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Sample records for cochlear modiolus visualized

  1. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. Methods: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. Results: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted. The color Doppler ultrasonography study detected a sizeable perforator at the level of the modiolus lateral to the angle of the mouth within a radius of 1 cm. This confirms the anatomical findings of previous authors and indicates that the modiolus perforator is a consistent anatomical finding, and flaps based on it can be recommended for several indications from the reconstruction of defects in the perioral area, cheek and nose. Conclusions: The modiolus is a well-described anatomical area containing a sizeable perforator that is consistently present and readily visualized using color Doppler ultrasonography. We have used the modiolus perforator flap successfully for several indications, and it is our first choice for perioral reconstruction. PMID:27257591

  2. Cochlear implantations in visually impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Kenji; Kanda, Yokihiko; Kumagami, Hidetaka; Yashida, Haruo; Yamamoto-Fukuda, Tomomi; Miyamoto, Ikue; Takahashi, Haruo

    2007-04-01

    We retrospectively review the cases to evaluate the outcome of cochlear implantation (CI) in patients with severe-to-profound hearing loss and visual impairment (VI). Six adults with severe or profound hearing loss and significant VI underwent multichannel CI. Follow-up period ranged from 17 months to 7 years. Case history, etiology of visual and hearing loss, and benefit from CI were evaluated. To measure the outcomes, we selected the pure-tone thresholds with CI, the speech discrimination scores (SDS) using the Japanese video SDS system, the speech perception rates using the Japanese CD SDS system by monosyllable and word, and the open-set and closed sentence score using live voice. All the patients live happily after CI. There was no significant difference between the present six patients and the patients with profound hearing loss without VI in evaluations of hearing and quality of life. CI can play a significant rehabilitative role in patients with severe hearing loss and VI. PMID:17082944

  3. Modiolus-hugging intracochlear electrode array with shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyou Sik; Jun, Sang Beom; Lim, Yoon Seob; Park, Se-Ik; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear implant system, the distance between spiral ganglia and the electrodes within the volume of the scala tympani cavity significantly affects the efficiency of the electrical stimulation in terms of the threshold current level and spatial selectivity. Because the spiral ganglia are situated inside the modiolus, the central axis of the cochlea, it is desirable that the electrode array hugs the modiolus to minimize the distance between the electrodes and the ganglia. In the present study, we propose a shape-memory-alloy-(SMA-) embedded intracochlear electrode which gives a straight electrode a curved modiolus-hugging shape using the restoration force of the SMA as triggered by resistive heating after insertion into the cochlea. An eight-channel ball-type electrode array is fabricated with an embedded titanium-nickel SMA backbone wire. It is demonstrated that the electrode array changes its shape in a transparent plastic human cochlear model. To verify the safe insertion of the electrode array into the human cochlea, the contact pressures during insertion at the electrode tip and the contact pressures over the electrode length after insertion were calculated using a 3D finite element analysis. The results indicate that the SMA-embedded electrode is functionally and mechanically feasible for clinical applications. PMID:23762181

  4. Visualization of spiral ganglion neurites within the scala tympani with a cochlear implant in situ

    PubMed Central

    Chikar, Jennifer A.; Batts, Shelley A.; Pfingst, Bryan E.; Raphael, Yehoash

    2009-01-01

    Current cochlear histology methods do not allow in situ processing of cochlear implants. The metal components of the implant preclude standard embedding and mid-modiolar sectioning, and whole mounts do not have the spatial resolution needed to view the implant within the scala tympani. One focus of recent auditory research is the regeneration of structures within the cochlea, particularly the ganglion cells and their processes, and there are multiple potential benefits to cochlear implant users from this work. To facilitate experimental investigations of auditory nerve regeneration performed in conjunction with cochlear implantation, it is critical to visualize the cochlear tissue and the implant together to determine if the nerve has made contact with the implant. This paper presents a novel histological technique that enables simultaneous visualization of the in situ cochlear implant and neurofilament – labeled nerve processes within the scala tympani, and the spatial relationship between them. PMID:19428528

  5. Visual activation of auditory cortex reflects maladaptive plasticity in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Pascale; Dillier, Norbert; Eichele, Tom; Meyer, Martin; Kegel, Andrea; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto Domingo; Marcar, Valentine Leslie; Jäncke, Lutz; Debener, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    Cross-modal reorganization in the auditory cortex has been reported in deaf individuals. However, it is not well understood whether this compensatory reorganization induced by auditory deprivation recedes once the sensation of hearing is partially restored through a cochlear implant. The current study used electroencephalography source localization to examine cross-modal reorganization in the auditory cortex of post-lingually deafened cochlear implant users. We analysed visual-evoked potentials to parametrically modulated reversing chequerboard images between cochlear implant users (n = 11) and normal-hearing listeners (n = 11). The results revealed smaller P100 amplitudes and reduced visual cortex activation in cochlear implant users compared with normal-hearing listeners. At the P100 latency, cochlear implant users also showed activation in the right auditory cortex, which was inversely related to speech recognition ability with the cochlear implant. These results confirm a visual take-over in the auditory cortex of cochlear implant users. Incomplete reversal of this deafness-induced cortical reorganization might limit clinical benefit from a cochlear implant and help explain the high inter-subject variability in auditory speech comprehension. PMID:22232592

  6. The inferior cochlear vein: surgical aspects in cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, HongLei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, XiaoQuan; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-02-01

    The patency of the inferior cochlear vein (ICV) may be challenged in cochlear implantation (CI) due to its location near the round window (RW). This may be essential to consider during selection of different trajectories for electrode insertion aiming at preserving residual hearing. Venous blood from the human cochlea is drained through the ICV. The vein also drains blood from the modiolus containing the spiral ganglion neurons. Surgical interference with this vein could cause neural damage influencing CI outcome. We analyzed the topographical relationship between the RW and ICV bony channel and cochlear aqueduct (CA) from a surgical standpoint. Archival human temporal bones were further microdissected to visualize the CA and its accessory canals (AC1 and AC2). This was combined with examinations of plastic and silicone molds of the human labyrinth. Metric analyses were made using photo stereomicroscopy documenting the proximal portion of the AC1, the internal aperture of the CA and the RW. The mean distance between the AC1 and the anterior rim of the RW was 0.81 mm in bone specimens and 0.67 mm assessed in corrosion casts. The AC1 runs from the floor of the scala tympani through the otic capsule passing parallel to the CA to the posterior cranial fossa. The mean distance between the CA and AC1 canal was 0.31 and 0.25 mm, respectively. PMID:25700831

  7. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance. Methods Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5–15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children. Results Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants. Conclusion Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show

  8. Visual activity predicts auditory recovery from deafness after adult cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, Kuzma; Rouger, Julien; Demonet, Jean-François; Lagleyre, Sebastien; Fraysse, Bernard; Deguine, Olivier; Barone, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    Modern cochlear implantation technologies allow deaf patients to understand auditory speech; however, the implants deliver only a coarse auditory input and patients must use long-term adaptive processes to achieve coherent percepts. In adults with post-lingual deafness, the high progress of speech recovery is observed during the first year after cochlear implantation, but there is a large range of variability in the level of cochlear implant outcomes and the temporal evolution of recovery. It has been proposed that when profoundly deaf subjects receive a cochlear implant, the visual cross-modal reorganization of the brain is deleterious for auditory speech recovery. We tested this hypothesis in post-lingually deaf adults by analysing whether brain activity shortly after implantation correlated with the level of auditory recovery 6 months later. Based on brain activity induced by a speech-processing task, we found strong positive correlations in areas outside the auditory cortex. The highest positive correlations were found in the occipital cortex involved in visual processing, as well as in the posterior-temporal cortex known for audio-visual integration. The other area, which positively correlated with auditory speech recovery, was localized in the left inferior frontal area known for speech processing. Our results demonstrate that the visual modality's functional level is related to the proficiency level of auditory recovery. Based on the positive correlation of visual activity with auditory speech recovery, we suggest that visual modality may facilitate the perception of the word's auditory counterpart in communicative situations. The link demonstrated between visual activity and auditory speech perception indicates that visuoauditory synergy is crucial for cross-modal plasticity and fostering speech-comprehension recovery in adult cochlear-implanted deaf patients. PMID:24136826

  9. Direct visualization of the murine dorsal cochlear nucleus for optogenetic stimulation of the auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Elliott D; Darrow, Keith N; Hight, Ariel E; Lehmann, Ashton E; Kaplan, Alyson B; Brown, M Christian; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of virus-mediated gene transfer to arrest or reverse hearing loss has largely been relegated to the peripheral auditory system. Few studies have examined gene transfer to the central auditory system. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of the brainstem, which contains second order neurons of the auditory pathway, is a potential site for gene transfer. In this protocol, a technique for direct and maximal exposure of the murine DCN via a posterior fossa approach is demonstrated. This approach allows for either acute or survival surgery. Following direct visualization of the DCN, a host of experiments are possible, including injection of opsins into the cochlear nucleus and subsequent stimulation by an optical fiber coupled to a blue light laser. Other neurophysiology experiments, such as electrical stimulation and neural injector tracings are also feasible. The level of visualization and the duration of stimulation achievable make this approach applicable to a wide range of experiments. PMID:25650555

  10. Direct Visualization of the Murine Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus for Optogenetic Stimulation of the Auditory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ashton E.; Kaplan, Alyson B.; Brown, M. Christian; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of virus-mediated gene transfer to arrest or reverse hearing loss has largely been relegated to the peripheral auditory system. Few studies have examined gene transfer to the central auditory system. The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of the brainstem, which contains second order neurons of the auditory pathway, is a potential site for gene transfer. In this protocol, a technique for direct and maximal exposure of the murine DCN via a posterior fossa approach is demonstrated. This approach allows for either acute or survival surgery. Following direct visualization of the DCN, a host of experiments are possible, including injection of opsins into the cochlear nucleus and subsequent stimulation by an optical fiber coupled to a blue light laser. Other neurophysiology experiments, such as electrical stimulation and neural injector tracings are also feasible. The level of visualization and the duration of stimulation achievable make this approach applicable to a wide range of experiments. PMID:25650555

  11. How does visual language affect crossmodal plasticity and cochlear implant success?

    PubMed Central

    Lyness, C.R.; Woll, B.; Campbell, R.; Cardin, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are the most successful intervention for ameliorating hearing loss in severely or profoundly deaf children. Despite this, educational performance in children with CI continues to lag behind their hearing peers. From animal models and human neuroimaging studies it has been proposed the integrative functions of auditory cortex are compromised by crossmodal plasticity. This has been argued to result partly from the use of a visual language. Here we argue that ‘cochlear implant sensitive periods’ comprise both auditory and language sensitive periods, and thus cannot be fully described with animal models. Despite prevailing assumptions, there is no evidence to link the use of a visual language to poorer CI outcome. Crossmodal reorganisation of auditory cortex occurs regardless of compensatory strategies, such as sign language, used by the deaf person. In contrast, language deprivation during early sensitive periods has been repeatedly linked to poor language outcomes. Language sensitive periods have largely been ignored when considering variation in CI outcome, leading to ill-founded recommendations concerning visual language in CI habilitation. PMID:23999083

  12. How does visual language affect crossmodal plasticity and cochlear implant success?

    PubMed

    Lyness, C R; Woll, B; Campbell, R; Cardin, V

    2013-12-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are the most successful intervention for ameliorating hearing loss in severely or profoundly deaf children. Despite this, educational performance in children with CI continues to lag behind their hearing peers. From animal models and human neuroimaging studies it has been proposed the integrative functions of auditory cortex are compromised by crossmodal plasticity. This has been argued to result partly from the use of a visual language. Here we argue that 'cochlear implant sensitive periods' comprise both auditory and language sensitive periods, and thus cannot be fully described with animal models. Despite prevailing assumptions, there is no evidence to link the use of a visual language to poorer CI outcome. Crossmodal reorganisation of auditory cortex occurs regardless of compensatory strategies, such as sign language, used by the deaf person. In contrast, language deprivation during early sensitive periods has been repeatedly linked to poor language outcomes. Language sensitive periods have largely been ignored when considering variation in CI outcome, leading to ill-founded recommendations concerning visual language in CI habilitation. PMID:23999083

  13. Early-onset hearing loss reorganizes the visual and auditory network in children without cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bin; Yang, Li-Zhuang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Shu-Li; Wang, Ying; Gu, Feng; Yang, Zhiyu; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2016-02-10

    The present study investigates the effect of early-onset hearing loss on the reorganization of visual and auditory networks in children without cochlear implants. Eleven congenitally deaf children and 12 age-matched hearing children were included in the study. Bilateral transverse temporal cortices and bilateral lateral occipital cortices were defined as auditory and visual seeds, respectively (as verified using an independent component analysis). The four seed-based connectivity maps were computed for each participant. As a result, group analysis showed that the primary auditory cortex was less connected with the motor cortex, whereas the visual cortex showed strengthened connectivity with motor and speech cortices in congenitally deaf children compared with the controls. Moreover, we found that the differences in functional connectivity between deaf and control children were not because of morphometric changes. Our results provide neural evidence for the sensorimotor coupling model of speech development. PMID:26730516

  14. Enhanced audio-visual interactions in the auditory cortex of elderly cochlear-implant users.

    PubMed

    Schierholz, Irina; Finke, Mareike; Schulte, Svenja; Hauthal, Nadine; Kantzke, Christoph; Rach, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Sandmann, Pascale

    2015-10-01

    Auditory deprivation and the restoration of hearing via a cochlear implant (CI) can induce functional plasticity in auditory cortical areas. How these plastic changes affect the ability to integrate combined auditory (A) and visual (V) information is not yet well understood. In the present study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine whether age, temporary deafness and altered sensory experience with a CI can affect audio-visual (AV) interactions in post-lingually deafened CI users. Young and elderly CI users and age-matched NH listeners performed a speeded response task on basic auditory, visual and audio-visual stimuli. Regarding the behavioral results, a redundant signals effect, that is, faster response times to cross-modal (AV) than to both of the two modality-specific stimuli (A, V), was revealed for all groups of participants. Moreover, in all four groups, we found evidence for audio-visual integration. Regarding event-related responses (ERPs), we observed a more pronounced visual modulation of the cortical auditory response at N1 latency (approximately 100 ms after stimulus onset) in the elderly CI users when compared with young CI users and elderly NH listeners. Thus, elderly CI users showed enhanced audio-visual binding which may be a consequence of compensatory strategies developed due to temporary deafness and/or degraded sensory input after implantation. These results indicate that the combination of aging, sensory deprivation and CI facilitates the coupling between the auditory and the visual modality. We suggest that this enhancement in multisensory interactions could be used to optimize auditory rehabilitation, especially in elderly CI users, by the application of strong audio-visually based rehabilitation strategies after implant switch-on. PMID:26302946

  15. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Zoë L; Hendrick, Vicki J; Burrows, Michael T; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  16. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Zoë L.; Hendrick, Vicki J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  17. Cross-modal reorganization in cochlear implant users: Auditory cortex contributes to visual face processing.

    PubMed

    Stropahl, Maren; Plotz, Karsten; Schönfeld, Rüdiger; Lenarz, Thomas; Sandmann, Pascale; Yovel, Galit; De Vos, Maarten; Debener, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    There is converging evidence that the auditory cortex takes over visual functions during a period of auditory deprivation. A residual pattern of cross-modal take-over may prevent the auditory cortex to adapt to restored sensory input as delivered by a cochlear implant (CI) and limit speech intelligibility with a CI. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether visual face processing in CI users activates auditory cortex and whether this has adaptive or maladaptive consequences. High-density electroencephalogram data were recorded from CI users (n=21) and age-matched normal hearing controls (n=21) performing a face versus house discrimination task. Lip reading and face recognition abilities were measured as well as speech intelligibility. Evaluation of event-related potential (ERP) topographies revealed significant group differences over occipito-temporal scalp regions. Distributed source analysis identified significantly higher activation in the right auditory cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, confirming visual take-over. Lip reading skills were significantly enhanced in the CI group and appeared to be particularly better after a longer duration of deafness, while face recognition was not significantly different between groups. However, auditory cortex activation in CI users was positively related to face recognition abilities. Our results confirm a cross-modal reorganization for ecologically valid visual stimuli in CI users. Furthermore, they suggest that residual takeover, which can persist even after adaptation to a CI is not necessarily maladaptive. PMID:26220741

  18. Minimal effects of visual memory training on auditory performance of adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Oba, Sandra I; Galvin, John J; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Auditory training has been shown to significantly improve cochlear implant (CI) users' speech and music perception. However, it is unclear whether posttraining gains in performance were due to improved auditory perception or to generally improved attention, memory, and/or cognitive processing. In this study, speech and music perception, as well as auditory and visual memory, were assessed in 10 CI users before, during, and after training with a nonauditory task. A visual digit span (VDS) task was used for training, in which subjects recalled sequences of digits presented visually. After the VDS training, VDS performance significantly improved. However, there were no significant improvements for most auditory outcome measures (auditory digit span, phoneme recognition, sentence recognition in noise, digit recognition in noise), except for small (but significant) improvements in vocal emotion recognition and melodic contour identification. Posttraining gains were much smaller with the nonauditory VDS training than observed in previous auditory training studies with CI users. The results suggest that posttraining gains observed in previous studies were not solely attributable to improved attention or memory and were more likely due to improved auditory perception. The results also suggest that CI users may require targeted auditory training to improve speech and music perception. PMID:23516087

  19. Connectivity and Dispersal Patterns of Protected Biogenic Reefs: Implications for the Conservation of Modiolus modiolus (L.) in the Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Kate; Mackenzie, Clara; Robins, Peter; Coscia, Ilaria; Cassidy, Andrew; James, Jenny; Hull, Angela; Piertney, Stuart; Sanderson, William; Porter, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic reefs created by Modiolus modiolus (Linnaeus, 1758) (horse mussel reefs) are marine habitats which support high levels of species biodiversity and provide valuable ecosystem services. Currently, M. modiolus reefs are listed as a threatened and/or declining species and habitat in all OSPAR regions and thus are highlighted as a conservation priority under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Determining patterns of larval dispersal and genetic connectivity of remaining horse mussel populations can inform management efforts and is a critical component of effective marine spatial planning (MSP). Larval dispersal patterns and genetic structure were determined for several M. modiolus bed populations in the Irish Sea including those in Wales (North Pen Llŷn), Isle of Man (Point of Ayre) and Northern Ireland (Ards Peninsula and Strangford Lough). Simulations of larval dispersal suggested extant connectivity between populations within the Irish Sea. Results from the genetic analysis carried out using newly developed microsatellite DNA markers were consistent with those of the biophysical model. Results indicated moderately significant differentiation between the Northern Ireland populations and those in the Isle of Man and Wales. Simulations of larval dispersal over a 30 day pelagic larval duration (PLD) suggest that connectivity over a spatial scale of 150km is possible between some source and sink populations. However, it appears unlikely that larvae from Northern Ireland will connect directly with sites on the Llŷn or Isle of Man. It also appears unlikely that larvae from the Llŷn connect directly to any of the other sites. Taken together the data establishes a baseline for underpinning management and conservation of these important and threatened marine habitats in the southern part of the known range. PMID:26625263

  20. Connectivity and Dispersal Patterns of Protected Biogenic Reefs: Implications for the Conservation of Modiolus modiolus (L.) in the Irish Sea

    PubMed Central

    Gormley, Kate; Mackenzie, Clara; Robins, Peter; Coscia, Ilaria; Cassidy, Andrew; James, Jenny; Hull, Angela; Piertney, Stuart; Sanderson, William; Porter, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic reefs created by Modiolus modiolus (Linnaeus, 1758) (horse mussel reefs) are marine habitats which support high levels of species biodiversity and provide valuable ecosystem services. Currently, M. modiolus reefs are listed as a threatened and/or declining species and habitat in all OSPAR regions and thus are highlighted as a conservation priority under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Determining patterns of larval dispersal and genetic connectivity of remaining horse mussel populations can inform management efforts and is a critical component of effective marine spatial planning (MSP). Larval dispersal patterns and genetic structure were determined for several M. modiolus bed populations in the Irish Sea including those in Wales (North Pen Llŷn), Isle of Man (Point of Ayre) and Northern Ireland (Ards Peninsula and Strangford Lough). Simulations of larval dispersal suggested extant connectivity between populations within the Irish Sea. Results from the genetic analysis carried out using newly developed microsatellite DNA markers were consistent with those of the biophysical model. Results indicated moderately significant differentiation between the Northern Ireland populations and those in the Isle of Man and Wales. Simulations of larval dispersal over a 30 day pelagic larval duration (PLD) suggest that connectivity over a spatial scale of 150km is possible between some source and sink populations. However, it appears unlikely that larvae from Northern Ireland will connect directly with sites on the Llŷn or Isle of Man. It also appears unlikely that larvae from the Llŷn connect directly to any of the other sites. Taken together the data establishes a baseline for underpinning management and conservation of these important and threatened marine habitats in the southern part of the known range. PMID:26625263

  1. Cross-Modal Functional Reorganization of Visual and Auditory Cortex in Adult Cochlear Implant Users Identified with fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Jeremy D.; Bleichner, Martin G.; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users show higher auditory-evoked activations in visual cortex and higher visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex compared to normal hearing (NH) controls, reflecting functional reorganization of both visual and auditory modalities. Visual-evoked activation in auditory cortex is a maladaptive functional reorganization whereas auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex is beneficial for speech recognition in CI users. We investigated their joint influence on CI users' speech recognition, by testing 20 postlingually deafened CI users and 20 NH controls with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Optodes were placed over occipital and temporal areas to measure visual and auditory responses when presenting visual checkerboard and auditory word stimuli. Higher cross-modal activations were confirmed in both auditory and visual cortex for CI users compared to NH controls, demonstrating that functional reorganization of both auditory and visual cortex can be identified with fNIRS. Additionally, the combined reorganization of auditory and visual cortex was found to be associated with speech recognition performance. Speech performance was good as long as the beneficial auditory-evoked activation in visual cortex was higher than the visual-evoked activation in the auditory cortex. These results indicate the importance of considering cross-modal activations in both visual and auditory cortex for potential clinical outcome estimation. PMID:26819766

  2. Effects of congruent and incongruent visual cues on speech perception and brain activity in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Chang, Sun O; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-03-01

    While deafness-induced plasticity has been investigated in the visual and auditory domains, not much is known about language processing in audiovisual multimodal environments for patients with restored hearing via cochlear implant (CI) devices. Here, we examined the effect of agreeing or conflicting visual inputs on auditory processing in deaf patients equipped with degraded artificial hearing. Ten post-lingually deafened CI users with good performance, along with matched control subjects, underwent H 2 (15) O-positron emission tomography scans while carrying out a behavioral task requiring the extraction of speech information from unimodal auditory stimuli, bimodal audiovisual congruent stimuli, and incongruent stimuli. Regardless of congruency, the control subjects demonstrated activation of the auditory and visual sensory cortices, as well as the superior temporal sulcus, the classical multisensory integration area, indicating a bottom-up multisensory processing strategy. Compared to CI users, the control subjects exhibited activation of the right ventral premotor-supramarginal pathway. In contrast, CI users activated primarily the visual cortices more in the congruent audiovisual condition than in the null condition. In addition, compared to controls, CI users displayed an activation focus in the right amygdala for congruent audiovisual stimuli. The most notable difference between the two groups was an activation focus in the left inferior frontal gyrus in CI users confronted with incongruent audiovisual stimuli, suggesting top-down cognitive modulation for audiovisual conflict. Correlation analysis revealed that good speech performance was positively correlated with right amygdala activity for the congruent condition, but negatively correlated with bilateral visual cortices regardless of congruency. Taken together these results suggest that for multimodal inputs, cochlear implant users are more vision-reliant when processing congruent stimuli and are disturbed

  3. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Emotions by Individuals with Cochlear Implants, Hearing Aids, and Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Aviner, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of cochlear implant (CI) with regard to emotion perception of participants differing in their age of implantation, in comparison to hearing aid users and adolescents with normal hearing (NH). Emotion perception was examined by having the participants identify happiness, anger, surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust.…

  4. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  5. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  6. Segmented detachable structure of cochlear-implant electrodes for close-hugging engagement with the modiolus.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, H; Abbasi, F

    2004-02-15

    Surface and bulk modification techniques of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymers were used to develop a new intracochlear electrode that can closely hug the inner wall of scala tympani. Laser-induced surface grafting of poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and sequential method for preparation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) of PDMS/PHEMA were, respectively, used for surface and bulk modifications. The hydrogel content and water-uptake capability of the modified samples were optimized by Taguchi method for experimental design. The modified PDMS samples were examined by performing attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, water contact-angle measurement, and peel strength tests. The performances of actual-sized fabricated electrodes were assessed inside a transparent model of scala tympani, which was filled with saline. After a swelling process, the hydrophilic branch begins to elongate and detach from hydrophobic branch and pushes it toward the inner wall. PMID:14737768

  7. The use of auditory and visual context in speech perception by listeners with normal hearing and listeners with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Matthew B.; Rhone, Ariane E.; Chatterjee, Monita; Idsardi, William J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wide range of acoustic and visual variability across different talkers and different speaking contexts. Listeners with normal hearing (NH) accommodate that variability in ways that facilitate efficient perception, but it is not known whether listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) can do the same. In this study, listeners with NH and listeners with CIs were tested for accommodation to auditory and visual phonetic contexts created by gender-driven speech differences as well as vowel coarticulation and lip rounding in both consonants and vowels. Accommodation was measured as the shifting of perceptual boundaries between /s/ and /∫/ sounds in various contexts, as modeled by mixed-effects logistic regression. Owing to the spectral contrasts thought to underlie these context effects, CI listeners were predicted to perform poorly, but showed considerable success. Listeners with CIs not only showed sensitivity to auditory cues to gender, they were also able to use visual cues to gender (i.e., faces) as a supplement or proxy for information in the acoustic domain, in a pattern that was not observed for listeners with NH. Spectrally-degraded stimuli heard by listeners with NH generally did not elicit strong context effects, underscoring the limitations of noise vocoders and/or the importance of experience with electric hearing. Visual cues for consonant lip rounding and vowel lip rounding were perceived in a manner consistent with coarticulation and were generally used more heavily by listeners with CIs. Results suggest that listeners with CIs are able to accommodate various sources of acoustic variability either by attending to appropriate acoustic cues or by inferring them via the visual signal. PMID:24204359

  8. Consensus panel on a cochlear coordinate system applicable in histological, physiological and radiological studies of the human cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Verbist, Berit M; Skinner, Margaret W; Cohen, Lawrence T; Leake, Patricia A.; James, Chris; Boëx, Colette; Holden, Timothy A; Finley, Charles C; Roland, Peter S; Roland, J. Thomas; Haller, Matt; Patrick, Jim F; Jolly, Claude N; Faltys, Mike A; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan HM

    2010-01-01

    Hypothesis An objective cochlear framework, for evaluation of the cochlear anatomy and description of the position of an implanted cochlear implant electrode, would allow the direct comparison of measures performed within the various sub-disciplines involved in cochlear implant research. Background Research on the human cochlear anatomy in relation to tonotopy and cochlear implantation is conducted by specialists from numerous disciplines such as histologists, surgeons, physicists, engineers, audiologists and radiologists. To allow accurate comparisons between and combinations of previous and forthcoming scientific and clinical studies, cochlear structures and electrode positions must be specified in a consistent manner. Methods Researchers with backgrounds in the various fields of inner ear research as well as representatives of the different manufacturers of cochlear implants (Advanced Bionics Corp, Med-El, Cochlear Corp) were involved in consensus meetings held in Dallas, March 2005 and Asilomar, August 2005. Existing coordinate systems were evaluated and requisites for an objective cochlear framework were discussed. Results The consensus panel agreed upon a 3-dimensional, cylindrical coordinate system of the cochlea using the “Cochlear View” as a basis and choosing a z-axis through the modiolus. The zero reference angle was chosen at the centre of the round window, which has a close relationship to the basal end of the Organ of Corti. Conclusions Consensus was reached on an objective cochlear framework, allowing the outcomes of studies from different fields of research to be compared directly. PMID:20147866

  9. Comparison of electrically evoked whole-nerve action potential and electrically evoked auditory brainstem response thresholds in nucleus CI24R cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia J; Brown, Carolyn J; Clay, Kelly Schmidt; Seyle, Keely

    2002-09-01

    In this study, differences between electrically evoked whole-nerve action potential (EAP) and electrically evoked auditory brainstem response (EABR) measurements within Nucleus CI24R cochlear implant recipients were evaluated. Precurved modiolus-hugging internal electrode arrays, such as the CI24R, are designed to provide more direct stimulation of neural elements of the modiolus. If the electrode array is closer to the modiolus, electrically evoked and behavioral levels might be lower than were previously recorded for the straight electrode array, the CI24M. EAP and EABR growth functions and behavioral levels were obtained for 10 postlingually deafened adults. Results revealed no significant differences between EAP and EABR threshold levels, and these levels were not significantly lower than those obtained using the CI24M. PMID:12371659

  10. Static and dynamic posture control in postlingual cochlear implanted patients: effects of dual-tasking, visual and auditory inputs suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Léonard, Jacques; Dumitrescu, Michel; Meller, Renaud; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Posture control is based on central integration of multisensory inputs, and on internal representation of body orientation in space. This multisensory feedback regulates posture control and continuously updates the internal model of body's position which in turn forwards motor commands adapted to the environmental context and constraints. The peripheral localization of the vestibular system, close to the cochlea, makes vestibular damage possible following cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Impaired vestibular function in CI patients, if any, may have a strong impact on posture stability. The simple postural task of quiet standing is generally paired with cognitive activity in most day life conditions, leading therefore to competition for attentional resources in dual-tasking, and increased risk of fall particularly in patients with impaired vestibular function. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of postlingual cochlear implantation on posture control in adult deaf patients. Possible impairment of vestibular function was assessed by comparing the postural performance of patients to that of age-matched healthy subjects during a simple postural task performed in static (stable platform) and dynamic (platform in translation) conditions, and during dual-tasking with a visual or auditory memory task. Postural tests were done in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions, with the CI activated (ON) or not (OFF). Results showed that the postural performance of the CI patients strongly differed from the controls, mainly in the EC condition. The CI patients showed significantly reduced limits of stability and increased postural instability in static conditions. In dynamic conditions, they spent considerably more energy to maintain equilibrium, and their head was stabilized neither in space nor on trunk: they behaved dynamically without vision like an inverted pendulum while the controls showed a whole body rigidification strategy. Hearing (prosthesis on) as well

  11. [The non-damaging method for the insertion of a standard electrode for cochlear ossification].

    PubMed

    Diab, Kh M; Daikhes, N A; Pashchinina, O A; Siraeva, A R; Kuznetsov, A O

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the non-damaging method for the insertion of a standard electrode for cochlear ossification with a view to improving the results of hearing and speech rehabilitation of the patients presenting with grade IV sensorineural impairment of hearing. Twenty preparations of the cadaveric temporal bone were used to investigate topographic and anatomical relationships in the main structures of the middle and internal ears, viz. the second cochlear coil, vestibulum and its windows, processus cochleaformis, spiral lamina, and modiolus. The optimal method for the insertion of a standard electrode into the spiral canal of the cochlea after the removal of the ossified structures is proposed. The optimal site for constructing the second colostomy is determined that allows the spiral plate and modiolus to be maximally preserved. The proposed method was employed to treat 11 patients with grade IV sensorineural impairment of hearing and more than 5 mm ossification of the basal cochlear coil. With this method, it proved possible to insert the maximum number of electrodes into the cochlear spiral canal and thereby to obtain excellent results of hearing and speech rehabilitation in the patients with the ossified cochlea. PMID:27367352

  12. Visualization of Live Cochlear Stereocilia at a Nanoscale Resolution Using Hopping Probe Ion Conductance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Ortega, A Catalina; Frolenkov, Gregory I

    2016-01-01

    The mechanosensory apparatus that detects sound-induced vibrations in the cochlea is located on the apex of the auditory sensory hair cells and it is made up of actin-filled projections, called stereocilia. In young rodents, stereocilia bundles of auditory hair cells consist of 3-4 rows of stereocilia of decreasing height and varying thickness. Morphological studies of the auditory stereocilia bundles in live hair cells have been challenging because the diameter of each stereocilium is near or below the resolution limit of optical microscopy. In theory, scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy, could visualize the surface of a living cell at a nanoscale resolution. However, their implementations for hair cell imaging have been largely unsuccessful because the probe usually damages the bundle and disrupts the bundle cohesiveness during imaging. We overcome these limitations by using hopping probe ion conductance microscopy (HPICM), a non-contact scanning probe technique that is ideally suited for the imaging of live cells with a complex topography. Organ of Corti explants are placed in a physiological solution and then a glass nanopipette-which is connected to a 3D-positioning piezoelectric system and to a patch clamp amplifier-is used to scan the surface of the live hair cells at nanometer resolution without ever touching the cell surface.Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the imaging of mouse or rat stereocilia bundles in live auditory hair cells using HPICM. We provide information about the fabrication of the nanopipettes, the calibration of the HPICM setup, the parameters we have optimized for the imaging of live stereocilia bundles and, lastly, a few basic image post-processing manipulations. PMID:27259929

  13. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  15. Cochlear implantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Makizumi, Yoshimi; Kashio, Akinori; Sakamoto, Takashi; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficit in the synthesis of type I collagen. Hearing loss affects 42-58% of OI patients and progresses to deafness in 35-60% of these patients. For OI patients, cochlear implantation (CI) is the only promising treatment option. However, literature on CI in patients with OI is relatively rare. After CI, speech perception is generally good. However, among patients with severe demineralization of the cochlea, most patients are reported to have complications of facial nerve stimulation (FNS), preventing some patients from using the cochlear implant on a daily basis. Here we report a successful CI using a Nucleus CI24 Contour Advance cochlear implant in a patient with OI. Although high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) showed extensive demineralization of the cochlea, intracochlear electrodes were inserted properly. The use of a modiolus-hugging device and the advance off-stylet technique contributed to the successful implantation, with no complications such as FNS or misplacement of electrodes. Therefore, CI can be used for treating deaf patients with OI. PMID:23219154

  16. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  17. Cross-Modal and Intra-Modal Characteristics of Visual Function and Speech Perception Performance in Postlingually Deafened, Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Beom; Shim, Hyun-Yong; Jin, Sun Hwa; Kang, Soojin; Woo, Jihwan; Han, Jong Chul; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Martha; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of visual-auditory cross-modal plasticity in deaf individuals has been widely reported. Superior visual abilities of deaf individuals have been shown to result in enhanced reactivity to visual events and/or enhanced peripheral spatial attention. The goal of this study was to investigate the association between visual-auditory cross-modal plasticity and speech perception in post-lingually deafened, adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Post-lingually deafened adults with CIs (N = 14) and a group of normal hearing, adult controls (N = 12) participated in this study. The CI participants were divided into a good performer group (good CI, N = 7) and a poor performer group (poor CI, N = 7) based on word recognition scores. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded from the temporal and occipital cortex to assess reactivity. Visual field (VF) testing was used to assess spatial attention and Goldmann perimetry measures were analyzed to identify differences across groups in the VF. The association of the amplitude of the P1 VEP response over the right temporal or occipital cortex among three groups (control, good CI, poor CI) was analyzed. In addition, the association between VF by different stimuli and word perception score was evaluated. The P1 VEP amplitude recorded from the right temporal cortex was larger in the group of poorly performing CI users than the group of good performers. The P1 amplitude recorded from electrodes near the occipital cortex was smaller for the poor performing group. P1 VEP amplitude in right temporal lobe was negatively correlated with speech perception outcomes for the CI participants (r = -0.736, P = 0.003). However, P1 VEP amplitude measures recorded from near the occipital cortex had a positive correlation with speech perception outcome in the CI participants (r = 0.775, P = 0.001). In VF analysis, CI users showed narrowed central VF (VF to low intensity stimuli). However, their far peripheral VF (VF to high intensity stimuli) was

  18. Intracochlear assessment of electrode position after cochlear implant surgery by means of multislice computer tomography.

    PubMed

    van Wermeskerken, Gijs K A; Prokop, Mathias; van Olphen, Adriaan F; Albers, Frans W J

    2007-12-01

    The development of electrode arrays, the past years, has focused on modiolus-hugging cochlear implant electrodes. Besides, atraumatic implantation of electrodes is of importance for the use in hearing preservation, in cases of combined electric and acoustic stimulation. Intracochlear positioning of the individual electrodes by means of multislice computer tomography (CT) has not yet been shown. In this study we formulated and tested a CT imaging protocol for postoperative scanning of the temporal bone in cochlear implant subjects. Both a fresh human temporal bone and a fresh human cadaver head were implanted with a cochlear implant. Multislice CT was performed for adequate depiction of the cochlear implant. All scans were analyzed on a viewing workstation. After mid-modiolar reconstruction we were able to identify the intracochlear electrode position relative to the scala tympani and scala vestibuli. This was possible in both the implanted isolated temporal bone and the fresh human cadaver head. The feasibility of imaging the electrode position of the cochlear implant within the intracochlear spaces is shown with multislice CT. An imaging protocol is suggested. PMID:17632730

  19. Aminoglycoside-induced cochlear pathology in man.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, L G; Hawkins, J E; Kingsley, T C; Black, F O; Matz, G J

    1981-01-01

    Temporal bones from five patients with hearing loss as a result of aminoglycoside treatment were examined by the method of microdissection and surface preparations, followed by celloidin embedding and serial sectioning of the modiolus. Three patients had received the newer antibiotics, gentamicin, tobramycin, and amikacin; the other two neomycin. In the cochleas from two patients of the first group there was only a small loss of hair cells, restricted to the lower end of the basal turn. The third, who had been treated with several antibiotics over a longer period of time, showed more extensive but strikingly asymmetrical patterns of degeneration in the two ears. This patient, as well as the fourth, who had received neomycin during peritoneal lavage, had numerous patchy areas of complete disappearance of Corti's organ in the basal turn, with incipient degeneration of the distal ends of the nerve fibers in adjacent portions of the osseous spiral lamina. The fifth patient, who had become deaf after prolonged treatment with neomycin by mouth, showed a complete loss of cochlear hair cells. Nerve fibers were present only in the middle and upper turns, where supporting cells remained. Midmodiolar sections showed a proportionately much greater loss of the distal than of the proximal processes of the cells of the spiral ganglion. These findings underscore once again the special hazard for the inner ear that is associated with the clinical use of neomycin, regardless of the route of administration. PMID:6282040

  20. COMPARISON OF PCB AND TRACE METAL BIOACCUMULATION IN THE BLUE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, AND THE RIBBED MUSSEL, MODIOLUS DEMISSUS, IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accumulation of PCBs and trace metals was compared at 14-d intervals between two filter-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, after deployment in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, for up to 56 d. Contaminant uptake in de...

  1. Coordinated movement of the three rows of outer hair cells is essential for cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakoshi, Michio; Suzuki, Sho; Wada, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    The process known as cochlear amplification is realized by coordinated movement of the outer hair cells (OHCs) in response to changes in their membrane potential. In this process, the displacement amplitude of the basilar membrane (BM) is thought to be increased, thereby leading to the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and sharp frequency selectivity of our hearing. Unfortunately, however, OHCs are vulnerable to noise exposure, ototoxic acid, aging and so on. Previous studies have shown that exposure to intense noise causes functional loss of OHCs from the innermost row (i.e., close to the modiolus) to the outermost row (i.e., close to the cochlear wall). On the contrary, by other traumatic stimuli such as ototoxic acid, aging and ischemia, such loss of OHCs has been reported to occur from the outermost row toward the innermost row. However, how the cochlear amplification changes when coordinated movement of OHCs is impaired, that is when the OHCs in one, two or all three rows have become dysfunctional, remains unclear. In the present study, therefore, a finite element (FE) model of the gerbil cochlea, which takes the motility of OHCs into account, was developed based on our previous FE model. Using this model, changes in the displacement amplitude of the BM due to the functional loss of OHCs in one, two or all three rows were investigated and the effects of incoordination of the three rows of OHCs on cochlear amplification were estimated. Results showed that the displacement amplitude of the BM significantly decreased when either the innermost row or the outermost row of OHCs lost its function, suggesting that all three rows of OHCs are required for cochlear amplification.

  2. Cochlear-Meningitis Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and otolaryngologists) and families should review the vaccination records of current and prospective cochlear implant recipients to ensure that all ... of Use Join Donate ENTConnect Contact Us ...

  3. Relational Learning in Children with Deafness and Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida-Verdu, Ana Claudia; Huziwara, Edson M.; de Souza, Deisy G.; de Rose, Julio C.; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecilia; Lopes, Jair, Jr.; Alves, Cristiane O.; McIlvane, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This four-experiment series sought to evaluate the potential of children with neurosensory deafness and cochlear implants to exhibit auditory-visual and visual-visual stimulus equivalence relations within a matching-to-sample format. Twelve children who became deaf prior to acquiring language (prelingual) and four who became deaf afterwards…

  4. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  5. Cochlear Macromechanical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Timothy Alan

    Contemporary research into the manifestations and origins of nonlinear, active cochlear processes often takes place in a context in which linear, passive cochlear mechanics are poorly understood and poorly communicated. The distinctions among models of one-, two-, and three-dimensional fluid motion in the cochlear scala--models popularized by (among others) Zwislocki, Ranke, and Steele, respectively --are confounded by fuzzy use of terms such as "long-wave model" or "short-wave model." Models are frequently evaluated by comparing their place responses with experimentally observed frequency responses; their global impedance parameters are sometimes chosen solely to secure fit to some local measurement. And Steele's WKB (phase-integral) approach is treated, more often than not, as just another technique for solving cochlear dynamical equations, rather than as a conceptual framework yielding significant insight into cochlear phenomena. In this thesis, I present cochlear dynamical equations for one-, two-, and three-dimensional fluid motion in a box-cochlea model, and I discuss the conditions under which such fluid motion is appropriately described as long wave, short wave, or as something in between. I describe the phase-integral approximate solution to these equations and discuss the utility of this framework for explaining cochlear phenomena. I develop generalized representations for both cochlear-partition impedance and cochlear-gain response that highlight the distinctions and similarities between the place response at a single frequency and the frequency response at a single place. The generalized representations clarify which aspects of partition impedance determine global phenomena, such as cochlear maps, and which aspects determine local features, such as magnitude -response peakiness and phase-response steepness. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253 -1690.).

  6. A Psychophysics experimental software to evaluate electrical pitch discrimination in Nucleus cochlear implanted patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Zaballos, M. T.; Ramos de Miguel, A.; Killian, M.; Ramos Macías, A.

    2016-02-01

    Multichannel electrode array design in cochlear implants has evolved into two major categories: straight and perimodiolar electrodes. When implanted, the former lies along the outer wall of the scala tympani, while the later are located closer to the modiolus, where the neural ends are. Therefore, a perimodiolar position of the electrode array could be expected to result in reduced stimulus thresholds and stimulating currents, increased dynamic range, and more localized stimulation of the neural elements. However, their advantage for pitch discrimination has not been conclusively stated. Therefore, in order to study electrode independence, a psychophysical software has been developed, making use of Nucleus Implant Communicator tools provided by Cochlear company under a research agreement. The application comprises a graphical interface to facilitate its use, since previous software has always required some type of computer language skills. It allows for customization of electrical pulse parameters, measurement of threshold and comfort levels, loudness balancing and alternative forced choice experiments to determine electrode discrimination in Nucleus© users.

  7. [Preoperative imaging of the inner ear prior to the implantation of a multichannel cochlear implant using computed and MR technology].

    PubMed

    Czerny, C; Gstoettner, W; Adunka, O; Hamzavi, J; Baumgartner, W D

    2000-06-01

    CT and MRT are now standard examinations prior to insertion of a cochlear implant. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages in terms of discovering potentially pathological structures in the inner ear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pros and cons of using CT and MRT before cochlear implantation. CT is usually performed using axial planigraphic planes. Like MRT, bone-specific CT is helpful in the diagnosis of congenital and acquired changes within the inner ear. Congenital defects in the meatus acusticus internus, the endolymphatic duct and sac, the cochlea and the vestibulum can be diagnosed and also quantified. Infectious morphologic changes can be seen on CT images in their terminal residual state (sclerotic tissue). However, acute inflammation and fibrotic tissue is not visible on CT. T2-specific MRT images are very fluid sensitive and play a major role in preoperative cochlear implant diagnosis. This examination demonstrates fluid within the peri- and enolymphatic cave and permits the diagnostician to determine whether congenital or acquired diseases have destroyed such fluid-filled cavities. In order to demonstrate pathological changes in the temporal bone and neural structures in the inner ear, MRT is the preferred method. Displaying the modiolus and the cochlear nerve is extremely important because, in their absence, a cochlear implantation may be contra-indicated. MRT also demonstrates other neural structures such as the facial nerve. This information may be important for the surgeon, e.g. the state of the pneumatic system in the mastoid cavity (which is best visualised by bone-specific CT). PMID:10890125

  8. Cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Young, N M

    1994-04-01

    Children with such profound deafness that they are not helped by hearing aids are now candidates for cochlear implantation. This technology permits us to provide these children with a significant degree of useful hearing. The degree of improvement in speech perception and spoken language in pediatric cochlear implant recipients varies. However, the younger the children and the less time they have been completely deprived of auditory stimuli, the more likely they are to make significant progress. The evaluation of the deaf child for implantation is best done by a multidisciplinary team who understands the needs of hearing-impaired children and who can work with the family, the child, and classroom teachers, as well as other school professionals. The decision to proceed with cochlear implantation in a child is one that requires long-term commitment on the part of the family and the cochlear implant team. PMID:8039409

  9. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  10. X-ray microtomographic confirmation of the reliability of CBCT in identifying the scalar location of cochlear implant electrode after round window insertion.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Hannula, Markus; Lehto, Kalle; Feng, Hao; Lähelmä, Jaakko; Aula, Antti S; Hyttinen, Jari; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2015-08-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays a key role in cochlear implantation in both planning implantation before surgery and quality control during surgery due to the high spatial resolution and convenience of application in the operation theater. We recently designed a novel, highresolution cone-beam acquisition system that has been tested in temporal bones with cochlear implantation to identify the scalar localization of the electrode arrays. The current study aimed to verify the reliability of the experimental CBCT set-up using high-resolution in vitro X-ray microtomography (μCT) imaging as a reference. Nine human temporal bones were studied by inserting a straight electrode of a cochlear implant using the round window approach followed by sequential imaging using experimental CBCT and μCT with and without 1% iodine as the contrast agent. In the CBCT images, the electrodes were located in the scala tympani and near the lateral wall in all temporal bones. In the μCT images, the cochlear fine structures, including Reissner's membrane, stria vascularis, spiral ligament, basilar membrane, spiral limbus, osseous spiral lamina, and Rosenthal's canal that hosts the spiral ganglion cells, were clearly delineated; the electrode array avoided the lateral wall of the scala tympani in the hook region and then ran along the lateral wall of the scala tympani without any exception, a feature that was also detected in a temporal bone with ruptures in the basilar and Reissner's membranes. In conclusion, the current in vitro μCT imaging system produced high-quality images that could demonstrate the fine cochlear structures faithfully and verify the reliability of a novel experimental CBCT set-up aimed for clinical application in identifying the scalar localization of the electrode array. The straight electrode is safe for cochlear structures with low risk of translocation and is suitable for atraumatic implantation, although a large gap between the contacts and the

  11. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  12. Questioning cochlear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel; Versteegh, Corstiaen P. C.

    2015-12-01

    Thirty years ago it was hypothesized that motile processes inject mechanical energy into cochlear traveling waves. This mechanical amplification, alternatively described as negative damping, is invoked to explain both the sensitivity and the nonlinear compression of cochlear responses. There is a recent trend to present cochlear amplification as an established fact, even though the evidence is at most circumstantial and several thorny problems have remained unresolved. We analyze several of these issues, and present new basilar membrane recordings that allowed us to quantify cochlear energy flow. Specifically, we address the following questions: (1) Does auditory sensitivity require narrowband amplification? (2) Has the "RC problem" (lowpass filtering of outer hair cell receptor potential) been resolved? (3) Can OHC motility improve auditory sensitivity? (4) Is there a net power gain between neighboring locations on the basilar membrane? The analyses indicate that mechanical amplification in the cochlea is neither necessary nor useful, and that realizing it by known forms of motility would reduce sensitivity rather than enhance it. Finally, our experimental data show that the peaking of the traveling wave is realized by focusing the acoustic energy rather than amplifying it. (Abbreviations. BM: basilar membrane; CF: characteristic frequency; IHC: inner hair cell; ME: middle ear; MT; mechanotransducer; OHC: outer hair cell; SPL: sound pressure level.)

  13. PET-imaging of brain plasticity after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, K; Marx, M; Lagleyre, S; Fraysse, B; Deguine, O; Barone, P

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we review the PET neuroimaging literature, which indicates peculiarities of brain networks involved in speech restoration after cochlear implantation. We consider data on implanted patients during stimulation as well as during resting state, which indicates basic long-term reorganisation of brain functional architecture. On the basis of our analysis of neuroimaging literature and considering our own studies, we indicate that auditory recovery in deaf patients after cochlear implantation partly relies on visual cues. The brain develops mechanisms of audio-visual integration as a strategy to achieve high levels of speech recognition. It turns out that this neuroimaging evidence is in line with behavioural findings of better audiovisual integration in these patients. Thus, strong visually and audio-visually based rehabilitation during the first months after cochlear implantation would significantly improve and fasten the functional recovery of speech intelligibility and other auditory functions in these patients. We provide perspectives for further neuroimaging studies in cochlear implanted patients, which would help understand brain organisation to restore auditory cognitive processing in the implanted patients and would potentially suggest novel approaches for their rehabilitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25448166

  14. Reading Comprehension of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Anneke M.; van Bon, Wim; Schreuder, Rob; Knoors, Harry; Snik, Ad

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (CI) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was expected to surpass that in deaf children without…

  15. Concept Formation Skills in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G.; Beer, Jessica; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Ditmars, Allison; Pisoni, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if a period of auditory sensory deprivation followed by degraded auditory input and related language delays affects visual concept formation skills in long-term prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users. We also examined if concept formation skills are mediated or moderated by other neurocognitive domains (i.e.,…

  16. Physiopathology of the Cochlear Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaorui

    2011-01-01

    Normal blood supply to the cochlea is critically important for establishing the endocochlear potential and sustaining production of endolymph. Abnormal cochlear microcirculation has long been considered an etiologic factor in noise-induced hearing loss, age-related hearing loss (presbycusis), sudden hearing loss or vestibular function, and Meniere's disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of cochlear microcirculation is of fundamental clinical importance. A better understanding of cochlear blood flow (CoBF) will enable more effective management of hearing disorders resulting from aberrant blood flow. This review focuses on recent discoveries and findings related to the physiopathology of the cochlear microvasculature. PMID:21875658

  17. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Teal, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM). Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling. PMID:25136555

  18. Cochlear labyrinth volume in Krapina Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Beals, Michaela E; Frayer, David W; Radovčić, Jakov; Hill, Cheryl A

    2016-01-01

    Research with extant primate taxa suggests that cochlear labyrinth volume is functionally related to the range of audible frequencies. Specifically, cochlear volume is negatively correlated with both the high and low frequency limits of hearing so that the smaller the cochlea, the higher the normal range of audible frequencies. The close anatomical relationship between the membranous cochlea and the bony cochlear labyrinth allows for the determination of cochlear size from fossil specimens. This study compares Krapina Neandertal cochlear volumes to extant taxa cochlear volumes. Cochlear volumes were acquired from high-resolution computed tomography scans of temporal bones of Krapina Neandertals, chimpanzees, gorillas, and modern humans. We find that Krapina Neandertals' cochlear volumes are similar to modern Homo sapiens and are significantly larger than chimpanzee and gorilla cochlear volumes. The measured cochlear volume in Krapina Neandertals suggests they had a range of audible frequencies similar to the modern human range. PMID:26603101

  19. Cochlear gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Marcel

    2005-03-01

    The nonlinear auditory phenomena of compression, suppression, and distortion are known to have a cochlear-mechanical origin. An instantaneous nonlinear transfer function is often assumed to underlie these phenomena, but there are experimental indications that auditory nonlinearity is sluggish rather than instantaneous. This study analyzes the consequences of such sluggishness, using automatic gain control (AGC) as a model noninstantaneous nonlinearity. The distinctive characteristic of AGC, its delayed action, is shown to produce a number of observable and measurable effects that distinguish AGC from instantaneous nonlinearities. A major class of such AGC-specific effects concerns the phase of aural distortion products. For example, the phase of the cancellation tone in the classical psychoacoustic cancellation paradigm is linearly related to the frequency spacing of the primary tones in an AGC, as opposed to the square-law relationship produced by an instantaneous nonlinearity. These and other predictions are confronted with experimental data from the literature. The impact of putative AGC-related delays on the interpretation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) is discussed. Detailed suggestions are made for experiments specifically aimed at determining whether cochlear nonlinearity is instantaneous or delayed. .

  20. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology. PMID:25912703

  1. Talker and Lexical Effects on Audiovisual Word Recognition by Adults with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Adam R.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Lachs, Lorin; Pisoni, David B.

    2003-01-01

    A study examined how 20 adults with postlingual deafness with cochlear implants combined visual information from lip reading with auditory cues in an open-set word recognition task. Word recognition performance was highest for audiovisual presentation followed by auditory-only and then visual-only stimulus presentation, and for single-talker…

  2. Visualizing Cochlear Mechanics Using Confocal Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulfendahl, M.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Fridberger, A.

    2003-02-01

    The sound-evoked vibration pattern of the hearing organ is based on complex mechanical interactions between different cellular structures. To explore the structural changes occurring within the organ of Corti during basilar-membrane motion, stepwise alterations of the scala tympani pressure were applied in an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig temporal bone. Confocal images were acquired at each pressure level. In this way, the motion of several structures could be simultaneously observed with high resolution in a nearly intact system. Images were analyzed using a novel wavelet-based optical-flow estimation algorithm. Under the present experimental conditions, the reticular lamina moved as a stiff plate with a center of rotation in the region of the inner hair cells. The outer hair cells appeared non-rigid and the basal, synaptic regions of these cells displayed significant radial motion indicative of cellular bending and internal shearing.

  3. A software tool for analyzing multichannel cochlear implant signals.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wai Kong; Bögli, Hans; Dillier, Norbert

    2003-10-01

    A useful and convenient means to analyze the radio frequency (RF) signals being sent by a speech processor to a cochlear implant would be to actually capture and display them with appropriate software. This is particularly useful for development or diagnostic purposes. sCILab (Swiss Cochlear Implant Laboratory) is such a PC-based software tool intended for the Nucleus family of Multichannel Cochlear Implants. Its graphical user interface provides a convenient and intuitive means for visualizing and analyzing the signals encoding speech information. Both numerical and graphic displays are available for detailed examination of the captured CI signals, as well as an acoustic simulation of these CI signals. sCILab has been used in the design and verification of new speech coding strategies, and has also been applied as an analytical tool in studies of how different parameter settings of existing speech coding strategies affect speech perception. As a diagnostic tool, it is also useful for troubleshooting problems with the external equipment of the cochlear implant systems. PMID:14534409

  4. Dynamics of Cochlear Nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nigel P; van der Heijden, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic aspects of cochlear mechanical compression were studied by recording basilar membrane (BM) vibrations evoked by tone pairs ("beat stimuli") in the 11-19 kHz region of the gerbil cochlea. The frequencies of the stimulus components were varied to produce a range of "beat rates" at or near the characteristic frequency (CF) of the BM site under study, and the amplitudes of the components were balanced to produce near perfect periodic cancellations, visible as sharp notches in the envelope of the BM response. We found a compressive relation between instantaneous stimulus intensity and BM response magnitude that was strongest at low beat rates (e.g., 10-100 Hz). At higher beat rates, the amount of compression reduced progressively (i.e. the responses became linearized), and the rising and falling flanks of the response envelope showed increasing amounts of hysteresis; the rising flank becoming steeper than the falling flank. This hysteresis indicates that cochlear mechanical compression is not instantaneous, and is suggestive of a gain control mechanism having finite attack and release times. In gain control terms, the linearization that occurs at higher beat rates occurs because the instantaneous gain becomes smoothened, or low-pass filtered, with respect to the magnitude fluctuations in the stimulus. In terms of peripheral processing, the linearization corresponds to an enhanced coding, or decompression, of rapid amplitude modulations. These findings are relevant both to those who wish to understand the underlying mechanisms and those who need a realistic model of nonlinear processing by the auditory periphery. PMID:27080667

  5. Cochlear implant simulator for surgical technique analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turok, Rebecca L.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery is a procedure in which an electrode array is inserted into the cochlea. The electrode array is used to stimulate auditory nerve fibers and restore hearing for people with severe to profound hearing loss. The primary goals when placing the electrode array are to fully insert the array into the cochlea while minimizing trauma to the cochlea. Studying the relationship between surgical outcome and various surgical techniques has been difficult since trauma and electrode placement are generally unknown without histology. Our group has created a CI placement simulator that combines an interactive 3D visualization environment with a haptic-feedback-enabled controller. Surgical techniques and patient anatomy can be varied between simulations so that outcomes can be studied under varied conditions. With this system, we envision that through numerous trials we will be able to statistically analyze how outcomes relate to surgical techniques. As a first test of this system, in this work, we have designed an experiment in which we compare the spatial distribution of forces imparted to the cochlea in the array insertion procedure when using two different but commonly used surgical techniques for cochlear access, called round window and cochleostomy access. Our results suggest that CIs implanted using round window access may cause less trauma to deeper intracochlear structures than cochleostomy techniques. This result is of interest because it challenges traditional thinking in the otological community but might offer an explanation for recent anecdotal evidence that suggests that round window access techniques lead to better outcomes.

  6. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended. PMID:24407715

  7. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  8. Efferent feedback slows cochlear aging.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M Charles; Liberman, Leslie D; Maison, Stéphane F

    2014-03-26

    The inner ear receives two types of efferent feedback from the brainstem: one pathway provides gain control on outer hair cells' contribution to cochlear amplification, and the other modulates the excitability of the cochlear nerve. Although efferent feedback can protect hair cells from acoustic injury and thereby minimize noise-induced permanent threshold shifts, most prior studies focused on high-intensity exposures (>100 dB SPL). Here, we show that efferents are essential for long-term maintenance of cochlear function in mice aged 1 year post-de-efferentation without purposeful acoustic overexposure. Cochlear de-efferentation was achieved by surgical lesion of efferent pathways in the brainstem and was assessed by quantitative analysis of immunostained efferent terminals in outer and inner hair cell areas. The resultant loss of efferent feedback accelerated the age-related amplitude reduction in cochlear neural responses, as seen in auditory brainstem responses, and increased the loss of synapses between hair cells and the terminals of cochlear nerve fibers, as seen in confocal analysis of the organ of Corti immunostained for presynaptic and postsynaptic markers. This type of neuropathy, also seen after moderate noise exposure, has been termed "hidden hearing loss", because it does not affect thresholds, but can be seen in the suprathreshold amplitudes of cochlear neural responses, and likely causes problems with hearing in a noisy environment, a classic symptom of age-related hearing loss in humans. Since efferent reflex strength varies among individuals and can be measured noninvasively, a weak reflex may be an important risk factor, and prognostic indicator, for age-related hearing impairment. PMID:24672005

  9. Cochlear implantation in Cockayne syndrome: our experience of two cases with different outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morris, David P; Alian, Wael; Maessen, Heather; Creaser, Cathy; Demmons-O'Brien, Stephanie; Van Wijhe, Rene; Bance, Manohar

    2007-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive defect in DNA repair resulting in a classic facies with potential visual and auditory impairment. The hearing loss begins peripherally and may become central as the condition progresses. Coexisting sensory deprivation from visual impairment and the possibility of progressive deterioration in mental function conspire with a lack of published experience to produce many challenges for the cochlear implant team. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case reports with documented follow-up of cochlear implantation in two patients with different manifestations of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:17473700

  10. Cued speech for enhancing speech perception and first language development of children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J

    2010-06-01

    Nearly 300 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment, if not adequately managed, has strong socioeconomic and affective impact on individuals. Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music. The auditory information delivered by the cochlear implant remains non-optimal for speech perception because it delivers a spectrally degraded signal and lacks some of the fine temporal acoustic structure. In this article, we discuss research revealing the multimodal nature of speech perception in normally-hearing individuals, with important inter-subject variability in the weighting of auditory or visual information. We also discuss how audio-visual training, via Cued Speech, can improve speech perception in cochlear implantees, particularly in noisy contexts. Cued Speech is a system that makes use of visual information from speechreading combined with hand shapes positioned in different places around the face in order to deliver completely unambiguous information about the syllables and the phonemes of spoken language. We support our view that exposure to Cued Speech before or after the implantation could be important in the aural rehabilitation process of cochlear implantees. We describe five lines of research that are converging to support the view that Cued Speech can enhance speech perception in individuals with cochlear implants. PMID:20724357

  11. Cued Speech for Enhancing Speech Perception and First Language Development of Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 300 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment, if not adequately managed, has strong socioeconomic and affective impact on individuals. Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music. The auditory information delivered by the cochlear implant remains non-optimal for speech perception because it delivers a spectrally degraded signal and lacks some of the fine temporal acoustic structure. In this article, we discuss research revealing the multimodal nature of speech perception in normally-hearing individuals, with important inter-subject variability in the weighting of auditory or visual information. We also discuss how audio-visual training, via Cued Speech, can improve speech perception in cochlear implantees, particularly in noisy contexts. Cued Speech is a system that makes use of visual information from speechreading combined with hand shapes positioned in different places around the face in order to deliver completely unambiguous information about the syllables and the phonemes of spoken language. We support our view that exposure to Cued Speech before or after the implantation could be important in the aural rehabilitation process of cochlear implantees. We describe five lines of research that are converging to support the view that Cued Speech can enhance speech perception in individuals with cochlear implants. PMID:20724357

  12. IMPORTANCE OF COCHLEAR HEALTH FOR IMPLANT FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Pfingst, Bryan E.; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J.; Watts, Melissa M.; Strahl, Stefan B.; Garadat, Soha N.; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C.; Budenz, Cameron L.; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. PMID:25261772

  13. Experimental cochlear hydrops in cats.

    PubMed

    Eby, T L

    1986-11-01

    An experimental model of cochlear hydrops was created in cats. Ten cats underwent surgical procedures to obliterate the saccule, and their temporal bones were studied by light microscopy after sacrifice at 10 weeks. In one group the saccules were destroyed by maceration and aspiration. However, in these ears the saccular lumens were not obliterated and endolymphatic hydrops did not develop. Obliteration of the saccules was achieved in the second group after fascia was introduced into the area of the injured saccules. Cochlear endolymphatic hydrops was a consistent finding in these ears except when a fistula of the membranous labyrinth was present. However, in addition to fibrosis and new bone formation in the vestibules there were also degenerative changes in the hair cells, tectorial membranes, and striae vasculares of these cochleae. The results supported the longitudinal flow theory of endolymph and are consistent with the reported examples of cochlear endolymphatic hydrops in man. PMID:3812642

  14. Developmental neuroplasticity after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Kral, Andrej; Sharma, Anu

    2012-02-01

    Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system, resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receive implants provide a platform to examine the characteristics of cortical plasticity in the auditory system. In this review, we discuss the existence of time limits for, and mechanistic constraints on, sensitive periods for cochlear implantation and describe the effects of multimodal and cognitive reorganization that result from long-term auditory deprivation. PMID:22104561

  15. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  16. Nonlinear cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zweig, George

    2016-05-01

    An earlier paper characterizing the linear mechanical response of the organ of Corti [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 1102-1121 (2015)] is extended to the nonlinear domain. Assuming the existence of nonlinear oscillators nonlocally coupled through the pressure they help create, the oscillator equations are derived and examined when the stimuli are modulated tones and clicks. The nonlinearities are constrained by the requirements of oscillator stability and the invariance of zero crossings in the click response to changes in click amplitude. The nonlinear oscillator equations for tones are solved in terms of the fluid pressure that drives them, and its time derivative, presumably a proxy for forces created by outer hair cells. The pressure equation is reduced to quadrature, the integrand depending on the oscillators' responses. The resulting nonlocally coupled nonlinear equations for the pressure, and oscillator amplitudes and phases, are solved numerically in terms of the fluid pressure at the stapes. Methods for determining the nonlinear damping directly from measurements are described. Once the oscillators have been characterized from their tone and click responses, the mechanical response of the cochlea to natural sounds may be computed numerically. Signal processing inspired by cochlear mechanics opens up a new area of nonlocal nonlinear time-frequency analysis. PMID:27250151

  17. Pediatric cochlear implantation: an update.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Bacciu, Andrea; Guida, Maurizio; Marra, Francesca; Bertoldi, Barbara; Bacciu, Salvatore; Pasanisi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Deafness in pediatric age can adversely impact language acquisition as well as educational and social-emotional development. Once diagnosed, hearing loss should be rehabilitated early; the goal is to provide the child with maximum access to the acoustic features of speech within a listening range that is safe and comfortable. In presence of severe to profound deafness, benefit from auditory amplification cannot be enough to allow a proper language development. Cochlear implants are partially implantable electronic devices designed to provide profoundly deafened patients with hearing sensitivity within the speech range. Since their introduction more than 30 years ago, cochlear implants have improved their performance to the extent that are now considered to be standard of care in the treatment of children with severe to profound deafness. Over the years patient candidacy has been expanded and the criteria for implantation continue to evolve within the paediatric population. The minimum age for implantation has progressively reduced; it has been recognized that implantation at a very early age (12-18 months) provides children with the best outcomes, taking advantage of sensitive periods of auditory development. Bilateral implantation offers a better sound localization, as well as a superior ability to understand speech in noisy environments than unilateral cochlear implant. Deafened children with special clinical situations, including inner ear malformation, cochlear nerve deficiency, cochlear ossification, and additional disabilities can be successfully treated, even thogh they require an individualized candidacy evaluation and a complex post-implantation rehabilitation. Benefits from cochlear implantation include not only better abilities to hear and to develop speech and language skills, but also improved academic attainment, improved quality of life, and better employment status. Cochlear implants permit deaf people to hear, but they have a long way to go before

  18. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  19. Music perception with cochlear implants: a review.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Hugh J

    2004-01-01

    The acceptance of cochlear implantation as an effective and safe treatment for deafness has increased steadily over the past quarter century. The earliest devices were the first implanted prostheses found to be successful in compensating partially for lost sensory function by direct electrical stimulation of nerves. Initially, the main intention was to provide limited auditory sensations to people with profound or total sensorineural hearing impairment in both ears. Although the first cochlear implants aimed to provide patients with little more than awareness of environmental sounds and some cues to assist visual speech-reading, the technology has advanced rapidly. Currently, most people with modern cochlear implant systems can understand speech using the device alone, at least in favorable listening conditions. In recent years, an increasing research effort has been directed towards implant users' perception of nonspeech sounds, especially music. This paper reviews that research, discusses the published experimental results in terms of both psychophysical observations and device function, and concludes with some practical suggestions about how perception of music might be enhanced for implant recipients in the future. The most significant findings of past research are: (1) On average, implant users perceive rhythm about as well as listeners with normal hearing; (2) Even with technically sophisticated multiple-channel sound processors, recognition of melodies, especially without rhythmic or verbal cues, is poor, with performance at little better than chance levels for many implant users; (3) Perception of timbre, which is usually evaluated by experimental procedures that require subjects to identify musical instrument sounds, is generally unsatisfactory; (4) Implant users tend to rate the quality of musical sounds as less pleasant than listeners with normal hearing; (5) Auditory training programs that have been devised specifically to provide implant users with

  20. Music Perception with Cochlear Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Hugh J.

    2004-01-01

    The acceptance of cochlear implantation as an effective and safe treatment for deafness has increased steadily over the past quarter century. The earliest devices were the first implanted prostheses found to be successful in compensating partially for lost sensory function by direct electrical stimulation of nerves. Initially, the main intention was to provide limited auditory sensations to people with profound or total sensorineural hearing impairment in both ears. Although the first cochlear implants aimed to provide patients with little more than awareness of environmental sounds and some cues to assist visual speech-reading, the technology has advanced rapidly. Currently, most people with modern cochlear implant systems can understand speech using the device alone, at least in favorable listening conditions. In recent years, an increasing research effort has been directed towards implant users’ perception of nonspeech sounds, especially music. This paper reviews that research, discusses the published experimental results in terms of both psychophysical observations and device function, and concludes with some practical suggestions about how perception of music might be enhanced for implant recipients in the future. The most significant findings of past research are: (1) On average, implant users perceive rhythm about as well as listeners with normal hearing; (2) Even with technically sophisticated multiple-channel sound processors, recognition of melodies, especially without rhythmic or verbal cues, is poor, with performance at little better than chance levels for many implant users; (3) Perception of timbre, which is usually evaluated by experimental procedures that require subjects to identify musical instrument sounds, is generally unsatisfactory; (4) Implant users tend to rate the quality of musical sounds as less pleasant than listeners with normal hearing; (5) Auditory training programs that have been devised specifically to provide implant users with

  1. Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted.…

  2. The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth with Cochlear Implant Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.; Valente, Daniel L.; McCreery, Ryan W.; Diaz, Gina R.; Sanford, Todd; Harpster, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients. Method: Speech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated…

  3. Cross-Modal Reorganization and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucet, M. E.; Bergeron, F.; Lassonde, M.; Ferron, P.; Lepore, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work suggests that once the auditory cortex of deaf persons has been reorganized by cross-modal plasticity, it can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant (CI) installed subsequently. To further examine this issue, we compared the evoked potentials involved in the processing of visual stimuli between CI users and hearing…

  4. Comparison of PCB and trace metal bioaccumulation in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.G.; Bergen, B.J.; Cobb, D.J.

    1995-03-01

    The accumulation of PCBs and trace metals was compared at 14-d intervals between two filter-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, after deployment in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, for up to 56 d. Contaminant uptake in deployed organisms also was compared with indigenous ribbed mussels. Significant mortality occurred in blue mussels after 28 d, when water temperatures exceeded 25 C. Therefore, tissue-residue comparisons between species are presented only up to day 28, while those between deployed and indigenous ribbed mussels continue to day 56. Results indicated that total PCB tissue residues and congener distributions were not statistically different in the two mussel species on day 28. Total PCB concentrations in both deployed mussel species reached approximately 30 {mu}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight by day 28. Additionally, total PCB concentrations and congener distributions in the deployed ribbed mussels were not statistically different from the indigenous ribbed mussels on day 28, demonstrating that steady state was attained within 28 d. With respect to metal uptake, no single accumulation pattern occurred for the eight metals quantified. After 28 d, lead, cadmium, and iron concentrations in deployed blue and ribbed mussels were statistically similar. However, nickel and zinc accumulations were significantly greater in the blue mussels, and copper, chromium, and manganese were accumulated to significantly higher concentrations in the ribbed mussels. The comparison between the ribbed mussels indicated that cadmium and lead concentrations were significantly higher in indigenous than in deployed mussels after 28 d.

  5. Developmental dysgraphia with profound hearing impairment: intervention by auditory methods enabled by cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kunihiro; Kawasaki, Akihiro; Nagayasu, Rie; Kunisue, Kazuya; Maeda, Yukihide; Kariya, Shin; Kataoka, Yuko; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2008-06-01

    Learning disability combined with hearing impairment (LDHI) is a poor prognostic factor for the language development of hearing impaired children after educational intervention. A typical example of a child with LDHI and effective interventions provided by cochlear implants are presented in this report. A case of congenital cytomegaloviral infection that showed dysgraphia as well as profound deafness was reported and an underlying visual processing problem diagnosed in the present case caused the patient's dysgraphia. The dysgraphia could be circumvented by the use of auditory memory fairly established by a cochlear implant. PMID:18082987

  6. Increased audiovisual integration in cochlear-implanted deaf patients: independent components analysis of longitudinal positron emission tomography data.

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, K; Rouger, J; Lagleyre, S; Fraysse, B; Démonet, J-F; Déguine, O; Barone, P

    2015-03-01

    It has been demonstrated in earlier studies that patients with a cochlear implant have increased abilities for audio-visual integration because the crude information transmitted by the cochlear implant requires the persistent use of the complementary speech information from the visual channel. The brain network for these abilities needs to be clarified. We used an independent components analysis (ICA) of the activation (H2(15)O) positron emission tomography data to explore occipito-temporal brain activity in post-lingually deaf patients with unilaterally implanted cochlear implants at several months post-implantation (T1), shortly after implantation (T0) and in normal hearing controls. In between-group analysis, patients at T1 had greater blood flow in the left middle temporal cortex as compared with T0 and normal hearing controls. In within-group analysis, patients at T0 had a task-related ICA component in the visual cortex, and patients at T1 had one task-related ICA component in the left middle temporal cortex and the other in the visual cortex. The time courses of temporal and visual activities during the positron emission tomography examination at T1 were highly correlated, meaning that synchronized integrative activity occurred. The greater involvement of the visual cortex and its close coupling with the temporal cortex at T1 confirm the importance of audio-visual integration in more experienced cochlear implant subjects at the cortical level. PMID:25728184

  7. 3D optical coherence tomography image registration for guiding cochlear implant insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gyeong-Woo; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Chalasani, Preetham; Chien, Wade W.; Iordachita, Iulian; Taylor, Russell; Niparko, John; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-03-01

    In cochlear implant surgery, an electrode array is inserted into the cochlear canal to restore hearing to a person who is profoundly deaf or significantly hearing impaired. One critical part of the procedure is the insertion of the electrode array, which looks like a thin wire, into the cochlear canal. Although X-ray or computed tomography (CT) could be used as a reference to evaluate the pathway of the whole electrode array, there is no way to depict the intra-cochlear canal and basal turn intra-operatively to help guide insertion of the electrode array. Optical coherent tomography (OCT) is a highly effective way of visualizing internal structures of cochlea. Swept source OCT (SSOCT) having center wavelength of 1.3 micron and 2D Galvonometer mirrors was used to achieve 7-mm depth 3-D imaging. Graphics processing unit (GPU), OpenGL, C++ and C# were integrated for real-time volumetric rendering simultaneously. The 3D volume images taken by the OCT system were assembled and registered which could be used to guide a cochlear implant. We performed a feasibility study using both dry and wet temporal bones and the result is presented.

  8. Cochlear Implants: The Young People's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Alexandra; Archbold, Sue; Gregory, Susan; Skipp, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is a relatively new procedure, which has already had significant impact on the lives of many profoundly deaf children and adults, in providing useful hearing to those unable to benefit significantly from hearing aids. After 16 years of cochlear implantation in the United Kingdom, there is now a body of evidence covering a…

  9. Deafblind People's Experiences of Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soper, Janet

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear implants are electronic devices that create the sensation of hearing in those who cannot obtain any benefit from conventional hearing aids. This article examines the experience of cochlear implantation in a select group of individuals with acquired deafblindness, focusing on three key themes: access to communication, information and…

  10. The Spatial Pattern of Cochlear Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A.N.; Nin, Fumiaki; Reichenbach, Tobias; Uthaiah, Revathy C.; Hudspeth, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Sensorineural hearing loss, which stems primarily from the failure of mechanosensory hair cells, changes the traveling waves that transmit acoustic signals along the cochlea. However, the connection between cochlear mechanics and the amplificatory function of hair cells remains unclear. Using an optical technique that permits the targeted inactivation of prestin, a protein of outer hair cells that generates forces on the basilar membrane, we demonstrate that these forces interact locally with cochlear traveling waves to achieve enormous mechanical amplification. By perturbing amplification in narrow segments of the basilar membrane, we further show that a cochlear traveling wave accumulates gain as it approaches its peak. Analysis of these results indicates that cochlear amplification produces negative damping that counters the viscous drag impeding traveling waves; targeted photoinactivation locally interrupts this compensation. These results reveal the locus of amplification in cochlear traveling waves and connect the characteristics of normal hearing to molecular forces. PMID:23217746

  11. Two-Photon Microscopy Allows Imaging and Characterization of Cochlear Microvasculature In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bertlich, Mattis; Weiss, Bernhard; Dietzel, Steffen; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of cochlear blood flow has been discussed as factor in the pathophysiology of various inner ear disorders. However, the microscopic study of cochlear microcirculation is limited due to small scale and anatomical constraints. Here, two-photon fluorescence microscopy is applied to visualize cochlear microvessels. Guinea pigs were injected with Fluorescein isothiocyanate- or Texas red-dextrane as plasma marker. Intravital microscopy was performed in four animals and explanted cochleae from four animals were studied. The vascular architecture of the cochlea was visualized up to a depth of 90.0 ± 22.7 μm. Imaging yielded a mean contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 3.3 ± 1.7. Mean diameter in vivo was 16.5 ± 6.0 μm for arterioles and 8.0 ± 2.4 μm for capillaries. In explanted cochleae, the diameter of radiating arterioles and capillaries was measured with 12.2 ± 1.6 μm and 6.6 ± 1.0 μm, respectively. The difference between capillaries and arterioles was statistically significant in both experimental setups (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, two-way ANOVA). Measured vessel diameters in vivo and ex vivo were in agreement with published data. We conclude that two-photon fluorescence microscopy allows the investigation of cochlear microvessels and is potentially a valuable tool for inner ear research. PMID:25883941

  12. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2010-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to more global changes in neurocognitive function. In this paper, we investigate implicit sequence learning abilities in deaf children with CIs using a novel task that measured learning through improvement to immediate serial recall for statistically-consistent visual sequences. The results demonstrated two key findings. First, the deaf children with CIs showed disturbances in their visual sequence learning abilities relative to the typically-developing normal-hearing children. Second, sequence learning was significantly correlated with a standardized measure of language outcome in the CI children. These findings suggest that a period of auditory deprivation has secondary effects related to general sequencing deficits, and that disturbances in sequence learning may at least partially explain why some deaf children still struggle with language following cochlear implantation. PMID:21159089

  13. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  14. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, B.; Gjedde, A.; Wallentin, M.; Vuust, P.

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca's area has been active prior to the loss of hearing. PMID:24377050

  15. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B.; Sweeney, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant. PMID:26097718

  16. Language Processing in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Report on Lexical Access for Production and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Steinman, Susan; Ying, Elizabeth; Mystal, Elana Ying; Houston, Derek M.

    2013-01-01

    In this plenary paper, we present a review of language research in children with cochlear implants along with an outline of a 5-year project designed to examine the lexical access for production and recognition. The project will use auditory priming, picture naming with auditory or visual interfering stimuli (Picture-Word Interference and…

  17. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... in aircraft interact in unpredictable ways with other computer systems Will have to be careful of static electricity. Static electricity may temporarily or permanently damage a cochlear implant. It ... computer monitors, or synthetic fabric. For more details regarding ...

  18. Educational Challenges for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Patricia M.; Nevins, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses educational challenges for children with severe to profound hearing loss who receive cochlear implants. Despite the implants, these children face acoustic challenges, academic challenges, attention challenges, associative challenges, and adjustment challenges. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  19. Melodic Contour Identification by Cochlear Implant Listeners

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, John J.; Fu, Qian-Jie; Nogaki, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Objective While the cochlear implant provides many deaf patients with good speech understanding in quiet, music perception and appreciation with the cochlear implant remains a major challenge for most cochlear implant users. The present study investigated whether a closed-set melodic contour identification (MCI) task could be used to quantify cochlear implant users’ ability to recognize musical melodies and whether MCI performance could be improved with moderate auditory training. The present study also compared MCI performance with familiar melody identification (FMI) performance, with and without MCI training. Methods For the MCI task, test stimuli were melodic contours composed of 5 notes of equal duration whose frequencies corresponded to musical intervals. The interval between successive notes in each contour was varied between 1 and 5 semitones; the “root note” of the contours was also varied (A3, A4, and A5). Nine distinct musical patterns were generated for each interval and root note condition, resulting in a total of 135 musical contours. The identification of these melodic contours was measured in 11 cochlear implant users. FMI was also evaluated in the same subjects; recognition of 12 familiar melodies was tested with and without rhythm cues. MCI was also trained in 6 subjects, using custom software and melodic contours presented in a different frequency range from that used for testing. Results Results showed that MCI recognition performance was highly variable among cochlear implant users, ranging from 14% to 91% correct. For most subjects, MCI performance improved as the number of semitones between successive notes was increased; performance was slightly lower for the A3 root note condition. Mean FMI performance was 58% correct when rhythm cues were preserved and 29% correct when rhythm cues were removed. Statistical analyses revealed no significant correlation between MCI performance and FMI performance (with or without rhythmic cues). However

  20. Cochlear otosclerosis: does bone formation affect cochlear implant surgery?

    PubMed

    Fayad, J; Moloy, P; Linthicum, F H

    1990-05-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate that new bone formation in the scala tympani of patients deaf from otosclerosis does not preclude cochlear implant surgery. In seven temporal bones from patients with otosclerosis, we measured the extent of new bone from the round window to the distal part of the new growth. We compared results to surgical data on the extent of drilling and depth and ease of placement of the electrode in 20 patients deaf from otosclerosis. We also examined clinical performance and voltage requirements for long-term implant use in patients with and patients without ossification of the scala tympani. Findings in our limited sample of patients and bones show that obstruction of the basal turn, which occurs in some otosclerotic patients, does not preclude implant surgery. The dynamic range in the studied sample was relatively stable long-term and clinical performance did not differ between groups with and without an ossified scala tympani. PMID:2188511

  1. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    PubMed

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding. PMID:11766315

  2. Parents' narratives on cochlear implantation: reconstructing the experience of having a child with cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Augusto; Suárez, Roberto M; Niño, Natalia M; Aparicio, Maria Leonor; García, Juan Manuel; Barón, Clemencia

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses parents' narratives on cochlear implantation in Bogotá, Colombia using a qualitative approach. The main research objective was to identify how parents perceived the processes of diagnosis of their child's hearing loss, making the decision for cochlear implantation and the post-surgery period. All participants were hearing couples (n = 13) with similar socio-cultural backgrounds whose children had undergone cochlear implant surgery. Results show why cochlear implants are a very highly valued technological device with great symbolic power for parents. The study also deals with how perceptions about oral/sign language and disability, as well as social expectations for their children's lifetime opportunities, determine how the parents themselves have experienced their journey through the process of their children's cochlear implantation. PMID:21917202

  3. A phone-assistive device based on Bluetooth technology for cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Loizou, Philipos C; Dorman, Michael F

    2003-09-01

    Hearing-impaired people, and particularly hearing-aid and cochlear-implant users, often have difficulty communicating over the telephone. The intelligibility of telephone speech is considerably lower than the intelligibility of face-to-face speech. This is partly because of lack of visual cues, limited telephone bandwidth, and background noise. In addition, cellphones may cause interference with the hearing aid or cochlear implant. To address these problems that hearing-impaired people experience with telephones, this paper proposes a wireless phone adapter that can be used to route the audio signal directly to the hearing aid or cochlear implant processor. This adapter is based on Bluetooth technology. The favorable features of this new wireless technology make the adapter superior to traditional assistive listening devices. A hardware prototype was built and software programs were written to implement the headset profile in the Bluetooth specification. Three cochlear implant users were tested with the proposed phone-adapter and reported good speech quality. PMID:14518792

  4. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Cochlear Implants Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... right, and Isabelle Jeppsen meet with Mia's cochlear implant surgeon, John Niparko, M.D., of Johns Hopkins ...

  5. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  6. Vowel acquisition by prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve; Le Normand, Marie-Thérèse; Ménard, Lucie; Goud, Marilyne; Cohen, Henri

    2001-05-01

    Phonetic transcriptions (study 1) and acoustic analysis (study 2) were used to clarify the nature and rhythm of vowel acquisition following the cochlear implantation of prelingually deaf children. In the first study, seven children were divided according to their degree of hearing loss (DHL): DHL I: 90-100 dB of hearing loss, 1 children; DHL II: 100-110 dB, 3 children; and DHL III: over 110 dB, 3 children. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded and videotaped 6 and 12 months postsurgery and vowel inventories were obtained by listing all vowels that occurred at least twice in the child's repertoire at the time of recording. Results showed that degree of hearing loss and age at implantation have a significant impact on vowel acquisition. Indeed, DHL I and II children demonstrated more diversified as well as more typical pattern of acquisition. In the second study, the values of the first and second formants were extracted. The results suggest evolving use of the acoustic space, reflecting the use of auditory feedback to produce the three phonological features exploited to contrast French vowels (height, place of articulation, and rounding). The possible influence of visual feedback before cochlear implant is discussed.

  7. Cochlear implantation in children and adults in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Brand, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Kompis, Martin; Dillier, Norbert; Allum, John H J

    2014-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) is one of the most successful neural prostheses developed to date. It offers artificial hearing to individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss and with insufficient benefit from conventional hearing aids. The first implants available some 30 years ago provided a limited sensation of sound. The benefit for users of these early systems was mostly a facilitation of lip-reading based communication rather than an understanding of speech. Considerable progress has been made since then. Modern, multichannel implant systems feature complex speech processing strategies, high stimulation rates and multiple sites of stimulation in the cochlea. Equipped with such a state-of-the-art system, the majority of recipients today can communicate orally without visual cues and can even use the telephone. The impact of CIs on deaf individuals and on the deaf community has thus been exceptional. To date, more than 300,000 patients worldwide have received CIs. In Switzerland, the first implantation was performed in 1977 and, as of 2012, over 2,000 systems have been implanted with a current rate of around 150 CIs per year. The primary purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary overview of cochlear implantation, emphasising the situation in Switzerland. PMID:24496729

  8. Reading Skills in Children with Multichannel Cochlear-Implant Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Linda; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Gantz, Bruce J.

    1997-01-01

    A study compared reading-achievement level of 40 children with deafness who received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implants between ages 2 and 13 with that of children with deafness without cochlear implants. Nearly one half of children with cochlear implants were reading at or within 8 months of grade level. (Author/CR)

  9. Polybrene: Observations on cochlear hair cell necrosis and minimal lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Miaomiao; Yu, Dongzhen; Song, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Dong, Pin; He, Jingchun

    2015-07-23

    Polybrene is widely used to enhance viral transduction; however, little is known about the utility thereof, in enhancing lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of polybrene, and the further effects thereof, on lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells, especially sensory hair cells. Cochlear basilar membranes of newborn rats were cultured and treated with 0.1-10 μg/mL polybrene for 24h to explore the potential development of ototoxicity. PI staining and TUNEL detection were used to evaluate necrosis or apoptosis of hair cell. Various doses of lentivirus-GFP were added to cochlear organotypic cultures with safe concentrations of polybrene, incubated for 24h, and cultured (in the absence of the virus and polybrene) for a further 48 h. Transduction efficiencies were evaluated. The results showed that polybrene at 0.1 μg/mL was safe to cochlear cells, and 0.5-10 μg/mL concentration induced hair cell necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, supporting cells were not damaged. Lentiviral vectors transduced into cochlear cells and 0.1 μg/mL polybrene enhanced transduction efficiency. However, hair cells were hardly transduced with lentiviral vectors either alone or in the presence of 0.1 μg/mL polybrene. The use of polybrene to aid lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells requires further attention. PMID:26071903

  10. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Monteiro, Tatiana Alves; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schmidt; de Brito, Rubens

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI) in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives: To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report: A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2 dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients. PMID:25992034

  11. Commissural axons of the mouse cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Drottar, Marie; Benson, Thane E; Darrow, Keith

    2013-05-01

    The axons of commissural neurons that project from one cochlear nucleus to the other were studied after labeling with anterograde tracer. Injections were made into the dorsal subdivision of the cochlear nucleus in order to restrict labeling only to the group of commissural neurons that gave off collaterals to, or were located in, this subdivision. The number of labeled commissural axons in each injection was correlated with the number of labeled radiate multipolar neurons, suggesting radiate neurons as the predominant origin of the axons. The radiate commissural axons are thick and myelinated, and they exit the dorsal acoustic stria of the injected cochlear nucleus to cross the brainstem in the dorsal half, near the crossing position of the olivocochlear bundle. They enter the opposite cochlear nucleus via the dorsal and ventral acoustic stria and at its medial border. Reconstructions of single axons demonstrate that terminations are mostly in the core and typically within a single subdivision of the cochlear nucleus. Extents of termination range from narrow to broad along both the dorsoventral (i.e., tonotopic) and the rostrocaudal dimensions. In the electron microscope, labeled swellings form synapses that are symmetric (in that there is little postsynaptic density), a characteristic of inhibitory synapses. Our labeled axons do not appear to include excitatory commissural axons that end in edge regions of the nucleus. Radiate commissural axons could mediate the broadband inhibition observed in responses to contralateral sound, and they may balance input from the two ears with a quick time course. PMID:23124982

  12. Considering optogenetic stimulation for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Marcus; Moser, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Electrical cochlear implants are by far the most successful neuroprostheses and have been implanted in over 300,000 people worldwide. Cochlear implants enable open speech comprehension in most patients but are limited in providing music appreciation and speech understanding in noisy environments. This is generally considered to be due to low frequency resolution as a consequence of wide current spread from stimulation contacts. Accordingly, the number of independently usable stimulation channels is limited to less than a dozen. As light can be conveniently focused, optical stimulation might provide an alternative approach to cochlear implants with increased number of independent stimulation channels. Here, we focus on summarizing recent work on optogenetic stimulation as one way to develop optical cochlear implants. We conclude that proof of principle has been presented for optogenetic stimulation of the cochlea and central auditory neurons in rodents as well as for the technical realization of flexible μLED-based multichannel cochlear implants. Still, much remains to be done in order to advance the technique for auditory research and even more for eventual clinical translation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25601298

  13. Detection of Cochlear Amplification and Its Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2013-01-01

    The operation of the mammalian cochlea relies on a mechanical traveling wave that is actively boosted by electromechanical forces in sensory outer hair cells (OHCs). This active cochlear amplifier produces the impressive sensitivity and frequency resolution of mammalian hearing. The cochlear amplifier has inspired scientists since its discovery in the 1970s, and is still not well understood. To explore cochlear electromechanics at the sensory cell/tissue interface, sound-evoked intracochlear pressure and extracellular voltage were measured using a recently developed dual-sensor with a microelectrode attached to a micro-pressure sensor. The resulting coincident in vivo observations of OHC electrical activity, pressure at the basilar membrane and basilar membrane displacement gave direct evidence for power amplification in the cochlea. Moreover, the results showed a phase shift of voltage relative to mechanical responses at frequencies slightly below the peak, near the onset of amplification. Based on the voltage-force relationship of isolated OHCs, the shift would give rise to effective OHC pumping forces within the traveling wave peak. Thus, the shift activates the cochlear amplifier, serving to localize and thus sharpen the frequency region of amplification. These results are the most concrete evidence for cochlear power amplification to date and support OHC somatic forces as its source. PMID:23972858

  14. [Cochlear implants in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Mlynski, R; Plontke, S

    2013-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have become standard in the treatment of prelingual, postlingual and perilingual deafness and hearing loss in children. Bilateral implants are considered standard for bilaterally affected children. The benefits for speech and language development, as well as speech intelligibility brought by CI-enabled hearing are greatest if these are received as soon after diagnosis as possible. Continued improvements in preoperative diagnostics, electrode design, speech coding strategies and surgical techniques, have broadened the CI applications spectrum. Nowadays--with the exception of cochlear- and cochlear nerve aplasia--almost all malformations are manageable with CIs. New indications concern partial and unilateral deafness. Treatment with CIs requires exceptional team work. In addition to ongoing medical care of the children, the involvement of parents and relatives in the cooperation between surgeons, audiologists, teachers and specialist centers is important for successful rehabilitation. PMID:23649525

  15. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  16. Understanding music with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  17. Localization model for cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas A.; Matin, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-01

    Normal hearing persons are able to localize the direction of sounds better using both ears than when listening with only one ear. Localization ability is dependent on auditory system perception of interaural differences in time, intensity, and phase. Interaural timing differences (ITDs) provide information for locating direction of low and mid frequency sounds, while interaural level differences (ILDs), which occur because of the horizontal plane shadowing effect of the head, provide information for locating direction of higher frequency sounds. The head related transfer function (HRTF) contains characteristic information important for acoustic localization. Models based on HRTFs take into account head shadow, torso, and pinna effects, and their impact on interaural frequency, level, and timing differences. Cochlear implants (CIs) have proven a successful treatment for persons with bilateral severe to profound hearing loss. A problem is that only some ITD and ILD cues are maintained with CI sound processing, and the microphone position alters the acoustic cues. The relative impact of differences in physical cues received by the auditory system with bilateral CIs versus differences in the ability of the damaged auditory nervous system to process bilateral inputs is not yet clear. The model presented in this paper was constructed as a step toward answering this question, and is intended to serve as a tool for future development of more optimal signal processing algorithms that may provide better localization ability for persons with bilateral CIs.

  18. Understanding music with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  19. Musical experience sharpens human cochlear tuning.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Nelms, Caitlin; Bhagat, Shaum P

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea functions as a filter bank that performs a spectral, Fourier-like decomposition on the acoustic signal. While tuning can be compromised (e.g., broadened with hearing impairment), whether or not human cochlear frequency resolution can be sharpened through experiential factors (e.g., training or learning) has not yet been established. Previous studies have demonstrated sharper psychophysical tuning curves in trained musicians compared to nonmusicians, implying superior peripheral tuning. However, these findings are based on perceptual masking paradigms, and reflect engagement of the entire auditory system rather than cochlear tuning, per se. Here, by directly mapping physiological tuning curves from stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs)-cochlear emitted sounds-we show that estimates of human cochlear tuning in a high-frequency cochlear region (4 kHz) is further sharpened (by a factor of 1.5×) in musicians and improves with the number of years of their auditory training. These findings were corroborated by measurements of psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) derived via simultaneous masking, which similarly showed sharper tuning in musicians. Comparisons between SFOAE and PTCs revealed closer correspondence between physiological and behavioral curves in musicians, indicating that tuning is also more consistent between different levels of auditory processing in trained ears. Our findings demonstrate an experience-dependent enhancement in the resolving power of the cochlear sensory epithelium and the spectral resolution of human hearing and provide a peripheral account for the auditory perceptual benefits observed in musicians. Both local and feedback (e.g., medial olivocochlear efferent) mechanisms are discussed as potential mechanisms for experience-dependent tuning. PMID:26900073

  20. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  1. On the Horizon: Cochlear Implant Technology.

    PubMed

    Roche, Joseph P; Hansen, Marlan R

    2015-12-01

    Cochlear implantation and cochlear implants (CIs) have a long history filled with innovations that have resulted in the high-performing device's currently available. Several promising technologies have been reviewed in this article, which hold the promise to drive performance even higher. Remote CI programming, totally implanted devices, improved neural health and survival through targeted drug therapy and delivery, intraneural electrode placement, electroacoustical stimulation and hybrid CIs, and methods to enhance the neural-prosthesis interface are evolving areas of innovation reviewed in this article. PMID:26443490

  2. Imaging plasticity in cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Giraud, A L; Truy, E; Frackowiak, R

    2001-01-01

    Auditory re-afferentation by cochlear implants (CI) offers a unique opportunity to study directly from within the auditory modality plastic changes taking place at organisational levels up to the supra- or polymodal level. These plastic changes resulting from deafness and chronic electrical stimulation can be studied using modern neuroimaging techniques. In this paper, we review the available techniques and the experimental approaches to human studies of plasticity, we discuss the different forms of plasticity that are associated with cochlear implantation and we point to the interest of imaging studies for providing a prognosis of functional outcome after implantation. PMID:11847465

  3. Cochlear implantation: current and future device options.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Driscoll, Colin L W; Gifford, René H; McMenomey, Sean O

    2012-02-01

    Today most cochlear implant users achieve above 80% on standard speech recognition in quiet testing, and enjoy excellent device reliability. Despite such success, conventional designs often fail to provide the frequency resolution required for complex listening tasks. Furthermore, performance variability remains a vexing problem, with a select group of patients performing poorly despite using the most recent technologies and processing strategies. This article provides a brief history of the development of cochlear implant technologies, reviews current implant systems from all 3 major manufacturers, examines recently devised strategies aimed at improving device performance, and discusses potential future developments. PMID:22115692

  4. Music Therapy for Preschool Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Kenworthy, Maura; Van Voorst, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually-deaf children (~age 2-5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) research regarding music perception of children with CIs. This information serves as a foundation for the final portion of the article, which describes typical music therapy goals and examples of interventions suitable for preschool children. PMID:23904691

  5. Cochlear ablation effects on amino acid levels in the chinchilla cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, D A; Chen, K; Godfrey, M A; Lee, A C; Crass, S P; Shipp, D; Simo, H; Robinson, K T

    2015-06-25

    Inner ear damage can lead to hearing disorders, including tinnitus, hyperacusis, and hearing loss. We measured the effects of severe inner ear damage, produced by cochlear ablation, on the levels and distributions of amino acids in the first brain center of the auditory system, the cochlear nucleus. Measurements were also made for its projection pathways and the superior olivary nuclei. Cochlear ablation produces complete degeneration of the auditory nerve, which provides a baseline for interpreting the effects of partial damage to the inner ear, such as that from ototoxic drugs or intense sound. Amino acids play a critical role in neural function, including neurotransmission, neuromodulation, cellular metabolism, and protein construction. They include major neurotransmitters of the brain - glutamate, glycine, and γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) - as well as others closely related to their metabolism and/or functions - aspartate, glutamine, and taurine. Since the effects of inner ear damage develop over time, we measured the changes in amino acid levels at various survival times after cochlear ablation. Glutamate and aspartate levels decreased by 2weeks in the ipsilateral ventral cochlear nucleus and deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, with the largest decreases in the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN): 66% for glutamate and 63% for aspartate. Aspartate levels also decreased in the lateral part of the ipsilateral trapezoid body, by as much as 50%, suggesting a transneuronal effect. GABA and glycine levels showed some bilateral decreases, especially in the PVCN. These results may represent the state of amino acid metabolism in the cochlear nucleus of humans after removal of eighth nerve tumors, which may adversely result in destruction of the auditory nerve. Measurement of chemical changes following inner ear damage may increase understanding of the pathogenesis of hearing impairments and enable improvements in their diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25839146

  6. Development of Pre-Word-Learning Skills in Infants with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Derek M.; Ying, Elizabeth A.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2011-01-01

    Families of infants who are congenitally deaf now have the option of cochlear implantation at a very young age. In order to assess the effectiveness of early cochlear implantation, however, new behavioral procedures are needed to measure speech perception and language skills during infancy. One important component of language development is word learning—a complex skill that involves learning arbitrary relations between words and their referents. A precursor to word learning is the ability to perceive and encode intersensory relations between co-occurring auditory and visual events. Recent studies in infants with normal hearing have shown that intersensory redundancies, such as temporal synchrony, can facilitate the ability to learn arbitrary pairings between speech sounds and objects (Gogate & Bahrick, 1998). To investigate the early stages of learning arbitrary pairings of sounds and objects after cochlear implantation, we used the Preferential Looking Paradigm (PLP) to assess infants’ ability to associate speech sounds to objects that moved in temporal synchrony with the onset and offsets of the signals. Children with normal hearing ranging in age from 6, 9, 18, and 30 months served as controls and demonstrated the ability to learn arbitrary pairings between temporally synchronous speech sounds and dynamic visual events. Infants who received their cochlear implants (CIs) at earlier ages (7–15 months of age) performed similarly to the infants with normal hearing after about 2–6 months of CI experience. In contrast, infants who received their implants at later ages (16–25 months of age) did not demonstrate learning of the associations within the context of this experiment. Possible implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21643556

  7. Pediatric cochlear implant candidacy issues.

    PubMed

    Osberger, M J; Chute, P M; Pope, M L; Kessler, K S; Carotta, C C; Firszt, J B; Zimmerman-Phillips, S

    1991-01-01

    Children with progressive sensorineural hearing impairment represent a special challenge to the audiologist and the otologist. These are patients with some residual auditory abilities that deteriorate with time as the hearing loss progresses. No doubt, the unnecessary implantation of an ear that significantly benefits from amplification needs to be avoided at all costs. By the same token however, there appears to be no advantage to waiting an inordinate amount of time after the loss of functional auditory abilities before recommending implantation. At times when a complete loss is predictable, implantation may be advantageous before the onset of complete auditory deprivation. Steps the clinicians should take to manage these patients effectively are briefly summarized below: Implementation of rigorous and frequent audiologic monitoring. If, for instance, a significant progressive loss of hearing has occurred over a 6-month period, resulting in a complete absence of open-set speech recognition abilities in the auditory-alone mode with appropriate hearing aids, it is probably counterproductive to wait to the point of a complete absence of aided speech detection. Implantation at a critical point in time will prevent complete auditory deprivation. Parental counseling concerning various management strategies, such as use of vibrotactile devices, changing communication skills, and issues involving cochlear implants need to be undertaken early. Parents need to be involved in every phase of the evaluation process because they are the ones who make the final decision concerning the implantation of their child. Relatively early implantation should be considered in light of what is known concerning the effects of disruption in a child's linguistic, cognitive, and emotional development resulting from complete auditory deprivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2069195

  8. Physical and mathematical cochlear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kian-Meng

    2000-10-01

    The cochlea is an intricate organ in the inner ear responsible for our hearing. Besides acting as a transducer to convert mechanical sound vibrations to electrical neural signals, the cochlea also amplifies and separates the sound signal into its spectral components for further processing in the brain. It operates over a broad-band of frequency and a huge dynamic range of input while maintaining a low power consumption. The present research takes the approach of building cochlear models to study and understand the underlying mechanics involved in the functioning of the cochlea. Both physical and mathematical models of the cochlea are constructed. The physical model is a first attempt to build a life- sized replica of the human cochlea using advanced micro- machining techniques. The model takes a modular design, with a removable silicon-wafer based partition membrane encapsulated in a plastic fluid chamber. Preliminary measurements in the model are obtained and they compare roughly with simulation results. Parametric studies on the design parameters of the model leads to an improved design of the model. The studies also revealed that the width and orthotropy of the basilar membrane in the cochlea have significant effects on the sharply tuned responses observed in the biological cochlea. The mathematical model is a physiologically based model that includes three-dimensional viscous fluid flow and a tapered partition with variable properties along its length. A hybrid asymptotic and numerical method provides a uniformly valid and efficient solution to the short and long wave regions in the model. Both linear and non- linear activity are included in the model to simulate the active cochlea. The mathematical model has successfully reproduced many features of the response in the biological cochlea, as observed in experiment measurements performed on animals. These features include sharply tuned frequency responses, significant amplification with inclusion of activity

  9. Progress in cochlear physiology after Békésy.

    PubMed

    Guinan, John J; Salt, Alec; Cheatham, Mary Ann

    2012-11-01

    In the fifty years since Békésy was awarded the Nobel Prize, cochlear physiology has blossomed. Many topics that are now current are things Békésy could not have imagined. In this review we start by describing progress in understanding the origin of cochlear gross potentials, particularly the cochlear microphonic, an area in which Békésy had extensive experience. We then review progress in areas of cochlear physiology that were mostly unknown to Békésy, including: (1) stereocilia mechano-electrical transduction, force production, and response amplification, (2) outer hair cell (OHC) somatic motility and its molecular basis in prestin, (3) cochlear amplification and related micromechanics, including the evidence that prestin is the main motor for cochlear amplification, (4) the influence of the tectorial membrane, (5) cochlear micromechanics and the mechanical drives to inner hair cell stereocilia, (6) otoacoustic emissions, and (7) olivocochlear efferents and their influence on cochlear physiology. We then return to a subject that Békésy knew well: cochlear fluids and standing currents, as well as our present understanding of energy dependence on the lateral wall of the cochlea. Finally, we touch on cochlear pathologies including noise damage and aging, with an emphasis on where the field might go in the future. PMID:22633944

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  11. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  12. Auditory Learning in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Boddupally, Shiva P.; Rayapati, Deeksha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine and characterize the training-induced changes in speech-in-noise perception in children with congenital deafness who have cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Twenty-seven children with congenital deafness who have CIs were studied. Eleven children with CIs were trained on a speech-in-noise task,…

  13. Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Sheft, Stanley; Kuvadia, Sejal; Gygi, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study investigated the effect of a short computer-based environmental sound training regimen on the perception of environmental sounds and speech in experienced cochlear implant (CI) patients. Method: Fourteen CI patients with the average of 5 years of CI experience participated. The protocol consisted of 2 pretests, 1 week apart,…

  14. "Does God Have a Cochlear Implant?".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses psychological and ethical considerations when providing family therapy for parents considering cochlear implantation for the deaf/hard-of-hearing child. Family dynamics, multilevel criteria of informed consent, therapist bias, and intervention strategies are illustrated by a case study of an 8-year-old boy. (Contains seven…

  15. Listening Effort with Cochlear Implant Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Baskent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing participants listened to CI simulations with varying…

  16. Gender Categorization in Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massida, Zoe; Marx, Mathieu; Belin, Pascal; James, Christopher; Fraysse, Bernard; Barone, Pascal; Deguine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined the ability of subjects with cochlear implants (CIs) to discriminate voice gender and how this ability evolved as a function of CI experience. Method: The authors presented a continuum of voice samples created by voice morphing, with 9 intermediate acoustic parameter steps between a typical male and a…

  17. Educational Progress Profiles of Cochlear Implant Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Sarah A.

    This study examined the educational development of 22 children (ages 2 to 10), under the supervision of the Cochlear Implant Team of the Medical College of Virginia, who had received implants as a result of deafness (in most cases prelingual and congenital) from 6 months to 3 years prior to the study. Data included a review of the children's case…

  18. Deaf Education: The Impact of Cochlear Implantation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbold, Sue; Mayer, Connie

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the impact that cochlear implantation has had on the practice of deaf education in terms of educational placement, communication choices, and educational attainments. Although there is variation in outcome, more children with implants are going to mainstream schools, and using spoken language as their primary means of…

  19. The management of cochlear nerve deficiency.

    PubMed

    Freeman, S R; Stivaros, S M; Ramsden, R T; O'Driscoll, M P; Nichani, J R; Bruce, I A; Green, K M; Henderson, L A; Rutherford, S A; King, A T; Lloyd, S K

    2013-11-01

    The assessment process is critical in deciding whether a profoundly deaf child with cochlear nerve deficiency (CND) will be suitable for a cochlear or auditory brainstem implant (ABI). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using submillimetric T2 weighted gradient echo or turbo spin echo sequences is mandatory for all profoundly deaf children to diagnose CND. Evidence of audition on behavioural or electrophysiological tests following both auditory and electrical stimulation sometimes allows identification of significant auditory tissue not visible on MRI. In particular electric auditory brainstem response (EABR) testing may allow some quantification of auditory tissue and help decide whether a cochlear implant will be beneficial. Age and cognitive development are the most critical factors in determining ABI benefit. Hearing outcomes from both cochlear implants and ABIs are variable and likely to be limited in children with CND. A proportion of children will get no benefit. Usually the implants would be expected to provide recognition of environmental sounds and understanding of simple phonetics. Most children will not develop normal speech and they will often need to learn to communicate with sign language. The ABI involves a major neurosurgical procedure and at present the long term outcomes are unknown. It is therefore essential that parents who are considering this intervention have plenty of time to consider all aspects and the opportunity for in depth discussion. PMID:24533760

  20. Word Learning in Children following Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Derek M.; Carter, Allyson K.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Ying, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed to investigate word-learning skills of children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Using interactive play scenarios, 2- to 5-year olds were presented with sets of objects (Beanie Baby stuffed animals) and words for their names that corresponded to salient perceptual attributes (e.g., "horns" for a goat). Their…

  1. Cochlear implant and delayed facial palsy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shawn Thadathil; Vishwakarma, Rajesh; Ramani, Mukesh Kumar; Aurora, Rupa

    2009-12-01

    Delayed facial nerve palsy following cochlear implant surgery is less documented though it poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Apart from the functional, aesthetic and emotional concerns, it can raise important medico legal issues. The objectives of this study were: to report a case of delayed facial palsy following cochlear implant surgery in a patient who had positive viral antibody markers pre operatively; and to review the literature on delayed onset facial paralysis following viral reactivation and its relation to cochlear implant surgery. An extensive literature review was done using internet and medical search engines and library facilities. Important articles on the topic were identified and summarised. Data on delayed facial palsy following cochlear implant surgery were collected, constructed in a coherent way and details discussed. Postulated mechanisms of delayed facial palsy include neural oedema, vasospasm and viral reactivation. Of these, reactivation of previous herpes simplex virus infection has special significance, as many of these patients are positive for viral antibody markers. Manipulation of sensory branches of the facial nerve and chorda tympani can be a mechanism in such cases. Correlation of clinical presentation and pre operative positive viral antibody markers with positive polymerase chain reaction can be strongly suggestive of viral reactivation. It is concluded that patients with positive viral antibody markers are more susceptible to facial palsy from viral reactivation. Corticosteroids, antiviral agents and physiotherapy can be useful in producing a quicker and complete recovery. An experienced cochlear implant surgery team and pre operative radiological evaluations are mandatory to decrease the chances of direct facial nerve trauma. Proper irrigation lowers the risk of neural oedema. PMID:19194876

  2. Anatomy of the murine and human cochlea visualized at the cellular level by synchrotron-radiation-based micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.; Lareida, A.; Beckmann, F.; Diakov, G. M.; Kral, F.; Schwarm, F.; Stoffner, R.; Gunkel, A. R.; Glueckert, R.; Schrott-Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Andronache, A.; Freysinger, W.

    2006-08-01

    Diseases of the hearing organ and impairment affect a significant fraction of population. Therefore, the hearing organ embedded as a helical structure in the cochlea within the hardest human osseous structure inside the petrous bone is intensively investigated. Currently, studies of the cochlea with true micrometer resolution or better are destructive. Membranes and three-dimensional vessel structures of post-mortem explanted human cochlea were only visualized with limited spatial resolution or deformed anatomical features resulting from preparation artifacts. We have applied a preparation and staining protocol developed for electron microscopy, which allows the visualization and quantification of a great variety of soft-tissue structures including the Reissner's membrane, the tectorial membrane, basilar membrane, modiolus, lamina radialis, and Nuel's space by the use of synchrotron-radiation-based micro computed tomography at the beamline BW 2 (HASYLAB at DESY). The level of detail can be even improved by the application of sophisticated computer vision tools, which enables the extraction of the vascular tree down to the capillaries and of the course of nerve fibers as well as the topology of the osseous lamina radialis, which assembles the nerve fibers from the hair-cells to the ganglia in the center of the cochlea, the modiolus. These non-destructively obtained three-dimensional data are principal for the refined understanding of the hearing process by membranes morphologies and further anatomical features at the cellular level and for teaching purposes in medical curricula.

  3. The effects of cochlear implantation on vestibular function

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Migliaccio, Americo A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Determine the risk posed by cochlear implantation (CI) to the labyrinth. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Academic tertiary referral center. Patients Thirty-six ears belonging to 35 adult CI candidates (mean: 46, range: 23–69 years old). Intervention Cochlear implantation. Main Outcome Measures Vestibular function was assessed using the quantitative 3D head impulse test (qHIT), clinical head impulse test (cHIT), post-headshake nystagmus (HSN), caloric electronystagmography (ENG), vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), dynamic visual acuity (DVA), and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Results All 36 ears were tested using qHIT before CI, and 28 ears were tested 4–8 weeks after CI. Quantitative HIT showed 1/28 of ears suffered reduced function. Clinical HIT was 44% sensitive and 94% specific for identification of severe-to-profound vestibular hypofunction confirmed by qHIT. HSN was unchanged in 11/11 subjects. New hyporeflexia was found in 1/16 of ENG-tested ears. VEMP showed either a disappearance of response or an increase in threshold by >10dB in 5/16 ears. Passive DVA showed no change in 16/16 ears. DHI scores worsened in 3/28 and improved in 4/28 subjects. Conclusions Although small, the observed rate of labyrinthine injury was comparable to that for other risks of CI. Thus, it is important to educate CI candidates about possible risk to balance function, particularly when CI of an “only balancing ear” is contemplated. Clinical HIT is useful for detecting severe high-frequency vestibular hypofunction and should be part of the pre-CI physical examination. PMID:19108038

  4. Centrifugal inhibitory processes affecting neurones in the cat cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Comis, S. D.

    1970-01-01

    1. Stimulation of the lateral part of the olivary S-segment in the cat inhibited neurones in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. A smaller number of neurones located in the ventral division of the cochlear nucleus were excited. 2. It is suggested that inhibition in the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus may be mediated directly by fibres making synaptic connexions on the cochlear nucleus neurones, or indirectly by inhibitory fibres acting at the cochlea. 3. The direct inhibitory process at the cochlear nucleus is unaffected by strychnine, whereas the inhibitory process at the cochlea is abolished by strychnine. 4. A cochlear nucleus neurone can be influenced simultaneously by excitatory and inhibitory processes. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5499823

  5. Speech perception with a single-channel cochlear implant: a comparison with a single-channel tactile device.

    PubMed

    Carney, A E; Kienle, M; Miyamoto, R T

    1990-06-01

    Suprasegmental and segmental speech perception tasks were administered to 8 patients with single-channel cochlear implants. Suprasegmental tasks included the recognition of syllable number, syllabic stress, and intonation. Segmental tasks included the recognition of vowels and consonants in three modalities: visual only, implant only, and visual + implant. Results were compared to those obtained from artificially deafened adults using a single-channel vibrotactile device. The patterns of responses for both suprasegmental and segmental tasks were highly similar for both groups of subjects, despite differences between the characteristics of the subject samples. These results suggest that single-channel sensory devices, whether they be cochlear implants or vibrotactile aids, produce similar patterns of speech perception errors, even when differences are observed in overall performance level. PMID:2141660

  6. Auditory distraction transmitted by a cochlear implant alters allocation of attentional resources

    PubMed Central

    Finke, Mareike; Sandmann, Pascale; Kopp, Bruno; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses which restore hearing via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The successful adaptation of auditory cognition to the CI input depends to a substantial degree on individual factors. We pursued an electrophysiological approach toward an analysis of cortical responses that reflect perceptual processing stages and higher-level responses to CI input. Performance and event-related potentials on two cross-modal discrimination-following-distraction (DFD) tasks from CI users and normal-hearing (NH) individuals were compared. The visual-auditory distraction task combined visual distraction with following auditory discrimination performance. Here, we observed similar cortical responses to visual distractors (Novelty-N2) and slowed, less accurate auditory discrimination performance in CI users when compared to NH individuals. Conversely, the auditory-visual distraction task was used to combine auditory distraction with visual discrimination performance. In this task we found attenuated cortical responses to auditory distractors (Novelty-P3), slowed visual discrimination performance, and attenuated cortical P3-responses to visual targets in CI users compared to NH individuals. These results suggest that CI users process auditory distractors differently than NH individuals and that the presence of auditory CI input has an adverse effect on the processing of visual targets and the visual discrimination ability in implanted individuals. We propose that this attenuation of the visual modality occurs through the allocation of neural resources to the CI input. PMID:25798083

  7. Auditory distraction transmitted by a cochlear implant alters allocation of attentional resources.

    PubMed

    Finke, Mareike; Sandmann, Pascale; Kopp, Bruno; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses which restore hearing via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. The successful adaptation of auditory cognition to the CI input depends to a substantial degree on individual factors. We pursued an electrophysiological approach toward an analysis of cortical responses that reflect perceptual processing stages and higher-level responses to CI input. Performance and event-related potentials on two cross-modal discrimination-following-distraction (DFD) tasks from CI users and normal-hearing (NH) individuals were compared. The visual-auditory distraction task combined visual distraction with following auditory discrimination performance. Here, we observed similar cortical responses to visual distractors (Novelty-N2) and slowed, less accurate auditory discrimination performance in CI users when compared to NH individuals. Conversely, the auditory-visual distraction task was used to combine auditory distraction with visual discrimination performance. In this task we found attenuated cortical responses to auditory distractors (Novelty-P3), slowed visual discrimination performance, and attenuated cortical P3-responses to visual targets in CI users compared to NH individuals. These results suggest that CI users process auditory distractors differently than NH individuals and that the presence of auditory CI input has an adverse effect on the processing of visual targets and the visual discrimination ability in implanted individuals. We propose that this attenuation of the visual modality occurs through the allocation of neural resources to the CI input. PMID:25798083

  8. Forward masking in different cochlear implant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boëx, Colette; Kós, Maria-Izabel; Pelizzone, Marco

    2003-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate, from a psychophysical standpoint, the neural spread of excitation produced by the stimulation of different types of intracochlear electrode arrays: the Ineraid™, the Clarion™ S-Series on its own or with the Electrode Positioning System (EPS), and the Clarion™ HiFocus-I with the EPS. The EPS is an independent silicone part designed to bring the electrode array close to the modiolus. Forward masking was evaluated in 12 adult subjects (3 Ineraid™, 4 Clarion™ S-Series, 3 Clarion™ S-Series+EPS, 3 HiFocus-I+EPS) by psychophysical experiments conducted using trains of biphasic stimuli (813 pulses per second, 307.6 μs/phase). Masker signals (+8 dB re: threshold, 300 ms) were applied to the most apical electrode. Probe signals (30 ms, 10-ms postmasker) were delivered to more basal electrodes. Masked and unmasked detection thresholds of probe signals were measured. For both Clarion™ HiFocus-I subjects, measurements were conducted in both monopolar and bipolar stimulus configurations. No major differences were found in forward masking between the different intracochlear electrode arrays tested in the monopolar configuration at suprathreshold levels equivalent to those used in speech-coding strategies, but significant differences were found between subjects. A significant negative correlation also was found between the level of forward masking and the consonant identification performance. These measurements showed that the neural spread of excitation was more restricted in the bipolar configuration than in the monopolar configuration for HiFocus-I subjects. It was found that CIS strategies implemented without using apical electrodes, which showed high levels of masking, could improve consonant identification.

  9. Imaging living hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2009-02-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing loss are commonly available for research. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes the study of their hair cells difficult. We developed a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae were harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and glued upright in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the region of the cochlear epithelium to be studied was opened and Reissner's membrane was incised. A fluorescent indicator was applied to the preparation to image intracellular calcium. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using three dimensional scanning. We were able to image about 1/3 of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we found that outer hair cells demonstrated increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. Thus, this methodology can be used to visualize hair cell calcium changes and mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are reduced.

  10. Successful cochlear implantation in a patient with MNGIE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Nan; Han, Dong-Yi; Ji, Fei; Chen, Ai-Ting; Wu, Nan; Xi, Xin; Shen, Wei-Dong; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2011-09-01

    Abstract A 28-year-old woman with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE syndrome) undergoing evaluation for multichannel cochlear implantation is described. The case history, diagnosis of mitochondrial disease, and assessment of the benefits of cochlear implantation are documented. The hearing level with cochlear implant and speech recognition were improved significantly for this patient. MNGIE syndrome is a rare congenital disorder of mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA). It is crucial for the otolaryngologist to have awareness of MNGIE syndrome and other mitochondrial encephalomyopathies when patients present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Cochlear implantation can be recommended to patients with MNGIE syndrome and satisfactory results can be achieved. PMID:21563873

  11. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  12. Audiological results with the cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Thielemeir, M A; Brimacombe, J A; Eisenberg, L S

    1982-01-01

    Audiological test results from 135 adult, profoundly deaf, single-electrode cochlear implant subjects are presented. Unaided, aided, and cochlear implant warble-tone and speech detection thresholds have been analyzed, as well as word, word stress, and environmental sound discrimination scores. Results indicate that implant thresholds are significantly better than aided thresholds at all frequencies tested and for speech detection. Also, word, word stress, and environmental sound discrimination scores are all significantly better with the implant than with a hearing aid. Although the implant does not provide speech discrimination, subjects report that it does provide valuable speech and sound awareness, which aids in speechreading and voice monitoring. A small group of subjects has shown that an an implant in the poorer ear can also be successfully combined with a hearing aid in the better ear. The audiological test results clearly show that the implant is a viable alternative for the profoundly deaf. PMID:6805394

  13. Ouabain-induced cochlear degeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yong; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Salvi, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Ouabain, an potent inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump, selectively destroys spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in gerbils and mice whereas in guinea pigs it preferentially damages cochlear hair cells. To elucidate the effects of ouabain on the rat inner ear, a species widely used in research, 5 µl of 1 mM or 10 mM ouabain was applied to the round window membrane. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were used identify functional deficits in hair cells and neurons respectively and histological techniques were used to characterize cochlear pathologies. High-frequency ABR thresholds were elevated after treatment with 1 mM ouabain whereas DPOAEs remained normal. In contrast, 10 mM ouabain increased ABR thresholds and reduced DPOAE amplitudes. Consistent with the physiological changes, 1 mM ouabain only damaged the SGNs and auditory nerve fibers in the basal turn of the cochlea whereas 10 mM ouabain destroyed both SGNs and cochlear hair cells; damage was greatest near the base and decreased toward the apex. The nuclei of degenerating SGNs and hair cells were condensed and fragmented and many cells were TUNEL-positive, morphological features of apoptotic cell death. Thus, ouabain-induced cochlear degeneration in rats is apoptotic and concentration dependent; low concentrations preferentially damage SGNs in the base of the cochlea, producing an animal model of partial auditory neuropathy, whereas high concentrations damage both hair cells and SGNs with damage decreasing from the base towards the apex. PMID:22476946

  14. Ouabain-induced cochlear degeneration in rat.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Salvi, Richard

    2012-08-01

    Ouabain, a potent inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump, selectively destroys spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in gerbils and mice, whereas in guinea pigs it preferentially damages cochlear hair cells. To elucidate the effects of ouabain on the rat inner ear, a species widely used in research, 5 μl of 1 or 10 mM ouabain was applied to the round window membrane. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were used to identify functional deficits in hair cells and neurons, respectively, and histological techniques were used to characterize cochlear pathologies. High-frequency ABR thresholds were elevated after treatment with 1 mM ouabain, whereas DPOAEs remained normal. In contrast, 10 mM ouabain increased ABR thresholds and reduced DPOAE amplitudes. Consistent with the physiological changes, 1 mM ouabain only damaged the SGNs and auditory nerve fibers in the basal turn of the cochlea whereas 10 mM ouabain destroyed both SGNs and cochlear hair cells; damage was greatest near the base and decreased toward the apex. The nuclei of degenerating SGNs and hair cells were condensed and fragmented and many cells were TUNEL-positive, morphological features of apoptotic cell death. Thus, ouabain-induced cochlear degeneration in rats is apoptotic and concentration dependent; low concentrations preferentially damage SGNs in the base of the cochlea, producing an animal model of partial auditory neuropathy, whereas high concentrations damage both hair cells and SGNs with damage decreasing from the base toward the apex. PMID:22476946

  15. Markers of Cochlear Inflammation Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Floc’h, Johann Le; Tan, Winston; Telang, Ravindra S.; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Nuttall, Alfred; Rooney, William D.; Pontré, Beau; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify spatial and temporal inflammation-induced changes in vascular permeability and macrophage infiltration in guinea-pig (GP) cochlea using MRI. Materials and Methods: GPs were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce cochlear inflammation. One group was injected with a gadolinium based contrast agent (GBCA) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI was performed at 4, 7, and 10 days after LPS treatment. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to determine the apparent rate constant of GBCA extravasation (Ktrans). A second group was injected with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (USPIOs) and studied at 2, 3, and 7 days after LPS treatment to detect tissue USPIO uptake and correlate with histology. For both groups, control GPs were scanned similarly. Results: The signal enhancement increased substantially and more rapidly at day 4 in LPS-treated than in control cochlea shortly following GBCA injection. Ktrans of LPS-treated cochlea was maximum on day 4 at 0.0218±0.0032 min−1 and then decreased to control level at 0.0036±0.0004 min−1 by day 10. In the second group, the relative signal intensity and T2 in cochlear perilymphatic spaces on day 2 decreased, on average, by 54% and 45%, respectively, compared with baseline and then remained under control levels by day 7. This suggests the infiltration of inflammatory cells, although unconfirmed by histology. Conclusion: This provides the first measurement of cochlear vascular permeability using MRI and a quantitative evaluation of the development of cochlear inflammation. MRI holds considerable potential for the assessment of disease processes such as clinical diagnosis of conditions such as labyrinthitis. PMID:23589173

  16. Local Cochlear Correlations of Perceived Pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martignoli, Stefan; Stoop, Ruedi

    2010-07-01

    Pitch is one of the most salient attributes of the human perception of sound, but is still not well understood. This difficulty originates in the entwined nature of the phenomenon, in which a physical stimulus as well as a psychophysiological signal receiver are involved. In an electronic realization of a biophysically detailed nonlinear model of the cochlea, we find local cochlear correlates of the perceived pitch that explain all essential pitch-shifting phenomena from physical grounds.

  17. An Electromechanical Model for the Cochlear Microphonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teal, Paul D.; Lineton, Ben; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2011-11-01

    The first of the many electrical signals generated in the ear, nerves and brain as a response to a sound incident on the ear is the cochlear microphonic (CM). The CM is generated by the hair cells of the cochlea, primarily the outer hairs cells. The potentials of this signal are a nonlinear filtered version of the acoustic pressure at the tympanic membrane. The CM signal has been used very little in recent years for clinical audiology and audiological research. This is because of uncertainty in interpreting the CM signal as a diagnostic measure, and also because of the difficulty of obtaining the signal, which has usually required the use of a transtympanic electrode. There are however, several potential clinical and research applications for acquisition of the CM. To promote understanding of the CM, and potential clinical application, a model is presented which can account for the generation of the cochlear microphonic signal. The model incorporates micro-mechanical and macro-mechanical aspects of previously published models of the basilar membrane and reticular lamina, as well as cochlear fluid mechanics, piezoelectric activity and capacitance of the outer hair cells. It also models the electrical coupling of signals along the scalae.

  18. Hearing preservation in cochlear implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Priscila Carvalho; Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes; Lopes, Rafaela Aquino Fernandes; Ramos Venosa, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires

    2014-01-01

    In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a "soft surgery" cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients. PMID:25276136

  19. Surgical evaluation of candidates for cochlear implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Lilly, D. J.; Fowler, L. P.; Stypulkowski, P. H.

    1987-01-01

    The customary presentation of surgical procedures to patients in the United States consists of discussions on alternative treatment methods, risks of the procedure(s) under consideration, and potential benefits for the patient. Because the contents of the normal speech signal have not been defined in a way that permits a surgeon systematically to provide alternative auditory signals to a deaf patient, the burden is placed on the surgeon to make an arbitrary selection of candidates and available devices for cochlear prosthetic implantation. In an attempt to obtain some information regarding the ability of a deaf patient to use electrical signals to detect and understand speech, the Good Samaritan Hospital and Neurological Sciences Institute cochlear implant team has routinely performed tympanotomies using local anesthesia and has positioned temporary electrodes onto the round windows of implant candidates. The purpose of this paper is to review our experience with this procedure and to provide some observations that may be useful in a comprehensive preoperative evaluation for totally deaf patients who are being considered for cochlear implantation.

  20. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes; Lopes, Rafaela Aquino Fernandes; Ramos Venosa, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires

    2014-01-01

    In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients. PMID:25276136

  1. Cochlear implantation in pontine tegmental cap dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bacciu, Andrea; Ormitti, Francesca; Pasanisi, Enrico; Vincenti, Vincenzo; Zanetti, Diego; Bacciu, Salvatore

    2010-08-01

    Pontine tegmental cap dysplasia (PTCD) is an exceptionally rare brain stem and cerebellar malformation characterized by ventral pontine hypoplasia, vaulted pontine tegmentum, hypoplasia of the vermis, subtotal absence of middle cerebellar peduncles, lateralized course of the superior cerebellar peduncles, and absence or alteration of the inferior olivary nucleus. The main clinical features are multiple cranial neurophaties and ataxia. Sensorineural hearing loss of varying severity is almost always present. To date, 14 cases of PTCD have been reported in the literature. We present a child with PTCD and profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss who underwent cochlear implantation. To the best of our knowledge, cochlear implantation in PTCD has not been previously reported. Functional outcome was assessed using the Speech Perception Categories and the Speech Intelligibility Rating scale. At 22 months' postoperative evaluation, the patient who was placed into speech perception category 0 (no detection of speech) preoperatively progressed to category 3 (beginning word identification). Before implantation, the child had connected speech unintelligible. At the last follow-up, she had connected speech intelligible to a listener who has little experience of a deaf person's speech. Cochlear implantation allowed this child to improve her quality of life, increasing her self-confidence, independence, and social integration. PMID:20627414

  2. Exploring Perspectives on Cochlear Implants and Language Acquisition within the Deaf Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants generated intense debate almost immediately following their introduction in the 1980s. Today, with a vast number of deaf individuals with cochlear implants, the debate about the cochlear implant device and mode of communication continues. Q-methodology was used in this study to explore cochlear implants and language acquisition…

  3. Cross-modal perception of rhythm in music and dance by cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Vongpaisal, Tara; Monaghan, Melanie

    2014-05-01

    Two studies examined adult cochlear implant (CI) users' ability to match auditory rhythms occurring in music to visual rhythms occurring in dance (Cha Cha, Slow Swing, Tango and Jive). In Experiment 1, adults CI users (n = 10) and hearing controls matched a music excerpt to choreographed dance sequences presented as silent videos. In Experiment 2, participants matched a silent video of a dance sequence to music excerpts. CI users were successful in detecting timing congruencies across music and dance at well above-chance levels suggesting that they were able to process distinctive auditory and visual rhythm patterns that characterized each style. However, they were better able to detect cross-modal timing congruencies when the reference was an auditory rhythm than when the reference was a visual rhythm. Learning strategies that encourage cross-modal learning of musical rhythms may have applications in developing novel rehabilitative strategies to enhance music perception and appreciation outcomes of child implant users. PMID:24869445

  4. Cochlear Implants:System Design, Integration and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rebscher, Stephen; Harrison, William V.; Sun, Xiaoan; Feng, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    As the most successful neural prosthesis, cochlear implants have provided partial hearing to more than 120,000 persons worldwide; half of which being pediatric users who are able to develop nearly normal language. Biomedical engineers have played a central role in the design, integration and evaluation of the cochlear implant system, but the overall success is a result of collaborative work with physiologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, and entrepreneurs. This review presents broad yet in-depth academic and industrial perspectives on the underlying research and ongoing development of cochlear implants. The introduction accounts for major events and advances in cochlear implants, including dynamic interplays among engineers, scientists, physicians, and policy makers. The review takes a system approach to address critical issues from design and specifications to integration and evaluation. First, the cochlear implant system design and specifications are laid out. Second, the design goals, principles, and methods of the subsystem components are identified from the external speech processor and radio frequency transmission link to the internal receiver, stimulator and electrode arrays. Third, system integration and functional evaluation are presented with respect to safety, reliability, and challenges facing the present and future cochlear implant designers and users. Finally, issues beyond cochlear implants are discussed to address treatment options for the entire spectrum of hearing impairment as well as to use the cochlear implant as a model to design and evaluate other similar neural prostheses such as vestibular and retinal implants. PMID:19946565

  5. Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searls, J. Matt, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of individuals with significant permanent hearing loss. Cochlear implants may not be suitable for everyone. They are designed to provide…

  6. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants: Effects on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on CI in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of five congenitally deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2…

  7. Interviews with Deaf Children about Their Experiences Using Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preisler, G.; Tvingstedt, A. -L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of a longitudinal study of deaf children with cochlear implants, 11 children with implants were interviewed. The objective was to shed light on what it is like for a child to use a cochlear implant, based on these children's own experience with implants, which ranged from 5.0 to 7.5 years. Six of the children were in schools…

  8. Evaluation of Evoked Potentials to Dyadic Tones after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jancke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of…

  9. Including Children with Cochlear Implants in General Education Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Joanna L.; Drasgow, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Cochlear implants can provide partial hearing to individuals with substantial hearing loss. Because of improvements in early identification and intervention, more children with cochlear implants will be included in elementary school general education classrooms. Thus, general education teachers should be prepared for teaching children with…

  10. Multidisciplinary Training for Rural Outreach to Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schery, Teris K.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    The number of deaf children with surgically implanted cochlear devices has been increasing since the device was approved in 1989. In rural communities, there may be no one who is knowledgeable about the care of cochlear implants, what to expect of the child's communication abilities, and how to maximize the child's progress. A federally funded…

  11. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  12. Realization of Complex Onsets by Pediatric Users of Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Steven B.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined variations in English complex onset realizations by children who use cochlear implants. Data consisted of 227 productions of two-segment onset clusters from 12 children. In general, onset cluster realizations of children with cochlear implants did not differ markedly from those reported for children with normal hearing: null…

  13. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  14. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  15. Parents' Views on Changing Communication after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Linda M.; Hardie, Tim; Archbold, Sue M.; Wheeler, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    We sent questionnaires to families of all 288 children who had received cochlear implants at one center in the United Kingdom at least 5 years previously. Thus, it was a large, unselected group. We received 142 replies and 119 indicated that the child and family had changed their communication approach following cochlear implantation. In 113 cases…

  16. Relationships among Professionals' Knowledge, Experience, and Expectations Regarding Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Itzhak, D.; Most, T.; Weisel, A.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between teachers' and communication clinicians' self-reported knowledge on cochlear implants and their expectations of CIs. The authors also explored these professionals' views regarding the child's communication mode, educational setting, and social options following cochlear implantation. The…

  17. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  18. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  19. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  20. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:27376080

  1. The influence of cochlear shape on low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S.; Ketten, Darlene R.; Arruda, Julie; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; O'Malley, Jen T.

    2008-01-01

    The conventional theory about the snail shell shape of the mammalian cochlea is that it evolved essentially and perhaps solely to conserve space inside the skull. Recently, a theory proposed that the spiral's graded curvature enhances the cochlea's mechanical response to low frequencies. This article provides a multispecies analysis of cochlear shape to test this theory and demonstrates that the ratio of the radii of curvature from the outermost and innermost turns of the cochlear spiral is a significant cochlear feature that correlates strongly with low-frequency hearing limits. The ratio, which is a measure of curvature gradient, is a reflection of the ability of cochlear curvature to focus acoustic energy at the outer wall of the cochlear canal as the wave propagates toward the apex of the cochlea. PMID:18413615

  2. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:27376080

  3. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oghalai, John S.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Raphael, Patrick D.; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-01

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  4. Gain and frequency tuning within the mouse cochlear apex

    SciTech Connect

    Oghalai, John S.; Raphael, Patrick D.; Gao, Simon; Lee, Hee Yoon; Groves, Andrew K.; Zuo, Jian; Applegate, Brian E.

    2015-12-31

    Normal mammalian hearing requires cochlear outer hair cell active processes that amplify the traveling wave with high gain and sharp tuning, termed cochlear amplification. We have used optical coherence tomography to study cochlear amplification within the apical turn of the mouse cochlea. We measured not only classical basilar membrane vibratory tuning curves but also vibratory responses from the rest of the tissues that compose the organ of Corti. Basilar membrane tuning was sharp in live mice and broad in dead mice, whereas other regions of the organ of Corti demonstrated phase shifts consistent with additional filtering beyond that provided by basilar membrane mechanics. We use these experimental data to support a conceptual framework of how cochlear amplification is tuned within the mouse cochlear apex. We will also study transgenic mice with targeted mutations that affect different biomechanical aspects of the organ of Corti in an effort to localize the underlying processes that produce this additional filtering.

  5. Non-penetrating round window electrode stimulation for tinnitus therapy followed by cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Gentiana I; Sarnes, Petra; Warnecke, Athanasia; Stöver, Timo; Jäger, Burkard; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Lenarz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    One main theory behind the origin of tinnitus is based on the idea that alterations of the spontaneous electrical activity within the auditory system lead to abnormal firing patterns in the affected nervous structures [1]. A possible therapeutic option is the use of electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve for the recovery or at least limitation of the abnormal firing pattern to a level that can be easily tolerated by the patient. The Tinnelec Implant consists of a single non-penetrating stimulation electrode connected to a Neurelec cochlear implant system. As a first feasibility study, before starting implantations in hearing patients, we thought to assess the potential of the Tinnelec stimulation to treat tinnitus in unilateral deaf patients, analysing hereby its effectivity and risks. Three patients suffering from unilateral tinnitus resistant to pharmacological treatment and ipsilateral severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss/deafness were implanted with a Tinnelec system between September 2007 and July 2008, at the ENT Department of Hannover Medical School. The stimulation strategy was chosen to induce alleviation of the tinnitus through suppression, masking and/or habituation and the response of each patient on the treatment was monitored using a visual analogue scale (VAS) on loudness and annoyance of tinnitus, mood of the patient, as well as the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI). All patients had a benefit from the electrical stimulation for their tinnitus (THI-score improvement of 20-70), however, not all participants profited from the Tinnelec system in same way and degree. In one patient, despite good results, the device had to be replaced with a conventional cochlear implant because of Tinnelec-independent increase in hearing loss on the contralateral ear. Additionally, due to the extension of cochlear implant indications, the devices of the other two patients have been meanwhile replaced with a conventional cochlear implant to benefit

  6. Effects of cross-modal selective attention on the sensory periphery: cochlear sensitivity is altered by selective attention.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Keil, A; Stratis, K; Woodruff Carr, K L; Smith, D W

    2012-10-25

    There is increasing evidence that alterations in the focus of attention result in changes in neural responding at the most peripheral levels of the auditory system. To date, however, those studies have not ruled out differences in task demands or overall arousal in explaining differences in responding across intermodal attentional conditions. The present study sought to compare changes in the response of cochlear outer hair cells, employing distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), under different, balanced conditions of intermodal attention. DPOAEs were measured while the participants counted infrequent, brief exemplars of the DPOAE primary tones (auditory attending), and while counting visual targets, which were instances of Gabor gradient phase shifts (visual attending). Corroborating an earlier study from our laboratory, the results show that DPOAEs recorded in the auditory-ignoring condition were significantly higher in overall amplitude, compared with DPOAEs recorded while participants attended to the eliciting primaries; a finding in apparent contradiction with more central measures of intermodal attention. Also consistent with our previous findings, DPOAE rapid adaptation, believed to be mediated by the medial olivocochlear efferents (MOC), was unaffected by changes in intermodal attention. The present findings indicate that manipulations in the conditions of attention, through the corticofugal pathway, and its last relay to cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), the MOC, alter cochlear sensitivity to sound. These data also suggest that the MOC influence on OHC sensitivity is composed of two independent processes, one of which is under attentional control. PMID:22871520

  7. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  8. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed. PMID:26561887

  9. Concept Formation Skills in Long-Term Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G.; Beer, Jessica; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Ditmars, Allison; Pisoni, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if a period of auditory sensory deprivation followed by degraded auditory input and related language delays affects visual concept formation skills in long-term prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users. We also examined if concept formation skills are mediated or moderated by other neurocognitive domains (i.e., language, working memory, and executive control). Relative to normally hearing (NH) peers, CI users displayed significantly poorer performance in several specific areas of concept formation, especially when multiple comparisons and relational concepts were components of the task. Differences in concept formation between CI users and NH peers were fully explained by differences in language and inhibition–concentration skills. Language skills were also found to be more strongly related to concept formation in CI users than in NH peers. The present findings suggest that complex relational concepts may be adversely affected by a period of early prelingual deafness followed by access to underspecified and degraded sound patterns and spoken language transmitted by a CI. Investigating a unique clinical population such as early-implanted prelingually deaf children with CIs can provide new insights into foundational brain–behavior relations and developmental processes. PMID:25583706

  10. Perceptual learning and auditory training in cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J

    2007-09-01

    Learning electrically stimulated speech patterns can be a new and difficult experience for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Recent studies have shown that most implant recipients at least partially adapt to these new patterns via passive, daily-listening experiences. Gradually introducing a speech processor parameter (eg, the degree of spectral mismatch) may provide for more complete and less stressful adaptation. Although the implant device restores hearing sensation and the continued use of the implant provides some degree of adaptation, active auditory rehabilitation may be necessary to maximize the benefit of implantation for CI recipients. Currently, there are scant resources for auditory rehabilitation for adult, postlingually deafened CI recipients. We recently developed a computer-assisted speech-training program to provide the means to conduct auditory rehabilitation at home. The training software targets important acoustic contrasts among speech stimuli, provides auditory and visual feedback, and incorporates progressive training techniques, thereby maintaining recipients' interest during the auditory training exercises. Our recent studies demonstrate the effectiveness of targeted auditory training in improving CI recipients' speech and music perception. Provided with an inexpensive and effective auditory training program, CI recipients may find the motivation and momentum to get the most from the implant device. PMID:17709574

  11. Concept formation skills in long-term cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G; Beer, Jessica; Colson, Bethany G; Henning, Shirley C; Ditmars, Allison; Pisoni, David B

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if a period of auditory sensory deprivation followed by degraded auditory input and related language delays affects visual concept formation skills in long-term prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users. We also examined if concept formation skills are mediated or moderated by other neurocognitive domains (i.e., language, working memory, and executive control). Relative to normally hearing (NH) peers, CI users displayed significantly poorer performance in several specific areas of concept formation, especially when multiple comparisons and relational concepts were components of the task. Differences in concept formation between CI users and NH peers were fully explained by differences in language and inhibition-concentration skills. Language skills were also found to be more strongly related to concept formation in CI users than in NH peers. The present findings suggest that complex relational concepts may be adversely affected by a period of early prelingual deafness followed by access to underspecified and degraded sound patterns and spoken language transmitted by a CI. Investigating a unique clinical population such as early-implanted prelingually deaf children with CIs can provide new insights into foundational brain-behavior relations and developmental processes. PMID:25583706

  12. Spiral CT image deblurring for cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Vannier, M W; Skinner, M W; Cavalcanti, M G; Harding, G W

    1998-04-01

    Cochlear implantation is the standard treatment for profound hearing loss. Preimplantation and postimplantation spiral computed tomography (CT) is essential in several key clinical and research aspects. The maximum image resolution with commercial spiral CT scanners is insufficient to define clearly anatomical features and implant electrode positions in the inner ear. In this paper, we develop an expectation-maximization (EM)-like iterative deblurring algorithm to achieve spiral CT image super-resolution for cochlear implantation, assuming a spatially invariant linear spiral CT system with a three-dimensional (3-D) separable Gaussian point spread function (PSF). We experimentally validate the 3-D Gaussian blurring model via phantom measurement and profile fitting. The imaging process is further expressed as convolution of an isotropic 3-D Gaussian PSF and a blurred underlying volumetric image. Under practical conditions, an oblique reconstructed section is approximated as convolution of an isotropic two-dimensional (2-D) Gaussian PSF and the corresponding actual cross section. The spiral CT image deblurring algorithm is formulated with sieve and resolution kernels for suppressing noise and edge artifacts. A typical cochlear cross section is used for evaluation, demonstrating a resolution gain up to 30%40% according to the correlation criterion. Physical phantoms, preimplantation and postimplantation patients are reconstructed into volumes of 0.1-mm cubic voxels. The patient images are digitally unwrapped along the central axis of the cochlea and the implanted electrode array respectively, then oblique sections orthogonal to the central axis formed. After deblurring, representation of structural features is substantially improved in all the cases. PMID:9688157

  13. Cochlear Function Monitoring After Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Janecka-Placek, Agata; Lisowska, Grażyna; Paradysz, Andrzej; Misiołek, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the effect of spinal anesthesia on the function of cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), determined by means of objective distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) testing. To the best of our knowledge, our study was the second OAE-based analysis of cochlear function during spinal anesthesia, and the only experiment including such a large group of patients. Material/Methods The study included 20 patients (18 men and 2 women) subjected to a scheduled uretherorenoscopic lithotripsy with routine spinal anesthesia with 10 mg (2 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 50 μg (1 ml) of fentanyl. The levels of DPOAEs and background noise at 1000–6000 Hz were recorded prior to and immediately after the anesthesia, and on the postoperative day 2. Results We did not find significant differences between DPOAEs values recorded prior to and immediately after the anesthesia. The only exception pertained to 5652 Hz, at which a significantly higher level of DPOAEs was observed immediately after the anesthesia. The levels of DPOAEs at 2002 Hz and 2380 Hz collected on the postoperative day 2 were significantly higher than the respective baseline values. Irrespective of the frequency and time of testing, we did not find any significant differences between the recorded levels of background noise. Conclusions Our findings point to the lack of a detrimental effect of spinal anesthesia on objectively evaluated cochlear function, and thus suggest that this method is safe, even for OHCs, which are extremely susceptible to exogenous and endogenous injuries. PMID:26377393

  14. Hearing Preservation Among Patients Undergoing Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Van Abel, Kathryn M.; Dunn, Camille C.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Oleson, Jacob J.; Beatty, Charles W.; Neff, Brian A.; Hansen, Marlan; Gantz, Bruce J.; Driscoll, Colin L. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite successful preservation of low-frequency hearing in patients undergoing cochlear implantation (CI) with shorter electrode lengths, there is still controversy regarding which electrodes maximize hearing preservation (HP). The thin straight electrode array (TSEA) has been suggested as a full cochlear coverage option for HP. However, very little is known regarding its HP potential. Methods A retrospective review was performed at two tertiary academic medical centers, reviewing the electronic records for 52 patients (mean, 58.2 yr; range, 11–85 yr) implanted with the Cochlear Nucleus CI422 Slim Straight (Centennial, CO, USA) electrode array, referred to herein as the thin straight electrode array or TSEA. All patients had a preoperative low-frequency pure-tone average (LFPTA) of 85 dB HL or less. Hearing thresholds were measured at initial activation (t1) and 6 months after activation (t2). HP was assessed by evaluating functional HP using a cutoff level of 85 dB HL PTA. Results At t1, 54% of the subjects had functional hearing; 33% of these subjects had an LFPTA between 71 and 85 dB HL, and 17% had an LFPTA between 56 and 70 dB HL. At t2, 47% of the patients had functional hearing, with 31% having an LFPTA between 71 and 85 dB HL. Discussion Preliminary research suggests that the TSEA has the potential to preserve functional hearing in 54% of patients at t1. However, 22% (n = 6) of the patients who had functional hearing at t1 (n = 28) lost their hearing between t1 and t2. Further studies are needed to evaluate factors that influence HP with the TSEA electrode and determine the speech perception benefits using electric and acoustic hearing over electric alone. PMID:25575373

  15. Speech perception abilities of children with cochlear implants, tactile aids, or hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Osberger, M J; Robbins, A M; Miyamoto, R T; Berry, S W; Myres, W A; Kessler, K S; Pope, M L

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was first, to compare the performance of three matched groups of experimental subjects who used either a single-channel cochlear implant, a multichannel cochlear implant, or a two-channel vibrotactile aid on a battery of speech perception measures, and second, to compare the performance of subjects with residual hearing who used hearing aids to that of the three groups of experimental subjects. The results revealed that the subjects using hearing aids achieved the highest scores on all measures. The performance of the group of multichannel implant users was significantly higher than that of the single-channel implant users on tests involving discrimination of speech features, categorization of stress patterns, closed-set identification of familiar words, and identification of common phrases with and without visual cues. The performance of the subjects using 3M/House and Tactaid II devices was similar on all tests except those requiring integration of auditory or tactile cues and visual cues, on which the 3M/House device users achieved significantly higher scores than did the Tactaid II device users. PMID:2069171

  16. Spatial Channel Interactions in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-01-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis for its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same 5 modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured voltage distribution as a function of electrode position in the cochlea in response to stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of electrode position in response to stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or lower in all measures. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope, and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological, and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal side. On the contrary, the evoked

  17. Microminiature molding techniques for cochlear electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Loeb, G E; Peck, R A; Smith, D W

    1995-12-01

    We provide a general method for producing a variety of small, complex electrode arrays based on injection molds produced using computer-aided drafting and machining (CAD-CAM) procedures and a novel method for connecting to the very fine electrical leads associated with the individual contacts of such arrays. Cat-sized cochlear electrode arrays with up to eight contacts were built according to these methods and their electrical contacts were characterized in vitro by impedance spectroscopy and in vivo by monitoring impedance for over 1 year of intermittent stimulation in chronically instrumented animals. PMID:8788052

  18. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea due to cochlear dysplasias.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2005-07-01

    Cochlear dysplasia associated with defect in stapes footplate can be a cause of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak in these cases is usually done by packing the vestibule with muscle or fascia. This traditional method of repair has 30-60% failure rate. Cerebrospinal fluid leak in four such patients was successfully repaired using multiple layer packing of vestibule, reinforced by pedicle temporalis muscle graft. Intraoperatively continuous lumbar drain was done. Magnetic resonance imaging of inner ear using 3D FSE T2WI and 3D FIESTA sequences was found helpful noninvasive investigation to localize site and route of cerebrospinal fluid leak. PMID:15911019

  20. Access to cochlear implants: Time to reflect.

    PubMed

    Raine, Christopher; Atkinson, Helen; Strachan, David R; Martin, Jane M

    2016-04-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) intervention is expensive and accessed mainly by developed countries. The introduction of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and funding via a public health service give children better access to CIs. However for adults large disparities exist between utilization and estimated prevalence. In the UK CI selection criteria are restrictive compared with many other countries. Improved audiological awareness and screening programmes for adults would improve access to hearing technologies that would improve health and quality of life. Hearing loss itself has significant medical and financial burdens on society and by investing in early intervention and using best technology this would mitigate some of the rising associated medical costs. PMID:27099110

  1. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  2. Cochlear amplification, outer hair cells and prestin

    PubMed Central

    Dallos, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical amplification of acoustic signals is apparently a common feature of vertebrate auditory organs. In non-mammalian vertebrates amplification is produced by stereociliary processes, related to the mechanotransducer channel complex and probably to the phenomenon of fast adaptation. The extended frequency range of the mammalian cochlea has likely co-evolved with a novel hair cell type, the outer hair cell and its constituent membrane protein, prestin. Cylindrical outer hair cells are motile and their somatic length changes are voltage driven and powered by prestin. One of the central outstanding problems in mammalian cochlear neurobiology is the relation between the two amplification processes. PMID:18809494

  3. Cochlear implant candidates: assessment with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Harnsberger, H R; Dart, D J; Parkin, J L; Smoker, W R; Osborn, A G

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-seven patients with severe to profound hearing loss were evaluated for possible placement of a multichannel cochlear implant hearing device. After initial clinical screening, 42 patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) examination. Five of these patients were also examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Twenty-two patients received implants. CT of the middle and inner ear was normal in 24 patients (57.1%) and showed labyrinthine ossification in 12 (28.6%), cochlear or fenestral otosclerosis (or both) in four (9.5%), and congenital cochlear malformation in two (4.8%). The information provided by CT was used to (a) exclude patients in whom multichannel cochlear implantation would most likely be unsuccessful (owing to obliterative labyrinthine ossification, or congenital cochlear malformation, severe cochlear, or fenestral otosclerosis), (b) help select the best ear for implantation, and (c) provide a preoperative picture of normal variants and avoidable surgical pitfalls. MR experience is limited but assessment of the size of the cochlear nerve and the membranous labyrinth is possible with this modality and may provide additional information in the evaluation of these patients. PMID:3108956

  4. Chronic Conductive Hearing Loss Leads to Cochlear Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M. Charles; Liberman, Leslie D.; Maison, Stéphane F.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses between cochlear nerve terminals and hair cells are the most vulnerable elements in the inner ear in both noise-induced and age-related hearing loss, and this neuropathy is exacerbated in the absence of efferent feedback from the olivocochlear bundle. If age-related loss is dominated by a lifetime of exposure to environmental sounds, reduction of acoustic drive to the inner ear might improve cochlear preservation throughout life. To test this, we removed the tympanic membrane unilaterally in one group of young adult mice, removed the olivocochlear bundle in another group and compared their cochlear function and innervation to age-matched controls one year later. Results showed that tympanic membrane removal, and the associated threshold elevation, was counterproductive: cochlear efferent innervation was dramatically reduced, especially the lateral olivocochlear terminals to the inner hair cell area, and there was a corresponding reduction in the number of cochlear nerve synapses. This loss led to a decrease in the amplitude of the suprathreshold cochlear neural responses. Similar results were seen in two cases with conductive hearing loss due to chronic otitis media. Outer hair cell death was increased only in ears lacking medial olivocochlear innervation following olivocochlear bundle cuts. Results suggest the novel ideas that 1) the olivocochlear efferent pathway has a dramatic use-dependent plasticity even in the adult ear and 2) a component of the lingering auditory processing disorder seen in humans after persistent middle-ear infections is cochlear in origin. PMID:26580411

  5. Performance of deaf children with cochlear implants and vibrotactile aids.

    PubMed

    Osberger, M J; Miyamoto, R T; Robbins, A M; Renshaw, J J; Berry, S W; Myres, W A; Kessler, K; Pope, M L

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal study is under way to examine the speech perception and production skills of deaf children who use a single- or multi-channel cochlear implant, or a two-channel tactile aid. The speech perception data showed that the majority of subjects who achieved the highest scores on a range of measures used the multi-channel cochlear implant. The production data showed that all three types of sensory aids were effective in promoting production skills, with the cochlear implant users showing the greatest gains in this area. PMID:2132583

  6. Audio-vocal responses elicited in adult cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Torrey M.; Suneel, Deepa; Aronoff, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation experienced prior to receiving a cochlear implant could compromise neural connections that allow for modulation of vocalization using auditory feedback. In this report, pitch-shift stimuli were presented to adult cochlear implant users to test whether compensatory motor changes in vocal F0 could be elicited. In five of six participants, rapid adjustments in vocal F0 were detected following the stimuli, which resemble the cortically mediated pitch-shift responses observed in typical hearing individuals. These findings suggest that cochlear implants can convey vocal F0 shifts to the auditory pathway that might benefit audio-vocal monitoring. PMID:26520350

  7. Von Békésy and cochlear mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Steele, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    Georg Békésy laid the foundation for cochlear mechanics, foremost by demonstrating the traveling wave that is the substrate for mammalian cochlear mechanical processing. He made mechanical measurements and physical models in order to understand that fundamental cochlear response. In this tribute to Békésy we make a bridge between modern traveling wave observations and those of Békésy, discuss the mechanical properties and measurements that he considered to be so important, and touch on the range of computational traveling wave models. PMID:22633943

  8. Better speech recognition with cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Blake S.; Finley, Charles C.; Lawson, Dewey T.; Wolford, Robert D.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rabinowitz, William M.

    1991-07-01

    HIGH levels of speech recognition have been achieved with a new sound processing strategy for multielectrode cochlear implants. A cochlear implant system consists of one or more implanted elec-trodes for direct electrical activation of the auditory nerve, an external speech processor that transforms a microphone input into stimuli for each electrode, and a transcutaneous (rf-link) or per-cutaneous (direct) connection between the processor and the elec-trodes. We report here the comparison of the new strategy and a standard clinical processor. The standard compressed analogue (CA) processor1,2 presented analogue waveforms simultaneously to all electrodes, whereas the new continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy presented brief pulses to each electrode in a nonover-lapping sequence. Seven experienced implant users, selected for their excellent performance with the CA processor, participated as subjects. The new strategy produced large improvements in the scores of speech reception tests for all subjects. These results have important implications for the treatment of deafness and for minimal representations of speech at the auditory periphery.

  9. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Guilherme Machado; Guimaraes, Alexandre C.; Duarte, Alexandre S. M.; Muranaka, Eder B.; Soki, Marcelo N.; Martins, Renata S. Zanotello; Bianchini, Walter A.; Paschoal, Jorge R.; Castilho, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS) is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America. PMID:23573094

  10. Diagnosis and management of cochlear hydrops.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, M E; Miller, G W

    1977-02-01

    In an early case of cochlear hydrops, the symptoms of a mild pressure sensation or fullness in the involved ear may be mistaken for a blocked eustachian tube. More severe cases demonstrate a true sensori-neutral hearing loss that fluctuates. Tinnitis is usually present during the attack and will often subside when the hearing returns to normal. The neurotologic evaluation is negative and attempts to establish an etiology are seldom fruitful. The treatment is usually medical, and empirically, these individuals are treated with diuretics, low salt diet, and vasodilators. It is felt by most investigators that cochlear hydrops is an early form of Ménière's disease, and over a long period of time these individuals may develop vertigo as a complaint. The purpose of this paper is to discuss this interesting form of Ménière's disease in detail concerning etiology, physiology, diagnosis, and treatment. A small series of patients who have undergone the subarachnoid endolymphatic sac procedure will be reported according to the guidelines set forth by the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. Based on the result in these patients, it would appear that this procedure should be considered in those individuals who are refractory to medical management. There is convincing evidence that the shunt does stabilize the hearing in many instances. PMID:839917

  11. Better speech recognition with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B S; Finley, C C; Lawson, D T; Wolford, R D; Eddington, D K; Rabinowitz, W M

    1991-07-18

    HIGH levels of speech recognition have been achieved with a new sound processing strategy for multielectrode cochlear implants. A cochlear implant system consists of one or more implanted electrodes for direct electrical activation of the auditory nerve, an external speech processor that transforms a microphone input into stimuli for each electrode, and a transcutaneous (rf-link) or percutaneous (direct) connection between the processor and the electrodes. We report here the comparison of the new strategy and a standard clinical processor. The standard compressed analogue (CA) processor presented analogue waveforms simultaneously to all electrodes, whereas the new continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy presented brief pulses to each electrode in a nonoverlapping sequence. Seven experienced implant users, selected for their excellent performance with the CA processor, participated as subjects. The new strategy produced large improvements in the scores of speech reception tests for all subjects. These results have important implications for the treatment of deafness and for minimal representations of speech at the auditory periphery. PMID:1857418

  12. Word Learning in Children Following Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Derek M.; Carter, Allyson K.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Ying, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed to investigate word-learning skills of children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Using interactive play scenarios, 2- to 5-year olds were presented with sets of objects (Beanie Baby stuffed animals) and words for their names that corresponded to salient perceptual attributes (e.g., “horns” for a goat). Their knowledge of the word-object associations was measured immediately after exposure and then following a 2-hour delay. Children who use cochlear implants performed more poorly than age-matched children with typical hearing both receptively and expressively. Both groups of children showed retention of the word-object associations in the delayed testing conditions for words that were previously known. Our findings suggest that although pediatric CI users may have impaired phonological processing skills, their long-term memory for familiar words may be similar to children with typical hearing. Further, the methods that developed in this study should be useful for investigating other aspects of word learning in children who use CIs. PMID:21528108

  13. Programming, Care, and Troubleshooting of Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current cochlear implant technology, programming strategies, troubleshooting, and care techniques. It considers: device components, initial stimulation, speech coding strategies, use and care, troubleshooting, and the classroom environment. (Contains references.) (DB)

  14. Vibrational modes and damping in the cochlear partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has been assumed in models of cochlear mechanics that the primary role of the cochlear active process is to counteract the damping of the basilar membrane, the vibration of which is much larger in a living animal than post mortem. Recent measurements of the relative motion between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane imply that this assumption is incorrect. We propose that damping is distributed throughout the cochlear partition rather than being concentrated in the basilar membrane. In the absence of significant damping, the cochlear partition possesses three modes of vibration, each associated with its own locus of Hopf bifurcations. Hair-cell activity can amplify any of these modes if the system's operating point lies near the corresponding bifurcation. The distribution of damping determines which mode of vibration predominates. For physiological levels of damping, only one mode produces a vibration pattern consistent with experimental measurements of relative motion and basilar-membrane motion.

  15. Supporting sensory transduction: cochlear fluid homeostasis and the endocochlear potential

    PubMed Central

    Wangemann, Philine

    2006-01-01

    The exquisite sensitivity of the cochlea, which mediates the transduction of sound waves into nerve impulses, depends on the endocochlear potential and requires a highly specialized environment that enables and sustains sensory function. Disturbance of cochlear homeostasis is the cause of many forms of hearing loss including the most frequently occurring syndromic and non-syndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss, Pendred syndrome and Cx26-related deafness. The occurrence of these and other monogenetic disorders illustrates that cochlear fluid homeostasis and the generation of the endocochlear potential are poorly secured by functional redundancy. This review summarizes the most prominent aspects of cochlear fluid homeostasis. It covers cochlear fluid composition, the generation of the endocochlear potential, K+ secretion and cycling and its regulation, the role of gap junctions, mechanisms of acid–base homeostasis, and Ca2+ transport. PMID:16857713

  16. An evaluation of retrograde tracing methods for the identification of chemically distinct cochlear efferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Vetter, D E; Mugnaini, E

    1990-07-01

    We have compared retrograde labelling of rat olivocochlear neurons after unilateral cochlear injections of wheatgerm agglutinin conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) and free HRP. After cochlear injection of WGA-HRP, labelling of nerve cell bodies in the brainstem can be explained not only as conventional retrograde labelling resulting from uptake by efferent nerve terminals synapsing on or near hair cells, but also as spurious labelling originating from tracer leakage, through the periotic duct and over the eighth nerve sheaths, into the cerebral-spinal fluid. Depending on the length of survival time, spurious labelling can involve small portions of the nucleus of the trapezoid body or the entire auditory brainstem and other non-auditory centers. On the contrary, moderate amounts of free HRP delivered to the cochlea do not lead to spurious labelling. With free HRP as the tracer of choice, we found that cochlear efferent cells were located not only in the ipsilateral LSO body and bilaterally within MVPO and RPO as already described by White and Warr, but also surrounding the ipsilateral LSO and in the ipsilateral LVPO. The allocation of these newly described olivocochlear neurons to the medial large cell or lateral small cell system is uncertain because they are located laterally in the brainstem and project ipsilaterally but are large spherical to fusiform or multipolar cells. A zinc salicylate-formol fixative and a metal intensified DAB reaction were found to be effective in visualizing retrogradely transported HRP in neurons and allowed immunocytochemical staining of the same sections with antisera to glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase. This double label protocol can be used to produce a neurochemical map of the OC systems. PMID:1702612

  17. Otoacoustic Estimation of Cochlear Tuning: Validation in the Chinchilla

    PubMed Central

    Guinan, John J.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze published auditory-nerve and otoacoustic measurements in chinchilla to test a network of hypothesized relationships between cochlear tuning, cochlear traveling-wave delay, and stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs). We find that the physiological data generally corroborate the network of relationships, including predictions from filter theory and the coherent-reflection model of OAE generation, at locations throughout the cochlea. The results support the use of otoacoustic emissions as noninvasive probes of cochlear tuning. Developing this application, we find that tuning ratios—defined as the ratio of tuning sharpness to SFOAE phase-gradient delay in periods—have a nearly species-invariant form in cat, guinea pig, and chinchilla. Analysis of the tuning ratios identifies a species-dependent parameter that locates a transition between “apical-like” and “basal-like” behavior involving multiple aspects of cochlear physiology. Approximate invariance of the tuning ratio allows determination of cochlear tuning from SFOAE delays. We quantify the procedure and show that otoacoustic estimates of chinchilla cochlear tuning match direct measures obtained from the auditory nerve. By assuming that invariance of the tuning ratio extends to humans, we derive new otoacoustic estimates of human cochlear tuning that remain mutually consistent with independent behavioral measurements obtained using different rationales, methodologies, and analysis procedures. The results confirm that at any given characteristic frequency (CF) human cochlear tuning appears sharper than that in the other animals studied, but varies similarly with CF. We show, however, that the exceptionality of human tuning can be exaggerated by the ways in which species are conventionally compared, which take no account of evident differences between the base and apex of the cochlea. Finally, our estimates of human tuning suggest that the spatial spread of excitation of a pure tone

  18. Cochlear implantation in a patient with Perisylvian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wendy; Axon, Patrick

    2007-06-01

    Perisylvian syndrome is a rare neurological disorder characterised by the partial paralysis of muscles, epilepsy and mild to severe mental retardation. It is associated with hearing loss and delay in language and speech development. This presents additional challenges in the assessment of whether a child is suitable for cochlea implantation. The method to determine whether the hearing loss is of cochlear or central origin and the progress of a child with Perisylvian syndrome who received a cochlear implant is discussed. PMID:17549806

  19. Abnormal Pitch Perception Produced by Cochlear Implant Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Tang, Qing; Lu, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects’ acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1–2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the “mean” shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large “variance” of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance. PMID:24551131

  20. Current research on music perception in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Limb, Charles J; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2012-02-01

    The authors present a comprehensive review of the state of music perception with cochlear implant (CI) users. They discuss methods of assessment and results of studies of the aspects of music perception, melody, timbre, rhythm, and so forth in individuals with cochlear implants. They discuss neural mechanisms of music perception and the anticipation of broader acceptance of standardized tests for music perception in CI users. PMID:22115686

  1. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  2. Abnormal pitch perception produced by cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Tang, Qing; Lu, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects' acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1-2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the "mean" shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large "variance" of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance. PMID:24551131

  3. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of unstained mammalian cochlear sections.

    PubMed

    Kalwani, Neil M; Ong, Cheng Ai; Lysaght, Andrew C; Haward, Simon J; McKinley, Gareth H; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2013-02-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the world, and most frequently it originates in the inner ear. Yet, the inner ear has been difficult to access for diagnosis because of its small size, delicate nature, complex three-dimensional anatomy, and encasement in the densest bone in the body. Evolving optical methods are promising to afford cellular diagnosis of pathologic changes in the inner ear. To appropriately interpret results from these emerging technologies, it is important to characterize optical properties of cochlear tissues. Here, we focus on that characterization using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) applied to unstained cochlear sections of the mouse, a common animal model of human hearing loss. We find that the most birefringent cochlear materials are collagen fibrils and myelin. Retardance of the otic capsule, the spiral ligament, and the basilar membrane are substantially higher than that of other cochlear structures. Retardance of the spiral ligament and the basilar membrane decrease from the cochlear base to the apex, compared with the more uniform retardance of other structures. The intricate structural details revealed by qPLM of unstained cochlear sections ex vivo strongly motivate future application of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to human cochlea in vivo. PMID:23407909

  4. Quantitative polarized light microscopy of unstained mammalian cochlear sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalwani, Neil M.; Ong, Cheng Ai; Lysaght, Andrew C.; Haward, Simon J.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2013-02-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in the world, and most frequently it originates in the inner ear. Yet, the inner ear has been difficult to access for diagnosis because of its small size, delicate nature, complex three-dimensional anatomy, and encasement in the densest bone in the body. Evolving optical methods are promising to afford cellular diagnosis of pathologic changes in the inner ear. To appropriately interpret results from these emerging technologies, it is important to characterize optical properties of cochlear tissues. Here, we focus on that characterization using quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) applied to unstained cochlear sections of the mouse, a common animal model of human hearing loss. We find that the most birefringent cochlear materials are collagen fibrils and myelin. Retardance of the otic capsule, the spiral ligament, and the basilar membrane are substantially higher than that of other cochlear structures. Retardance of the spiral ligament and the basilar membrane decrease from the cochlear base to the apex, compared with the more uniform retardance of other structures. The intricate structural details revealed by qPLM of unstained cochlear sections ex vivo strongly motivate future application of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to human cochlea in vivo.

  5. Evaluation of evoked potentials to dyadic tones after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Pascale; Eichele, Tom; Buechler, Michael; Debener, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz; Dillier, Norbert; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Meyer, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Auditory evoked potentials are tools widely used to assess auditory cortex functions in clinical context. However, in cochlear implant users, electrophysiological measures are challenging due to implant-created artefacts in the EEG. Here, we used independent component analysis to reduce cochlear implant-related artefacts in event-related EEGs of cochlear implant users (n = 12), which allowed detailed spatio-temporal evaluation of auditory evoked potentials by means of dipole source analysis. The present study examined hemispheric asymmetries of auditory evoked potentials to musical sounds in cochlear implant users to evaluate the effect of this type of implantation on neuronal activity. In particular, implant users were presented with two dyadic tonal intervals in an active oddball design and in a passive listening condition. Principally, the results show that independent component analysis is an efficient approach that enables the study of neurophysiological mechanisms of restored auditory function in cochlear implant users. Moreover, our data indicate altered hemispheric asymmetries for dyadic tone processing in implant users compared with listeners with normal hearing (n = 12). We conclude that the evaluation of auditory evoked potentials are of major relevance to understanding auditory cortex function after cochlear implantation and could be of substantial clinical value by indicating the maturation/reorganization of the auditory system after implantation. PMID:19293240

  6. Cochlear re-implantation: lessons learnt and the way ahead.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Uma; Sikka, Kapil; Agarwal, Shivani; Kumar, Rakesh; Thakar, Alok; Sharma, Suresh C

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion A cochlear re-implantation procedure is undesirable; however, the cochlear implant surgeon may have to perform a re-implantation procedure occasionally for various reasons. Following standard techniques, implant performance comparable with primary implantation may be achieved. Objective To study the causes and outcomes of cochlear re-implantation in an Asian Indian population. Study design Retrospective analysis of clinical charts over an 18-year period with prospective follow-up of patients. Methods The charts of 534 patients, who underwent cochlear implant, at an Otorhinolaryngology institutional Centre, from January 1997 to January 2015 were studied. Of these, the charts of 18 patients who underwent cochlear re-implantation were studied. The causes and audiological and speech outcomes were analysed. Results Eighteen patients (3.4%) underwent cochlear re-implantation for various reasons. The commonest indication was device failure in seven patients (39%), followed by electrode extrusion in five (28%), trauma in three (11%), electrode migration in two (11%) and improper electrode placement in one (6%) patient. The audiological performance tests and speech tests either remained the same or improved from those achieved for patients undergoing primary implantation, in 87% patients. PMID:26898701

  7. The development of the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    Patrick, James F; Busby, Peter A; Gibson, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus Freedom, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour Advance electrode, the modular Freedom processor, the available speech coding strategies, the input processing options of Smart Sound to improve the signal before coding as electrical signals, and the programming software. Preliminary results from multicenter studies with the Freedom system are reported, demonstrating better levels of performance compared with the previous systems. The final section presents the most recent implant reliability data, with the early findings at 18 months showing improved reliability of the Freedom implant compared with the earlier Nucleus 3 System. Also reported are some of the findings of Cochlear's collaborative research programs to improve recipient outcomes. Included are studies showing the benefits from bilateral implants, electroacoustic stimulation using an ipsilateral and/or contralateral hearing aid, advanced speech coding, and streamlined speech processor programming. PMID:17172547

  8. Cochlear precursors of neural pitch and loudness codes.

    PubMed

    Zwislocki, J J

    1995-09-01

    It has been believed by most auditory scientists for over a century that the place of maximum vibration in the cochlea provides the main pitch code. Recently, we have obtained experimental evidence showing that this is quite unlikely, because the maximum of cochlear excitation changes its location with sound intensity, moving over the useful sound intensity range toward the cochlear base by a distance equivalent to more than one octave, whereas the pitch remains almost constant. In the presence of outer hair cell damage, the maximum is shifted toward the base by a similar distance, whereas the pitch is hardly affected. Of interest, the location of the apical cutoff of excitation is practically unaffected by sound intensity or cochlear damage. For any given sound frequency, the shift of the maximum with sound intensity precludes any single cochlear location from coding for loudness over the entire useful intensity range. The code is very likely provided by the maximum, which changes its location with the intensity, or by the whole cochlear excitation area. Of significance in this respect is our determination that the growth of the output of the whole auditory nerve parallels the growth of the excitation area. These findings may be useful for the coding of sound in cochlear implants, as well as for hearing aid dynamics. PMID:7668600

  9. Calcium imaging of inner ear hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing, loss are commonly available. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes study of their hair cells difficult. We develop a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae are harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and fixed in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the cochlear epithelium is opened and Reissner's membrane is incised. A fluorescent calcium indicator is applied to the preparation. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using 3-D scanning. We are able to image about one third of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we find that outer hair cells demonstrate increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. This methodology is then used to visualize hair cell calcium changes during mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are expected to be reduced.

  10. Calcium imaging of inner ear hair cells within the cochlear epithelium of mice using two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tao; Gao, Simon S.; Saggau, Peter; Oghalai, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Mice are an excellent model for studying mammalian hearing and transgenic mouse models of human hearing, loss are commonly available. However, the mouse cochlea is substantially smaller than other animal models routinely used to study cochlear physiology. This makes study of their hair cells difficult. We develop a novel methodology to optically image calcium within living hair cells left undisturbed within the excised mouse cochlea. Fresh cochleae are harvested, left intact within their otic capsule bone, and fixed in a recording chamber. The bone overlying the cochlear epithelium is opened and Reissner’s membrane is incised. A fluorescent calcium indicator is applied to the preparation. A custom-built upright two-photon microscope was used to image the preparation using 3-D scanning. We are able to image about one third of a cochlear turn simultaneously, in either the apical or basal regions. Within one hour of animal sacrifice, we find that outer hair cells demonstrate increased fluorescence compared with surrounding supporting cells. This methodology is then used to visualize hair cell calcium changes during mechanotransduction over a region of the epithelium. Because the epithelium is left within the cochlea, dissection trauma is minimized and artifactual changes in hair cell physiology are expected to be reduced. PMID:20210449

  11. Deafness in cochlear and auditory nerve disorders.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of hearing impairment worldwide. It arises as a consequence of damage to the cochlea or auditory nerve, and several structures are often affected simultaneously. There are many causes, including genetic mutations affecting the structures of the inner ear, and environmental insults such as noise, ototoxic substances, and hypoxia. The prevalence increases dramatically with age. Clinical diagnosis is most commonly accomplished by measuring detection thresholds and comparing these to normative values to determine the degree of hearing loss. In addition to causing insensitivity to weak sounds, sensorineural hearing loss has a number of adverse perceptual consequences, including loudness recruitment, poor perception of pitch and auditory space, and difficulty understanding speech, particularly in the presence of background noise. The condition is usually incurable; treatment focuses on restoring the audibility of sounds made inaudible by hearing loss using either hearing aids or cochlear implants. PMID:25726286

  12. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    PubMed

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  13. Cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Phillip M; Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2008-11-01

    Congenital deafness leads to atypical organization of the auditory nervous system. However, the extent to which auditory pathways reorganize during deafness is not well understood. We recorded cortical auditory evoked potentials in normal hearing children and in congenitally deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. High-density EEG and source modeling revealed principal activity from auditory cortex in normal hearing and early implanted children. However, children implanted after a critical period of seven years revealed activity from parietotemporal cortex in response to auditory stimulation, demonstrating reorganized cortical pathways. Reorganization of central auditory pathways is limited by the age at which implantation occurs, and may help explain the benefits and limitations of implantation in congenitally deaf children. PMID:18775684

  14. Dynamic Aspects of Cochlear Microphonic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenderink, Sebastiaan W. F.; van der Heijden, Marcel

    2011-11-01

    Cochlear microphonic potentials were recorded from the Mongolian gerbil in response to low-frequency auditory stimuli. Provided that contamination of the potentials by the phase-locked neurophonic is avoided, these recordings can be interpreted "as if recorded from a single outer hair cell". It is found that the instantaneous I/O-curves resemble the well-known Boltzmann activation curve. The dynamic aspect of the I/O-curves does reveal hysteresis and a level-dependent gain that is not observed in static measures of these curves. We explore a model that simulates CM generation from hair cell populations, but find it inadequate to reproduce the data. Rather, there seem to be fast, adaptive mechanisms probably at the level of the transduction channels themselves.

  15. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  16. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Hwang, M.; Rau, C.; Fishman, A.; Lee, W.; Richter, C.

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  17. Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccine=MPSV4 Meningococcal conjugate vaccine=MenACWY Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants ... References FACT SHEET What You Should Know Pneumococcal Vaccine Recommendations Pneumococcal Vaccination for Cochlear Implant Candidates and ...

  18. Influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulan; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Zhaobing

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion Vestibular function in patients can be damaged following cochlear implantation. Therefore, assessing the pre-operative vestibular status, carefully choosing the side of implantation, and preserving function by using minimally invasive surgical techniques are important. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function in patients with severe and profound sensorineural hearing loss, and to analyze a possible correlation between the changes in vestibular testing and post-operative vestibular symptoms. Methods Thirty-four patients were evaluated for vestibular function using the cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively), and 29 patients underwent caloric tests pre-operatively and 4 weeks post-operatively. Results Before surgery, the cVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 22 patients, unilaterally in eight patients, and absent bilaterally in four patients. The oVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 19 patients, unilaterally in six patients, and absent bilaterally in nine patients. After implantation, the cVEMPs were absent in 10 patients and the oVEMPs were absent in seven patients on the implanted side. Caloric tests demonstrated canal paresis in 17 patients, and normal responses were recorded in 12 of the 29 patients pre-operatively. There was a significant decrease post-implantation in the ear implanted, with the exception of two patients. Two patients presented with vertigo and another two patients reported slight unsteadiness post-operatively, but all symptoms resolved within 7 days. The impaired vestibular function did not correlate with vestibular symptoms, age, or gender. Function on the contralateral side remained unaffected. PMID:27008103

  19. Emergent literacy in kindergartners with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Nittrouer, Susan; Caldwell, Amanda; Lowenstein, Joanna H; Tarr, Eric; Holloman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Problem A key ingredient to academic success is being able to read. Deaf individuals have historically failed to develop literacy skills comparable to those of their normal-hearing peers, but early identification and cochlear implants have improved prospects that these children can learn to read at the levels of their peers. The goal of this study was to examine early, or emergent, literacy in these children. Method 27 deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) who had just completed kindergarten were tested on emergent literacy, as well as on cognitive and linguistic skills that support emergent literacy, specifically ones involving phonological awareness, executive functioning, and oral language. 17 kindergartners with normal hearing (NH) and 8 with hearing loss, but who used hearing aids (HAs) served as controls. Outcomes were compared for these three groups of children, regression analyses were performed to see if predictor variables for emergent literacy differed for children with NH and those with CIs, and factors related to the early treatment of hearing loss and prosthesis configuration were examined for children with CIs. Results Performance of children with CIs was roughly one or more standard deviations below the mean performance of children with NH on all tasks, except for syllable counting, reading fluency, and rapid serial naming. Oral language skills explained more variance in emergent literacy for children with CIs than for children with NH. Age of first implant explained moderate amounts of variance for several measures. Having one or two CIs had no effect, but children who had some amount of bimodal experience outperformed children who had none on several measures. Conclusions Even deaf children who have benefitted from early identification, intervention, and implantation are still at risk for problems with emergent literacy that could affect their academic success. This finding means that intensive language support needs to continue through at

  20. A Resonance Approach to Cochlear Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background How does the cochlea analyse sound into its component frequencies? In the 1850s Helmholtz thought it occurred by resonance, whereas a century later Békésy's work indicated a travelling wave. The latter answer seemed to settle the question, but with the discovery in 1978 that the cochlea emits sound, the mechanics of the cochlea was back on the drawing board. Recent studies have raised questions about whether the travelling wave, as currently understood, is adequate to explain observations. Approach Applying basic resonance principles, this paper revisits the question. A graded bank of harmonic oscillators with cochlear-like frequencies and quality factors is simultaneously excited, and it is found that resonance gives rise to similar frequency responses, group delays, and travelling wave velocities as observed by experiment. The overall effect of the group delay gradient is to produce a decelerating wave of peak displacement moving from base to apex at characteristic travelling wave speeds. The extensive literature on chains of coupled oscillators is considered, and the occurrence of travelling waves, pseudowaves, phase plateaus, and forced resonance in such systems is noted. Conclusion and significance This alternative approach to cochlear mechanics shows that a travelling wave can simply arise as an apparently moving amplitude peak which passes along a bank of resonators without carrying energy. This highlights the possible role of the fast pressure wave and indicates how phase delays and group delays of a set of driven harmonic oscillators can generate an apparent travelling wave. It is possible to view the cochlea as a chain of globally forced coupled oscillators, and this model incorporates fundamental aspects of both the resonance and travelling wave theories. PMID:23144835

  1. Precise Toxigenic Ablation of Intermediate Cells Abolishes the “Battery” of the Cochlear Duct

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Gratton, Michael Anne; Lee, Jeong-Han; Perez Flores, Maria Cristina; Wang, Wenying; Doyle, Karen J.; Beermann, Friedrich; Crognale, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular potential of excitable and nonexcitable cells with respect to ground is ∼0 mV. One of the known exceptions in mammals is the cochlear duct, where the potential is ∼80–100 mV, called the endocochlear potential (EP). The EP serves as the “battery” for transduction of sound, contributing toward the sensitivity of the auditory system. The stria vascularis (StV) of the cochlear duct is the station where the EP is generated, but the cell-specific roles in the StV are ill defined. Using the intermediate cell (IC)-specific tyrosinase promoter, under the control of diphtheria toxin (DT), we eliminated and/or halted differentiation of neural crest melanocytes after migration to the StV. The ensuing adult transgenic mice are profoundly deaf. Additionally, the EP was abolished. Expression of melanocyte early marker and Kir4.1 in ICs precedes the onset of pigment synthesis. Activation of DT leads to loss of ICs. Finally, in accord with the distinct embryology of retinal pigmented cells, transgenic mice with toxigenic ablation of neural crest-derived melanocytes have intact visual responses. We assert that the tyrosinase promoter is the distinct target for genetic manipulation of IC-specific genes. PMID:24005310

  2. Imaging of cochlear tissue with a grating interferometer and hard X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie; Fishman, Andrew; David, Christian; Robinson, Ian; Rau, Christoph

    2010-01-28

    This article addresses an important current development in medical and biological imaging: the possibility of imaging soft tissue at resolutions in the micron range using hard X-rays. Challenging environments, including the cochlea, require the imaging of soft tissue structure surrounded by bone. We demonstrate that cochlear soft tissue structures can be imaged with hard X-ray phase contrast. Furthermore, we show that only a thin slice of the tissue is required to introduce a large phase shift. It is likely that the phase contrast image of the soft tissue structures is sufficient to image the structures even if surrounded by bone. For the present set of experiments, structures with low-absorption contrast have been visualized using in-line phase contrast imaging and a grating interferometer. The experiments have been performed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories, a third generation source of synchrotron radiation. The source provides highly coherent X-ray radiation with high-photon flux (>10{sup 12} photons/s) at high-photon energies (5-70 keV). Radiographic and light microscopy images of the gerbil cochlear slice samples were compared. It has been determined that a 20-{micro}m thick tissue slice induces a phase shift between 1/3{pi} and 2/3{pi}.

  3. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants.

    PubMed

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  4. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    PubMed Central

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  5. A 12-consonant confusion study on a multiple-channel cochlear implant patient.

    PubMed

    Dowell, R C; Martin, L F; Tong, Y C; Clark, G M; Seligman, P M; Patrick, J F

    1982-12-01

    A consonant confusion study was undertaken on a multiple-channel cochlear implant patient using a wearable speech processing device. This patient suffered from total bilateral deafness acquired postlingually. The consonants /b/, /p/, /m/, /v/, /f/, /d/, /t/, /n/, /z/, /s/, /g/, /k/ were presented in a VCV context with the vowel /a/ as in father by a male and female speaker under three conditions: lipreading alone; electrical stimulation alone using the wearable speech processor and multiple-channel cochlear implant; lipreading in conjunction with electrical stimulation. No significant difference was detected between the results for the male and female speakers. The percentage correct scores for the pooled results of both speakers were lipreading alone--30%; electrical stimulation alone--48%; lipreading with electrical stimulation--70%. Performance was significantly better for lipreading with electrical stimulation than for lipreading alone and for electrical stimulation alone than for lipreading alone. An information transmission analysis demonstrated the effective integration of visual and auditory information for lipreading with electrical stimulation. There was a significant improvement in performance for the electrical stimulation alone condition over the 2 months of the study in contrast to no such improvement for lipreading alone. PMID:6897661

  6. Timbral recognition and appraisal by adult cochlear implant users and normal-hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, K; Knutson, J F; Woodworth, G; Witt, S; DeBus, B

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appraisal and recognition of timbre (four different musical instruments) by recipients of Clarion cochlear implants (CIS strategy, 75- or 150-microsec pulse widths) and to compare their performance with that of normal-hearing listeners. Twenty-eight Clarion cochlear implant users and 41 normal-hearing listeners were asked to give a subjective assessment of the pleasantness of each instrument using a visual analog scale with anchors of "like very much" to "dislike very much," and to match each sound with a picture of the instrument they believed had produced it. No significant differences were found between the two different pulse widths for either appreciation or recognition; thus, data from the two pulse widths following 12 months of Clarion implant use were collapsed for further analyses. Significant differences in appraisal were found between normal-hearing listeners and implant recipients for two of the four instruments sampled. Normal-hearing adults were able to recognize all of the instruments with significantly greater accuracy than implant recipients. Performance on timbre perception tasks was correlated with speech perception and cognitive tasks. PMID:9493937

  7. Executive Functioning Skills in Preschool-Age Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Castellanos, Irina; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether deficits in executive functioning (EF) in children with cochlear implants (CIs) emerge as early as the preschool years. Method Two groups of children ages 3 to 6 years participated in this cross-sectional study: 24 preschoolers who had CIs prior to 36 months of age and 21 preschoolers with normal hearing (NH). All were tested on normed measures of working memory, inhibition-concentration, and organization-integration. Parents completed a normed rating scale of problem behaviors related to EF. Comparisons of EF skills of children with CIs were made to peers with NH and to published nationally representative norms. Results Preschoolers with CIs showed significantly poorer performance on inhibition-concentration and working memory compared with peers with NH and with national norms. No group differences were found in visual memory or organization-integration. When data were controlled for language, differences in performance measures of EF remained, whereas differences in parent-reported problems with EF were no longer significant. Hearing history was generally unrelated to EF. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that EF deficits found in older children with CIs begin to emerge as early as preschool years. The ability to detect these deficits early has important implications for early intervention and habilitation after cochlear implantation. PMID:24686747

  8. Imaging Evaluation of Pediatric Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Potential Candidates for Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jallu, Aleena Shafi; Jehangir, Majid; Ul Hamid, Waqar; Pampori, Rafiq Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) are complementary in the imaging of the labyrinth, the internal auditory canal and the brain in children with sensorineural hearing loss who are being evaluated for cochlear implantation. An accurate anatomical description of the inner ear is essential in the preoperative work up. Computerized tomography visualizes the bony structures, whereas MR can discern soft-tissue components including intra labyrinthine fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerves, and vessels within the IAC. This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Government Medical College, Srinagar. 40 children in the age group of 1-16 years with unidentified causes of bilateral SNHL were analysed radiologically over the period of 2 years from Dec 2011 to Jan 2014. Each patient underwent MRI and high resolution CT scanning of temporal bone in axial and coronal planes. Out of the 40 patients 22 were males (55 %) and 18 were females (45 %). 30 patients (72.5 %)in our study had normal radiological scans. Five patients (12.5 %) had B/L large vestibular aqueduct and two patients (5 %) had internal auditory canal stenosis with cochlear nerve hypoplasia on CT and MR imaging. Cochlear dysplasia was present in two patients (5 %) and semicircular canal dysplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %) as an isolated finding on HRCT. In addition isolated cochlear nerve hypoplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %). Hyperintense basal ganglia lesion suggestive of kernicterus was present in one patient (2.5 %) and hyperintense posterior parietal and occipital white matter lesions suggestive of congenital CMV infection was present in one patient (2.5 %) on MR imaging. Arachnoid cysts of middle cranial fossa was an incidental finding present in one patient. Radiological abnormalities of the inner ear are not uncommon. Computerized tomography and MRI are important modalities to analyze the inner ear in

  9. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Mary K.; Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. "Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition"…

  10. International Classification of Reliability for Implanted Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Backous, Douglas D.; Balkany, Thomas J.; Briggs, Robert J. S.; Gantz, Bruce J.; van Hasselt, Andrew; Kim, Chong Sun; Kubo, Takeshi; Lenarz, Thomas; Pillsbury, Harold C.; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design an international standard to be used when reporting reliability of the implanted components of cochlear implant systems to appropriate governmental authorities, cochlear implant (CI) centers, and for journal editors in evaluating manuscripts involving cochlear implant reliability. Study Design The International Consensus Group for Cochlear Implant Reliability Reporting was assembled to unify ongoing efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia to create a consistent and comprehensive classification system for the implanted components of CI systems across manufacturers. Setting All members of the consensus group are from tertiary referral cochlear implant centers. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure A clinically relevant classification scheme adapted from principles of ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1) originally designed for reporting reliability of cardiac pacemakers, pulse generators, or leads. Results Standard definitions for device failure, survival time, clinical benefit, reduced clinical benefit, and specification were generated. Time intervals for reporting back to implant centers for devices tested to be “out of specification,” categorization of explanted devices, the method of cumulative survival reporting, and content of reliability reports to be issued by manufacturers was agreed upon by all members. The methodology for calculating Cumulative survival was adapted from ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1). Conclusion The International Consensus Group on Cochlear Implant Device Reliability Reporting recommends compliance to this new standard in reporting reliability of implanted CI components by all manufacturers of CIs and the adoption of this standard as a minimal reporting guideline for editors of journals publishing cochlear implant research results. PMID:20864879

  11. Electrode migration after cochlear implant surgery: more common than expected?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Aarno; Wennström, Minna; Lehtimäki, Antti; Löppönen, Heikki; Valtonen, Hannu

    2016-06-01

    The overall complication rate of cochlear implant surgery is low and so-called electrode failures (electrode migration, misplacement, etc.,) account for only a minority of all complications. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of electrode migration as the cause for increased impedance values and non-auditory stimulation in the basal channels. Within the scope of a quality control process, the cochlear implant database of the Kuopio University Hospital (Finland) was reviewed. Patients with gradual elevation of impedance values and/or non-auditory stimulation of the basal electrode channels were re-examined and cone-beam computed tomography was administered. There were 162 cochlear implant recipients and 201 implanted devices registered in the database. A total of 18 patients (18 devices) were identified having significantly increased impedance values or non-auditory stimulation of the basal electrodes. Cone-beam computed tomography revealed extra-cochlear electrodes in 12 of these patients due to the migration of the electrode array. All extruded electrodes were lateral wall electrodes, i.e., straight electrode arrays (Cochlear CI422 and Med-El devices). The most common feature of electrode migration was the gradual increase of the impedance values in the basal electrodes, even though telemetry could also be unsuspicious. Electrode migration after cochlear implant surgery may be more common than previously reported. At surgery, special attention should be paid to the reliable fixation of the electrode array. This study underlines the importance of postoperative imaging after cochlear implant surgery. PMID:26164294

  12. Cochlear nucleus whole mount explants promote the differentiation of neuronal stem cells from the cochlear nucleus in co-culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Jürgens, Lukas; Völker, Christine; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Jablonka, Sibylle; Mlynski, Robert; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    The cochlear nucleus is the first brainstem nucleus to receive sensory input from the cochlea. Depriving this nucleus of auditory input leads to cellular and molecular disorganization which may potentially be counteracted by the activation or application of stem cells. Neuronal stem cells (NSCs) have recently been identified in the neonatal cochlear nucleus and a persistent neurogenic niche was demonstrated in this brainstem nucleus until adulthood. The present work investigates whether the neurogenic environment of the cochlear nucleus can promote the survival of engrafted NSCs and whether cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs can differentiate into neurons and glia in brain tissue. Therefore, cochlear nucleus whole-mount explants were co-cultured with NSCs extracted from either the cochlear nucleus or the hippocampus and compared to a second environment using whole-mount explants from the hippocampus. Factors that are known to induce neuronal differentiation were also investigated in these NSC-explant experiments. NSCs derived from the cochlear nucleus engrafted in the brain tissue and differentiated into all cells of the neuronal lineage. Hippocampal NSCs also immigrated in cochlear nucleus explants and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Laminin expression was up-regulated in the cochlear nucleus whole-mounts and regulated the in vitro differentiation of NSCs from the cochlear nucleus. These experiments confirm a neurogenic environment in the cochlear nucleus and the capacity of cochlear nucleus-derived NSCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. Consequently, the presented results provide a first step for the possible application of stem cells to repair the disorganization of the cochlear nucleus, which occurs after hearing loss. PMID:25960344

  13. Variability of the mental representation of the cochlear anatomy during cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Renato; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Bernardeschi, Daniele; De Seta, Daniele; Bensimon, Jean Loup; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Nguyen, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mental representation of the insertion axis of surgeons with different degrees of experience, and reproducibility of the insertion axis in repeated measures. A mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy were prepared in five different artificial temporal bones. A cone-beam CT was performed for each temporal bone and the data were registered on a magnetic navigation system. In these five temporal bones, 16 surgeons (3 experts; >50 cochlear implant surgery/year; 7 fellows with few cochlear implant experience, and 6 residents) were asked to determine the optimal insertion axis according to their mental representation. Compared to a planned ideal axis, the insertion axis was better determined by the experts with higher accuracy (axial: 7° ± 1.5°, coronal: 6° ± 1.5°) than fellows (axial: 14° ± 1.7°, coronal: 13° ± 1.7°; p < 0.05), or residents (axial: 15° ± 1.5°; p < 0.001, coronal: 17° ± 1.9°; p < 0.001). This study suggests that mental representation of the cochlea is experience-dependent. A high variation of the insertion axis to the scala tympani can be observed due to the complexity of the temporal bone anatomy and lack of landmarks to determine scala tympani orientation. Navigation systems can be used to evaluate and improve mental representation of the insertion axis to the scala tympani for cochlear implant surgery. PMID:26324880

  14. IL-10/HMOX1 signaling modulates cochlear inflammation via negative regulation of MCP-1/CCL2 expression in cochlear fibrocytes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jeong-Im; Kil, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sejo; Lee, Yoo-Jin; Park, Raekil; Lim, David J; Moon, Sung K

    2015-04-15

    Cochlear inflammatory diseases, such as tympanogenic labyrinthitis, are associated with acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Although otitis media is extremely frequent in children, tympanogenic labyrinthitis is not commonly observed, which suggests the existence of a potent anti-inflammatory mechanism modulating cochlear inflammation. In this study, we aimed to determine the molecular mechanism involved in cochlear protection from inflammation-mediated tissue damage, focusing on IL-10 and hemoxygenase-1 (HMOX1) signaling. We demonstrated that IL-10Rs are expressed in the cochlear lateral wall of mice and rats, particularly in the spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs). The rat SLF cell line was found to inhibit nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi)-induced upregulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; CCL2) in response to IL-10. This inhibition was suppressed by silencing IL-10R1 and was mimicked by cobalt Protoporphyrin IX and CO-releasing molecule-2. In addition, IL-10 appeared to suppress monocyte recruitment through reduction of NTHi-induced rat SLF cell line-derived chemoattractants. Silencing of HMOX1 was found to attenuate the inhibitory effect of IL-10 on NTHi-induced MCP-1/CCL2 upregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that IL-10 inhibits NTHi-induced binding of p65 NF-κB to the distal motif in the promoter region of MCP-1/CCL2, resulting in suppression of NTHi-induced NF-κB activation. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency appeared to significantly affect cochlear inflammation induced by intratympanic injections of NTHi. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-10/HMOX1 signaling is involved in modulation of cochlear inflammation through inhibition of MCP-1/CCL2 regulation in SLFs, implying a therapeutic potential for a CO-based approach for inflammation-associated cochlear diseases. PMID:25780042

  15. IL-10/HMOX1 signaling modulates cochlear inflammation via negative regulation of MCP-1/CCL2 expression in cochlear fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jeong-Im; Kil, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sejo; Lee, Yoo-Jin; Park, Raekil; Lim, David J.; Moon, Sung K.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear inflammatory diseases such as tympanogenic labyrinthitis are associated with acquired sensorineural hearing loss. Although otitis media is extremely frequent in children, tympanogenic labyrinthitis is not commonly observed, which suggests the existence of a potent anti-inflammatory mechanism modulating cochlear inflammation. In this study, we aim to determine the molecular mechanism involved in cochlear protection from inflammation-mediated tissue damage, focusing on interleukin-10 (IL-10) and hemoxygenase-1 (HMOX1) signaling. We demonstrated that IL-10 receptors (IL-10Rs) are expressed in the cochlear lateral wall of mice and rats, particularly in the spiral ligament fibrocytes (SLFs). The rat SLF cell line (RSL) was found to inhibit nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi)-induced up-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) in response to IL-10. This inhibition was suppressed by silencing IL-10R1 and was mimicked by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) and carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2). In addition, IL-10 appeared to suppress monocyte recruitment through reduction of NTHi-induced RSL-derived chemoattractants. Silencing of HMOX1 was found to attenuate the inhibitory effect of IL-10 on NTHi-induced MCP-1/CCL2 up-regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that IL-10 inhibits NTHi-induced binding of p65 NF-κB to the distal motif in the promoter region of MCP-1/CCL2, resulting in suppression of NTHi-induced NF-κB activation. Furthermore, IL-10 deficiency appeared to significantly affect cochlear inflammation induced by intratympanic injections of NTHi. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-10/HMOX1 signaling is involved in modulation of cochlear inflammation through inhibition of MCP-1/CCL2 regulation in SLFs, implying therapeutic potential of a carbon monoxide (CO)-based approach for inflammation-associated cochlear diseases. PMID:25780042

  16. Automatic segmentation of intra-cochlear anatomy in post-implantation CT of unilateral cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Reda, Fitsum A; McRackan, Theodore R; Labadie, Robert F; Dawant, Benoit M; Noble, Jack H

    2014-04-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a neural prosthetic device that restores hearing by directly stimulating the auditory nerve using an electrode array that is implanted in the cochlea. In CI surgery, the surgeon accesses the cochlea and makes an opening where he/she inserts the electrode array blind to internal structures of the cochlea. Because of this, the final position of the electrode array relative to intra-cochlear anatomy is generally unknown. We have recently developed an approach for determining electrode array position relative to intra-cochlear anatomy using a pre- and a post-implantation CT. The approach is to segment the intra-cochlear anatomy in the pre-implantation CT, localize the electrodes in the post-implantation CT, and register the two CTs to determine relative electrode array position information. Currently, we are using this approach to develop a CI programming technique that uses patient-specific spatial information to create patient-customized sound processing strategies. However, this technique cannot be used for many CI users because it requires a pre-implantation CT that is not always acquired prior to implantation. In this study, we propose a method for automatic segmentation of intra-cochlear anatomy in post-implantation CT of unilateral recipients, thus eliminating the need for pre-implantation CTs in this population. The method is to segment the intra-cochlear anatomy in the implanted ear using information extracted from the normal contralateral ear and to exploit the intra-subject symmetry in cochlear anatomy across ears. To validate our method, we performed experiments on 30 ears for which both a pre- and a post-implantation CT are available. The mean and the maximum segmentation errors are 0.224 and 0.734mm, respectively. These results indicate that our automatic segmentation method is accurate enough for developing patient-customized CI sound processing strategies for unilateral CI recipients using a post-implantation CT alone. PMID

  17. Cochlear Injury and Adaptive Plasticity of the Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fetoni, Anna Rita; Troiani, Diana; Petrosini, Laura; Paludetti, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that cochlear stressors as noise exposure and aging can induce homeostatic/maladaptive changes in the central auditory system from the brainstem to the cortex. Studies centered on such changes have revealed several mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult (noise trauma, drug-, or age-related injury). The oxidative stress is central to current theories of induced sensory-neural hearing loss and aging, and interventions to attenuate the hearing loss are based on antioxidant agent. The present review addresses the recent literature on the alterations in hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons due to noise-induced oxidative stress in the cochlea, as well on the impact of cochlear damage on the auditory cortex neurons. The emerging image emphasizes that noise-induced deafferentation and upward spread of cochlear damage is associated with the altered dendritic architecture of auditory pyramidal neurons. The cortical modifications may be reversed by treatment with antioxidants counteracting the cochlear redox imbalance. These findings open new therapeutic approaches to treat the functional consequences of the cortical reorganization following cochlear damage. PMID:25698966

  18. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis. PMID:25962718

  19. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  20. Maximizing cochlear implant patients' performance with advanced speech training procedures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J

    2008-08-01

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years' experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted auditory training can significantly improve cochlear implant patients' speech recognition performance. Such benefits are not only observed in poorly performing patients, but also in good performers under difficult listening conditions (e.g., speech noise, telephone speech, music, etc.). Targeted auditory training has also been shown to enhance performance gains provided by new implant devices and/or speech processing strategies. These studies suggest that cochlear implantation alone may not fully meet the needs of many patients, and that additional auditory rehabilitation may be needed to maximize the benefits of the implant device. Continuing research will aid in the development of efficient and effective training protocols and materials, thereby minimizing the costs (in terms of time, effort and resources) associated with auditory rehabilitation while maximizing the benefits of cochlear implantation for all recipients. PMID:18295992

  1. Single and Multiple Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R.

    2012-01-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow. PMID:22923425

  2. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal hearing. Adult listeners with normal hearing judged the intelligibility of the words in the BIT sentences, identified the PUP sentences as one of four grammatical or emotional moods (i.e., declarative, interrogative, happy, or sad), and rated the PUP sentences according to how well they thought the child conveyed the designated mood. Results Percent correct scores were higher for intelligibility than for prosody and higher for children with normal hearing than for children with cochlear implants. Declarative sentences were most readily identified and received the highest ratings by adult listeners; interrogative sentences were least readily identified and received the lowest ratings. Correlations between intelligibility and all mood identification and rating scores except declarative were not significant. Discussion The findings suggest that the development of speech intelligibility progresses ahead of prosody in both children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing; however, children with normal hearing still perform better than children with cochlear implants on measures of intelligibility and prosody even after accounting for hearing age. Problems with interrogative intonation may be related to more general restrictions on rising intonation, and the correlation results indicate that intelligibility and sentence intonation may be relatively dissociated at these ages. PMID:22717120

  3. Surgical findings and auditory performance after cochlear implant revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Huarte, R; Huarte, A; Manrique, M J

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review cochlear reimplantation outcomes in the tertiary hospital and analyze whether facts such as type of failure, surgical findings, or etiology of deafness have an influence. A retrospective study including 38 patients who underwent cochlear implant revision surgery in a tertiary center is performed. Auditory outcomes (pure tone audiometry, % disyllabic words) along with etiology of deafness, type of complication, issues with insertion, and cochlear findings are included. Complication rate is 2.7 %. Technical failure rate is 57.9 % (50 % hard failure and 50 % soft failure), and medical failure (device infection or extrusion, migration, wound, or flap complication) is seen in 42.1 % of the cases. Management of cochlear implant complications and revision surgery is increasing due to a growing number of implantees. Cases that require explantation and reimplantation of the cochlear implant are safe procedures, where the depth of insertion and speech perception results are equal or higher in most cases. Nevertheless, there must be an increasing effort on using minimally traumatic electrode arrays and surgical techniques to improve currently obtained results. PMID:25814389

  4. Endoscopic Transcanal Retrocochlear Approach to the Internal Auditory Canal with Cochlear Preservation: Pilot Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Kempfle, Judith; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Eckhard, Andreas; Edge, Albert; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-05-01

    Contemporary operative approaches to the internal auditory canal (IAC) require the creation of large surgical portals for visualization with associated morbidity, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, facial nerve injury, and skull base defects that increase the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Transcanal approaches to the IAC have been possible only via a transcochlear technique. To preserve cochlear function, we describe a novel endoscopic transcanal infracochlear approach to the IAC in cadaveric temporal bones. Navigation fiducials were secured on fresh cadaveric heads, and real-time computed tomography imaging was used for surgical guidance. With a combination of curved instruments and rigid angled endoscopy, a transcanal hypotympanotomy and subcochlear tunnel were created with superior extension to access the IAC. Postprocedure imaging and temporal bone dissection confirmed access to the IAC without injury to the cochlea or neighboring neurovascular structures. PMID:26932951

  5. Endoscopic Transcanal Retrocochlear Approach to the Internal Auditory Canal with Cochlear Preservation: Pilot Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Eckhard, Andreas; Edge, Albert; Lee, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary operative approaches to the internal auditory canal (IAC) require the creation of large surgical portals for visualization with associated morbidity, including hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, facial nerve injury, and skull base defects that increase the risk of cerebrospinal fluid leak. Transcanal approaches to the IAC have been possible only via a transcochlear technique. To preserve cochlear function, we describe a novel endoscopic transcanal infracochlear approach to the IAC in cadaveric temporal bones. Navigation fiducials were secured on fresh cadaveric heads, and real-time computed tomography imaging was used for surgical guidance. With a combination of curved instruments and rigid angled endoscopy, a transcanal hypotympanotomy and subcochlear tunnel were created with superior extension to access the IAC. Postprocedure imaging and temporal bone dissection confirmed access to the IAC without injury to the cochlea or neighboring neurovascular structures. PMID:26932951

  6. Cochlear implantation and management of chronic suppurative otitis media: single stage procedure?

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, S; Shanks, M; Sivaji, N; Allen, Agnes A

    2005-10-01

    In a series of 360 patients who underwent cochlear implantation at our center, four patients (five procedures) had cochlear implantation with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and management of cholesteatoma as a single-staged procedure. Three patients were bilaterally deaf secondary to CSOM and had bilateral mastoid cavities, and in one patient congenital cholesteatoma was identified during cochlear implantation. A mastoidectomy or revision mastoidectomy with obliteration of the mastoid cavity and cochlear implantation was performed as a single stage procedure. Cholesteatoma reoccurred in one patient 9 years after cochlear implantation. Surgical procedures, complications, follow-up and outcomes are discussed. PMID:15756568

  7. Preoperative differences of cerebral metabolism relate to the outcome of cochlear implants in congenitally deaf children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Eunjoo; Oh, Seung-Ha; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong-Sun

    2005-05-01

    In congenitally deaf children, chronological age is generally accepted as a critical factor that affects successful rehabilitation following cochlear implantation (CI). However, a wide variance among patients is known to exist regardless of the age at CI [Sarant, J.Z., Blamey, P.J., Dowell, R.C., Clark, G.M., Gibson, W.P., 2001. Variation in speech perception scores among children with cochlear implants. Ear Hear. 22, 18-28]. In a previous study, we reported that prelingually deaf children in the age range 5-7 years at implantation showed greatest outcome variability [Oh S.H., Kim C.S., Kang E.J., Lee D.S., Lee H.J., Chang S.O., Ahn S.H., Hwang C.H., Park H.J., Koo J.W., 2003. Speech perception after cochlear implantation over a 4-year time period. Acta Otolaryngol. 123, 148-153]. Eleven children who underwent CI between the age of 5 and 7 1/2 years were subdivided into a good (above 65%: GOOD) and a poor (below 45%: POOR) group based on the performance in a speech perception test given 2 years after CI. The preoperative (18)F-FDG-PET (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) images were compared between the two groups in order to examine if regional glucose metabolic difference preexisted before the CI surgery. In the GOOD group, metabolic activity was greater in diverse fronto-parietal regions compared to the POOR group. In the POOR group, the regions related to the ventral visual pathway showed greater metabolic activity relative to the GOOD group. These findings suggest that the deaf children who had developed greater executive and visuospatial functions subserved by the prefrontal and parietal cortices might be successful in auditory language learning after CI. On the contrary, greater dependency on the visual function subserved by the occipito-temporal region due to auditory deprivation may interfere with acquisition of auditory language after CI. PMID:15855024

  8. Development and Characterization of Piezoelectric Artificial Cochlear with micro Actuator mimicking Human Cochlear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y.; Kim, S.; Kwak, J.; Kang, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Park, S.; Kim, W.; Hur, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the development of piezoelectric artificial cochlear (P-AC) capable of analyzing incoming acoustic or mechanical signals without external power source. The P-AC consists of membrane part and package part. The package part provides liquid environment through which the incoming signal is transmitted to membrane part. The membrane part responds to the transmitted signal and local area of the membrane part vibrates differently depending on its local resonant frequency. Previously in our group, we have demonstrated the feasibility of the P-AC with trapezoidal membrane part as sound analyzer by using mouth simulator as a sound input. In this research, we modified the P-AC to have the membrane part of logarithmically varying width. Also by incorporating mico-actuator into the package part that mimic the function of stapes bone in middle ear, we created similar environment to cochlear where human basilar membrane vibrates. The fabricated P-AC successfully demonstrates frequency separation of incoming mechanical signal from micro-actuator into several frequency bands within human hearing range.

  9. Finite element cochlear models and their steady state response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Y.; Yamabuchi, T.; Watanabe, N.; Mizoguchi, T.

    1987-12-01

    Numerical cochlear models are constructed by means of a finite element approach and their frequency and spatial responses are calculated. The cochlea is modelled as a coupled fluid-membrane system, for which both two- and three-dimensional models are considered. The fluid in the scala canals is assumed to be incompressible and the basilar membrane is assumed to be a locally reactive impedance wall or a lossy elastic membrane. With the three-dimensional models, the effects are examined of the spiral configuration of the cochlea, of the presence of the lamina and the ligament that narrows the coupling area between the two fluid canals (scala vestibuli and scala tympani), and of the extended reaction of the basilar membrane which cannot be included in case of the two-dimensional models. The conclusion is that these effects on the cochlear response and the inherent mechanism governing the cochlear behaviour are found to be rather secondary.

  10. Imaging cochlear soft tissue displacement with coherent x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Christoph; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    At present, imaging of cochlear mechanics at mid-cochlear turns has not been accomplished. Although challenging, this appears possible with partially coherent hard x-rays. The present study shows results from stroboscopic x-ray imaging of a test object at audio frequencies. The vibration amplitudes were quantified. In a different set of experiments, an intact and calcified gerbil temporal bone was used to determine displacements of the reticular lamina, tectorial membrane, and Reissner’s membrane with the Lucas and Kanade video flow algorithm. The experiments validated high frequency x-ray imaging and imaging in a calcified cochlea. The present work is key for future imaging of cochlear micromechanics at a high spatial resolution.

  11. Pre-, Intra- and Post-Operative Imaging of Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Vogl, T J; Tawfik, A; Emam, A; Naguib, N N N; Nour-Eldin, A; Burck, I; Stöver, T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants. PMID:26327670

  12. Estimation of risks associated with paediatric cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J Cyne; Smith, Andrée Durieux; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Annette; Angus, Douglas; Benzies, Karen; Schramm, David

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the rates of complications associated with paediatric cochlear implantation use: a) at one Canadian cochlear implant (CI) centre, and b) in the published literature. It comprised a retrospective hospital-based chart review and a concurrent review of complications in the published literature. There were 224 children who had undergone surgery from 1994 to June 2007. Results indicate that the rates of complications at the local Canadian paediatric CI centre are not significantly different from the literature rates for all examined complication types. This hospital-based retrospective chart review and review of the literature provide readers with an estimation of the risks to aid in evidence-based decision-making surrounding paediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:19655302

  13. Cochlear Implantation in a Patient with Kabuki Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vesseur, Annemarie; Cillessen, Eva; Mylanus, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Criteria for cochlear implants are expanding and now include children with disabilities in addition to hearing loss, such as those with Kabuki syndrome (KS). This case report describes language outcomes and changes in the quality of life of a female child with KS after cochlear implantation. The subject had a profound progressive sensorineural hearing loss, cognitive impairments, and other disabilities and communicated using vocalized sounds and the Dutch Sign Language. After cochlear implantation at an age of nine years and three months, the patient displayed no progress in speech production and minimal progress in receptive language development, but she had an increased awareness of the world and an increase in the quality of life. PMID:27341000

  14. The Spiral Staircase: Tonotopic Microstructure and Cochlear Tuning

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although usually assumed to be smooth and continuous, mammalian cochlear frequency-position maps are predicted to manifest a staircase-like structure comprising plateaus of nearly constant characteristic frequency separated by abrupt discontinuities. The height and width of the stair steps are determined by parameters of cochlear frequency tuning and vary with location in the cochlea. The step height is approximately equal to the bandwidth of the auditory filter (critical band), and the step width matches that of the spatial excitation pattern produced by a low-level pure tone. Stepwise tonotopy is an emergent property arising from wave reflection and interference within the cochlea, the same mechanisms responsible for the microstructure of the hearing threshold. Possible relationships between the microstructure of the cochlear map and the tiered tonotopy observed in the inferior colliculus are explored. PMID:25788685

  15. [How does a cochlear implant speech processor work?].

    PubMed

    Adunka, O; Kiefer, J

    2005-11-01

    Cochlear implants have become a standard treatment modality for sensorineural hearing loss. In this review article, assembly and function of a cochlear implant are described. Cochlear implants replace the normal inner ear by transforming acoustic sound signals into electric stimuli and deliver these to the auditory nerve. Speech processors translate the acoustic signal of the microphone into one that fits electrostimulation of the auditory system. In multiple steps, the signal has to be analyzed and processed to fit the demands of electrical stimulation. The speech processor then sends commands and the energy for stimulation to the implanted parts via a transcutaneous high frequency radio link. The implant refers the information as electrical stimuli to each electrode contact. PMID:16358193

  16. Multichannel cochlear implants in partially ossified cochleas.

    PubMed

    Balkany, T; Gantz, B; Nadol, J B

    1988-01-01

    Deposition of bone within the fluid spaces of the cochlea is encountered commonly in cochlear implant candidates and previously has been considered a relative contraindication to the use of multichannel intracochlear electrodes. This contraindication has been based on possible mechanical difficulty with electrode insertion as well as uncertainty about the potential benefit of the multichannel device in the patient. Fifteen profoundly deaf patients with partial ossification of the basal turn of the cochlea received implants with long intracochlear electrodes (11, Nucleus; 1, University of California at San Francisco/Storz; and 3, Symbion/Inneraid). In 11 cases, ossification had been predicted preoperatively by computed tomographic scan. Electrodes were completely inserted in 14 patients, and partial insertion was accomplished in one patient. All patients currently are using their devices and nine of 12 postlingually deaf patients have achieved some degree of open-set speech discrimination. This series demonstrates that in experienced hands, insertion of long multichannel electrodes into partially ossified cochleas is possible and that results are similar to those achieved in patients who have nonossified cochleas. PMID:3140705

  17. Design for a simplified cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    An, Soon Kwan; Park, Se-Ik; Jun, Sang Beom; Lee, Choong Jae; Byun, Kyung Min; Sung, Jung Hyun; Wilson, Blake S; Rebscher, Stephen J; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Sung June

    2007-06-01

    A simplified cochlear implant (CI) system would be appropriate for widespread use in developing countries. Here, we describe a CI that we have designed to realize such a concept. The system implements 8 channels of processing and stimulation using the continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy. A generic digital signal processing (DSP) chip is used for the processing, and the filtering functions are performed with a fast Fourier transform (FFT) of a microphone or other input. Data derived from the processing are transmitted through an inductive link using pulse width modulation (PWM) encoding and amplitude shift keying (ASK) modulation. The same link is used in the reverse direction for backward telemetry of electrode and system information. A custom receiver-stimulator chip has been developed that demodulates incoming data using pulse counting and produces charge balanced biphasic pulses at 1000 pulses/s/electrode. This chip is encased in a titanium package that is hermetically sealed using a simple but effective method. A low cost metal-silicon hybrid mold has been developed for fabricating an intracochlear electrode array with 16 ball-shaped stimulating contacts. PMID:17554817

  18. Temporal feature perception in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Timm, Lydia; Agrawal, Deepashri; C Viola, Filipa; Sandmann, Pascale; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    For the perception of timbre of a musical instrument, the attack time is known to hold crucial information. The first 50 to 150 ms of sound onset reflect the excitation mechanism, which generates the sound. Since auditory processing and music perception in particular are known to be hampered in cochlear implant (CI) users, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) study with an oddball paradigm to evaluate the processing of small differences in musical sound onset. The first 60 ms of a cornet sound were manipulated in order to examine whether these differences are detected by CI users and normal-hearing controls (NH controls), as revealed by auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). Our analysis focused on the N1 as an exogenous component known to reflect physical stimuli properties as well as on the P2 and the Mismatch Negativity (MMN). Our results revealed different N1 latencies as well as P2 amplitudes and latencies for the onset manipulations in both groups. An MMN could be elicited only in the NH control group. Together with additional findings that suggest an impact of musical training on CI users' AEPs, our findings support the view that impaired timbre perception in CI users is at partly due to altered sound onset feature detection. PMID:23028971

  19. Temporal Feature Perception in Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Lydia; Agrawal, Deepashri; C. Viola, Filipa; Sandmann, Pascale; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    For the perception of timbre of a musical instrument, the attack time is known to hold crucial information. The first 50 to 150 ms of sound onset reflect the excitation mechanism, which generates the sound. Since auditory processing and music perception in particular are known to be hampered in cochlear implant (CI) users, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) study with an oddball paradigm to evaluate the processing of small differences in musical sound onset. The first 60 ms of a cornet sound were manipulated in order to examine whether these differences are detected by CI users and normal-hearing controls (NH controls), as revealed by auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). Our analysis focused on the N1 as an exogenous component known to reflect physical stimuli properties as well as on the P2 and the Mismatch Negativity (MMN). Our results revealed different N1 latencies as well as P2 amplitudes and latencies for the onset manipulations in both groups. An MMN could be elicited only in the NH control group. Together with additional findings that suggest an impact of musical training on CI users’ AEPs, our findings support the view that impaired timbre perception in CI users is at partly due to altered sound onset feature detection. PMID:23028971

  20. Development of Cochlear Mechanics in the Gerbil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, E. H., III; Temchin, A. N.; Ruggero, M. A.

    2003-02-01

    Using a laser velocimeter, basilar-membrane vibrations were measured in adult and neonatal gerbils at a site with characteristic frequency of 34-37 kHz located 1.2 mm from the round window of the cochlea. Stapes vibrations and compound action potential thresholds were also measured up to frequencies exceeding the site's characteristic frequency. In adult gerbils, basilar-membrane responses at this site exhibited a compressive nonlinearity. Post-mortem, basilar-membrane responses in adults became "passive", i.e., linear and insensitive, and the best frequency shifted downward by about 0.5 octave. At 14 and 16 days after birth, basilar-membrane responses in neonatal gerbils were passive but otherwise very different from post-mortem responses in adult gerbils: best frequency was more than an octave lower, the steep slopes of the phase-vs.-frequency curves were shifted downward in frequency by nearly one octave, and the maximum phase lags amounted to only 180 degrees re. stapes. Best frequencies and phase lags increased systematically between 14 and 20 days after birth, implying drastic alterations of the passive material properties of cochlear tissues and accounting for a large part of the shift in best frequency that characterizes maturation of auditory-nerve responses during the same period.

  1. Environmental Sound Training in Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Sheft, Stanley; Kuvadia, Sejal; Gygi, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The study investigated the effect of a short computer-based environmental sound training regimen on the perception of environmental sounds and speech in experienced cochlear implant (CI) patients. Method Fourteen CI patients with the average of 5 years of CI experience participated. The protocol consisted of 2 pretests, 1 week apart, followed by 4 environmental sound training sessions conducted on separate days in 1 week, and concluded with 2 posttest sessions, separated by another week without training. Each testing session included an environmental sound test, which consisted of 40 familiar everyday sounds, each represented by 4 different tokens, as well as the Consonant Nucleus Consonant (CNC) word test, and Revised Speech Perception in Noise (SPIN-R) sentence test. Results Environmental sounds scores were lower than for either of the speech tests. Following training, there was a significant average improvement of 15.8 points in environmental sound perception, which persisted 1 week later after training was discontinued. No significant improvements were observed for either speech test. Conclusions The findings demonstrate that environmental sound perception, which remains problematic even for experienced CI patients, can be improved with a home-based computer training regimen. Such computer-based training may thus provide an effective low-cost approach to rehabilitation for CI users, and potentially, other hearing impaired populations. PMID:25633579

  2. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  3. Auditory Cortex Basal Activity Modulates Cochlear Responses in Chinchillas

    PubMed Central

    León, Alex; Elgueda, Diego; Silva, María A.; Hamamé, Carlos M.; Delano, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The auditory efferent system has unique neuroanatomical pathways that connect the cerebral cortex with sensory receptor cells. Pyramidal neurons located in layers V and VI of the primary auditory cortex constitute descending projections to the thalamus, inferior colliculus, and even directly to the superior olivary complex and to the cochlear nucleus. Efferent pathways are connected to the cochlear receptor by the olivocochlear system, which innervates outer hair cells and auditory nerve fibers. The functional role of the cortico-olivocochlear efferent system remains debated. We hypothesized that auditory cortex basal activity modulates cochlear and auditory-nerve afferent responses through the efferent system. Methodology/Principal Findings Cochlear microphonics (CM), auditory-nerve compound action potentials (CAP) and auditory cortex evoked potentials (ACEP) were recorded in twenty anesthetized chinchillas, before, during and after auditory cortex deactivation by two methods: lidocaine microinjections or cortical cooling with cryoloops. Auditory cortex deactivation induced a transient reduction in ACEP amplitudes in fifteen animals (deactivation experiments) and a permanent reduction in five chinchillas (lesion experiments). We found significant changes in the amplitude of CM in both types of experiments, being the most common effect a CM decrease found in fifteen animals. Concomitantly to CM amplitude changes, we found CAP increases in seven chinchillas and CAP reductions in thirteen animals. Although ACEP amplitudes were completely recovered after ninety minutes in deactivation experiments, only partial recovery was observed in the magnitudes of cochlear responses. Conclusions/Significance These results show that blocking ongoing auditory cortex activity modulates CM and CAP responses, demonstrating that cortico-olivocochlear circuits regulate auditory nerve and cochlear responses through a basal efferent tone. The diversity of the obtained effects

  4. A case report: the first successful cochlear implant in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Byaruhanga, Richard; Roland, J Thomas; Buname, Gustav; Kakande, Emily; Awubwa, Michael; Ndorelire, Chris; Namwagala, Justine

    2015-12-01

    Hearing impairment is a significant disability. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 80% of the world's approximately 120 million people with hearing impairment live in developing countries. Cochlear implant is the only therapeutic intervention for those with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss. We are reporting an interesting case of the very first cochlear implant operation carried out in Uganda. The patient was a 23 year old male whose presenting complaint was inability to hear in the left ear for three and a half years and in the right ear for one year. He had been treated for TB(Tuberculosis) mastoiditis. After the 8 months of treatment, the otorrhea persisted and he underwent a tympanomastoidectomy on the same ear. He reported no familial history of hearing loss. On examination, ENT examination revealed a small pars flaccida retration pocket of the right tympanic membrane with cholesteatoma. The left ear had an intact tympanic membrane. Pure tone audiometry revealed profound sensorineural hearing loss in both ears (see attached PTA results), CT scan of the temporal bone showed normal inner ear anatomy bilaterally and mild sclerotic changes in both mastoid bones. He then had surgery on his right ear which included cochlear implantation. The cochlear implant (CI) was activated on the first postoperative day remotely via internet with the help of the cochlear implant team at New York University Cochlear Implant Center and the patient was immediately able to appreciate some sounds. He received a pneumococcal vaccine on the first postoperative day and was discharged the following day. PMID:26958040

  5. Noise alters hair-bundle mechanics at the cochlear apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strimbu, C. Elliott; Fridberger, Anders

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to loud sounds can lead to both permanent and short term changes in auditory sensitivity. Permanent hearing loss is often associated with gross changes in cochlear morphology including the loss of hair cells and auditory nerve fibers while the mechanisms of short term threshold shifts are much less well understood and may vary at different locations across the cochlea. Previous reports suggest that exposure to loud sounds leads to a decrease in the cochlear microphonic potential and in the stiffness of the organ of Corti. Because the cochlear microphonic reflects changes in the membrane potential of the hair cells, this suggests that hair-bundle motion should be reversibly altered following exposure to loud sounds. Using an in vitro preparation of the guinea pig temporal bone we investigate changes in the micro-mechanical response near the cochlear apex following a brief (up to 10 - 20 minutes) exposure to loud (˜ 120 dB) tones near the best frequency at this location. We use time-resolved confocal imaging to record the motion of outer hair cell bundles before and after acoustic overstimulation. We have also recorded larger-scale structural views of the organ of Corti before and after exposure to the loud sound. Conventional electrophysiological techniques are used measure the cochlear microphonic potential. As has been previously reported, following acoustic overexposure the cochlear microphonic declines in value and typically recovers on the order of 30 - 60 minutes. Hair-bundle trajectories are affected following the loud sound and typically recover on a somewhat faster time scale than the microphonic potential, although the results vary considerably across preparations. Preliminary results also suggest reversible changes in the hair cell's resting potential following the loud sound.

  6. The cochlear implant. A technology for the profoundly deaf.

    PubMed

    Lea, A R; Hailey, D M

    1995-01-01

    The cochlear implant is a device that enables the profoundly deaf to hear. This article considers the nature of the technology, the need for rehabilitation programs for those who are implanted and the evidence of benefits from this approach. A preliminary economic assessment suggests that costs per QALY for this technology would be of the order of $ 14,000 for children and $ 22,000 for adults. Cochlear implantation appears to be superior to vibrotactile devices, and is an effective technology for appropriately selected persons. PMID:7791692

  7. Cochlear implantation after resection of an intralabyrinthine schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Christopher A; Kveton, John F

    2014-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare tumors of the distal ends of the cochlear and vestibular nerve. Their presence can be debilitating secondary to symptoms of hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, and imbalance. Currently, treatment to restore hearing in those who have become profoundly deaf is not attempted. Additionally, resection in patients with functioning hearing is rare, as the surgery assures deafness. We report the first case demonstrating the feasibility of resection of an intralabyrinthine schwannoma with immediate cochlear implantation. This technique addresses the patients hearing status by taking into account advancing technology, allowing for an improved quality of life. PMID:24321750

  8. Success of children with cochlear implants in mainstream educational settings.

    PubMed

    Nevins, M E; Chute, P M

    1995-09-01

    The availability of cochlear implant technology has made mainstreaming a more reachable social and academic goal for profoundly deaf children. Traditionally, the profoundly deaf child has required more self-contained education. It has been the hard-of-hearing child who reached the mainstream education classroom during the elementary years. Cochlear implant recipients, implanted early and receiving appropriate educational services that maximize learning across all domains, have shown a significant trend toward moving from a more self-contained to a less restrictive educational environment. Children with implants are making these transitions earlier than the larger majority of profoundly deaf children using traditional amplification. PMID:7668592

  9. Chinese tonal language rehabilitation following cochlear implantation in children.

    PubMed

    Wei, W I; Wong, R; Hui, Y; Au, D K; Wong, B Y; Ho, W K; Tsang, A; Kung, P; Chung, E

    2000-03-01

    Cantonese language rehabilitation in 28 prelingually deaf children who underwent cochlear implantation was evaluated. All patients were implanted with multichannel devices and the operations went smoothly. They all had improved scores on audiological assessments and speech perception tests. The speech evaluation tests included the recognition of sounds, vowels, consonants and tone. Sentence recognition and story comprehension were both improved after training for 2 years. Cochlear implantation is a useful measure for the speech rehabilitation of prelingually profound deaf children when hearing aids are of no benefit. The multichannel implant device is of clinical significance in the rehabilitation of those patients using tonal language. PMID:11603776

  10. [Experiences in Kiel with the cochlear implant].

    PubMed

    Müller-Deile, J; Schmidt, B J; Rudert, H

    1994-06-01

    Since 1988 22 deaf patients were provided with a 22-channel cochlear implant at the Kiel University Hospital. No surgical or postoperative complications were seen in any of the patients. Side effects like facial stimulation and pain sensation during electrode activation do not reduce the utility. Tinnitus may initially be severe but usually subsides to preop levels after a few days. A tinnitus masking effect is pronounced during stimulation but hardly lasts long after switch off. Besides an individually arranged hearing training the accurate speech processor fitting to the needs of the patient remains the cornerstone of successful rehabilitation. Objective intraoperative measurements such as the electrically evoked brain stem potentials and the middle ear reflexes yield estimates of the threshold values relevant for initial processor programming. Further information needed for the following extensive fine adjustment is obtained by subjective evaluation of loudness growth during electrical stimulation with variable parameters, by loudness scaling of narrow band noises with different middle frequencies and intensities presented under free field conditions and by speech audiometric procedures. The latter include a monosyllabic rhyme test and a logatom test developed at this institution. More speech testing is applied to document the degree of auditive rehabilitation. The results of speech tracking and the Freiburg tests as well as a new sentence test in silence and noise are discussed. In the multisyllable Freiburg test all but two of the adults understand the complete presented material, in the open set monosyllable test an average of 55% correct is achieved. Speech discrimination-oriented ranking showed 95% of all postlingually deaf patients in the highest performance category. PMID:8060448

  11. Assessment of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator.

    PubMed

    Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the functional results of a new, active, acoustic-mechanical hearing implant, the Direct Acoustic Cochlear Stimulation Partial Implant (DACS PI), in a preclinical study. The DACS PI is an electromagnetic device fixed to the mastoid by screws and coupled to a standard stapes prosthesis by an artificial incus (AI). The function of the DACS PI-aided reconstruction was assessed by determining: (1) the maximum equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) of the implant, which was obtained from measurements of the volume displacement at the round window in normal and implanted ears, and (2) the quality at the coupling interface between the AI of the DACS and the stapes prosthesis, which was quantified from measurements of relative motions between the AI and the prosthesis. Both measurements were performed with fresh temporal bones using a scanning laser Doppler interferometry system. The expected maximum equivalent SPL with a typical driving voltage of 0.3 V was about 115-125 dB SPL up to 1.5 kHz in reconstruction with the DACS PI, and decreased with a roll-off slope of about 65 dB/decade, reaching 90 dB SPL at 8 kHz. The large roll-off relative to a normal ear was presumed to be a relatively high inductive impedance of the coil of the DACS PI actuator at higher frequencies. Good coupling quality between the AI and the prosthesis was achieved below the resonance (∼1.5 kHz) of the DACS PI for all tested stapes prostheses. Above the resonance, the SMart Piston, which is composed of a shape-memory alloy, had the best coupling quality. PMID:22739432

  12. The Role of Visual Speech Information in Supporting Perceptual Learning of Degraded Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne, Rachel V.; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.

    2012-01-01

    Following cochlear implantation, hearing-impaired listeners must adapt to speech as heard through their prosthesis. Visual speech information (VSI; the lip and facial movements of speech) is typically available in everyday conversation. Here, we investigate whether learning to understand a popular auditory simulation of speech as transduced by a…

  13. Auditory rehabilitation of patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 by using cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Roehm, Pamela C.; St. Clair, Jon Mallen; Jethanamest, Daniel; Golfinos, John G.; Shapiro, William; Waltzman, Susan; Roland, J. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Object The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) who have intact ipsilateral cochlear nerves can have open-set speech discrimination following cochlear implantation. Methods Records of 7 patients with documented NF2 were reviewed to determine speech discrimination outcomes following cochlear implantation. Outcomes were measured using consonant-nucleus-consonant words and phonemes; Hearing in Noise Test sentences in quiet; and City University of New York sentences in quiet and in noise. Results Preoperatively, none of the patients had open-set speech discrimination. Five of the 7 patients had previously undergone excision of ipsilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS). One of the patients who received a cochlear implant had received radiation therapy for ipsilateral VS, and another was undergoing observation for a small ipsilateral VS. Following cochlear implantation, 4 of 7 patients with NF2 had open-set speech discrimination following cochlear implantation during extended follow-up (15–120 months). Two of the 3 patients without open-set speech understanding had a prolonged period between ipsilateral VS resection and cochlear implantation (120 and 132 months), and had cochlear ossification at the time of implantation. The other patient without open-set speech understanding had good contralateral hearing at the time of cochlear implantation. Despite these findings, 6 of the 7 patients were daily users of their cochlear implants, and the seventh is an occasional user, indicating that all of the patients subjectively gained some benefit from their implants. Conclusions Cochlear implantation can provide long-term auditory rehabilitation, with open-set speech discrimination for patients with NF2 who have intact ipsilateral cochlear nerves. Factors that can affect implant performance include the following: 1) a prolonged time between VS resection and implantation; and 2) cochlear ossification. PMID:21761973

  14. Speech perception skills of deaf infants following cochlear implantation: a first report

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Derek M.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Ying, Elizabeth A.; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective We adapted a behavioral procedure that has been used extensively with normal-hearing (NH) infants, the visual habituation (VH) procedure, to assess deaf infants’ discrimination and attention to speech. Methods Twenty-four NH 6-month-olds, 24 NH 9-month-olds, and 16 deaf infants at various ages before and following cochlear implantation (CI) were tested in a sound booth on their caregiver’s lap in front of a TV monitor. During the habituation phase, each infant was presented with a repeating speech sound (e.g. ‘hop hop hop’) paired with a visual display of a checkerboard pattern on half of the trials (‘sound trials’) and only the visual display on the other half (‘silent trials’). When the infant’s looking time decreased and reached a habituation criterion, a test phase began. This consisted of two trials: an ‘old trial’ that was identical to the ‘sound trials’ and a ‘novel trial’ that consisted of a different repeating speech sound (e.g. ‘ahhh’) paired with the same checkerboard pattern. Results During the habituation phase, NH infants looked significantly longer during the sound trials than during the silent trials. However, deaf infants who had received cochlear implants (CIs) displayed a much weaker preference for the sound trials. On the other hand, both NH infants and deaf infants with CIs attended significantly longer to the visual display during the novel trial than during the old trial, suggesting that they were able to discriminate the speech patterns. Before receiving CIs, deaf infants did not show any preferences. Conclusions Taken together, the findings suggest that deaf infants who receive CIs are able to detect and discriminate some speech patterns. However, their overall attention to speech sounds may be less than NH infants’. Attention to speech may impact other aspects of speech perception and spoken language development, such as segmenting words from fluent speech and learning novel words

  15. Effects of Talker Variability on Vowel Recognition in Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yi-ping; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of talker variability on vowel recognition by cochlear implant (CI) users and by normal-hearing (NH) participants listening to 4-channel acoustic CI simulations. Method: CI users were tested with their clinically assigned speech processors. For NH participants, 3 CI processors were simulated, using different…

  16. Prosody and Voice Characteristics of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenden, Jessica M.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This descriptive, longitudinal study involved the analysis of the prosody and voice characteristics of conversational speech produced by six young children with severe to profound hearing impairments who had been fitted with cochlear implants. A total of 40 samples were analyzed using the Prosody-Voice Screening Profile (PVSP; Shriberg, L. D.,…

  17. Strategies for Working with Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn; Prause-Weber, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 23,000 individuals in the United States, including 10,000 children, have a cochlear implant. This biomedical electronic device has been a breakthrough in the auditory rehabilitation of individuals diagnosed with severe or profound sensorineural hearing losses who…

  18. Sensitive Periods and Language in Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno-Torres, Ignacio; Madrid-Canovas, Sonia; Blanco-Montanez, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that the existence of a short sensitive period for lower-level speech perception/articulation skills, and a long one for higher-level language skills, may partly explain the language outcomes of children with cochlear implants (CIs). The participants were fourteen children fitted with a CI before their second…

  19. Phoneme Recognition and Confusions with Multichannel Cochlear Implants: Vowels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valimaa, Taina T.; Maatta, Taisto K.; Lopponen, Heikki J.; Sorri, Martti J.

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated how 19 Finnish adults who were postlingually severely or profoundly hearing impaired would relearn to recognize vowels after receiving multi-channel cochlear implants. Average vowel recognition was 68% 6 months after switch-on, and 80% 24 months after switch-on. Vowels y, e, and o were most difficult. (Contains references.)…

  20. Phoneme Recognition and Confusions with Multichannel Cochlear Implants: Consonants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valimaa, Taina T.; Maatta, Taisto K.; Lopponen, Heikki J.; Sorri, Martti J.

    2002-01-01

    A study investigated how 19 Finnish adults who were postlingually severely or profoundly hearing impaired would relearn to recognize consonants after receiving multi-channel cochlear implants. Two years after the switch-on, the mean recognition for consonants was 71%. Consonants with alveolar, palatal, or velar transitions were better recognized.…

  1. Multichannel Cochlear Implantation and the Organization of Early Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Helen A.; Davis, Barbara L.; MacNeilage, Peter F.; von Hapsburg, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    A case study of a child who was stimulated with a cochlear implant at age 25 months is reported. Postimplantation, nasals decreased and other consonant types increased, particularly alveolars. The vowel space expanded, including increased production of diphthongs. Serial organization of speech postimplantation mirrored basic motor propensities in…

  2. Acoustic and Semantic Enhancements for Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiljanic, Rajka; Sladen, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined how signal clarity interacts with the use of sentence context information in determining speech-in-noise recognition for children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing. Method: One hundred and twenty sentences in which the final word varied in predictability (high vs. low semantic…

  3. Implants and Ethnocide: Learning from the Cochlear Implant Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This paper uses the fictional case of the "Babel fish" to explore and illustrate the issues involved in the controversy about the use of cochlear implants in prelinguistically deaf children. Analysis of this controversy suggests that the development of genetic tests for deafness poses a serious threat to the continued flourishing of Deaf culture.…

  4. Using Flanagan's phase vocoder to improve cochlear implant performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-10-01

    The cochlear implant has restored partial hearing to more than 100000 deaf people worldwide, allowing the average user to talk on the telephone in quiet environment. However, significant difficulty still remains for speech recognition in noise, music perception, and tonal language understanding. This difficulty may be related to speech processing strategies in current cochlear implants that emphasized the extraction and encoding of the temporal envelope while ignoring the temporal fine structure in speech sounds. A novel strategy was developed based on Flanagan's phase vocoder [Flanagan and Golden, Bell Syst. Tech. 45, 1493-1509 (1966)], in which frequency modulation was extracted from the temporal fine structure and then added to amplitude modulation in the current cochlear implants. Acoustic simulation results showed that amplitude and frequency modulation contributed complementarily to speech perception with amplitude modulation contributing mainly to intelligibility whereas frequency modulation contributed to speaker identification and auditory grouping. The results also showed that the novel strategy significantly improved cochlear implant performance under realistic listening situations. Overall, the present result demonstrated that Flanagan's classic work on phase vocoder still shed insight on current problems of both theoretical and practical importance. [Work supported by NIH.

  5. Counselling Challenges and Strategies for Cochlear Implant Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implant specialists daily observe patients and families grapple with a wide range of emotions. As nonprofessional counsellors, we can help patients address those emotions by providing more opportunities to talk about their thoughts and feelings. This paper will review some familiar counselling challenges, such as the disappointment that…

  6. Cochlear Implants in the Inclusive Classroom: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jachova, Zora; Kovacevic, Jasmina

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a child aged 12 years with a cochlear implant who is attending a mainstream educational setting in Skopje, FYR Macedonia. The study, which uses both qualitative and quantitative data, took place over a period of 12 months. It illustrates the importance of professional development and training of teachers and a…

  7. Profiles of Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, David J.; Young, Nancy M.; Nathani, Suneeti

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of cochlear implant experience on prelinguistic vocal development in young deaf children. Procedure: A prospective longitudinal research design was used to document the sequence and time course of vocal development in 7 children who were implanted between 10 and 36 months…

  8. Speech Perception in Noise by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Amanda; Nittrouer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Common wisdom suggests that listening in noise poses disproportionately greater difficulty for listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) than for peers with normal hearing (NH). The purpose of this study was to examine phonological, language, and cognitive skills that might help explain speech-in-noise abilities for children with CIs.…

  9. Spelling of Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heather; Kessler, Brett; Treiman, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The spellings of 39 profoundly deaf users of cochlear implants, aged 6 to 12 years, were compared with those of 39 hearing peers. When controlled for age and reading ability, the error rates of the 2 groups were not significantly different. Both groups evinced phonological spelling strategies, performing better on words with more typical…

  10. Growing up with a Cochlear Implant: Education, Vocation, and Affiliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Linda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term educational/vocational, affiliation, and quality-of-life outcomes of the first and second cohorts of children with bilateral, profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants under a large National Institutes of Health-funded study was investigated in 41 of 61 eligible participants. Educational and vocational outcomes were…

  11. Single Word and Sentence Intelligibility in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of speech produced by 17 children (aged 4-11 years) with cochlear implants. Stimulus items included sentences from the Beginners' Intelligibility Test (BIT) and words from the Children Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM). Naive listeners responded by writing sentences heard or with two types of responses…

  12. Bilateral Cochlear Implantation in Children: Experiences and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Andrea; Spitzlei, Vera; Lippert, Karl L.; Keilmann, Annerose

    2006-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2006, the University Clinic for Ear Nose and Throat and Communication Disorders in Mainz, Germany, performed 41 bilateral cochlear implantations in children. This article addresses some of the factors to be considered in a decision to bilaterally implant a child, including the age of the child at the first implant, the length of…

  13. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Mangado, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas; Kjer, Hans Martin; Vera, Sergio; Dejea Velardo, Hector; Mistrik, Pavel; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Fagertun, Jens; Noailly, Jérôme; Piella, Gemma; González Ballester, Miguel Ángel

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging. To address such a challenge, we propose an automatic framework for the generation of patient-specific meshes for finite element modeling of the implanted cochlea. First, a statistical shape model is constructed from high-resolution anatomical μCT images. Then, by fitting the statistical model to a patient's CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns constitutive parameters to all components of the finite element model. This model can then be used to study in silico the effects of the electrical stimulation of the cochlear implant. Results are shown on a total of 25 models of patients. In all cases, a final mesh suitable for finite element simulations was obtained, in an average time of 94 s. The framework has proven to be fast and robust, and is promising for a detailed prognosis of the cochlear implantation surgery. PMID:26715210

  14. Production Accuracy in a Young Cochlear Implant Recipient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Davis, Barbara L.; Morrison, Helen M.

    2005-01-01

    The availability of cochlear implants in younger children has provided the opportunity to evaluate the relative impact of the production system, or the sounds young children can say, and the auditory system, or the sounds children can hear, on early vocal communication. Limited access to the acoustic properties of speech results in differences in…

  15. Enduring Advantages of Early Cochlear Implantation for Spoken Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geers, Anne E.; Nicholas, Johanna G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors sought to determine whether the precise age of implantation (AOI) remains an important predictor of spoken language outcomes in later childhood for those who received a cochlear implant (CI) between 12 and 38 months of age. Relative advantages of receiving a bilateral CI after age 4.5 years, better…

  16. Identification and Multiplicity of Double Vowels in Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Bomjun J.; Perry, Trevor T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examined cochlear implant (CI) users' perception of vowels presented concurrently (i.e., "double vowels") to further our understanding of auditory grouping in electric hearing. Method: Identification of double vowels and single vowels was measured with 10 CI subjects. Fundamental frequencies (F0s) of…

  17. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Joanna; Stredler-Brown, Arlene; Greenway, Pat; Kahn, Gary

    2012-01-01

    What might bring the efforts of a physician, a speech-language pathologist, a teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing, and a nurse together? The answer is the innovative use of telepractice to deliver high quality, family-centered early intervention to infants and toddlers with hearing loss. TeleCITE: Telehealth--A Cochlear Implant Therapy…

  18. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than conventional hearing aids in prelingually deaf patients. Summary of the findings: The study was a systematic review of scientific papers selected by a search of the SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME databases. Among the 2169 articles found, 12 studies proved relevant to the issue and presented an evidence strength rating of B. No publications rated evidence strength A. Seven of the studies analyzed were prospective cohorts and 5 were cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Based on several studies, cochlear implants were demonstrated to be the best current alternative for bilateral severe or profound hearing loss, achieving better results in speech perception and development in prelingual children when compared to conventional hearing aids. PMID:25991962

  19. Motor Development of Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gheysen, Freja; Loots, Gerrit; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a cochlear implant (CI) on the motor development of deaf children. The study involved 36 mainstreamed deaf children (15 boys, 21 girls; 4- to 12-years old) without any developmental problems. Of these children, 20 had been implanted. Forty-three hearing children constituted a comparison…

  20. How the Cochlear Implant Helps Deaf Children Learn To Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moog, Jean S.; Gustus, Christine

    This conference presentation discusses how the Nucleus 22 cochlear implant, with its ability to improve speech perception, can be capitalized upon to improve the speech production of very profoundly deaf children. The paper is designed to accompany a video presentation demonstrating the speech ability and theory of two young children (ages 3 and…

  1. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  2. Models of Deafness: Cochlear Implants in the Australian Daily Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des

    2005-01-01

    This article examined a database of Australian daily newspapers on the terms cochlear implant and deaf children to investigate how journalists and columnists report competing models of deafness: as either "medical" (deafness is a condition to be cured) or "sociocultural" (deafness provides a way of life to be lived). The results from the cochlear…

  3. Temporal-Gap Detection by Cochlear Prosthesis Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, John P.; Tyler, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Three experiments were undertaken involving three users of multi-electrode cochlear prostheses. The experiments established a scale of stimulus loudness; measured minimum-detectable gaps for sinusoidal stimuli as functions of stimulus level, frequency, and electrode place within the cochlea; and assessed independence of the electrodes using a…

  4. Perioperative complications of cochlear implant surgery in children.

    PubMed

    Darlong, V; Khanna, Puneet; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Chandralekha; Pandey, Ravindra; Punj, Jyotsna; Kumar, Rakesh; Sikka, Kapil

    2015-02-01

    Cochlear implant is a commonly performed surgery for hearing loss in pre-school and school children. However, data on anesthesia management and anesthesia-related complications are sparse. We retrospectively reviewed the data of our institute from January, 2007 to December, 2012. Medical records and anesthesia charts of all the patients who had undergone cochlear implant under general anesthesia between this period were reviewed. Information related to the demographic profile, preoperative evaluation, anesthetic techniques, and perioperative complications were collected and analyzed. A total of 190 patients underwent cochlear implant surgery for pre-lingual (175) and post-lingual (15) deafness. General endotracheal anesthesia with inhalational agents was used in all the cases. Difficult intubation was encountered in three patients. Anesthesia-related complications were laryngospasm at extubation (4.73 %), emergence agitation (2.63 %), and postoperative nausea and vomiting (1.05 %). Major surgical complications were CSF leak without meningitis (3.15 %), device migration/failure (1.05 %), and flap infection (1.57 %). Cochlear implant under general anesthesia in small children is safe and anesthesia-related complications were minimal. Surgical complications, although more frequent, were predominantly minor and self-limiting. PMID:24986254

  5. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  6. Theory of Mind and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmel, Ethan; Peters, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Thirty children with cochlear implants (CI children), age range 3-12 years, and 30 children with normal hearing (NH children), age range 4-6 years, were tested on theory of mind and language measures. The CI children showed little to no delay on either theory of mind, relative to the NH children, or spoken language, relative to hearing norms. The…

  7. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  8. Production of Consonants by Prelinguistically Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve Gaul; Le Normand, Marie-Therese; Cohen, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Consonant production following the sensory restoration of audition was investigated in 22 prelinguistically deaf French children who received cochlear implants. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded at 6, 12, and 18 months post-surgery and consonant inventories were derived from both glossable and non-glossable phones using two acquisition…

  9. Outcomes from Cochlear Implantation for Child and Family: Parental Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbold, Sue; Sach, Tracey; O'Neill, Ciaran; Lutman, Mark; Gregory, Susan

    2008-01-01

    While cochlear implantation is an increasingly routine provision for profoundly deaf children in many countries, parents still require information about the procedure and likely outcomes in order to make an informed decision. Other parents can provide them with the insights of those who have undergone the process themselves and observed outcomes…

  10. Effects of Cochlear Implants on Children's Reading and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marschark, Marc; Rhoten, Cathy; Fabich, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a critical analysis of empirical studies assessing literacy and other domains of academic achievement among children with cochlear implants. A variety of recent studies have demonstrated benefits to hearing, language, and speech from implants, leading to assumptions that early implantation and longer periods of implant should…

  11. Relationship between multipulse integration and speech recognition with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2014-01-01

    Comparisons of performance with cochlear implants and postmortem conditions in the cochlea in humans have shown mixed results. The limitations in those studies favor the use of within-subject designs and non-invasive measures to estimate cochlear conditions. One non-invasive correlate of cochlear health is multipulse integration, established in an animal model. The present study used this measure to relate neural health in human cochlear implant users to their speech recognition performance. The multipulse-integration slopes were derived based on psychophysical detection thresholds measured for two pulse rates (80 and 640 pulses per second). A within-subject design was used in eight subjects with bilateral implants where the direction and magnitude of ear differences in the multipulse-integration slopes were compared with those of the speech-recognition results. The speech measures included speech reception threshold for sentences and phoneme recognition in noise. The magnitude of ear difference in the integration slopes was significantly correlated with the magnitude of ear difference in speech reception thresholds, consonant recognition in noise, and transmission of place of articulation of consonants. These results suggest that multipulse integration predicts speech recognition in noise and perception of features that use dynamic spectral cues. PMID:25190399

  12. Linguistic and Pragmatic Skills in Toddlers with Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Pasquale; Baruffaldi, Francesca; Burdo, Sandro; Caselli, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of deaf children received cochlear implants (CI) in the first years of life, but no study has focused on linguistic and pragmatic skills in children with CI younger than 3 years of age. Aims: To estimate the percentage of children who had received a CI before 2 years of age whose linguistic skills were within the…

  13. Musical Involvement and Enjoyment of Children Who Use Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gfeller, Kate; Witt, Shelley A.; Spencer, Linda J.; Stordahl, Julie; Tomblin, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    A questionnaire on their child's musical involvement and appreciation was completed by parents of 65 children who use cochlear implants. Findings indicated many of these children were involved in some type of formal or informal musical activity and few accommodations were provided in formal music classes. Correlations between speech measures and…

  14. Use of Acoustic Cues by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giezen, Marcel R.; Escudero, Paola; Baker, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the use of different acoustic cues in auditory perception of consonant and vowel contrasts by profoundly deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) in comparison to age-matched children and young adults with normal hearing. Method: A speech sound categorization task in an XAB format was administered to 15 children ages…

  15. Word Learning Processes in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; McGregor, Karla K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether 3 aspects of the word learning process--fast mapping, retention, and extension--are problematic for children with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: The authors compared responses of 24 children with CIs, 24 age-matched hearing children, and 23 vocabulary-matched hearing children to a novel object noun training episode.…

  16. Fricatives, Affricates, and Vowels in Croatian Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildner, Vesna; Liker, Marko

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the research was to analyse the speech of children with cochlear implants over approximately a 46-month period, and compare it with the speech of hearing controls. It focused on three categories of sounds in Croatian: vowels (F1 and F2 of /i/, /e/, /a/, /o/ and /u/), fricatives /s/ and /[esh]/ (spectral differences expressed in terms of…

  17. Picture Naming and Verbal Fluency in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler-Kashi, Deena; Schwartz, Richard G.; Cleary, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, the authors examined lexical naming in children with cochlear implants (CIs). The goal was to determine whether children with CIs have deficits in lexical access and organization as revealed through reaction time in picture-naming and verbal fluency (VF) experiments. Method: Children with CIs (n = 20, ages 7-10) were…

  18. Deaf Teenagers with Cochlear Implants in Conversation with Hearing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibertsson, Tina; Hansson, Kristina; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Willstedt-Svensson, Ursula; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study investigates the use of requests for clarification in conversations between teenagers with a cochlear implant (CI) and hearing peers. So far very few studies have focused on conversational abilities in children with CI. Aims: The aim was to explore co-construction of dialogue in a referential communication task and the…

  19. Simulating auditory and visual sensorineural prostheses: a comparative review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallum, L. E.; Dagnelie, G.; Suaning, G. J.; Lovell, N. H.

    2007-03-01

    Microelectronic vision prosthesis proposes to render luminous spots (so-called phosphenes) in the visual field of the otherwise blind subject by way of an implanted array of stimulating electrodes, and in doing so restore some spatial vision. There are now many research teams worldwide working towards a therapeutic device, analogous to the cochlear implant, for the profoundly blind. Despite the similarities between the cochlear implant and vision prostheses, there are few instances in the literature where the two approaches are compared and contrasted with a mind to informing the science and engineering of the latter. This is the focus of the present review; specifically, our interest is psychophysics and signal processing. Firstly, we examine the cochlear implant, and review a handful of psychophysical work: the acoustic simulation of cochlear implants and the method used. We focus on the use of normally hearing subjects (played coloured noise bands or sine waves) as a means of investigating cochlear-implant efficacy and speech processing algorithms. These results provide guidance to vision researchers, for they address the interpretation of simulation data, and flag key areas, such as 'artificial' perception in the presence of noise, that require experimental work in coming years. Secondly, we provide an up-to-date review of the body of analogous psychophysical work: the visual simulation, involving normal observers, of microelectronic vision prosthesis. These simulations allow predictions as to the likely clinical efficacy of the prosthesis; indeed, results to date suggest that a number on the order of 100 implanted electrodes will afford subjects mobility and recognition of faces (and other complex stimuli), while even fewer electrodes facilitate reading printed text and very simple visuomanual tasks. Further, the simulations allow investigations of image and signal processing strategies, plus they provide researchers in the field, and other interested persons

  20. Implications of Minimizing Trauma During Conventional Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Matthew L.; Driscoll, Colin L. W.; Gifford, René H.; Service, Geoffrey J.; Tombers, Nicole M.; Hughes-Borst, Becky J.; Neff, Brian A.; Beatty, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the relationship between implantation-associated trauma and postoperative speech perception scores among adult and pediatric patients undergoing cochlear implantation using conventional length electrodes and minimally traumatic surgical techniques. Study Design Retrospective chart review (2002–2010). Setting Tertiary academic referral center. Patients All subjects with significant preoperative low-frequency hearing (≤70 dB HL at 250 Hz) who underwent cochlear implantation with a newer generation implant electrode (Nucleus Contour Advance, Advanced Bionics HR90K [1J and Helix], and Med El Sonata standard H array) were reviewed. Intervention(s) Preimplant and postimplant audiometric thresholds and speech recognition scores were recorded using the electronic medical record. Main Outcome Measure(s) Postimplantation pure tone threshold shifts were used as a surrogate measure for extent of intracochlear injury and correlated with postoperative speech perception scores. Results Between 2002 and 2010, 703 cochlear implant (CI) operations were performed. Data from 126 implants were included in the analysis. The mean preoperative low-frequency pure-tone average was 55.4 dB HL. Hearing preservation was observed in 55% of patients. Patients with hearing preservation were found to have significantly higher postoperative speech perception performance in the cochlear implantation-only condition than those who lost all residual hearing. Conclusion Conservation of acoustic hearing after conventional length cochlear implantation is unpredictable but remains a realistic goal. The combination of improved technology and refined surgical technique may allow for conservation of some residual hearing in more than 50% of patients. Germane to the conventional length CI recipient with substantial hearing loss, minimizing trauma allows for improved speech perception in the electric condition. These findings support the use of minimally traumatic techniques in all CI

  1. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Samuel, Paola Angélica; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schimdt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed. Results: During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2%) were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24® implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor. Conclusion: Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception. PMID:25992025

  2. Selective Deletion of Cochlear Hair Cells Causes Rapid Age-Dependent Changes in Spiral Ganglion and Cochlear Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ling; Strong, Melissa K.; Kaur, Tejbeer; Juiz, Jose M.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.; Hume, Clifford; Warchol, Mark E.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    During nervous system development, critical periods are usually defined as early periods during which manipulations dramatically change neuronal structure or function, whereas the same manipulations in mature animals have little or no effect on the same property. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus (CN) are dependent on excitatory afferent input for survival during a critical period of development. Cochlear removal in young mammals and birds results in rapid death of target neurons in the CN. Cochlear removal in older animals results in little or no neuron death. However, the extent to which hair-cell-specific afferent activity prevents neuronal death in the neonatal brain is unknown. We further explore this phenomenon using a new mouse model that allows temporal control of cochlear hair cell deletion. Hair cells express the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor behind the Pou4f3 promoter. Injections of DT resulted in nearly complete loss of organ of Corti hair cells within 1 week of injection regardless of the age of injection. Injection of DT did not influence surrounding supporting cells directly in the sensory epithelium or spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Loss of hair cells in neonates resulted in rapid and profound neuronal loss in the ventral CN, but not when hair cells were eliminated at a more mature age. In addition, normal survival of SGNs was dependent on hair cell integrity early in development and less so in mature animals. This defines a previously undocumented critical period for SGN survival. PMID:25995473

  3. Variation analysis of transcriptome changes reveals cochlear genes and their associated functions in cochlear susceptibility to acoustic overstimulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuzhi; Cai, Qunfeng; Bard, Jonathan; Jamison, Jennifer; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weiping; Hu, Bo Hua

    2015-12-01

    Individual variation in the susceptibility of the auditory system to acoustic overstimulation has been well-documented at both the functional and structural levels. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this variation is unclear. The current investigation was designed to examine the variation patterns of cochlear gene expression using RNA-seq data and to identify the genes with expression variation that increased following acoustic trauma. This study revealed that the constitutive expressions of cochlear genes displayed diverse levels of gene-specific variation. These variation patterns were altered by acoustic trauma; approximately one-third of the examined genes displayed marked increases in their expression variation. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that the genes that exhibited increased variation were functionally related to cell death, biomolecule metabolism, and membrane function. In contrast, the stable genes were primarily related to basic cellular processes, including protein and macromolecular syntheses and transport. There was no functional overlap between the stable and variable genes. Importantly, we demonstrated that glutamate metabolism is related to the variation in the functional response of the cochlea to acoustic overstimulation. Taken together, the results indicate that our analyses of the individual variations in transcriptome changes of cochlear genes provide important information for the identification of genes that potentially contribute to the generation of individual variation in cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. PMID:26024952

  4. Neural tonotopy in cochlear implants: an evaluation in unilateral cochlear implant patients with unilateral deafness and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Katrien; Nobbe, Andrea; Schleich, Peter; Nopp, Peter; Voormolen, Maurits H; Van de Heyning, Paul H

    2008-11-01

    In cochlear implants, the signal is filtered into different frequency bands and transmitted to electrodes along the cochlea. In this study the frequency-place function for electric hearing was investigated as a means to possibly improve speech coding by delivering information to the appropriate cochlear place. Fourteen subjects with functional hearing in the contralateral ear have been provided with a MED-EL cochlear implant in the deaf ear in order to reduce intractable tinnitus. Pitch scaling experiments were performed using single-electrode, constant-amplitude, constant-rate stimuli in the implanted ear, and acoustic sinusoids in the contralateral ear. The frequency-place function was calculated using the electrode position in the cochlea as obtained from postoperative skull radiographs. Individual frequency-place functions were compared to Greenwood's function in normal hearing. Electric stimulation elicited a low pitch in the apical region of the cochlea, and shifting the stimulating electrode towards the basal region elicited increasingly higher pitch. The frequency-place function did not show a significant shift relative to Greenwood's function. In cochlear implant patients with functional hearing in the non-implanted ear, electrical stimulation produced a frequency-place function that on average resembles Greenwood's function. These results differ from previously derived data. PMID:18817861

  5. DPOAE level mapping for detecting noise-induced cochlear damage from short-duration music exposures.

    PubMed

    Buckey, Jay C; Fellows, Abigail M; Clavier, Odile H; Allen, Lindsay V; Brooks, Chris A; Norris, Jesse A; Gui, Jiang; Meinke, Deanna K

    2015-01-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level mapping provides a comprehensive picture of cochlear responses over a range of DP frequencies and f₂/f₁ratios. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to high-level sound would show changes detectable by DPOAE mapping, but not apparent on a standard DP-gram. Thirteen normal hearing subjects were studied before and after attending music concerts. Pure-tone audiometry (500-8,000 Hz), DP-grams (0.3-10 kHz) at 1.22 ratio, and DPOAE level maps were collected prior to, as soon as possible after, and the day after the concerts. All maps covered the range of 2,000-6,000 Hz in DP frequency and from 1.3 to -1.3 in ratio using equi-level primary tone stimuli. Changes in the pure-tone audiogram were significant (P ≤ 0.01) immediately after the concert at 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 6,000 Hz. The DP-gram showed significant differences only at f₂= 4,066 (P = 0.01) and f₂= 4,348 (P = 0.04). The postconcert changes were readily apparent both visually and statistically (P ≤ 0.01) on the mean DP level maps, and remained statistically significantly different from baseline the day after noise exposure although no significant changes from baseline were seen on the DP-gram or audiogram the day after exposure. Although both the DP-gram and audiogram showed recovery by the next day, the average DPOAE level maps remained significantly different from baseline. The mapping data showed changes in the cochlea that were not detected from the DP-gram obtained at a single ratio. DPOAE level mapping provides comprehensive information on subtle cochlear responses, which may offer advantages for studying and tracking noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:26356368

  6. DPOAE level mapping for detecting noise-induced cochlear damage from short-duration music exposures

    PubMed Central

    Buckey, Jay C.; Fellows, Abigail M.; Clavier, Odile H.; Allen, Lindsay V.; Brooks, Chris A.; Norris, Jesse A.; Gui, Jiang; Meinke, Deanna K.

    2015-01-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level mapping provides a comprehensive picture of cochlear responses over a range of DP frequencies and f2/f1 ratios. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to high-level sound would show changes detectable by DPOAE mapping, but not apparent on a standard DP-gram. Thirteen normal hearing subjects were studied before and after attending music concerts. Pure-tone audiometry (500-8,000 Hz), DP-grams (0.3-10 kHz) at 1.22 ratio, and DPOAE level maps were collected prior to, as soon as possible after, and the day after the concerts. All maps covered the range of 2,000-6,000 Hz in DP frequency and from 1.3 to -1.3 in ratio using equi-level primary tone stimuli. Changes in the pure-tone audiogram were significant (P ≤ 0.01) immediately after the concert at 1,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, and 6,000 Hz. The DP-gram showed significant differences only at f2 = 4,066 (P = 0.01) and f2 = 4,348 (P = 0.04). The postconcert changes were readily apparent both visually and statistically (P ≤ 0.01) on the mean DP level maps, and remained statistically significantly different from baseline the day after noise exposure although no significant changes from baseline were seen on the DP-gram or audiogram the day after exposure. Although both the DP-gram and audiogram showed recovery by the next day, the average DPOAE level maps remained significantly different from baseline. The mapping data showed changes in the cochlea that were not detected from the DP-gram obtained at a single ratio. DPOAE level mapping provides comprehensive information on subtle cochlear responses, which may offer advantages for studying and tracking noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). PMID:26356368

  7. Altered cortical activity in prelingually deafened cochlear implant users following long periods of auditory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Marc J W; Versnel, Huib; van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-02-01

    Auditory stimulation during childhood is critical for the development of the auditory cortex in humans and with that for hearing in adulthood. Age-related changes in morphology and peak latencies of the cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) have led to the use of this cortical response as a biomarker of auditory cortical maturation including studies of cortical development after deafness and subsequent cochlear implantation. To date, it is unknown whether prelingually deaf adults, with early onset deafness (before the age of 2 years) and who received a cochlear implant (CI) only during adulthood, would display absent or aberrant CAEP waveforms as predicted from CAEP studies in late implanted prelingually deaf children. In the current study, CAEP waveforms were recorded in response to electric stimuli in prelingually deaf adults, who received their CI after the age of 21 years. Waveform morphology and peak latencies were compared to the CAEP responses obtained in postlingually deaf adults, who became deaf after the age of 16. Unexpectedly, typical CAEP waveforms with adult-like P1-N1-P2 morphology could be recorded in the prelingually deaf adult CI users. On visual inspection, waveform morphology was comparable to the CAEP waveforms recorded in the postlingually deaf CI users. Interestingly, however, latencies of the N1 peak were significantly shorter and amplitudes were significantly larger in the prelingual group than in the postlingual group. The presence of the CAEP together with an early and large N1 peak might represent activation of the more innate and less complex components of the auditory cortex of the prelingually deaf CI user, whereas the CAEP in postlingually deaf CI users might reflect activation of the mature neural network still present in these patients. The CAEPs may therefore be helpful in the assessment of developmental state of the auditory cortex. PMID:25315357

  8. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  9. Visual Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirrane, Diane E.

    1992-01-01

    An increasingly visual culture is affecting work and training. Achievement of visual literacy means acquiring competence in critical analysis of visual images and in communicating through visual media. (SK)

  10. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider sits directly in front ...

  11. Measurements and modeling of ear-canal reflectance and cochlear reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, Stephen T.; Rasetshwane, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Cochlear reflectance (CR), the cochlear contribution to ear-canal reflectance (ECR), has theoretical advantages for cochlear modeling. Comparisons between measurements and models may lead to improved clinical interpretation of cochlear status and provide a basis for making improvements to the models. Simulation of ECR was performed using a combination of (1) an ear-canal model, (2) a middle-ear model and (3) a one-dimensional cochlear model. Simulated CR was the ECR difference between active and passive conditions of the model. The model simulation results were compared with measurements of both ECR and CR in both the time-domain and frequency-domains. Disparities between measurements and model provide a basis for improvements in the model. Substantial agreement between measurements and model suggest that CR is consistent with linear coherent reflection due to random impedance perturbations along the cochlear partition.

  12. MED-EL Cochlear Implants: State of the Art and a Glimpse Into the Future

    PubMed Central

    Hochmair, Ingeborg; Nopp, Peter; Jolly, Claude; Schmidt, Marcus; Schößer, Hansjörg; Garnham, Carolyn; Anderson, Ilona

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is an accepted treatment method for adults and children with severe to profound hearing loss. Confidence in technology has led to changes in individuals who can receive a cochlear implant and changes in expected benefit with a cochlear implant. This article describes the research and development activities at MED-EL, which make possible the implementation of new speech-coding strategies as well as the application of acoustic and electric stimulation via a combined speech processor in MED-EL devices. Research on benefits from bilateral cochlear implantation and electric-acoustic stimulation are also reviewed. Finally, the potential of drug delivery systems is considered as a way to improve cochlear implant outcomes, and results from preliminary evaluations of a hybrid cochlear implant system with drug delivery capabilities are reported. PMID:17172548

  13. Influence of medial olivocochlear efferents on the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates in children.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dinger, Zoë

    2016-08-01

    The present study objectively quantified the efferent-induced changes in the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates and compared these alterations in cochlear tuning between adults and children. Click evoked otoacoustic emissions with and without contralateral broadband noise were recorded from 15 young adults and 14 children aged between 5 and 10 yrs. Time-frequency distributions of click evoked otoacoustic emissions were obtained via the S-transform, and the otoacoustic emission latencies were used to estimate the sharpness of cochlear tuning. Contralateral acoustic stimulation caused a significant reduction in the sharpness of cochlear tuning estimates in the low to mid frequency region, but had no effect in the higher frequencies (3175 and 4000 Hz). The magnitude of efferent-induced changes in cochlear tuning estimates was similar between adults and children. The current evidence suggests that the stimulation of the medial olivocochlear efferent neurons causes similar alterations in cochlear frequency selectivity in adults and children. PMID:27586737

  14. Dopamine in the auditory brainstem and midbrain: co-localization with amino acid neurotransmitters and gene expression following cochlear trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fyk-Kolodziej, Bozena E.; Shimano, Takashi; Gafoor, Dana; Mirza, Najab; Griffith, Ronald D.; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Holt, Avril Genene

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs), including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory, and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012). The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA) in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005). In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN) and inferior colliculus (IC) to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after 2 months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both 3 days and 2 months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GLYT2) and the GABA transporter (GABAtp) were also significantly reduced only after 2 months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1), vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (VGLUT2, VGLUT3), GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the 3 days and 2 months time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GLYT2 and VGLUT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons. PMID:26257610

  15. Are routine preoperative CT scans necessary in adult cochlear implantation? Implications for the allocation of resources in cochlear implant programs.

    PubMed

    Kenway, Bruno; Vlastarakos, Petros V; Kasbekar, Anand V; Axon, Patrick R; Donnelly, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to critically assess the influence of preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans on implantation decisions for adult cochlear implant candidates. The working hypothesis was that these routine scans might not provide critical additional information in most adult cochlear implant candidates. The charts of 175 adults with unilateral cochlear implantation were reviewed. Preoperative CT scan reports were audited, and scans with reported pathology were examined by an Otologist/ENT Surgeon. Clinic notes and multidisciplinary team meeting summaries were also analyzed to assess whether the results of the radiology report had influenced the decision to implant or the laterality of implantation. Twenty-five of the 175 scans (14.3%) showed an abnormality. Five of those 25 scans showed evidence of previous surgeries already known to the clinicians. Of the remaining 20 scans, 17 showed abnormalities, including wide vestibular aqueducts, Mondini deformities, and varying degrees of otospongiosis, the identification of which can be considered preoperatively helpful. Of the 175 scans, 3 (1.7%) demonstrated abnormalities that influenced the side of implantation or the decision to implant and, therefore, had an impact on treatment. We conclude that a preoperative CT scan seems to have an impact on treatment in only a small percentage of adult cochlear implantees. Hence, it may only need to be performed in patients with a history or clinical suspicion of meningitis or otosclerosis, if the individual was born deaf or became deaf before the age of 16, or if there are other clinical reasons to scan (e.g., otoscopic appearance). The related resources can be allocated to other facets of cochlear implant programs. PMID:27551842

  16. [Development of improving speech perception of cochlear implants in noisy environment].

    PubMed

    Pan, Haolai; Chen, Zhengnong

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation has been a standard therapy for treating severe deafness because patients who receive it have better speech perception. However, the hearing performance of cochlear implantation in noisy environment is far from satisfaction. Efforts have been made to reverse such condition, such as EAS, bimodal stimulation, environment-adaptive speech enhancement and multipolar stimulation, and patients who receive it get more or less better speech perception in noisy environment than traditional cochlear implantation. PMID:27192923

  17. Cortical and medullary somatosensory projections to the cochlear nuclear complex in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A; Künzle, H

    1997-01-17

    Various tracer substances were injected into the spinal cord, the dorsal column nuclei, the trigeminal nuclear complex and the somatosensory cortex in Madagascan hedgehog tenrecs. With the exception of the cases injected exclusively into the spinal cord all injections gave rise to sparse, but distinct anterograde projections to the cochlear nuclear complex, particularly the granular cell domain within and outside of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. Among these cochlear afferents the projection from the primary somatosensory cortex is the most remarkable because the hedgehog tenrec has one of the lowest encephalisation indices among mammals and a similar cortico-cochlear connection has not been demonstrated so far in other species. PMID:9121680

  18. Brain voice processing with bilateral cochlear implants: a positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Coez, Arnaud; Zilbovicius, Monica; Ferrary, Evelyne; Bouccara, Didier; Mosnier, Isabelle; Ambert-Dahan, Emmanuèle; Bizaguet, Eric; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Samson, Yves; Sterkers, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Most cochlear implantations are unilateral. To explore the benefits of a binaural cochlear implant, we used water-labelled oxygen-15 positron emission tomography. Relative cerebral blood flow was measured in a binaural implant group (n = 11), while the subjects were passively listening to human voice sounds, environmental sounds non-voice or silence. Binaural auditory stimulation in the cochlear implant group bilaterally activated the temporal voice areas, whereas monaural cochlear implant stimulation only activated the left temporal voice area. Direct comparison of the binaural and the monaural cochlear implant stimulation condition revealed an additional right temporal activation during voice processing in the binaural condition and the activation of a right fronto-parietal cortical network during sound processing that has been implicated in attention. These findings provide evidence that a bilateral cochlear implant stimulation enhanced the spectral cues associated with sound perception and improved brain processing of voice stimuli in the right temporal region when compared to a monaural cochlear implant stimulation. Moreover, the recruitment of sensory attention resources in a right fronto-parietal network allowed patients with bilateral cochlear implant stimulation to enhance their sound discrimination, whereas the same patients with only one cochlear implant stimulation had more auditory perception difficulties. PMID:24272140

  19. Assessing multimodal spoken word-in-sentence recognition in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Rachael Frush; Kirk, Karen Iler; Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To examine multimodal spoken word-in-sentence recognition in children. Method Two experiments were undertaken. In Experiment I, the youngest age with which the multimodal sentence recognition materials could be used was evaluated. In Experiment II, lexical difficulty and presentation modality effects were examined, along with test-retest reliability and validity in normal-hearing children and those with cochlear implants. Results Normal-hearing children as young as 3.25 years and those with cochlear implants just under 4 years who have used their device for at least 1 year were able to complete the multimodal sentence testing. Both groups identified lexically easy words in sentences more accurately than lexically hard words across modalities, although the largest effects occurred in the auditory-only modality. Both groups displayed audiovisual integration with the highest scores achieved in the audiovisual modality, followed sequentially by auditory-only and visual-only modalities. Recognition of words in sentences was correlated with recognition of words in isolation. Preliminary results suggest fair to good test-retest reliability. Conclusions The results suggest that children’s audiovisual word-in-sentence recognition can be assessed using the materials developed for this investigation. With further development, the materials hold promise for becoming a test of multimodal sentence recognition for children with hearing loss. PMID:20689028

  20. Use of Audiovisual Information in Speech Perception by Prelingually Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: A First Report

    PubMed Central

    Lachs, Lorin; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although there has been a great deal of recent empirical work and new theoretical interest in audiovisual speech perception in both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired adults, relatively little is known about the development of these abilities and skills in deaf children with cochlear implants. This study examined how prelingually deafened children combine visual information available in the talker’s face with auditory speech cues provided by their cochlear implants to enhance spoken language comprehension. Design Twenty-seven hearing-impaired children who use cochlear implants identified spoken sentences presented under auditory-alone and audiovisual conditions. Five additional measures of spoken word recognition performance were used to assess auditory-alone speech perception skills. A measure of speech intelligibility was also obtained to assess the speech production abilities of these children. Results A measure of audiovisual gain, “Ra,” was computed using sentence recognition scores in auditory-alone and audiovisual conditions. Another measure of audiovisual gain, “Rv,” was computed using scores in visual-alone and audiovisual conditions. The results indicated that children who were better at recognizing isolated spoken words through listening alone were also better at combining the complementary sensory information about speech articulation available under audiovisual stimulation. In addition, we found that children who received more benefit from audiovisual presentation also produced more intelligible speech, suggesting a close link between speech perception and production and a common underlying linguistic basis for audiovisual enhancement effects. Finally, an examination of the distribution of children enrolled in Oral Communication (OC) and Total Communication (TC) indicated that OC children tended to score higher on measures of audiovisual gain, spoken word recognition, and speech intelligibility. Conclusions The relationships

  1. The acceptability of cochlear implants and vibrotactile aids.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A R

    1988-05-01

    To obtain data on the likely acceptability of cochlear implants (and of vibrotactile aids), a questionnaire was sent to profoundly/totally hearing-impaired patients. The patients were asked how they felt about their current communication problems and possible benefits to be obtained from such devices. Of the 153 replies obtained, the combined 'yes' or 'maybe' responses indicated that 58% would accept an implant. The corresponding figure for vibrotactile aids was 73%. The statistically significant factors correlating with cochlear implant acceptance were the patient's expectation of the benefit it would give, the time needed for rehabilitation and the degree of communication difficulty that they suffer. The only significant factor in acceptance of a vibrotactile aid was whether the patient had attended the IHR clinic. This implies that the underlying factor is the patient's knowledge about these devices. PMID:2968826

  2. Cochlear function in mice following inhalation of brevetoxin-3

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Janet M.; Stagner, Barden B.; Martin, Glen K.; Friedman, Melissa; Durr, Sarah E.; Gomez, Andrea; McDonald, Jacob; Fleming, Lora E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Baden, Daniel G.; Bourdelais, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Lonsbury-Martin, Brenda L.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxin-3 was shown previously to adversely affect central auditory function in goldfish. The present study evaluated the effects of exposure to this agent on cochlear function in mice using the 2f1-f2 distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE). Towards this end, inbred CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to a relatively high concentration of brevetoxin-3 (∼400 μg/m3) by nose-only inhalation for a 2-h period. Further, a subset of these mice received a second exposure a day later that lasted for an additional 4 h. Mice exposed only once for 2 h did not exhibit any notable cochlear effects. Similarly, mice exposed two times, for a cumulative dose of 6 h, exhibited essentially no change in DPOAE levels. PMID:15902474

  3. Cochlear implantation in a child with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Henkin, Yael; Hildesheimer, Minka; Kronenberg, Jona

    2003-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disease of connective tissue and affects bone, dentine, sclera, joint, tendon, blood vessels, heart valves, and skin. Approximately 50% of the adult patients with OI have associated hearing impairment. To date, only three cases of cochlear implantation in adults with OI have been reported, but none in children. We present a case of cochlear implantation in a congenitally deaf 6-year-old boy with OI. The Nucleus 24 Contour device was successfully implanted using the suprameatal approach (SMA). At 6 months post-initial stimulation there was no evidence of non-acoustic nerve excitation (i.e. facial twitching) or discomfort, and significant progress in auditory abilities was manifested by open set word identification. PMID:12745164

  4. Severe cochlear dysplasia causing recurrent meningitis: a surgical lesson.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Proops, D W; Phelps, P D

    1993-08-01

    Meningitis may be the sole presenting sign of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula of the temporal bone. An eight-year-old boy suffering from recurrent meningitis was found to have bilateral severe cochlear dysplasia. Bilateral tympanotomies were performed, planning to obliterate each vestibule. In the right ear a stapedectomy was performed, resulting in a torrential 'CSF gusher' and difficulty in packing the vestibule. CSF rhinorrhoea requiring revision surgery and two episodes of gram-negative bacterial meningitis complicated the post-operative management, resulting in a prolonged hospital stay. Subsequently, the left ear was managed in a different fashion, leaving the stapes in situ, with grafts placed to seal the oval window niche. We would recommend this alternative procedure in cases of severe cochlear dysplasia, where abnormalities of the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea mean that performing a stapedectomy to pack the vestibule may result in a severe 'CSF gusher', by opening directly into the subarachnoid space. PMID:8409727

  5. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    PubMed

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  6. Intracochlear Bleeding Enhances Cochlear Fibrosis and Ossification: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Kyeung A.; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Park, Heesung; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracochlear bleeding during cochleostomy on cochlear inflammatory response and residual hearing in a guinea pig animal model. Auditory brainstem response threshold shifts were greater in blood injected ears (p<0.05). Interleukin-1β, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide synthase 2, cytokines that are related to early stage inflammation, were significantly increased in blood injected ears compared to normal and cochleostomy only ears at 1 day after surgery; with the increased IL-1β being sustained until 3 days after the surgery (p<0.05). Hair cells were more severely damaged in blood injected ears than in cochleostomy only ears. Histopathologic examination revealed more extensive fibrosis and ossification in blood injected ears than cochleostomy only ears. These results show that intracochlear bleeding enhanced cochlear inflammation resulting in increased fibrosis and ossification in an experimental animal model. PMID:26308864

  7. Achieving early functional auditory access in paediatric cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Orzan, E; Muzzi, E; Marchi, R; Falzone, C; Battelino, S; Ciciriello, E

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is a viable option for providing access to auditory stimulation in severe-to-profound hearing loss/impairment of cochlear origin. It has been demonstrated that CI is safe and effective for deaf children. Younger age at activation after CI is linked with better outcomes. It is important to study variables and issues that can interfere with an early fitting and access to sound after CI. They range from patient characteristics, family compliance and support, to technical, medical or organisational problems. A SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix was conducted to discuss issues and propose recommendations to be considered when operating an early switch on of the CI. PMID:27054390

  8. Bimodal Hearing Aid Retention after Unilateral Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Devocht, Elke M J; George, Erwin L J; Janssen, A Miranda L; Stokroos, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate contralateral hearing aid (HA) use after unilateral cochlear implantation and to identify factors of influence on the occurrence of a unilateral cochlear implant (CI) recipient becoming a bimodal user. A retrospective cross-sectional chart review was carried out among 77 adult unilateral CI recipients 1 year after implantation. A bimodal HA retention rate of 64% was observed. Associations with demographics, hearing history, residual hearing and speech recognition ability were investigated. Better pure-tone thresholds and unaided speech scores in the non-implanted ear, as well as a smaller difference in speech recognition scores between both ears, were significantly associated with HA retention. A combined model of HA retention was proposed, and cut-off points were determined to identify those CI recipients who were most likely to become bimodal users. These results can provide input to clinical guidelines concerning bimodal CI candidacy. PMID:26461124

  9. Decoding of neural firing to improve cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moissl, Ulrich; Meyer-Baese, Uwe

    2000-03-01

    In the last decades biologists have gained much knowledge about neural firing in the auditory system. It is a challenging problem to use this knowledge for the improvement of hearing aids and cochlear implants. This study first present the model of a human cochlea, which transforms acoustic signals into auditory nerve impulses. Then a method is proposed, which reconstructs the nerve impulses into acoustic signals. This method will then be used on the impulse-output of a widely used cochlear implant, in order to get an impression of what patients actually perceive with such a device. Suggestions for the improvement of coding strategies will be made, based on the findings of this study.

  10. Music recognition by Japanese children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Takayuki; Trehub, Sandra E; Mitani, Chisato; Kanda, Yukihiko; Shibasaki, Atsuko; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Congenitally deaf Japanese children with cochlear implants were tested on their recognition of theme songs from television programs that they watched regularly. The children, who were 4-9 years of age, attempted to identify each song from a closed set of alternatives. Their song identification ability was examined in the context of the original commercial recordings (vocal plus instrumental), the original versions without the words (i.e., karaoke versions), and flute versions of the melody. The children succeeded in identifying the music only from the original versions, and their performance was related to their music listening habits. Children gave favorable appraisals of the music even when they were unable to recognize it. Further research is needed to find means of enhancing cochlear implants users' perception and appreciation of music. PMID:15684539

  11. Otoacoustic Estimates of Cochlear Tuning: Testing Predictions in Macaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.; Bergevin, Christopher; Kalluri, Radha; Mc Laughlin, Myles; Michelet, Pascal; van der Heijden, Marcel; Joris, Philip X.

    2011-11-01

    Otoacoustic estimates of cochlear frequency selectivity suggest substantially sharper tuning in humans. However, the logic and methodology underlying these estimates remain untested by direct measurements in primates. We report measurements of frequency tuning in macaque monkeys, Old-World primates phylogenetically closer to humans than the small laboratory animals often taken as models of human hearing (e.g., cats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas). We find that measurements of tuning obtained directly from individual nerve fibers and indirectly using otoacoustic emissions both indicate that peripheral frequency selectivity in macaques is significantly sharper than in small laboratory animals, matching that inferred for humans at high frequencies. Our results validate the use of otoacoustic emissions for noninvasive measurement of cochlear tuning and corroborate the finding of sharper tuning in humans.

  12. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  13. Cochlear implantation outcomes in children with Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amirsalari, Susan; Ajallouyean, Mohammad; Saburi, Amin; Haddadi Fard, Adel; Abed, Maryam; Ghazavi, Yasaman

    2012-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia iridis, white forelock, and congenital sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of cochlear implantation in children with WS and compare it with children with pure SNHL. In a prospective study we evaluated 336 cochlear implanted children from 2008 to 2010. The WS was diagnosed by its established criteria and for control group children without any dysmorphic features, anatomical, behavioral, and developmental disorders were also enrolled. We evaluated children of both groups 1 year after cochlear implantation by categories of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) tests. Eighty-one children out of the total 336 who had SNHL were included in study. Out of these 75 (22.3%) were healthy and six (1.78%) had WS. Of the 75 healthy children 40 (53.3%) were girls, while of the six children with WS, three (50%) were girls. There was a significant difference in SIR between WS and cases with pure SNHL (2.67 ± 1.03 vs. 3.79 ± 1.11, p = 021) however, the difference was not significant in CAP (4 ± 1.26 vs. 5.13 ± 1.13, p = 0.082). Prevalence of WS was 1.78% at Baqiyatallah Cochlear Implant Center. One year after implantation there was no significant difference in auditory outcome; however, the difference in speech outcome was significant between WS and cases with pure SNHL. PMID:22159916

  14. Cochlear mechanics: implications of electrophysiological and acoustical observations.

    PubMed

    Kim, D O

    1980-06-01

    Implications of the spatial distribution of distortion products (2f1--f2) and (f2--f1) observed from populations of cochlear nerve fibers for cochlear mechanics are reviewed (the terms f1 and f2 represent the primary stimulus frequencies; f1 < f2). Characteristics of the distortion products (2f1--f2) and (f2--f1) in the ear-canal sound pressure of the cat and the chinchilla are investigated. Physiological origin of the acoustic distortion product (2f1--f2) is supported by demonstrations of the vulnerability of the distortion product to anoxia, to overstimulation and to cyanide perfusion of the cochlea. Observations are presented describing the dependence of levels of acoustic distortion products (2f1--f2) and (f2--f1): (1) on primary levels; (2) on f2 with iso-f1; and (3) on f1 and f2 with iso-(2f1--f2). Observations and interpretations are discussed in support of the conclusions: (1) that the distortion product (2f1--f2) in the ear-canal sound pressure observed in our studies is not generated in the experimental apparatus, in the eardrum, or in the middle ear but in the primary-frequency region of the cochlea; (2) that the distortion-product generation requires normal physiological processes in the cochlear sensory apparatus but not the neural activity; and (3) that the distortion-product is mechanically propagated from the generation region in the cochlea toward the distortion-frequency place and toward the stapes, through the middle ear, and into the ear canal involving gross motions of the cochlear partition and the middle-ear ossicles. It is now inevitable that we accept the notion that, in a normal ear, manifestations of significant nonlinear behavior are present in the mechanical response of the middle ear and the cochlea at most of the physiologically normal sound pressure levels. PMID:7410234

  15. Heterogeneous calretinin expression in the avian cochlear nucleus angularis.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S; Williams, A; MacLeod, K M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) are expressed at high levels and in complementary patterns in the auditory pathways of birds, mammals, and other vertebrates, but whether specific members of the CaBP family can be used to identify neuronal subpopulations is unclear. We used double immunofluorescence labeling of calretinin (CR) in combination with neuronal markers to investigate the distribution of CR-expressing neurons in brainstem sections of the cochlear nucleus in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). While CR was homogeneously expressed in cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, CR expression was highly heterogeneous in cochlear nucleus angularis (NA), a nucleus with diverse cell types analogous in function to neurons in the mammalian ventral cochlear nucleus. To quantify the distribution of CR in the total NA cell population, we used antibodies against neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), a postmitotic neuron-specific nuclear marker. In NA neurons, NeuN label was variably localized to the cell nucleus and the cytoplasm, and the intensity of NeuN immunoreactivity was inversely correlated with the intensity of CR immunoreactivity. The percentage of CR + neurons in NA increased from 31 % in embryonic (E)17/18 chicks, to 44 % around hatching (E21), to 51 % in postnatal day (P) 8 chicks. By P8, the distribution of CR + neurons was uniform, both rostrocaudal and in the tonotopic (dorsoventral) axis. Immunoreactivity for the voltage-gated potassium ion channel Kv1.1, used as a marker for physiological type, showed broad and heterogeneous postsynaptic expression in NA, but did not correlate with CR expression. These results suggest that CR may define a subpopulation of neurons within nucleus angularis. PMID:24752525

  16. The evolution of cochlear implant technology and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hainarosie, M; Zainea, V; Hainarosie, R

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a brief history of the development of the cochlear implant, from its beginnings to the present day. After a short description of the device, it describes the evolution of the technology for three of the top manufacturing companies, from the first model marketed, to the latest. It presents the technological advancements from one model to the next, taking into account the exterior design, processing capabilities and functionality. PMID:25870662

  17. Acoustic Analysis of Speech of Cochlear Implantees and Its Implications

    PubMed Central

    Patadia, Rajesh; Govale, Prajakta; Rangasayee, R.; Kirtane, Milind

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Cochlear implantees have improved speech production skills compared with those using hearing aids, as reflected in their acoustic measures. When compared to normal hearing controls, implanted children had fronted vowel space and their /s/ and /∫/ noise frequencies overlapped. Acoustic analysis of speech provides an objective index of perceived differences in speech production which can be precursory in planning therapy. The objective of this study was to compare acoustic characteristics of speech in cochlear implantees with those of normal hearing age matched peers to understand implications. Methods Group 1 consisted of 15 children with prelingual bilateral severe-profound hearing loss (age, 5-11 years; implanted between 4-10 years). Prior to an implant behind the ear, hearing aids were used; prior & post implantation subjects received at least 1 year of aural intervention. Group 2 consisted of 15 normal hearing age matched peers. Sustained productions of vowels and words with selected consonants were recorded. Using Praat software for acoustic analysis, digitized speech tokens were measured for F1, F2, and F3 of vowels; centre frequency (Hz) and energy concentration (dB) in burst; voice onset time (VOT in ms) for stops; centre frequency (Hz) of noise in /s/; rise time (ms) for affricates. A t-test was used to find significant differences between groups. Results Significant differences were found in VOT for /b/, F1 and F2 of /e/, and F3 of /u/. No significant differences were found for centre frequency of burst, energy concentration for stops, centre frequency of noise in /s/, or rise time for affricates. These findings suggest that auditory feedback provided by cochlear implants enable subjects to monitor production of speech sounds. Conclusion Acoustic analysis of speech is an essential method for discerning characteristics which have or have not been improved by cochlear implantation and thus for planning intervention. PMID:22701768

  18. Pitch Discrimination: An Independent Factor in Cochlear Implant Performance Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kenway, Bruno; Tam, Yu Chuen; Vanat, Zebunnisa; Harris, Frances; Gray, Roger; Birchall, John; Carlyon, Robert; Axon, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in pitch-ranking ability across a range of speech understanding performance levels and as a function of electrode position. Study Design: An observational study of a cross-section of cochlear implantees. Setting: Tertiary referral center for cochlear implantation. Patients: A total of 22 patients were recruited. All three manufacturers’ devices were included (MED-EL, Innsbruck, Austria, n = 10; Advanced Bionics, California, USA, n = 8; and Cochlear, Sydney, Australia, n = 4) and all patients were long-term users (more than 18 months). Twelve of these were poor performers (scores on BKB sentence lists <60%) and 10 were excellent performers (BKB >90%). Intervention: After measurement of threshold and comfort levels, and loudness balancing across the array, all patients underwent thorough pitch-ranking assessments at 80% of comfort levels. Main Outcome Measure: Ability to discriminate pitch across the electrode array, measured by consistency in discrimination of adjacent pairs of electrodes, as well as an assessment of the pitch order across the array using the midpoint comparison task. Results: Within the poor performing group there was wide variability in ability to pitch rank, from no errors, to a complete inability to reliably and consistently differentiate pitch change across the electrode array. Good performers were overall significantly more accurate at pitch ranking (p = 0.026). Consistent pitch ranking was found to be a significant independent predictor of BKB score, even after adjusting for age. Users of the MED-EL implant experienced significantly more pitch confusions at the apex than at more basal parts of the electrode array. Conclusions: Many cochlear implant users struggle to discriminate pitch effectively. Accurate pitch ranking appears to be an independent predictor of overall outcome. Future work will concentrate on manipulating maps based upon pitch discrimination findings in an attempt to improve

  19. Prediction of Cochlear Implant Outcomes in Patients With Prelingual Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Myoung Jin; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Lee, Sang Heun; Jang, Jeong Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the factors that limit post-cochlear implantation (CI) speech perception in prelingually deaf children. Methods. Patients with CI were divided into two groups according to Category of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores 3 years post-CI: the poor performance group (poor performance group, CAP scores≤4, n=41) and the good performance group (good performance group, CAP scores≥5, n=85). The distribution and contribution of the potential limiting factors related to post-CI speech perception was compared. Results. Perinatal problems, inner ear anomalies, narrow bony cochlear nerve canal (BCNC), and intraoperative problems was significantly higher in the poor performance group than the good performance group (P=0.010, P=0.003, P=0.001, and P=0.045, respectively). The mean number of limiting factors was significantly higher in the poor performance group (1.98±1.04) than the good performance group (1.25±1.11, P=0.001). The odds ratios for perinatal problems and narrow bony cochlear nerve canal in the poor performance group in comparison with the good performance group were 4.878 (95% confidence interval, 0.067 to 0.625; P=0.005) and 4.785 (95% confidence interval, 0.045 to 0.972; P=0.046). Conclusion. This study highlights the comprehensive prediction of speech perception after CI and provides otologic surgeons with useful information for individualized preoperative counseling of CI candidates. PMID:27337951

  20. Is age a limiting factor for adaptation to cochlear implant?

    PubMed

    Hiel, Anne-Lise; Gerard, Jean-Marc; Decat, Monique; Deggouj, Naïma

    2016-09-01

    The influence of age on adaptation to cochlear implant (CI) is still being contested in the literature. The aim of this study was twofold. First, hearing outcomes in quiet conditions were compared between CI users implanted over and under the age of 70 years. Second, the effect of the duration of auditory deprivation was investigated. The study design is a retrospective review and the setting is in academic tertiary referral center. One hundred and twenty-one postlingually deafened implanted adults participated in this study. Hearing outcomes were compared between 121 postlingually deafened adults implanted under 40, between 40 and 70, and over 70 years of age. Speech audiometry measurements were taken at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 60 months post-cochlear implantation (pCI), in quiet conditions only. Hearing outcomes were significantly better only at 1 year pCI in the youngest group compared to the two older groups. No significant difference was observed between the middle-aged and eldest subjects at any time. The influence of the severe-to-profound hearing loss (SPHL) duration was investigated and found to be equally distributed among the different age groups. Good hearing outcomes in elderly patients are not secondary to a difference in SPHL duration. Age should not be a limiting factor for cochlear implantation decision. PMID:26676874

  1. Secreted Factors from Human Vestibular Schwannomas Can Cause Cochlear Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dilwali, Sonam; Landegger, Lukas D.; Soares, Vitor Y. R.; Deschler, Daniel G.; Stankovic, Konstantina M.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VSs) are the most common tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Ninety-five percent of people with VS present with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL); the mechanism of this SNHL is currently unknown. To establish the first model to study the role of VS-secreted factors in causing SNHL, murine cochlear explant cultures were treated with human tumour secretions from thirteen different unilateral, sporadic VSs of subjects demonstrating varied degrees of ipsilateral SNHL. The extent of cochlear explant damage due to secretion application roughly correlated with the subjects’ degree of SNHL. Secretions from tumours associated with most substantial SNHL resulted in most significant hair cell loss and neuronal fibre disorganization. Secretions from VSs associated with good hearing or from healthy human nerves led to either no effect or solely fibre disorganization. Our results are the first to demonstrate that secreted factors from VSs can lead to cochlear damage. Further, we identified tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) as an ototoxic molecule and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) as an otoprotective molecule in VS secretions. Antibody-mediated TNFα neutralization in VS secretions partially prevented hair cell loss due to the secretions. Taken together, we have identified a new mechanism responsible for SNHL due to VSs. PMID:26690506

  2. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-05-01

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  3. Optical coherence tomography as a guide for cochlear implant surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, T.; Lankenau, E.; Hüttmann, G.; Pau, H. W.

    2008-02-01

    To assess the potential use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in cochlear implant surgery, OCT was applied in human temporal bones before cochleostomy. The question was whether OCT might provide information about the cochlear topography, especially about the site of the scala tympani. OCT was carried out on human temporal bone preparations, in which the cochleostomy was performed leaving the membranous labyrinth and the fluid-filled inner ear intact. A specially equipped operating microscope with integrated OCT prototype was used. Spectral-domain (SD)-OCT was used for all investigations. On all scans, OCT supplied information about inner ear structures, such as scala tympani, scala vestibuli while the membranous labyrinth was still intact. In the fresh temporal bone the scala media, basilar membrane and the Reissner's membrane were identified. This OCT study clearly documents the possibility to identify inner ear structures, especially the scala tympani without opening its enveloping membranes. These findings may have an impact on cochlear implant surgery, especially as an orientation guide to localize the scala tympani precisely before opening the fluid filled inner ear.

  4. Optoacoustic effect is responsible for laser-induced cochlear responses

    PubMed Central

    Kallweit, N.; Baumhoff, P.; Krueger, A.; Tinne, N.; Kral, A.; Ripken, T.; Maier, H.

    2016-01-01

    Optical stimulation of the cochlea with laser light has been suggested as an alternative to conventional treatment of sensorineural hearing loss with cochlear implants. The underlying mechanisms are controversially discussed: The stimulation can either be based on a direct excitation of neurons, or it is a result of an optoacoustic pressure wave acting on the basilar membrane. Animal studies comparing the intra-cochlear optical stimulation of hearing and deafened guinea pigs have indicated that the stimulation requires intact hair cells. Therefore, optoacoustic stimulation seems to be the underlying mechanism. The present study investigates optoacoustic characteristics using pulsed laser stimulation for in vivo experiments on hearing guinea pigs and pressure measurements in water. As a result, in vivo as well as pressure measurements showed corresponding signal shapes. The amplitude of the signal for both measurements depended on the absorption coefficient and on the maximum of the first time-derivative of laser pulse power (velocity of heat deposition). In conclusion, the pressure measurements directly demonstrated that laser light generates acoustic waves, with amplitudes suitable for stimulating the (partially) intact cochlea. These findings corroborate optoacoustic as the basic mechanism of optical intra-cochlear stimulation. PMID:27301846

  5. Development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) cochlear biomodel

    SciTech Connect

    Ngelayang, Thailis Bounya Anak; Latif, Rhonira

    2015-05-15

    Human cochlear is undeniably one of the most amazing organs in human body. The functional mechanism is very unique in terms of its ability to convert the sound waves in the form of mechanical vibrations into the electrical nerve impulses. It is known that the normal human auditory system can perceive the audible frequency range between 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Scientists have conducted several researches trying to build the artificial basilar membrane in the human cochlea (cochlear biomodel). Micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) is one of the potential inventions that have the ability to mimic the active behavior of the basilar membrane. In this paper, an array of MEMS bridge beams that are mechanically sensitive to the perceived audible frequency has been proposed. An array of bridge bridge beams with 0.5 µm thickness and length varying from 200 µm to 2000 µm have been designed operate within the audible frequency range. In the bridge beams design, aluminium (Al), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta) and platinum (Pt) have considered as the material for the bridge beam structure. From the finite element (FE) and lumped element (LE) models of the MEMS bridge beams, platinum has been found to be the best material for the cochlear biomodel design, closely mimicking the basilar membrane.

  6. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Two Generations of Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Nicolas; Gérard, Anaïs; Dupré, Jeanne; Goursonnet, Delphine; Hoen, Michel; Gnansia, Dan; Angellier, Gaëlle; Thariat, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the behavior of two different generations of cochlear implant systems subjected to a clinical radiotherapy scheme and to determine the maximal acceptable cumulative radiation levels at which the devices show out-of-specification behaviors. Using stereotactic irradiation (Cyberknife, 6 MV photon beam), three Digisonic SP and three Neuro devices were submitted to 5 Gy doses that cumulated to 60 Gy (12 sessions) and 80 Gy (16 sessions), respectively. A follow-up series of irradiation was then applied, in which Digisonic SP devices received two additional fractions of 50 Gy each, cumulating to 160 Gy, and Neuro devices three additional fractions of 20, 40, and 150 Gy, cumulating to 290 Gy. Output current values were monitored during the treatment. At clinical doses, with 60 or 80 Gy cumulative radiation exposure, no single measurement showed more than 10% divergence from the reference measure. The cochlear implants tested in this study showed high resistance to clinically relevant cumulative radiation doses and showed no out-of-bounds behavior up to cumulative doses of 140 or 160 Gy. These observations suggest that cochlear implant users can undergo radiotherapy up to cumulative doses well above those currently used in clinical situations without risk of failure. PMID:26491679

  7. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Venail, Frederic; Mura, Thibault; Akkari, Mohamed; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement), electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device). The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry) algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = -0.11 ± 0.02, P < 0.01), the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = -8.50 ± 1.97, P < 0.01), and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF). Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas. PMID:26236725

  8. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Two Generations of Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Nicolas; Gérard, Anaïs; Dupré, Jeanne; Goursonnet, Delphine; Hoen, Michel; Gnansia, Dan; Angellier, Gaëlle; Thariat, Juliette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the behavior of two different generations of cochlear implant systems subjected to a clinical radiotherapy scheme and to determine the maximal acceptable cumulative radiation levels at which the devices show out-of-specification behaviors. Using stereotactic irradiation (Cyberknife, 6 MV photon beam), three Digisonic SP and three Neuro devices were submitted to 5 Gy doses that cumulated to 60 Gy (12 sessions) and 80 Gy (16 sessions), respectively. A follow-up series of irradiation was then applied, in which Digisonic SP devices received two additional fractions of 50 Gy each, cumulating to 160 Gy, and Neuro devices three additional fractions of 20, 40, and 150 Gy, cumulating to 290 Gy. Output current values were monitored during the treatment. At clinical doses, with 60 or 80 Gy cumulative radiation exposure, no single measurement showed more than 10% divergence from the reference measure. The cochlear implants tested in this study showed high resistance to clinically relevant cumulative radiation doses and showed no out-of-bounds behavior up to cumulative doses of 140 or 160 Gy. These observations suggest that cochlear implant users can undergo radiotherapy up to cumulative doses well above those currently used in clinical situations without risk of failure. PMID:26491679

  9. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  10. Pathophysiology of the cochlear intrastrial fluid-blood barrier (review).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaorui

    2016-08-01

    The blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) in the stria vascularis is a highly specialized capillary network that controls exchanges between blood and the intrastitial space in the cochlea. The barrier shields the inner ear from blood-born toxic substances and selectively passes ions, fluids, and nutrients to the cochlea, playing an essential role in the maintenance of cochlear homeostasis. Anatomically, the BLB is comprised of endothelial cells (ECs) in the strial microvasculature, elaborated tight and adherens junctions, pericytes (PCs), basement membrane (BM), and perivascular resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms), which together form a complex "cochlear-vascular unit" in the stria vascularis. Physical interactions between the ECs, PCs, and PVM/Ms, as well as signaling between the cells, is critical for controlling vascular permeability and providing a proper environment for hearing function. Breakdown of normal interactions between components of the BLB is seen in a wide range of pathological conditions, including genetic defects and conditions engendered by inflammation, loud sound trauma, and ageing. In this review, we will discuss prevailing views of the structure and function of the strial cochlear-vascular unit (also referred to as the "intrastrial fluid-blood barrier"). We will also discuss the disrupted homeostasis seen in a variety of hearing disorders. Therapeutic targeting of the strial barrier may offer opportunities for improvement of hearing health and amelioration of auditory disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:26802581

  11. Optoacoustic effect is responsible for laser-induced cochlear responses.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, N; Baumhoff, P; Krueger, A; Tinne, N; Kral, A; Ripken, T; Maier, H

    2016-01-01

    Optical stimulation of the cochlea with laser light has been suggested as an alternative to conventional treatment of sensorineural hearing loss with cochlear implants. The underlying mechanisms are controversially discussed: The stimulation can either be based on a direct excitation of neurons, or it is a result of an optoacoustic pressure wave acting on the basilar membrane. Animal studies comparing the intra-cochlear optical stimulation of hearing and deafened guinea pigs have indicated that the stimulation requires intact hair cells. Therefore, optoacoustic stimulation seems to be the underlying mechanism. The present study investigates optoacoustic characteristics using pulsed laser stimulation for in vivo experiments on hearing guinea pigs and pressure measurements in water. As a result, in vivo as well as pressure measurements showed corresponding signal shapes. The amplitude of the signal for both measurements depended on the absorption coefficient and on the maximum of the first time-derivative of laser pulse power (velocity of heat deposition). In conclusion, the pressure measurements directly demonstrated that laser light generates acoustic waves, with amplitudes suitable for stimulating the (partially) intact cochlea. These findings corroborate optoacoustic as the basic mechanism of optical intra-cochlear stimulation. PMID:27301846

  12. The Effect of Visual Cues on Difficulty Ratings for Segregation of Musical Streams in Listeners with Impaired Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Marozeau, Jeremy; Blamey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background Enjoyment of music is an important part of life that may be degraded for people with hearing impairments, especially those using cochlear implants. The ability to follow separate lines of melody is an important factor in music appreciation. This ability relies on effective auditory streaming, which is much reduced in people with hearing impairment, contributing to difficulties in music appreciation. The aim of this study was to assess whether visual cues could reduce the subjective difficulty of segregating a melody from interleaved background notes in normally hearing listeners, those using hearing aids, and those using cochlear implants. Methodology/Principal Findings Normally hearing listeners (N = 20), hearing aid users (N = 10), and cochlear implant users (N = 11) were asked to rate the difficulty of segregating a repeating four-note melody from random interleaved distracter notes. The pitch of the background notes was gradually increased or decreased throughout blocks, providing a range of difficulty from easy (with a large pitch separation between melody and distracter) to impossible (with the melody and distracter completely overlapping). Visual cues were provided on half the blocks, and difficulty ratings for blocks with and without visual cues were compared between groups. Visual cues reduced the subjective difficulty of extracting the melody from the distracter notes for normally hearing listeners and cochlear implant users, but not hearing aid users. Conclusion/Significance Simple visual cues may improve the ability of cochlear implant users to segregate lines of music, thus potentially increasing their enjoyment of music. More research is needed to determine what type of acoustic cues to encode visually in order to optimise the benefits they may provide. PMID:22195046

  13. Auditory Preferences of Young Children with and without Hearing Loss for Meaningful Auditory-Visual Compound Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zupan, Barbra; Sussman, Joan E.

    2009-01-01

    Experiment 1 examined modality preferences in children and adults with normal hearing to combined auditory-visual stimuli. Experiment 2 compared modality preferences in children using cochlear implants participating in an auditory emphasized therapy approach to the children with normal hearing from Experiment 1. A second objective in both…

  14. PERSPECTIVE: Toward the development of a cortically based visual neuroprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normann, Richard A.; Greger, Bradley A.; House, Paul; Romero, Samuel F.; Pelayo, Francisco; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Motivated by the success of cochlear implants for deaf patients, we are now facing the goal of creating a visual neuroprosthesis designed to interface with the occipital cortex as a means through which a limited but useful sense of vision could be restored in profoundly blind patients. We review the most important challenges regarding this neuroprosthetic approach and emphasize the need for basic human psychophysical research on the best way of presenting complex stimulating patterns through multiple microelectrodes. Continued research will hopefully lead to the development of and design specifications for the first generation of a cortically based visual prosthesis system.

  15. Comparison of Auditory Perception in Cochlear Implanted Children with and without Additional Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Basir; Monshizadeh, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: The number of children with cochlear implants who have other difficulties such as attention deficiency and cerebral palsy has increased dramatically. Despite the need for information on the results of cochlear implantation in this group, the available literature is extremely limited. We, therefore, sought to compare the levels of auditory perception in children with cochlear implants with and without additional disabilities. Methods: A spondee test comprising 20 two-syllable words was performed. The data analysis was done using SPSS, version 19. Results: Thirty-one children who had received cochlear implants 2 years previously and were at an average age of 7.5 years were compared via the spondee test. From the 31 children, 15 had one or more additional disabilities. The data analysis indicated that the mean score of auditory perception in this group was approximately 30 scores below that of the children with cochlear implants who had no additional disabilities. Conclusion: Although there was an improvement in the auditory perception of all the children with cochlear implants, there was a noticeable difference in the level of auditory perception between those with and without additional disabilities. Deafness and additional disabilities depended the children on lip reading alongside the auditory ways of communication. In addition, the level of auditory perception in the children with cochlear implants who had more than one additional disability was significantly less than that of the other children with cochlear implants who had one additional disability. PMID:27217602

  16. Preliminary speech recognition results after cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral hearing loss: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cochlear implants known to provide support in individuals with bilateral hearing loss may also be of great benefit for individuals with unilateral hearing loss. This case report demonstrates the positive effects of cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise conditions in patients with unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing on the contralateral side. To the best of our knowledge, the data presented here are from the first few cases to receive a cochlear implant for unilateral hearing loss. Case presentation Four Caucasian German men, two aged 48 and the others aged 51 and 57 years old, with post-lingual unilateral hearing loss and normal hearing on the contralateral side were implanted with a cochlear implant. All our patients were members of the German army. Before and after implantation, they were given a battery of speech tests in different hearing conditions to assess the effect of unilateral cochlear implantation on speech understanding in noise conditions. Test results showed that all patients benefited from unilateral cochlear implantation, particularly in terms of speech understanding in noise conditions. Conclusions Unilateral cochlear implantation might be a successful treatment method for patients with unilateral hearing loss not benefiting from alternative treatment options. The results of this case report open up the field of cochlear implantation for expanded criteria and new areas of research. PMID:21810235

  17. Analogic and Symbolic Comparison of Numerosity in Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arfe, Barbara; Lucangeli, Daniela; Genovese, Elisabetta; Monzani, Daniele; Gubernale, Marco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Santarelli, Rosamaria

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how preschoolers with cochlear implants process numerical comparisons from two different inputs: a) nonverbal (analogical) and b) verbal (symbolic). Preschool cochlear-implanted children (CI) ranging in age from 4;3 to 6;1 were compared with 99 age-matched hearing children (HC) in three numerical tasks: verbal counting, a digit…

  18. Age-related cochlear synaptopathy: an early-onset contributor to auditory functional decline.

    PubMed

    Sergeyenko, Yevgeniya; Lall, Kumud; Liberman, M Charles; Kujawa, Sharon G

    2013-08-21

    Aging listeners experience greater difficulty understanding speech in adverse listening conditions and exhibit degraded temporal resolution, even when audiometric thresholds are normal. When threshold evidence for peripheral involvement is lacking, central and cognitive factors are often cited as underlying performance declines. However, previous work has uncovered widespread loss of cochlear afferent synapses and progressive cochlear nerve degeneration in noise-exposed ears with recovered thresholds and no hair cell loss (Kujawa and Liberman 2009). Here, we characterize age-related cochlear synaptic and neural degeneration in CBA/CaJ mice never exposed to high-level noise. Cochlear hair cell and neuronal function was assessed via distortion product otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses, respectively. Immunostained cochlear whole mounts and plastic-embedded sections were studied by confocal and conventional light microscopy to quantify hair cells, cochlear neurons, and synaptic structures, i.e., presynaptic ribbons and postsynaptic glutamate receptors. Cochlear synaptic loss progresses from youth (4 weeks) to old age (144 weeks) and is seen throughout the cochlea long before age-related changes in thresholds or hair cell counts. Cochlear nerve loss parallels the synaptic loss, after a delay of several months. Key functional clues to the synaptopathy are available in the neural response; these can be accessed noninvasively, enhancing the possibilities for translation to human clinical characterization. PMID:23966690

  19. Beginning To Talk at 20 Months: Early Vocal Development in a Young Cochlear Implant Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, David J.; Mellon, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    Early vocal development, consonant production, and spoken vocabulary were examined in a deaf toddler whose multichannel cochlear implant was activated at 20 months. The child understood almost 240 words and spoke approximately 90 words after one year of implant experience. The combination of early cochlear implantation, family support, and regular…

  20. Quality of life in bimodal hearing users (unilateral cochlear implants and contralateral hearing aids).

    PubMed

    Farinetti, A; Roman, S; Mancini, J; Baumstarck-Barrau, K; Meller, R; Lavieille, J P; Triglia, J M

    2015-11-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the bimodal self-rated benefits on auditory performance under real conditions and the quality of life in two groups of cochlear-implanted adults, with or without a contralateral hearing aid. The secondary objective was to investigate correlations between the use of a hearing aid and residual hearing on the non-implanted ear. This retrospective study was realized between 2000 and 2010 in two referral centers. A population of 183 postlingually deaf adults, implanted with a cochlear experience superior to 6 months, was selected. The Speech, Spatial, and other Qualities of Hearing Scale were administered to evaluate the auditory performances, and the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. The population was divided into two groups: a group with unilateral cochlear implants (Cochlear Implant-alone, n = 54), and a bimodal group with a cochlear implant and a contralateral hearing aid (n = 62). Both groups were similar in terms of auditory deprivation duration, duration of cochlear implant use, and pure-tone average on the implanted ear. There was a significant difference in terms of pure-tone average on low and low-to-mid frequencies on the non-implanted ear. The scores on both questionnaires showed an improvement in the basic sound perception and quality of social activities for the bimodal group. The results suggest that the bimodal stimulation (cochlear implant and contralateral hearing aid) improved auditory perception in quiet and the quality of life domain of social activities. PMID:25373837

  1. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  2. Children with Cochlear Implants and Developmental Disabilities: A Language Skills Study with Developmentally Matched Hearing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    The number of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) with significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. Unfortunately, children with additional disabilities receiving CIs have largely been excluded from studies on cochlear implant outcomes. Thus limited data exists on outcomes in this population to guide…

  3. Examining Multiple Sources of Influence on the Reading Comprehension Skills of Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Zwolan, Teresa A.

    2004-01-01

    Children with profound deafness are at risk for serious reading difficulties. Multiple factors affect their development of reading skills, including use of cochlear implants. Further, multiple factors influence the overall success that children experience with their cochlear implants. These factors include the age at which they receive an implant,…

  4. Phonological Awareness and Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Fey, Marc E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. Method: The sample comprised 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36…

  5. Children with Cochlear Implants in Australia: Educational Settings, Supports, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Renee; Hyde, Merv

    2010-01-01

    This Australian study examined the communication, academic, and social outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation from the perspectives of teachers working with children with cochlear implants. The children were aged from 1 to 18 years and attended a range of educational settings in early intervention, primary, and secondary schooling. One…

  6. The Self-Regulation of a Child with Cochlear Implants within a School Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Kristin L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research, which utilized a narrative design strategy, was to describe the process of self-regulation of a child who has bilateral cochlear implants within the social environment of school. The study investigated the use of self-regulatory strategies by the cochlear implant recipient. It also examined how the child…

  7. Examining Speech Sound Acquisition for Children with Cochlear Implants Using the GFTA-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines use of the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-Second Edition (GFTA-2) with children who use cochlear implants to evaluate whether or not it would be appropriate to use this test with this population. Participants included 15 children with cochlear implants who ranged in age of implantation and amount of implant experience.…

  8. Synchrony, Complexity and Directiveness in Mothers’ Interactions with Infants Pre- and Post-Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Mary K.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Morris, Kourtney J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of profound hearing loss on mother-infant interactions before and after cochlear implantation with a focus on maternal synchrony, complexity, and directiveness. Participants included two groups of mother-infant dyads: 9 dyads of mothers and infants with normal hearing; and 9 dyads of hearing mothers and infants with profound hearing loss. Dyads were observed at two time points: Time 1, scheduled to occur before cochlear implantation for infants with profound hearing loss (mean age = 13.6 months); and Time 2 (mean age = 23.3 months), scheduled to occur approximately six months after cochlear implantation. Hearing infants were age-matched to infants with hearing loss at both time points. Dependent variables included the proportion of maternal utterances that overlapped infant vocalizations, maternal mean length of utterance, infant word use, and combined maternal directives and prohibitions. Results showed mothers’ utterances overlapped the vocalizations of infants with hearing loss more often before cochlear implantation than after, mothers used less complex utterances with infants with cochlear implants compared to hearing peers (Time 2), and mothers of infants with profound hearing loss used frequent directives and prohibitions both before and after cochlear implantation. Together, mothers and infants adapted relatively quickly to infants’ access to cochlear implants, showing improved interactional synchrony, increased infant word use, and levels of maternal language complexity compatible with infants’ word use, all within seven months of cochlear implant activation. PMID:24793733

  9. Cyborgization: Deaf Education for Young Children in the Cochlear Implantation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    The author, who was raised oral deaf himself, recounts a visit to a school for young deaf children and discovers that young d/Deaf children and their rights are subverted by the cochlear implantation empire. The hypercapitalist, techno-manic times of cochlear implantation has wreaked havoc to the lives of not only young children with deafness but…

  10. Speech Perception for Adults Who Use Hearing Aids in Conjunction with Cochlear Implants in Opposite Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Mansze; Grayden, David; Dowell, Richard C.; Lawrence, David

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) investigate the effect of using a hearing aid in conjunction with a cochlear implant in opposite ears on speech perception in quiet and in noise, (b) identify the speech information obtained from a hearing aid that is additive to the information obtained from a cochlear implant, and (c) explore the relationship between…

  11. Educational Interpreters: Meeting the Communication Needs of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Julie; Higbee, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved cochlear implants for deaf and hard of hearing children, the number of children who have cochlear implants has increased in mainstream settings. Recent research suggests that these students, like their deaf and hard of hearing peers without implants who use sign language,…

  12. Contribution of Family Environment to Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users' Speech and Language Outcomes: Some Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Rachael Frush; Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Lalonde, Kaylah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the family environments of children with cochlear implants and to examine relationships between family environment and postimplant language development and executive function. Method: Forty-five families of children with cochlear implants completed a self-report family environment questionnaire (Family Environment Scale-Fourth…

  13. The olivocochlear reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity are independently modulated by auditory cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, Constantino D; Aedo, Cristian; León, Alex; Bowen, Macarena; Jara, Natalia; Terreros, Gonzalo; Robles, Luis; Delano, Paul H

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, efferent projections to the cochlear receptor are constituted by olivocochlear (OC) fibers that originate in the superior olivary complex. Medial and lateral OC neurons make synapses with outer hair cells and with auditory nerve fibers, respectively. In addition to the OC system, there are also descending projections from the auditory cortex that are directed towards the thalamus, inferior colliculus, cochlear nucleus, and superior olivary complex. Olivocochlear function can be assessed by measuring a brainstem reflex mediated by auditory nerve fibers, cochlear nucleus neurons, and OC fibers. Although it is known that the OC reflex is activated by contralateral acoustic stimulation and produces a suppression of cochlear responses, the influence of cortical descending pathways in the OC reflex is largely unknown. Here, we used auditory cortex electrical microstimulation in chinchillas to study a possible cortical modulation of cochlear and auditory nerve responses to tones in the absence and presence of contralateral noise. We found that cortical microstimulation produces two different peripheral modulations: (i) changes in cochlear sensitivity evidenced by amplitude modulation of cochlear microphonics and auditory nerve compound action potentials and (ii) enhancement or suppression of the OC reflex strength as measured by auditory nerve responses, which depended on the intersubject variability of the OC reflex. Moreover, both corticofugal effects were not correlated, suggesting the presence of two functionally different efferent pathways. These results demonstrate that auditory cortex electrical microstimulation independently modulates the OC reflex strength and cochlear sensitivity. PMID:25663383

  14. Negotiating Reassurance: Parents' Narratives on Follow-Up after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruin, Marieke; Ohna, Stein Erik

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of parental experiences on follow-up after cochlear implantation. Data were constructed in semi-structured, individual interviews with the parents of 14 children who use cochlear implants. Drawing on narrative analysis, the study explores parental responses to insecurity concerning children's learning and…

  15. Pediatric Cochlear Implants: An Overview of the Alternatives in Education and Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Judith M., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 10 papers is intended as a resource book integrating information on pediatric cochlear implants for educators, parents, implant teams, and rehabilitation specialists. The papers focus on the importance of providing an oral educational environment to maximize cochlear implant success. An introduction notes controversies in the…

  16. In search of the cochlear amplifier: New mechanical and molecular tools to probe transduction channel function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavitaki, K. Domenica; Indzhykulian, Artur A.; Zhang, Duan-Sun; Corey, David P.

    2015-12-01

    The study of mechanotransduction in cochlear hair cells requires stimulus methods that mimic the in-vivo stimulation. We have developed a new mechanical probe to better mimic the physiological stimulus delivered to cochlear hair cells through the overlying tectorial membrane. We combine these new probes with electroporation to study the contribution of different components of the transduction apparatus.

  17. Persistent Language Delay versus Late Language Emergence in Children with Early Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geers, Ann E.; Nicholas, Johanna; Tobey, Emily; Davidson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation is to differentiate children using cochlear implants (CIs) who did or did not achieve age-appropriate language scores by mid-elementary grades and to identify risk factors for persistent language delay following early cochlear implantation. Materials and Method: Children receiving unilateral CIs at…

  18. Speech and Literacy Development in a Child with a Cochlear Implant: Application of a Psycholinguistic Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascoe, Michelle; Randall-Pieterse, Candice; Geiger, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This single case study describes the speech, phonological awareness and literacy of a 6;0-year-old girl with a cochlear implant. NG, a child with a congenital bilateral severe/profound hearing loss, received a monaural cochlear implant at the age of 3;0, three years prior to the study. Using a psycholinguistic framework to investigate her single…

  19. Searching for Cochlear Implant Information on the Internet Maze: Implications for Parents and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Jamieson, Janet R.

    2004-01-01

    The present study has three purposes: (a) to determine who disseminates information on cochlear implants on the Web; (b) to describe a representative sample of Web sites that disseminate information on cochlear implants, with a focus on the content topics and their relevance to parents of deaf children; and (c) to discuss the practical issues of…

  20. [Scanning electron microscopy studies of the structure of tissue in the cochlear opening of the cochlear aqueduct].

    PubMed

    Galić, M; Giebel, W

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the internal and external tissue of the cochlear opening of the cochlear aquaeduct was examined by light microscopy on semithin sections and by scanning electron microscopy. The whole area is filled with a net of mesenchymal cells. The cell axes are randomly orientated inside the aquaeduct. On the outside of the cochlear aquaeduct fibrocytic tissue fills a space which is triangular in cross-section between the basal part of the cochlea wall of the tympanic scala and the middle portion of the round window membrane. In this area the direction of the net is uniform and it gives the impression of anchorage of the round window membrane on the perilymphatic side. The rim bordering the perilymphatic space is a dense net but not fully closed. The scanning electron microscopic pictures taken perpendicular to this border structure show clearly a texture of mesenchymal cells with open spaces. No closed "membrana limitans" was found. The possible function of the fixation of the round window membrane to the perilymphatic space giving rise to an asymmetric perilymph movement is discussed with regard to the physiology of sound transmission. PMID:3561119

  1. Cochlear implantation in the world's largest medical device market: Utilization and awareness of cochlear implants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Donna L.

    2013-01-01

    Provision of cochlear implants (CIs) for those within the criteria for implantation remains lower in the United States than in some other developed nations. When adults and children are grouped together, the rate of utilization/provision remains low at around 6%. For children, the provision rate is about 50% of those who could benefit from an implant, compared with figures of about 90% for the Flanders part of Belgium, the United Kingdom and other European countries. The probable reasons for this underprovision include: low awareness of the benefits of CIs among the population; low awareness among health-care professionals; the lack of specific referral pathways; some political issues relating to the Deaf Community; and financial issues related to health provision. Such financial issues result in situations which either fail to provide for access to implants or provide too low a level of the necessary funding, especially for low-income individuals covered by public health-care programs such as Medicaid. These issues might be mitigated by adoption and publication of standards for best clinical practices for CI provision, availability of current cost-effectiveness data, and the existence of an organization dedicated to cochlear implantation. Such an organization, the American Cochlear Implant Alliance (ACI Alliance), was recently organized and is described in the paper by Niparko et al. in this Supplement. PMID:23453146

  2. School failure in students who are normal-hearing or deaf: with or without cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ivone; Santos, Cristina Costa; Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of cochlear implants on the school failure of deaf who attend mainstream classes by comparing them to their normal-hearing peers as well as deaf without cochlear implants. This case-control study included participants aged 8-18 years. The number of school years failed was obtained from school records. The greatest differences in achievement levels were found between hearing students and those who were deaf without cochlear implants. Cochlear implants provide educational opportunities for hearing-impaired students, yet those without cochlear implants remain at a great disadvantage. These findings suggest that measures promoting greater equity and quality for all deaf students allow achievement levels closer to those of the not impaired. PMID:27026931

  3. Reactive Neurogenesis and Down-Regulation of the Potassium-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 in the Cochlear Nuclei after Cochlear Deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Dutheil, Sophie; Siponen, Marina I.; Noreña, Arnaud J.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have been devoted to investigating the homeostatic plasticity triggered by cochlear hearing loss, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these central changes remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of reactive neurogenesis after unilateral cochlear nerve section in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of cats. We found a strong cell proliferation in all the CN sub-divisions ipsilateral to the lesion. Most of the newly generated cells survive up to 1 month after cochlear deafferentation in all cochlear nuclei (except the dorsal CN) and give rise to a variety of cell types, i.e., microglial cells, astrocytes, and neurons. Interestingly, many of the newborn neurons had an inhibitory (GABAergic) phenotype. This result is intriguing since sensory deafferentation is usually accompanied by enhanced excitation, consistent with a reduction in central inhibition. The membrane potential effect of GABA depends, however, on the intra-cellular chloride concentration, which is maintained at low levels in adults by the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. The KCC2 density on the plasma membrane of neurons was then assessed after cochlear deafferentation in the cochlear nuclei ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Cochlear deafferentation is accompanied by a strong down-regulation of KCC2 ipsilateral to the lesion at 3 and 30 days post-lesion. This study suggests that reactive neurogenesis and down-regulation of KCC2 is part of the vast repertoire involved in homeostatic plasticity triggered by hearing loss. These central changes may also play a role in the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis.

  4. New strategies for high precision surgery of the temporal bone using a robotic approach for cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Klenzner, Thomas; Ngan, Chiu Chun; Knapp, Felix Bernhard; Knoop, Hayo; Kromeier, Jan; Aschendorff, Antje; Papastathopoulos, Evangelos; Raczkowsky, Joerg; Wörn, Heinz; Schipper, Joerg

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate a collision-free trajectory of an instrument through the facial recess to the site of planned cochleostomy guided by a surgery robot. The indication for cochlear implantation is still expanding toward more substantial residual hearing. A cochleostomy as atraumatic as possible will influence the preservation of inner ear function. The employment of a highly precise instrument guidance using a robot could represent a feasible solution for a constant reproducible surgical procedure. Screw markers for a point-based registration were fixed on a human temporal bone specimen prepared with a mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy. A DICOM dataset has been generated thereof in a 64-multislice computer tomography (CT). A virtual trajectory in a 3D model has been planned representing the path of instrumentation toward the desired spot of cochleostomy. A 1.9-mm endoscope has been mounted onto the robot system RobaCKa (Staeubli RX90CR) to visualize this trajectory. The target registration error added up to 0.25 mm, which met the desirable tolerance of <0.5 mm. A collision-free propagation of the endoscope into the tympanic cavity via the facial recess has been performed by the robot and the spot of cochleostomy could be visualized through the endoscope. Using a DICOM dataset of a high-resolution CT and a robot as a positioning platform for surgical instruments could be a feasible approach to perform a highly precise and constant reproducible cochleostomy. Furthermore, it could be a crucial step to preserve substantial residual hearing in terms of expanding the indications for cochlear implantation. PMID:19015866

  5. Visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, R; Masjuan, J

    2016-03-01

    Visual agnosia is defined as an impairment of object recognition, in the absence of visual acuity or cognitive dysfunction that would explain this impairment. This condition is caused by lesions in the visual association cortex, sparing primary visual cortex. There are 2 main pathways that process visual information: the ventral stream, tasked with object recognition, and the dorsal stream, in charge of locating objects in space. Visual agnosia can therefore be divided into 2 major groups depending on which of the two streams is damaged. The aim of this article is to conduct a narrative review of the various visual agnosia syndromes, including recent developments in a number of these syndromes. PMID:26358494

  6. Emergence of band-pass filtering through adaptive spiking in the owl's cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Bertrand; MacLeod, Katrina M; Lubejko, Susan T; Steinberg, Louisa J; Köppl, Christine; Peña, Jose L

    2014-07-15

    In the visual, auditory, and electrosensory modalities, stimuli are defined by first- and second-order attributes. The fast time-pressure signal of a sound, a first-order attribute, is important, for instance, in sound localization and pitch perception, while its slow amplitude-modulated envelope, a second-order attribute, can be used for sound recognition. Ascending the auditory pathway from ear to midbrain, neurons increasingly show a preference for the envelope and are most sensitive to particular envelope modulation frequencies, a tuning considered important for encoding sound identity. The level at which this tuning property emerges along the pathway varies across species, and the mechanism of how this occurs is a matter of debate. In this paper, we target the transition between auditory nerve fibers and the cochlear nucleus angularis (NA). While the owl's auditory nerve fibers simultaneously encode the fast and slow attributes of a sound, one synapse further, NA neurons encode the envelope more efficiently than the auditory nerve. Using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology and computational analysis, we show that a single-cell mechanism inducing spike threshold adaptation can explain the difference in neural filtering between the two areas. We show that spike threshold adaptation can explain the increased selectivity to modulation frequency, as input level increases in NA. These results demonstrate that a spike generation nonlinearity can modulate the tuning to second-order stimulus features, without invoking network or synaptic mechanisms. PMID:24790170

  7. Emergence of band-pass filtering through adaptive spiking in the owl's cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Katrina M.; Lubejko, Susan T.; Steinberg, Louisa J.; Köppl, Christine; Peña, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    In the visual, auditory, and electrosensory modalities, stimuli are defined by first- and second-order attributes. The fast time-pressure signal of a sound, a first-order attribute, is important, for instance, in sound localization and pitch perception, while its slow amplitude-modulated envelope, a second-order attribute, can be used for sound recognition. Ascending the auditory pathway from ear to midbrain, neurons increasingly show a preference for the envelope and are most sensitive to particular envelope modulation frequencies, a tuning considered important for encoding sound identity. The level at which this tuning property emerges along the pathway varies across species, and the mechanism of how this occurs is a matter of debate. In this paper, we target the transition between auditory nerve fibers and the cochlear nucleus angularis (NA). While the owl's auditory nerve fibers simultaneously encode the fast and slow attributes of a sound, one synapse further, NA neurons encode the envelope more efficiently than the auditory nerve. Using in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology and computational analysis, we show that a single-cell mechanism inducing spike threshold adaptation can explain the difference in neural filtering between the two areas. We show that spike threshold adaptation can explain the increased selectivity to modulation frequency, as input level increases in NA. These results demonstrate that a spike generation nonlinearity can modulate the tuning to second-order stimulus features, without invoking network or synaptic mechanisms. PMID:24790170

  8. Benefits of Music Training in Mandarin-Speaking Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, John J.; Wang, Xiaosong; Wu, Jiunn-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to assess young (5- to 10-year-old) Mandarin-speaking cochlear implant (CI) users' musical pitch perception and to assess the benefits of computer-based home training on performance. Method Melodic contour identification (MCI) was used to assess musical pitch perception in 14 Mandarin-speaking pediatric CI users; the instrument timbre and the contour length were varied as experimental parameters. Six subjects received subsequent MCI training on their home computer in which auditory and visual feedback were provided. Results MCI performance was generally poor (grand mean = 33.3% correct) and highly variable, with scores ranging from 9.3% to 98.1% correct; there was no significant effect of instrument timbre or contour length on performance (p > .05). After 4 weeks of training, performance sharply improved. Follow-up measures that were conducted 8 weeks after training was stopped showed no significant decline in MCI performance. For the 6 trained subjects, there was a significant effect of contour length for the training and follow-up measures. Conclusion These preliminary data suggest that although baseline MCI performance initially may be poor, training may greatly improve Mandarin-speaking pediatric CI users' melodic pitch perception. PMID:25321148

  9. Early unilateral cochlear implantation promotes mature cortical asymmetries in adolescents who are deaf.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Salima; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral cochlear implant (CI) stimulation establishes hearing to children who are deaf but compromises bilateral auditory development if a second implant is not provided within ∼ 1.5 years. In this study we asked: 1) What are the cortical consequences of missing this early sensitive period once children reach adolescence? 2) What are the effects of unilateral deprivation on the pathways from the opposite ear? Cortical responses were recorded from 64-cephalic electrodes within the first week of bilateral CI activation in 34 adolescents who had over 10 years of unilateral right CI experience and in 16 normal hearing peers. Cortical activation underlying the evoked peaks was localized to areas of the brain using beamformer imaging. The first CI evoked activity which was more strongly lateralized to the contralateral left hemisphere than normal, with abnormal recruitment of the left prefrontal cortex (involved in cognition/attention), left temporo-parietal-occipital junction (multi-modal integration), and right precuneus (visual processing) region. CI stimulation in the opposite deprived ear evoked atypical cortical responses with abnormally large and widespread dipole activity across the cortex. Thus, using a unilateral CI to hear beyond the period of cortical maturation causes lasting asymmetries in the auditory system, requires recruitment of additional cortical areas to support hearing, and does little to protect the unstimulated pathways from effects of auditory deprivation. The persistence of this reorganization into maturity could signal a closing of a sensitive period for promoting auditory development on the deprived side. PMID:26456629

  10. Indication criteria for cochlear implants and hearing aids: impact of audiological and non-audiological findings

    PubMed Central

    Haumann, Sabine; Hohmann, Volker; Meis, Markus; Herzke, Tobias; Lenarz, Thomas; Büchner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Owing to technological progress and a growing body of clinical experience, indication criteria for cochlear implants (CI) are being extended to less severe hearing impairments. It is, therefore, worth reconsidering these indication criteria by introducing novel testing procedures. The diagnostic evidence collected will be evaluated. The investigation includes postlingually deafened adults seeking a CI. Prior to surgery, speech perception tests [Freiburg Speech Test and Oldenburg sentence (OLSA) test] were performed unaided and aided using the Oldenburg Master Hearing Aid (MHA) system. Linguistic skills were assessed with the visual Text Reception Threshold (TRT) test, and general state of health, socio-economic status (SES) and subjective hearing were evaluated through questionnaires. After surgery, the speech tests were repeated aided with a CI. To date, 97 complete data sets are available for evaluation. Statistical analyses showed significant correlations between postsurgical speech reception threshold (SRT) measured with the adaptive OLSA test and pre-surgical data such as the TRT test (r=−0.29), SES (r=−0.22) and (if available) aided SRT (r=0.53). The results suggest that new measures and setups such as the TRT test, SES and speech perception with the MHA provide valuable extra information regarding indication for CI. PMID:26557327

  11. Distribution of Ca2+ channels on cochlear outer hair cells revealed by fluorescent dihydropyridines.

    PubMed

    Oshima, T; Ikeda, K; Furukawa, M; Ueda, N; Suzuki, H; Takasaka, T

    1996-09-01

    Physiological evidence has shown that cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) possess L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels through which Ca2+ enters the OHC during depolarization. Their subcellular distribution has, however, remained unclear. In this study, the distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels on the basolateral plasma membrane of OHC has been demonstrated by the use of a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) and a fluorescent probe DMBODIPY-DHP. The fluorescent staining pattern on the basolateral wall is nonuniform, suggesting a heterogeneous distribution of the channels in the plasma membrane. Direct imaging of intracellular Ca2+ visualized in real time by means of the LSCM and the fluorescent Ca2+ probe fluo 3 revealed temporal and spatial integration of Ca2+ movements and Ca2+ channel distribution. Exposure to high-K+ solution induced heterogeneity in the subcellular increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results suggest that the heterogeneous distribution of L-type Ca2+ channels on the basolateral membrane might induce heterogeneous intracellular Ca2+ distribution during electrical activity in the OHC. PMID:8843725

  12. Age-Dependent Cost-Utility of Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Yevgeniy R.; Yeh, Susan T.; Seshamani, Meena; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Tobey, Emily A.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Frick, Kevin D.; Niparko, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cochlear implantation has become the mainstay of treatment for children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Yet, despite mounting evidence on the clinical benefits of early implantation, little data are available on the long-term societal benefits and comparative effectiveness of this procedure across various ages of implantation--a choice parameter for parents and clinicians with high prognostic value for clinical outcome. As such, the aim of the current study is to evaluate a model of the consequences of the timing of this intervention from a societal economic perspective. Average cost-utility of pediatric cochlear implantation by age at intervention will be analyzed. Design Prospective, longitudinal assessment of health-utility and educational placement outcomes in 175 children recruited from 6 US centers between November 2002 and December 2004, who had severe-to-profound SNHL onset within 1 year of age, underwent cochlear implantation before 5 years of age, and had up to 6 years of post-implant follow-up that ended in November 2008 to December 2011. Costs of care were collected retrospectively and stratified by pre-operative, operative, and post-operative expenditures. Incremental costs and benefits of implantation were compared between the three age groups and relative to a non-implantation baseline. Results Children implanted at <18 months of age gained an average of 10.7 QALYs over their projected lifetime as compared to 9.0 and 8.4 QALYs for those implanted between 18 and 36 months and at >36 months of age, respectively. Medical and surgical complication rates were not significantly different between the 3 age groups. Additionally, mean lifetime costs of implantation were similar between the 3 groups, at approximately $2,000/child/year (77.5 year life expectancy), yielding costs of $14,996, $17,849, and $19,173 per QALY for the youngest, middle, and oldest implant age groups, respectively. Full mainstream classroom

  13. The dolphin cochlear nucleus: topography, histology and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Malkemper, E P; Oelschläger, H H A; Huggenberger, S

    2012-02-01

    Despite the outstanding auditory capabilities of dolphins, there is only limited information available on the cytology of the auditory brain stem nuclei in these animals. Here, we investigated the cochlear nuclei (CN) of five brains of common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) and La Plata dolphins (Pontoporia blainvillei) using cell and fiber stain microslide series representing the three main anatomical planes. In general, the CN in dolphins comprise the same set of subnuclei as in other mammals. However, the volume ratio of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) in relation to the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of dolphins represents a minimum among the mammals examined so far. Because, for example, in cats the DCN is necessary for reflexive orientation of the head and pinnae towards a sound source, the massive restrictions in head movability in dolphins and the absence of outer ears may be correlated with the reduction of the DCN. Moreover, the same set of main neuron types were found in the dolphin CN as in other mammals, including octopus and multipolar cells. Because the latter two types of neurons are thought to be involved in the recognition of complex sounds, including speech, we suggest that, in dolphins, they may be involved in the processing of their communication signals. Comparison of the toothed whale species studied here revealed that large spherical cells were present in the La Plata dolphin but absent in the common dolphin. These neurons are known to be engaged in the processing of low-frequency sounds in terrestrial mammals. Accordingly, in the common dolphin, the absence of large spherical cells seems to be correlated with a shift of its auditory spectrum into the high-frequency range above 20 kHz. The existence of large spherical cells in the VCN of the La Plata dolphin, however, is enigmatic asthis species uses frequencies around 130 kHz. PMID:21987441

  14. Medial olivocochlear efferent reflex inhibition of human cochlear nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Lichtenhan, J T; Wilson, U S; Hancock, K E; Guinan, J J

    2016-03-01

    Inhibition of cochlear amplifier gain by the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent system has several putative roles: aiding listening in noise, protection against damage from acoustic overexposure, and slowing age-induced hearing loss. The human MOC reflex has been studied almost exclusively by measuring changes in otoacoustic emissions. However, to help understand how the MOC system influences what we hear, it is important to have measurements of the MOC effect on the total output of the organ of Corti, i.e., on cochlear nerve responses that couple sounds to the brain. In this work we measured the inhibition produced by the MOC reflex on the amplitude of cochlear nerve compound action potentials (CAPs) in response to moderate level (52-60 dB peSPL) clicks from five, young, normal hearing, awake, alert, human adults. MOC activity was elicited by 65 dB SPL, contralateral broadband noise (CAS). Using tympanic membrane electrodes, approximately 10 h of data collection were needed from each subject to yield reliable measurements of the MOC reflex inhibition on CAP amplitudes from one click level. The CAS produced a 16% reduction of CAP amplitude, equivalent to a 1.98 dB effective attenuation (averaged over five subjects). Based on previous reports of efferent effects as functions of level and frequency, it is possible that much larger effective attenuations would be observed at lower sound levels or with clicks of higher frequency content. For a preliminary comparison, we also measured MOC reflex inhibition of DPOAEs evoked from the same ears with f2's near 4 kHz. The resulting effective attenuations on DPOAEs were, on average, less than half the effective attenuations on CAPs. PMID:26364824

  15. Ototoxicity of paclitaxel in rat cochlear organotypic cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Dalian; Jiang, Haiyan; Shi, Jian-rong; Salvi, Richard; Roth, Jerome A.

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used antineoplastic drug employed alone or in combination to treat many forms of cancer. Paclitaxel blocks microtubule depolymerization thereby stabilizing microtubules and suppressing cell proliferation and other cellular processes. Previous reports indicate that paclitaxel can cause mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss and some histopathologic changes in the mouse cochlea; however, damage to the neurons and the underlying cell death mechanisms are poorly understood. To evaluate the ototoxicity of paclitaxel in more detail, cochlear organotypic cultures from postnatal day 3 rats were treated with paclitaxel for 24 or 48 h with doses ranging from 1 to 30 μM. No obvious histopathologies were observed after 24 h treatment with any of the paclitaxel doses employed, but with 48 h treatment, paclitaxel damaged cochlear hair cells in a dose-dependent manner and also damaged auditory nerve fibers and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) near the base of the cochlea. TUNEL labeling was negative in the organ of Corti, but positive in SGN with karyorrhexis 48 h after 30 μM paclitaxel treatment. In addition, caspase-6, caspase-8 and caspase-9 labeling was present in SGN treated with 30 μM paclitaxel for 48 h. These results suggest that caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways are involved in paclitaxel-induced damage of SGN, but not hair cells in cochlea. - Highlights: • Paclitaxel was toxic to cochlear hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. • Paclitaxel-induced spiral ganglion degeneration was apoptotic. • Paclitaxel activated caspase-6, -8 and -8 in spiral ganglion neurons.

  16. Perceptual fusion of polyphonic pitch in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Patrick J; Guo, Benjamin Z; Limb, Charles J

    2009-11-01

    In music, multiple pitches often occur simultaneously, an essential feature of harmony. In the present study, the authors assessed the ability of cochlear implant (CI) users to perceive polyphonic pitch. Acoustically presented stimuli consisted of one, two, or three superposed tones with different fundamental frequencies (f(0)). The normal hearing control group obtained significantly higher mean scores than the CI group. CI users performed near chance levels in recognizing two- and three-pitch stimuli, and demonstrated perceptual fusion of multiple pitches as single-pitch units. These results suggest that limitations in polyphonic pitch perception may significantly impair music perception in CI users. PMID:19894787

  17. Precedence based speech segregation in bilateral cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shaikat; Montazeri, Vahid; Assmann, Peter F; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2015-12-01

    The precedence effect (PE) enables the perceptual dominance by a source (lead) over an echo (lag) in reverberant environments. In addition to facilitating sound localization, the PE can play an important role in spatial unmasking of speech. Listeners attending to binaural vocoder simulations with identical channel center frequencies and phase demonstrated PE-based benefits in a closed-set speech segregation task. When presented with the same stimuli, bilateral cochlear implant users did not derive such benefits. These findings suggest that envelope extraction in itself may not lead to a breakdown of the PE benefits, and that other factors may play a role. PMID:26723365

  18. Deprivation-induced cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anu; Gilley, Phillip M; Dorman, Michael F; Baldwin, Robert

    2007-09-01

    A basic finding in developmental neurophysiology is that some areas of the cortex cortical areas will reorganize following a period of stimulus deprivation. In this review, we discuss mainly electroencephalography (EEG) studies of normal and deprivation-induced abnormal development of the central auditory pathways in children and in animal models. We describe age cut-off for sensitive periods for central auditory development in congenitally deaf children who are fitted with a cochlear implant. We speculate on mechanisms of decoupling and reorganization which may underlie the end of the sensitive period. Finally, we describe new magentoencephalography (MEG) evidence of somatosensory cross-modal plasticity following long-term auditory deprivation. PMID:17828665

  19. Systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked via endolymph into cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhe; Steyger, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics rapidly enter and kill cochlear hair cells via apical mechanoelectrical transduction (MET) channels in vitro. In vivo, it remains unknown whether systemically-administered aminoglycosides cross the blood-labyrinth barrier into endolymph and enter hair cells. Here we show, for the first time, that systemic aminoglycosides are trafficked across the blood-endolymph barrier and preferentially enter hair cells across their apical membranes. This trafficking route is predominant compared to uptake via hair cell basolateral membranes during perilymph infusion. PMID:22355674

  20. Research directions for future generations of cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Clark, Graeme

    2004-09-01

    Physiological and psychophysical research indicates that improved hearing in noise and music appreciation are likely with cochlear implants, with better reproduction of the fine temporospatial patterns of neural response in the auditory pathways due to phase differences in neuron firing patterns as the result of the basilar membrane travelling wave. An initial speech-processing strategy, to in part reproduce this information, is showing better frequency discrimination and musical perception. However, more exact reproduction is likely with a new generation electrode array which could involve the use of neurotrophins and inherently conducting polymers. The siting and design of this, as well as safety, needs further investigation before it is implemented. PMID:18792214

  1. Speech recognition for 40 patients receiving multichannel cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Dowell, R C; Mecklenburg, D J; Clark, G M

    1986-10-01

    We collected data on 40 patients who received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant. Results were reviewed to determine if the coding strategy is effective in transmitting the intended speech features and to assess patient benefit in terms of communication skills. All patients demonstrated significant improvement over preoperative results with a hearing aid for both lipreading enhancement and speech recognition without lipreading. Of the patients, 50% demonstrated ability to understand connected discourse with auditory input only. For the 23 patients who were tested 12 months postoperatively, there was substantial improvement in open-set speech recognition. PMID:3755975

  2. Precedence based speech segregation in bilateral cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Shaikat; Montazeri, Vahid; Assmann, Peter F.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2015-01-01

    The precedence effect (PE) enables the perceptual dominance by a source (lead) over an echo (lag) in reverberant environments. In addition to facilitating sound localization, the PE can play an important role in spatial unmasking of speech. Listeners attending to binaural vocoder simulations with identical channel center frequencies and phase demonstrated PE-based benefits in a closed-set speech segregation task. When presented with the same stimuli, bilateral cochlear implant users did not derive such benefits. These findings suggest that envelope extraction in itself may not lead to a breakdown of the PE benefits, and that other factors may play a role. PMID:26723365

  3. Improved fundamental frequency coding in cochlear implant signal processing.

    PubMed

    Milczynski, Matthias; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2009-04-01

    A new signal processing algorithm for improved pitch perception in cochlear implants is proposed. The algorithm realizes fundamental frequency (F0) coding by explicitly modulating the amplitude of the electrical stimulus. The proposed processing scheme is compared with the standard advanced combination encoder strategy in psychophysical music perception related tasks. Possible filter-bank and loudness cues between the strategies under study were minimized to predominantly focus on differences in temporal processing. The results demonstrate significant benefits provided by the new coding strategy for pitch ranking, melodic contour identification, and familiar melody identification. PMID:19354401

  4. Contour identification with pitch and loudness cues using cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Masterson, Megan E; Wu, Ching-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Different from speech, pitch and loudness cues may or may not co-vary in music. Cochlear implant (CI) users with poor pitch perception may use loudness contour cues more than normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Contour identification was tested in CI users and NH listeners; the five-note contours contained either pitch cues alone, loudness cues alone, or both. Results showed that NH listeners' contour identification was better with pitch cues than with loudness cues; CI users performed similarly with either cues. When pitch and loudness cues were co-varied, CI performance significantly improved, suggesting that CI users were able to integrate the two cues. PMID:24437857

  5. Using channel-specific statistical models to detect reverberation in cochlear implant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Jill M; Collins, Leslie M; Throckmorton, Chandra S

    2013-08-01

    Reverberation is especially detrimental for cochlear implant listeners; thus, mitigating its effects has the potential to provide significant improvements to cochlear implant communication. Efforts to model and correct for reverberation in acoustic listening scenarios can be quite complex, requiring estimation of the room transfer function and localization of the source and receiver. However, due to the limited resolution associated with cochlear implant stimulation, simpler processing for reverberation detection and mitigation may be possible for cochlear implants. This study models speech stimuli in a cochlear implant on a per-channel basis both in quiet and in reverberation, and assesses the efficacy of these models for detecting the presence of reverberation. This study was able to successfully detect reverberation in cochlear implant pulse trains, and the results appear to be robust to varying room conditions and cochlear implant stimulation parameters. Reverberant signals were detected 100% of the time for a long reverberation time of 1.2 s and 86% of the time for a shorter reverberation time of 0.5 s. PMID:23927111

  6. The role of G protein-coupled receptors in cochlear planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinpeng; Zhang, Daolai; Wang, Yanfei; Lin, Hal; Yu, Xiao; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is defined as the coordinated alignment of cell polarity across the tissue plane, which is important for the integration of cells into tissues. One of the best examples of PCP is in the cochlear epithelium. Several core PCP proteins have been identified to play important roles in PCP regulation, in which these proteins form complexes and associate with the cell membrane asymmetrically, mediating intercellular PCP signal transduction. Among the core PCP proteins are two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Celsr and Frizzled, both of which have been shown to play important roles in cochlear PCP regulation. Celsr and Frizzled genes are expressed in the cochlear sensory epithelium, and Frizzled1, 2, 3 and 6 show asymmetric localizations on the cell membrane of hair cells or supporting cells. In the animal model, Celsr1, Frizzled2 and Frizzled3/6 mutant or knockout mice have profound cochlear PCP deficits. Downstream of GPCR signaling, Gαi was shown to asymmetrically localize on the apical surface of hair cells, together with LGN and mInsc, Gαi controls cochlear PCP in a cell-autonomous way. Inactivity of Gαi, LGN or mInsc results in PCP deficits in the mouse cochlea. We hypothesize that GPCR-Gαi coupling plays a pivotal role in cochlear PCP regulation via connecting the intercellular PCP signals with cell-autonomous PCP machinery. Further investigations are needed to fully understand the mechanism of cochlear PCP regulation. PMID:26921719

  7. Speech Perception Outcomes after Cochlear Implantation in Children with GJB2/DFNB1 associated Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Davcheva-Chakar, Marina; Sukarova-Stefanovska, Emilija; Ivanovska, Valentina; Lazarevska, Vesna; Filipche, Ilija; Zafirovska, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cochlear implants (CI) for the rehabilitation of patients with profound or total bilateral sensorineural hypoacusis represent the initial use of electrical fields to provide audibility in cases where the use of sound amplifiers does not provide satisfactory results. Aims: To compare speech perception performance after cochlear implantation in children with connexin 26-associated deafness with that of a control group of children with deafness of unknown etiology. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: During the period from 2006 to, cochlear implantation was performed on 26 children. Eighteen of these children had undergone genetic tests for mutation of the Gap Junction Protein Beta 2 (GJB2) gene. Bi-allelic GJB2 mutations were confirmed in 7 out of 18 examined children. In order to confirm whether genetic factors have influence on speech perception after cochlear implantation, we compared the post-implantation speech performance of seven children with mutations of the GBJ2 (connexin 26) gene with seven other children who had the wild type version of this particular gene. The latter were carefully matched according to the age at cochlear implantation. Speech perception performance was measured before cochlear implantation, and one and two years after implantation. All the patients were arranged in line with the appropriate speech perception category (SPC). Non-parametric tests, Friedman ANOVA and Mann-Whitney’s U test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Both groups showed similar improvements in speech perception scores after cochlear implantation. Statistical analysis did not confirm significant differences between the groups 12 and 24 months after cochlear implantation. Conclusion: The results obtained in this study showed an absence of apparent distinctions in the scores of speech perception between the two examined groups and therefore might have significant implications in selecting prognostic indicators of speech

  8. Event-related potentials for better speech perception in noise by cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Soshi, Takahiro; Hisanaga, Satoko; Kodama, Narihiro; Kanekama, Yori; Samejima, Yasuhiro; Yumoto, Eiji; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2014-10-01

    Speech perception in noise is still difficult for cochlear implant (CI) users even with many years of CI use. This study aimed to investigate neurophysiological and behavioral foundations for CI-dependent speech perception in noise. Seventeen post-lingual CI users and twelve age-matched normal hearing adults participated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, CI users' auditory-only word perception in noise (white noise, two-talker babble; at 10 dB SNR) degraded by about 15%, compared to that in quiet (48% accuracy). CI users' auditory-visual word perception was generally better than auditory-only perception. Auditory-visual word perception was degraded under information masking by the two-talker noise (69% accuracy), compared to that in quiet (77%). Such degradation was not observed for white noise (77%), suggesting that the overcoming of information masking is an important issue for CI users' speech perception improvement. In Experiment 2, event-related cortical potentials were recorded in an auditory oddball task in quiet and noise (white noise only). Similarly to the normal hearing participants, the CI users showed the mismatch negative response (MNR) to deviant speech in quiet, indicating automatic speech detection. In noise, the MNR disappeared in the CI users, and only the good CI performers (above 66% accuracy) showed P300 (P3) like the normal hearing participants. P3 amplitude in the CI users was positively correlated with speech perception scores. These results suggest that CI users' difficulty in speech perception in noise is associated with the lack of automatic speech detection indicated by the MNR. Successful performance in noise may begin with attended auditory processing indicated by P3. PMID:25158303

  9. Measuring Success: Cost-Effectiveness and Expanding Access to Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, James E; Francis, Howard W; Skarzynski, Piotr H

    2016-02-01

    Only a small fraction of patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss have access to cochlear implantation with the majority of these affected people living in developing countries. Cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an important tool to demonstrate the value of this technology to healthcare policy makers. This approach requires that hearing healthcare professionals incorporate methods of assessing long-term benefits of cochlear implantation that include psychosocial, quality of life, and disability outcomes. This review explores different aspects of CEA methodology relevant to cochlear implants and discusses ways that we can improve global access by addressing factors that influence cost-effectiveness. PMID:26756147

  10. A newborn with three cochlear turns: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hildrew, Douglas M; Ananth, Ashwin; Rodriguez, Kimsey H

    2016-02-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: The human cochlea is most commonly considered to have two and a half turns. Although the causes of cochlear hypoplasia are well described, cochlear hyperplasia is a rarer entity that is poorly understood. We describe rare anatomic cochlear malformations identified in a 4-month-old male originally referred for evaluation after a failed newborn hearing screening. The full diagnostic evaluation, imaging findings, treatment, and follow-up are described in detail. Cochleae with three turns are an uncommon malformation that is not included in current classifications schemes and may represent a distinct type of anomaly not caused by developmental arrest. PMID:26308370

  11. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf--Cochlear Implants: a Technical and Personal Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2006-04-01

    Cochlear implants are the first device to successfully restore neural function. They have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. In this talk the physiology of natural hearing will be reviewed from the perspective of a physicist, and the function of cochlear implants will be described in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. The social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses will also be discussed.

  12. Fiber-optic bending sensor for cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Cochlear implantation has been proved as a great success in treating profound sensorineural deafness in both children and adults. Cochlear electrode array implantation is a complex and delicate surgical process. Surgically induced damage to the inner wall of the scala tympani could happen if the insertion angle of the electrode is incorrect and an excessive insertion force is applied to the electrode. This damage could lead to severe degeneration of the remaining neural elements. It is therefore of vital importance to monitor the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation surgery. In this paper, we report a fiber-optic bending sensor which can be integrated with the electrode and used to guide the implantation process. The sensor consists of a piece of optical fiber. The end of the fiber is coated with aluminum layer to form a mirror. Bending the fiber with the electrode introduces loss to the light transmitting in the fiber. By detecting the power of the reflected light, we can detennine the bending happened to the fiber, and consequently measure the curved shape of the electrode. Experimental results show that the proposed fiber sensor is a promising technique to make in-situ monitoring of the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation process.

  13. Cochlear anatomy using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkeun; Yoon, Yongjin; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2008-02-01

    A novel micro computed tomography (μCT) image processing method was implemented to measure anatomical features of the gerbil and chinchilla cochleas, taking into account the bent modailosis axis. Measurements were made of the scala vestibule (SV) area, the scala tympani (SV) area, and the basilar membrane (BM) width using prepared cadaveric temporal bones. 3-D cochlear structures were obtained from the scanned images using a process described in this study. It was necessary to consider the sharp curvature of mododailosis axis near the basal region. The SV and ST areas were calculated from the μCT reconstructions and compared with existing data obtained by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM), showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement. In addition to this, the width of the BM, which is the distance between the primary and secondary osseous spiral laminae, is calculated for the two animals and compared with previous data from the MRM method. For the gerbil cochlea, which does not have much cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina, the μCT-based BM width measurements show good agreement with previous data. The chinchilla BM, which contains more cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina than the gerbil, shows a large difference in the BM widths between the μCT and MRM methods. The SV area, ST area, and BM width measurements from this study can be used in building an anatomically based mathematical cochlear model.

  14. Forward-masked spatial tuning curves in cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David A.; Donaldson, Gail S.; Kreft, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Forward-masked psychophysical spatial tuning curves (fmSTCs) were measured in twelve cochlear-implant subjects, six using bipolar stimulation (Nucleus devices)and six using monopolar stimulation (Clarion devices). fmSTCs were measured at several probe levels on a middle electrode using a fixed-level probe stimulus and variable-level maskers. The average fmSTC slopes obtained in subjects using bipolar stimulation (3.7 dB/mm) were approximately three times steeper than average slopes obtained in subjects using monopolar stimulation (1.2 dB/mm). Average spatial bandwidths were about half as wide for subjects with bipolar stimulation (2.6 mm) than for subjects with monopolar stimulation (4.6 mm). None of the tuning curve characteristics changed significantly with probe level. fmSTCs replotted in terms of acoustic frequency, using Greenwood’s [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 33, 1344–1356 (1961)] frequency-to-place equation, were compared with forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves obtained previously from normal-hearing and hearing-impaired acoustic listeners. The average tuning characteristics of fmSTCs in electric hearing were similar to the broad tuning observed in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired acoustic listeners at high stimulus levels. This suggests that spatial tuning is not the primary factor limiting speech perception in many cochlear implant users. PMID:18345841

  15. Toward automated cochlear implant insertion using tubular manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granna, Josephine; Rau, Thomas S.; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    During manual cochlear implant electrode insertion the surgeon is at risk to damage the intracochlear fine-structure, as the electrode array is inserted through a small opening in the cochlea blindly with little force-feedback. This paper addresses a novel concept for cochlear electrode insertion using tubular manipulators to reduce risks of causing trauma during insertion and to automate the insertion process. We propose a tubular manipulator incorporated into the electrode array composed of an inner wire within a tube, both elastic and helically shaped. It is our vision to use this manipulator to actuate the initially straight electrode array during insertion into the cochlea by actuation of the wire and tube, i.e. translation and slight axial rotation. In this paper, we evaluate the geometry of the human cochlea in 22 patient datasets in order to derive design requirements for the manipulator. We propose an optimization algorithm to automatically determine the tube set parameters (curvature, torsion, diameter, length) for an ideal final position within the cochlea. To prove our concept, we demonstrate that insertion can be realized in a follow-the-leader fashion for 19 out of 22 cochleas. This is possible with only 4 different tube/wire sets.

  16. Enduring Advantages of Early Cochlear Implantation for Spoken Language Development

    PubMed Central

    Geers, Ann E.; Nicholas, Johanna G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the precise age of implantation (AOI) remains an important predictor of spoken language outcomes in later childhood for those who received a cochlear implant (CI) between 12–38 months of age. Relative advantages of receiving a bilateral CI after age 4.5, better pre-CI aided hearing, and longer CI experience were also examined. Method Sixty children participated in a prospective longitudinal study of outcomes at 4.5 and 10.5 years of age. Twenty-nine children received a sequential second CI. Test scores were compared to normative samples of hearing age-mates and predictors of outcomes identified. Results Standard scores on language tests at 10.5 years of age remained significantly correlated with age of first cochlear implantation. Scores were not associated with receipt of a second, sequentially-acquired CI. Significantly higher scores were achieved for vocabulary as compared with overall language, a finding not evident when the children were tested at younger ages. Conclusion Age-appropriate spoken language skills continued to be more likely with younger AOI, even after an average of 8.6 years of additional CI use. Receipt of a second implant between ages 4–10 years and longer duration of device use did not provide significant added benefit. PMID:23275406

  17. Bilingualism: A Pearl to Overcome Certain Perils of Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Tom; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Napoli, Donna Jo; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian; Smith, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated success in improving young deaf children’s speech and low-level speech awareness across a range of auditory functions, but this success is highly variable, and how this success correlates to high-level language development is even more variable. Prevalence on the success rate of CI as an outcome for language development is difficult to obtain because studies vary widely in methodology and variables of interest, and because not all cochlear implant technology (which continues to evolve) is the same. Still, even if the notion of treatment failure is limited narrowly to those who gain no auditory benefit from CI in that they cannot discriminate among ambient noises, the reported treatment failure rate is high enough to call into question the current lack of consideration of alternative approaches to ensure young deaf children’s language development. Recent research has highlighted the risks of delaying language input during critical periods of brain development with concomitant consequences for cognitive and social skills. As a result, we propose that before, during, and after implantation deaf children learn a sign language along with a spoken language to ensure their maximal language development and optimal long-term developmental outcomes. PMID:25419095

  18. Adenosine Amine Congener as a Cochlear Rescue Agent

    PubMed Central

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M.; Chang, Hao; Paek, Song Yee; Chi, Howard H.-T.; Sreebhavan, Sreevalsan; Telang, Ravindra S.; Tingle, Malcolm; Housley, Gary D.; Thorne, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that adenosine amine congener (ADAC), a selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist, can ameliorate noise- and cisplatin-induced cochlear injury. Here we demonstrate the dose-dependent rescue effects of ADAC on noise-induced cochlear injury in a rat model and establish the time window for treatment. Methods. ADAC (25–300 μg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to Wistar rats (8–10 weeks old) at intervals (6–72 hours) after exposure to traumatic noise (8–16 kHz, 110 dB sound pressure level, 2 hours). Hearing sensitivity was assessed using auditory brainstem responses (ABR) before and 12 days after noise exposure. Pharmacokinetic studies investigated ADAC concentrations in plasma after systemic (intravenous) administration. Results. ADAC was most effective in the first 24 hours after noise exposure at doses >50 μg/kg, providing up to 21 dB protection (averaged across 8–28 kHz). Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a short (5 min) half-life of ADAC in plasma after intravenous administration without detection of degradation products. Conclusion. Our data show that ADAC mitigates noise-induced hearing loss in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but further studies are required to establish its translation as a clinical otological treatment. PMID:25243188

  19. An analysis of cochlear response harmonics: Contribution of neural excitation.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, M E; Kamerer, A M; Peppi, M; Lichtenhan, J T

    2015-11-01

    In this report an analysis of cochlear response harmonics is developed to derive a mathematical function to estimate the gross mechanics involved in the in vivo transfer of acoustic sound into neural excitation (f(Tr)). In a simulation it is shown that the harmonic distortion from a nonlinear system can be used to estimate the nonlinearity, supporting the next phase of the experiment: Applying the harmonic analysis to physiologic measurements to derive estimates of the unknown, in vivo f(Tr). From gerbil ears, estimates of f(Tr) were derived from cochlear response measurements made with an electrode at the round window niche from 85 Hz tone bursts. Estimates of f(Tr) before and after inducing auditory neuropathy-loss of auditory nerve responses with preserved hair cell responses from neurotoxic treatment with ouabain-showed that the neural excitation from low-frequency tones contributes to the magnitude of f(Tr) but not the sigmoidal, saturating, nonlinear morphology. PMID:26627769

  20. Bilingualism: A Pearl to Overcome Certain Perils of Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Tom; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Napoli, Donna Jo; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian; Smith, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated success in improving young deaf children's speech and low-level speech awareness across a range of auditory functions, but this success is highly variable, and how this success correlates to high-level language development is even more variable. Prevalence on the success rate of CI as an outcome for language development is difficult to obtain because studies vary widely in methodology and variables of interest, and because not all cochlear implant technology (which continues to evolve) is the same. Still, even if the notion of treatment failure is limited narrowly to those who gain no auditory benefit from CI in that they cannot discriminate among ambient noises, the reported treatment failure rate is high enough to call into question the current lack of consideration of alternative approaches to ensure young deaf children's language development. Recent research has highlighted the risks of delaying language input during critical periods of brain development with concomitant consequences for cognitive and social skills. As a result, we propose that before, during, and after implantation deaf children learn a sign language along with a spoken language to ensure their maximal language development and optimal long-term developmental outcomes. PMID:25419095

  1. Active control of waves in a cochlear model with subpartitions.

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, R S; Dimitriadis, E K; Iwasa, K H

    1996-01-01

    Multiscale asymptotic methods developed previously to study macromechanical wave propagation in cochlear models are generalized here to include active control of a cochlear partition having three subpartitions, the basilar membrane, the reticular lamina, and the tectorial membrane. Activation of outer hair cells by stereocilia displacement and/or by lateral wall stretching result in a frequency-dependent force acting between the reticular lamina and basilar membrane. Wavelength-dependent fluid loads are estimated by using the unsteady Stokes' equations, except in the narrow gap between the tectorial membrane and reticular lamina, where lubrication theory is appropriate. The local wavenumber and subpartition amplitude ratios are determined from the zeroth order equations of motion. A solvability relation for the first order equations of motion determines the subpartition amplitudes. The main findings are as follows: The reticular lamina and tectorial membrane move in unison with essentially no squeezing of the gap; an active force level consistent with measurements on isolated outer hair cells can provide a 35-dB amplification and sharpening of subpartition waveforms by delaying dissipation and allowing a greater structural resonance to occur before the wave is cut off; however, previously postulated activity mechanisms for single partition models cannot achieve sharp enough tuning in subpartitioned models. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8637914

  2. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea. PMID:21895085

  3. Auditory plasticity in deaf children with bilateral cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2005-04-01

    Human children with cochlear implants represent a unique population of individuals who have undergone variable amounts of auditory deprivation prior to being able to hear. Even more unique are children who received bilateral cochlear implants (BICIs), in sequential surgical procedures, several years apart. Auditory deprivation in these individuals consists of a two-stage process, whereby complete deafness is experienced initially, followed by deafness in one ear. We studied the effects of post-implant experience on the ability of deaf children to localize sounds and to understand speech in noise. These are two of the most important functions that are known to depend on binaural hearing. Children were tested at time intervals ranging from 3-months to 24-months following implantation of the second ear, while listening with either implant alone or bilaterally. Our findings suggest that the period during which plasticity occurs in human binaural system is protracted, extending into middle-to-late childhood. The rate at which benefits from bilateral hearing abilities are attained following deprivation is faster for speech intelligibility in noise compared with sound localization. Finally, the age at which the second implant was received may play an important role in the acquisition of binaural abilities. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD.

  4. Speech feature discrimination in deaf children following cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Tonya R.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2002-05-01

    Speech feature discrimination is a fundamental perceptual skill that is often assumed to underlie word recognition and sentence comprehension performance. To investigate the development of speech feature discrimination in deaf children with cochlear implants, we conducted a retrospective analysis of results from the Minimal Pairs Test (Robbins et al., 1988) selected from patients enrolled in a longitudinal study of speech perception and language development. The MP test uses a 2AFC procedure in which children hear a word and select one of two pictures (bat-pat). All 43 children were prelingually deafened, received a cochlear implant before 6 years of age or between ages 6 and 9, and used either oral or total communication. Children were tested once every 6 months to 1 year for 7 years; not all children were tested at each interval. By 2 years postimplant, the majority of these children achieved near-ceiling levels of discrimination performance for vowel height, vowel place, and consonant manner. Most of the children also achieved plateaus but did not reach ceiling performance for consonant place and voicing. The relationship between speech feature discrimination, spoken word recognition, and sentence comprehension will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD Research Grant No. R01DC00064 and NIH/NIDCD Training Grant No. T32DC00012.

  5. Managing cochlear implant patients with suspected insulation damage.

    PubMed

    Cullington, Helen E

    2013-01-01

    Six Nucleus® 24 Contour™ and five Nucleus® Freedom™ with Contour Advance™ cochlear implants examined at the South of England Cochlear Implant Centre have failed and were explanted because of insulation damage. Insulation damage occurs when the silicone elastomer coating surrounding the electrode array wires and electronics capsule fails, allowing fluid entry to the electrode lead bundle. In addition, four Nucleus® 24 Contour™, one Nucleus® Freedom™ with Contour Advance™, and one Nucleus® 24 devices have failed as a result of suspected insulation damage; two have been explanted but explant reports not yet been received from the device manufacturer, four have not been explanted. Sixteen other Nucleus® devices are suspected to have insulation damage but the patients have retained clinical benefit, with remapping to exclude some or all affected electrodes in 14 cases. Insulation damage does not cause a sudden loss of sound; instead, a progressive deterioration can occur, which can make management and detection challenging, particularly in young children or those with additional needs. Monitoring of both impedances and clinical benefit is recommended. PMID:23411657

  6. Understanding Language, Hearing Status, and Visual-Spatial Skills.

    PubMed

    Marschark, Marc; Spencer, Linda J; Durkin, Andreana; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Machmer, Elizabeth; Kronenberger, William G; Trani, Alexandra

    2015-10-01

    It is frequently assumed that deaf individuals have superior visual-spatial abilities relative to hearing peers and thus, in educational settings, they are often considered visual learners. There is some empirical evidence to support the former assumption, although it is inconsistent, and apparently none to support the latter. Three experiments examined visual-spatial and related cognitive abilities among deaf individuals who varied in their preferred language modality and use of cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing individuals who varied in their sign language skills. Sign language and spoken language assessments accompanied tasks involving visual-spatial processing, working memory, nonverbal logical reasoning, and executive function. Results were consistent with other recent studies indicating no generalized visual-spatial advantage for deaf individuals and suggested that their performance in that domain may be linked to the strength of their preferred language skills regardless of modality. Hearing individuals performed more strongly than deaf individuals on several visual-spatial and self-reported executive functioning measures, regardless of sign language skills or use of CIs. Findings are inconsistent with assumptions that deaf individuals are visual learners or are superior to hearing individuals across a broad range of visual-spatial tasks. Further, performance of deaf and hearing individuals on the same visual-spatial tasks was associated with differing cognitive abilities, suggesting that different cognitive processes may be involved in visual-spatial processing in these groups. PMID:26141071

  7. Visual Scripting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halas, John

    Visual scripting is the coordination of words with pictures in sequence. This book presents the methods and viewpoints on visual scripting of fourteen film makers, from nine countries, who are involved in animated cinema; it contains concise examples of how a storybook and preproduction script can be prepared in visual terms; and it includes a…

  8. Musical Sound Quality Impairments in Cochlear Implant (CI) Users as a Function of Limited High-Frequency Perception

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Alexis T.; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Carver, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) apply the musical sound quality assessment method, Cochlear Implant-MUltiple Stimulus with Hidden Reference and Anchor (CI-MUSHRA), to quantify musical sound quality deficits in CI (cochlear implant) users with respect to high-frequency loss, and (b) assess possible correlations between CI-MUSHRA performance and self-reported musical sound quality, as assessed by more traditional rating scales. Five versions of real-world musical stimuli were created: 8-,4-, and 2-kHz low-pass-filtered (LPF) versions with increasing high-frequency removal, a composite stimulus containing a 1-kHz LPF-filtered version and white noise (“anchor”), and an unaltered version (“hidden reference”). Using the CI-MUSHRA methodology, these versions were simultaneously presented to participants in addition to a labeled reference. Participants listened to all versions and provided ratings based on a 100-point scale that reflected perceived sound quality difference among the versions. A total of 25 musical stimuli were tested. As comparison measures, participants completed four Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) to assess musical sound quality. Overall, compared to normal hearing (NH) listeners, CI users demonstrated an impaired ability to discriminate between unaltered and altered musical stimuli with variable amounts of high-frequency information removed. Performance using CI-MUSHRA to evaluate this parameter did not correlate to measurements of musical sound quality, as assessed by VAS. This study identified high-frequency loss as one acoustic parameter contributing to overall CI-mediated musical sound quality limitations. CI-MUSHRA provided a quantitative assessment of musical sound quality. This method offers the potential to quantify CI impairments of many different acoustic parameters related to musical sound quality in the future. PMID:23172009

  9. Label-Free Ferrocene-Loaded Nanocarrier Engineering for In Vivo Cochlear Drug Delivery and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Youm, Ibrahima; Musazzi, Umberto M; Gratton, Michael Anne; Murowchick, James B; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2016-10-01

    It is hypothesized that ferrocene (FC)-loaded nanocarriers (FC-NCs) are safe label-free contrast agents for cochlear biodistribution study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To test this hypothesis, after engineering, the poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/polyglycolide NCs are tested for stability with various types and ratios of sugar cryoprotectants during freeze-drying. Their physicochemical properties are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The biodistribution of the FC-NCs in the cochlear tissue after intratympanic injection in guinea pigs is visualized by TEM. Auditory brainstem responses are measured before and after 4-day treatments. These FC-NCs have 153.4 ± 8.7 nm, 85.5 ± 11.2%, and -22.1 ± 1.1 mV as mean diameters, percent drug association efficiency, and zeta potential, respectively (n = 3). The incorporation of FC into the NCs is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and SEM/EDS spectra. Lactose (3:1 ratio, v/v) is the most effective stabilizer after a 12-day study. The administered NCs are visible by TEM in the scala media cells of the cochlea. Based on auditory brainstem response data, FC-NCs do not adversely affect hearing. Considering the electrondense, radioactive, and magnetic properties of iron inside FC, FC-NCs are promising nanotemplate for future inner ear theranostics. PMID:27449230

  10. Frequency of vocalization before and after cochlear implantation: Dynamic effect of auditory feedback on infant behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for infants’ non-word vocalizations in the second half of the first year and later is unclear. This study of hearing infants and infants with profound hearing loss with and without cochlear implants addressed the hypothesis that vocalizations are primarily motivated by auditory feedback. Early access to cochlear implants has created unique conditions of auditory manipulation that permit empirical tests of relations between auditory perception and infant behavior. Evidence from two separate tests of the research hypothesis showed, before cochlear implantation, infants with profound hearing loss vocalized significantly less often than hearing infants; however, soon after cochlear implantation, they vocalized at levels commensurate with hearing peers. In contrast, vocal behaviors that are typically considered reflexive or emotion-based signals (e.g., crying) were infrequent overall and did not vary with auditory access. These results support the hypothesis that auditory feedback is a critical component motivating early vocalization frequency. PMID:24980742

  11. In Vivo Impedance of the Gerbil Cochlear Partition at Auditory Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The specific acoustic impedance of the cochlear partition was measured from 4 to 20 kHz in the basal turn of the gerbil cochlea, where the best frequency is ∼40 kHz. The acoustic impedance was found as the ratio of driving pressure to velocity response. It is the physical attribute that governs cochlear mechanics and has never before been directly measured, to our knowledge. The basilar membrane velocity was measured through the transparent round window membrane. Simultaneously, the intracochlear pressure was measured close to the stapes and quite close to the cochlear partition. The impedance phase was close to −90° and the magnitude decreased with frequency, consistent with stiffness-dominated impedance. The resistive component of the impedance was relatively small. Usually the resistance was negative at frequencies below 8 kHz; this unexpected finding might be due to other vibration modes within the cochlear partition. PMID:19720011

  12. Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention with Children who have Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Ellie C.; Swanson, Lori A.; Buebler, Velvet

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the use of narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) with 3 children who have cochlear implants. Findings reveal that NBLI is effective intervention to increase the narrative skills of children with specific language impairment.

  13. Plasticity of somatosensory inputs to the cochlear nucleus – implications for tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Shore, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews evidence for functional connections of the somatosensory and auditory systems at the very lowest levels of the nervous system. Neural inputs from the dosal root and trigeminal ganglia, as well as their brain stem nuclei, cuneate, gracillis and trigeminal, terminate in the cochlear nuclei. Terminations are primarily in the shell regions surrounding the cochlear nuclei but some terminals are found in the magnocellular regions of cochlear nucleus. The effects of stimulating these inputs on multisensory integration are shown as short and long-term, both suppressive and enhancing. Evidence that these projections are glutamatergic and are altered after cochlear damage is provided in the light of probable influences on the modulation and generation of tinnitus. PMID:21620940

  14. Expressive vocabulary, morphology, syntax and narrative skills in profoundly deaf children after early cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-06-01

    Practical experience and research reveal generic spoken language benefits after cochlear implantation. However, systematic research on specific language domains and error analyses are required to probe sub-skills. Moreover, the effect of predictive factors on distinct language domains is unknown. In this study, outcomes of 70 school-aged children with cochlear implants were compared with hearing peers. Approximately half of the children with cochlear implants achieved age-adequate language levels. Results did not reveal systematic strong or weak language domains. Error analyses showed difficulties with morphological and syntactic rules and inefficient narrative skills. Children without additional disabilities who received early intervention were raised with one spoken language, and used a second cochlear implant or contralateral hearing aid were more likely to present good language skills. PMID:23584181

  15. Skin Flap Necrosis by Bone Marking with Methylene Blue in Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Hoo; Cho, Sung Il

    2015-09-01

    One of surgical complications in cochlear implantation is the necrosis of the skin flap above the receiver-stimulator coil. We present a case of 55-year-old woman who underwent cochlear implantation and developed a bluish skin necrosis due to bone marking. The planned position for the receiver-stimulator was marked using methylene blue through skin to bone. She did not undergo skin flap thinning and underwent successful implantation with complete electrode insertion. Few weeks postoperatively, the patient developed bluish discoloration with progressive thick, blue eschar formation and skin flap necrosis. She subsequently underwent wound debridement and skin flap closure. Cochlear explantation was not necessary. Timely diagnosis and management about this complication is necessary to prevent further skin breakdown and subsequent device extrusion. This report identifies the marking using methylene blue as another possible source of skin flap necrosis in cochlear implantation, and surgeons should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:26413579

  16. Cochlear Implantation and Single-sided Deafness: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cabral Junior, Francisco; Pinna, Mariana Hausen; Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Malerbi, Andrea Felice dos Santos; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current data show that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral hearing, specifically in the understanding of speech in noisy environments. Furthermore, unilateral hearing reduce onés ability to localize sound. Objectives This study provides a systematic review of recent studies to evaluate the outcomes of cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) with regards to speech discrimination, sound localization and tinnitus suppression. Data Synthesis We performed a search in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs databases to assess studies related to cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness. After critical appraisal, eleven studies were selected for data extraction and analysis of demographic, study design and outcome data. Conclusion Although some studies have shown encouraging results on cochlear implantation and SSD, all fail to provide a high level of evidence. Larger studies are necessary to define the tangible benefits of cochlear implantation in patients with SSD. PMID:26722349

  17. Unilateral spectral and temporal compression reduces binaural fusion for normal hearing listeners with cochlear implant simulations

    PubMed Central

    Aronoff, Justin M.; Shayman, Corey; Prasad, Akila; Suneel, Deepa; Stelmach, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Patients with single sided deafness have recently begun receiving cochlear implants in their deaf ear. These patients gain a significant benefit from having a cochlear implant. However, despite this benefit, they are considerably slower to develop binaural abilities such as summation compared to bilateral cochlear implant patients. This suggests that these patients have difficulty fusing electric and acoustic signals. Although this may reflect inherent differences between electric and acoustic stimulation, it may also reflect properties of the processor and fitting system, which result in spectral and temporal compression. To examine the possibility that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can adversely affect binaural fusion, this study tested normal hearing listeners’ binaural fusion through the use of vocoded speech with unilateral spectral and temporal compression. The results indicate that unilateral spectral and temporal compression can hinder binaural fusion and thus may adversely affect binaural abilities in patients with single sided deafness who use a cochlear implant in their deaf ear. PMID:25549574

  18. Cochlear Implantation and Single-sided Deafness: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cabral Junior, Francisco; Pinna, Mariana Hausen; Alves, Ricardo Dourado; Malerbi, Andrea Felice Dos Santos; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current data show that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral hearing, specifically in the understanding of speech in noisy environments. Furthermore, unilateral hearing reduce onés ability to localize sound. Objectives This study provides a systematic review of recent studies to evaluate the outcomes of cochlear implantation in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) with regards to speech discrimination, sound localization and tinnitus suppression. Data Synthesis We performed a search in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Lilacs databases to assess studies related to cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral deafness. After critical appraisal, eleven studies were selected for data extraction and analysis of demographic, study design and outcome data. Conclusion Although some studies have shown encouraging results on cochlear implantation and SSD, all fail to provide a high level of evidence. Larger studies are necessary to define the tangible benefits of cochlear implantation in patients with SSD. PMID:26722349

  19. Frequency of vocalization before and after cochlear implantation: dynamic effect of auditory feedback on infant behavior.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Mary K

    2014-10-01

    The motivation for infants' non-word vocalizations in the second half of the first year of life and later is unclear. This study of hearing infants and infants with profound hearing loss with and without cochlear implants addressed the hypothesis that vocalizations are primarily motivated by auditory feedback. Early access to cochlear implants has created unique conditions of auditory manipulation that permit empirical tests of relations between auditory perception and infant behavior. Evidence from two separate tests of the research hypothesis showed that, before cochlear implantation, infants with profound hearing loss vocalized significantly less often than hearing infants; however, soon after cochlear implantation, they vocalized at levels commensurate with hearing peers. In contrast, vocal behaviors that are typically considered reflexive or emotion-based signals (e.g., crying) were infrequent overall and did not vary with auditory access. These results support the hypothesis that auditory feedback is a critical component motivating early vocalization frequency. PMID:24980742

  20. Visual Imagery without Visual Perception?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertolo, Helder

    2005-01-01

    The question regarding visual imagery and visual perception remain an open issue. Many studies have tried to understand if the two processes share the same mechanisms or if they are independent, using different neural substrates. Most research has been directed towards the need of activation of primary visual areas during imagery. Here we review…

  1. Parent versus child assessment of quality of life in children using cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter S.; Tong, Liyue; Tobey, Emily A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants have lower quality of life (QoL) in social situations and lower self-esteem than hearing peers. The child’s QoL has been assessed primarily by asking the parent rather than asking the child. This poses a problem because parents have difficulty judging less observable aspects like self-esteem and socio-emotional functioning, the domains most affected by hearing loss. Methods This case-control study evaluated QoL in 50 preschoolers using a cochlear implant and their parents with the Kiddy KINDLR, an established QoL measure. Children’s responses were compared to a hearing control group and correlated with demographic variables. We used a questionnaire for parents and a face-to-face interview with children. T-tests were used to compare (a) paired parent-child ratings and (b) children with cochlear implants versus normal hearing. Spearman rank correlations were used to compare QoL with demographic variables. Results Children using cochlear implants rated overall QoL significantly more positively than their parents (MD = 4.22, p=.03). Child rating of QoL did not differ significantly by auditory status (cochlear implant (82.8) vs. hearing (80.8), p=0.42). Overall QoL correlated inversely with cochlear implant experience and chronologic age, but did not correlate with implantation age. Conclusions Preschool children using cochlear implants can assess adequately their own QoL, but parents afford valuable complementary perspective on the child’s socio-emotional and physical well-being. Preschool children using cochlear implants rate overall QoL measures similar to hearing peers. A constellation of QoL measures should be collected to yield a better understanding of general QoL as well as specific domains centered on hearing loss. PMID:19674798

  2. No longer falling on deaf ears: mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cochlear ribbon synapses.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoqiang; Corfas, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Cochlear ribbon synapses are required for the rapid and precise neural transmission of acoustic signals from inner hair cells to the spiral ganglion neurons. Emerging evidence suggests that damage to these synapses represents an important form of cochlear neuropathy that might be highly prevalent in sensorineural hearing loss. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge on how ribbon synapses are damaged by noise and during aging, as well as potential strategies to promote ribbon synapse regeneration for hearing restoration. PMID:25937135

  3. An Analysis of Phonological Process Use in Young Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhler, Helen C.; DeThomasis, Betty; Chute, Pat; DeCora, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Phonological process use was investigated in five children who used Nucleus 24 cochlear implants (CIs). All participants were less than 3 years of age at the time of cochlear implantation and ranged from 4;2 to 4;7 years of age at onset of study. Speech samples obtained from the GFTA-2 were analyzed using the KLPA-2 to evaluate participants'…

  4. It's not your father's recruitment: A new view of loudness growth in cochlear hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren

    2002-05-01

    For over 60 years, one of the most commonly held beliefs in audiology has been that loudness grows more rapidly than normal near the elevated thresholds of listeners with cochlear hearing losses. This belief was based on the untested assumption that loudness at threshold is the same-often incorrectly assumed to be zero-in normal listeners and listeners with cochlear hearing losses. Recent tests of this assumption indicate that loudness at threshold is not zero in either group of listeners. These data also indicate that loudness near threshold grows at a normal rate in listeners with cochlear hearing losses. In other words, recruitment in the sense of a rapid growth of loudness near an elevated threshold does not occur. How, then, can intense sounds have approximately normal loudness in listeners with cochlear hearing losses? The explanation is that loudness at threshold is greater when the threshold is elevated by a cochlear loss than when it is normal. We call this softness imperception. Therefore, listeners with cochlear hearing losses not only have reduced dynamic range of audibility; they also have reduced dynamic range of loudness. Implications for the design of hearing aids will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD grant R01DC02241.

  5. Round-window delivery of neurotrophin 3 regenerates cochlear synapses after acoustic overexposure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jun; Corfas, Gabriel; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-01-01

    In acquired sensorineural hearing loss, such as that produced by noise or aging, there can be massive loss of the synaptic connections between cochlear sensory cells and primary sensory neurons, without loss of the sensory cells themselves. Because the cell bodies and central projections of these cochlear neurons survive for months to years, there is a long therapeutic window in which to re-establish functional connections and improve hearing ability. Here we show in noise-exposed mice that local delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to the round window niche, 24 hours after an exposure that causes an immediate loss of up to 50% loss of synapses in the cochlear basal region, can regenerate pre- and post-synaptic elements at the hair cell / cochlear nerve interface. This synaptic regeneration, as documented by confocal microscopy of immunostained cochlear sensory epithelia, was coupled with a corresponding functional recovery, as seen in the suprathreshold amplitude of auditory brainstem response Wave 1. Cochlear delivery of neurotrophins in humans is likely achievable as an office procedure via transtympanic injection, making our results highly significant in a translational context. PMID:27108594

  6. Round-window delivery of neurotrophin 3 regenerates cochlear synapses after acoustic overexposure

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Corfas, Gabriel; Liberman, M. Charles

    2016-01-01

    In acquired sensorineural hearing loss, such as that produced by noise or aging, there can be massive loss of the synaptic connections between cochlear sensory cells and primary sensory neurons, without loss of the sensory cells themselves. Because the cell bodies and central projections of these cochlear neurons survive for months to years, there is a long therapeutic window in which to re-establish functional connections and improve hearing ability. Here we show in noise-exposed mice that local delivery of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to the round window niche, 24 hours after an exposure that causes an immediate loss of up to 50% loss of synapses in the cochlear basal region, can regenerate pre- and post-synaptic elements at the hair cell / cochlear nerve interface. This synaptic regeneration, as documented by confocal microscopy of immunostained cochlear sensory epithelia, was coupled with a corresponding functional recovery, as seen in the suprathreshold amplitude of auditory brainstem response Wave 1. Cochlear delivery of neurotrophins in humans is likely achievable as an office procedure via transtympanic injection, making our results highly significant in a translational context. PMID:27108594

  7. A retrospective study of cochlear implant outcomes in children with residual hearing

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; McCrae, Rosemary; Schramm, David

    2006-01-01

    Background There has been increasing demand for the cochlear implantation of children who demonstrate some auditory capacity with conventional hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine speech recognition outcomes in a group of children who were regarded as borderline candidates for cochlear implantation as their residual hearing and/or auditory functioning levels exceeded typical audiologic candidacy criteria. Methods A retrospective chart review was undertaken at one Canadian cochlear implant centre to identify children implanted at age 4 or older with a pure-tone-average of 90 dB or better and speech recognition of 30% or greater. Pre-implant and post-implant open-set word and sentence test scores were analyzed. Results Eleven children of 195 paediatric cochlear implant recipients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Speech recognition results for the10 English-speaking children indicated significant gains in both open-set word and sentence understanding within the first 6 to 12 months of implant use. Seven of 9 children achieved 80% open-set sentence recognition within 12 months post-surgery. Conclusion Children with several years of experience using conventional amplification demonstrated rapid progress in auditory skills following cochlear implantation. These findings suggest that cochlear implantation may be an appropriate intervention for selected children with severe hearing losses and/or auditory capacity outside current candidacy criteria. PMID:16623948

  8. Speech Intelligibility of Cochlear-Implanted and Normal-Hearing Children

    PubMed Central

    Poursoroush, Sara; Ghorbani, Ali; Soleymani, Zahra; Kamali, Mohammd; Yousefi, Negin; Poursoroush, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Speech intelligibility, the ability to be understood verbally by listeners, is the gold standard for assessing the effectiveness of cochlear implantation. Thus, the goal of this study was to compare the speech intelligibility between normal-hearing and cochlear-implanted children using the Persian intelligibility test. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six cochlear-implanted children aged 48–95 months, who had been exposed to 95–100 speech therapy sessions, were compared with 40 normal-hearing children aged 48–84 months. The average post-implanted time was 14.53 months. Speech intelligibility was assessed using the Persian sentence speech intelligibility test. Results: The mean score of the speech intelligibility test among cochlear-implanted children was 63.71% (standard deviation [SD], 1.06) compared with 100% intelligible among all normal-hearing children (P<0.000). No effects of age or gender on speech intelligibility were observed in these two groups at this range of ages (P>0.05). Conclusion: Speech intelligibility in the Persian language was poorer in cochlear-implanted children in comparison with normal-hearing children. The differences in speech intelligibility between cochlear-implanted and normal-hearing children can be shown through the Persian sentence speech intelligibility test. PMID:26568940

  9. Evidence of a tonotopic organization of the auditory cortex in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Guiraud, Jeanne; Besle, Julien; Arnold, Laure; Boyle, Patrick; Giard, Marie-Hélène; Bertrand, Olivier; Norena, Arnaud; Truy, Eric; Collet, Lionel

    2007-07-18

    Deprivation from normal sensory input has been shown to alter tonotopic organization of the human auditory cortex. In this context, cochlear implant subjects provide an interesting model in that profound deafness is made partially reversible by the cochlear implant. In restoring afferent activity, cochlear implantation may also reverse some of the central changes related to deafness. The purpose of the present study was to address whether the auditory cortex of cochlear implant subjects is tonotopically organized. The subjects were thirteen adults with at least 3 months of cochlear implant experience. Auditory event-related potentials were recorded in response to electrical stimulation delivered at different intracochlear electrodes. Topographic analysis of the auditory N1 component (approximately 85 ms latency) showed that the locations on the scalp and the relative amplitudes of the positive/negative extrema differ according to the stimulated electrode, suggesting that distinct sets of neural sources are activated. Dipole modeling confirmed electrode-dependent orientations of these sources in temporal areas, which can be explained by nearby, but distinct sites of activation in the auditory cortex. Although the cortical organization in cochlear implant users is similar to the tonotopy found in normal-hearing subjects, some differences exist. Nevertheless, a correlation was found between the N1 peak amplitude indexing cortical tonotopy and the values given by the subjects for a pitch scaling task. Hence, the pattern of N1 variation likely reflects how frequencies are coded in the brain. PMID:17634377

  10. Cochlear Delay and Medial Olivocochlear Functioning in Children with Suspected Auditory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Boothalingam, Sriram; Allan, Chris; Allen, Prudence; Purcell, David

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral manifestations of processing deficits associated with auditory processing disorder (APD) have been well documented. However, little is known about their anatomical underpinnings, especially cochlear processing. Cochlear delays, a proxy for cochlear tuning, measured using stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) group delay, and the influence of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system activation at the auditory periphery was studied in 23 children suspected with APD (sAPD) and 22 typically developing (TD) children. Results suggest that children suspected with APD have longer SFOAE group delays (possibly due to sharper cochlear tuning) and reduced MOC function compared to TD children. Other differences between the groups include correlation between MOC function and SFOAE delay in quiet in the TD group, and lack thereof in the sAPD group. MOC-mediated changes in SFOAE delay were in opposite directions between groups: increase in delay in TD vs. reduction in delay in the sAPD group. Longer SFOAE group delays in the sAPD group may lead to longer cochlear filter ringing, and potential increase in forward masking. These results indicate differences in cochlear and MOC function between sAPD and TD groups. Further studies are warranted to explore the possibility of cochlea as a potential site for processing deficits in APD. PMID:26317850

  11. Bilateral cochlear implantation in the ferret: A novel animal model for behavioral studies

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Douglas E.H.; Vongpaisal, Tara; Xu, Jin; Shepherd, Robert K.; King, Andrew J.; Isaiah, Amal

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implantation has recently been introduced with the aim of improving both speech perception in background noise and sound localization. Although evidence suggests that binaural perception is possible with two cochlear implants, results in humans are variable. To explore potential contributing factors to these variable outcomes, we have developed a behavioral animal model of bilateral cochlear implantation in a novel species, the ferret. Although ferrets are ideally suited to psychophysical and physiological assessments of binaural hearing, cochlear implantation has not been previously described in this species. This paper describes the techniques of deafening with aminoglycoside administration, surgical implantation of an intracochlear array and chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation with monitoring for electrode integrity and efficacy of stimulation. Experiments have been presented elsewhere to show that the model can be used to study behavioral and electrophysiological measures of binaural hearing in chronically implanted animals. This paper demonstrates that cochlear implantation and chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation are both safe and effective in ferrets, opening up the possibility of using this model to study potential protective effects of bilateral cochlear implantation on the developing central auditory pathway. Since ferrets can be used to assess psychophysical and physiological aspects of hearing along with the structure of the auditory pathway in the same animals, we anticipate that this model will help develop novel neuroprosthetic therapies for use in humans. PMID:20576507

  12. Cross-Modal Plasticity in Higher-Order Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Cats Does Not Limit Auditory Responsiveness to Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Lomber, Stephen G.; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Congenital sensory deprivation can lead to reorganization of the deprived cortical regions by another sensory system. Such cross-modal reorganization may either compete with or complement the “original“ inputs to the deprived area after sensory restoration and can thus be either adverse or beneficial for sensory restoration. In congenital deafness, a previous inactivation study documented that supranormal visual behavior was mediated by higher-order auditory fields in congenitally deaf cats (CDCs). However, both the auditory responsiveness of “deaf” higher-order fields and interactions between the reorganized and the original sensory input remain unknown. Here, we studied a higher-order auditory field responsible for the supranormal visual function in CDCs, the auditory dorsal zone (DZ). Hearing cats and visual cortical areas served as a control. Using mapping with microelectrode arrays, we demonstrate spatially scattered visual (cross-modal) responsiveness in the DZ, but show that this did not interfere substantially with robust auditory responsiveness elicited through cochlear implants. Visually responsive and auditory-responsive neurons in the deaf auditory cortex formed two distinct populations that did not show bimodal interactions. Therefore, cross-modal plasticity in the deaf higher-order auditory cortex had limited effects on auditory inputs. The moderate number of scattered cross-modally responsive neurons could be the consequence of exuberant connections formed during development that were not pruned postnatally in deaf cats. Although juvenile brain circuits are modified extensively by experience, the main driving input to the cross-modally (visually) reorganized higher-order auditory cortex remained auditory in congenital deafness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In a common view, the “unused” auditory cortex of deaf individuals is reorganized to a compensatory sensory function during development. According to this view, cross-modal plasticity takes

  13. Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma in the Only Hearing Ear

    PubMed Central

    Celis-Aguilar, Erika; Lassaletta, Luis; Gavilán, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a new surgical option in the hearing rehabilitation of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) and patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) in the only hearing ear. Auditory brainstem implant (ABI) has been the standard surgical treatment for these patients. We performed a literature review of patients with NF2 and patients with VS in the only hearing ear. Cochlear implantation (CI) provided some auditory benefit in all patients. Preservation of cochlear nerve integrity is crucial after VS resection. Results ranged from environmental sound awareness to excellent benefit with telephone use. Promontory stimulation is recommended although not crucial. MRI can be performed safely in cochlear implanted patients. PMID:22518152

  14. Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia; Lyxell, Björn; Sahlén, Birgitta; Dahlström, Orjan; Lindgren, Magnus; Ors, Marianne; Kallioinen, Petter; Uhlén, Inger

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included 48 children, 5, 6 and 7 years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children's reading ability at pre and post-intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year-olds compared to the DHH 7-year-olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children's beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children. PMID:25078707

  15. Changes in otoacoustic emissions during selective auditory and visual attention.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kyle P; Pasanen, Edward G; McFadden, Dennis

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) measured during behavioral tasks can have different magnitudes when subjects are attending selectively or not attending. The implication is that the cognitive and perceptual demands of a task can affect the first neural stage of auditory processing-the sensory receptors themselves. However, the directions of the reported attentional effects have been inconsistent, the magnitudes of the observed differences typically have been small, and comparisons across studies have been made difficult by significant procedural differences. In this study, a nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency OAE (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was used to measure cochlear responses from human subjects while they simultaneously performed behavioral tasks requiring selective auditory attention (dichotic or diotic listening), selective visual attention, or relative inattention. Within subjects, the differences in nSFOAE magnitude between inattention and attention conditions were about 2-3 dB for both auditory and visual modalities, and the effect sizes for the differences typically were large for both nSFOAE magnitude and phase. These results reveal that the cochlear efferent reflex is differentially active during selective attention and inattention, for both auditory and visual tasks, although they do not reveal how attention is improved when efferent activity is greater. PMID:25994703

  16. Changes in otoacoustic emissions during selective auditory and visual attention

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kyle P.; Pasanen, Edward G.; McFadden, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) measured during behavioral tasks can have different magnitudes when subjects are attending selectively or not attending. The implication is that the cognitive and perceptual demands of a task can affect the first neural stage of auditory processing—the sensory receptors themselves. However, the directions of the reported attentional effects have been inconsistent, the magnitudes of the observed differences typically have been small, and comparisons across studies have been made difficult by significant procedural differences. In this study, a nonlinear version of the stimulus-frequency OAE (SFOAE), called the nSFOAE, was used to measure cochlear responses from human subjects while they simultaneously performed behavioral tasks requiring selective auditory attention (dichotic or diotic listening), selective visual attention, or relative inattention. Within subjects, the differences in nSFOAE magnitude between inattention and attention conditions were about 2–3 dB for both auditory and visual modalities, and the effect sizes for the differences typically were large for both nSFOAE magnitude and phase. These results reveal that the cochlear efferent reflex is differentially active during selective attention and inattention, for both auditory and visual tasks, although they do not reveal how attention is improved when efferent activity is greater. PMID:25994703

  17. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  18. Cochlear implant assessment and candidacy for children with partial hearing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine; Ambler, Marette; Hanvey, Kate; Jenkins, Marsha; Jiang, Dan; Maggs, Justine; Tzifa, Konstance

    2016-04-01

    Children who have partial hearing (PH) in the low frequencies and profound sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequencies can present a challenge to cochlear implant (CI) teams in terms of referral, assessment, and candidacy. Neither clinical criteria nor optimal timing for implantation has been explored in the literature. Data from both the Hearing Implant Centres of Birmingham Children's Hospital and St Thomas' Hospital indicate that it is clinically appropriate to implant children with PH; they perform better with CIs than with hearing aids, even if their hearing is not fully preserved. We have also found that children need early access to high frequency sound in order to reach their full potential. PMID:26913562

  19. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Puria, Sunil; Steele, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  20. Musician effect in cochlear implant simulated gender categorization.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Christina D; Galvin, John J; Free, Rolien H; Başkent, Deniz

    2014-03-01

    Musicians have been shown to better perceive pitch and timbre cues in speech and music, compared to non-musicians. It is unclear whether this "musician advantage" persists under conditions of spectro-temporal degradation, as experienced by cochlear-implant (CI) users. In this study, gender categorization was measured in normal-hearing musicians and non-musicians listening to acoustic CI simulations. Recordings of Dutch words were synthesized to systematically vary fundamental frequency, vocal-tract length, or both to create voices from the female source talker to a synthesized male talker. Results showed an overall musician effect, mainly due to musicians weighting fundamental frequency more than non-musicians in CI simulations. PMID:24606310