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Sample records for cocaine derivative lacking

  1. Lack of effect of ethanol on cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Cocaine and alcohol are commonly co-abused for reasons that are incompletely understood. Laboratory animal studies have suggested that, although the reinforcing effects of low cocaine doses are increased following chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption, acute EtOH administration does not consistently alter cocaine self-administration. The present study examined whether EtOH influences another abuse-related effect of cocaine: reinstatement of extinguished responding. Rhesus monkeys that had previously consumed EtOH for 8 weeks (2.0 g/kg over 1 h, 5 days/week) self-administered up to 10 injections per day of 0.1 mg/kg cocaine under a fixed-interval 300-s schedule. After responding had been extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine, a pre-session infusion of saline or EtOH (0.5 or 1.0 g/kg, intravenously over 10 min) was followed by a 'priming' injection of saline or cocaine (intravenously). Responding was increased significantly by priming injections of cocaine, but not saline. EtOH infusions neither reinstated behavior when administered before a saline prime nor altered the priming effect of cocaine. The inability of EtOH to alter the response-reinstating ability of cocaine provides further evidence for a lack of acute behavioral interactions between cocaine and EtOH. PMID:27509315

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Whitfield, Timothy W.; Berglind, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cocaine-seeking are brain region-specific. Infusion of BDNF into subcortical structures, like the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area, enhances cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and cocaine seeking. Conversely, repeated administration of BDNF antiserum into the nucleus accumbens during chronic cocaine self-administration attenuates cocaine-induced reinstatement. In contrast, BDNF infusion into the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex immediately following a final session of cocaine self-administration attenuates relapse to cocaine seeking after abstinence, as well as cue- and cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking following extinction. BDNF-induced alterations in the ERK-MAP kinase cascade and in prefronto-accumbens glutamatergic transmission are implicated in BDNF’s ability to alter cocaine seeking. Within 22 hr after infusion into the prefrontal cortex, BDNF increases BDNF protein in prefrontal cortical targets, including nucleus accumbens, and restores cocaine-mediated decreases in phospho-ERK expression in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, three weeks after BDNF infusion in animals with a cocaine self-administration history, suppressed basal levels of glutamate are normalized and a cocaine-prime-induced increase in extracellular glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens is prevented. Thus, BDNF may have local effects at the site of infusion and distal effects in target areas that are critical to mediating or preventing cocaine-induced dysfunctional neuroadaptations. PMID:19732758

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Jacqueline F; Whitfield, Timothy W; Berglind, William J

    2010-02-16

    The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cocaine-seeking are brain region-specific. Infusion of BDNF into subcortical structures, like the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area, enhances cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and cocaine-seeking. Conversely, repeated administration of BDNF antiserum into the nucleus accumbens during chronic cocaine self-administration attenuates cocaine-induced reinstatement. In contrast, BDNF infusion into the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex immediately following a final session of cocaine self-administration attenuates relapse to cocaine-seeking after abstinence, as well as cue- and cocaine prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking following extinction. BDNF-induced alterations in the ERK-MAP kinase cascade and in prefronto-accumbens glutamatergic transmission are implicated in BDNF's ability to alter cocaine-seeking. Within 22 hours after infusion into the prefrontal cortex, BDNF increases BDNF protein in prefrontal cortical targets, including nucleus accumbens, and restores cocaine-mediated decreases in phospho-ERK expression in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, 3 weeks after BDNF infusion in animals with a cocaine self-administration history, suppressed basal levels of glutamate are normalized and a cocaine prime-induced increase in extracellular glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens is prevented. Thus, BDNF may have local effects at the site of infusion and distal effects in target areas that are critical to mediating or preventing cocaine-induced dysfunctional neuroadaptations. PMID:19732758

  4. Locomotion and self-administration induced by cocaine in 129/OlaHsd mice lacking galanin

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, Christian; Kuschpel, Anna S; Picciotto, Marina R

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the galanin system modulates responses to drugs of abuse such as morphine. The current study examined whether genetic deletion of galanin could affect the locomotor and reinforcing effects of cocaine in mice. We examined spontaneous motor activity and cocaine-induced hyperactivity in wild-type (GAL-WT) and knockout mice lacking galanin (GAL-KO) maintained on the 129/OlaHsd background. Our results indicate that cocaine enhanced locomotion (defined as moving more than 5 cm) dose-dependently in GAL-WT and GAL-KO mice. However, general activity (total beam breaks) was increased by cocaine only in GAL-WT mice. An additional experiment indicated that galnon, a non-selective galanin receptor agonist, did not affect cocaine-induced hyperactivity. In a second set of experiments, mice of both genotypes were trained to self-administer cocaine under a fixed ratio schedule and tested with various doses of cocaine under different schedules of reinforcement. This set of experiments showed that cocaine self-administration did not differ markedly between genotypes. However, while GAL-WT mice acquired cocaine self-administration, a median split analysis showed that mice could be divided into large and small drug takers, whereas all GAL-KO mice were small drug takers. Our results indicate that wild-type and galanin knockout mice on a congenic 129/OlaHsd background are responsive to the locomotor effects of cocaine and can acquire i.v. cocaine self-administration. However, the phenotype observed in GAL-KO mice does not support a major role for galanin in cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and self-administration. PMID:21038934

  5. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cocaine KidsHealth > For Teens > Cocaine Print A A A ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Cocaine What Is Cocaine? Cocaine is a powerful and highly addictive drug ...

  6. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... DEA Press Room » Multi-Media Library » Image Gallery » Cocaine COCAINE To Save Images: First click on the thumbnail ... your Save in directory and then click Save. Cocaine Crack Cocaine RESOURCE CENTER Controlled Substances Act DEA ...

  7. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Share Print Home » Drugs of Abuse » Cocaine Cocaine Email Facebook Twitter Brief Description Cocaine is a ... NIDA for Teens: Stimulants NIDA Therapy Manuals for Cocaine Addiction (Archives): Manual 1: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach: ...

  8. Comparative behavioral pharmacology and toxicology of cocaine and its ethanol-derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene)

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.L.; Terry, P.; Witkin, J.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The present study compared the behavioral and toxic effects of cocaine and its ethanol derived metabolite, cocaine ethyl-ester (cocaethylene). Both drugs produced qualitatively similar psychomoter stimulant effects. Cocaine and cocaethylene increased locomotor activity in mice, with cocaine approximately four times more potent than cocaethylene. The durations of action of ED{sub 75} doses of each of the drugs were comparable. Each of the drugs also produced stimulation of operant responding in rats. In rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine injections from saline, cocaine was approximately three to five times more potent than cocaethylene in producing these cocaine-like interoceptive effects. In contrast to the behavioral effects, cocaine and cocaethylene were equipotent in producing convulsions, and cocaethylene was more potent than cocaine in producing lethality. These results suggest that the conversion of cocaine to cocaethylene with simultaneous cocaine and alcohol use may produce an increased risk of toxicity due to a decrease in the potency of cocaethylene in producing psychomotor stimulant effects, and its increased potency in producing toxicity.

  9. Cocaine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Nick J.; Yeager, Rebecca D.

    Cocaine was first used by Europeans in the nineteenth century when extract from the coca leaf was combined with various beverages. Cocaine comes as a white crystalline powder. However, a product called crack cocaine may come as an opaque crystal similar in size and shape to rock salt. A third form of cocaine is known as coca paste, which is an…

  10. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, called crack. Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. ...

  11. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, ... Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel ...

  12. Lack of Specific Involvement of (+)-Naloxone and (+)-Naltrexone on the Reinforcing and Neurochemical Effects of Cocaine and Opioids.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Mereu, Maddalena; Hiranita, Takato; Quarterman, Juliana C; Coggiano, Mark; Katz, Jonathan L

    2016-10-01

    Effective medications for drug abuse remain a largely unmet goal in biomedical science. Recently, the (+)-enantiomers of naloxone and naltrexone, TLR4 antagonists, have been reported to attenuate preclinical indicators of both opioid and stimulant abuse. To further examine the potential of these compounds as drug-abuse treatments, we extended the previous assessments to include a wider range of doses and procedures. We report the assessment of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone on the acute dopaminergic effects of cocaine and heroin determined by in vivo microdialysis, on the reinforcing effects of cocaine and the opioid agonist, remifentanil, tested under intravenous self-administration procedures, as well as the subjective effects of cocaine determined by discriminative-stimulus effects in rats. Pretreatments with (+)-naloxone or (+)-naltrexone did not attenuate, and under certain conditions enhanced the stimulation of dopamine levels produced by cocaine or heroin in the nucleus accumbens shell. Furthermore, although an attenuation of either cocaine or remifentanil self-administration was obtained at the highest doses of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, those doses also attenuated rates of food-maintained behaviors, indicating a lack of selectivity of TLR4 antagonist effects for behaviors reinforced with drug injections. Drug-discrimination studies failed to demonstrate a significant interaction of (+)-naloxone with subjective effects of cocaine. The present studies demonstrate that under a wide range of doses and experimental conditions, the TLR4 antagonists, (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, did not specifically block neurochemical or behavioral abuse-related effects of cocaine or opioid agonists. PMID:27296151

  13. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  14. Lack of behavioral sensitization to repeated cocaine administration from postnatal days 1 to 10.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Yacht, A C

    1993-09-01

    This research determined whether sensitization (or tolerance) to the behavioral effects of cocaine in rat pups would occur following repeated cocaine administration. Rats were injected daily with 20 mg/kg of cocaine HCl s.c. from postnatal day 1 to day 10, injected with saline vehicle only, or left untreated during this period. On day 11, animals from each group were challenged with either 0, .625, 1.25, or 2.50 mg/kg of cocaine and their behavioral responses were recorded. Prior cocaine treatment did not influence the acute effects of cocaine on ultrasonic vocalizations or on any observed motor responses. In contrast, the cocaine- and saline-treated pups differed in a similar manner from the untreated control group on several behavioral measures. These results indicate that the sensitizing effects of repeated cocaine administration are not manifested during the neonatal period. However, the stimulation (stress) of handling and injection may alter the subsequent responsivity of infant rats to a cocaine challenge. PMID:8225794

  15. Cocaine-induced Psychosis and Brain-derived Neurothrophic Factor in Patients with Cocaine Dependence: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; Palma-Álvarez, Raul Felipe; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Barral, Carmen; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Casas, Miguel; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to numerous brain functions. In addition, BDNF alterations contribute to neurological, mental, and addictive disorders. Cocaine dependence has received much attention recently due to its prevalence and psychological effects. Symptoms of psychosis are one of the most serious adverse events precipitated by cocaine use. It is particularly important to identify patients at risk of developing cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP). We described two cases of patients with cocaine dependence who presented with CIP and had changes in their BDNF levels during the psychotic episode. BDNF levels were initially low in both patients, and then decreased by more than 50% in association with CIP. The relationship between BDNF and psychosis is described in the literature. These cases revealed that BDNF levels decreased during a CIP episode and, thus, it is necessary to investigate BDNF and its relationship with CIP further. PMID:26792050

  16. Cocaine-induced Psychosis and Brain-derived Neurothrophic Factor in Patients with Cocaine Dependence: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Palma-Álvarez, Raul Felipe; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Barral, Carmen; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Casas, Miguel; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-02-29

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked to numerous brain functions. In addition, BDNF alterations contribute to neurological, mental, and addictive disorders. Cocaine dependence has received much attention recently due to its prevalence and psychological effects. Symptoms of psychosis are one of the most serious adverse events precipitated by cocaine use. It is particularly important to identify patients at risk of developing cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP). We described two cases of patients with cocaine dependence who presented with CIP and had changes in their BDNF levels during the psychotic episode. BDNF levels were initially low in both patients, and then decreased by more than 50% in association with CIP. The relationship between BDNF and psychosis is described in the literature. These cases revealed that BDNF levels decreased during a CIP episode and, thus, it is necessary to investigate BDNF and its relationship with CIP further. PMID:26792050

  17. Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurotransmitter in the brain. It is this flood of dopamine that causes cocaine’s high. The drug ... Articles: Stimulants Research Report Series: Cocaine Statistics and Trends NIDA: DrugFacts: High School and Youth Trends Centers ...

  18. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1 Infectivity in Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells by Suppressing microRNA-155

    PubMed Central

    Napuri, Jessica; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Raymond, Andrea; Agudelo, Marisela; Yndart-Arias, Adriana; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Nair, Madhavan

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine and other drugs of abuse increase HIV-induced immunopathogenesis; and neurobiological mechanisms of cocaine addiction implicate a key role for microRNAs (miRNAs), single-stranded non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and defend against viruses. In fact, HIV defends against miRNAs by actively suppressing the expression of polycistronic miRNA cluster miRNA-17/92, which encodes miRNAs including miR-20a. IFN-g production by natural killer cells is regulated by miR-155 and this miRNA is also critical to dendritic cell (DC) maturation. However, the impact of cocaine on miR-155 expression and subsequent HIV replication is unknown. We examined the impact of cocaine on two miRNAs, miR-20a and miR-155, which are integral to HIV replication, and immune activation. Using miRNA isolation and analysis, RNA interference, quantitative real time PCR, and reporter assays we explored the effects of cocaine on miR-155 and miR-20 in the context of HIV infection. Here we demonstrate using monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDCCs) that cocaine significantly inhibited miR-155 and miR-20a expression in a dose dependent manner. Cocaine and HIV synergized to lower miR-155 and miR-20a in MDDCs by 90%. Cocaine treatment elevated LTR-mediated transcription and PU.1 levels in MDCCs. But in context of HIV infection, PU.1 was reduced in MDDCs regardless of cocaine presence. Cocaine increased DC-SIGN and and decreased CD83 expression in MDDC, respectively. Overall, we show that cocaine inhibited miR-155 and prevented maturation of MDDCs; potentially, resulting in increased susceptibility to HIV-1. Our findings could lead to the development of novel miRNA-based therapeutic strategies targeting HIV infected cocaine abusers. PMID:24391808

  19. Cell-type specific insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs with cocaine exposure leading to sensitization, cue-induced seeking and incubation of craving

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Terrier; Christian, Lüscher; Vincent, Pascoli

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Addiction is a behavioral disease, of which core components can be modeled in rodents. Much evidence implicates drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in cocaine-evoked locomotor sensitization, cue-induced cocaine seeking and incubation of cocaine craving. However the type of plasticity evoked by different modalities of cocaine administration (e.g. contingent versus non-contingent) and its role in reshaping circuit function remains largely elusive. Here we exposed mice to various regimens of cocaine and recorded excitatory transmission onto identified medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN, expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of either D1R or D2R dopamine receptor promotor) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) at time points when behavioural adaptations are observed. In D1-MSN, we found the presence of GluA2-lacking α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) after single or chronic non-contingent exposure to cocaine, as well as after cocaine self-administration. We also report an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio (A/N) in D1-MSN, which was observed only after repeated passive injections associated with locomotor sensitization as well as in a condition of self-administration (SA) leading to seeking behaviour. Remarkably, insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs was also detected in D2-MSN after self-administration of a high dose of cocaine but not regular dose (1.5 vs. 0.75 mg/kg), which was the only condition where incubation of cocaine craving was observed in this study. Moreover, synapses containing GluA2-lacking AMPARs belonged to amygdala inputs in D2-MSN and to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) inputs in D1-MSN. Taken together this study allows for a refinement of a circuit model of addiction based on specific synaptic changes induced by cocaine. PMID:26585289

  20. Cell-Type Specific Insertion of GluA2-Lacking AMPARs with Cocaine Exposure Leading to Sensitization, Cue-Induced Seeking, and Incubation of Craving.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Jean; Lüscher, Christian; Pascoli, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Addiction is a behavioral disease, of which core components can be modeled in rodents. Much evidence implicates drug-evoked synaptic plasticity in cocaine-evoked locomotor sensitization, cue-induced cocaine seeking, and incubation of cocaine craving. However, the type of plasticity evoked by different modalities of cocaine administration (eg contingent vs non-contingent) and its role in reshaping circuit function remains largely elusive. Here we exposed mice to various regimens of cocaine and recorded excitatory transmission onto identified medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN, expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of either D1R or D2R dopamine receptor promotor) in the nucleus accumbens at time points when behavioral adaptations are observed. In D1-MSN, we found the presence of GluA2-lacking α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) after single or chronic non-contingent exposure to cocaine as well as after cocaine self-administration (SA). We also report an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio (A/N) in D1-MSN, which was observed only after repeated passive injections associated with locomotor sensitization as well as in a condition of SA leading to seeking behavior. Remarkably, insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPARs was also detected in D2-MSN after SA of a high dose of cocaine but not regular dose (1.5 vs 0.75 mg/kg), which was the only condition where incubation of cocaine craving was observed in this study. Moreover, synapses containing GluA2-lacking AMPARs belonged to amygdala inputs in D2-MSN and to medial prefrontal cortex inputs in D1-MSN. Taken together this study allows for a refinement of a circuit model of addiction based on specific synaptic changes induced by cocaine. PMID:26585289

  1. Cocaine Dependence Treatment Data: Methods for Measurement Error Problems With Predictors Derived From Stationary Stochastic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yongtao; Li, Yehua; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    In a cocaine dependence treatment study, we use linear and nonlinear regression models to model posttreatment cocaine craving scores and first cocaine relapse time. A subset of the covariates are summary statistics derived from baseline daily cocaine use trajectories, such as baseline cocaine use frequency and average daily use amount. These summary statistics are subject to estimation error and can therefore cause biased estimators for the regression coefficients. Unlike classical measurement error problems, the error we encounter here is heteroscedastic with an unknown distribution, and there are no replicates for the error-prone variables or instrumental variables. We propose two robust methods to correct for the bias: a computationally efficient method-of-moments-based method for linear regression models and a subsampling extrapolation method that is generally applicable to both linear and nonlinear regression models. Simulations and an application to the cocaine dependence treatment data are used to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods. Asymptotic theory and variance estimation for the proposed subsampling extrapolation method and some additional simulation results are described in the online supplementary material. PMID:21984854

  2. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced 2 hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hours following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 µg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  3. Time-dependent increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels within the mesolimbic dopamine system after withdrawal from cocaine: implications for incubation of cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Jeffrey W; Lu, Lin; Hayashi, Teruo; Hope, Bruce T; Su, Tsung-Ping; Shaham, Yavin

    2003-02-01

    Using a rat model of drug craving, we found that the responsiveness to cocaine cues progressively increases or incubates over the first 60 d of cocaine withdrawal. Here we studied whether alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels within the mesolimbic dopamine system are associated with this incubation phenomenon. BDNF is involved in synaptic plasticity and was found to enhance responding for cues associated with natural rewards. Rats were trained to press a lever to receive intravenous cocaine or oral sucrose for 6 hr/d for 10 d; each earned reward was paired with a tone-light cue. Resumption of lever-pressing behavior was then assessed on days 1, 30, or 90 of reward withdrawal. First, resistance to extinction was assessed during 6 hr in which lever presses were not reinforced and the cue was absent. Second, cue-induced reinstatement was assessed after extinction during 1 hr in which responding led to cue presentations. Other rats were killed without testing on days 1, 30, and 90 of reward withdrawal, and BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF) protein levels were measured in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), accumbens, and amygdala. Lever pressing during extinction and cue-induced reinstatement tests of cocaine craving progressively increased after cocaine withdrawal. Time-dependent changes also were observed during the tests for sucrose craving, with maximal responding on day 30. BDNF, but not NGF, levels in the VTA, accumbens, and amygdala progressively increased after cocaine, but not sucrose, withdrawal. Time-dependent increases in BDNF levels may lead to synaptic modifications that underlie enhanced responsiveness to cocaine cues after prolonged withdrawal periods. PMID:12574402

  4. Lack of increased immediate early gene expression in rats reinstating cocaine-seeking behavior to discrete sensory cues.

    PubMed

    Riedy, Matthew D; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-01-01

    Drug-seeking behavior elicited by drug-associated cues contributes to relapse in addiction; however, whether relapse elicited by drug-associated conditioned reinforcers (CR) versus discriminative stimuli (DS) involves distinct or overlapping neuronal populations is unknown. To address this question, we developed a novel cocaine self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement paradigm that exposed the same rats to distinct cocaine-associated CR and DS. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine in separate sessions. In one, a DS signaled cocaine availability; in the other, cocaine delivery was paired with a different CR. After extinction training and reinstatement testing, where both cues were presented in separate sessions, rats were sacrificed and processed for cellular analysis of temporal activity by fluorescent in situ hybridization (CatFISH) for activity regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) mRNA and for radioactive in situ hybridization for Arc and zif268 mRNAs. CatFISH did not reveal significant changes in Arc mRNA expression. Similar results were obtained with radioactive in situ hybridization. We have shown that while rats reinstate drug seeking in response to temporally discrete presentations of distinct drug-associated cues, such reinstatement is not associated with increased transcriptional activation of Arc or zif268 mRNAs, suggesting that expression of these genes may not be necessary for cue-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior. PMID:24069163

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-conjugated nanoparticles suppress acquisition of cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Green-Sadan, T; Kuttner, Y; Lublin-Tennenbaum, T; Kinor, N; Boguslavsky, Y; Margel, S; Yadid, G

    2005-07-01

    The neurotrophic factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating cocaine addiction. Previously, we found that transplantation of a GDNF-expressing astrocyte cell line into the striatum and nucleus accumbens attenuates cocaine-seeking behavior in Sprague-Dawley rats. However, as a potential treatment for humans, cell transplantation presents several technical and ethical complications. Nanoparticulate systems are a safe and effective method for introducing exogenous compounds into the brain. Therefore, we examined the effect of GDNF-conjugated nanoparticles microinjected into the striatum and nucleus accumbens on cocaine self-administration in rats. GDNF-conjugated nanoparticles blocked the acquisition of cocaine self-administration compared to control treatments. Furthermore, a cocaine dose response demonstrated that decreased lever response in rats that received GDNF-conjugated nanoparticles persisted after substitution with different cocaine doses. This effect is not due to a non-specific disruption of locomotor or operant behavior, as seen following a water operant task. The current study is one of the first demonstrations that drug-conjugated nanoparticles may be effective in treating brain disorders. These findings suggest that GDNF-conjugated nanoparticles may serve as a novel potential treatment for drug addiction. PMID:15899247

  6. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled iodinated cocaine derivatives and their distribution in baboon brain measured using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, D W; Gatley, S J; Wolf, A P; MacGregor, R R; Dewey, S L; Fowler, J S; Schlyer, D J

    1992-06-12

    Three iodine-substituted derivatives of cocaine, methyl esters of 3-[(2'-, 3'-, and 4'-iodobenzoyl)oxy]-8-methyl-[1R-(exo,exo)]-8- azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2 carboxylic acid (2a-c), were synthesized and subjected to N-demethylation to give the corresponding noriodococaines 3-[(2'-,3'-, and 4'-iodobenzoyl)oxy]-[1R-(exo,exo)]-8- azabicyclo[3.2.1]-octane-2-carboxylic acid (3a-c). These were remethylated with [11C]CH3I to give the [N-11C-methyl]iodococaines 4a-c which were examined in baboon brain in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET). Compared to [N-11C]cocaine itself the regional distributions were changed from a highly specific localization in the corpus striatum to more diffuse patterns which included the cerebellum and cortex. Peak brain uptakes and clearance kinetics were also changed. [N-11C]-o-Iodococaine (4a) had a peak uptake in the striatum at 4-5 min after injection of only 17% that of cocaine in the same animal. The peak uptake of [N-11C]-p-iodococaine (4c) was 60% of that of [N-11C]cocaine and a clearance half-time of approximately 55 min, twice that of [N-11C]cocaine. [N-11C]-m-Iodococaine (4b) displayed half the uptake of [N-11C]cocaine, buts its clearance was similar to that of the parent molecule. The fractions of unmetabolized tracer in blood plasma at 1-30 min were higher for 4a-c than for [N-11C]cocaine. Plasma protein binding experiments showed 10%, 0.3%, 1.6%, and 6% as the free fraction for cocaine and o-, m-, and p-iodococaines respectively, consistent with the low brain uptake observed for the ortho isomer, and implicated alpha 1-acid glycoprotein as responsible for the low free fraction of o-iodococaine. The potencies of 2a-c to displace tritiated cocaine from striatal membranes were p-iodo approximately cocaine greater than m-iodo approximately o-iodo. PMID:1613745

  7. Reinforcing effects of compounds lacking intrinsic efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptor subtypes in midazolam- but not cocaine-experienced rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shinday, Nina M; Sawyer, Eileen K; Fischer, Bradford D; Platt, Donna M; Licata, Stephanie C; Atack, John R; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S; Rowlett, James K

    2013-05-01

    Benzodiazepines are prescribed widely but their utility is limited by unwanted side effects, including abuse potential. The mechanisms underlying the abuse-related effects of benzodiazepines are not well understood, although α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors have been proposed to have a critical role. Here, we examine the reinforcing effects of several compounds that vary with respect to intrinsic efficacy at α2, α3, and α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors but lack efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors ('α1-sparing compounds'): MRK-623 (functional selectivity for α2/α3 subunit-containing receptors), TPA023B (functional selectivity for α2/α3/α5 subunit-containing receptors), and TP003 (functional selectivity for α3 subunit-containing receptors). The reinforcing effects of the α1-sparing compounds were compared with those of the non-selective benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist MRK-696, and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, midazolam and lorazepam, in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer midazolam or cocaine, under a progressive-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug injection. The α1-sparing compounds were self-administered significantly above vehicle levels in monkeys maintained under a midazolam baseline, but not under a cocaine baseline over the dose ranges tested. Importantly, TP003 had significant reinforcing effects, albeit at lower levels of self-administration than non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Together, these results suggest that α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may have a role in the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in monkeys with a history of stimulant self-administration, whereas α3 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may be important mediators of the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in animals with a history of sedative-anxiolytic/benzodiazepine self-administration. PMID:23303046

  8. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-01-01

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products. PMID:25816077

  9. Structure-affinity relationship of the cocaine-binding aptamer with quinine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Slavkovic, Sladjana; Altunisik, Merve; Reinstein, Oren; Johnson, Philip E

    2015-05-15

    In addition to binding its target molecule, cocaine, the cocaine-binding aptamer tightly binds the alkaloid quinine. In order to understand better how the cocaine-binding aptamer interacts with quinine we have used isothermal titration calorimetry-based binding experiments to study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a series of structural analogs of quinine. As a basis for comparison we also investigated the binding of the cocaine-binding aptamer to a set of cocaine metabolites. The bicyclic aromatic ring on quinine is essential for tight affinity by the cocaine-binding aptamer with 6-methoxyquinoline alone being sufficient for tight binding while the aliphatic portion of quinine, quinuclidine, does not show detectable binding. Compounds with three fused aromatic rings are not bound by the aptamer. Having a methoxy group at the 6-position of the bicyclic ring is important for binding as substituting it with a hydrogen, an alcohol or an amino group all result in lower binding affinity. For all ligands that bind, association is driven by a negative enthalpy compensated by unfavorable binding entropy. PMID:25858454

  10. Enhanced extinction of cocaine seeking in brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Briand, Lisa A; Lee, Francis S; Blendy, Julie A; Pierce, R Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) gene results in alterations in fear extinction behavior in both human populations and mouse models. However, it is not clear whether this polymorphism plays a similar role in extinction of appetitive behaviors. Therefore, we examined operant learning and extinction of both food and cocaine self-administration behavior in an inbred genetic knock-in mouse strain expressing the variant Bdnf. These mice provide a unique opportunity to relate alterations in aversive and appetitive extinction learning as well as provide insight into how human genetic variation can lead to differences in behavior. BDNF(Met/Met) mice exhibited a severe deficit in operant learning as demonstrated by an inability to learn the food self-administration task. Therefore, extinction experiments were performed comparing wildtype (BDNF(Val/Val) ) animals to mice heterozygous for the Met allele (BDNF(Val/Met) ), which did not differ in food or cocaine self-administration behavior. In contrast to the deficit in fear extinction previously demonstrated in these mice, we found that BDNF(Val/Met) mice exhibited more rapid extinction of cocaine responding compared to wildtype mice. No differences were found between the genotypes in the extinction of food self-administration behavior or the reinstatement of cocaine seeking, indicating that the effect is specific to extinction of cocaine responding. These results suggest that the molecular mechanisms underlying aversive and appetitive extinction are distinct from one another and BDNF may play opposing roles in the two phenomena. PMID:22394056

  11. High levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are associated with treatment adherence among crack-cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Juliana N; Schuch, Silvia; Ornell, Felipe; Sordi, Anne O; Bristot, Giovana; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kessler, Felix H P; Fumagalli, Fabio; Pechansky, Flavio; von Diemen, Lisia

    2016-09-01

    Due to the complexity of crack -cocaine addiction treatment, the identification of biological markers that could help determining the impact or outcome of drug use has become a major subject of study. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the association of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) levels in crack -cocaine users with treatment adherence and with drug addiction severity. A sample of 47 male inpatient crack- cocaine users were recruited in a treatment unit, and blood samples were collected at admission and discharge in order to measure BDNF and TBARS serum levels. Subjects were split into 2 groups: treatment non-completers (n=23) and treatment completers (n=24). The completer group had a tendency of higher levels of BDNF than non-completers at admission (16.85±3.24 vs. 14.65±5.45, p=0.10), and significant higher levels at discharge (18.10±4.88 vs. 13.91±4.77, p=0.001). A negative correlation between BDNF levels at admission and years of crack use was observed. We did not find significant changes in TBARS levels during inpatient treatment, although the completer group tended to decrease these levels while non-completers tend to increase it. These findings suggest an association between higher levels of BDNF and better clinical outcomes in crack- cocaine users after detoxification. We believe that the variation in BDNF and TBARS found here add evidence to literature data that propose that such biomarkers could be used to better understand the physiopathology of crack- cocaine addiction. PMID:27473943

  12. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  13. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a lot of cocaine cuts down or quits taking the drug. Symptoms ... even if the user is not completely off cocaine and still has some of the drug in ...

  14. Involvement of the NADPH Oxidase NOX2-Derived Brain Oxidative Stress in an Unusual Fatal Case of Cocaine-Related Neurotoxicity Associated With Excited Delirium Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Trabace, Luigia

    2016-10-01

    Here, we investigated the possible role of the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate oxidase NOX2-derived brain oxidative stress in a fatal case of cocaine-related neurotoxicity, associated to excited delirium syndrome. We detected a strong NOX2 immunoreactivity, mainly in cortical GABAergic neurons and astrocytes, with a minor presence in microglia, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurons as well as a significant immunostaining for other markers of oxidative stress (8OhDG, HSP70, HSP90, and NF-κB) and apoptotic phenomena. These results support a crucial role of NOX2-derived brain oxidative stress in cocaine-induced brain dysfunctions and neurotoxicity. PMID:27533346

  15. Fluorescence Immunoassay for Cocaine Detection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjjou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki; Ito, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    A fluorescence immunoassay (FIA) has been developed for the detection of cocaine using norcocaine labeled with merocyanine dye and a monoclonal antibody specific to cocaine. Using this FIA, the detection range for cocaine was between 20.0 and 1700 μg/L with a limit of detection of 20.0 μg/L. Other cocaine derivatives did not interfere significantly with the detection when using this immunoassay technique with cross-reactivity values of less than 20%. Thus this FIA could be considered a useful tool for the detection of cocaine. PMID:26977890

  16. [Cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Pitchot, W; Scantamburlo, G; Pinto, E; Karila, L

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug after cannabis in the general population. Cocaine is a powerful stimulating agent of the central nervous system and a highly addictogenic drug. Somatic and psychiatric consequences of cocaine addiction are major and clinically relevant. The increasing consumption of cocaine and the importance of its consequences justify an update of our knowledge about cocaine addiction. PMID:23888579

  17. The role of the NADPH oxidase derived brain oxidative stress in the cocaine-related death associated with excited delirium: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Neri, Margherita; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo; Trabace, Luigia; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-09-01

    Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is a term used to describe a clinical condition characterized by bizarre and aggressive behaviour, commonly associated with the use of psychoactive compounds, especially cocaine. The pathophysiology of ExDS is complex and not yet fully understood. In addition to a central dopamine hypothesis, other mechanisms are thought to be involved in cocaine-related ExDS, such as increased reactive oxygen species production by the family of the NADPH oxidase NOX enzymes. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge on the crucial contribution of brain NADPH oxidase derived oxidative stress in the development of cocaine-induced ExDS. Data from animal models as well as human evidence will be discussed. PMID:27265246

  18. Responsiveness to cocaine challenge in adult rats following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Heyser, C J; Rajachandran, L; Spear, N E; Spear, L P

    1994-09-01

    Adult rats that were gestationally exposed to cocaine and control offspring were examined for their sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine. Offspring were derived from Sprague-Dawley dams that had received subcutaneous injections of 40 mg/kg per 3 cc cocaine hydrochloride daily on gestational days 8-20, pair-fed dams that were injected with saline, and nontreated control dams. In order to investigate the sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine, offspring were assessed in adulthood for locomotor activity, cocaine drug discrimination, and the time course of cocaine in brain tissue following acute cocaine challenge. Adult offspring prenatally exposed to cocaine were observed to exhibit a reduced sensitivity to the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine as evidenced by a significant shift to the right in the dose-response curve of cocaine discrimination. No prenatal treatment effects were observed in terms of the temporal patterns of cocaine discrimination or with regard to brain levels of cocaine. In addition, baseline locomotor activity and locomotor responses to challenge doses of cocaine were comparable across the prenatal treatment groups. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure reduced sensitivity of offspring to the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine without altering either the distribution of cocaine to the brain or the sensitivity of the offspring to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. PMID:7862930

  19. MCMI-III-derived typological analysis of cocaine and heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Craig, R J; Bivens, A; Olson, R

    1997-12-01

    A sample of 441 African American men who were either inpatient heroin or cocaine addicts, or both; were assessed with the MCMI-III. The modal codetype showed primary elevations on the Antisocial Personality Disorder Scale (6A), consistent with previous research using the MCMI-I and MCMI-II with substance abusers. The data were subjected to 3 independent clustering procedures that resulted in general consistency among procedures. The solutions were validated on a randomly selected half of the sample. Three subtypes were variants of the antisocial parent codetype, whereas another subtype was characterized by a Within Normal Limits profile suggesting no personality disorder. These 4 subtypes were also associated with different external correlates with significant clinical import. The results suggest that findings from previous research with substance-abusing patients, using the MCMI-I and MCMI-II, should be applicable to the MCMI-III as well. PMID:9501486

  20. Cocaine withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000947.htm Cocaine withdrawal To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a ...

  1. Cocaine intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    ... deadly. See also: Drug abuse Drug abuse and dependence Drug abuse first aid Cocaine withdrawal ... Perrone J, Hoffman RS. Cocaine, amphetamines, caffeine, and ... eds. Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide . 6th ed. ...

  2. On the lack of polymorphism in Aβ-peptide aggregates derived from patient brains

    PubMed Central

    Alred, Erik J; Phillips, Malachi; Berhanu, Workalemahu M; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers and fibrils that are found in neural tissues of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease may either cause or contribute to the pathology of the disease. In vitro, these Aβ-aggregates are characterized by structural polymorphism. However, recent solid state NMR data of fibrils acquired post mortem from the brains of two Alzheimer's patients indicate presence of only a single, patient-specific structure. Using enhanced molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the factors that modulate the stability of Aβ-fibrils. We find characteristic differences in molecular flexibility, dynamics of interactions, and structural behavior between the brain-derived Aβ-fibril structure and in vitro models. These differences may help to explain the lack of polymorphism in fibrils collected from patient brains, and have to be taken into account when designing aggregation inhibitors and imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25739352

  3. Stability of cocaine and its metabolites in municipal wastewater--the case for using metabolite consolidation to monitor cocaine utilization.

    PubMed

    Bisceglia, Kevin J; Lippa, Katrice A

    2014-03-01

    Transformations of cocaine and eleven of its metabolites were investigated in untreated municipal sewage at pH ≈ 7 and 9, 23, and 31 °C. Results indicated that hydrolysis-possibly bacterially mediated-was the principal transformation pathway. Residues possessing alkyl esters were particularly susceptible to hydrolysis, with pseudo-first-order rate constants varying from 0.54 to 1.7 day(-1) at 23 °C. Metabolites lacking esters or possessing only a benzoyl ester appeared stable. Residues lacking alkyl esters did accumulate through hydrolysis of precursors, however. As noted previously, this may positively bias cocaine utilization estimates based on benzoylecgonine alone. Reported variability in metabolic excretion was used in conjunction with transformation data to evaluate different approaches for estimating cocaine loading. Results indicate that estimates derived from measurands that capture all major cocaine metabolites, such as COCtot (the sum of all measurable metabolites) and EChyd (the sum of all metabolites that can be hydrolyzed to ecgonine), may reduce uncertainty arising from variability in metabolite transformation and excretion, possibly to ≈ 10 % RSD. This is more than a two-fold reduction relative to estimates derived from benzoylecgonine (>26 % RSD), and roughly equivalent to reported uncertainties from sources that are not metabolite-specific (e.g., sampling frequency, flow variability). They and other composite measurands merit consideration from the sewage epidemiology community, beginning with efforts to evaluate the stability of the total cocaine load under realistic sewer conditions. PMID:24337995

  4. Increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein concentrations in mice lacking brain serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Mosienko, Valentina; Gertz, Karen; Alenina, Natalia; Hellweg, Rainer; Klempin, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between BDNF signaling and the serotonergic system remains incompletely understood. Using a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we studied BDNF concentrations in hippocampus and cortex of two mouse models of altered serotonin signaling: tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)2-deficient (Tph2 (-/-)) mice lacking brain serotonin and serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient (SERT(-/-)) mice lacking serotonin re-uptake. Surprisingly, hippocampal BDNF was significantly elevated in Tph2 (-/-) mice, whereas no significant changes were observed in SERT(-/-) mice. Furthermore, BDNF levels were increased in the prefrontal cortex of Tph2 (-/-) but not of SERT(-/-) mice. Our results emphasize the interaction between serotonin signaling and BDNF. Complete lack of brain serotonin induces BDNF expression. PMID:26100147

  5. Plasma profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in cocaine users under outpatient treatment: influence of cocaine symptom severity and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Araos, Pedro; Pedraz, María; Serrano, Antonia; Lucena, Miguel; Barrios, Vicente; García-Marchena, Nuria; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan J; Romero, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Baixeras, Elena; de la Torre, Rafael; Montesinos, Jorge; Guerri, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, José; Martínez-Riera, Roser; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Mason, Barbara J; Pavón, Francisco J; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    The treatment for cocaine use constitutes a clinical challenge because of the lack of appropriate therapies and the high rate of relapse. Recent evidence indicates that the immune system might be involved in the pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and its co-morbid psychiatric disorders. This work examined the plasma pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine profile in abstinent cocaine users (n = 82) who sought outpatient cocaine treatment and age/sex/body mass-matched controls (n = 65). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Diseases according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) were decreased in cocaine users, although all cytokines were identified as predictors of a lifetime pathological use of cocaine. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), chemokine (C-X3-C motif) ligand 1 (CX3CL1)/fractalkine and CXCL12/SDF-1 positively correlated with the cocaine symptom severity when using the DSM-IV-TR criteria for cocaine abuse/dependence. These cytokines allowed the categorization of the outpatients into subgroups according to severity, identifying a subgroup of severe cocaine users (9-11 criteria) with increased prevalence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders [mood (54%), anxiety (32%), psychotic (30%) and personality (60%) disorders]. IL-1β was observed to be increased in users with such psychiatric disorders relative to those users with no diagnosis. In addition to these clinical data, studies in mice demonstrated that plasma IL-1β, CX3CL1 and CXCL12 were also affected after acute and chronic cocaine administration, providing a preclinical model for further research. In conclusion, cocaine exposure modifies the circulating levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Plasma

  6. Immunotoxicity of cocaine and crack.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Chasapis, Christos T; Spiliopoulou, Chara A

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of cocaine and crack was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using several endpoints, such as the DNA content of the macronuclei and the phagocytic ability. Both forms induced an increase in the DNA content of the protozoan, which indicates the stimulation of the mitotic process. In contrast, the phagocytic activity, of the protozoan was decreased after the administration of cocaine, an effect that was more extensive after the administration of crack. These results, derived from previous experiments, suggest a possible relationship between the observed immunosuppression in cocaine abusers and the immunosuppression found in the protozoan. This suppression subsequently may play a role in the development of other opportunistic infections in drug abusers. This paper, based on in vivo experiments with the protozoan Tetrahymena, suggests the compromised immune response in cocaine addicts and assures the reported effects of cocaine on immune cell function. PMID:21696343

  7. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  8. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  9. Cocaine Constrictor Mechanisms of the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Robert M; Yoon, SeongHun; Zuccarello, Mario

    2016-05-01

    Cocaine constriction of the cerebral vasculature is thought to contribute to the ischemia associated with cocaine use. However, the mechanisms whereby cocaine elicits relevant vasoconstriction remain elusive. Indeed, proposed intra- and intercellular mechanisms based on over 3 decades of ex vivo vascular studies are, for the most part, of questionable relevancy due to the generally low contractile efficacy of cocaine combined with the use of nonresistance-type vessels. Furthermore, the significance attached to mechanisms derived from in vivo animal studies may be limited by the inability to demonstrate cocaine-induced decreased cerebral blood flow, as observed in (awake) humans. Despite these apparent limitations, we surmise that the vasoconstriction relevant to cocaine-induced ischemia is elicited by inhibition of dilator and activation of constrictor pathways because of cocaine action on the neurovascular unit (neuron, astrocyte, and vessel) and on vessels outside the unit. Furthermore, previous cocaine exposure, that is, conditions present in human subjects, downregulates and sensitizes these dilator and constrictor pathways, respectively, thereby enhancing constriction to acute cocaine. Identification of specific intra- and intercellular mechanisms requires investigations in the isolated microvasculature and the neurovascular unit from species chronically exposed to cocaine and in which cocaine decreases cerebral blood flow. PMID:26771152

  10. Polygenic determinants of white matter volume derived from GWAS lack reproducibility in a replicate sample

    PubMed Central

    Papiol, S; Mitjans, M; Assogna, F; Piras, F; Hammer, C; Caltagirone, C; Arias, B; Ehrenreich, H; Spalletta, G

    2014-01-01

    A recent publication reported an exciting polygenic effect of schizophrenia (SCZ) risk variants, identified by a large genome-wide association study (GWAS), on total brain and white matter volumes in schizophrenic patients and, even more prominently, in healthy subjects. The aim of the present work was to replicate and then potentially extend these findings. According to the original publication, polygenic risk scores—using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information of SCZ GWAS—(polygenic SCZ risk scores; PSS) were calculated in 122 healthy subjects, enrolled in a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. These scores were computed based on P-values and odds ratios available through the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium. In addition, polygenic white matter scores (PWM) were calculated, using the respective SNP subset in the original publication. None of the polygenic scores, either PSS or PWM, were found to be associated with total brain, white matter or gray matter volume in our replicate sample. Minor differences between the original and the present study that might have contributed to lack of reproducibility (but unlikely explain it fully), are number of subjects, ethnicity, age distribution, array technology, SNP imputation quality and MRI scanner type. In contrast to the original publication, our results do not reveal the slightest signal of association of the described sets of GWAS-identified SCZ risk variants with brain volumes in adults. Caution is indicated in interpreting studies building on polygenic risk scores without replication sample. PMID:24548877

  11. Extended access of cocaine self-administration results in tolerance to the dopamine-elevating and locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2014-01-01

    Tolerance to the neurochemical and psychoactive effects of cocaine after repeated use is a hallmark of cocaine addiction in humans. However, comprehensive studies on tolerance to the behavioral, psychoactive, and neurochemical effects of cocaine following contingent administration in rodents are lacking. We outlined the consequences of extended access cocaine self-administration as it related to tolerance to the psychomotor activating, dopamine (DA) elevating, and DA transporter (DAT) inhibiting effects of cocaine. Cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/inj; 40 inj; 5 days), which resulted in escalation of first hour intake, caused reductions in evoked DA release and reduced maximal rates of uptake through the DAT as measured by slice voltammetry in the nucleus accumbens core. Furthermore, we report reductions in cocaine-induced uptake inhibition and a corresponding increase in the dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of DA uptake (Ki ) at the DAT. Cocaine tolerance at the DAT translated to reductions in cocaine-induced DA overflow as measured by microdialysis. In addition, cocaine-induced elevations in locomotor activity and stereotypy were reduced, while rearing behavior was enhanced in animals with a history of cocaine self-administration. Here, we demonstrate both neurochemical and behavioral cocaine tolerance in an extended-access rodent model of cocaine abuse, which allows for a better understanding of the neurochemical and psychomotor tolerance that develops to cocaine in human addicts. We demonstrate tolerance to the neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine following extended-access cocaine self-administration. With respect to neurochemistry, we show reduced cocaine-induced dopamine uptake inhibition, an increased dose of cocaine required for 50% inhibition of the dopamine transporter, and reduced cocaine-induced dopamine overflow. In addition, we show escalation of cocaine intake and reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity following

  12. Mice Lacking Platelet-Derived Growth Factor D Display a Mild Vascular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Muhl, Lars; Ehnman, Monika; Tannenberg, Philip; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Betsholtz, Christer; Eriksson, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF-D) is the most recently discovered member of the PDGF family. PDGF-D signals through PDGF receptor β, but its biological role remains largely unknown. In contrast to other members of the PDGF family of growth factors, which have been extensively investigated using different knockout approaches in mice, PDGF-D has until now not been characterized by gene inactivation in mice. Here, we present the phenotype of a constitutive Pdgfd knockout mouse model (Pdgfd-/-), carrying a LacZ reporter used to visualize Pdgfd promoter activity. Inactivation of the Pdgfd gene resulted in a mild phenotype in C57BL/6 mice, and the offspring was viable, fertile and generally in good health. We show that Pdgfd reporter gene activity was consistently localized to vascular structures in both postnatal and adult tissues. The expression was predominantly arterial, often localizing to vascular bifurcations. Endothelial cells appeared to be the dominating source for Pdgfd, but reporter gene activity was occasionally also found in subpopulations of mural cells. Tissue-specific analyses of vascular structures revealed that NG2-expressing pericytes of the cardiac vasculature were disorganized in Pdgfd-/- mice. Furthermore, Pdgfd-/- mice also had a slightly elevated blood pressure. In summary, the vascular expression pattern together with morphological changes in NG2-expressing cells, and the increase in blood pressure, support a function for PDGF-D in regulating systemic arterial blood pressure, and suggests a role in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27032083

  13. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Ciancetta, Antonella; Warnick, Eugene; O'Connor, Robert; Chen, Zhoumou; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Crane, Steven; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-14

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5'-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  14. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the “addiction phase” examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF’s potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  15. Multiple faces of BDNF in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Wolf, Marina E

    2015-02-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to play roles in many types of plasticity including drug addiction. Here, we focus on rodent studies over the past two decades that have demonstrated diverse roles of BDNF in models of cocaine addiction. First, we will provide an overview of studies showing that cocaine exposure alters (and generally increases) BDNF levels in reward-related regions including the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala. Then we will review evidence that BDNF contributes to behavioral changes in animal models of cocaine addiction, focusing on conditioned place preference, behavioral sensitization, maintenance and reinstatement of self-administration, and incubation of cocaine craving. Last, we will review the role of BDNF in synaptic plasticity, particularly as it relates to plasticity of AMPA receptor transmission after cocaine exposure. We conclude that BDNF regulates cocaine-induced behaviors in a highly complex manner that varies depending on the brain region (and even among different cell types within the same brain region), the nature of cocaine exposure, and the "addiction phase" examined (e.g., acquisition vs maintenance; early vs late withdrawal). These complexities make BDNF a daunting therapeutic target for treating cocaine addiction. However, recent clinical evidence suggests that the serum BDNF level may serve as a biomarker in cocaine addicts to predict future relapse, providing an alternative direction for exploring BDNF's potential relevance to treating cocaine addiction. PMID:25449839

  16. Cocaine. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    This compilation of journal articles on cocaine includes a report describing cocaine as the recreational drug of the middle class, statistics from the United States Department of Health on health consequences of cocaine use, an article on "speedballing" (use of cocaine and heroin in combination), and a discussion of the various ways cocaine is…

  17. Sleep Regulates Incubation of Cocaine Craving

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    After withdrawal from cocaine, chronic cocaine users often experience persistent reduction in total sleep time, which is accompanied by increased sleep fragmentation resembling chronic insomnia. This and other sleep abnormalities have long been speculated to foster relapse and further drug addiction, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we report that after prolonged withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, rats exhibited persistent reduction in nonrapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, as well as increased sleep fragmentation. In an attempt to improve sleep after cocaine withdrawal, we applied chronic sleep restriction to the rats during their active (dark) phase of the day, which selectively decreased the fragmentation of REM sleep during their inactive (light) phase without changing NREM or the total amount of daily sleep. Animals with improved REM sleep exhibited decreased incubation of cocaine craving, a phenomenon depicting the progressive intensification of cocaine seeking after withdrawal. In contrast, experimentally increasing sleep fragmentation after cocaine self-administration expedited the development of incubation of cocaine craving. Incubation of cocaine craving is partially mediated by progressive accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After withdrawal from cocaine, animals with improved REM sleep exhibited reduced accumulation of CP-AMPARs in the NAc, whereas increasing sleep fragmentation accelerated NAc CP-AMPAR accumulation. These results reveal a potential molecular substrate that can be engaged by sleep to regulate cocaine craving and relapse, and demonstrate sleep-based therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sleep abnormalities are common symptoms in chronic drug users long after drug withdrawal. These withdrawal-associated sleep symptoms, particularly reduction in total sleep time and deteriorating sleep quality, have been

  18. Electroencephalographic activity and mood in cocaine-dependent outpatients: effects of cocaine cue exposure.

    PubMed

    Bauer, L O; Kranzler, H R

    1994-08-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) and subjective reactions to cocaine cues were evaluated in 18 cocaine-dependent outpatients, after 14 or fewer days of abstinence, and 16 noncocaine-dependent controls. EEG activity and desire for cocaine were recorded while subjects viewed three 5-min films that featured either cocaine-associated, erotic, or neutral stimuli. Other measures of mood state and cocaine craving, derived from the Mood Adjective Checklist and the Cocaine Craving Questionnaire, respectively, were recorded immediately after each film. Analyses of absolute EEG power within six frequency bands (delta, theta, slow and fast alpha, slow and fast beta) revealed no EEG abnormalities in the cocaine-dependent group under any condition. In both subject groups, the cocaine-associated and erotic films produced a similar reduction in total EEG power. The cocaine-associated and erotic films also produced a similar increase in the self-rated desire for cocaine, but this change only occurred in the cocaine-dependent group. PMID:7948456

  19. Substance use -- cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000793.htm Substance use - cocaine To use the sharing features on this page, ... Charlie, coca, coke, flake, rock, snow, speedball, toot. Cocaine's Effects on Your Brain Cocaine is a strong ...

  20. Mind Over Matter: Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Term(s): Teachers / NIDA Teaching Guide / Mind Over Matter Teaching Guide and Series / Cocaine Print Mind Over Matter: Cocaine Order Free Publication in: English Spanish Download PDF 806.08 KB Cocaine is made ...

  1. Epigenetic Inheritance of a Cocaine Resistance Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vassoler, Fair M.; White, Samantha L.; Schmidt, Heath D.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A heritable phenotype resulting from the self-administration of cocaine in rats was delineated. We observed delayed acquisition and reduced maintenance of cocaine self-administration in male, but not female, offspring of sires that self-administered cocaine. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were increased in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and there was an increased association of acetylated histone H3 with BDNF promoters only in the male offspring of cocaine-experienced sires. Administration of a BDNF receptor antagonist (the TrkB receptor antagonist ANA-12) reversed the diminished cocaine self-administration in male cocaine-sired rats. In addition, the association of acetylated histone H3 with BDNF promoters was increased in the sperm of sires that self-administered cocaine. Collectively, these findings indicate that voluntary paternal ingestion of cocaine results in epigenetic reprograming of the germline resulting in profound effects on mPFC gene expression and resistance to cocaine reinforcement in male offspring. PMID:23242310

  2. Premature Ovarian Failure in Mice with Oocytes Lacking Core 1-Derived O-Glycans and Complex N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) affects up to 1.4% of women under the age of 40 yr and less than 30% of cases have a known cause. Here we describe a new mouse model of POF resulting from oocyte-specific ablation of core 1-derived (mucin) O-glycans and complex and hybrid N-glycans. Females carrying floxed alleles of both the C1galt1 (T-syn) and Mgat1 glycosyltransferase genes and a ZP3Cre transgene, generate oocytes lacking complex O- and N-glycans following oocyte-specific deletion at the primary follicle stage. We previously showed that few double-mutant females are fertile, and those produce only a single small litter. Here we show that ovarian function declined rapidly in double-mutant females with less than 1% ovulating at 11 wk of age after superovulation with exogenous gonadotropins. Ovary weight was significantly decreased in double-mutant females by 3 months of age, consistent with a decrease in the number of developing follicles. FSH levels in double-mutant females were elevated at 3 months of age, and testosterone and inhibin A were decreased, showing that the loss of complex N- and O-glycans from oocyte glycoproteins affected hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal feedback loops. The absence of developing follicles, ovary dysfunction, reduced testosterone and inhibin A, and elevated FSH in double-mutant females lacking C1galt1 and Mgat1 in oocytes represents a new mouse model for the study of follicular POF. PMID:21239444

  3. Premature ovarian failure in mice with oocytes lacking core 1-derived O-glycans and complex N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Williams, Suzannah A; Stanley, Pamela

    2011-03-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) affects up to 1.4% of women under the age of 40 yr and less than 30% of cases have a known cause. Here we describe a new mouse model of POF resulting from oocyte-specific ablation of core 1-derived (mucin) O-glycans and complex and hybrid N-glycans. Females carrying floxed alleles of both the C1galt1 (T-syn) and Mgat1 glycosyltransferase genes and a ZP3Cre transgene, generate oocytes lacking complex O- and N-glycans following oocyte-specific deletion at the primary follicle stage. We previously showed that few double-mutant females are fertile, and those produce only a single small litter. Here we show that ovarian function declined rapidly in double-mutant females with less than 1% ovulating at 11 wk of age after superovulation with exogenous gonadotropins. Ovary weight was significantly decreased in double-mutant females by 3 months of age, consistent with a decrease in the number of developing follicles. FSH levels in double-mutant females were elevated at 3 months of age, and testosterone and inhibin A were decreased, showing that the loss of complex N- and O-glycans from oocyte glycoproteins affected hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal feedback loops. The absence of developing follicles, ovary dysfunction, reduced testosterone and inhibin A, and elevated FSH in double-mutant females lacking C1galt1 and Mgat1 in oocytes represents a new mouse model for the study of follicular POF. PMID:21239444

  4. Effects of mazindol on behavior maintained or occasioned by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, R S; Balster, R L

    1993-01-01

    The effects of mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine were studied in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and in rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Non-contingent intravenous drug injections were administered to monkeys responding under a session consisting of a 5-min period during which lever-pressing produced food reinforcement and a 60-min session in which responding produced i.v. cocaine infusions (10 or 33 micrograms/kg per infusion). Acute i.v. injections of cocaine (0.1-1.7 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and the dopamine re-uptake inhibitor mazindol (0.03-0.56 mg/kg) given 5 min before the session decreased self-administration of cocaine, but also decreased rates of behavior maintained by the presentation of food. In both rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-maintained procedure, mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine substituted for cocaine in a dose-related manner. Despite a lack of selectivity to decrease cocaine self-administration as compared to behavior maintained by food, the present data provide some rationale for further consideration of mazindol as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse, due to its relatively low abuse liability and cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:8436063

  5. Cocaine and Cardiovascular Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, John D.; Rose, Fred D.

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 21-year-old man who suffered a myocardial infarction after using cocaine and amphetamines is reported. A brief literature review provides evidence of cocaine's potential cardiovascular effects. (Author/MT)

  6. Substance use - cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... injecting into a vein (speedballing) Smoking it (this type of cocaine is called freebase or crack) Street names for cocaine include blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coca, coke, flake, rock, snow, speedball, toot.

  7. Cocaine Addiction: Psychology and Neurophysiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawin, Frank H.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of cocaine addiction, cocaine abstinence symptoms, and the short-term and long-term neurochemical actions of cocaine are discussed. The relative therapeutic value of various medications and treatment programs are discussed. (KR)

  8. Differential antagonism of cocaine self-administration and cocaine-induced disruptions of learning by haloperidol in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Winsauer, Peter J; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M; Roussell, Alison M

    2008-03-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response rate and the number of infusions in the self-administration component when compared to saline administration, whereas 0.1-0.32 mg/kg/infusion decreased response rate and the number of infusions. When compared to saline administration, the two lowest infusion doses of cocaine had little or no effect on responding in the acquisition and performance components; however, higher infusion doses of cocaine dose-dependently decreased response rate in these components. In addition, the higher doses of cocaine also increased the percentage of errors in the acquisition and performance components. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.0032 or 0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) antagonized the effects of low doses of cocaine on the number of infusions in the self-administration component, whereas only the 0.01-mg/kg dose antagonized the effects of high doses of cocaine on the number of infusions. Neither dose of haloperidol antagonized the rate-decreasing effects of cocaine on responding in the acquisition and performance components significantly; the highest dose of haloperidol alone decreased rates of responding in each component. Antagonism of cocaine's error-increasing effects by haloperidol was only evident at one dose of cocaine (0.032 mg/kg/infusion), and was more complete in the performance components than in the acquisition components. Together, these data show the limited suitability of haloperidol for selectively antagonizing cocaine self-administration in the context of a multiple schedule involving transition behavior, and show the lack of uniform antagonism across operant behaviors. PMID:18422020

  9. Medical consequences of cocaine.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Cocaine use among middle-class North Americans increased dramatically during the 1980s. Medical complications involve almost every organ system and are produced by intense vasoconstriction. Managing cocaine-induced disease requires careful identification and the use of alpha-adrenergic blocking agents, in addition to standard therapy and referral to specialists to manage cocaine withdrawal. Images p1976-a p1980-a PMID:8106032

  10. Cocaine potentiates defensive behaviors related to fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D C; Blanchard, R J

    1999-11-01

    Cocaine use has been associated with a number of psychiatric disturbances, and an emerging literature attests to its ability to enhance anxiety-like behaviors in animal models. Ethoexperimental analyses of defensive behaviors, and tests designed specifically to provide individual measures of these behaviors, have been shown to respond very selectively and appropriately to anxiolytic and panicogenic or panicolytic drugs, suggesting that these tests, and this approach, might provide a more detailed and comprehensive description of the emotionality effects of cocaine than is currently available. In a Mouse Defense Test Battery (MDTB) using mouse subjects and an anesthetized rat as the threat stimulus, cocaine consistently enhanced flight and escape, with effects seen at 10-30 mg/kg (i.p.) dose levels. The effect was so potent that a lack of cocaine effect on other behaviors may have been due to response competition, or to early distancing of cocaine-dosed subjects from the threat stimulus. In a Rat Runway Test (RRT) similar to the MDTB but with rat subjects, 4 mg/kg cocaine, i.v. produced an explosive, but well directed, flight response. Flight was still elevated, although of lesser magnitude than originally, 30 min. after the i.v. cocaine, and defensive threat/attack to the oncoming threat stimulus were also reliably increased. Cocaine enhancement of defense was also seen in tests of sniffing "stereotypy" in rats. Sniffing after 30 mg/kg cocaine, i.p. was found to be appropriately oriented toward the direction of incoming air flow, suggesting that it may be part of a defensive risk assessment pattern. In undosed rats, risk assessment is suppressed by the presence of high-magnitude threat stimuli such as a cat, and the same, durable, phenomenon was obtained after 30 mg/kg (i.p.) cocaine. Toy cat exposure initially suppressed sniffing in cocaine-dosed rats, but this suppression was removed and sniffing increased, over repeated dose/toy cat exposures. Crouching in the

  11. Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Score and Derived Variants Lack Prognostic Ability after Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Salinas, Ricardo; Jäger, Mark D; Lehner, Frank; Sakirow, Larissa; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Schrem, Harald

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score is currently used for donor liver allocation in many regions. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the MELD score and its diverse variants as prognostic models for mortality after liver transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS An analysis of 454 consecutive adult liver transplants since the introduction of MELD-based donor liver allocation was conducted. Eight different MELD score variants were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, and overall model correctness of the investigated scores as a predictive model. The Brier score was used for the prediction of model accuracy and calculated as described before. Study endpoints were 90-day mortality and long-term patient mortality. RESULTS A 90-day mortality of 15.4% (n=69) and long-term mortality of 25% (n=112) were observed. All investigated models fail to reach relevant areas under the ROC curve greater than 0.700 for the prediction of mortality after liver transplantation. All calculated Brier scores were greater than 0.25, indicating a significant lack of model discrimination and calibration of the investigated scores. CONCLUSIONS A prognostic model for the prediction of outcome after transplantation still needs to be identified and should allow weighing urgency against utility in liver transplantation. PMID:26242315

  12. Fundamental Reaction Mechanism and Free Energy Profile for (−)-Cocaine Hydrolysis Catalyzed by Cocaine Esterase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental reaction mechanism of cocaine esterase (CocE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (−)-cocaine and the corresponding free energy profile have been studied by performing pseudobond first-principle quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)-free energy (FE) calculations. Based on the QM/MM-FE results, the entire hydrolysis reaction consists of four reaction steps, including the nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester by hydroxyl group of Ser117, dissociation of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester, nucleophilic attack on carbonyl carbon of (−)-cocaine benzoyl ester by water, and finally the dissociation between (−)-cocaine benzoyl group and Ser117 of CocE. The third reaction step involving the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule was found to be rate-determining, which is remarkably different from (−)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by wild-type butyrylcholinesterase (where the formation of prereactive BChE-(−)-cocaine complex is rate-determining) or its mutants containing Tyr332Gly or Tyr332Gly mutation (where the first chemical reaction step is rate-determining). Besides, the role of Asp259 in the catalytic triad of CocE does not follow the general concept of the “charge-relay system” for all serine esterases. The free energy barrier calculated for the rate-determining step of CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (−)-cocaine is 17.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of 16.2 kcal/mol. In present study, where many sodium ions are present, the effects of counter ions are found to be significant in determining the free energy barrier. The finding of the significant effects of counter ions on the free energy barrier may also be valuable in guiding future mechanistic studies on other charged enzymes. PMID:19642701

  13. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  15. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. (a) Identification. A cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system is a device intended to measure cocaine and a cocaine...

  17. A Lack of Correlation between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Level and Verbal Memory Performance in Healthy Polish Population.

    PubMed

    Wilkosc, Monika; Markowska, Anita; Zajac-Lamparska, Ludmila; Skibinska, Maria; Szalkowska, Agnieszka; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is considered to be connected with memory and learning through the processes of long term synaptic potentiation and synaptic plasticity. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between precursor BDNF (proBNDF) and mature BDNF (mBDNF) serum levels and performance on Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 150 healthy volunteers. In addition, we have verified the relationships between serum concentration of both forms of BDNF and RAVLT with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.We found no strong evidence for the correlation of proBDNF and mBDNF serum levels with performance on RAVLT in healthy Polish population in early and middle adulthood. We observed the mBDNF serum concentration to be higher in women compared with men. Moreover, we revealed higher mBDNF level to be connected with lower body mass index (BMI). In turn, the results of RAVLT correlated with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, such as: age, education, gender, BMI and smoking. PMID:27242447

  18. A Lack of Correlation between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Level and Verbal Memory Performance in Healthy Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Wilkosc, Monika; Markowska, Anita; Zajac-Lamparska, Ludmila; Skibinska, Maria; Szalkowska, Agnieszka; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is considered to be connected with memory and learning through the processes of long term synaptic potentiation and synaptic plasticity. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between precursor BDNF (proBNDF) and mature BDNF (mBDNF) serum levels and performance on Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 150 healthy volunteers. In addition, we have verified the relationships between serum concentration of both forms of BDNF and RAVLT with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.We found no strong evidence for the correlation of proBDNF and mBDNF serum levels with performance on RAVLT in healthy Polish population in early and middle adulthood. We observed the mBDNF serum concentration to be higher in women compared with men. Moreover, we revealed higher mBDNF level to be connected with lower body mass index (BMI). In turn, the results of RAVLT correlated with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, such as: age, education, gender, BMI and smoking. PMID:27242447

  19. Response to CRH Infusion in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kathleen T.; McRae, Aimee L.; Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M.; DeSantis, Stacia M.; Simpson, Annie N.; Waldrop, Angela E.; Back, Sudie E.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Context Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), through the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis and other brain stress systems, is involved in the emotional dysregulation associated with cocaine dependence. Little is known about the response of cocaine-dependent individuals to CRH administration. Objective The primary objective was to examine the HPA axis, subjective and physiologic response to CRH in cocaine-dependent individuals and controls. Design Case-control study Setting Subjects were admitted to a General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) for testing and abstinence verified with urine drug screening. Participants Participants were control males (n=23), control females (n=24), cocaine-dependent males (n=28), and cocaine-dependent females (n=25). Individuals with dependence on other substances (except caffeine, nicotine) or with major depression, PTSD, bipolar, psychotic and eating disorders were excluded. Intervention Subjects received i.v. CRH (1ug/kg). Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes included plasma ACTH and cortisol, heart rate, and subjective measurements. Results Cocaine-dependent individuals exhibited higher stress (P < 0.001) and craving to CRH compared to controls. A positive correlation (rs=.51, P=0.0002) between stress and craving was found in cocaine dependent subjects. CRH elevated heart rates in all groups, however cocaine dependent females, demonstrated a significantly higher heart rate at all time points (P=0.05). Women had higher cortisol response to CRH (P=0.028). No effect of cocaine status was observed. ACTH response to CRH was independent of gender and cocaine. Cortisol and ACTH were positively correlated in the controls and cocaine-dependent males, but not in cocaine-dependent females (rs = 0.199; P = 0.4). Conclusion There is an increased subjective and heart rate response to CRH and a relationship between stress and craving in cocaine-dependent individuals. The lack of difference in HPA axis response between the cocaine and

  20. [Complications of cocaine addiction].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Lowenstein, William; Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2009-06-20

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by repetitive and compulsive drug-seeking behavior and drug abuse despite negative health or social consequences. Cocaine addiction is a significant worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. Some of the most frequent complications are cardiovascular effects (acute coronary syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, increased blood pressure); respiratory effects (fibrosis, interstitial pneumonitis, pulmonary hypertension, alveolar haemorrhage, asthma exacerbation; emphysema), neurological effects (strokes, aneurysms, seizures, headaches); risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, sexual transmitted disease and otolaryngologic effects. Other complications are not discussed here. The vast majority of studies indicate that there are cognitive deficits induced by cocaine addiction. Attention, visual and working memories, executive functioning are affected in cocaine users. Psychiatric complications found in clinical practice are major depressive disorders, cocaine-induced paranoia, cocaine-induced compulsive foraging and panic attacks. PMID:19642439

  1. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    PubMed

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544. PMID:27623834

  2. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Comorbidity and Plasma Biomarkers for Cocaine Addiction in Abstinent Cocaine-Addicted Subjects in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A.; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview “Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders.” Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  3. Sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and plasma biomarkers for cocaine addiction in abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects in outpatient settings.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Araos, Pedro; García-Marchena, Nuria; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Pastor, Antoni; Barrios, Vicente; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Torrens, Marta; de la Torre, Rafael; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are sex differences in the progression of drug addiction, relapse, and response to therapies. Because biological factors participate in these differences, they should be considered when using biomarkers for addiction. In the current study, we evaluated the sex differences in psychiatric comorbidity and the concentrations of plasma mediators that have been reported to be affected by cocaine. Fifty-five abstinent cocaine-addicted subjects diagnosed with lifetime cocaine use disorders (40 men and 15 women) and 73 healthy controls (48 men and 25 women) were clinically assessed with the diagnostic interview "Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders." Plasma concentrations of chemokines, cytokines, N-acyl-ethanolamines, and 2-acyl-glycerols were analyzed according to history of cocaine addiction and sex, controlling for covariates age and body mass index (BMI). Relationships between these concentrations and variables related to cocaine addiction were also analyzed in addicted subjects. The results showed that the concentrations of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP-1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL12/SDF-1) were only affected by history of cocaine addiction. The plasma concentrations of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were affected by history of cocaine addiction and sex. In fact, whereas cytokine concentrations were higher in control women relative to men, these concentrations were reduced in cocaine-addicted women without changes in addicted men. Regarding fatty acid derivatives, history of cocaine addiction had a main effect on the concentration of each acyl derivative, whereas N-acyl-ethanolamines were increased overall in the cocaine group, 2-acyl-glycerols were decreased. Interestingly, N-palmitoleoyl-ethanolamine (POEA) was only increased in cocaine-addicted women. The covariate BMI had a significant

  4. Cocaine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the semen and may reduce the number of sperm, and increase the number of abnormal sperm. This can result in fertility problems. Cocaine can attach to sperm. This has led to the suggestion that sperm ...

  5. Phenytoin Toxicity from Cocaine Adulteration

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of phenytoin (PHT) as a cocaine adulterant was reported decades ago; that practice is still current. Ironically PHT has also been used for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A drug smuggler developed PHT toxicity after swallowing several rocks of crack. We investigated the current trends of PHT as a cocaine adulterant and its toxicological implications. We also reviewed the clinical use of PTH in relation to cocaine. The use of PHT as cocaine cut is a current practice. This may affect the clinical manifestations and the management of the cocaine-related visits to the emergency department. PMID:24672596

  6. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, D-84, suppresses cocaine self-administration, but does not occasion cocaine-like levels of generalization.

    PubMed

    Batman, Angela M; Dutta, Aloke K; Reith, Maarten E A; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2010-12-01

    A successful replacement pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine dependency would likely reduce cocaine's abuse, support a low abuse liability, overlap cocaine's subjective effects, and have a long duration of action. Inhibitors with varying selectivity at the dopamine transporter (DAT) have approximated these properties. The objective of the present study was to characterize the behavioural effects of an extremely selective DAT inhibitor, (+) trans-4-(2-Benzhydryloxyethyl)-1-(4-fluorobenzyl) piperadin-3-ol (D-84), a 3-hydroxy substituted piperidine derivative of GBR-12935, for its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, its effects on cocaine self-administration, and for its own self-administration. During cocaine discrimination tests, cocaine occasioned the 10 mg/kg cocaine training stimulus with an ED(50) value of 3.13 (1.54-6.34) mg/kg, and reduced response rates with an ED(50) value of 20.39 (7.24-57.44) mg/kg. D-84 incompletely generalized to the cocaine stimulus occasioning a maximal 76% cocaine-lever responding, while reducing response rates with lower potency than cocaine (ED(50)=30.94 (12.34-77.60) mg/kg). Pretreatment with D-84 (9.6-30.4 mg/kg) significantly (P<0.05) reduced cocaine intake at 17.1 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.5 mg/kg/infusion, and at 30.4 mg/kg D-84 when cocaine was self-administered at 0.1, 0.5 .and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. During self-administration tests with D-84 (0.1-1 mg/kg/infusion), numbers of infusions significantly exceeded vehicle levels at 0.3 mg/kg/infusion. These results show that D-84 pretreatment can decrease cocaine intake especially when high doses of cocaine are being self-administered. This observation, combined with its incomplete generalization to the cocaine discriminative stimulus and its reported long duration of action, provides a profile consistent with a potential replacement therapy for treating cocaine-abusing patients. PMID:20840845

  7. Methamphetamine Cured my Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Haile, Colin N; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2010-10-14

    Cocaine dependence is an enduring problem and years of research and drug development has yet to produce an efficacious pharmacotherapy. Recent clinical research suggests that chronic treatment with amphetamine-like medications produces tolerance to cocaine's reinforcing effects and may offer a viable pharmacotherapy. Three methamphetamine-dependent participants that had been in our clinical laboratory experiments and previously addicted to cocaine are reviewed. Data obtained from initial screen and informal conversation suggested that all participants considered methamphetamine to have helped them stop using cocaine and eliminate cocaine craving. Methamphetamine also significantly decreased their alcohol consumption but did not alter cannabis or nicotine use. PMID:23066512

  8. Covalent thiol adducts arising from reactive intermediates of cocaine biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin J; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-11-18

    Exposure to cocaine results in the depletion of hepatocellular glutathione and macromolecular protein binding in humans. Such cocaine-induced responses have generally been attributed to oxidative stress and reactive metabolites resulting from oxidative activation of the cocaine tropane nitrogen. However, little conclusive data exists on the mechanistic pathways leading to protein modification or the structure and specificity of cocaine-derived adduction products. We now report a previously uncharacterized route of cocaine bioactivation leading to the covalent adduction of biological thiols, including cysteine and glutathione. Incubation of cocaine with biological nucleophiles in an in vitro biotransformation system containing human liver microsomes identified a monooxygenase-mediated event leading to the oxidation of, and subsequent sulfhydryl addition to, the cocaine aryl moiety. Adduct structures were confirmed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution, high mass accuracy mass spectrometry. Examination of assays containing transgenic bactosomes expressing single human cytochrome P450 isoforms determined the role of P450s 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6 in the oxidation process resulting in adduct formation. P450-catalyzed aryl epoxide formation and subsequent attack by free nucleophilic moieties is consistent with the resulting adduct structures, mechanisms of formation, and the empirical observation of multiple structural and stereo isomers. Analogous adduction mechanisms were maintained across all sulfhydryl-containing nucleophile models examined; N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and a synthetic cysteine-containing hexapeptide. Predictive in silico calculations of molecular reactivity and electrophilicity/nucleophilicity were compared to the results of in vitro assay incubations in order to better understand the adduction process using the principles of hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. This study elucidated a novel metabolic

  9. Prenatal exposure to cocaine produces unique developmental and long-term adaptive changes in dopamine D1 receptor activity and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Stanwood, Gregg D; Levitt, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose intravenous cocaine administration to pregnant rabbits causes permanent structural alterations in dopamine-rich cerebral cortical areas, substantially reduced dopamine D1 receptor coupling to G(s)-protein, and deficits in cognitive function. The developmental influences of reduced D1-G(s) coupling and the underlying cellular basis are unknown. Using primary neuronal cultures derived from the medial frontal cortex and striatum of in utero saline- and cocaine-exposed embryos, spontaneous neurite outgrowth of in utero-exposed cortical neurons was greater than in control neurons. In contrast, striatal neurons exposed to cocaine in utero exhibited an entirely opposite adaptive response, with diminished spontaneous neurite outgrowth compared with saline-exposed controls. Control neurons isolated from the two structures also exhibited opposite regulatory responses to the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 (1-phenyl-2,3,4-5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol hydrochloride), inhibiting outgrowth in cortical cultures and stimulating outgrowth in striatal cultures. The agonist was ineffective in modulating neurite outgrowth of neurons from either structure isolated from cocaine-exposed fetuses, reflecting the reduced D1-Gs coupling. Total D1 receptor number was indistinguishable in neurons from the cocaine- and saline-exposed animals, but cell imaging and receptor binding of differentially isolated membranes showed that the lack of responsiveness was because of greatly reduced cell-surface localization of D1 receptors. These data suggest that prenatal exposure to cocaine causes a novel, long-lasting adaptive response in the subcellular distribution of D1 receptors, resulting in alterations in signaling capacity that have developmental and behavioral consequences. PMID:17202482

  10. Cocaine detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srijanto, Bernadeta; Cheney, Christine P.; Hedden, David L.; Gehl, Anthony; Ferrell, Thomas L.

    2008-03-01

    Sensitive and inexpensive sensors play a significant role in the analysis of drugs and drug metabolites. Specifically, reliable in vivo detection of cocaine and cocaine metabolites serves as a useful tool in research of the body's reaction to the drug and in the treatment of the drug addiction. We present here a promising cocaine biosensor to be used in the human body. The sensor's active element consists of piezoresistive microcantilevers coated with an oligonucleotide-based aptamer as the cocaine binder. In vitro cocaine detection was carried out by flowing a cocaine solution over the microcantilevers. Advantages of this device are its low power consumption, its high sensitivity, and its potential for miniaturization into an implantable capsule. The limit of detection for cocaine in distilled water was found to be 1 ng/ml.

  11. Lack of association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and body mass index change over time in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Pavlovic, Mladen; Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver; Barisic, Ivan; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela

    2013-06-17

    Obesity is becoming the epidemic health problem worldwide with a very complex etiology. The interaction between diverse genetic and environmental factors contributes to development of obesity. Among myriad of functions in central and peripheral tissues, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also regulates energy homeostasis, food intake and feeding behavior, and has a role in obesity and increased body mass index (BMI). BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism is associated with BMI gain, but both positive associations and non-replications are reported. Since BMI changes over time and since genetic influences on BMI vary with age, the aim of the study was to evaluate association between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and BMI gain in healthy subjects with middle or old age. The study included a cohort of 339 adult healthy Caucasians of Croatian origin, free of eating and metabolic disorders, evaluated in three time periods in the year 1972, 1982 and 2006, when the subjects were around 40, 50 and 70 years old, respectively. The results revealed a significant effect of smoking on BMI, but a lack of significant association between BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and overweight or obesity, and no significant association between BDNF Val66Met and BMI changes over time. These results did not confirm the major role of BDNF Val66Met in the regulation of BMI changes in adult and old healthy subjects. PMID:23643991

  12. Copper Ion Attenuated the Antiproliferative Activity of Di-2-pyridylhydrazone Dithiocarbamate Derivative; However, There Was a Lack of Correlation between ROS Generation and Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Fu, Yun; Huang, Tengfei; Liu, Youxun; Wu, Meihao; Yuan, Yanbin; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2016-01-01

    The use of chelators for cancer treatment has been an alternative option. Dithiocarbamates have recently attracted considerable attention owning to their diverse biological activities; thus, the preparation of new dithiocarbamate derivatives with improved antitumor activity and selectivity as well as probing the underlying molecular mechanism are required. In this study, di-2-pyridylhydrazone dithiocarbamate S-propionic acid (DpdtpA) and its copper complex were prepared and characterized, and its antiproliferative activity was evaluated. The proliferation inhibition assay showed that DpdtpA exhibited excellent antiproliferative effect in hepatocellular carcinoma (IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.3 μM for HepG2, and 2.5 ± 0.6 μM for Bel-7402). However, in the presence of copper ion, the antiproliferative activity of DpdtpA was dramatically attenuated (20-30 fold) owing to the formation of copper chelate. A preliminarily mechanistic study revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation mediated the antiproliferative activity of DpdtpA, and accordingly induced apoptosis, DNA cleavage, and autophagy. Surprisingly, the cytotoxicity of DpdtpA copper complex (DpdtpA-Cu) was also involved in ROS generation; however, a paradoxical relation between cellular ROS level and cytotoxicity was observed. Further investigation indicated that DpdtpA could induce cell cycle arrest at the S phase; however, DpdtpA-Cu lacked this effect, which explained the difference in their antiproliferative activity. PMID:27556432

  13. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms identify "Type B" cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Kampman, Kyle; Dackis, Charles; Sparkman, Thorne; Pettinati, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies of substance dependence typologies briefly show that multivariate systems originally developed for identifying subtypes of alcoholics, such as Babor's Type A and B system, may also be valid in abusers of other substances, such as cocaine. Type B patients are characterized by an earlier onset of addiction and more severe symptoms of their addiction, psychopathology, and impulsivity. The Type B classification has also been associated with deficits in serotonergic function. We have found that patients who exhibit more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms, as measured by scores on the Cocaine Selective Severity Assessment (CSSA), have poor treatment outcome and share many characteristics with "Type B" patients. In this paper, we review baseline characteristics of cocaine-dependent patients from several recently completed outpatient cocaine dependence treatment trials to assess the association of cocaine withdrawal symptom severity and the Type B profile. Identifying subtypes of cocaine-dependent patients may improve our ability to treat cocaine dependence by targeting treatments for specific subtypes of patients. We examined the ability of the CSSA scores to capture Type B characteristics in cocaine dependence by analyzing a series of cocaine medication trials that included 255 cocaine-dependent subjects. High CSSA scores at baseline were associated with a history of violent behavior, a family history of substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder, higher addiction severity, and co-morbid psychiatric diseases. Patients with high CSSA scores are also more likely to meet criteria for Type B (Type II) cocaine dependence. Identifying Type B cocaine-dependent patients may help to develop targeted psychosocial or pharmacological treatments for these difficult-to-treat patients. PMID:18214724

  14. Hapten Optimization for Cocaine Vaccine with Improved Cocaine Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Muthu; Kinsey, Berma M.; Singh, Rana A.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of any effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, immunotherapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic intervention. While several different cocaine haptens have been explored to develop anti-cocaine antibodies, none of the hapten was successfully designed which had a protonated tropane nitrogen as is found in native cocaine under physiological conditions, including the succinyl norcocaine (SNC) hapten that has been tested in phase II clinical trials. Herein, we discuss three different cocaine haptens: hexyl-norcocaine (HNC), bromoacetamido butyl- norcocaine (BNC), and succinyl-butyl- norcocaine (SBNC), each with a tertiary nitrogen structure mimicking that of native cocaine which could optimize the specificity of anti-cocaine antibodies for better cocaine recognition. Mice immunized with these haptens conjugated to immunogenic proteins produced high titer anti-cocaine antibodies. However, during chemical conjugation of HNC and BNC haptens to carrier proteins, the 2β methyl ester group is hydrolyzed and immunizing mice with these conjugate vaccines in mice produced antibodies that bound both cocaine and the inactive benzoylecgonine metabolite. While in the case of the SBNC conjugate vaccine hydrolysis of the methyl ester did not appear to occur, leading to antibodies with high specificity to cocaine over BE. Though we observed similar specificity with a SNC hapten, the striking difference is that SBNC carries a positive charge on the tropane nitrogen atom, and therefore it is expected to have better binding of cocaine. The 50% cocaine inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for SBNC antibodies (2.8 μM) was significantly better than the SNC antibodies (9.4 μM) when respective hapten-BSA was used as a substrate. In addition, antibodies from both sera had no inhibitory effect from BE. In contrast to BNC and HNC, the SBNC conjugate was also found to be highly stable without any noticeable hydrolysis for several months at 4°C and 2-3 days in p

  15. Development of the dopamine transporter selective RTI-336 as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F Ivy; Howard, James L; Howell, Leonard L; Fox, Barbara S; Kuhar, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The discovery and preclinical development of selective dopamine reuptake inhibitors as potential pharmacotherapies for treating cocaine addiction are presented. The studies are based on the hypothesis that a dopamine reuptake inhibitor is expected to partially substitute for cocaine, thus decreasing cocaine self-administration and minimizing the craving for cocaine. This type of indirect agonist therapy has been highly effective for treating smoking addiction (nicotine replacement therapy) and heroin addiction (methadone). To be an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, the potential drug must be safe, long-acting, and have minimal abuse potential. We have developed several 3-phenyltropane analogs that are potent dopamine uptake inhibitors, and some are selective for the dopamine transporter relative to the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. In animal studies, these compounds substitute for cocaine, reduce the intake of cocaine in rats and rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and have demonstrated a slow onset and long duration of action and lack of sensitization. The 3-phenyltropane analogs were also tested in a rhesus monkey self-administration model to define their abuse potential relative to cocaine. Based on these studies, 3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-2beta-[3-(4'-methylphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]tropane (RTI-336) has been selected for preclinical development. PMID:16584128

  16. Impaired emotional empathy and related social network deficits in cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Hulka, Lea M; Vonmoos, Matthias; Jenni, Daniela; Baumgartner, Markus R; Seifritz, Erich; Dziobek, Isabel; Quednow, Boris B

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cocaine users consistently display neurochemical and functional alterations in brain areas involved in social cognition (e.g. medial and orbitofrontal cortex). Although social functioning plays a crucial role in the development and treatment of drug dependence, studies investigating social cognition in cocaine users are lacking. Therefore, we investigated mental perspective taking ('theory of mind') and emotional and cognitive empathy in recreational (RCU) and dependent (DCU) cocaine users. Furthermore, we related these measures to real-life indicators of social functioning. One-hundred cocaine users (69 RCU, 31 DCU) and 68 stimulant-naïve healthy controls were tested with the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET), Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC) and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). The Social Network Questionnaire was conducted to assess social network size. Furthermore, participants provided information on committed criminal offenses. RCU and DCU showed less emotional empathy compared to controls (MET), whereas cognitive empathy was not impaired (MET, RMET). Additionally, DCU made more errors in mental perspective taking (MASC). Notably, cocaine users committed more criminal offenses and displayed a smaller social network and higher cocaine use was correlated with less social contacts. Diminished mental perspective taking was tentatively correlated with more intense cocaine use as well. Finally, younger age of onset of cocaine use was associated with more pronounced empathy impairment. In conclusion, social cognition impairments in cocaine users were related to real-life social functioning and should therefore be considered in therapy and prevention strategies. PMID:23800218

  17. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response. PMID:26328908

  18. Signs of Cocaine Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Signs of Cocaine Use and Addiction Listen After the "high" of ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  19. Prevalence of Traumatic Brain Injury in Cocaine-Dependent Research Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Divya; Keyser-Marcus, Lori A.; Ma, Liangsuo; Schmitz, Joy M.; Lane, Scott D.; Marwitz, Jennifer H.; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S.; Moeller, Frederick Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among those with substance dependence. However, TBI often remains undiagnosed in these individuals, due to lack of routine screening in substance use treatment settings or due to overlap in some of the cognitive sequelae (eg impulsivity, disinhibition) of TBI and cocaine dependence. Methods The prevalence of self-reported mild to moderate TBI in a group of cocaine-dependent (n = 95) and a group of healthy volunteers (n = 75) enrolled at the same facility was assessed. Additionally, the relationship between TBI and clinically relevant correlates, including impulsivity, cocaine use history, and treatment outcome in the cocaine-dependent group was also examined. Results A higher proportion of individuals with cocaine dependence (29.5%) reported having suffered a TBI in their lifetime compared to controls (8%) on a Closed Head Injury scale. Among cocaine users, the average age of sustaining TBI was significantly lower than the age of initiating cocaine use. Presence of TBI was not associated with higher impulsivity on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 or self-reported years of cocaine use. No differences were noted on treatment outcome for cocaine dependence as measured by treatment effectiveness scores (TES) between cocaine users with TBI and their non-TBI counterparts. Conclusions These results are the first to highlight the high prevalence of TBI among individuals with cocaine dependence. This study underscores the possible role of TBI history as a risk factor for onset of cocaine use, however, more research is needed to determine the impact of co-morbid TBI as a complicating factor in the substance abuse treatment setting. PMID:25662909

  20. Enhanced Choice for Viewing Cocaine Pictures in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Goldstein, R.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T. Parvaz, M.A.; Dunning, J.P.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Hajcak, G.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2009-02-01

    Individuals with cocaine use disorder (CUD) chose cocaine over nondrug rewards. In two newly designed laboratory tasks with pictures, we document this modified choice outside of a cocaine administration paradigm. Choice for viewing cocaine, pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral pictures-under explicit contingencies (choice made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more implicit contingencies (selections made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)-was examined in 20 CUD and 20 matched healthy control subjects. Subjects also provided self-reported ratings of each picture's pleasantness and arousal. Under both contingencies, CUD subjects chose to view more cocaine pictures than control subjects, group differences that were not fully explained by the self-reported picture ratings. Furthermore, whereas CUD subjects choice for viewing cocaine pictures exceeded choice for viewing unpleasant pictures (but did not exceed choice for viewing pleasant pictures, in contrast to their self-reported ratings), healthy control subjects avoided viewing cocaine pictures as frequently as, or even more than, unpleasant pictures. Finally, CUD subjects with the most cocaine viewing selections, even when directly compared with selections of the pleasant pictures, also reported the most frequent recent cocaine use. Enhanced drug-related choice in cocaine addiction can be demonstrated even for nonpharmacologic (pictorial) stimuli. This choice, which is modulated by alternative stimuli, partly transcends self-reports (possibly indicative of a disconnect in cocaine addiction between self-reports and objective behavior) to provide an objective marker of addiction severity. Neuroimaging studies are needed to establish the neural underpinnings of such enhanced cocaine-related choice.

  1. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M.; Hannigan, John H.; Greenwald, Mark K.; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Partridge, Robert T.; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. PMID:20609384

  2. [Addiction to cocaine and other stimulants].

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Jérôme; Delavenne-Garcia, Héloïse; Charles-Nicolas, Aimé; Duarte Garcia, Frederico; Jehel, Louis

    2012-12-01

    Due to many available forms (powder, pasta base, freebase and crack…) and because of multiple routes of administration (intranasal, intravenous, or smoked), cocaine has become in 30 years one of the most consumed illegal drugs worldwide, after cannabis. While the frequency of consumption decreases in North America, it continues to rise in Europe, and in some countries in South America, including Brazil, despite a growing knowledge of its specific effects, physical complications and psychiatric consequences. Elsewhere (notably in Asia and Indian Ocean), amphetamine and other stimulants (including methamphetamine), whose properties and patterns of use are very similar to those of cocaine, tend to replace it. Another amphetamine derivative, MDMA or ecstasy, is also consumed by many young people of less than 25 years, in Europe and North America, in a festive setting, with specific consequences and special procedures of care. Although there is currently no consensus for a specific medication, the most appropriate therapeutic approach seems to involve a psychosocial treatment associated with an anticraving medication, which will reduce compulsive desire to consume, in order to facilitate the psychotherapeutic and social care. However, pharmacological research remains very active, and many options are explored (GABAergic or dopaminergic agonists, amphetamine derivatives with long half-life, vaccine…), whether to treat addiction to cocaine or to methamphetamine. PMID:23021656

  3. Methamphetamine Cured my Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Haile, Colin N.; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is an enduring problem and years of research and drug development has yet to produce an efficacious pharmacotherapy. Recent clinical research suggests that chronic treatment with amphetamine-like medications produces tolerance to cocaine’s reinforcing effects and may offer a viable pharmacotherapy. Three methamphetamine-dependent participants that had been in our clinical laboratory experiments and previously addicted to cocaine are reviewed. Data obtained from initial screen and informal conversation suggested that all participants considered methamphetamine to have helped them stop using cocaine and eliminate cocaine craving. Methamphetamine also significantly decreased their alcohol consumption but did not alter cannabis or nicotine use. PMID:23066512

  4. Cocaine inhibits human endothelial cell IL-8 production: the role of transforming growth factor-beta.

    PubMed

    Mao, J T; Zhu, L X; Sharma, S; Chen, K; Huang, M; Santiago, S J; Gulsurd, J; Tashkin, D P; Dubinett, S M

    1997-10-10

    Cocaine use is associated with modulation of a broad range of biological functions including the capacity to influence cytokine production in murine and human immunoeffector cells. Little is known, however, regarding the effects of cocaine on endothelial cell cytokine production. Because the vascular endothelium actively participates in acute and chronic inflammatory responses and interleukin-8 (IL-8) is one of the key cytokines involved in the inflammatory process, modification of the production of IL-8 by vascular endothelial cells may interfere with the host response to infection or tissue injury. We investigated the effect of cocaine on endothelial cell IL-8 production. Conditioned supernatant from EA.hy 926 cells were evaluated by ELISA following in vitro cocaine exposure. Cocaine decreased IL-8 production in a dose-responsive manner, and this reduction correlated with down-regulation of IL-8 mRNA expression. Cocaine also increased the production of TGF-beta by EA.hy 926 cells and anti-TGF-beta abrogated the cocaine-mediated decrement of IL-8 production, indicating that cocaine down-regulates endothelial IL-8 production by increasing TGF-beta. Our findings suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of cocaine may be mediated, in part, by modification of endothelial-derived cytokine production. PMID:9344494

  5. Role of environmental factors in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Aldo; Spagnolo, Primavera A

    2013-01-01

    Decades of experimentation with a variety of pharmacological treatments have identified some effective therapies for heroin addiction but not for cocaine addiction. This may be due, at least in part, to our incomplete understanding of the factors involved in the differential vulnerability to these addictions, which are often considered mere variations of the same disorder. Indeed, the preference for one drug or another has been variously attributed to factors such as drug availability or price, to the addict's lifestyle, or even to chance. Yet, there is evidence of substance-specific influences on drug taking. Data from twin registries, for example, suggest that a sizeable portion of the variability in the susceptibility to drug abuse is due to environmental factors that are unique to opiates or to psychostimulants. Very little is known about the nature of these environmental influences. We report here original data, based on retrospective reports in human addicts, indicating that the setting of drug taking exerts a differential influence on heroin versus cocaine use. We also review additional clinical and pre-clinical data pointing to fundamental differences in the way in which the environment interacts with cocaine relative to heroin and other addictive drugs. These findings - as well as other evidence, including the lack of pharmacological treatments effective for both cocaine and heroin addiction - support the notion that much is to be gained by taking into account the substance-specific aspects of drug addiction. At a therapeutic level, for example, it appears reasonable to propose that cognitive-behavioral approaches should be tailored in a substance-specific manner in order to allow the addict to anticipate, and cope with, the risks associated to the various environmental settings of drug use. PMID:23574438

  6. Specificity and Ligand Affinities of the Cocaine Aptamer: Impact of Structural Features and Physiological NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ilgu, Muslum; Kempema, Aaron; Kraus, George A; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2016-08-01

    The cocaine aptamer has been seen as a good candidate for development as a probe for cocaine in many contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the aptamer binds cocaine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene with similar affinities and aminoglycosides with similar or higher affinities in a mutually exclusive manner with cocaine. Analysis of its affinities for a series of cocaine derivatives shows that the aptamer specificity is the consequence of its interaction with all faces of the cocaine molecule. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and 2-aminopurine (2AP) fluorescence studies show no evidence of large structural rearrangement of the cocaine aptamer upon ligand binding, which is contrary to the general view of this aptamer. The aptamer's affinity for cocaine and neomycin-B decreases with the inclusion of physiological NaCl. The substitution of 2AP for A in position 6 (2AP6) of the aptamer sequence eliminated the effect of NaCl on its affinities for cocaine and analogues, but not for neomycin-B, showing a selective effect of 2AP substitution on cocaine binding. The affinity for cocaine also decreased with increasing concentrations of serum or urine, with the 2AP6 substitution blunting the effect of urine. Its low affinities for cocaine and metabolites and its ability to bind irrelevant compounds limit the opportunities for application of this aptamer in its current form as a selective and reliable sensor for cocaine. However, these studies also show that a small structural adjustment to the aptamer (2AP exchanged for adenine) can increase its specificity for cocaine in physiological NaCl relative to an off-target ligand. PMID:27348073

  7. Copper thiocyanato complexes and cocaine - a case of 'black cocaine'.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Grzesiak, Ireneus; Krest, Alexander; Stirnat, Kathrin; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid; Ruschewitz, Uwe; Klein, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of a black powder confiscated by German customs was elucidated. Black powders are occasionally used as a 'transporter' for cocaine and are obviously especially designed to cloak the presence of the drug. The material consisting of cocaine, copper, iron, thiocyanate, and graphite was approached by analytical tools and chemical modelling. Graphite is added to the material probably with the intention of masking the typical infrared (IR) fingerprints of cocaine and can be clearly detected by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Cu(2+) and NCS(-) ions, when carefully reacted with cocaine hydrochloride, form the novel compound (CocH)2 [Cu(NCS)4 ] (CocH(+)  = protonated cocaine), which has been characterised by single crystal XRD, IR, NMR, UV/Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopy. Based on some further experiments the assumed composition of the original black powder is discussed. PMID:24753444

  8. Loss of Feedback Inhibition via D2 Autoreceptors Enhances Acquisition of Cocaine Taking and Reactivity to Drug-Paired Cues

    PubMed Central

    Holroyd, Kathryn B; Adrover, Martin F; Fuino, Robert L; Bock, Roland; Kaplan, Alanna R; Gremel, Christina M; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2015-01-01

    A prominent aspect of drug addiction is the ability of drug-associated cues to elicit craving and facilitate relapse. Understanding the factors that regulate cue reactivity will be vital for improving treatment of addictive disorders. Low availability of dopamine (DA) D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum is associated with high cocaine intake and compulsive use. However, the role of D2Rs of nonstriatal origin in cocaine seeking and taking behavior and cue reactivity is less understood and possibly underestimated. D2Rs expressed by midbrain DA neurons function as autoreceptors, exerting inhibitory feedback on DA synthesis and release. Here, we show that selective loss of D2 autoreceptors impairs the feedback inhibition of DA release and amplifies the effect of cocaine on DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in vitro. Mice lacking D2 autoreceptors acquire a cued-operant self-administration task for cocaine faster than littermate control mice but acquire similarly for a natural reward. Furthermore, although mice lacking D2 autoreceptors were able to extinguish self-administration behavior in the absence of cocaine and paired cues, they exhibited perseverative responding when cocaine-paired cues were present. This enhanced cue reactivity was selective for cocaine and was not seen during extinction of sucrose self-administration. We conclude that low levels of D2 autoreceptors enhance the salience of cocaine-paired cues and can contribute to the vulnerability for cocaine use and relapse. PMID:25547712

  9. Loss of feedback inhibition via D2 autoreceptors enhances acquisition of cocaine taking and reactivity to drug-paired cues.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Kathryn B; Adrover, Martin F; Fuino, Robert L; Bock, Roland; Kaplan, Alanna R; Gremel, Christina M; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2015-05-01

    A prominent aspect of drug addiction is the ability of drug-associated cues to elicit craving and facilitate relapse. Understanding the factors that regulate cue reactivity will be vital for improving treatment of addictive disorders. Low availability of dopamine (DA) D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the striatum is associated with high cocaine intake and compulsive use. However, the role of D2Rs of nonstriatal origin in cocaine seeking and taking behavior and cue reactivity is less understood and possibly underestimated. D2Rs expressed by midbrain DA neurons function as autoreceptors, exerting inhibitory feedback on DA synthesis and release. Here, we show that selective loss of D2 autoreceptors impairs the feedback inhibition of DA release and amplifies the effect of cocaine on DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in vitro. Mice lacking D2 autoreceptors acquire a cued-operant self-administration task for cocaine faster than littermate control mice but acquire similarly for a natural reward. Furthermore, although mice lacking D2 autoreceptors were able to extinguish self-administration behavior in the absence of cocaine and paired cues, they exhibited perseverative responding when cocaine-paired cues were present. This enhanced cue reactivity was selective for cocaine and was not seen during extinction of sucrose self-administration. We conclude that low levels of D2 autoreceptors enhance the salience of cocaine-paired cues and can contribute to the vulnerability for cocaine use and relapse. PMID:25547712

  10. Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Rosas, Miguel; Jimenez-Santos, Cecilia Irene; García-González, Claudia Lorena

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed. PMID:16648760

  11. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  12. Heavy cocaine use by adolescents.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Schwartz, R H; Martin, D M

    1989-04-01

    Adolescents are susceptible to becoming cocaine users. Twenty-eight teenagers in a drug rehabilitation program were identified as heavy cocaine users and questioned about their experiences. They reported family conflict leading to running away (86%), school drop-out (24%) and delinquent behaviors such as stealing (96%) and vandalism (57%). Cocaine use started at 14 years for 21%, with progression from onset to at least weekly use within eight weeks (54%). Side effects included sleep disturbance (18%) and tolerance to cocaine (25%). Withdrawal was characterized by cocaine craving up to one month later (93%). The majority (96%) were polydrug abusers. Possible causes of teen substance abuse are discussed, and the importance of prevention is emphasized. PMID:2927994

  13. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  14. Glutamatergic neuroplasticity in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Uys, Joachim D; Reissner, Kathryn J

    2011-01-01

    Neuroadaptations among glutamatergic projections within the mesocorticolimbic circuits engaged by drugs of abuse have been described since the 1990s. There is now substantial evidence that drugs of abuse lead to long-term changes in glutamatergic signaling and encompass multiple levels of analysis. For example, cocaine induces changes in extracellular glutamate concentrations and in synaptic glutamatergic transmission. In addition, glutamate receptors are required for the expression of cocaine-related behaviors, and long-term changes have been reported in the expression of proteins at glutamatergic synapses, in glutamate-related redox regulation of neurons, and in glutamatergic synaptic and structural plasticity following chronic exposure to cocaine. In this chapter, we will describe the neurocircuitry involved, and will summarize evidence for adaptations in glutamatergic neuroplasticity as a mechanism for cocaine addiction. Finally, we will discuss progress in the development of glutamate-mediated pharmacotherapies for the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:21199777

  15. Covalent modification of proteins by cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shi-Xian; Bharat, Narine; Fischman, Marian C.; Landry, Donald W.

    2002-03-01

    Cocaine covalently modifies proteins through a reaction in which the methyl ester of cocaine acylates the -amino group of lysine residues. This reaction is highly specific in vitro, because no other amino acid reacts with cocaine, and only cocaine's methyl ester reacts with the lysine side chain. Covalently modified proteins were present in the plasma of rats and human subjects chronically exposed to cocaine. Modified endogenous proteins are immunogenic, and specific antibodies were elicited in mouse and detected in the plasma of human subjects. Covalent modification of proteins could explain cocaine's autoimmune effects and provide a new biochemical approach to cocaine's long-term actions.

  16. Connectomics Signatures of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Affected Adolescent Brains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kaiming; Zhu, Dajiang; Guo, Lei; Li, Zhihao; Lynch, Mary Ellen; Coles, Claire; Hu, Xiaoping; Liu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Recent in-vivo neuroimaging studies revealed that several brain networks are altered in prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) affected adolescent brains. However, due to a lack of dense and corresponding cortical landmarks across individuals, the systematical alterations of functional connectivities in large-scale brain networks and the alteration of structural brain architecture in PCE affected brain are largely unknown. In this paper, we adopted a newly-developed data-driven strategy to build a large set of cortical landmarks that are consistent and corresponding across PCE adolescents and their matched controls. Based on these landmarks, we constructed large-scale functional connectomes, and applied the well-established approaches of deriving genomics signatures in genome-wide gene expression studies to discover functional connectomics signatures for the characterization of PCE adolescent brains. Results derived from experimental data demonstrated that 10 structurally disrupted landmarks were identified in PCE, and more importantly, the discovered informative functional connectomics signatures among consistent landmarks distinctively differentiate PCE brains from their matched controls. PMID:22461404

  17. Cocaine and alcohol interactions in the rat: effect of cocaine and alcohol pretreatments on cocaine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pan, W J; Hedaya, M A

    1999-12-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the effect of pretreatment with cocaine and alcohol on cocaine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Four groups of rats (n = 8 per group) received one of the following pretreatments for two weeks: none, alcohol (10% v/v in drinking water), cocaine (15 mg/kg/day ip), and alcohol+cocaine (10% v/v in drinking water + 15 mg/kg/day ip). On the day of the experiment, cocaine was administered (30 mg/kg, ip) to each rat, either alone or in combination with alcohol (5 g/kg, po), in a balanced crossover experimental design. Plasma and brain ECF concentrations of cocaine and its three metabolites: benzoylecgonine, norcocaine, and cocaethylene were assayed by HPLC-UV. The percent change in brain dopamine concentration, mean arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were determined simultaneously. A sigmoid-E(max) model was used to describe the brain cocaine concentration-neurochemical effect (dopamine) relationship, and an indirect pharmacodynamic response model was used to describe the plasma cocaine concentration-cardiovascular effect relationships. Alcohol pretreatment led to significant increase in cocaine AUC(p), alpha(t1/2), and beta(t1/2). Cocaine pretreatment significantly increased cocaine bioavailability, absorption rate constant, TBC, and the formation clearance of cocaethylene. Acute alcohol coadministration with cocaine increased cocaine AUC(p) and bioavailability, reduced the fraction of cocaine dose converted to benzoylecgonine, and increased the formation of norcocaine. These results indicate that the pharmacokinetics of cocaine, either administered alone or in combination with alcohol, is significantly altered due to prior cocaine and/or alcohol use. Both cocaine and alcohol pretreatments increased the E(max) for dopamine, with no effect on the EC(50). Acute alcohol coadministration with cocaine significantly increased the E(max) for dopamine and reduced the EC(50). Cocaine pretreatment significantly decreased the I

  18. Reward and Toxicity of Cocaine Metabolites Generated by Cocaine Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Vishakantha; Geng, Liyi; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Jordan D; Reyes, Santiago; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) gene therapy is emerging as a promising concept for treatment of cocaine addiction. BChE levels after gene transfer can rise 1000-fold above those in untreated mice, making this enzyme the second most abundant plasma protein. For months or years, gene transfer of a BChE mutated into a cocaine hydrolase (CocH) can maintain enzyme levels that destroy cocaine within seconds after appearance in the blood stream, allowing little to reach the brain. Rapid enzyme action causes a sharp rise in plasma levels of two cocaine metabolites, benzoic acid (BA) and ecgonine methyl ester (EME), a smooth muscle relaxant that is mildly hypotensive and, at best, only weakly rewarding. The present study, utilizing Balb/c mice, tested reward effects and cardiovascular effects of administering EME and BA together at molar levels equivalent to those generated by a given dose of cocaine. Reward was evaluated by conditioned place preference. In this paradigm, cocaine (20 mg/kg) induced a robust positive response but the equivalent combined dose of EME + BA failed to induce either place preference or aversion. Likewise, mice that had undergone gene transfer with mouse CocH (mCocH) showed no place preference or aversion after repeated treatments with a near-lethal 80 mg/kg cocaine dose. Furthermore, a single administration of that same high cocaine dose failed to affect blood pressure as measured using the noninvasive tail-cuff method. These observations confirm that the drug metabolites generated after CocH gene transfer therapy are safe even after a dose of cocaine that would ordinarily be lethal. PMID:25814464

  19. Hypothalamic proteoglycan syndecan-3 is a novel cocaine addiction resilience factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jihuan; Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Kawamura, Tomoya; Lefebvre, Celine; Shin, William; Howell, Leonard L; Hemby, Scott E; Harvey, Brandon K; Califano, Andrea; Morales, Marisela; Koob, George F; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans like syndecan-3 have complex signaling roles in addition to their function as structural components of the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus has an unexpected new role in limiting compulsive cocaine intake. In particular, we observe that syndecan-3 null mice self-administer greater amounts of cocaine than wild-type mice. This effect can be rescued by re-expression of syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus with an adeno-associated viral vector. Adeno-associated viral vector delivery of syndecan-3 to the lateral hypothalamus also reduces motivation for cocaine in normal mice. Syndecan-3 limits cocaine intake by modulating the effects of glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor, which uses syndecan-3 as an alternative receptor. Our findings indicate syndecan-3-dependent signaling as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:23736082

  20. Hypothalamic proteoglycan syndecan-3 is a novel cocaine addiction resilience factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jihuan; Repunte-Canonigo, Vez; Kawamura, Tomoya; Lefebvre, Celine; Shin, William; Howell, Leonard L.; Hemby, Scott E.; Harvey, Brandon K.; Califano, Andrea; Morales, Marisela; Koob, George F.; Sanna, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycans like syndecan-3 have complex signaling roles in addition to their function as structural components of the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus has an unexpected new role in limiting compulsive cocaine intake. In particular, we observe that syndecan-3 null mice self-administer greater amounts of cocaine than wild-type mice. This effect can be rescued by re-expression of syndecan-3 in the lateral hypothalamus with an adeno-associated viral vector. Adeno-associated viral vector delivery of syndecan-3 to the lateral hypothalamus also reduces motivation for cocaine in normal mice. Syndecan-3 limits cocaine intake by modulating the effects of glial-cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor, which uses syndecan-3 as an alternative receptor. Our findings indicate syndecan-3-dependent signaling as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:23736082

  1. Cocaine tolerance in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Eirik; Cornish, Jennifer L; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly invertebrates are being used to investigate the molecular and cellular effects of drugs of abuse to explore basic mechanisms of addiction. However, in mammals the principle factors contributing to addiction are long-term adaptive responses to repeated drug use. Here we examined whether adaptive responses to cocaine are also seen in invertebrates using the honey bee model system. Repeated topical treatment with a low dose of cocaine rendered bees resistant to the deleterious motor effects of a higher cocaine dose, indicating the development of physiological tolerance to cocaine in bees. Cocaine inhibits biogenic amine reuptake transporters, but neither acute nor repeated cocaine treatments caused measurable changes in levels of biogenic amines measured in whole bee brains. Our data show clear short and long-term behavioural responses of bees to cocaine administration, but caution that, despite the small size of the bee brain, measures of biogenic amines conducted at the whole-brain level may not reveal neurochemical effects of the drug. PMID:23741423

  2. Acute crack cocaine exposure induces genetic damage in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Eduardo Gregolin; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Claudio, Samuel Rangel; Silva, Marcelo Jose Dias; Vilegas, Wagner; Pereira, Camilo Dias Seabra; de Oliveira, Flavia; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-04-01

    Crack cocaine is a very toxic product derived from cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic damage in multiple organs of rats following acute exposure to crack cocaine. A total of 20 Wistar rats were distributed into four groups (n = 5), as follows: 0, 4.5, 9, and 18 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of crack cocaine administered by intraperitoneal route (i.p.). All animals were killed 24 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The results showed that crack cocaine increased the number of micronucleated cells in bone marrow cells exposed to 18 mg/kg crack cocaine (p < 0.05). Peripheral blood and liver cells presented genetic damage as depicted by single cell gel (comet) assay at 9 and 18 mg/kg doses (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry data revealed significant increase in 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) immunoexpression in hepatocytes of animals exposed to crack cocaine at 9 and 18 mg/kg (p < 0.05) when compared with negative controls. Taken together, our results demonstrate that crack cocaine is able to induce genomic damage in multiple organs of Wistar rats. PMID:26825523

  3. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor-NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  4. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Upregulates BDNF-TrkB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stucky, Andres; Bakshi, Kalindi P.; Friedman, Eitan; Wang, Hoau-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure causes profound changes in neurobehavior as well as synaptic function and structure with compromised glutamatergic transmission. Since synaptic health and glutamatergic activity are tightly regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its cognate tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), we hypothesized that prenatal cocaine exposure alters BDNF-TrkB signaling during brain development. Here we show prenatal cocaine exposure enhances BDNF-TrkB signaling in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFCX) of 21-day-old rats without affecting the expression levels of TrkB, P75NTR, signaling molecules, NMDA receptor—NR1 subunit as well as proBDNF and BDNF. Prenatal cocaine exposure reduces activity-dependent proBDNF and BDNF release and elevates BDNF affinity for TrkB leading to increased tyrosine-phosphorylated TrkB, heightened Phospholipase C-γ1 and N-Shc/Shc recruitment and higher downstream PI3K and ERK activation in response to ex vivo BDNF. The augmented BDNF-TrkB signaling is accompanied by increases in association between activated TrkB and NMDARs. These data suggest that cocaine exposure during gestation upregulates BDNF-TrkB signaling and its interaction with NMDARs by increasing BDNF affinity, perhaps in an attempt to restore the diminished excitatory neurotransmission. PMID:27494324

  5. On the Electronic Structure of Cocaine and its Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, David A.; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, Maria Natália; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2009-11-01

    This work aims at describing the electronic features of cocaine and how they are modified by the different substituents present in its metabolites. The QTAIM analysis of B3LYP and MP2 electron densities obtained with the 6-311++G** 6d basis set for cocaine and its principal metabolites indicates: (i) its positive charge is shared among the amino hydrogen, those of the methylamino group, and all of the hydrogens attached to the bicycle structure; (ii) the zwitterionic structure of benzoylecgonine can be described as two partial charges of 0.63 au, the negative one shared by the oxygens of the carboxylate group, whereas the positive charge is distributed among all the hydrogens that bear the positive charge in cocaine; (iii) its hydrogen bond is strengthened in the derivatives without benzoyloxy group and is also slightly strengthened as the size of the alkyl ester group at position 2 increases.

  6. Cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alex; Walker, Vyvyca J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine, a potent addictive substance, is an inhibitor of monoamine transporters, including DAT (dopamine transporter), SERT (serotonin transporter) and NET (norepinephrine transporter). Cocaine administration induces complex behavioral alterations in mammals, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we tested the effect of cocaine on C. elegans behavior. We show for the first time that acute cocaine treatment evokes changes in C. elegans locomotor activity. Interestingly, the neurotransmitter serotonin, rather than dopamine, is required for cocaine response in C. elegans. The C. elegans SERT MOD-5 is essential for the effect of cocaine, consistent with the role of cocaine in targeting monoamine transporters. We further show that the behavioral response to cocaine is primarily mediated by the ionotropic serotonin receptor MOD-1. Thus, cocaine modulates locomotion behavior in C. elegans primarily by impinging on its serotoninergic system. PMID:19536276

  7. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Suchismita

    2013-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined both implicit and explicit memory processes involving cocaine related visual information in the same cocaine user, (b) neural mechanisms underlying implicit and explicit memory processes for cocaine-related visual cues have not been directly investigated in cocaine users in the imaging literature, and (c) none of the previous imaging studies has examined connectivity between the memory system and craving system in the brain of chronic users of cocaine. Finally, future directions in the field of cocaine addiction are suggested. PMID:25009766

  8. Cocaine Use: 2002 and 2003. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine, including crack cocaine, was responsible for 12.8 percent of admissions to substance abuse treatment services in 2002.1 The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) asks persons aged 12 or older to report their use of illicit drugs, including cocaine. NSDUH defines cocaine use as use of cocaine in any form, including crack cocaine.…

  9. Efficacy of contingency management for cocaine dependence treatment: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Schierenberg, Alwin; van Amsterdam, Jan; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2012-12-01

    Cocaine dependence causes serious individual and social harm and a considerable proportion of substance related treatment capacity is devoted to cocaine dependent persons. In the absence of approved pharmacotherapies, other treatments for cocaine dependence should be explored. In this review, the efficacy of Contingency Management (CM), a promising behavior therapy using operant conditioning, is evaluated for the treatment of cocaine dependence. A systematic evaluation of 19 studies with a total of 1,664 patients showed that CM - in combination with standard cognitive behavioral or other psychological interventions - (1) increases cocaine abstinence, (2) improves treatment retention during and after group-based or individual psychological treatment, (3) is of benefit in pharmacotherapy trials, and (4) that CM may act synergistically with pharmacotherapy. This suggests that CM is a promising add-on intervention for cocaine dependence treatment. Therefore, it is advocated to include CM in standard treatment programs for cocaine dependence and future pharmacotherapy research. Future larger studies are deemed necessary to replicate these promising results, now often lacking statistical significance. PMID:23244344

  10. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Kenneth J; Painter, Michael R; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A; Neisewander, Janet L

    2012-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e. the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-minute test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared with IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  11. Environmental enrichment counters cocaine abstinence-induced stress and brain reactivity to cocaine cues but fails to prevent the incubation effect

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Kenneth J.; Painter, Michael R.; Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Mitroi, Danut; Crawford, Cynthia A.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) during a period of forced abstinence attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine-paired stimuli. Here we examined whether EE during forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration would prevent time-dependent increases in cue-elicited cocaine-seeking behavior (i.e., the incubation effect). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, which was paired with light/tone cues, for 15 days while living in isolated conditions (IC). Controls received yoked saline infusions. Subsequently, rats were assigned to live in either continued IC or EE for either 1 or 21 days of forced abstinence prior to a test for cocaine-seeking behavior. During testing, responding resulted only in presentation of the light/tone cues. Contrary to our prediction, cocaine-seeking behavior increased over time regardless of living condition during abstinence; however, EE attenuated cocaine-seeking behavior relative to IC regardless of length of abstinence. Brains were harvested and trunk blood was collected immediately after the 60-min test and later assayed. Results indicated that short-term EE elevated hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reduced plasma corticosterone compared to IC. Furthermore, 21 days of EE during forced abstinence prevented increases in the cue-elicited amygdala phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression that was observed in IC rats. These findings suggest that EE attenuates incentive motivational effects of cocaine cues through a mechanism other than preventing the incubation effect, perhaps involving reduction of stress and neural activity in response to cocaine-paired cues during acute withdrawal. PMID:21812872

  12. Marker-assisted dissection of genetic influences on motor and neuroendocrine sensitization to cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, L F; Vendruscolo, J C M; Terenina, E; Ramos, A; Takahashi, R N; Mormède, P

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated genetic influences on behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to cocaine sensitization. We used male and female rats of the inbred strains Lewis (LEW) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), which display genetic differences in stress-related responses. The influence of two quantitative trait loci (QTL; Ofil1 and Ofil2 on chromosomes 4 and 7), which modulate stress reactivity in rats, on the effects of cocaine was also investigated through the use of recombinant lines (derived from a LEW x SHR intercross) selected by their genotype at Ofil1 and Ofil2. Animals were given repeated cocaine or saline injections and tested for locomotion (induction of sensitization). Two weeks later, all animals were challenged with cocaine, and locomotion and corticosterone levels were measured (expression of sensitization). Results indicated that male SHR rats showed more behavioral sensitization than LEW rats, whereas no strain differences in sensitization were seen among females. When challenged with cocaine, LEW and SHR rats of both sexes pretreated with cocaine showed behavioral sensitization compared with saline pretreated animals; however, only LEW rats displayed an increase in the corticosterone levels. Ofil1 was found to influence the induction of sensitization in males and Ofil2 modulated the locomotor effect of cocaine in females. This study provides evidence of a genotype-dependent relationship between the induction and expression of cocaine sensitization, and between the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses induced by cocaine. Moreover, the Ofil1 and Ofil2 loci may contain one or more genes that control the behavioral effects of cocaine in rats. PMID:19077120

  13. Cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion and neuronal apoptosis from HIV-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zenón, Frances; Segarra, Annabell C; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Meléndez, Loyda M

    2014-12-01

    Substance abuse is a risk factor for HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Recent evidence establishes that cocaine use promotes brain perivascular macrophage infiltration and microglia activation. The lysosomal protease cathepsin B is increased in monocytes from patients with HIV dementia and its secretion induces 10-15% of neurotoxicity. Here we asked if cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion from HIV-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and its effect in neuronal apoptosis. Samples of plasma, CSF, and post-mortem brain tissue from HIV positive patients that used cocaine were tested for cathepsin B and its inhibitors to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings. MDM were inoculated with HIV-1ADA, exposed to cocaine, and the levels of secreted and bioactive cathepsin B and its inhibitors were measured at different time-points. Cathepsin B expression (p < 0.001) and activity (p < 0.05) increased in supernatants from HIV-infected cocaine treated MDM compared with HIV-infected cocaine negative controls. Increased levels of cystatin B expression was also found in supernatants from HIV-cocaine treated MDM (p < 0.05). A significant increase in 30% of apoptotic neurons was obtained that decreased to 5% with the specific cathepsin B inhibitor (CA-074) or with cathepsin B antibody. Cathepsin B was significantly increased in the plasma and post-mortem brain tissue of HIV/cocaine users over non-drug users. Our results demonstrated that cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion in HIV-infected MDM and increase neuronal apoptosis. These findings provide new evidence that cocaine synergize with HIV-1 infection in increasing cathepsin B secretion and neurotoxicity. PMID:25209871

  14. Behavioral effects of cocaine mediated by nitric oxide-GAPDH transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Risheng; Serritella, Anthony V; Sen, Tanusree; Farook, Justin M; Sedlak, Thomas W; Baraban, Jay; Snyder, Solomon H; Sen, Nilkantha

    2013-05-22

    Cocaine's behavioral-stimulant effects derive from potentiation of synaptic signaling by dopamine and serotonin leading to transcriptional alterations in postsynaptic cells. We report that a signaling cascade involving nitric oxide (NO) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mediates cocaine's transcriptional and behavioral actions. Lower, behavioral-stimulant doses enhance the cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling system, while higher, neurotoxic doses stimulate the p53 cytotoxic system. The drug CGP3466B, which potently and selectively blocks GAPDH nitrosylation and GAPDH-Siah binding, prevents these actions as well as behavioral effects of cocaine providing a strategy for anticocaine therapy. PMID:23719162

  15. Encounters with aggressive conspecifics enhance the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marrow, L P; Overton, P G; Brain, P F; Clark, D

    1999-10-01

    Evidence suggests that stress enhances the behavioural actions of cocaine in the rat. Paradoxically, however, encounters with aggressive conspecifics lead to a pattern of cocaine self-administration indicative of a reduced functional impact of the drug. Hence, we examined the effects of aggressive encounters on another behavioural measure-locomotor activity. Encounters between Lister Hooded rats and rats of the aggressive Tryon Maze Dull strain significantly enhanced the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine (20 mg/kg) in the Lister Hooded rats. The results suggest that the discrepant findings derived from self-administration studies are a property of the paradigm rather than a property of the stressor. PMID:20575812

  16. Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Katherine R.; Pike, Erika; Stoops, William W.; Rush, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is a known antecedent to cocaine relapse. Through associative conditioning, it is hypothesized that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine and thus the salience of cocaine-related cues, which are important in maintaining drug-taking behavior. Cocaine-using individuals display a robust cocaine cue attentional bias as measured by fixation time during the visual probe task. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of alcohol administration on cocaine cue attentional bias using eye-tracking technology to directly measure attentional allocation. Methods Twenty current cocaine users completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects study that tested the effect of three doses of alcohol (0.00, 0.325, 0.65 g/kg alcohol) on cocaine cue attentional bias using the visual probe task with eye-tracking technology. The participant-rated and physiological effects of alcohol were also assessed. Results Participants displayed a robust cocaine cue attentional bias following both placebo and alcohol administration as measured by fixation time, but not response time. Alcohol administration did not influence cocaine cue attentional bias, but increased craving for cocaine in a dose dependent manner. Alcohol produced prototypic psychomotor and participant-rated effects. Conclusions Alcohol administration increases cocaine craving but not cocaine cue attentional bias. Alcohol-induced cocaine craving suggests that alcohol increases incentive motivation for cocaine but not the salience of cocaine-related cues. PMID:26331880

  17. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with talc pulmonary granulomatosis after cocaine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Accardo, Marina; Rossi, Francesco; Santini, Mario

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with cocaine abuse through inhalation alone. He underwent thoracoscopic apical lung resection with mechanical pleurodesis. Despite the lack of significant radiological features of talc induced pulmonary granulomatosis, pathological findings showed granulomas with foreign materials suggestive of being talc. Electronic microscopy showed that the size of talc particles were <4.0 µm and thus small enough to reach the alveoli. PMID:24942102

  18. Cocaine Enhances HIV-1 Transcription in Macrophages by Inducing p38 MAPK Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Swepson, Chelsie; Ranjan, Alok; Balasubramaniam, Muthukumar; Pandhare, Jui; Dash, Chandravanu

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly used illicit drug among HIV-1 infected individuals and is known to increase HIV-1 replication in permissive cells including PBMCs, CD4+ T cells, and macrophages. Cocaine’s potentiating effects on HIV-1 replication in macrophages- the primary targets of the virus in the central nervous system, has been suggested to play an important role in HIV-1 neuro-pathogenesis. However, the mechanism by which cocaine enhances HIV-1 replication in macrophages remain poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of cocaine-induced signaling events that lead to enhanced HIV-1 transcription in macrophages. Treatment of physiologically relevant concentrations of cocaine enhanced HIV-1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner in infected THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1macs) and primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Toward decoding the underlying mechanism, results presented in this report demonstrate that cocaine induces the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), a known activator of HIV-1 transcription. We also present data suggesting that the p38 MAPK-driven HIV-1 transcription is dependent on the induction of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1). Consequently, MSK1 mediates the phosphorylation of serine 10 residue of histone 3 (H3 Ser10), which is known to activate transcription of genes including that of HIV-1 in macrophages. Importantly, our results show that inhibition of p38 MAPK/MSK1 signaling by specific pharmacological inhibitors abrogated the positive effect of cocaine on HIV-1 transcription. These results validate the functional link between cocaine and p38 MAPK/MSK1 pathways. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that the p38 MAPK/MSK1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in the cocaine-induced potentiating effects on HIV-1 infection, thus providing new insights into the interplay between cocaine abuse and HIV-1 neuro-pathogenesis. PMID:27375565

  19. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  20. Lacking "Lack": A Reply to Joldersma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, James D.

    2007-01-01

    First I would like to thank Clarence Joldersma for his review of our "Poststructuralism, Philosophy, Pedagogy" (Marshall, 2004-PPP). In particular, I would thank him for his opening sentence: "[t]his book is a response to a lack." It is the notion of a lack, noted again later in his review, which I wish to take up mainly in this response. Rather…

  1. Lack of Association between Nuclear Factor Erythroid-Derived 2-Like 2 Promoter Gene Polymorphisms and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Lucia; Borgia, Loredana; Rocchi, Anna; D'Amelio, Antonia; Carlesi, Cecilia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress involvement has been strongly hypothesized among the possible pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The intracellular redox balance is finely modulated by numerous complex mechanisms critical for cellular functions, among which the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) pathways. We genotyped, in a cohort of ALS patients (n = 145) and healthy controls (n = 168), three SNPs in Nrf2 gene promoter: −653 A/G, −651 G/A, and −617 C/A and evaluated, in a subset (n = 73) of patients, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), iron-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and plasma thiols (-SH) as oxidative damage peripheral biomarkers. Nrf2 polymorphisms were not different among patients and controls. Increased levels of AOPP (P < 0.05) and decreased levels of FRAP (P < 0.001) have been observed in ALS patients compared with controls, but no difference in -SH values was found. Furthermore, no association was found between biochemical markers of redox balance and Nrf2 polymorphisms. These data confirm an altered redox balance in ALS and indicate that, while being abnormally modified compared to controls, the oxidative stress biomarkers assessed in this study are independent from the −653 A/G, −651 G/A, and −617 C/A Nrf2 SNPs in ALS patients. PMID:24672634

  2. Lack of association between nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 promoter gene polymorphisms and oxidative stress biomarkers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    LoGerfo, Annalisa; Chico, Lucia; Borgia, Loredana; Petrozzi, Lucia; Rocchi, Anna; D'Amelio, Antonia; Carlesi, Cecilia; Caldarazzo Ienco, Elena; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress involvement has been strongly hypothesized among the possible pathogenic mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The intracellular redox balance is finely modulated by numerous complex mechanisms critical for cellular functions, among which the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) pathways. We genotyped, in a cohort of ALS patients (n = 145) and healthy controls (n = 168), three SNPs in Nrf2 gene promoter: -653 A/G, -651 G/A, and -617 C/A and evaluated, in a subset (n = 73) of patients, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), iron-reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and plasma thiols (-SH) as oxidative damage peripheral biomarkers. Nrf2 polymorphisms were not different among patients and controls. Increased levels of AOPP (P < 0.05) and decreased levels of FRAP (P < 0.001) have been observed in ALS patients compared with controls, but no difference in -SH values was found. Furthermore, no association was found between biochemical markers of redox balance and Nrf2 polymorphisms. These data confirm an altered redox balance in ALS and indicate that, while being abnormally modified compared to controls, the oxidative stress biomarkers assessed in this study are independent from the -653 A/G, -651 G/A, and -617 C/A Nrf2 SNPs in ALS patients. PMID:24672634

  3. Interactions of Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 (RS218) and Its Derivatives Lacking Genomic Islands with Phagocytic Acanthamoeba castellanii and Nonphagocytic Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Farzana Abubakar; Yousuf, Zuhair; Iqbal, Junaid; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Hafsa; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Here we determined the role of various genomic islands in E. coli K1 interactions with phagocytic A. castellanii and nonphagocytic brain microvascular endothelial cells. The findings revealed that the genomic islands deletion mutants of RS218 related to toxins (peptide toxin, α-hemolysin), adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (IbeA, CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism, dihydroxyacetone, glycerol, and glyoxylate metabolism) showed reduced interactions with both A. castellanii and brain microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, the deletion of RS218-derived genomic island 21 containing adhesins (P fimbriae, F17-like fimbriae, nonfimbrial adhesins, Hek, and hemagglutinin), protein secretion system (T1SS for hemolysin), invasins (CNF1), metabolism (D-serine catabolism) abolished E. coli K1-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity in a CNF1-independent manner. Therefore, the characterization of these genomic islands should reveal mechanisms of evolutionary gain for E. coli K1 pathogenicity. PMID:24818136

  4. Prenatal stress enhances responsiveness to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kippin, Tod E; Szumlinski, Karen K; Kapasova, Zuzana; Rezner, Betsy; See, Ronald E

    2008-03-01

    Early environmental events have profound influences on a wide range of adult behavior. In the current study, we assessed the influence of maternal stress during gestation on psychostimulant and neurochemical responsiveness to cocaine, cocaine self-administration, and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in adult offspring. Pregnant, female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either no treatment or to restraint stress three times per day for the last 7 days of gestation and cocaine-related behavior was assessed in offspring at 10 weeks of age. Relative to controls, a noncontingent cocaine injection elevated locomotor activity as well as nucleus accumbens levels of extracellular dopamine and glutamate to a greater extent in both cocaine-naive and cocaine-experienced prenatal stress (PNS) rats and elevated prefrontal cortex dopamine in cocaine-experienced PNS rats. To assess the impact of PNS on cocaine addiction-related behavior, rats were trained to lever press for intravenous (i.v.) infusions of cocaine (0.25, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg/infusion), with each infusion paired with a light+tone-conditioned stimulus. Lever-pressing was extinguished and cocaine-seeking reinstated by re-exposure to the conditioned cues or by intraperitoneal cocaine-priming injections (5 or 10 mg/kg). PNS elevated active lever responding both during extinction and cocaine-primed reinstatement, but not during self-administration or conditioned-cued reinstatement. PNS also did not alter intake during self-administration. These findings demonstrate that PNS produces enduring nervous system alterations that increase the psychomotor stimulant, motivational, and neurochemical responsiveness to noncontingent cocaine. Thus, early environmental factors contribute to an individual's initial responsiveness to cocaine and propensity to relapse to cocaine-seeking. PMID:17487224

  5. Antibody-Catalyzed Degradation of Cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Donald W.; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ginger X.-Q.; Glickman, Michael; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.

    1993-03-01

    Immunization with a phosphonate monoester transition-state analog of cocaine provided monoclonal antibodies capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of the cocaine benzoyl ester group. An assay for the degradation of radiolabeled cocaine identified active enzymes. Benzoyl esterolysis yields ecgonine methyl ester and benzoic acid, fragments devoid of cocaine's stimulant activity. Passive immunization with such an artificial enzyme could provide a treatment for dependence by blunting reinforcement.

  6. Cortical mechanisms of cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Steketee, Jeffery D

    2005-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization is the augmented motor-stimulant response that occurs with repeated, intermittent exposure to most drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Sensitization, which is a long-lasting phenomenon, is thought to underlie drug craving and relapse to drug use. Much research has been conducted to determine the neural mechanisms of sensitization. The bulk of this effort has focused on the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area (VTA) that comprise a portion of the mesolimbic dopamine system. Recently, studies have begun to also explore the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in sensitization, in part because this region provides glutamatergic innervation to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The present review will coalesce these studies into a working hypothesis that states that cocaine sensitization results from a decrease in inhibitory modulation of excitatory transmission from the mPFC to the VTA and nucleus accumbens. The discussion will revolve around how repeated cocaine exposure alters dopamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamate regulation of pyramidal cell activity. It will be proposed that cocaine-induced alterations in cortical transmission occur in two phases. During early withdrawal from repeated cocaine exposure, changes in neurotransmitter release are thought to underlie the decreased inhibitory modulation of pyramidal projection neurons. Following more prolonged withdrawal, the attenuation in inhibitory transmission appears to occur at the receptor level. A model will be presented that may serve to direct future studies on the involvement of the mPFC in the development of cocaine sensitization, which ultimately could lead to development of pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction. PMID:16808728

  7. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  8. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  9. Discriminative and reinforcing stimulus effects of nicotine, cocaine, and cocaine + nicotine combinations in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Newman, Jennifer L

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent cigarette smoking and cocaine use is well documented. However, the behavioral pharmacology of cocaine and nicotine combinations is poorly understood, and there is a need for animal models to examine this form of polydrug abuse. The purpose of this study was twofold: first to assess the effects of nicotine on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, and second, to study self-administration of nicotine/cocaine combinations in a novel polydrug abuse model. In drug discrimination experiments, nicotine increased the discriminative stimulus effects of low cocaine doses in two of three monkeys, but nicotine did not substitute for cocaine in any monkey. Self-administration of cocaine and nicotine alone, and cocaine + nicotine combinations was studied under a second-order fixed ratio 2, variable ratio 16 (FR2[VR16:S]) schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine and nicotine alone were self-administered in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of marginally reinforcing doses of cocaine and nicotine increased drug self-administration behavior above levels observed with the same dose of either cocaine or nicotine alone. These findings indicate that nicotine may increase cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects in rhesus monkeys, and illustrate the feasibility of combining cocaine and nicotine in a preclinical model of polydrug abuse. Further studies of the behavioral effects of nicotine + cocaine combinations will contribute to our understanding the pharmacology of dual nicotine and cocaine dependence, and will be useful for evaluation of new treatment medications. PMID:21480727

  10. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  11. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  12. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  13. Tips for Teens: The Truth about Cocaine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rock (Crack) Get the Facts… Cocaine affects your brain. The word “cocaine” refers to the drug in both a powder ( ... when you’re not high. Cocaine is addictive. Cocaine interferes with the way your brain processes chemicals that create feelings of pleasure, so ...

  14. Effects of extended cocaine access and cocaine withdrawal on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Negus, S Stevens

    2010-01-01

    Chronic drug use may lead to sufficient drug intake to produce dependence and the emergence of abstinence signs during withdrawal. Although withdrawal can increase the reinforcing effects of some drugs (eg opioids), the impact of withdrawal on the reinforcing effects of stimulants like cocaine is less clear. This study used a novel cocaine vs food choice procedure to examine the relative reinforcing strength of cocaine before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of extended cocaine access. Responding in four rhesus monkeys was maintained by cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) and food delivery under a concurrent-choice schedule during daily 2-h sessions. Under baseline conditions, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Subsequently, subjects were exposed to and withdrawn from periods of extended cocaine access, which was accomplished by implementing daily 21-h supplemental sessions of cocaine self-administration in addition to daily choice sessions. During supplemental sessions, cocaine (0.1 mg/kg/injection) was available under a fixed-ratio 10/time-out X schedule, and the duration of the time-out was varied from 30 to 7.5 min. Cocaine intake increased 10-fold to >11 mg/kg/day during exposure to supplemental sessions with the shortest post-injection time-out. However, parameters of cocaine choice were not significantly affected either during or after extended cocaine access. These results do not support the hypothesis that cocaine withdrawal increases the reinforcing strength of cocaine. This differs from results with the opioid agonist heroin and suggests that withdrawal may have different functions in the maintenance of opioid and stimulant abuse. PMID:19776729

  15. Possibilities for discrimination between chewing of coca leaves and abuse of cocaine by hair analysis including hygrine, cuscohygrine, cinnamoylcocaine and cocaine metabolite/cocaine ratios.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Nelida Cristina; Hastedt, Martin; Gonzalez, Jorge; Pragst, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the illegal use of any form of manufactured cocaine, chewing of coca leaves and drinking of coca tea are allowed and are very common and socially integrated in several South American countries. Because of this different legal state, an analytical method for discrimination between use of coca leaves and abuse of processed cocaine preparations is required. In this study, the applicability of hair analysis for this purpose was examined. Hair samples from 26 Argentinean coca chewers and 22 German cocaine users were analysed for cocaine (COC), norcocaine (NC), benzoylecgonine (BE), ecgonine methyl ester (EME), cocaethylene (CE), cinnamoylcocaine (CIN), tropacocaine (TRO), cuscohygrine (CUS) and hygrine (HYG) by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) in combination with triplequad mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOF-MS). The following concentrations (range, median, ng/mg) were determined in hair of the coca chewers: COC 0.085-75.5, 17.0; NC 0.03-1.15, 0.12; BE 0.046-35.5, 6.1; EME 0.014-6.0, 0.66; CE 0.00-13.8, 0.38; CIN 0.005-16.8, 0.79; TRO 0.02-0.16, 0.023; CUS 0.026-26.7, 0.31. In lack of a reference substance, only qualitative data were obtained for HYG, and two metabolites of CUS were detected which were not found in hair of the cocaine users. For interpretation, the concentrations of the metabolites and of the coca alkaloids in relation to cocaine were statistically compared between coca chewers and cocaine users. By analysis of variance (ANOVA) significant differences were found for all analytes (α = 0.000 to 0.030) with the exception of TRO (α = 0.218). The ratios CUS/COC, CIN/COC and EME/COC appeared to be the most suitable criteria for discrimination between both groups with the means and medians 5-fold to 10-fold higher for coca chewers and a low overlap of the ranges between both groups. The same was qualitatively found for HYG. However, these criteria cannot exclude

  16. ¹H NMR-based metabonomics in brain nucleus accumbens and striatum following repeated cocaine treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Yan, G-Y; Zhou, J-Q; Bu, Q; Deng, P-C; Yang, Y-Z; Lv, L; Deng, Y; Zhao, J-X; Shao, X; Zhu, R-M; Huang, Y-N; Zhao, Y-L; Cen, X-B

    2012-08-30

    Studies have shown a few cerebral metabolites modified by cocaine in brain regions; however, endogenous metabolic profiling has been lacking. Ex vivo (1)H NMR (hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy-based metabonomic approach coupled with partial least squares was applied to investigate the changes of cerebral metabolites in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and striatum of rats subjected to cocaine treatment. Our results showed that both single and repeated cocaine treatment can induce significant changes in a couple of cerebral metabolites. The increase of neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) were observed in NAc and striatum from the rats repeatedly treated with cocaine. Creatine and taurine increased in NAc whereas taurine increased and creatine decreased in striatum after repeated cocaine treatment. Elevation of N-acetylaspartate in NAc and striatum and decrease of lactate in striatum were observed, which may reflect the mitochondria dysregulation caused by cocaine; moreover, alterations of choline, phosphocholine and glycerol in NAc and striatum could be related to membrane disruption. Moreover, groups of rats with and without conditioned place preference (CPP) apparatus are presenting difference in metabolites. Collectively, our results provide the first evidence of metabonomic profiling of NAc and striatum in response to cocaine, exhibiting a regionally-specific alteration patterns. We find that repeated cocaine administration leads to significant metabolite alterations, which are involved in neurotransmitter disturbance, oxidative stress, mitochondria dysregulation and membrane disruption in brain. PMID:22609933

  17. The neuropathology of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Andreas; Mall, Gita; Penning, Randolph; Sachs, Hans; Weis, Serge

    2003-03-01

    Cocaine abuse represents a worldwide significant forensic issue as it is becoming widely recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs in common use today. Besides cardiovascular complications, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms are the most common manifestations of cocaine toxicity. The latter include seizures, movement disorders and cerebrovascular complications. In chronic cocaine abusers morphological, physiological, and neurochemical abnormalities have been demonstrated by using neuroradiological techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography. The spectrum of neuropathologic changes encountered in the brains of cocaine abusers is broad, but the major findings consist of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhages and cerebral ischemia. Especially persons with underlying arteriovenous malformation or aneurysm are at risk for such events. Except for a few instances of vasculitis, the etiology of cocaine-related cerebrovascular accidents is still unclear. Besides pharmacologically-induced vasospasm, impaired hemostasis and platelet function and decreased cerebral blood flow have been proposed. At the cellular level, abnormalities in the expression of transcription factors and changes of brain neurotransmitter systems have been reported. PMID:12935600

  18. The relationship between years of cocaine use and brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Joseph, Jane E.; Myrick, Hugh; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Henderson, Scott; Pfeifer, James; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging research has attempted to elucidate the neurobehavioral underpinnings of cocaine dependence by evaluating differences in brain activation to cocaine and response inhibition cues between cocaine dependent individuals and controls. Less research has investigated associations between task-related brain activation and cocaine use characteristics; the present study was designed to address this gap in the literature. Design Cross-sectional. Setting The Center for Brain Imaging at the Medical University of South Carolina. Participants 51 cocaine users (41 dependent). Measurements Brain activation to cocaine-cue exposure and go no-go tasks in six a priori selected brain regions of interest and cocaine use characteristics (i.e., cocaine dependence status, years of cocaine use, cocaine use in the past 90 days) assessed via standardized interviews. Findings Participants demonstrated elevated activation to cocaine (bilateral ventral striatum, dorsal caudate, amygdala; mean F=19.00, mean p<.001) and response inhibition (bilateral anterior cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus; mean F=7.01, mean p=.02) cues in all hypothesized brain regions. Years of cocaine use was associated with task-related brain activation, with more years of cocaine use associated with greater activation to cocaine cues in right (F=7.97,p=.01) and left (F=5.47,p=.02) ventral striatum and greater activation to response inhibition cues in left insula (F=5.10,p=.03) and inferior frontal gyrus (F=4.12,p=.05) controlling for age, cocaine dependence status, and cocaine use in the past 90 days. Conclusions Years of cocaine use may be more centrally related to cocaine cue and response inhibition brain activation as compared to cocaine dependence diagnosis or amount of recent use. PMID:24938849

  19. Cognitive effects of cocaine and polydrug abuse.

    PubMed

    Rosselli, M; Ardila, A

    1996-02-01

    One hundred and eighty-three participants were divided into three groups containing: 61 cocaine-dependent; 59 polydrug-dependent; and 63 normal subjects. All were evaluated using a basic neuropsychological assessment battery. The dependent groups exhibited significantly lower scores on short-term memory, attention, and concept formation tests. Performance on some subtests correlated negatively with the length of dependency and frequency of substance use. As compared with the control group, the dependent groups exhibited significant differences in the following personal and family areas: (a) depression and anxiety traits; (b) self-aggression and lack of fear in childhood; (c) family history of substance dependency; and (d) difficulties with interpersonal relationships. The operation of predisposing developmental factors for substance dependence is suggested. PMID:8926291

  20. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  1. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  2. Cocaine cue versus cocaine dosing in humans: Evidence for distinct neurophysiological response profiles

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Malcolm S.; Flammino, Frank; Howard, Bryant; Nilsen, Diana; Prichep, Leslie S.

    2008-01-01

    Subjective, physiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) profiles were studied in cocaine dependent study participants in response to cocaine cue exposure or a dose of smoked cocaine. Both stimuli increased subjective ratings of cocaine high and craving, enhanced negative affect, and boosted plasma ACTH and skin conductance levels. However, cocaine dose produced a greater increase in high and a more prolonged increase in plasma ACTH, while cocaine cue produced a decline in skin temperature. Both stimuli produced increases in absolute theta, alpha and beta EEG power over the prefrontal cortex. However, interhemispheric EEG coherence over the prefrontal cortex decreased during cocaine cue exposure but increased following cocaine dose. Moreover, correlation analysis of subjective, physiological and EEG responding to cocaine cue and dose revealed distinct profiles. Delta and theta activity were associated with negative affect during cocaine cue exposure, but were associated with cocaine craving and reward following cocaine dosing. In both conditions, alpha activity was marker for anxiousness but not high. These data demonstrate similar subjective, physiological responding in clinical laboratory states of cocaine craving and reward. However, differences in EEG response profiles, and their relationship to function, indicate distinct neurophysiological mediators of cocaine craving and reward within the prefrontal cortex. PMID:18674556

  3. Cocaine use and the breastfeeding mother.

    PubMed

    Jones, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is the second most commonly used illicit drug. Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding may have severe consequences for the baby due to its pharmacokinetic properties. Midwives need to be aware of the prolonged action of cocaine and be alert to the possibility of cocaine toxicity if a baby is excessively irritable and tachycardic. Euphoric highs are brief but breast milk and urine remain positive for long periods. Infant urine following exposure to cocaine via breast milk may remain positive for up to 60 hours. Mothers who snort cocaine should pump and dump breast milk for 24-48 hours. Passive inhalation of crack cocaine smoke may also result in infants with positive toxicology screens. Cocaine powder should never be applied to the nipples of breastfeeding mothers. PMID:26310088

  4. Cocaine abuse among heroin addicts in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torrens, M; San, L; Peri, J M; Olle, J M

    1991-01-01

    Abuse of cocaine is becoming a major problem among heroin addicts in Spain. Between 1987 and 1988, 75% of patients admitted as inpatients for detoxification from opiate dependence had consumed cocaine during the 6 months prior to admission and 25% had abused cocaine daily or several times/week. These cocaine abusers showed more toxicologic and psychopathologic problems than opiate addicts who did not abuse cocaine. The opiate addicts who also abused cocaine had begun using illicit drugs earlier and showed a higher frequency of anti-HIV antibodies. They also had more antisocial personality disorders and persistence of depressive symptoms during opiate detoxification than heroin addicts who did not abuse cocaine. Based on these findings, we insist on the need to develop different treatments for detoxifying patients with this dual addiction. PMID:2029857

  5. Prefrontal cortical BDNF: A regulatory key in cocaine- and food-reinforced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pitts, Elizabeth G; Taylor, Jane R; Gourley, Shannon L

    2016-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects synaptic plasticity and neural structure and plays key roles in learning and memory processes. Recent evidence also points to important, yet complex, roles for BDNF in rodent models of cocaine abuse and addiction. Here we examine the role of prefrontal cortical (PFC) BDNF in reward-related decision making and behavioral sensitivity to, and responding for, cocaine. We focus on BDNF within the medial and orbital PFC, its regulation by cocaine during early postnatal development and in adulthood, and how BDNF in turn influences responding for drug reinforcement, including in reinstatement models. When relevant, we draw comparisons and contrasts with experiments using natural (food) reinforcers. We also summarize findings supporting, or refuting, the possibility that BDNF in the medial and orbital PFC regulate the development and maintenance of stimulus-response habits. Further investigation could assist in the development of novel treatment approaches for cocaine use disorders. PMID:26923993

  6. Intravenous Cocaine Priming Reinstates Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombas, Andres S.; Freeman, Kevin B.; Roma, Peter G.; Riley, Anthony L.

    2007-01-01

    Separate groups of rats underwent an unbiased conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure involving alternate pairings of distinct environments with intravenous (IV) injections of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg) or saline immediately or 15 min after injection. A subsequent extinction phase consisted of exposure to both conditioning environments preceded by…

  7. Neurodegeneration of lateral habenula efferent fibers after intermittent cocaine administration: implications for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lax, Elad; Friedman, Alexander; Croitoru, Ofri; Sudai, Einav; Ben-Moshe, Hila; Redlus, Lior; Sasson, Efrat; Blumenfeld-Katzir, Tamar; Assaf, Yaniv; Yadid, Gal

    2013-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging technique for effective, non-pharmacological intervention in the course of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Several brain targets have been suggested as suitable for DBS treatment of drug addiction. Previously, we showed that DBS of the lateral habenula (LHb) can reduce cocaine intake, facilitate extinction and attenuate drug-induced relapse in rats trained to self-administrate cocaine. Herein, we demonstrated that cocaine self-administration dose-dependently decreased connectivity between the LHb and midbrain, as shown by neurodegeneration of the main LHb efferent fiber, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR). FR degeneration, in turn, may have caused lack of response to LHb stimulation in rats trained to self-administer high-dose cocaine (1.5 mg/kg; i.v.). Furthermore, we show that the micro-structural changes caused by cocaine can be non-invasively detected using magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Detection of cocaine-induced alterations in FR anatomy can aid the selection of potential responders to LHb stimulation for treatment of drug addiction. PMID:23891640

  8. Orbitofrontal activation restores insight lost after cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Lucantonio, Federica; Takahashi, Yuji K; Hoffman, Alexander F; Chang, Chun Yun; Bali-Chaudhary, Sheena; Shaham, Yavin; Lupica, Carl R; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2014-08-01

    Addiction is characterized by a lack of insight into the likely outcomes of one's behavior. Insight, or the ability to imagine outcomes, is evident when outcomes have not been directly experienced. Using this concept, work in both rats and humans has recently identified neural correlates of insight in the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices. We found that these correlates were selectively abolished in rats by cocaine self-administration. Their abolition was associated with behavioral deficits and reduced synaptic efficacy in orbitofrontal cortex, the reversal of which by optogenetic activation restored normal behavior. These results provide a link between cocaine use and problems with insight. Deficits in these functions are likely to be particularly important for problems such as drug relapse, in which behavior fails to account for likely adverse outcomes. As such, our data provide a neural target for therapeutic approaches to address these defining long-term effects of drug use. PMID:25042581

  9. Treatment of cocaine craving with as-needed nalmefene, a partial κ opioid receptor agonist: first clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Grosshans, Martin; Mutschler, Jochen; Kiefer, Falk

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of cocaine dependence is difficult as no approved pharmacotherapy is available as yet. However, in preclinical and clinical trials, a variety of compounds were tested for suitability as inhibitors of craving for and relapse into the use of cocaine, among these antidepressants, antiepileptics, dopamine agonists, disulfiram, and naltrexone. Nalmefene, a structural derivative of naltrexone, shares with its parent compound approval (granted by the European Medical Agency in 2013) as a medication for the treatment of alcohol addiction in the European Union. It differs from naltrexone by a higher affinity for the δ opioid-receptors and a partial agonistic affinity to the κ opioid-receptors. It should be noted that patients addicted to cocaine show a considerable increase in κ receptors in the nucleus accumbens. This report describes the case of an abstinent cocaine-addicted patient regularly afflicted with cravings for cocaine. The patient took as-needed nalmefene for 5 months whenever she developed a craving for cocaine. For most of these interventions, the patient reported an abatement of craving and could avoid relapsing into cocaine consumption. This effect may be accounted for by nalmefene acting, other than naltrexone, as a partial agonist of the κ opioid-receptors. Therefore, nalmefene might be a promising new option in the pharmacological repertoire for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:25647453

  10. 5-HT1A Autoreceptors in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Convey Vulnerability to Compulsive Cocaine Seeking.

    PubMed

    You, In-Jee; Wright, Sherie R; Garcia-Garcia, Alvaro L; Tapper, Andrew R; Gardner, Paul D; Koob, George F; David Leonardo, E; Bohn, Laura M; Wee, Sunmee

    2016-04-01

    Cocaine addiction and depression are comorbid disorders. Although it is well recognized that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) plays a central role in depression, our understanding of its role in addiction is notably lacking. The 5-HT system in the brain is carefully controlled by a combined process of regulating 5-HT neuron firing through 5-HT autoreceptors, neurotransmitter release, enzymatic degradation, and reuptake by transporters. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, which would lessen 5-HT neuron firing, contributes to cocaine-seeking behaviors. Using 5-HT neuron-specific reduction of 5-HT1A autoreceptor gene expression in mice, we demonstrate that 5-HT1A autoreceptors are necessary for cocaine conditioned place preference. In addition, using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) technology, we found that stimulation of the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) afferents to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) abolishes cocaine reward and promotes antidepressive-like behaviors. Finally, using a rat model of compulsive-like cocaine self-administration, we found that inhibition of dorsal raphe 5-HT1A autoreceptors attenuates cocaine self-administration in rats with 6 h extended access, but not 1 h access to the drug. Therefore, our findings suggest an important role for 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and thus DRNNAc 5-HT neuronal activity, in the etiology and vulnerability to cocaine reward and addiction. Moreover, our findings support a strategy for antagonizing 5-HT1A autoreceptors for treating cocaine addiction. PMID:26324408

  11. Effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S Stevens; Poklis, Justin L; Banks, Matthew L

    2015-10-01

    One complicating factor in cocaine addiction may be concurrent exposure and potential dependence on nicotine. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of continuous nicotine treatment and subsequent termination on cocaine versus food choice in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). For comparison, we also determined effects of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine on cocaine versus food choice during continuous saline and nicotine treatment. Rhesus monkeys (N = 3) responded under a concurrent schedule of food pellet (1 g) and intravenous cocaine (0-0.1 mg/kg/injection) availability. Saline and ascending nicotine doses (0.1-1.0 mg/kg/hr, intravenous) were continuously infused for 7-day treatment periods and separated by 24-hr saline treatment periods. Acute effects of mecamylamine (0.32-1.8 mg/kg, intramuscular, 15 min pretreatment) were determined during continuous saline and 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatments. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Nicotine treatment did not alter cocaine versus food choice. In contrast, preference of 0.032 mg/kg/injection cocaine was attenuated 24 hr following termination of 0.32-mg/kg/hr nicotine treatment, despite no somatic abstinence signs being observed. Acute mecamylamine enhanced cocaine choice during saline treatment and mainly suppressed rates of behavior during nicotine treatment. Overall, continuous nicotine exposure, up to 1 mg/kg/hr, does not enhance cocaine choice and does not produce nicotine dependence, as demonstrated by the lack of abstinence signs. PMID:26098473

  12. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction. PMID:20680706

  13. Rethinking Cocaine-Associated Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Jonathan B.; Marhefka, Gregary D.

    2011-01-01

    Every year more than 500,000 patients present to the emergency department with cocaine-associated complications, most commonly chest pain. Many of these patients undergo extensive work-up and treatment. Much of the evidence regarding cocaine’s cardiovascular effects, as well as the current management of cocaine-associated chest pain and acute coronary syndromes, is anecdotally derived and based on studies written more than 2 decades ago that involved only a few patients. Newer studies have brought into question many of the commonly held theories and practices regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this common clinical scenario. However, there continues to be a paucity of prospective, randomized trials addressing this topic as it relates to clinical outcomes. We searched PubMed for English-language articles from 1960 to 2011 using the keywords cocaine, chest pain, coronary arteries, myocardial infarction, emergency department, cardiac biomarkers, electrocardiogram, coronary computed tomography, observation unit, β-blockers, benzodiazepines, nitroglycerin, calcium channel blockers, phentolamine, and cardiomyopathy; including various combinations of these terms. We reviewed the abstracts to confirm relevance, and then full articles were extracted. References from extracted articles were also reviewed for relevant articles. In this review, we critically evaluate the limited historical evidence underlying the current teachings on cocaine’s cardiovascular effects and management of cocaine-associated chest pain. We aim to update the reader on more recent, albeit small, studies on the emergency department evaluation and clinical and pharmacologic management of cocaine-associated chest pain. Finally, we summarize recent guidelines and review an algorithm based on the current best evidence. PMID:22134939

  14. Occult cocaine exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, N M; Meert, K L; Knazik, S R; Yee, H; Kauffman, R E

    1991-12-01

    We determined the prevalence of cocaine and cannabinoid exposure among young children presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department without signs or symptoms suggestive of the exposure. The study included 460 children between 1 and 60 months of age in whom urinalysis was required for investigation of routine pediatric complaints. Anonymously and without informed consent, an aliquot of urine was screened for cocaine metabolite (benzoylecgonine) and 11- or delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid with the enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique. Positive specimens were rescreened with a radioimmunoassay and confirmed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, if a sufficient quantity of urine was available. Benzoylecgonine was identified in 25 patients (5.4%) by both screening techniques. Enough urine was available for confirmatory testing in eight patients, and all eight urine specimens contained benzoylecgonine. Neither 11- nor delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9 carboxylic acid was detected in any patient. We documented the magnitude of the problem of occult passive cocaine exposure in young children living in an urban environment. Such exposure has serious implications for the assessment of outcomes in postnatal follow-up studies of prenatally exposed children as well as potential risks to children living in household environments where occult cocaine exposure occurs. PMID:1669673

  15. Medical outcome of cocaine bodystuffers.

    PubMed

    June, R; Aks, S E; Keys, N; Wahl, M

    2000-02-01

    To describe the clinical course of cocaine "bodystuffers" presenting to regional emergency departments, a descriptive retrospective analysis was performed on all cases of cocaine bodystuffers received by a metropolitan poison control center and associated toxicology service from January 1993 to May 1994. We identified 46 cases of patients classified as bodystuffers. Of these, 34 patients (74%) remained asymptomatic. Eight patients (18%) had mild symptoms including hypertension and tachycardia that resolved with no treatment beyond decontamination or benzodiazepines (one patient). Two patients (4%) had moderate symptoms including agitation and fever that resolved with no treatment beyond decontamination or benzodiazepines (one patient). Two patients (4%) had severe symptoms including seizure and cardiac dysrhythmia. Both died. Radiographs of the abdomen were negative for foreign body in all 23 examinations performed. Mild cocaine intoxication is common in cocaine bodystuffers. Severe intoxication can occur, resulting in death. Abdominal radiographs are not of value for stuffers ingesting cellophane-wrapped packets. More experience is needed to determine the length of intensive care monitoring that these patients require. PMID:10699526

  16. The First American Cocaine Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtwright, David T.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the wave of cocaine abuse that followed the drug's recommendation by the late nineteenth-century medical community as a cure all. Details drug addiction among ethnic and social groups at the turn of the century. Warns that drug epidemics have important social and legal consequences. Suggests legal pressure may alter the form of drug…

  17. Knockout of p11 attenuates the acquisition and reinstatement of cocaine conditioned place preference in male but not in female mice.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Malave, Lauren; Delis, Foteini; Mangine, Paul; Kane, Katie; Grunseich, Adam; Vitale, Melissa; Greengard, Paul; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine's enhancement of dopamine signaling is crucial for its rewarding effects but its serotonergic effects are also relevant. Here we examined the role of the protein p11, which recruits serotonin 5HT1B and 5HT4 receptors to the cell surface, in cocaine reward. For this purpose we tested wild-type (WT) and p11 knockout (KO) male and female mice for cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) and its cocaine-induced reinstatement at different abstinence times, after 8 days of extinction and 28 days of being home-caged. All mice showed significant cocaine CPP. Among males, p11KO showed lower CPP than WT; this difference was also evident after 28 days of home-cage abstinence. In contrast, in females there were no CPP differences between p11KO and WT mice at any time point tested. Cocaine priming after the 28-day home-cage abstinence period also resulted in lower cocaine conditioned motor activity in both male and female p11KO mice. These results suggest that cocaine CPP and its persistence during extinction and reinstatement are modulated in a sex-differentiated manner by p11. The lack of protein p11 confers protection from CPP on male, but not female mice, immediately after cocaine conditioning as well as after prolonged abstinence, but not after short-term withdrawal. Synapse 70:293-301, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990537

  18. Adverse health consequences of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Cregler, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    Cocaine creates a strong physical addiction and is becoming recognized as one of the most dangerous illicit drugs abused today. The myth is that cocaine is harmless and nonaddictive. An estimated 30 million Americans have used cocaine, but the number may be as high as 40 million. Five to six million individuals are compulsive users. A review of the current literature revealed multiple reports of acute myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident with a temporal relation to cocaine use. Cocaine has also been associated with acute rupture of the aorta, cardiac arrhythmia, and sudden death. Cocaine has multisystem toxicity involving neurologic, psychiatric, obstetric, pulmonary, dermatologic, and gastrointestinal systems. The dopamine depletion hypothesis may explain why cocaine is repeatedly administered; cocaine produces a transient increase in synaptic dopamine. Alterations in dopamine neurotransmission may be responsible for the development of compulsive use patterns. When cocaine use becomes compulsive, psychosocial dysfunction, deviant behaviors, and a wide spectrum of social, financial, and family problems invariably result. Addiction, major medical complications, and death are true hazards of cocaine use. PMID:2657079

  19. Metabolic Enzymes of Cocaine Metabolite Benzoylecgonine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiabin; Zheng, Xirong; Zhan, Max; Zhou, Ziyuan; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2016-08-19

    Cocaine is one of the most addictive drugs without a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication. Enzyme therapy using an efficient cocaine-metabolizing enzyme is recognized as the most promising approach to cocaine overdose treatment. The actual enzyme, known as RBP-8000, under current clinical development for cocaine overdose treatment is our previously designed T172R/G173Q mutant of bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE). The T172R/G173Q mutant is effective in hydrolyzing cocaine but inactive against benzoylecgonine (a major, biologically active metabolite of cocaine). Unlike cocaine itself, benzoylecgonine has an unusually stable zwitterion structure resistant to further hydrolysis in the body and environment. In fact, benzoylecgonine can last in the body for a very long time (a few days) and, thus, is responsible for the long-term toxicity of cocaine and a commonly used marker for drug addiction diagnosis in pre-employment drug tests. Because CocE and its mutants are all active against cocaine and inactive against benzoylecgonine, one might simply assume that other enzymes that are active against cocaine are also inactive against benzoylecgonine. Here, through combined computational modeling and experimental studies, we demonstrate for the first time that human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is actually active against benzoylecgonine, and that a rationally designed BChE mutant can not only more efficiently accelerate cocaine hydrolysis but also significantly hydrolyze benzoylecgonine in vitro and in vivo. This sets the stage for advanced studies to design more efficient mutant enzymes valuable for the development of an ideal cocaine overdose enzyme therapy and for benzoylecgonine detoxification in the environment. PMID:27224254

  20. Regulation of BDNF expression by cocaine.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Brown, Amber N; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. It is expressed throughout the nervous system. A unique feature of the BDNF gene is the existence of multiple mRNA transcripts, all of which are translated into BDNF protein, suggesting a multilevel regulation of expression. In particular, the BDNF exon IV promoter region is a preferential target for epigenetic alterations, as it contains binding sites for CREB and MeCP2, two transcriptional regulators known to mediate epigenetic changes. Exposure to drugs of abuse is known to modulate epigenetic regulation of BDNF gene expression. This review will discuss how exposure to cocaine, one of the most addictive drugs known to mankind, can produce alterations in BDNF gene expression, especially in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which lead to alterations in the reward-mediated behaviors involved in addiction. PMID:23239946

  1. The emergency care of cocaine intoxications.

    PubMed

    Vroegop, M P; Franssen, E J; van der Voort, P H J; van den Berg, T N A; Langeweg, R J; Kramers, C

    2009-04-01

    Cocaine is frequently used, especially among adolescents and by men between the age of 25 and 44. Many of them are able to use cocaine in normal day-to-day life, without any problems. Reduced prices of cocaine and other recreational drugs such as MDMA (ecstasy) and gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has led to an increased incidence of intoxications with these drugs. Since the production of cocaine is illegal, it may be impure and mixtures with other drugs such as atropine may occur. The treatment of patients with an acute cocaine intoxication can be complicated. Combination of cocaine with other drugs results in clinical pictures which are difficult to discriminate and that may have important consequences for treatment. PMID:19581655

  2. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Scott J; Maloney, Thomas; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2010-05-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects' self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes. PMID:20395264

  3. 21 CFR 862.3250 - Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cocaine and cocaine metabolite test system. 862.3250 Section 862.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3250 Cocaine and...

  4. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Thomas; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects’ self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes. PMID:20395264

  5. Cocaine self-administration disrupts mesolimbic dopamine circuit function and attenuates dopaminergic responsiveness to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Cody A; Ferris, Mark J; Jones, Sara R

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have long been implicated in encoding associations between reward availability and environmental stimuli. As such, this circuit is instrumental in guiding behaviors towards obtaining maximal rewards based on previous experience. Cocaine acts on the dopamine system to exert its reinforcing effects and it is thought that cocaine-induced dysregulation of dopamine neurotransmission contributes to the difficulty that cocaine addicts exhibit in selecting environmentally appropriate behaviors. Here we used cocaine self-administration combined with in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry in anesthetised rats to examine the function of the ventral tegmental area to NAc projection neurons. Over 5 days of cocaine self-administration (fixed-ratio 1; 1.5 mg/kg/injection; 40 injections/day), animals increased their rate of intake. Following cocaine self-administration, there was a marked reduction in ventral tegmental area-stimulated NAc dopamine release. Additionally, there was a decreased augmentation of stimulated dopamine overflow in response to a cocaine challenge. These findings demonstrate that cocaine induces a hypodopaminergic state, which may contribute to the inflexible drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors observed in cocaine abusers. Additionally, tolerance to the ability of cocaine to elevate dopamine may lead to increased cocaine intake in order to overcome decreased effects, another hallmark of cocaine abuse. PMID:26037018

  6. Impaired insight in cocaine addiction: laboratory evidence and effects on cocaine-seeking behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, S.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Maloney, T.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-04-15

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are often characterized by impaired insight into behaviour. Such an insight deficit has been suggested, but never directly tested, in drug addiction. Here we tested for the first time this impaired insight hypothesis in drug addiction, and examined its potential association with drug-seeking behaviour. We also tested potential modulation of these effects by cocaine urine status, an individual difference known to impact underlying cognitive functions and prognosis. Sixteen cocaine addicted individuals testing positive for cocaine in urine, 26 cocaine addicted individuals testing negative for cocaine in urine, and 23 healthy controls completed a probabilistic choice task that assessed objective preference for viewing four types of pictures (pleasant, unpleasant, neutral and cocaine). This choice task concluded by asking subjects to report their most selected picture type; correspondence between subjects self-reports with their objective choice behaviour provided our index of behavioural insight. Results showed that the urine positive cocaine subjects exhibited impaired insight into their own choice behaviour compared with healthy controls; this same study group also selected the most cocaine pictures (and fewest pleasant pictures) for viewing. Importantly, however, it was the urine negative cocaine subjects whose behaviour was most influenced by insight, such that impaired insight in this subgroup only was associated with higher cocaine-related choice on the task and more severe actual cocaine use. These findings suggest that interventions to enhance insight may decrease drug-seeking behaviour, especially in urine negative cocaine subjects, potentially to improve their longer-term clinical outcomes.

  7. Interactions between modafinil and cocaine during the induction of conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization in mice: Implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Shuman, Tristan; Cai, Denise J.; Sage, Jennifer R.; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.

    2013-01-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug effective at enhancing alertness and attention with a variety of approved and off-label applications. The mechanism of modafinil is not well understood but initial studies indicated a limited abuse potential. A number of recent publications, however, have shown that modafinil can be rewarding under certain conditions. The present study assessed the reinforcing properties of modafinil using conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization in mice. Experiment 1 examined a high dose of modafinil (75 mg/kg) as well as its interactions with cocaine (15 mg/kg). Cocaine alone and modafinil co-administered with cocaine induced sensitization of locomotor activity; modafinil alone showed little or no locomotor sensitization. Animals given modafinil alone, cocaine alone, and modafinil plus cocaine exhibited a strong and roughly equivalent place preference. When tested for sensitization using a low challenge dose of modafinil, cross-sensitization was observed in all cocaine-pretreated mice. Experiment 2 examined a low dose of modafinil that is similar to the dose administered to humans and has been shown to produce cognitive enhancements in mice. Low dose modafinil (0.75 mg/kg) did not produce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization. Together, these results suggest that modafinil has the potential to produce reward, particularly in cocaine addicts, and should be used with caution. However, the typical low dose administered likely moderates these effects and may account for lack of addiction seen in humans. PMID:22963989

  8. Increased MFG-E8 expression and its implications in the vascular pathophysiology of cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kimura-Kojima, Haruka; Unuma, Kana; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Kato, Chizuru; Komatsu, Ayumi; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the possible involvement of smooth muscle cell remodeling and the induction of MFG-E8 (milk fat globule protein epidermal growth factor-VIII) in vascular pathophysiology during cocaine administration in cultured cells and rats. Cocaine exerts bifurcate effects on vascular cells; it stimulates vasoconstriction through enhancement of catecholamine release at low doses, while it suppresses cardiovascular functions through inhibition of ion channels at high doses. Short-term exposure to a high concentration of cocaine (3 mM, 24 hr) resulted in cell death of A7r5 rat aorta-derived smooth muscle cells. On the other hand, long-term exposure of the same cells to a low concentration (0.3 mM, ~7 days) resulted in a transient increase in MFG-E8 expression followed by an increased tendency toward cyclin D1, PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), and CDK4 (cyclin-dependent protein kinase-4) expression. Interestingly, autophagy was not induced, but rather was impaired, in cocaine-treated cells. Increased expressions of MFG-E8, PCNA, and CDK4 were also observed in the aortic vascular cells of rats administered cocaine (50 mg/kg, 2 days, i.v.), confirming that cocaine induced MFG-E8 expression in vivo. Taken together, the results show that MFG-E8 is induced in vascular cells exposed to cocaine, and that this induction is likely to be involved in the vascular toxicity elicited by cocaine abuse. PMID:27182119

  9. Inhibiting activator protein-1 activity alters cocaine-induced gene expression and potentiates sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paletzki, R F; Myakishev, M V; Polesskaya, O; Orosz, A; Hyman, S E; Vinson, C

    2008-04-01

    We have expressed A-FOS, an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding, in adult mouse striatal neurons. We observed normal behavior including locomotion and exploratory activities. Following a single injection of cocaine, locomotion increased similarly in both the A-FOS expressing and littermate controls. However, following repeated injections of cocaine, the A-FOS expressing mice showed increased locomotion relative to littermate controls, an increase that persisted following a week of withdrawal and subsequent cocaine administration. These results indicate that AP-1 suppresses this behavioral response to cocaine. We analyzed mRNA from the striatum before and 4 and 24 h after a single cocaine injection in both A-FOS and control striata using Affymetrix microarrays (430 2.0 Array) to identify genes mis-regulated by A-FOS that may mediate the increased locomotor sensitization to cocaine. A-FOS expression did not change gene expression in the basal state or 4 h following cocaine treatment relative to controls. However, 24 h after an acute cocaine treatment, 84 genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the A-FOS and control mice. Fifty-six genes are down-regulated while 28 genes are up-regulated including previously identified candidates for addiction including brain-derived neurotrophic factor and period homolog 1. Using a random sample of identified genes, quantitative PCR was used to verify the microarray studies. The chromosomal location of these 84 genes was compared with human genome scans of addiction to identify potential genes in humans that are involved in addiction. PMID:18355967

  10. A severe complication of crack cocaine use

    PubMed Central

    Vidyasankar, Gokul; Souza, Carolina; Lai, Chi; Mulpuru, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 48-year-old woman with a history of recurrent ‘crack’ cocaine use, who developed progressive shortness of breath over a period of years. Serial imaging revealed progressive interstitial fibrosis secondary to recurrent alveolar hemorrhage and inflammation from crack cocaine. The present case serves as a reminder of the numerous sequelae of crack cocaine use, highlighting one particularly severe outcome. PMID:25848717

  11. Neuropsychiatric effects of cocaine use disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, Charles U.; Mimiko, Olubansile A.; McCurtis, Henry L.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2005-01-01

    Individuals who use cocaine report a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms that are yet to be adequately targeted with treatment modalities. To address this problem requires an understanding of these symptoms and their neurobiological origins. Our paper reviewed the existing data on the neuropsychiatic implications of cocaine. We conducted a Medline search from 1984-2004 using terms, such as "cocaine", "cocaine addiction", "cocaine abuse", "cocaine neuropsychiatry" and "dual diagnosis". The search produced additional reference materials that were used in this review, although we focused on data that have likely clinical implications. The literature evidence suggested that, whereas acute cocaine overdose is potentially fatal, the ingestion of mild-to-moderate doses could result in fatal or nonfatal neuropsychiatric events. Also, chronic cocaine use may be associated with deficits in neurocognition, brain perfusion and brain activation patterns. Some of these deficits were unresolved with periods of abstinence ranging from 3-200 days. Taken together, these studies suggest the need for further investigations to fully characterize the neurobiological substrates of cocaine use disorders (CUDs) with the future possibility of more efficient treatment modalities. PMID:16334497

  12. [Cocaine addiction: current data for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Zarmdini, Rim; Petit, Aymeric; Lafaye, Geneviève; Lowenstein, William; Reynaud, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine remains the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide after cannabis. Observed levels of cocaine use among countries considerably vary. An increased cocaine use is recorded in the general European population. Cocaine addiction is a worldwide public health problem, which has somatic, psychiatric, socio-economic and judicial complications. It is a multifactorial disorder variable in its clinical manifestations and heritable. Compared to the general population, there is a high prevalence of somatic and psychiatric disorders among cocaine-dependent patients. There are predictable dose-related effects of pharmacological action of cocaine and effects which are uncommon, unrelated to dose and occur randomly in this population. The number of patients entering drug treatment for primary cocaine use has been increasing in Europe for several years. However, there is no specific pharmacotherapy with established efficacy for the treatment of cocaine addiction, nor is any medication approved by regulatory authorities for such treatment. Recent controlled clinical studies and laboratory studies have highlighted some very promising medications. The perfect therapeutic platform for abstinence initiation and relapse prevention of cocaine addiction is a combination of pharmacological treatments and behavioral treatments. Targeting somatic and psychiatric comorbidity is another way to use pharmacological treatments in addictions. PMID:23727012

  13. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  14. [Comorbidity between cocaine addiction and personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, J; Lorea, I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current knowledge about the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders. Results concerning a specific profile of cocaine patients are not conclusive. The prevalence rate of personality disorders in cocaine dependents is very heterogeneous (with a mean of 66% of cases), and a great variability is observed between all the studies carried out. There is a tendency for a higher proportion of cocaine dependents to be found within the cluster B category (mainly antisocial and borderline). Lastly, implications of this kind of study for future research and clinical practice are commented upon. PMID:17898818

  15. Nifedipine lowers cocaine-induced brain and liver enzyme activity and cocaine urinary excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Vitcheva, Vessela; Simeonova, Rumyana; Karova, Dima; Mitcheva, Mitka

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to see how nifedipine counters the effects of cocaine on hepatic and brain enzymatic activity in rats and whether it affects urinary excretion of cocaine. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups of six: control, nifedipine group (5 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days); cocaine group (15 mg kg-1i.p. a day for five days), and the nifedipine+cocaine group. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, we measured neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in the brain and cytochrome P450 quantity, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase activity in the liver. Urine samples were collected 24 h after the last cocaine and cocaine+nifedipine administration. Urinary cocaine concentration was determined using the GC/MS method.Cocaine administration increased brain nNOS activity by 55 % (p<0.05) in respect to control, which indicates the development of tolerance and dependence. In the combination group, nifedipine decreased the nNOS activity in respect to the cocaine-only group.In the liver, cocaine significantly decreased and nifedipine significantly increased cytochrome P450, ethylmorphine-N-demethylase, and anilinehydroxylase in respect to control. In combination, nifedipine successfully countered cocaine effects on these enzymes.Urine cocaine excretion in the cocaine+nifedipine group significantly dropped (by 35 %) compared to the cocaine-only group.Our results have confirmed the effects of nifedipine against cocaine tolerance and development of dependence, most likely due to metabolic interactions between them. PMID:21705300

  16. Stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Acosta, Jazmin I.; Browning, Jenny R.; Hamilton, Elizabeth C.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors (5-HT1BRs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT1BR agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3–10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0–1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT1BRs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT1BRs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  17. Stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Acosta, Jazmin I; Browning, Jenny R; Hamilton, Elizabeth C; Neisewander, Janet L

    2009-09-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors (5-HT(1B)Rs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT(1B)R agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253 would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0-1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT(1B)Rs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT(1B)Rs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  18. A thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase rapidly eliminates cocaine from brain in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Howell, L L; Nye, J A; Stehouwer, J S; Voll, R J; Mun, J; Narasimhan, D; Nichols, J; Sunahara, R; Goodman, M M; Carroll, F I; Woods, J H

    2014-01-01

    A long-acting, thermostable bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) has been identified that rapidly degrades cocaine with a K(M) of 1.33+0.085 μM. In vivo evaluation of CocE has shown protection against convulsant and lethal effects of cocaine in rodents, confirming the therapeutic potential of CocE against cocaine overdose. However, the current study is the first to evaluate the effects of CocE on cocaine brain levels. Positron emission tomogrpahy neuroimaging of [(11)C]cocaine was used to evaluate the time course of cocaine elimination from brain in the presence and absence of CocE in nonhuman primates. Systemic administration of CocE eliminated cocaine from the rhesus-monkey brain approximately three times faster than control conditions via peripheral actions through attenuating the input function from blood plasma. The efficiency of this process is sufficient to alleviate or prevent adverse central nervous system effects induced by cocaine. Although the present study used tracer doses of cocaine to access brain clearance, these findings further support the development of CocE for the treatment of acute cocaine toxicity. PMID:24984194

  19. Role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced cardiotoxicity and cocaine-related death.

    PubMed

    Cerretani, D; Fineschi, V; Bello, S; Riezzo, I; Turillazzi, E; Neri, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular disorders such as hypertension, thrombosis, myocardial dysfunction, cardiac dysrhythmias and endocarditis have received widespread attention in the context of cocaine abuse. The number of sudden deaths from cardiac causes, including myocardial infarction, ventricular tachyarrhythmia or aortic dissection, is also increasing. This manuscript will highlight the recent employment of study about cocaine cardiotoxicity and oxidative stress. Evidence has revealed that cardiac oxidative stress is a prominent early event of cocaine administration, which severely compromises the cardiac antioxidant cellular system and causes cardiac antioxidant cellular system injuries. Oxidative damage such as peroxidation of membrane phospholipids and depletion of nonenzymatic antioxidants such as glutathione have been found in the myocardium of chronic cocaine-treated animals and in patients. The data indicate that cocaine administration compromised the heart's antioxidant defense system. About the mechanisms involved in the cellular damage, the evidence that cocaine causes apoptosis in the heart comes from in vivo study. In animals model after short-term and long term-cocaine administration, the investigators demonstrates the role of Reactive Oxygen Species as a trigger of cardiac injury induced by cocaine. Cocaine also increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the heart, and apoptotic cells were predominantly found near inflammatory cells. The role of oxidative stress in cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart is wide studied and documented. PMID:22856662

  20. Follow-up of inpatient cocaine withdrawal for cocaine-using methadone patients.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, A; Foote, J; Magura, S; Sturiano, V; Xu, N; Stimmel, B

    1996-01-01

    Significant proportions of opiate-dependent persons entering methadone treatment are also addicted to cocaine and continue to use cocaine during treatment. One standard response to cocaine use has been inpatient detoxification. This study examined the effectiveness of this procedure by comparing pre- and posttreatment urine toxicologies for methadone patients who had been hospitalized for cocaine withdrawal. The results showed a negligible effect on cocaine abstinence (less than 1 out of 10 patients abstinent 12 weeks after detox) and a modest reduction in the frequency of cocaine use (one-quarter decline in urine tests positive after 12 weeks). These findings raise serious doubts about the cost-effectiveness of inpatient cocaine detoxification. Better strategies need to be implemented to enhance the chances of remaining abstinent once detoxified. PMID:9219143

  1. Modifications of the input currents on VTA dopamine neurons following acute versus chronic cocaine exposure.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Matzner, Henry; Poltyrev, Tatyana; Yaka, Rami

    2012-03-01

    Excitatory synapses on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are modulated following exposure to various addictive drugs, including cocaine. Previously we have shown that cocaine affects GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated neurotransmission in VTA DA neurons. This finding led us to reexamine the modulation of the excitatory synapse on these neurons in response to cocaine exposure, while the activity of GABA(A)R is uninterrupted. Using rat brain slices, evoked post synaptic currents (ePSC) were monitored and inhibitors of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and AMPA receptor (AMPAR) were gradually added to inhibitors-free bath solution. Modifications in the efficacy of the excitatory synapses were evaluated by comparing AMPAR-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (AMPA/NMDA ratio). The lack of GABA(A)R inhibitors enabled us to examine parallel changes in the relation between GABA(A)R-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (GABA(A)/NMDA ratio). First, we found that AMPA/NMDA ratio measured under complete availability of GABA(A)R, is significantly higher than the ratio measured under GABA(A)R blockade. In addition, GABA(A)/NMDA ratio, but not AMPA/NMDA ratio, is augmented a few hours following in vitro acute cocaine exposure. When measured 24 h after in vivo single cocaine injection, no change in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio was observed, however, the AMPA/NMDA ratio was found to be significantly higher. Finally, a decrease in both ratios was detected in rats repeatedly injected with cocaine. Taken together, these results lead to a better understanding of the means by which cocaine modifies synaptic inputs on VTA DA neurons. The parallel changes in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio may suggest an interaction between inhibitory and excitatory neural systems. PMID:22197515

  2. Clinical Profile, Acute Care, and Middle-Term Outcomes of Cocaine-Associated ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction in an Inner-City Community.

    PubMed

    Shitole, Sanyog G; Kayo, Noel; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Alapati, Venkatesh; Nordin, Charles; Southern, William; Christia, Panagiota; Faillace, Robert T; Scheuer, James; Kizer, Jorge R

    2016-04-15

    Although cocaine is a well-recognized risk factor for coronary disease, detailed information is lacking regarding related behavioral and clinical features of cocaine-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), particularly in socioeconomically disadvantaged urban settings. Nor are systematic or extended follow-up data available on outcomes for cocaine-associated STEMI in the contemporary era of percutaneous coronary intervention. We leveraged a prospective STEMI registry from a large health system serving an inner-city community to characterize the clinical features, acute management, and middle-term outcomes of cocaine-related versus cocaine-unrelated STEMI. Of the 1,003 patients included, 60% were black or Hispanic. Compared with cocaine-unrelated STEMI, cocaine-related STEMI (n = 58) was associated with younger age, male gender, lower socioeconomic score, current smoking, high alcohol consumption, and human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity but less commonly with diabetes or hypertension. Cocaine users less often received drug-eluting stents or β blockers at discharge. During median follow-up of 2.7 years, rates of death, death or any rehospitalization, and death or cardiovascular rehospitalization did not differ significantly between cocaine users and nonusers but were especially high for death or any hospitalization in the 2 groups (31.4 vs 32.4 per 100 person-years, p = 0.887). Adjusted hazard ratios for outcomes were likewise not significantly different. In conclusion, in this low-income community, cocaine use occurred in a substantial fraction of STEMI cases, who were younger than their nonuser counterparts but had more prevalent high-risk habits and exhibited similarly high rates of adverse outcomes. These data suggest that programs targeting cocaine abuse and related behaviors could contribute importantly to disease prevention in disadvantaged communities. PMID:26897639

  3. Familiar companions diminish cocaine conditioning and attenuate cocaine-stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Wang, Shyi-Wu; Yu, Lung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of companions on the rewarding effects of cocaine. Three cage mates, serving as companions, were housed with each experimental mouse throughout cocaine-place conditioning in a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm using conditioning doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. The presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP. At 20mg/kg, cocaine stimulated dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens as evidenced by a significant decrease in total (spontaneous and electrical stimulation-provoked) DA release in accumbal superfusate samples. The presence of companions prevented this cocaine-stimulated DA release; such a reduction in cocaine-induced DA release may account for the reduction in the magnitude of the CPP in the presence of the companions. Furthermore, cocaine pretreatment (2.5mg/kg) was found to prevent the companion-produced decreases in cocaine (10mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP as well as the cocaine (10mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Moreover, the presence of methamphetamine (MA) (1mg/kg)-treated companions decreased cocaine (20mg/kg/conditioning)-induced CPP and prevented the cocaine (20mg/kg)-stimulated DA release. Finally, the presence of companions decreased the magnitude of the CPP could not seem to be accounted for by cocaine-stimulated corticosterone (CORT) release. Taken together, these results indicate that familiar companions, regardless of their pharmacological status, may exert dampening effects on CPP induced by moderate to high conditioning doses of cocaine, at least in part, by preventing cocaine-stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:27001454

  4. Two-carbon bridge substituted cocaines: enantioselective synthesis, attribution of the absolute configuration and biological activity of novel 6- and 7-methoxylated cocaines.

    PubMed

    Simoni, D; Roberti, M; Andrisano, V; Manferdini, M; Rondanin, R; Invidiata, F P

    1999-05-30

    In an effort to learn more about the general structure-activity relationships of cocaine with the aim to elucidate those structural features that might confer antagonistic properties to such analogues, we describe herein our synthetic efforts to prepare two-carbon bridge functionalized (methoxylated and hydroxylated) analogues. Our approach makes use of a modification of the classical Willstatter synthesis of cocaine: Mannich type cyclization of acetonedicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester with methylamine hydrochloride and 2-methoxysuccindialdehyde in a citrate buffer solution afforded the 6- and 7-substituted 2-carbomethoxy-3-tropinones 3a,b and 4a,b in approximate yields of 64%. Reduction of the (+/-)-tropinone derivatives was performed with sodium amalgam in a sulfuric acid solution to afford a mixture of (+/-)-methoxyecgonine and (+/-)-methoxypseudoecgonine derivatives 5, 11 and 6, 7, 12, 13. Benzoylation of these alcohols yielded the desired cocaine and pseudococaine-like compounds 8, 14 and 9, 10, 15, 16. Additionally, we show that enzymatic hydrolysis of these cocaine analogues using pig liver esterase (PLE) affords a practical means for achieving their chemical resolution. The enantiomers of the methoxycocaine analogues were also prepared starting from chiral (+)- and (-)-6-methoxytropinone. All new analogues were examined for their ability to displace [3H]mazindol binding and to inhibit high-affinity uptake of [3H]dopamine into striatal nerve ending (synaptosomes). It appeared evident that methoxylation of the cocaine two-carbon bridge provides compounds of particular interest: the Ki for the binding of the methoxypseudococaines is about two to four times smaller than the Ki for inhibition of dopamine uptake, thus enabling these compounds capable of countering the effects of cocaine to some extent. PMID:10418122

  5. Children of Cocaine: Treatment and Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, Kate; Howze, Wendell M.

    Information concerning the treatment and care of children addicted to cocaine is provided. Contents: (1) describe the drug; (2) put cocaine use in its historical and demographic perspectives; (3) report findings of a study documenting the incidence of maternal substance abuse in Pinellas County, Florida; (4) point out false perceptions,…

  6. [Sucrose reward promotes rats' motivation for cocaine].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Qing; LE, Qiu-Min; Yu, Xiang-Chen; Ma, Lan; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2016-06-25

    Caloric diet, such as fat and sugar intake, has rewarding effects, and has been indicated to affect the responses to addictive substances in animal experiments. However, the possible association between sucrose reward and the motivation for addictive drugs remains to be elucidated. Thus, we carried out behavioral tests after sucrose self-administration training to determine the effects of sucrose experience on rats' motivation for cocaine, locomotor sensitivity to cocaine, basal locomotor activity, anxiety level, and associative learning ability. The sucrose-experienced (sucrose) group exhibited higher lever press, cocaine infusion and break point, as well as upshift of cocaine dose-response curve in cocaine self-administration test, as compared with the control (chow) group. Additionally, despite similar locomotor activity in open field test and comparable score in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, the sucrose group showed higher cocaine-induced locomotor sensitivity as compared with the chow group. The anxiety level and the performance in vocal-cue induced fear memory were similar between these two groups in elevated plus maze and fear conditioning tests, respectively. Taken together, our work indicates that sucrose experience promotes the rats' motivation for cocaine. PMID:27350195

  7. Children of Cocaine: Facing the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fact Find, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Statistical data illustrate the incidence of babies who have been prenatally exposed to cocaine. The damaging effects of maternal cocaine use on the fetus, infant, and young child are described, including: (1) prenatal strokes, malformed kidneys and limbs, and deformed hearts and lungs; (2) physical problems, social and emotional problems, and…

  8. Maternal Cocaine Addiction: Correlates and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawley, Theresa Lawton

    This study investigated the effects of cocaine addiction on mothers' ability to care for their children. The population interviewed included 25 cocaine-addicted mothers in a drug treatment center and a comparison group of 25 mothers of children in a Head Start program. Each mother was questioned about: (1) her pregnancy with a specific child…

  9. Progesterone receptors activation after acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Bing K; Fabian, Sosimo; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2006-12-18

    Cocaine modulates serum levels of progesterone in intact female and male rats, as well as in pregnant dams, and progesterone decreases or attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral and reward responses. It has been postulated that cocaine's modulation of serum progesterone levels may in turn alter progesterone receptor activity, thereby contributing to cocaine-induced alterations of neuronal functions and genomic regulations. To test this hypothesis, intact male rats received acute injections of saline or cocaine (15 or 30 mg/kg, dissolved in 0.9% saline, intraperitoneal). Progesterone serum levels, progesterone receptor (PR) protein levels, and PR-DNA binding complexes were measured in the striatum by radioimmunoassay, Western blot, and gel shift analyses, respectively. After injection of 15 mg/kg of cocaine, induction of progesterone serum levels was closely followed by an increase in receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes. After injection of 30 mg/kg of cocaine, similar effects were observed along with an attenuation of receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes at 60 min. Our results suggest that activation of progesterone receptors may be a mechanism by which cocaine mediates behavior through molecular alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:17109827

  10. Plasma concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in abstinent cocaine users with high prevalence of substance use disorders: relationship to psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pedraz, María; Martín-Velasco, Ana Isabel; García-Marchena, Nuria; Araos, Pedro; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Barrios, Vicente; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie Ann; Argente, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael; Santín, Luis Javier; Villanúa, María Ángeles; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified biomarkers related to the severity and pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Monitoring these plasma mediators may improve the stratification of cocaine users seeking treatment. Because the neurotrophic factors are involved in neural plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal survival, we have determined plasma concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-1 binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in a cross-sectional study with abstinent cocaine users who sought outpatient treatment for cocaine (n = 100) and age/body mass matched controls (n = 85). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview 'Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders'. Plasma concentrations of these peptides were not different in cocaine users and controls. They were not associated with length of abstinence, duration of cocaine use or cocaine symptom severity. The pathological use of cocaine did not influence the association of IGF-1 with age observed in healthy subjects, but the correlation between IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 was not significantly detected. Correlation analyses were performed between these peptides and other molecules sensitive to addiction: BDNF concentrations were not associated with inflammatory mediators, lipid derivatives or IGF-1 in cocaine users, but correlated with chemokines (fractalkine/CX3CL1 and SDF-1/CXCL12) and N-acyl-ethanolamines (N-palmitoyl-, N-oleoyl-, N-arachidonoyl-, N-linoleoyl- and N-dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-ethanolamine) in controls; IGF-1 concentrations only showed association with IGFBP-3 concentrations in controls; and IGFBP-3 was only correlated with N-stearoyl-ethanolamine concentrations in cocaine users. Multiple substance use disorders and life-time comorbid psychopathologies were common in abstinent cocaine users. Interestingly, plasma BDNF concentrations were exclusively found to be decreased in users diagnosed

  11. Plasma Concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in Abstinent Cocaine Users with High Prevalence of Substance Use Disorders: Relationship to Psychiatric Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Pedro; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Sanchiz, Pablo; Suárez, Juan; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Barrios, Vicente; Campos-Cloute, Rafael; Ruiz, Juan Jesús; Torrens, Marta; Chowen, Julie Ann; Argente, Jesús; de la Torre, Rafael; Santín, Luis Javier; Villanúa, María Ángeles; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Pavón, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have identified biomarkers related to the severity and pathogenesis of cocaine addiction and common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Monitoring these plasma mediators may improve the stratification of cocaine users seeking treatment. Because the neurotrophic factors are involved in neural plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal survival, we have determined plasma concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-1 binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) in a cross-sectional study with abstinent cocaine users who sought outpatient treatment for cocaine (n = 100) and age/body mass matched controls (n = 85). Participants were assessed with the diagnostic interview ‘Psychiatric Research Interview for Substance and Mental Disorders’. Plasma concentrations of these peptides were not different in cocaine users and controls. They were not associated with length of abstinence, duration of cocaine use or cocaine symptom severity. The pathological use of cocaine did not influence the association of IGF-1 with age observed in healthy subjects, but the correlation between IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 was not significantly detected. Correlation analyses were performed between these peptides and other molecules sensitive to addiction: BDNF concentrations were not associated with inflammatory mediators, lipid derivatives or IGF-1 in cocaine users, but correlated with chemokines (fractalkine/CX3CL1 and SDF-1/CXCL12) and N-acyl-ethanolamines (N-palmitoyl-, N-oleoyl-, N-arachidonoyl-, N-linoleoyl- and N-dihomo-γ-linolenoyl-ethanolamine) in controls; IGF-1 concentrations only showed association with IGFBP-3 concentrations in controls; and IGFBP-3 was only correlated with N-stearoyl-ethanolamine concentrations in cocaine users. Multiple substance use disorders and life-time comorbid psychopathologies were common in abstinent cocaine users. Interestingly, plasma BDNF concentrations were exclusively found to be decreased in users diagnosed

  12. Cocaine Abuse: The Evolution from Coca Leaves to Freebase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forno, Joseph J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes historical and sociological patterns of cocaine use. Discusses cocaine as an example of a new drug abuse trend as users search for new ways of using old drugs in ways that produce enhanced euphoria. Describes the use of cocaine freebase and emergency treatment of cocaine toxicity. (Author)

  13. Regulation of opioid receptors by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Unterwald, E M

    2001-06-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused psychostimulant. Its direct actions include inhibition of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine reuptake into presynaptic nerve terminals, thereby potentiating the actions of these transmitters in the synapse. A variety of studies have demonstrated that cocaine can also have profound effects on the endogenous opioid system. Compelling evidence points to the importance of mu opioid receptors in human cocaine addiction and craving. Animal studies support these findings and demonstrate that chronic cocaine administration can result in alterations in opioid receptor expression and function as measured by changes in critical signal transduction pathways. This chapter reviews studies on the regulation of opioid receptors as the result of exposure to cocaine. PMID:11458541

  14. Hypomanic personality trait in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Lemere, F; Smith, J W

    1990-04-01

    An analysis of 292 private patients treated for cocaine addiction showed the following. Comorbid Axis I psychiatric disorders were found in 19% and preaddiction Axis I disorders in 9% of these patients. Psychopathology at the time of treatment appeared to be more the result of than the cause of the addiction. Of these patients 63% had become addicted pursuing euphoria. A definitive nonpathologic unipolar hypomanic subtype of cocaine addict was observed in 13% of these 292 patients. This was manifested more as a trait than a disorder. This subgroup had been reasonably well adjusted, fun-loving and action oriented extroverts before their addiction. The rush and lifestyle of cocaine fit the imperatives of their personality. In a significant subtype of cocaine addict, an underlying hypomanic personality trait is ego-syntonic with the abuse of cocaine. PMID:2346798

  15. Illicit traffic and abuse of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Stamler, R T; Fahlman, R C; Keele, S A

    1984-01-01

    There has been an increasing availability and abuse of cocaine in Canada in recent years. Cocaine abuse has spread from the affluent adult sectors of society to middle-income groups and the young, involving large sections of the population. The increase in illicit demand for, and the social acceptability of, cocaine has led to an increase in illicit cocaine supply. The availability of cocaine on the illicit market has been sustained by a vast over-production of the raw materials needed to produce cocaine in coca-growing areas of South America and the activities of sophisticated trafficking organizations with large operations and profits. As a result, cocaine prices at the wholesale level in South America and Canada are declining, and at the retail level in Canada have remained relatively stable or have slightly decreased. It has been estimated that more than one half of the amount of cocaine on the illicit market in Canada was illegally produced in Colombia, but the main quantities of the raw materials used for such production originated in Bolivia and Peru. Cocaine is smuggled into Canada primarily by commercial air transport, arriving at the three principal ports of entry, namely Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, from whence it is distributed to other parts of the country. As drug law enforcement efforts increase in one area, traffickers shift their illicit operations to other areas in an attempt to escape detection. Current evidence suggests that both the availability and abuse of cocaine in Canada are likely to increase in the coming years. PMID:6569821

  16. Cocaine-mediated enhancement of virus replication in macrophages: implications for human immunodeficiency virus-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navneet K; Williams, Rachel; Peng, Fuwang; Tsai, Yi-Jou; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Nicolay, Brandon; Gadgil, Milind; Kumar, Anil; Buch, Shilpa J

    2007-12-01

    Injection drug use has been recognized as a major risk factor for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from the outset of the epidemic. Cocaine, one of the most widely abused drugs in the United States, can both impair the functions of macrophages and CD4(+) lymphocytes and also activate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 expression in these cells. Because the brain is the target organ for both cocaine and HIV, the objective of the present study was to explore the effects of cocaine on virus replication in macrophages, the target cells for the virus in the central nervous system (CNS). Cocaine markedly enhanced virus production in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and in U1 cells, a chronically infected promonocytic cell line as monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry. Cocaine treatment also resulted in the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and transcriptional activation of the HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) gag-GFP (green fluorescent protein). Analyses of chemokines in cocaine-treated macrophages by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Luminex assays suggested increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10, a cytokine that is known to promote HIV replication in MDMs. In addition to enhancing IL-10 expression, cocaine also caused an up-regulation of the macrophage activation marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, in MDMs. The synergistic effect of cocaine on virus replication and its enhancement of host activation markers suggest that cocaine functions at multiple pathways to accelerate HIV-associated dementia (HAD). PMID:18097880

  17. Cocaine Dependent Individuals Discount Future Rewards more than Future Losses for both Cocaine and Monetary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; Bruner, Natalie R.; Johnson, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence and other forms of drug dependence are associated with steeper devaluation of future outcomes (delay discounting). Although studies in this domain have typically assessed choices between monetary gains (e.g., receive less money now versus receive more money after a delay), delay discounting is also applicable to decisions involving losses (e.g., small loss now versus larger delayed loss), with gains typically discounted more than losses (the “sign effect”). It is also known that drugs are discounted more than equivalently valued money. In the context of drug dependence, however, relatively little is known about the discounting of delayed monetary and drug losses and the presence of the sign effect. In this within-subject, laboratory study, delay discounting for gains and losses was assessed for cocaine and money outcomes in cocaine-dependent individuals (n=89). Both cocaine and monetary gains were discounted at significantly greater rates than cocaine and monetary losses, respectively (i.e., the sign effect). Cocaine gains were discounted significantly more than monetary gains, but cocaine and monetary losses were discounted similarly. Results suggest that cocaine is discounted by cocaine-dependent individuals in a systematic manner similar to other rewards. Because the sign effect was shown for both cocaine and money, delayed aversive outcomes may generally have greater impact than delayed rewards in shaping present behavior in this population. PMID:25260200

  18. Levamisole and cocaine synergism: a prevalent adulterant enhances cocaine's action in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Christopher S; Egan, Erin; Alejo, Gissel D; Raffa, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J; Rawls, Scott M

    2014-04-01

    Levamisole is estimated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to be present in about 80% of cocaine seized in the United States and linked to debilitating, and sometimes fatal, immunologic effects in cocaine abusers. One explanation for the addition of levamisole to cocaine is that it increases the amount of product and enhances profits. An alternative possibility, and one investigated here, is that levamisole alters cocaine's action in vivo. We specifically investigated effects of levamisole on cocaine's stereotypical and place-conditioning effects in an established invertebrate (planarian) assay. Acute exposure to levamisole or cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in stereotyped movements. For combined administration of the two agents, isobolographic analysis revealed that the observed stereotypical response was enhanced relative to the predicted effect, indicating synergism for the interaction. In conditioned place preference (CPP) experiments, cocaine produced a significant preference shift; in contrast, levamisole was ineffective at all concentrations tested. For combination experiments, a submaximal concentration of cocaine produced CPP that was enhanced by inactive concentrations of levamisole, indicating synergism. The present results provide the first experimental evidence that levamisole enhances cocaine's action in vivo. Most important is the identification of synergism for the levamisole/cocaine interaction, which now requires further study in mammals. PMID:24440755

  19. Cocaine dependent individuals discount future rewards more than future losses for both cocaine and monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Bruner, Natalie R; Johnson, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine dependence and other forms of drug dependence are associated with steeper devaluation of future outcomes (delay discounting). Although studies in this domain have typically assessed choices between monetary gains (e.g., receive less money now versus receive more money after a delay), delay discounting is also applicable to decisions involving losses (e.g., small loss now versus larger delayed loss), with gains typically discounted more than losses (the "sign effect"). It is also known that drugs are discounted more than equivalently valued money. In the context of drug dependence, however, relatively little is known about the discounting of delayed monetary and drug losses and the presence of the sign effect. In this within-subject, laboratory study, delay discounting for gains and losses was assessed for cocaine and money outcomes in cocaine-dependent individuals (n=89). Both cocaine and monetary gains were discounted at significantly greater rates than cocaine and monetary losses, respectively (i.e., the sign effect). Cocaine gains were discounted significantly more than monetary gains, but cocaine and monetary losses were discounted similarly. Results suggest that cocaine is discounted by cocaine-dependent individuals in a systematic manner similar to other rewards. Because the sign effect was shown for both cocaine and money, delayed aversive outcomes may generally have greater impact than delayed rewards in shaping present behavior in this population. PMID:25260200

  20. Levamisole and cocaine synergism: a prevalent adulterant enhances cocaine's action in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tallarida, Christopher S.; Egan, Erin; Alejo, Gissel D.; Raffa, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Levamisole is estimated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to be present in about 80% of cocaine seized in the United States and linked to debilitating, and sometimes fatal, immunologic effects in cocaine abusers. One explanation for the addition of levamisole to cocaine is that it increases the amount of product and enhances profits. An alternative possibility, and one investigated here, is that levamisole alters cocaine's action in vivo. We specifically investigated effects of levamisole on cocaine's stereotypical and place-conditioning effects in an established invertebrate (planarian) assay. Acute exposure to levamisole or cocaine produced concentration-dependent increases in stereotyped movements. For combined administration of the two agents, isobolographic analysis revealed that the observed stereotypical response was enhanced relative to the predicted effect, indicating synergism for the interaction. In conditioned place preference (CPP) experiments, cocaine produced a significant preference shift; in contrast, levamisole was ineffective at all concentrations tested. For combination experiments, a submaximal concentration of cocaine produced CPP that was enhanced by inactive concentrations of levamisole, indicating synergism. The present results provide the first experimental evidence that levamisole enhances cocaine's action in vivo. Most important is the identification of synergism for the levamisole/cocaine interaction, which now requires further study in mammals. PMID:24440755

  1. Cocaine-induced psychosis and impulsivity in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-López, Lara; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Barral, Carmen; Pérez-Pazos, Jesús; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Corominas, Margarita; Casas, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine-dependent patients have high impulsiveness. Cocaine-induced psychosis is common among cocaine-dependent patients. Different risk factors associated with cocaine-induced psychosis have been reported. The aim of this study is to analyze the relationship between psychotic symptoms in cocaine-dependent patients and impulsivity and mental disorders characterized by impulsivity. This descriptive study included 287 outpatients with cocaine dependence according to the DSM-IV-TR criteria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and II, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a specific questionnaire on the presence of cocaine-induced psychosis were used to assess patients. Symptoms were observed in 59.9% of the study population. Total and cognitive impulsiveness scores obtained from the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were significantly higher in patients with cocaine-induced psychosis. Individuals from this group reported more overdose incidents, initiated more treatments during their lifetime, and had a significantly greater prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Patients with cocaine-induced psychosis have a greater degree of impulsivity and a higher prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Thus, if these disorders are observed in cocaine-dependent participants, the presence of psychotic symptoms should be evaluated to prevent further occurrence and their consequences. PMID:24074192

  2. Humoral and In Vivo Cellular Immunity against the Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Leishmania infantum Antigens KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and papLe22 in Dogs from an Endemic Area

    PubMed Central

    Todolí, Felicitat; Solano-Gallego, Laia; de Juan, Rafael; Morell, Pere; del Carmen Núñez, Maria; Lasa, Rodrigo; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Escribano, José M.; Alberola, Jordi; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania infantum causes visceral leishmaniasis, a severe zoonotic and systemic disease that is fatal if left untreated. Identification of the antigens involved in Leishmania-specific protective immune response is a research priority for the development of effective control measures. For this purpose, we evaluated, in 27 dogs from an enzootic zone, specific humoral and cellular immune response by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test both against total L. infantum antigen and the raw Trichoplusia ni insect-derived kinetoplastid membrane protein-11 (rKMPII), tryparedoxin peroxidase (rTRYP), Leishmania homologue of receptors for activated C kinase (rLACK), and 22-kDa potentially aggravating protein of Leishmania (rpapLe22) antigens from this parasite. rTRYP induced the highest number of positive DTH responses (55% of leishmanin skin test [LST]-positive dogs), showing that TRYP antigen is an important T cell immunogen, and it could be a promising vaccine candidate against this disease. When TRYP-DTH and KMPII-DTH tests were evaluated in parallel, 82% of LST-positive dogs were detected, suggesting that both antigens could be considered as components of a standardized DTH immunodiagnostic tool for dogs. PMID:21118936

  3. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  4. Gene by Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Woicik, Patricia A.; Konova, Anna B.; Maloney, Thomas; Shumay, Elena; Wang, Ruiliang; Telang, Frank; Biegon, Anat; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2011-01-01

    Context Chronic cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine receptive neurons. However, the concomitant use of other drugs and common genetic variability in monoamine regulation present additional structural variability. Objective To examine variations in gray matter volume (GMV) as a function of lifetime drug use and the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype in men with cocaine use disorders (CUD) and healthy male controls. Design Cross-sectional comparison between 40 CUD and 42 controls scanned with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess GMV and genotyped for the MAOA polymorphism. The impact of cocaine addiction on GM was tested by 1) comparing CUD with controls, 2) testing diagnosis-by-MAOA interactions, and 3) correlating GMV with lifetime cocaine, alcohol, and cigarette smoking, and testing their unique contribution to GM beyond other factors. Outcome Measures GMV were derived from MRI with voxel-based-morphometry. Genotyping was performed for a functional polymorphism (a variable number tandem repeat or VNTR) in the promoter region of the MAOA gene with “high” and “low” alleles. Results 1) Individuals with CUD had reductions in GMV in the orbitofrontal (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and temporal cortex, and hippocampus, compared to controls. 2) The OFC reductions were uniquely driven by CUD with low MAOA genotype and by lifetime cocaine use. 3) GMV in the DLPFC and hippocampus, was driven by lifetime alcohol use beyond the genotype and other pertinent variables. Conclusions This study documents for the first time, the enhanced sensitivity of CUD low MAOA carriers to GM loss, specifically in the OFC, indicating that this genotype may exacerbate the deleterious effects of cocaine in the brain. In addition, chronic alcohol use was a major contributor to GM loss in the DLPFC and hippocampus, and is likely to further impair executive function and learning in cocaine addiction. PMID:21383264

  5. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rieker, Claus; Cannella, Nazzareno; Parlato, Rosanna; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Korostynski, Michal; Engblom, David; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Schütz, Günther; Spanagel, Rainer; Parkitna, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB. PMID:24966820

  6. Choice to view cocaine images predicts concurrent and prospective drug use in cocaine addiction*

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; Beebe-Wang, Nicasia; Woicik, Patricia A.; Konova, Anna B.; Maloney, Thomas; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background Identifying variables that predict drug use in treatment-seeking drug addicted individuals is a crucial research and therapeutic goal. This study tested the hypothesis that choice to view cocaine images is associated with concurrent and prospective drug use in cocaine addiction. Methods To establish choice-concurrent drug use associations, 71 cocaine addicted subjects (43 current users and 28 treatment seekers) provided data on (A) choice to view cocaine images and affectively pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral images [collected under explicit contingencies (when choice was made between two fully visible side-by-side images) and under more probabilistic contingencies (when choice was made between pictures hidden under flipped-over cards)]; and (B) past-month cocaine and other drug use. To establish choice-prospective drug use associations, 20 of these treatment-seeking subjects were followed over the next six months. Results Baseline cocaine-related picture choice as measured by both tasks positively correlated with subjects’ concurrent cocaine and other drug use as driven by the actively-using subjects. In a subsequent multiple regression analysis, choice to view cocaine images as compared with affectively pleasant images (under probabilistic contingencies) was the only predictor that continued to be significantly associated with drug use. Importantly, this same baseline cocaine>pleasant probabilistic choice also predicted the number of days drugs were used (cocaine, alcohol, and marijuana) over the next six months. Conclusions Simulated cocaine choice – especially when probabilistic and when compared with other positive reinforcers – may provide a valid laboratory marker of current and future drug use in cocaine addiction. PMID:23218913

  7. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  8. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. PMID:26318765

  9. Assessing cocaine abuse using LC-MS/MS measurements in biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Mário; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine use is still a problem in today's world, and this has several implications on human activities. Indeed, important problems related to cocaine derive from its use in situations where concentration and focus skills are necessary, namely while driving and/or working. The need of analytical methods for drug analysis in specimens of biological origin for proper documentation of human exposure is increasing. While GC-MS-based procedures represented the state-of-the-art of analytical techniques a few years ago, there is a growing trend for their replacement by LC-MS/MS, which can be justified by the increased sensitivity presented by these new technologies. This paper will review recently published papers on the use of LC-MS/MS-based procedures for cocaine measurement in biological specimens. PMID:26168256

  10. Deletion of dopamine D1 and D3 receptors differentially affects spontaneous behaviour and cocaine-induced locomotor activity, reward and CREB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Karasinska, Joanna M; George, Susan R; Cheng, Regina; O'Dowd, Brian F

    2005-10-01

    Co-localization of dopamine D1 and D3 receptors in striatal neurons suggests that these two receptors interact at a cellular level in mediating dopaminergic function including psychostimulant-induced behaviour. To study D1 and D3 receptor interactions in cocaine-mediated effects, cocaine-induced locomotion and reward in mice lacking either D1, D3 or both receptors were analysed. Spontaneous locomotor activity was increased in D1-/- and D1-/-D3-/- mice and D1-/-D3-/- mice did not exhibit habituation of spontaneous rearing activity. Cocaine (20 mg/kg) increased locomotor activity in wild-type and D3-/- mice, failed to stimulate activity in D1-/- mice and reduced activity in D1-/-D3-/- mice. In the conditioned place preference, all groups exhibited reward at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of cocaine. D1-/-D3-/- mice did not demonstrate preference at 2.5 mg/kg of cocaine although preference was observed in wild-type, D1-/- and D3-/- mice. The transcription factor cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) is activated by phosphorylation in striatal regions following dopamine receptor activation. Striatal pCREB levels following acute cocaine were increased in wild-type and D3-/- mice and decreased in D1-/- and D1-/-D3-/- mice. After repeated administration of 2.5 mg/kg of cocaine, D1-/- mice had lower pCREB levels in caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens. Our findings suggest that, although spontaneous and cocaine-induced horizontal activity depended mainly on the presence of the D1 receptor, there may be crosstalk between D1 and D3 receptors in rearing habituation and the perception of cocaine reward at low doses of the drug. Furthermore, alterations in pCREB levels were associated with changes in cocaine-induced locomotor activity but not reward. PMID:16197514

  11. A neurocomputational model for cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Dezfouli, Amir; Piray, Payam; Keramati, Mohammad Mahdi; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Lucas, Caro; Mokri, Azarakhsh

    2009-10-01

    Based on the dopamine hypotheses of cocaine addiction and the assumption of decrement of brain reward system sensitivity after long-term drug exposure, we propose a computational model for cocaine addiction. Utilizing average reward temporal difference reinforcement learning, we incorporate the elevation of basal reward threshold after long-term drug exposure into the model of drug addiction proposed by Redish. Our model is consistent with the animal models of drug seeking under punishment. In the case of nondrug reward, the model explains increased impulsivity after long-term drug exposure. Furthermore, the existence of a blocking effect for cocaine is predicted by our model. PMID:19635010

  12. Synaptic mechanisms underlying persistent cocaine craving.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marina E

    2016-06-01

    Although it is challenging for individuals with cocaine addiction to achieve abstinence, the greatest difficulty is avoiding relapse to drug taking, which is often triggered by cues associated with prior cocaine use. This vulnerability to relapse persists for long periods (months to years) after abstinence is achieved. Here, I discuss rodent studies of cue-induced cocaine craving during abstinence, with a focus on neuronal plasticity in the reward circuitry that maintains high levels of craving. Such work has the potential to identify new therapeutic targets and to further our understanding of experience-dependent plasticity in the adult brain under normal circumstances and in the context of addiction. PMID:27150400

  13. Developmental trajectories of cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed and non-cocaine-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Linda C; Cicchetti, Domenic; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Zhang, Heping

    2003-10-01

    Few data are available concerning the trajectories of mental and motor development across time for cocaine-exposed children compared with others. Findings are presented from individual group curve analyses of the mental and motor development measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II (BSID-II) on repeated visits from 3 through 36 months of a group of prenatally cocaine-and-other-drug-exposed children (n = 265) compared with those exposed to no drugs (n = 129) or no-cocaine-but-other-drugs (n = 66), including alcohol and/or tobacco. Across time, there was a general decline in motor performance but cocaine-exposed-infants showed a trend toward a greater decrease than children in the other two comparison groups. For mental performance, there was also a decline across age but only through 24 months and no differences in the trajectory of the cocaine-exposed group compared to the other two. And, across all assessment ages, cocaine-exposed-infants showed lower BSID-II mental performance compared to both non-drug and non-cocaine-exposed children. Results suggest that prenatally cocaine-exposed children show delayed developmental indices, particularly in their mental performance, but their trajectories across time are similar to those from impoverished, non-cocaine-exposed groups. PMID:14578693

  14. Cocaine attenuates vasoconstriction to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, A.A.; Morley, D.; Vosacek, R.; Zhang, X.Y.; Shah, R. )

    1991-03-11

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effects of cocaine and ethanol on vasomotor tone. Using a standard isolated vascular ring preparation, 24 rings from 7 New Zealand White Rabbits were studied. All rings were denuded as verified by methacholine challenge. The dose response to NE for each ring was used as a standard for vasoconstrictors Dose response curves to ETH and C were done in random order. Concentrations of both ETH and C employed were physiologically attainable in man and below thresholds for coma or death. The dose response curve to ETH was repeated after addition of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M C to the arterial bath. After adding 1,500 ug/ml of ETH, the dose response curve to C was repeated. Ethanol, alone caused significant vasoconstriction of arterial rings. After the addition of C to the bath, the dose response to ETH was significantly shifted to the right, peak contraction achieved was 36.6 {plus minus} 3.2% of maximal NE contraction. Cocaine alone did not result in any change in resting tension of the rings. When ETH was added to the bath, C caused vasoconstriction, the peak value equivalent to 12.5 {plus minus} 2.2% of maximal contraction to NE.

  15. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology. PMID:26612422

  16. Opioid and cocaine combined effect on cocaine-induced changes in HPA and HPG axes hormones in men.

    PubMed

    Goletiani, Nathalie V; Mendelson, Jack H; Sholar, Michelle B; Siegel, Arthur J; Mello, Nancy K

    2009-02-01

    Nalbuphine, a mixed micro-/kappa-opioid analgesic, may have potential as a new medication for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Kappa-opioid agonists functionally antagonize some abuse-related and locomotor effects of cocaine, and both kappa-selective and mixed micro-/kappa-opioids reduce cocaine self-administration by rhesus monkeys. Because cocaine's interactions with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and (HPA) hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes may contribute to its reinforcing properties, we examined the effects of cocaine alone and in combination with nalbuphine. Neuroendocrine effects of a single dose of cocaine alone (0.2 mg/kg, IV), with nalbuphine (5 mg/70 kg, IV)+cocaine (0.2 mg/kg, IV) in combination were compared in seven adult men (ages 18-35) who met DSM-IV criteria for current cocaine abuse. Cocaine alone, and in combination with nalbuphine was administered on separate test days under placebo-controlled, double blind conditions. Cocaine stimulated ACTH, cortisol, and LH, whereas cocaine+nalbuphine in combination produced a smaller increase in ACTH, and decreased cortisol and LH. Thus it appears that nalbuphine attenuated cocaine's effects on ACTH, cortisol, and LH. These data are consistent with our earlier report that nalbuphine modestly attenuated cocaine's positive subjective effects, and that the subjective and cardiovascular effects of cocaine+nalbuphine in combination were not additive. PMID:18848957

  17. Tolerance to cocaine in brain stimulation reward following continuous cocaine infusions.

    PubMed

    Pudiak, Cindy M; KuoLee, Rhonda; Bozarth, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    This study examined tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect in brain stimulation reward (BSR) following continuous cocaine infusions and secondly, used the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to determine NO's involvement in the development of cocaine tolerance. Animals were continuously infused with saline or cocaine (30 mg/kg per day) via osmotic minipump for 14 days and injected daily with saline or L-NAME (30 mg/kg, i.p.) following BSR testing. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed stable BSR thresholds across the 14-day infusion period. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed markedly lowered BSR thresholds on Day 1 followed by a progressive increase in BSR thresholds across the infusion period - indicating the development of tolerance. L-NAME-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed stimulation thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine. A cocaine challenge injection (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 3 and again at 10 days following minipump removal revealed that saline-treated animals continuously infused with saline showed lowered BSR thresholds. Saline-treated animals continuously infused with cocaine displayed lowered BSR thresholds that were not significantly different from saline-infused animals. L-NAME treated animals continuously infused with cocaine showed higher BSR thresholds to a challenge 3 days following pump removal. However, stimulation thresholds for this group failed to reach statistical significance on both days (i.e., Days 3 and 10) following pump removal. Results showed that animals continuously infused with cocaine develop robust tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect during the 14-day infusion period. Tolerance to cocaine's threshold-lowering effect was short-lived and dissipated soon after minipump removal. L-NAME treatment failed to significantly

  18. Impaired Inhibitory Control in Recreational Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed. PMID:17989775

  19. Levamisole-contaminated cocaine: a hairy affair.

    PubMed

    van der Veer, Tjeerd; Pennings, Ed; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Korswagen, Lindy-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Levamisole-contaminated cocaine can induce severe systemic vasculitis. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially when substance abuse is uncertain. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman suffering from vasculitis due to levamisole-contaminated cocaine, who persistently denied substance abuse. Symptoms included ulcerating skin lesions, arthralgia and myalgia, and the occurrence of an ileal intussusception. The definitive diagnosis was made using hair testing for toxins. She recovered through cocaine abstinence, but re-exposure resulted in a severe relapse with glomerulonephritis. Importantly, at time of the relapse, the patient became positive for both myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and proteinase 3-ANCA. Cocaine-levamisole-induced vasculitis poses a great clinical challenge. The proper diagnostic strategy and therapy is still controversial. We highlight our diagnostic and therapeutic considerations, including hair testing for definitive proof of exposure. PMID:26311010

  20. Cocaine causes atrial Purkinje fiber damage.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Ekwedike, Nelson N

    2010-04-01

    Comparisons of atrial tissues from Syrian hamster offspring born from cocaine-treated mothers during the last days of pregnancy with sham-treated ones demonstrate irreversible focal ischemic damage in the Purkinje myofibers and minor endocardial damages as well as minute cardiomyocyte vacuolization. These defects are consistent with the pharmacotoxicity of cocaine or its metabolites. The damaged Purkinje myocytes apparently remain in contact with adjacent cardiomyocytes but undergo autolytic process similar to that found in autoschizic cell death. Adjacent cell type(s) appear to segregate or engulf the injured cells. Data collected in this report demonstrate why clinical bradyarrhythmias, arrhythmias, or sudden death as cardiac arrest can be found in pre- and postnatal cocaine-abused babies as well as those found in young individuals caused by acute or chronic cocaine abuse. PMID:20192706

  1. Effects of estradiol on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination by female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Negus, S Stevens; Knudson, Inge M; Kelly, Maureen; Mendelson, Jack H

    2008-03-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone, estradiol, enhances the reinforcing and locomotor activating effects of cocaine in rodents under some conditions. The present study evaluated the acute effects of estradiol benzoate (E(2)beta) on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination in female rhesus monkeys. Cocaine self-administration (0.10 mg/kg/inj., i.v.) was maintained on a fixed-ratio (FR) 30 schedule of reinforcement, and monkeys had access to cocaine during one 2-h session each day. E(2)beta in a cyclodextrin vehicle (0.00001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) was administered 30 min before test sessions conducted twice each week. Cocaine doses were administered in an irregular order during each dose-effect curve determination (0.001-0.3 mg/kg/inj.). Blood samples were collected after test sessions to determine 17beta-estradiol levels. Banana-flavored food pellets were available on an FR 30 schedule in three 1-h sessions each day. Five monkeys were trained to discriminate cocaine (0.18 mg/kg, i.m.) from saline in a two-key food-reinforced procedure, and the effects of pretreatment with E(2)beta in cyclodextrin and in sesame oil were studied. Acute administration of E(2)beta did not consistently alter the cocaine self-administration or drug discrimination dose-effect curves in comparison to saline control treatment. Females also did not self-administer E(2)beta (0.00001-0.10 mg/kg, i.v.) above saline levels. Finally, E(2)beta (0.0001-0.01 mg/kg, i.m.) did not substitute for cocaine in monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Taken together, these data suggest that over the dose range studied, estradiol administration does not consistently alter the abuse-related effects of cocaine in female rhesus monkeys. PMID:17507915

  2. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2010-07-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic

  3. Single prolonged stress effects on sensitization to cocaine and cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Andrew L; Singh, Robby; Kohler, Robert J; Friedman, Amy L; Liebowitz, Chelsea P; Galloway, Matthew P; Enman, Nicole M; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Perrine, Shane A

    2015-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often comorbid with substance use disorders (SUD). Single prolonged stress (SPS) is a well-validated rat model of PTSD that provides a framework to investigate drug-induced behaviors as a preclinical model of the comorbidity. We hypothesized that cocaine sensitization and self-administration would be increased following exposure to SPS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to SPS or control treatment. After SPS, cocaine (0, 10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered for 5 consecutive days and locomotor activity was measured. Another cohort was assessed for cocaine self-administration (0.1 or 0.32 mg/kg/i.v.) after SPS. Rats were tested for acquisition, extinction and cue-induced reinstatement behaviors. Control animals showed a dose-dependent increase in cocaine-induced locomotor activity after acute cocaine whereas SPS rats did not. Using a sub-threshold sensitization paradigm, control rats did not exhibit enhanced locomotor activity at Day 5 and therefore did not develop behavioral sensitization, as expected. However, compared to control rats on Day 5 the locomotor response to 20mg/kg repeated cocaine was greatly enhanced in SPS-treated rats, which exhibited enhanced cocaine locomotor sensitization. The effect of SPS on locomotor activity was unique in that SPS did not modify cocaine self-administration behaviors under a simple schedule of reinforcement. These data show that SPS differentially affects cocaine-mediated behaviors causing no effect to cocaine self-administration, under a simple schedule of reinforcement, but significantly augmenting cocaine locomotor sensitization. These results suggest that SPS shares common neurocircuitry with stimulant-induced plasticity, but dissociable from that underlying psychostimulant-induced reinforcement. PMID:25712697

  4. Anxiogenic effects of cocaine withdrawal in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    López-Patiño, Marcos A; Yu, Lili; Cabral, Howard; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2008-01-28

    Continued usage of cocaine is determined by genetic, conditioned and homeostatic factors, while it is reinforced by drug-induced reward and the emotionally negative state of drug withdrawal, which includes anxiety. The molecular mechanisms of these long-term behavioral and physiological alterations have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we demonstrate that in zebrafish, a wide range of non-anesthetic cocaine doses, 0.015-15 muM, does not result in acute alterations in locomotor activity, in spite of the high brain cocaine levels induced (7-120 pg/microg protein). Conversely, cocaine withdrawal causes hyperactivity associated with stereotypy. The behavioral hyperactivity is progressively increased during the initial period of withdrawal (24-72 h) and is maintained for at least 5 days. Such effect of cocaine withdrawal is aggravated by environmental stimulation and attenuated in the home environment. Administration of cocaine (1.5 microM) or a non-sedative dose of diazepam (5 microM, immersion) acutely counteracts withdrawal-associated hyperactivity and stereotypy in zebrafish, with the magnitude of these effects positively correlating with the degree of prior increase in basal activity. Administration of an anxiogenic benzodiazepine inverse agonist, FG-7142, results in zebrafish behavior similar to that observed during cocaine withdrawal. Together, the results suggest that cocaine withdrawal produces long-lasting behavioral effects in zebrafish which are consistent with an anxiety-like state. Thus, zebrafish, a powerful model for the study of vertebrate genetics, could provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of drug withdrawal. PMID:17889042

  5. Immunopharmacotherapeutic Manifolds and Modulation of Cocaine Overdose

    PubMed Central

    Treweek, Jennifer B.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Janda, Kim D.

    2011-01-01

    Cocaine achieves its psychostimulant, reinforcing properties through selectively blocking dopamine transporters, and this neurobiological mechanism impedes the use of classical receptor-antagonist pharmacotherapies to outcompete cocaine at CNS sites. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for cocaine circumvents this problem as drug is sequestered in the periphery prior to entry into the brain. To optimize an immunopharmacotherapeutic strategy for reversing severe cocaine toxicity, the therapeutic properties of mAb GNC92H2 IgG were compared to those of its engineered formats in a mouse overdose model. Whereas the extended half-life of an IgG justifies its application to the prophylactic treatment of addiction, the rapid, thorough biodistribution of mAb-based fragments, including F(ab')2, Fab and scFv, may correlate to accelerated scavenging of cocaine and reversal of toxicity. To test this hypothesis, mice were administered the anti-cocaine IgG (180 mg/kg, i.v.) or GNC92H2-based agent after receiving an LD50 cocaine dose (93 mg/kg, i.p.), and the timeline of overdose symptoms was recorded. All formats lowered the rate of lethality despite the >100-fold molar excess of drug to antibody binding capacity. However, only F(ab')2-92H2 and Fab-92H2 significantly attenuated the progression of premorbid behaviors, and Fab-92H2 prevented seizure generation in a percentage of mice. The calculation of serum half-life of each format demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic profile of Fab-92H2 (elimination half-life, t1/2 ∼ 100 minutes) best approximated that of cocaine. These results not only confirm the importance of highly specific and tight drug binding by the mAb, but also highlight the benefit of aligning the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the immunopharmacotherapeutic with the targeted drug. PMID:21356233

  6. Lack of cross-reactivity between the Bacillus thuringiensis derived protein Cry1F in maize grain and dust mite Der p7 protein with human sera positive for Der p7-IgE.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Bardina, Luda; Cressman, Robert F; Mattsson, Joel L; Sampson, Hugh A

    2006-03-01

    Cry1F protein, derived from Bacillus thuringiensis, is effective at controlling lepidopteran pests and a synthetic Cry1F transgene was transferred into maize. For the safety assessment of genetically modified food crops, the allergenic potential of the introduced novel trait(s) is evaluated. Because no single parameter is currently predictive of allergic potential, a 'weight of evidence' approach has been proposed. As part of this assessment, the amino acid (aa) sequence of the Cry1F protein was compared to a database of known allergens using recommended criteria. The Cry1F protein did not show significant similarity or a match of eight contiguous identical aa with any allergen. However, a single six contiguous aa match was identified between Cry1F and the Der p7 protein of the dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. To investigate whether Cry1F was cross-reactive with Der p7, sera from 10 dust mite allergic patients containing Der p 7-specific IgE antibody were used to compare IgE-specific binding. No evidence of cross-reactivity was observed between Cry1F and Der p7. This study provides in vitro IgE sera screening data, that when considered in the context of other bioinformatic data [Hileman R.E., Silvanovich, A., Goodman R.E., Rice E.A., Holleschak G., Astwood J.D., Hefle S.L., 2002. Bioinformatic methods for allergenicity assessment using a comprehensive allergen database. Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. 128, 280-291; Stadler, M.B., Stadler, B.M., 2003. Allergenicity prediction by protein sequence. FASEB J. 17, 1141-1143.], adds further evidence arguing against the use of a six contiguous identical amino acid search to identify potential cross-reactive allergens. Cry1F is heat labile, rapidly hydrolyzed in an in vitro pepsin resistance assay, not glycosylated and not from an allergenic source. Taken together, these data indicate a lack of allergenic concern for Cry1F. PMID:16406630

  7. Modulation of behavioral sensitization to cocaine by NAALADase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shippenberg, T S; Rea, W; Slusher, B S

    2000-11-01

    Sensitization to cocaine has been attributed to alterations in excitatory amino acid and dopamine neurotransmission in the mesolimbic system. The present study sought to determine whether inhibition of NAALADase, an enzyme that cleaves glutamate from the endogenous neuropeptide, N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), attenuates sensitization to the psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. Rats received daily injections of cocaine (20.0 mg/kg/day; i.p.) or saline for 5 days. Fifteen minutes prior to these injections they received an i.p. injection of the NAALADase inhibitor, 2-PMPA (50.0-100 mg/kg), or vehicle. Locomotor activity and stereotypy produced by a challenge dose of cocaine (15.0 mg/kg) were assessed 3 days later. Acute cocaine administration increased locomotor activity in control animals. In animals with a prior history of cocaine administration, the behavioral response to cocaine was significantly enhanced. In animals that had received 2-PMPA in combination with cocaine, the enhancement of cocaine-induced locomotor activity was attenuated. No alteration in cocaine-evoked activity was observed in animals that had received once daily injections of 2-PMPA, alone. Acute administration of 2-PMPA also did not modify saline-induced locomotor activity or activity produced by an acute cocaine challenge. These data demonstrate that NAALADase inhibition attenuates the development of sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine. Furthermore, this action cannot be attributed to an antagonism of the acute effects of cocaine. PMID:11018790

  8. Cardiovascular effects of cocaine: cellular, ionic and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, E; Bello, S; Neri, M; Pomara, C; Riezzo, I; Fineschi, V

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused drug responsible for the majority of deaths ascribed to drug overdose. Many mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain the various cocaine associated cardiovascular complications. Conventionally, cocaine cardiotoxicity has been thought to be mediated indirectly through its sympathomimetic effect, i.e., by inhibiting the reuptake and thus increasing the levels of neuronal catecholamines at work on adrenoceptors. Increased oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, and cocaine-induced apoptosis in the heart muscle have suggested a new way to understand the cardiotoxic effects of cocaine. More recent studies have led the attention to the interaction of cocaine and some metabolites with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. The current paper is aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cocaine cardiotoxicity which have a specific clinical and forensic interest. From a clinical point of view the full knowledge of the exact mechanisms by which cocaine exerts cardio - vascular damage is essential to identify potential therapeutic targets and improve novel strategies for cocaine related cardiovascular diseases. From a forensic point of view, it is to be underlined that cocaine use is often associated to sudden death in young, otherwise healthy individuals. While such events are widely reported, the relationship between cardiac morphological alterations and molecular/cellular mechanisms is still controversial. In conclusion, the study of cocaine cardiovascular toxicity needs a strict collaboration between clinicians and pathologists which may be very effective in further dissecting the mechanisms underlying cocaine cardiotoxicity and understanding the cardiac cocaine connection. PMID:22856657

  9. Levamisole-adulterated cocaine: Two fatal case reports and evaluation of possible cocaine toxicity potentiation.

    PubMed

    Indorato, Francesca; Romano, Guido; Barbera, Nunziata

    2016-08-01

    Levamisole has been identified as a cocaine adulterant in the United States since 2002. Although there is a variation in the percentage of levamisole in cocaine samples between European countries, measurement of levamisole in human samples of cocaine users has become increasingly important. To our best knowledge, only five deaths are reported (one twice) as a result of complications secondary to levamisole-tainted cocaine and none of these cases reports the post-mortem levamisole concentration. In this article, we present the post-mortem levamisole concentrations in fluids and tissues in two young cocaine users, dead after levamisole-adulterated cocaine intake. With the dearth of levamisole reported concentrations in literature, this particular report is of interest to the forensic toxicological and pathological communities. This article aims to be a supplementary alert to aware the risk that may occur using levamisole-adulterated cocaine and an incentive to publication of toxicity reports and new researches involving the combination of levamisole and cocaine. PMID:26866560

  10. Cyclostomes Lack Clustered Protocadherins.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vydianathan; Yu, Wei-Ping; Pillai, Nisha E; Lian, Michelle M; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2016-02-01

    The brain, comprising billions of neurons and intricate neural networks, is arguably the most complex organ in vertebrates. The diversity of individual neurons is fundamental to the neuronal network complexity and the overall function of the vertebrate brain. In jawed vertebrates, clustered protocadherins provide the molecular basis for this neuronal diversity, through stochastic and combinatorial expression of their various isoforms in individual neurons. Based on analyses of transcriptomes from the Japanese lamprey brain and sea lamprey embryos, genome assemblies of the two lampreys, and brain expressed sequence tags of the inshore hagfish, we show that extant jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes) lack the clustered protocadherins. Our findings indicate that the clustered protocadherins originated from a nonclustered protocadherin in the jawed vertebrate ancestor, after the two rounds of whole-genome duplication. In the absence of clustered protocadherins, cyclostomes might have evolved novel molecules or mechanisms for generating neuronal diversity which remains to be discovered. PMID:26545918