make a significant contribution to sustainable energy production. Thermoelectrochemical cells are one such emerging technology, where the thermal response of a redox couple in an electrolyte is used to generate a potential difference across a cell when a temperature gradient exists. The unique physical properties of ionic liquids make them ideal for application as electrolytes in these devices. One of the keys to utilizing these media in efficient thermoelectrochemical cells is achieving high Seebeck coefficients, Se: the thermodynamic quantity that determines the magnitude of the voltage achieved per unit temperature difference. Here, we report the Se and cell performance of a cobalt-based redox couple in a range of different ionic liquids, to investigate the influence of the nature of the IL on the thermodynamics and cell performance of the redox system. The results reported include the highest Se to-date for an IL-based electrolyte. The effect of diluting the different ILs with propylene carbonate is also reported, which results in a significant increase in the output powers and current densities of the device. PMID:27200437

  20. Disgust: Evolved Function and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tybur, Joshua M.; Lieberman, Debra; Kurzban, Robert; DeScioli, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Interest in and research on disgust has surged over the past few decades. The field, however, still lacks a coherent theoretical framework for understanding the evolved function or functions of disgust. Here we present such a framework, emphasizing 2 levels of analysis: that of evolved function and that of information processing. Although there is…

  1. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  2. 18O/16O in CO2 evolved from goethite during some unusually rapid solid state α-FeOOH to α-Fe2O3 phase transitions: Test of an exchange model for possible use in oxygen isotope analyses of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapp, Crayton J.

    2015-12-01

    The initial ∼60% of an isothermal vacuum dehydration of goethite can commonly be approximated by first order kinetics. Also, natural goethites contain small amounts of an Fe(CO3)OH component in apparent solid solution. The 18O/16O of CO2 evolved from the Fe(CO3)OH during isothermal vacuum dehydrations is related to the 18O/16O of the goethite by an apparent fractionation factor (αapp) that is, in turn, correlated with a first order rate constant, |m|. A kinetic exchange model predicts that αapp should decrease as |m| increases for a range of |m| that corresponds to relatively slow rates of dehydration. This pattern has been observed in published results. In contrast, for rapid rates of dehydration, αapp is predicted to increase with increasing |m|. Isothermal vacuum dehydrations of two natural goethites had unusually large values of |m| and provided serendipitous tests of this rapid-rate prediction. For these experiments, the measured values of αapp were consistent with patterns of variation predicted by the model. This allowed an estimate of the activation energy (E2) of a model parameter, K2, which is the rate constant for oxygen isotope exchange between CO2 and H2O during the solid-state goethite to hematite phase transition. The estimated value of E2 is only ∼9 kJ/mol. Heterogeneous catalysis tends to decrease the activation energies of gas reactions. Consequently, the inferred value of E2 suggests that goethite and/or hematite catalyze oxygen isotope exchange between CO2 and H2O during the solid-state phase change. Yield, δ13C, and δ18O values are routinely measured for increments of CO2 evolved from the Fe(CO3)OH component during isothermal vacuum dehydration of goethite. Model-predicted values of αapp can be combined with plateau δ18O values of the evolved CO2 to estimate the δ18O of the goethite with a less than optimal, but potentially useful, precision of about ±0.8‰. Therefore, a single analytical procedure (incremental dehydration

  3. Natural Selection Promotes Antigenic Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Christopher J.; Ros, Vera I. D.; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed ‘cassettes’ that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections

  4. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  5. Homonuclear Mixed-Valent Cobalt Imidazolate Framework for Oxygen-Evolution Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Flügel, Erik A; Lau, Vincent W-H; Schlomberg, Hendrik; Glaum, Robert; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2016-03-01

    Herein, the synthesis and characterization of the first mixed-valent, purely cobalt-based zeolitic imidazolate framework, Co(II)3Co(III)2(C3H3N2)12 is presented. The material adopts the cubic garnet-type structure and combines high thermal stability of up to 350 °C with excellent chemical stability. Electrochemical characterization showed that the cobalt centres are redox active and efficiently support oxygen evolution, thus rendering this framework a potential candidate for single-site heterogeneous catalysis based on earth-abundant elements. PMID:26676066

  6. Robustness to Faults Promotes Evolvability: Insights from Evolving Digital Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Nolfi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the need to cope with operational faults enables evolving circuits to find more fit solutions. The analysis of the results obtained in different experimental conditions indicates that, in absence of faults, evolution tends to select circuits that are small and have low phenotypic variability and evolvability. The need to face operation faults, instead, drives evolution toward the selection of larger circuits that are truly robust with respect to genetic variations and that have a greater level of phenotypic variability and evolvability. Overall our results indicate that the need to cope with operation faults leads to the selection of circuits that have a greater probability to generate better circuits as a result of genetic variation with respect to a control condition in which circuits are not subjected to faults. PMID:27409589

  7. Observations of the Dust Around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. J.; Heinrichsen, I.; Richards, P. J.

    ISOPHOT has been used to obtain low resolution spectra from 2.5µm to 5µm and 5.8µm to 11.6µm and multi-aperture photometry at 60µm of several evolved stars; oxygen-rich and carbon-rich (including the peculiar carbon-rich stars R CrB and RY Sgr). R CrB was observed early in the ISO mission, 3 weeks after it had been at minimum light. Another spectrum was obtained several months later. The second spectrum shows that the broad plateau (from around 6µm to 8µm) is still present but the flux density has declined from 60Jy to 50Jy. The spectrum for RY Sgr shows the same type of plateau. The multi-aperture data suggest that the dust shells are resolved around R CrB, RY Sgr, Y CVn and RS Lib.

  8. Evolving phenotypic networks in silico.

    PubMed

    François, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Evolved gene networks are constrained by natural selection. Their structures and functions are consequently far from being random, as exemplified by the multiple instances of parallel/convergent evolution. One can thus ask if features of actual gene networks can be recovered from evolutionary first principles. I review a method for in silico evolution of small models of gene networks aiming at performing predefined biological functions. I summarize the current implementation of the algorithm, insisting on the construction of a proper "fitness" function. I illustrate the approach on three examples: biochemical adaptation, ligand discrimination and vertebrate segmentation (somitogenesis). While the structure of the evolved networks is variable, dynamics of our evolved networks are usually constrained and present many similar features to actual gene networks, including properties that were not explicitly selected for. In silico evolution can thus be used to predict biological behaviours without a detailed knowledge of the mapping between genotype and phenotype. PMID:24956562

  9. Slippery Texts and Evolving Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The idea of "slippery texts" provides a useful descriptor for materials that mutate and evolve across different media. Eight adult gamers, encountering the slippery text "American McGee's Alice," demonstrate a variety of ways in which players attempt to manage their attention as they encounter a new text with many resonances. The range of their…

  10. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas.

    PubMed

    Rochat, P; Johannesen, H H; Poulsgård, L; Bøgeskov, L

    2002-12-01

    Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas, where the second haematoma evolves after surgical removal of the first haematoma, are rarely reported. We report two cases of this entity. One patient was involved in a road traffic accident and the other was suffering from a head injury after an assault. CT scans showed that both patients had an unilateral epidural haematoma with a thin presumably epidural haemorrhage on the opposite side. Both patients were operated for their epidural haematomas, but did not improve after surgical treatment, and postoperative CT scans revealed evolving of an epidural haematoma on the opposite side. After evacuation of the second epidural haematoma both patients recovered quickly. Sequentially evolved bilateral epidural haematomas are rare, but must be considered in the postoperative intensive care treatment in patients with epidural haematomas. Both cases emphasize the need for intensive care monitoring after an operation for an epidural haematoma and the need for CT scans if the patient does not improve quickly after removal of the haematoma. This is especially important if a small contralateral haematoma is seen on the initial CT scan. PMID:12445923

  11. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  12. Composition of the Silicates around Evolved Stars and Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyk, K.; Dartois, E.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Jones, A.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Jourdain de Muizon, M.; Heras, A. M.

    2000-11-01

    We present a study of the composition of the silicates around five evolved stars and three high-mass protostars. Around evolved stars, the oxygen-rich dust is composed of amorphous olivine, crystalline silicates (enstatite, forsterite, diopside) and some oxides (FeO, Al2O3). Using a radiative transfer code we have modelled the SED of two OH/IR stars. We estimate that the amount of crystalline silicates in these objects is of the order of 20%. Around protostars, the dust is composed of porous pyroxene and/or aluminosilicate grains containing iron oxide. We calculate that at most 1-2% of the dust mass is crystalline. The newly formed dust around evolved stars has a different structure and composition from the old dust found around protostars. This implies that some mechanism, which remains to be found, occurs during the grain lifetime and alters the chemical composition and structure of the grains.

  13. Removal of Ca2+ from the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II Has Minimal Effect on the Mn4O5 Core Structure: A Polarized Mn X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmiller, Thomas; Shelby, Megan L.; Long, Xi; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko

    2015-05-19

    We studied Ca2+ -depleted and Ca2+ -reconstituted spinach photosystem II using polarized X-ray absorption spectroscopy of oriented PS II preparations to investigate the structural and functional role of the Ca2+ ion in the Mn4O5Ca cluster of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Samples were prepared by low pH/citrate treatment as one-dimensionally ordered membrane layers and poised in the Ca2+ -depleted S1 (S1') and S2 (S2') states, the S2'YZ• state, at which point the catalytic cycle of water oxidation is inhibited, and the Ca2+ -reconstituted S1 state. Polarized Mn K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectra exhibit pronounced dichroism. Polarized EXAFS data of all states of Ca2+ -depleted PS II investigated show only minor changes in distances and orientations of the Mn-Mn vectors compared to the Ca2+ -containing OEC, which may be attributed to some loss of rigidity of the core structure. Thus, removal of the Ca2+ ion does not lead to fundamental distortion or rearrangement of the tetranuclear Mn cluster, which indicates that the Ca2+ ion in the OEC is not critical for structural maintenance of the cluster, at least in the S1 and S2 states, but fulfills a crucial catalytic function in the mechanism of the water oxidation reaction. On the basis of this structural information, reasons for the inhibitory effect of Ca2+ removal are discussed, attributing to the Ca2+ ion a fundamental role in organizing the surrounding (substrate) water framework and in proton-coupled electron transfer to YZ• (D1-Tyr161).

  14. Diversity sustains an evolving network

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Ravi; Soni, Vikram; Jain, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    We study an evolutionary model of a complex system that evolves under catalytic dynamics and Darwinian selection and exhibits spontaneous growth, stasis and then a collapse of its structure. We find that the typical lifetime of the system increases sharply with the diversity of its components or species. We also find that the prime reason for crashes is a naturally occurring internal fragility of the system. This fragility is captured in the network organizational character and is related to a reduced multiplicity of pathways or feedback loops between its components. These results apply to several generalizations of the model as well. This work suggests new parameters for understanding the robustness of evolving molecular networks, ecosystems, societies and markets. PMID:19033136

  15. Evolvable Hardware for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason; Globus, Al; Hornby, Gregory; Larchev, Gregory; Kraus, William

    2004-01-01

    This article surveys the research of the Evolvable Systems Group at NASA Ames Research Center. Over the past few years, our group has developed the ability to use evolutionary algorithms in a variety of NASA applications ranging from spacecraft antenna design, fault tolerance for programmable logic chips, atomic force field parameter fitting, analog circuit design, and earth observing satellite scheduling. In some of these applications, evolutionary algorithms match or improve on human performance.

  16. Oxygen in demand: How oxygen has shaped vertebrate physiology.

    PubMed

    Dzal, Yvonne A; Jenkin, Sarah E M; Lague, Sabine L; Reichert, Michelle N; York, Julia M; Pamenter, Matthew E

    2015-08-01

    In response to varying environmental and physiological challenges, vertebrates have evolved complex and often overlapping systems. These systems detect changes in environmental oxygen availability and respond by increasing oxygen supply to the tissues and/or by decreasing oxygen demand at the cellular level. This suite of responses is termed the oxygen transport cascade and is comprised of several components. These components include 1) chemosensory detectors that sense changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH in the blood, and initiate changes in 2) ventilation and 3) cardiac work, thereby altering the rate of oxygen delivery to, and carbon dioxide clearance from, the tissues. In addition, changes in 4) cellular and systemic metabolism alters tissue-level metabolic demand. Thus the need for oxygen can be managed locally when increasing oxygen supply is not sufficient or possible. Together, these mechanisms provide a spectrum of responses that facilitate the maintenance of systemic oxygen homeostasis in the face of environmental hypoxia or physiological oxygen depletion (i.e. due to exercise or disease). Bill Milsom has dedicated his career to the study of these responses across phylogenies, repeatedly demonstrating the power of applying the comparative approach to physiological questions. The focus of this review is to discuss the anatomy, signalling pathways, and mechanics of each step of the oxygen transport cascade from the perspective of a Milsomite. That is, by taking into account the developmental, physiological, and evolutionary components of questions related to oxygen transport. We also highlight examples of some of the remarkable species that have captured Bill's attention through their unique adaptations in multiple components of the oxygen transport cascade, which allow them to achieve astounding physiological feats. Bill's research examining the oxygen transport cascade has provided important insight and leadership to the study of the diverse suite

  17. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  18. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  19. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 85-95% pure oxygen. The concentrator runs on electricity or a battery. A concentrator for home usually ... systems deliver 100% oxygen, and do not require electricity. A small canister can be filled from the ...

  20. Improved chlorate candle provides concentrated oxygen source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, R. D.; Myers, D. A.; Tanzar, G. F.

    1967-01-01

    Improved chlorate candle is used as a solid, portable source of oxygen in emergency situations. It contains sodium chlorate, iron, barium peroxide, and glass mixed in powdered form. The oxygen evolves from the decomposition of the sodium chlorate when an ignition pellet is electrically initiated.

  1. Synchronization in an evolving network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Bagarti, Trilochan

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study the dynamics of Kuramoto oscillators on a stochastically evolving network whose evolution is governed by the phases of the individual oscillators and degree distribution. Synchronization is achieved after a threshold connection density is reached. This cumulative effect of topology and dynamics has many real-world implications, where synchronization in a system emerges as a collective property of its components in a self-organizing manner. The synchronous state remains stable as long as the connection density remains above the threshold value, with additional links providing resilience against network fluctuations.

  2. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  3. Evolving Robust Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Noman, Nasimul; Monjo, Taku; Moscato, Pablo; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Design and implementation of robust network modules is essential for construction of complex biological systems through hierarchical assembly of ‘parts’ and ‘devices’. The robustness of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is ascribed chiefly to the underlying topology. The automatic designing capability of GRN topology that can exhibit robust behavior can dramatically change the current practice in synthetic biology. A recent study shows that Darwinian evolution can gradually develop higher topological robustness. Subsequently, this work presents an evolutionary algorithm that simulates natural evolution in silico, for identifying network topologies that are robust to perturbations. We present a Monte Carlo based method for quantifying topological robustness and designed a fitness approximation approach for efficient calculation of topological robustness which is computationally very intensive. The proposed framework was verified using two classic GRN behaviors: oscillation and bistability, although the framework is generalized for evolving other types of responses. The algorithm identified robust GRN architectures which were verified using different analysis and comparison. Analysis of the results also shed light on the relationship among robustness, cooperativity and complexity. This study also shows that nature has already evolved very robust architectures for its crucial systems; hence simulation of this natural process can be very valuable for designing robust biological systems. PMID:25616055

  4. The Evolved Pulsating CEMP Star HD 112869

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Začs, Laimons; Sperauskas, Julius; Grankina, Aija; Deveikis, Viktoras; Kaminskyi, Bogdan; Pavlenko, Yakiv; Musaev, Faig A.

    2015-04-01

    Radial velocity measurements, BVRC photometry, and high-resolution spectroscopy in the wavelength region from blue to near-infrared are employed in order to clarify the evolutionary status of the carbon-enhanced metal-poor star HD 112869 with a unique ratio of carbon isotopes in the atmosphere. An LTE abundance analysis was carried out using the method of spectral synthesis and new self-consistent 1D atmospheric models. The radial velocity monitoring confirmed semiregular variations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about 10 km {{s}-1} and a dominating period of about 115 days. The light, color, and radial velocity variations are typical of the evolved pulsating stars. The atmosphere of HD 112869 appears to be less metal-poor than reported before, [Fe/H] = -2.3 ± 0.2 dex. Carbon-to-oxygen and carbon isotope ratios are found to be extremely high, C/O ≃ 12.6 and12C/13C ≳ 1500, respectively. The s-process elements yttrium and barium are not enhanced, but neodymium appears to be overabundant. The magnesium abundance seems to be lower than the average found for CEMP stars, [Mg/Fe] < +0.4 dex. HD 112869 could be a single low-mass halo star in the stage of asymptotic giant branch evolution.

  5. Primordial evolvability: Impasses and challenges.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Vera; Fernando, Chrisantha; Szilágyi, András; Zachár, István; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    While it is generally agreed that some kind of replicating non-living compounds were the precursors of life, there is much debate over their possible chemical nature. Metabolism-first approaches propose that mutually catalytic sets of simple organic molecules could be capable of self-replication and rudimentary chemical evolution. In particular, the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, depicting assemblies of amphiphilic molecules, has received considerable interest. The system propagates compositional information across generations and is suggested to be a target of natural selection. However, evolutionary simulations indicate that the system lacks selectability (i.e. selection has negligible effect on the equilibrium concentrations). We elaborate on the lessons learnt from the example of the GARD model and, more widely, on the issue of evolvability, and discuss the implications for similar metabolism-first scenarios. We found that simple incorporation-type chemistry based on non-covalent bonds, as assumed in GARD, is unlikely to result in alternative autocatalytic cycles when catalytic interactions are randomly distributed. An even more serious problem stems from the lognormal distribution of catalytic factors, causing inherent kinetic instability of such loops, due to the dominance of efficiently catalyzed components that fail to return catalytic aid. Accordingly, the dynamics of the GARD model is dominated by strongly catalytic, but not auto-catalytic, molecules. Without effective autocatalysis, stable hereditary propagation is not possible. Many repetitions and different scaling of the model come to no rescue. Despite all attempts to show the contrary, the GARD model is not evolvable, in contrast to reflexively autocatalytic networks, complemented by rare uncatalyzed reactions and compartmentation. The latter networks, resting on the creation and breakage of chemical bonds, can generate novel ('mutant') autocatalytic loops from a given set of

  6. Isotopic Analysis and Evolved Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swindle, Timothy D.; Boynton, William V.; Chutjian, Ara; Hoffman, John H.; Jordan, Jim L.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; McEntire, Richard W.; Nyquist, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Precise measurements of the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of planetary surface material and gases, and observed variations in these compositions, can contribute significantly to our knowledge of the source(s), ages, and evolution of solar system materials. The analyses discussed in this paper are mostly made by mass spectrometers or some other type of mass analyzer, and address three broad areas of interest: (1) atmospheric composition - isotopic, elemental, and molecular, (2) gases evolved from solids, and (3) solids. Current isotopic data on nine elements, mostly from in situ analysis, but also from meteorites and telescopic observations are summarized. Potential instruments for isotopic analysis of lunar, Martian, Venusian, Mercury, and Pluto surfaces, along with asteroid, cometary and icy satellites, surfaces are discussed.

  7. Drastic events make evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.; Lambiotte, R.

    2007-05-01

    Co-authorship networks of neighbouring scientific disciplines, i.e. granular (G) media and networks (N) are studied in order to observe drastic structural changes in evolving networks. The data is taken from arXives. The system is described as coupled networks. By considering the 1995-2005 time interval and scanning the author-article network evolution with a mobile time window, we focus on the properties of the links, as well as on the time evolution of the nodes. They can be in three states, N, G or multi-disciplinary (M). This leads to drastic jumps in a so-called order parameter, i.e. the link proportion of a given type, forming the main island, that reminds of features appearing at percolation and during metastable (aggregation-desaggregation) processes. The data analysis also focuses on the way different kinds (N, G or M) of authors collaborate, and on the kind of the resulting collaboration.

  8. Speech processing: An evolving technology

    SciTech Connect

    Crochiere, R.E.; Flanagan, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    As we enter the information age, speech processing is emerging as an important technology for making machines easier and more convenient for humans to use. It is both an old and a new technology - dating back to the invention of the telephone and forward, at least in aspirations, to the capabilities of HAL in 2001. Explosive advances in microelectronics now make it possible to implement economical real-time hardware for sophisticated speech processing - processing that formerly could be demonstrated only in simulations on main-frame computers. As a result, fundamentally new product concepts - as well as new features and functions in existing products - are becoming possible and are being explored in the marketplace. As the introductory piece to this issue, the authors draw a brief perspective on the evolving field of speech processing and assess the technology in the the three constituent sectors: speech coding, synthesis, and recognition.

  9. Planets in Evolved Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Hagai B.

    2011-03-01

    Exo-planets are typically thought to form in protoplanetary disks left over from protostellar disk of their newly formed host star. However, additional planetary formation and evolution routes may exist in old evolved binary systems. Here we discuss the implications of binary stellar evolution on planetary systems in such environments. In these binary systems stellar evolution could lead to the formation of symbiotic stars, where mass is lost from one star and could be transferred to its binary companion, and may form an accretion disk around it. This raises the possibility that such a disk could provide the necessary environment for the formation of a new, second generation of planets in both circumstellar or circumbinary configurations. Pre-existing first generation planets surviving the post-MS evolution of such systems would be dynamically effected by the mass loss in the systems and may also interact with the newly formed disk. Such planets and/or planetesimals may also serve as seeds for the formation of the second generation planets, and/or interact with them, possibly forming atypical planetary systems. Second generation planetary systems should be typically found in white dwarf binary systems, and may show various observational signatures. Most notably, second generation planets could form in environment which are inaccessible, or less favorable, for first generation planets. The orbital phase space available for the second generation planets could be forbidden (in terms of the system stability) to first generation planets in the pre-evolved progenitor binaries. In addition planets could form in metal poor environments such as globular clusters and/or in double compact object binaries. Observations of exo-planets in such forbidden or unfavorable regions could possibly serve to uniquely identify their second generation character. Finally, we point out a few observed candidate second generation planetary systems, including Gl 86, HD 27442 and all of the

  10. A Quantitative Approach to Assessing System Evolvability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A., III

    2004-01-01

    When selecting a system from multiple candidates, the customer seeks the one that best meets his or her needs. Recently the desire for evolvable systems has become more important and engineers are striving to develop systems that accommodate this need. In response to this search for evolvability, we present a historical perspective on evolvability, propose a refined definition of evolvability, and develop a quantitative method for measuring this property. We address this quantitative methodology from both a theoretical and practical perspective. This quantitative model is then applied to the problem of evolving a lunar mission to a Mars mission as a case study.

  11. A photoemission study of the effectiveness of nickel, manganese, and cobalt based corrosion barriers for silicon photo-anodes during water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Robert; Bogan, Justin; McCoy, Anthony; Byrne, Conor; Hughes, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is an attractive material for solar water splitting applications due to its abundance and its capacity to absorb a large fraction of incident solar radiation. However, it has not received as much attention as other materials due to its tendency to oxidize very quickly in aqueous environments, particularly when it is employed as the anode where it drives the oxygen evolution reaction. In recent years, several works have appeared in the literature examining the suitability of thin transition metal oxide films grown on top of the silicon to act as a corrosion barrier. The film should be transparent to solar radiation, allow hole transport from the silicon surface to the electrolyte, and stop the diffusion of oxygen from the electrolyte back to the silicon. In this work, we compare Mn-oxide, Co-oxide, and Ni-oxide thin films grown using physical vapor deposition in order to evaluate which material offers the best combination of photocurrent and corrosion protection. In addition to the electrochemical data, we also present a detailed before-and-after study of the surface chemistry of the films using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This approach allows for a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms by which the corrosion barriers protect the underlying silicon, and how they degrade during the water oxidation reaction.

  12. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  13. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch out for splattering grease. It can catch fire. Keep children with oxygen away from the stove top and oven. Cooking ... under the bed. Keep liquids that may catch fire away from your oxygen. This includes cleaning products that contain oil, grease, ...

  14. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium Chemistry in Evolved Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    2015-11-01

    It has been found that sub-Neptune-sized planets, although not existing in our Solar System, are ubiquitous in our interstellar neighborhood. This revelation is profound because, due to their special sizes and proximity to their host stars, Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets may have highly evolved atmospheres. I will discuss helium-dominated atmospheres as one of the outcomes of extensive atmospheric evolution on warm Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets. Due to depleted hydrogen abundance, the dominant carbon and oxygen species may not be methane or water on these evolved planets. Equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry models are used to compute the molecular compositions of the atmospheres and their spectral features. Applications to GJ 436 b and other Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets will be discussed. As the observations to obtain the spectra of these planets continue to flourish, we will have the opportunity to study unconventional atmospheric chemical processes and test atmosphere evolution theories

  15. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium Chemistry in Evolved Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    2015-12-01

    It has been found that sub-Neptune-sized planets, although not existing in our Solar System, are ubiquitous in our interstellar neighborhood. This revelation is profound because, due to their special sizes and proximity to their host stars, Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets may have highly evolved atmospheres. I will discuss helium-dominated atmospheres as one of the outcomes of extensive atmospheric evolution on warm Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets. Due to depleted hydrogen abundance, the dominant carbon and oxygen species may not be methane or water on these evolved planets. Equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry models are used to compute the molecular compositions of the atmospheres and their spectral features. Applications to GJ 436 b and other Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets will be discussed. As the observations to obtain the spectra of these planets continue to flourish, we will have the opportunity to study unconventional atmospheric chemical processes and test atmosphere evolution theories

  16. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:24806920

  17. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  18. Circumstellar Crystalline Silicates: Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartar, Josh; Speck, A. K.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most exciting developments in astronomy in the last 15 years was the discovery of crystalline silicate stardust by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board of ISO; discovery of the crystalline grains was indeed one of the biggest surprises of the ISO mission. Initially discovered around AGB stars (evolved stars in the range of 0.8 > M/M¤>8) at far-infrared (IR) wavelengths, crystalline silicates have since been seen in many astrophysical environments including young stellar objects (T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be), comets and Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies. Low and intermediate mass stars (LIMS) comprise 95% of the contributors to the ISM, so study of the formation of crystalline silicates is critical to our understanding of the ISM, which is thought to be primarily amorphous (one would expect an almost exact match between the composition of AGB dust shells and the dust in the ISM). Whether the crystalline dust is merely undetectable or amorphized remains a mystery. The FORCAST instrument on SOFIA as well as the PACS instrument on Herschel will provide exciting observing opportunities for the further study of crystalline silicates.

  19. How do drumlin patterns evolve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Jeremy; Clark, Chris; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The flow of a geomorphic agent over a sediment bed creates patterns in the substrate composed of bedforms. Ice is no exception to this, organising soft sedimentary substrates into subglacial bedforms. As we are yet to fully observe their initiation and evolution beneath a contemporary ice mass, little is known about how patterns in subglacial bedforms develop. Here we study 36,222 drumlins, divided into 72 flowsets, left behind by the former British-Irish Ice sheet. These flowsets provide us with 'snapshots' of drumlin pattern development. The probability distribution functions of the size and shape metrics of drumlins within these flowsets were analysed to determine whether behaviour that is common of other patterned phenomena has occurred. Specifically, we ask whether drumlins i) are printed at a specific scale; ii) grow or shrink after they initiate; iii) stabilise at a specific size and shape; and iv) migrate. Our results indicate that drumlins initiate at a minimum size and spacing. After initiation, the log-normal distribution of drumlin size and shape metrics suggests that drumlins grow, or possibly shrink, as they develop. We find no evidence for stabilisation in drumlin length, supporting the idea of a subglacial bedform continuum. Drumlin migration is difficult to determine from the palaeo-record. However, there are some indications that a mixture of static and mobile drumlins occurs, which could potentially lead to collisions, cannibalisation and coarsening. Further images of modern drumlin fields evolving beneath ice are required to capture stages of drumlin pattern evolution.

  20. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  1. Oxygen therapy and intraocular oxygenation.

    PubMed Central

    Jampol, L M

    1987-01-01

    When delivered to the corneal surface of rabbits or monkeys, 100% oxygen can significantly increase the pO2 in the aqueous humor. Under hyperbaric conditions (two atmospheres), an observed rise in the aqueous pO2 in rabbits breathing room air can be increased further by exposing the rabbit cornea to 100% oxygen. The high oxygen levels under hyperbaric conditions are mediated by intravascular and transcorneal delivery of oxygen. The increase in the pO2 levels in the aqueous can prevent sickling of intracameral human erythrocytes containing sickle hemoglobin. Thus, oxygen therapy transcorneally or systemically could potentially be used to treat a sickle cell hyphema. The exposure of rabbit eyes to 100% oxygen at the corneal surface is followed by autoregulation (constriction) of the iris vasculature. We could demonstrate no constriction in the eyes of two normal human volunteers or of four patients with chronic stable rubeosis iridis. Preretinal vitreous pO2 levels can be significantly raised by exposing monkeys to hyperbaric 100% oxygen. This procedure may be of value in treating acute, reversible ischemic inner retinal diseases. Transcorneal or vascular delivery of oxygen to the eye under normobaric or hyperbaric conditions may be effective in treating ischemic diseases of the anterior segment, such as anterior segment necrosis or rubeosis iridis, or ischemic inner retinal diseases. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 5 C FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 6 PMID:3447339

  2. Voyages Through Time: Everything Evolves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tarter, J. C.; DeVore, E. K.; O'Sullivan, K. A.; Taylor, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    Evolutionary change is a powerful framework for studying our world and our place therein. It is a recurring theme in every realm of science: over time, the universe, the planet Earth, life, and human technologies all change, albeit on vastly different scales. Evolution offers scientific explanations for the age-old question, "Where did we come from?" In addition, historical perspectives of science show how our understanding has evolved over time. The complexities of all of these systems will never reveal a "finished" story. But it is a story of epic size, capable of inspiring awe and of expanding our sense of time and place, and eminently worthy of investigating. This story is the basis of Voyages Through Time. Voyages Through Time (VTT), provides teachers with not only background science content and pedagogy, but also with materials and resources for the teaching of evolution. The six modules, Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution, and Evolution of Technology, emphasize student inquiry, and promote the nature of science, as recommended in the NSES and BSL. The modules are unified by the overarching theme of evolution and the meta questions: "What is changing?" "What is the rate of change?" and "What is the mechanism of change?" Determination of student outcomes for the project required effective collaboration of scientists, teachers, students and media specialists. The broadest curricula students outcomes are 1) an enjoyment of science, 2) an understanding of the nature of science, especially the understanding of evidence and re-evaluation, and 3) key science content. The curriculum is being developed by the SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, California Academy of Sciences, and San Francisco State University, and is funded by the NSF (IMD 9730693), with support form Hewlett-Packard Company, The Foundation for Microbiology, Combined Federated Charities, NASA Astrobiology Institute, and NASA Fundamental

  3. A Review in Mixed Chemistry of Low Mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.

    2015-12-01

    During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. These phenomena is seen in both Galactic Disk and Bulge planetary nebulae. For the Galactic Disk objects the mixed chemistry phenomenon is best explained through a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch that changed the surface chemistry of the star. On the contrary, we conclude that the mixed chemistry phenomenon occurring in the Galactic Bulge planetary nebulae is best explained through hydrocarbon chemistry in an ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated, dense torus.

  4. Pilot Plant Makes Oxygen Difluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F.; Lawton, Emil A.

    1989-01-01

    Pilot plant makes oxygen difluoride highly-energetic, space-storable oxidizer not made commercially. Designed to handle reactants, product, and byproduct, most of which highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic. Oxygen difluoride evolves continuously from reactor containing potassium hydroxide in water at 10 degree C. Collection tanks alternated; one filled while other drained to storage cylinder. Excess OF2 and F2 dissipated in combustion of charcoal in burn barrel. Toxic byproduct, potassium fluoride, reacted with calcium hydroxide to form nontoxic calcium fluoride and to regenerate potassium hydroxide. Equipment processes toxic, difficult-to-make substance efficiently and safely.

  5. Evolving Human Alteration of the Carbon Cycle: the Watershed Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S.; Delaney Newcomb, K.; Newcomer Johnson, T.; Pennino, M. J.; Smith, R. M.; Beaulieu, J. J.; Belt, K.; Grese, M.; Blomquist, J.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Likens, G.; Mayer, P. M.; Murthy, S.; Utz, R.; Yepsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Watersheds experiencing land development are constantly evolving, and their biogeochemical signatures are expected to evolve across both space and time in drainage waters. We investigate how land development influences spatial and temporal evolution of the carbon cycle from small streams to major rivers in the Eastern U.S. Along the watershed continuum, we show that there is spatial evolution in: (1) the amount, chemical form, and bioavailability of carbon; (2) carbon retention/release at the reach scale; and (3) ecosystem metabolism of carbon from headwaters to coastal waters. Over shorter time scales, the interaction between land use and climate variability alters magnitude and frequency of carbon "pulses" in watersheds. Amounts and forms of carbon pulses in agricultural and urban watersheds respond similarly to climate variability due to headwater alteration and loss of ecosystem services to buffer runoff and temperature changes. Over longer time scales, land use change has altered organic carbon concentrations in tidal waters of Chesapeake Bay, and there have been increased bicarbonate alkalinity concentrations in rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. due to human activities. In summary, our analyses indicates that the form and reactivity of carbon have evolved over space and time along the watershed continuum with major implications for downstream ecosystem metabolism, biological oxygen demand, carbon dioxide production, and river alkalinization.

  6. The Problem of Evolving a Genetic Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woese, Carl R.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes models for the evolution of the genetic code and translation mechanisms. Suggests that the translation process is so complex and precise that it must have evolved in many stages, and that the evolution of the code was influenced by the constraints imposed by the evolving translation mechanism. (EB)

  7. What Technology? Reflections on Evolving Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Each year, the members of the EDUCAUSE Evolving Technologies Committee identify and research the evolving technologies that are having--or are predicted to have--the most direct impact on higher education institutions. The committee members choose the relevant topics, write white papers, and present their findings at the EDUCAUSE annual…

  8. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of

  9. The origin and evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Hartman, H.

    1998-01-01

    The evolutionary developments that led to the ability of photosynthetic organisms to oxidize water to molecular oxygen are discussed. Two major changes from a more primitive non-oxygen-evolving reaction center are required: a charge-accumulating system and a reaction center pigment with a greater oxidizing potential. Intermediate stages are proposed in which hydrogen peroxide was oxidized by the reaction center, and an intermediate pigment, similar to chlorophyll d, was present.

  10. Systems approaches in understanding evolution and evolvability.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sumeet

    2013-12-01

    Systems and network-based approaches are becoming increasingly popular in cellular biology. One contribution of such approaches has been to shed some light on the evolutionary origins of core organisational principles in biological systems, such as modularity, robustness, and evolvability. Models of interactions between genes (epistasis) have also provided insight into how sexual reproduction may have evolved. Additionally, recent work on viewing evolution as a form of learning from the environment has indicated certain bounds on the complexity of the genetic circuits that can evolve within feasible quantities of time and resources. Here we review the key studies and results in these areas, and discuss possible connections between them. In particular, we speculate on the link between the two notions of 'evolvability': the evolvability of a system in terms of how agile it is in responding to novel goals or environments, and the evolvability of certain kinds of gene network functionality in terms of its computational complexity. Drawing on some recent work on the complexity of graph-theoretic problems on modular networks, we suggest that modularity as an organising principle may have its raison d'etre in its ability to enhance evolvability, in both its senses. PMID:24120732

  11. Oxygen-Concentrating Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, K.

    1986-01-01

    High-purity oxygen produced from breathing air or from propellantgrade oxygen in oxygen-concentrating cell. Operating economics of concentrator attractive: Energy consumption about 4 Wh per liter of oxygen, slightly lower than conventional electrochemical oxygen extractors.

  12. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... DO NOT use oil-based products, such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Ask your oxygen equipment provider about ... oxygen; Hypoxia - home oxygen; Hospice - home oxygen References American Thoracic Society. Why do I need oxygen therapy? ...

  13. Interactions between planets and evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengbang, Qian; Zhongtao, Han; Fernández Lajús, E.; liying, Zhu; Wenping, Liao; Miloslav, Zejda; Linjia, Li; Voloshina, Irina; Liang, Liu; Jiajia., He

    2016-07-01

    Searching for planetary companions to evolved stars (e.g., white dwarfs (WD) and Cataclysmic Variables (CV)) can provide insight into the interaction between planets and evolved stars as well as on the ultimate fate of planets. We have monitored decades of CVs and their progenitors including some detached WD binaries since 2006 to search for planets orbiting these systems. In the present paper, we will show some observational results of circumbinary planets in orbits around CVs and their progenitors. Some of our findings include planets with the shortest distance to the central evolved binaries and a few multiple planetary systems orbiting binary stars. Finally, by comparing the observational properties of planetary companions to single WDs and WD binaries, the interaction between planets and evolved stars and the ultimate fate of planets are discussed.

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying the evolvability of behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of nervous systems alters the evolvability of behaviour. Complex nervous systems are phylogenetically constrained; nevertheless particular species-specific behaviours have repeatedly evolved, suggesting a predisposition towards those behaviours. Independently evolved behaviours in animals that share a common neural architecture are generally produced by homologous neural structures, homologous neural pathways and even in the case of some invertebrates, homologous identified neurons. Such parallel evolution has been documented in the chromatic sensitivity of visual systems, motor behaviours and complex social behaviours such as pair-bonding. The appearance of homoplasious behaviours produced by homologous neural substrates suggests that there might be features of these nervous systems that favoured the repeated evolution of particular behaviours. Neuromodulation may be one such feature because it allows anatomically defined neural circuitry to be re-purposed. The developmental, genetic and physiological mechanisms that contribute to nervous system complexity may also bias the evolution of behaviour, thereby affecting the evolvability of species-specific behaviour. PMID:21690127

  15. Critical oxygen levels and metabolic suppression in oceanic oxygen minimum zones.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Brad A

    2011-01-15

    The survival of oceanic organisms in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) depends on their total oxygen demand and the capacities for oxygen extraction and transport, anaerobic ATP production and metabolic suppression. Anaerobic metabolism and metabolic suppression are required for daytime forays into the most extreme OMZs. Critical oxygen partial pressures are, within a range, evolved to match the minimum oxygen level to which a species is exposed. This fact demands that low oxygen habitats be defined by the biological response to low oxygen rather than by some arbitrary oxygen concentration. A broad comparative analysis of oxygen tolerance facilitates the identification of two oxygen thresholds that may prove useful for policy makers as OMZs expand due to climate change. Between these thresholds, specific physiological adaptations to low oxygen are required of virtually all species. The lower threshold represents a limit to evolved oxygen extraction capacity. Climate change that pushes oxygen concentrations below the lower threshold (~0.8 kPa) will certainly result in a transition from an ecosystem dominated by a diverse midwater fauna to one dominated by diel migrant biota that must return to surface waters at night. Animal physiology and, in particular, the response of animals to expanding hypoxia, is a critical, but understudied, component of biogeochemical cycles and oceanic ecology. Here, I discuss the definition of hypoxia and critical oxygen levels, review adaptations of animals to OMZs and discuss the capacity for, and prevalence of, metabolic suppression as a response to temporary residence in OMZs and the possible consequences of climate change on OMZ ecology. PMID:21177952

  16. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium Chemistry in Evolved Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renyu

    2015-08-01

    It has been found that sub-Neptune-sized planets, although not existing in our Solar System, are ubiquitous in our interstellar neighborhood. This revelation is profound because, due to their special sizes and proximity to their host stars, Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets may have highly evolved atmospheres. I will discuss helium-dominated atmospheres as one of the outcomes of extensive atmospheric evolution on warm Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets. Due to depleted hydrogen abundance, the dominant carbon and oxygen species may not be methane or water on these evolved planets. Equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry models are used to compute the molecular compositions of the atmospheres and their spectral features. Applications to GJ 436 b, HD 97658 b, and other Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized exoplanets will be discussed. As the observations to obtain the spectra of these planets continue to flourish, we will have the opportunity to study unconventional atmospheric chemical processes and test atmosphere evolution theories.

  17. Iron-cobalt based soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sujit

    FeCo-based alloys with high Tc and low magnetic anisotropy are the most promising soft magnetic materials for high temperature application such as turbine and electric vehicles. Present commercially available Hiperco alloys do not meet very well the high temperature application requirements. To develop new generation of soft magnets, firstly, the relationship among magnetic properties, mechanical properties and microstructure should been studied and clarified. At high temperature, the evolution of microstructure of FeCo is very complicated, including the change of defects, ordering parameter, the amount of precipitates, and the grain size. All of these factors significantly affect the high temperature properties. In our study, a big effort was focused on the separation of these individual effects. We are now able to understand the mechanism of these effects on the magnetic and mechanical properties. Based on this understanding, new magnets have been tentatively developed by using Electrodeposition technique. This involves fiber matrix composites where the magnetic properties are borne by the magnetic matrix and the mechanical properties by the composite fibers.

  18. Monitoring oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Severinghaus, John W

    2011-06-01

    Cyanosis was used for a century after dentists began pulling teeth under 100% N(2)O in 1844 because brief (2 min) severe hypoxia is harmless. Deaths came with curare and potent anesthetic respiratory arrest. Leland Clark's invention of a polarographic blood oxygen tension electrode (1954) was introduced for transcutaneous PO2 monitoring to adjust PEEP and CPAP PO2 to prevent premature infant blindness from excess O2 (1972). Oximetry for warning military aviators was tried after WW II but not used for routine monitoring until Takuo Aoyagi (1973) discovered an equation to measure SaO2 by the ratio of ratios of red and IR light transmitted through tissue as it changed with arterial pulses. Pulse oximetry (1982) depended on simultaneous technology improvements of light emitting red and IR diodes, tiny cheap solid state sensors and micro-chip computers. Continuous monitoring of airway anesthetic concentration and oxygen also became very common after 1980. Death from anesthesia fell 10 fold between 1985 and 2000 as pulse oximetry became universally used, but no proof of a causative relationship to pulse oximetry exists. It is now assumed that all anesthesiologist became much more aware of the dangers of prolonged hypoxia, perhaps by using the pulse oximeters. PMID:21717228

  19. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Mugler, Andrew; Ziv, Etay; Wiggins, Chris H

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  20. Metanetworks of artificially evolved regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danacı, Burçin; Erzan, Ayşe

    2016-04-01

    We study metanetworks arising in genotype and phenotype spaces, in the context of a model population of Boolean graphs evolved under selection for short dynamical attractors. We define the adjacency matrix of a graph as its genotype, which gets mutated in the course of evolution, while its phenotype is its set of dynamical attractors. Metanetworks in the genotype and phenotype spaces are formed, respectively, by genetic proximity and by phenotypic similarity, the latter weighted by the sizes of the basins of attraction of the shared attractors. We find that evolved populations of Boolean graphs form tree-like giant clusters in genotype space, while random populations of Boolean graphs are typically so far removed from each other genetically that they cannot form a metanetwork. In phenotype space, the metanetworks of evolved populations are super robust both under the elimination of weak connections and random removal of nodes.

  1. Evolving networks in the human epileptic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Ansmann, Gerrit; Bialonski, Stephan; Dickten, Henning; Geier, Christian; Porz, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Network theory provides novel concepts that promise an improved characterization of interacting dynamical systems. Within this framework, evolving networks can be considered as being composed of nodes, representing systems, and of time-varying edges, representing interactions between these systems. This approach is highly attractive to further our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological dynamics in human brain networks. Indeed, there is growing evidence that the epileptic process can be regarded as a large-scale network phenomenon. We here review methodologies for inferring networks from empirical time series and for a characterization of these evolving networks. We summarize recent findings derived from studies that investigate human epileptic brain networks evolving on timescales ranging from few seconds to weeks. We point to possible pitfalls and open issues, and discuss future perspectives.

  2. Evolvable, reconfigurable hardware for future space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, A.; Zebulum, R. S.; Keymeulen, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Thakoor, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper overviews Evolvable Hardware (EHW) technology, examining its potential for enhancing survivability and flexibility of future space systems. EHW refers to selfconfiguration of electronic hardware by evolutionary/genetic search mechanisms. Evolvable Hardware can maintain existing functionality in the presence of faults and degradations due to aging, temperature and radiation. It can also configure itself for new functionality when required for mission changes or encountered opportunities. The paper illustrates hardware evolution in silicon using a JPL-designed programmable device reconfigurable at transistor level as the platform and a genetic algorithm running on a DSP as the reconfiguration mechanism. Rapid reconfiguration allows convergence to circuit solutions in the order of seconds. The experiments demonstrate functional recovery from faults as well as from degradation at extreme temperatures indicating the possibility of expanding the operational range of extreme electronics through evolved circuit solutions.

  3. Distribution characteristics of weighted bipartite evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Danping; Dai, Meifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by an evolving model of online bipartite networks, we introduce a model of weighted bipartite evolving networks. In this model, there are two disjoint sets of nodes, called user node set and object node set. Edges only exist between two disjoint sets. Edge weights represent the usage amount between a couple of user node and object node. This model not only clinches the bipartite networks' internal mechanism of network growth, but also takes into account the object strength deterioration over time step. User strength and object strength follow power-law distributions, respectively. The weighted bipartite evolving networks have scare-free property in certain situations. Numerical simulations results agree with the theoretical analyses.

  4. JavaGenes: Evolving Graphs with Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Atsatt, Sean; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd

    2000-01-01

    Genetic algorithms usually use string or tree representations. We have developed a novel crossover operator for a directed and undirected graph representation, and used this operator to evolve molecules and circuits. Unlike strings or trees, a single point in the representation cannot divide every possible graph into two parts, because graphs may contain cycles. Thus, the crossover operator is non-trivial. A steady-state, tournament selection genetic algorithm code (JavaGenes) was written to implement and test the graph crossover operator. All runs were executed by cycle-scavagging on networked workstations using the Condor batch processing system. The JavaGenes code has evolved pharmaceutical drug molecules and simple digital circuits. Results to date suggest that JavaGenes can evolve moderate sized drug molecules and very small circuits in reasonable time. The algorithm has greater difficulty with somewhat larger circuits, suggesting that directed graphs (circuits) are more difficult to evolve than undirected graphs (molecules), although necessary differences in the crossover operator may also explain the results. In principle, JavaGenes should be able to evolve other graph-representable systems, such as transportation networks, metabolic pathways, and computer networks. However, large graphs evolve significantly slower than smaller graphs, presumably because the space-of-all-graphs explodes combinatorially with graph size. Since the representation strongly affects genetic algorithm performance, adding graphs to the evolutionary programmer's bag-of-tricks should be beneficial. Also, since graph evolution operates directly on the phenotype, the genotype-phenotype translation step, common in genetic algorithm work, is eliminated.

  5. Evolved Massive Stars in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drout, M. R.; Massey, P.

    2015-05-01

    In this manuscript we describe a number of recent advances in the study of evolved massive stars in the Local Group, with an emphasis on how representative populations of these stars can be used to test models of massive star evolution. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) we attempt to put these finding in some historical context by discussing how our understanding of the various stages in the lives of massive stars has evolved since Cerro Tololo was first selected as the site for the observatory which would become CTIO.

  6. A Stefan problem on an evolving surface

    PubMed Central

    Alphonse, Amal; Elliott, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a Stefan problem on an evolving hypersurface and study the well posedness of weak solutions given L1 data. To do this, we first develop function spaces and results to handle equations on evolving surfaces in order to give a natural treatment of the problem. Then, we consider the existence of solutions for data; this is done by regularization of the nonlinearity. The regularized problem is solved by a fixed point theorem and then uniform estimates are obtained in order to pass to the limit. By using a duality method, we show continuous dependence, which allows us to extend the results to L1 data. PMID:26261364

  7. Surveying The Digital Landscape: Evolving Technologies 2004. The EDUCAUSE Evolving Technologies Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Each year, the members of the EDUCAUSE Evolving Technologies Committee identify and research the evolving technologies that are having the most direct impact on higher education institutions. The committee members choose the relevant topics, write white papers, and present their findings at the EDUCAUSE annual conference. This year, under the…

  8. Field-evolved resistance to Bt toxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt cotton) has been used commercially in the United States since 1996. An article by Tabashnik et al. 2008, Nature Biotechnology 26:199-202, states that, for the first time, there is field-evolved Bt resistance in bollworm, Helicoverpa zea...

  9. Apollo 16 Evolved Lithology Sodic Ferrogabbro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Evolved lunar igneous lithologies, often referred to as the alkali suite, are a minor but important component of the lunar crust. These evolved samples are incompatible-element rich samples, and are, not surprisingly, most common in the Apollo sites in (or near) the incompatible-element rich region of the Moon known as the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT). The most commonly occurring lithologies are granites (A12, A14, A15, A17), monzogabbro (A14, A15), alkali anorthosites (A12, A14), and KREEP basalts (A15, A17). The Feldspathic Highlands Terrane is not entirely devoid of evolved lithologies, and rare clasts of alkali gabbronorite and sodic ferrogabbro (SFG) have been identified in Apollo 16 station 11 breccias 67915 and 67016. Curiously, nearly all pristine evolved lithologies have been found as small clasts or soil particles, exceptions being KREEP basalts 15382/6 and granitic sample 12013 (which is itself a breccia). Here we reexamine the petrography and geochemistry of two SFG-like particles found in a survey of Apollo 16 2-4 mm particles from the Cayley Plains 62283,7-15 and 62243,10-3 (hereafter 7-15 and 10-3 respectively). We will compare these to previously reported SFG samples, including recent analyses on the type specimen of SFG from lunar breccia 67915.

  10. A Course Evolves-Physical Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of an online physical anthropology course at Palomar College (California) that evolved from online tutorials. Discusses the ability to update materials on the Web more quickly than in traditional textbooks; creating Web pages that are readable by most Web browsers; test security issues; and clarifying ownership of online…

  11. Project Evolve User-Adopter Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Lee M.

    An adult basic education (ABE) program for mentally retarded young adults between the ages of 14 and 26 years, Project Evolve can provide education agencies for educationally handicapped children with detailed information concerning an innovative program. The manual format was developed through interviews with professional educators concerning the…

  12. The Evolving Leadership Path of Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Kluse, Michael; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Gracio, Deborah K.

    2012-01-02

    This is a requested book chapter for an internationally authored book on visual analytics and related fields, coordianted by a UK university and to be published by Springer in 2012. This chapter is an overview of the leadship strategies that PNNL's Jim Thomas and other stakeholders used to establish visual analytics as a field, and how those strategies may evolve in the future.

  13. The Evolving Office of the Registrar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Harold L.

    2011-01-01

    A healthy registrar's office will continue to evolve as it considers student, faculty, and institutional needs; staff talents and expectations; technological opportunities; economic realities; space issues; work environments; and where the strategic plan is taking the institution in support of the mission. Several recognized leaders in the field…

  14. Did Language Evolve Like the Vertebrate Eye?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botha, Rudolf P.

    2002-01-01

    Offers a critical appraisal of the way in which the idea that human language or some of its features evolved like the vertebrate eye by natural selection is articulated in Pinker and Bloom's (1990) selectionist account of language evolution. Argues that this account is less than insightful because it fails to draw some of the conceptual…

  15. Hyper massive black holes in evolved galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cruz, Fernando J.

    2015-09-01

    From the SDSS DR7 we took a sample of 16733 galaxies which do not show all of the emission lines required to classify their activity according to the classical BPT diagram (Baldwin et al. 1981 PASP). Since they do not show these emission lines they are thought to be evolved enough so to host Hyper Massive Black holes. We compared their statistical properties with other galaxies from the SDSS DR7 which do show emission lines and confirmed that their M-sigma relationship correspond to HMBHs (Gutelkin et al. 2009 ApJ) and also that their SFH confirms evolution. We also analyzed them with a new Diagnostic Diagram in the IR (Coziol et al. 2015 AJ) and found that their position in the IR color space (W3W4 vs W2W3) correspond to AGN activity with current low SF, another confirmation of an evolved galaxy. The position of our final sample in the IR diagram is in the same region in which Holm 15A lies, this galaxy is considered to host the most massive BHs in the nearby universe (Lopez-Cruz et al. 2014 ApJL). The morphology of these galaxies (all of them are classified as elliptical) confirms that they are very evolved. We claim that the hyper massive BH lie in galaxies very evolved and with very low SF and without clear AGN activity in the BPT diagram.

  16. Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, William C; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Rogers, David W; Greig, Duncan; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Complex life has arisen through a series of 'major transitions' in which collectives of formerly autonomous individuals evolve into a single, integrated organism. A key step in this process is the origin of higher-level evolvability, but little is known about how higher-level entities originate and gain the capacity to evolve as an individual. Here we report a single mutation that not only creates a new level of biological organization, but also potentiates higher-level evolvability. Disrupting the transcription factor ACE2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents mother-daughter cell separation, generating multicellular 'snowflake' yeast. Snowflake yeast develop through deterministic rules that produce geometrically defined clusters that preclude genetic conflict and display a high broad-sense heritability for multicellular traits; as a result they are preadapted to multicellular adaptation. This work demonstrates that simple microevolutionary changes can have profound macroevolutionary consequences, and suggests that the formation of clonally developing clusters may often be the first step to multicellularity. PMID:25600558

  17. Organizational Innovation: Current Research and Evolving Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Lloyd A.; Boise, William B.

    1974-01-01

    A conceptual framework for organizational innovation can evolve from such ideas as the process of innovation, the climate(s) required, the organizational and societal space affected by an innovation, innovation radicalness, and innovation strategies such as organizational development, functional specialization, and periodicity. (Author/WM)

  18. Leadership for Literacy Coaching: Evolving Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Rosemarye T.; Moxley, Dale E.

    2008-01-01

    Leadership for literacy coaching is evolving in both the skills of the literacy coaches and the skills of those they coach. Issues of role clarification, communication with administration, and hesitancy to provide authentic feedback are consistently identified. Trends associated with literacy coaching indicate that they continue on their…

  19. [Families and psychiatry: models and evolving links].

    PubMed

    Frankhauser, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    The role of the families of persons with severe psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia in particular) in the care of their relatives has recently evolved: once seen as pathogenic to be kept at a distance, the family is now recognised by professionals as a partner in the care process. The links between families and psychiatric institutions remain complex and marked by ambivalence and paradoxes. PMID:27157191

  20. The Mineralogy of Dust Around Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, A. K.

    1998-11-01

    Infrared (IR) observations of evolved red giant stars (AGB stars) have shown that many are surrounded by dust envelopes, which are ejected into the interstellar medium and seed the next generation of stars and planets. By studying these one can understand the origins of interstellar and solar system materials. AGB stars fall into two main categories: oxygen-rich and carbon-rich. The prominent features of the IR spectra of AGB stars are: the 11.3microns feature of C-stars, attributed to silicon carbide (SiC); and the 9.7microns feature of O-rich stars, attributed to silicates. There are also various minor features with less secure identifications. Identifying dust around stars requires the use of laboratory spectra of dust species analogous to those one expects to observe. I have compiled a database of such spectra, and thereby constrained the identifications of circumstellar dust, which I have also tried to ensure are compatible with data from meteoritic presolar grains. Some laboratory spectra need to be modified before they are relevant to the problem in hand, i.e. stardust. The techniques used for such modifications are outlined in the thesis. In order to fully comprehend the problems that can arise from using laboratory spectra, the way in which light interacts with matter must be understood. To this end the optical properties of matter are discussed. While the mineral constituents of the Earth have been reprocessed so extensively that they no longer contain any evidence of their stellar origins, the same is not true of primitive meteorites which contain "presolar" dust grains with isotopic fingerprints identifying their stellar sources. By comparing these presolar grains with nucleosynthesis models, grains expected to form around various stars and observational evidence of dust, we can gain a better picture of the formation mechanisms and sites of the various dust grains. I have investigated the mineralogy of SiC of 32 C-stars and its relationship to

  1. Evolved gas analysis of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Williams, E.L. II; Grosjean, E. ); Novakov, T. )

    1994-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosols have been characterized by evolved gas analysis (EGA). Hydrocarbons selected as aerosol precursors were representative of anthropogenic emissions (cyclohexene, cyclopentene, 1-decene and 1-dodecene, n-dodecane, o-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and of biogenic emissions (the terpenes [alpha]-pinene, [beta]-pinene and d-limonene and the sesquiterpene trans-caryophyllene). Also analyzed by EGA were samples of secondary, primary (highway tunnel), and ambient (urban) aerosols before and after exposure to ozone and other photochemical oxidants. The major features of the EGA thermograms (amount of CO[sub 2] evolved as a function of temperature) are described. The usefulness and limitations of EGA data for source apportionment of atmospheric particulate carbon are briefly discussed. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Traceless protein splicing utilizing evolved split inteins

    PubMed Central

    Lockless, Steve W.; Muir, Tom W.

    2009-01-01

    Split inteins are parasitic genetic elements frequently found inserted into reading frames of essential proteins. Their association and excision restore host protein function through a protein self-splicing reaction. They have gained an increasingly important role in the chemical modification of proteins to create cyclical, segmentally labeled, and fluorescently tagged proteins. Ideally, inteins would seamlessly splice polypeptides together with no remnant sequences and at high efficiency. Here, we describe experiments that identify the branched intermediate, a transient step in the overall splicing reaction, as a key determinant of the splicing efficiency at different splice-site junctions. To alter intein specificity, we developed a cell-based selection scheme to evolve split inteins that splice with high efficiency at different splice junctions and at higher temperatures. Mutations within these evolved inteins occur at sites distant from the active site. We present a hypothesis that a network of conserved coevolving amino acids in inteins mediates these long-range effects. PMID:19541616

  3. Nursing administration research: an evolving science.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Scott, Elaine S; Warshawsky, Nora E

    2014-12-01

    The nature and focus of nursing administrative research have evolved over time. Recently, the research agenda has primarily reflected the national health policy agenda. Although nursing research has traditionally been dominated by clinical interests, nursing administrative research has historically addressed the interface of reimbursement, quality, and care delivery systems. This article traces the evolution of nursing administrative research to answer questions relevant to scope, practice, and policy and suggests future directions. PMID:25393136

  4. Design Space Issues for Intrinsic Evolvable Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hereford, James; Gwaltney, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of increased programming time for intrinsic evolvable hardware (EM) as the complexity of the circuit grows. As the circuit becomes more complex, then more components will be required and a longer programming string, L, is required. We develop equations for the size of the population, n, and the number of generations required for the population to converge, based on L. Our analytical results show that even though the design search space grows as 2L (assuming a binary programming string), the number of circuit evaluations, n*ngen, only grows as O(Lg3), or slightly less than O(L). This makes evolvable techniques a good tool for exploring large design spaces. The major hurdle for intrinsic EHW is evaluation time for each possible circuit. The evaluation time involves downloading the bit string to the device, updating the device configuration, measuring the output and then transferring the output data to the control processor. Each of these steps must be done for each member of the population. The processing time of the computer becomes negligible since the selection/crossover/mutation steps are only done once per generation. Evaluation time presently limits intrinsic evolvable hardware techniques to designing only small or medium-sized circuits. To evolve large or complicated circuits, several researchers have proposed using hierarchical design or reuse techniques where submodules are combined together to form complex circuits. However, these practical approaches limit the search space of available designs and preclude utilizing parasitic coupling or other effects within the programmable device. The practical approaches also raise the issue of why intrinsic EHW techniques do not easily apply to large design spaces, since the analytical results show only an O(L) complexity growth.

  5. The evolving epidemiology of stone disease.

    PubMed

    Roudakova, Ksenia; Monga, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of kidney stones is evolving - not only is the prevalence increasing, but also the gender gap has narrowed. What drives these changes? Diet, obesity or environmental factors? This article will review the possible explanations for a shift in the epidemiology, with the hope of gaining a better understanding of the extent to which modifiable risk factors play a role on stone formation and what measures may be undertaken for disease prevention in view of these changing trends. PMID:24497682

  6. Quantum games on evolving random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawela, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    We study the advantages of quantum strategies in evolutionary social dilemmas on evolving random networks. We focus our study on the two-player games: prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and stag-hunt games. The obtained result show the benefits of quantum strategies for the prisoner's dilemma game. For the other two games, we obtain regions of parameters where the quantum strategies dominate, as well as regions where the classical strategies coexist.

  7. Chemical evolution of viscously evolving galactic discs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Catherine J.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the Lin-Pringle (1987) model of galactic disk formation to reproduce the observed radial distributions of total gas surface density and metals in disk galaxies is investigated. It is found that a satisfactory fit is obtained provided that there exists an outer cut-off to the star-forming disk beyond which gas is allowed to viscously evolve. The metallicity gradient is then established by radial inflow of gas from beyond this cut-off.

  8. Continuous evaluation of evolving behavioral intervention technologies.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Cheung, Ken; Schueller, Stephen M; Hendricks Brown, C; Duan, Naihua

    2013-10-01

    Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) are web-based and mobile interventions intended to support patients and consumers in changing behaviors related to health, mental health, and well-being. BITs are provided to patients and consumers in clinical care settings and commercial marketplaces, frequently with little or no evaluation. Current evaluation methods, including RCTs and implementation studies, can require years to validate an intervention. This timeline is fundamentally incompatible with the BIT environment, where technology advancement and changes in consumer expectations occur quickly, necessitating rapidly evolving interventions. However, BITs can routinely and iteratively collect data in a planned and strategic manner and generate evidence through systematic prospective analyses, thereby creating a system that can "learn." A methodologic framework, Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CEEBIT), is proposed that can support the evaluation of multiple BITs or evolving versions, eliminating those that demonstrate poorer outcomes, while allowing new BITs to be entered at any time. CEEBIT could be used to ensure the effectiveness of BITs provided through deployment platforms in clinical care organizations or BIT marketplaces. The features of CEEBIT are described, including criteria for the determination of inferiority, determination of BIT inclusion, methods of assigning consumers to BITs, definition of outcomes, and evaluation of the usefulness of the system. CEEBIT offers the potential to collapse initial evaluation and postmarketing surveillance, providing ongoing assurance of safety and efficacy to patients and consumers, payers, and policymakers. PMID:24050429

  9. Transistor Level Circuit Experiments using Evolvable Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoica, A.; Zebulum, R. S.; Keymeulen, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Daud, Taher; Thakoor, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) performs research in fault tolerant, long life, and space survivable electronics for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). With that focus, JPL has been involved in Evolvable Hardware (EHW) technology research for the past several years. We have advanced the technology not only by simulation and evolution experiments, but also by designing, fabricating, and evolving a variety of transistor-based analog and digital circuits at the chip level. EHW refers to self-configuration of electronic hardware by evolutionary/genetic search mechanisms, thereby maintaining existing functionality in the presence of degradations due to aging, temperature, and radiation. In addition, EHW has the capability to reconfigure itself for new functionality when required for mission changes or encountered opportunities. Evolution experiments are performed using a genetic algorithm running on a DSP as the reconfiguration mechanism and controlling the evolvable hardware mounted on a self-contained circuit board. Rapid reconfiguration allows convergence to circuit solutions in the order of seconds. The paper illustrates hardware evolution results of electronic circuits and their ability to perform under 230 C temperature as well as radiations of up to 250 kRad.

  10. Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, David C.; Cheung, Ken; Schueller, Stephen M.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Duan, Naihua

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) are web-based and mobile interventions intended to support patients and consumers in changing behaviors related to health, mental health, and well-being. BITs are provided to patients and consumers in clinical care settings and commercial marketplaces, frequently with little or no evaluation. Current evaluation methods, including RCTs and implementation studies, can require years to validate an intervention. This timeline is fundamentally incompatible with the BIT environment, where technology advancement and changes in consumer expectations occur quickly, necessitating rapidly evolving interventions. However, BITs can routinely and iteratively collect data in a planned and strategic manner and generate evidence through systematic prospective analyses, thereby creating a system that can “learn.” A methodologic framework, Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CEEBIT), is proposed that can support the evaluation of multiple BITs or evolving versions, eliminating those that demonstrate poorer outcomes, while allowing new BITs to be entered at any time. CEEBIT could be used to ensure the effectiveness of BITs provided through deployment platforms in clinical care organizations or BIT marketplaces. The features of CEEBIT are described, including criteria for the determination of inferiority, determination of BIT inclusion, methods of assigning consumers to BITs, definition of outcomes, and evaluation of the usefulness of the system. CEEBIT offers the potential to collapse initial evaluation and postmarketing surveillance, providing ongoing assurance of safety and efficacy to patients and consumers, payers, and policymakers. PMID:24050429