Science.gov

Sample records for coded wire tagging

  1. Tag retention, growth, and survival of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Eversole, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    Juvenile red swamp crayfish (or crawfish), Procambarus clarkii (20-41 mm in total length) were collected from a crayfish culture pond by dipnetting and tagged with sequentially numbered, standard length, binary-coded wire tags. Four replicates of 50 crayfish were impaled perpendicular to the long axis of the abdomen with a fixed needle. Tags were injected transversely into the ventral surface of the first or second abdominal segment and were imbedded in the musculature just beneath the abdominal sternum. Tags were visible upon inspection. Additionally, two replicates of 50 crayfish were not tagged and were used as controls. Growth, survival, and tag retention were evaluated after 7 d in individual containers, after 100 d in aquaria, and after 200 d in field cages. Tag retention during each sample period was 100%, and average mortality of tagged crayfish within 7 d of tagging was 1%. Mortality during the remainder of the study was high (75-91%) but was similar between treatment and control samples. Most of the deaths were probably due to cannibalism. Average total length increased threefold during the course of the study, and crayfish reached maturity. Because crayfish were mature by the end of the study, we concluded that the coded wire tag was retained through the life history of the crayfish.

  2. Survival and tag retention of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meeuwig, M.H.; Puls, A.L.; Bayer, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the survival, tag retention, and growth of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata larvae and macrophthalmia marked with standard-length decimal coded wire tags and exposed to two levels of handling stress. The survival of marked individuals did not differ from that of unmarked individuals at either life stage for the duration of the experiment (56 d). Tag retention was 100% for all treatment combinations except larvae that were handled frequently (93 ?? 3%). The majority of tag loss occurred within 28 d of marking, and no tag loss was observed between 42 and 56 d after marking. The individuals that lost tags were among the smallest marked, and a logistic regression model indicated a relationship between larva length and the probability of tag retention. Size of larvae (length and mass) and macrophthalmia (mass) decreased over the duration of the experiment; however, changes in size were systematic among treatment combinations, indicating that factors other than tagging or handling affected growth. These data indicate that coded wire tags may be useful for field-based studies of Pacific lamprey larvae and macrophthalmia.

  3. Evaluation of coded wire tags for marking lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; Schneider, Clifford P.

    1986-01-01

    Among hatchery-reared lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of the 1979-1982 year classes stocked in New York waters of Lake Ontario, more than 3 million fish were marked with a coded wire tag (CWT) plus an adipose fin clip, and 1.5 million with only conventional fin clips. Altogether, 7,640 tags were recovered from fish collected with bottom trawls and gill nets or caught by anglers during 1980-1983. One person was able to extract and decipher 200 or more CWTs per day with about a 1% error rate in reading and recording codes. Presence of the CWT did not affect growth. The adipose fin clip did not regenerate. The occurrence of fish with an adipose fin clip but no CWT resulted primarily from the regeneration of paired fins among fish marked with a combination of the adipose fin and a paired fin. Loss of CWTs between marking and stocking (generally 4-5 months for fish stocked in spring and 1-8 d for fish stocked in fall) declined from nearly 11% for the 1979 year class stocked as fall fingerlings to less than 3% for the 1981 and 1982 year classes - a difference that primarily reflected improvements in instrumentation and tagging technique. The rate of CWT loss after the marked fish were stocked was probably less than 1% per year. The CWT is a reliable method for marking hatchery-reared lake trout. A large number of experimental groups can be uniquely marked, and fish from each group can be accurately identified throughout their life. Use of this technique should greatly facilitate evaluations of genetic strain, hatchery experience, condition at time of stocking, season of stocking, size at stocking, method of stocking and other factors that affect poststocking survival and performance of lake trout stocked in the Great Lakes.

  4. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, James; Fuss, Howard J.

    1999-10-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ``Annual Coded Wire Tag Program--Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries'' project. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries.

  5. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, James; Fuss, Howard J.; Ashbrook, Charmane

    1997-10-01

    The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time.

  6. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Washington Missing Production Groups, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Dammers, Wolf; Mills, Robin D.

    2002-02-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the ''Annual Coded-wire Tag Program - Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries'' project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time and to meet various measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries. Objective 1 for FY-00 was met with few modifications to the original FY-00 proposal. Under Objective 2, snouts containing coded-wire tags that were recovered during FY-00 were decoded. Under Objective 3, this report summarizes available recovery information through 2000 and includes detailed information for brood years 1989 to 1994 for chinook and 1995 to 1997 for coho.

  7. Annual Coded-Wire Tag Program : Washington : Missing Production Groups Annual Report for 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Robin D.

    2002-02-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds the 'Annual Coded-wire Tag Program - Missing Production Groups for Columbia River Hatcheries' project. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) all operate salmon and steelhead rearing programs in the Columbia River basin. The intent of the funding is to coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to provide a holistic assessment of survival and catch distribution over time and to meet various measures of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The WDFW project has three main objectives: (1) coded-wire tag at least one production group of each species at each Columbia Basin hatchery to enable evaluation of survival and catch distribution over time, (2) recover coded-wire tags from the snouts of fish tagged under objective 1 and estimate survival, contribution, and stray rates for each group, and (3) report the findings under objective 2 for all broods of chinook, and coho released from WDFW Columbia Basin hatcheries. Objective 1 for FY-00 was met with few modifications to the original FY-00 proposal. Under Objective 2, snouts containing coded-wire tags that were recovered during FY-00 were decoded. Under Objective 3, this report summarizes available recovery information through 2000 and includes detailed information for brood years 1989 to 1994 for chinook and 1995 to 1997 for coho.

  8. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

    2003-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife project 'Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW)'. Results for the 2002 contract period: Objective 1 - Over 1 million juvenile salmon were coded-wire by this program (Table 1). This accounted for about 20% of the fish ODFW coded-wire tagged in 2002 for release in the Columbia Basin; Objective 2 - ODFW recovered and processed over 50,000 snouts collected from coded-wire tagged fish (Table 2); Objective 3 - The survival data summarized below includes results for coded-wire groups funded by this program as well as coded-wire groups funded from other sources; Objective 4 - The last returns of experimental groups of coho marked with VIE tags occurred in 2002 at Sandy Hatchery. This sampling showed that 26 of 67 jack coho and 1 of 2,223 adult coho VIE marked as juveniles retained the VIE mark as adults.

  9. Retention of coded wire tags, and their effect on maturation and survival of yellow mealworms (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffler, James J.; Isely, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    This study demonstrates that coded wire tags can be used to mark certain insect larvae without adverse effects on maturation, and that tags are retained through the adult phase in high enough proportion for practical application. Coded wire tags also offer the benefit that marked organisms can be identified to the batch or individual level.

  10. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

    2002-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife project 'Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW)'. Results for the 2001 contract period: Objective 1--Over 1 million juvenile salmon were coded-wire by this program (Table 1); Objective 2--ODFW recovered and processed over 40,000 snout collected from coded-wire tagged fish (Table 2); Objective 3--Survival data is summarized below; Objective 4--The last group of VIE tagged coho was released in 2001 and returning coho were samples at Sandy Hatchery. This sampling showed only 1 of 1,160 returning coho VIE marked as juveniles retained the VIE mark as adults.

  11. Effects of coded-wire-tagging on stream-dwelling Sea Lamprey larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Nicholas; Swink, William D.; Dawson, Heather A.; Jones, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of coded wire tagging Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus larvae from a known-aged stream-dwelling population were assessed. Tagged larvae were significantly shorter on average than untagged larvae from 3 to 18 months after tagging. However, 30 months after tagging, the length distribution of tagged and untagged larvae did not differ and tagged Sea Lampreys were in better condition (i.e., higher condition factor) and more likely to have undergone metamorphosis than the untagged population. The reason why tagged larvae were more likely to metamorphose is not clear, but the increased likelihood of metamorphosis could have been a compensatory response to the period of slower growth after tagging. Slower growth after tagging was consistent across larval size-classes, so handling and displacement from quality habitat during the early part of the growing season was likely the cause rather than the tag burden. The tag effects observed in this study, if caused by displacement and handling, may be minimized in future studies if tagging is conducted during autumn after growth has concluded for the year.

  12. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    2009-07-21

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  13. Evidence that coded-wire-tagging procedures can enhance transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum in chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Binary coded wire tags (CWTs) are used extensively for identification and management of anadromous salmonid populations. A study of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in two brood year groups of hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha provided strong evidence that horizontal transmission of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of BKD, might be enhanced by CWT-marking procedures. About 4 months after CWTs were implanted in the snouts of juvenile fish, 14-16 different tissues were sampled from each of 60 fish per brood year group for histological analysis. Of the fish that were positive for R. salmoninarum by histological examination, 41% (7 of 17) of the 1988 brood year fish and 24% (10 of 42) of the 1989 brood year fish had BKD lesions confined to the head near the site of tag implantation. These lesions often resulted in the destruction of tissues of one or both olfactory organs. No focal snout infections were observed in fish that had not been marked with CWTs. Further data obtained from tissue analyses by use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescent antibody test for detection of R. salmoninarum supported the hypothesis that infections of R. salmoninarum can be initiated in the snout tissues of CWT-marked fish and then spread to other organs. The tagging procedures might promote transmission of the pathogen among fish via contaminated tagging needles, by facilitating the entry of pathogens through the injection wound, or both. Limited evidence from this study suggested that implantation of passive integrated transponder tags in the peritoneal cavities of fish might also promote the transmission of R. salmoninarum or exacerbate existing infections. The results indicated a need for strict sanitary procedures during the tagging of fish in populations positive for R. salmoninarum to reduce the probability of enhanced horizontal transmission of the pathogen.

  14. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    1999-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1998 (1991 through 1995 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks

  15. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Stock Assessment, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William

    2002-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Stock Assessment - Coded Wire Tag Program (ODFW) Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin sport fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and freshwater sport fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of

  16. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin; Volume XII; A Multinomial Model for Estimating Ocean Survival from Salmonid Coded Wire-Tag Data.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, Kristen E.; Skalski, John R.

    1999-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the development of a stochastic model using coded wire-tag (CWT) release and age-at-return data, in order to regress first year ocean survival probabilities against coastal ocean conditions and climate covariates.

  17. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    2000-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin non-gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch

  18. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    1998-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, and Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette system. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia River sport fisheries and other freshwater recovery areas. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed primarily to the Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1997 (1991 through 1994 broods). This has resulted in a greater average percent of catch for other fishery areas. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam contributed mainly to Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch, but much higher contribution to gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam had similar contribution to ocean fisheries as other coho releases. However, they contributed

  19. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Robert L.; Mallette, Christine; Lewis, Mark A.

    1995-12-01

    Bonneville Power Administration is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule brood fall chinook were caught primarily in the British Columbia, Washington and northern Oregon ocean commercial fisheries. The up-river bright fall chinook contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Contribution of Rogue fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River system occurred primarily in the Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries Willamette spring chinook salmon contributed primarily to the Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Restricted ocean sport and commercial fisheries limited contribution of the Columbia coho released in the Umatilla River that survived at an average rate of 1.05% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. The 1987 to 1991 brood years of coho released in the Yakima River survived at an average rate of 0.64% and contributed primarily to the Washington, Oregon and California ocean sport and commercial fisheries and the Columbia River gillnet fishery. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery, disease, density, diet and size and time of release, but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are controlled by large scale weather patterns such as El Nino over which man has no influence. Man could have some influence over river flow conditions, but political and economic pressures generally out weigh the biological needs of the fish.

  20. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    1998-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, and Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar fisheries as the same stocks released in the Willamette system. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia River sport fisheries and other freshwater recovery areas. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed primarily to the Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited in 1994 and 1995 (1991 and 1992 broods). This has resulted in a greater average percent of catch for other fishery areas. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam contributed mainly to Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had much higher contribution to gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam contributed to the same fisheries as those released below Bonneville Dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet

  1. Effects of Renibacterium salmoninarum on olfactory organs of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) marked with coded wire tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Conway, Carla M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum can cause significant morbidity and mortality in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), particularly in Chinook salmon of the stream (spring) life history type, which migrate to sea as yearlings rather than subyearlings. R. salmoninarum can be transmitted vertically from the female parent to the progeny in association with the egg, as well as horizontally from fish to fish. This study was conducted as part of a research project to investigate whether the prevalence and intensity of R. salmoninarum infections in adult spring Chinook salmon could affect the survival and pathogen prevalence and intensity in their progeny (Pascho et al., 1991, 1993; Elliott et al., 1995). Fish from two brood years (1988 and 1989) were reared at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (Idaho, USA) for about 1-1/2 years, released as yearling smolts, and allowed to migrate to the Pacific Ocean for maturation. The majority of progeny fish were marked with coded wire tags (CWTs) about 4 months before they were released from the hatchery so that adult returns could be monitored. The CWTs were implanted in the snouts of the fish by an experienced team of fish markers using automated wire-tagging machines. The intended placement site was the cartilage, skeletal muscle or loose connective tissue of the snout.

  2. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Robert L.; Isaac, Dennis L.; Lewis, Mark A.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop the ability to estimate hatchery production survival values and evaluate effectiveness of Oregon hatcheries. To accomplish this goal. We are tagging missing production groups within hatcheries to assure each production group is identifiable to allow future evaluation upon recovery of tag data.

  3. Coded wire tag studies on Prince William Sound Salmon, 1992. Restoration study number 60a. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharr, S.; Peckham, C.J.; Sharp, D.G.; Smith, J.L.; Evans, D.G.

    1995-11-01

    Coded wire tags applied in 1991 at four hatcheries in Prince William Sound were recovered in the commercial catch of 1992 and used to provide inseason estimates of hatchery contributions. The estimates were used by fishery managers to target the numerically superior hatchery returns, and reduce the pressure upon oil-damaged wild stocks. A postseason analysis suggested that future inseason analyses be carried out using undecoded-tag data gathered from all sampled processors and that out of a commercial catch of 9.42 million pink salmon, 1.66 million fish were estimated to be of wild origin and 7.77 million of the hatchery origin. Tag recoveries from stream surveys in 1992 were also used to complete an estimation of oiling effects upon survival rates of adult wild pink salmon and no oiling effects were observed for 1992 returns.

  4. Recovery of coded wire tags at a caspian tern colony in san francisco bay: A technique to evaluate impacts of avian predation on juvenile salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, A.F.; Roby, D.D.; Collis, K.; Cramer, B.M.; Sheggeby, J.A.; Adrean, L.J.; Battaglia, D.S.; Lyons, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    We recovered coded wire tags (CWTs) from a colony of Caspian terns Hydroprogne caspia on Brooks Island in San Francisco Bay, California, to evaluate predation on juvenile salmonids originating from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Subsamples of colony substrate representing 11.7% of the nesting habitat used by the terns yielded 2,079 salmonid CWTs from fish released and subsequently consumed by terns in 2008. The estimated number of CWTs deposited on the entire tern colony was 40,143 (ranging from 26,763 to 80,288), once adjustments were made to account for tag loss and the total amount of nesting habitat used by terns. Tags ingested by terns and then egested on the colony were undamaged, and the tags' complete numeric codes were still identifiable. The CWTs found on the tern colony indicated that hatchery Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha trucked to and released in San Pablo Bay were significantly more likely to be consumed by Caspian terns than Chinook salmon that migrated in-river to the bay; 99.7% of all tags recovered were from bay-released Chinook salmon. Of the CWTs recovered on the tern colony, 98.0% were from fall-run Chinook salmon, indicating a higher susceptibility to tern predation than for the spring run type. None of the approximately 518,000 wild Chinook salmon that were coded-wire-tagged and released in the basin were recovered on the tern colony, suggesting that the impacts on wild, U.S. Endangered Species Act-listed Chinook salmon populations were minimal in 2008. Overall, we estimate that 0.3% of the approximately 12.3 million coded-wire-tagged Chinook salmon released in the basin in 2008 were subsequently consumed by Caspian terns from the Brooks Island colony. These results indicate that CWTs implanted in juvenile salmon can be recovered from a piscivorous waterbird colony and used to evaluate smolt losses for runs that are tagged. Abstract We recovered coded wire tags (CWTs) from a colony of Caspian terns Hydroprogne caspia on

  5. Coded wire tag recoveries from pink salmon in Prince William sound salmon fisheries, 1993. Restoration project 93067. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharr, S.; Peckham, C.J.; Sharp, D.G.; Evans, D.G.; Bue, B.G.

    1995-11-01

    Coded wire tags applied to pink salmon fry in 1992 at four hatcheries in Prince William Sound were recovered in the commercial catch of 1993 and used to provide inseason estimates of hatchery contributions. These estimates were used by fishery managers to target the numerically superior hatchery returns, and reduce the pressure on oil-damaged wild stocks. Inseason estimates were made in two stages. The postseason analysis revealed that of a catch of 3.51 million pink salmon, 1.12 million were estimated to be of wild origin.

  6. 49 CFR 236.76 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 236.76 Section 236.76 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or otherwise so... apparatus. Inspections and Tests; All Systems...

  7. 49 CFR 236.76 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 236.76 Section 236.76 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or otherwise so... apparatus. Inspections and Tests; All Systems...

  8. Coded wire tag studies on Prince William Sound salmon, 1989-1991. Fish/shellfish study number 3. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharr, S.; Peckham, C.J.; Sharp, D.G.; Peltz, L.; Smith, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    Following the Exxon Valdez oil spill, wild and hatchery juvenile pink salmon were coded wire tagged to evaluate damages and improve management strategies. Tagging rates were sufficiently high to allow adequate numbers of marks to be recovered in the fishery catches, brood stock, and streams. Results indicated that 5.3 million (24%) of the 22.5 million pink salmon caught in 1989 were of wild origin. There were no significant differences in survival rates for pink salmon originating from oiled and unoiled streams in 1990 or 1991. In additon to meeting damage assessment objectives, the coded wire tagging program has furnished information critical to management decisions associated with restoration of damaged wild salmon stocks.

  9. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 234.239 Section 234.239 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or... of the apparatus. This requirement applies to each wire at each terminal in all housings...

  10. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 234.239 Section 234.239 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or... of the apparatus. This requirement applies to each wire at each terminal in all housings...

  11. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. 234.239 Section 234.239 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION...

  12. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... terminal. Tags and other marks of identification shall be made of insulating material and so arranged that... wire at each terminal in all housings including switch circuit controllers and terminal or...

  13. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... terminal. Tags and other marks of identification shall be made of insulating material and so arranged that... wire at each terminal in all housings including switch circuit controllers and terminal or...

  14. Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume IX; Comparison of Statistical Methods of Estimating Treatment-Control Ratios Using Coded-Wire Tags, Based on Spring Chinook Salmon on the Columbia River, 1986-1988 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2000-06-01

    The strength of a salmon run is often measured as the adult return rate from some previous brood year (i.e. the percent of a smolt population returning to spawn or captured in fisheries). The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE) program of barge transportation of smolts from collector dams is one mitigation measure used to improve smolt survival. Using Coded Wire-tags, the adult return rates of transported and untransported smolt have been tracked. A ratio of the recovered percentages of adult salmon, those transported in the smolt stage over the salmon not transported (controls), is often used to summarize the program effectiveness. There are a number of ways to estimate this transportation/control (T/C) ratio, and this paper explores six alternative statistical models to improve accuracy and precision of the estimate. Assuming the proportion of adult recoveries are binomially distributed, the data were analyzed using linear regression of arc-sine square-root and logit transformations; general linear model regression (GLM) with logit- and log-links; and a maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) of the T/C ratio. Profile likelihood intervals were calculated to generate 95% confidence interval estimates of the T/C ratio. Depending on the analytical method, T/C ratios varied greatly. Arc-sine square-root and logit transformations gave individual release T/C ratios which ranged from 1.0934 to 4.0076 and {minus}1.2193 to 1.9057, respectively. The negative T/C ratio is due to the back-transformation properties of the logit transformation. The GLM and MLE approaches produced mean T/C ratios (after adjusting for the individual release batch effects) ranging from 1.4964 to 1.4974. The recommended method from this analysis, a binomial maximum likelihood estimate adjusted for over-dispersion, produced a T/C ratio of 1.4965 with a 95% confidence interval of (1.0618, 1.9312).

  15. Pseudo-orthogonal frequency coded wireless SAW RFID temperature sensor tags.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Nancy; Malocha, Donald C

    2012-08-01

    SAW sensors are ideal for various wireless, passive multi-sensor applications because they are small, rugged, radiation hard, and offer a wide range of material choices for operation over broad temperature ranges. The readable distance of a tag in a multi-sensor environment is dependent on the insertion loss of the device and the processing gain of the system. Single-frequency code division multiple access (CDMA) tags that are used in high-volume commercial applications must have universal coding schemes and large numbers of codes. The use of a large number of bits at the common center frequency to achieve sufficient code diversity in CDMA tags necessitates reflector banks with >30 dB loss. Orthogonal frequency coding is a spread-spectrum approach that employs frequency and time diversity to achieve enhanced tag properties. The use of orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) SAW tags reduces adjacent reflector interactions for low insertion loss, increased range, complex coding, and system processing gain. This work describes a SAW tag-sensor platform that reduces device loss by implementing long reflector banks with optimized spectral coding. This new pseudo-OFC (POFC) coding is defined and contrasted with the previously defined OFC coding scheme. Auto- and cross-correlation properties of the chips and their relation to reflectivity per strip and reflector length are discussed. Results at 250 MHz of 8-chip OFC and POFC SAW tags will be compared. The key parameters of insertion loss, cross-correlation, and autocorrelation of the two types of frequency-coded tags will be analyzed, contrasted, and discussed. It is shown that coded reflector banks can be achieved with near-zero loss and still maintain good coding properties. Experimental results and results predicted by the coupling of modes model are presented for varying reflector designs and codes. A prototype 915-MHz POFC sensor tag is used as a wireless temperature sensor and the results are shown. PMID:22899121

  16. A user's manual for Electromagnetic Surface Patch (ESP) code. Version 2: Polygonal plates and wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, E. H.; Alexandropoulos, P.

    1983-09-01

    This report serves as a user's manual for the Electromagnetic Surface Patch (ESP) Code. This code is a method of moments solution for interconnections of thin wires and polygonal plates. The code can compute currents, input impedance, efficiency, mutual coupling, and far-zone radiation and scattering patterns. In addition to describing the code input and output, the use of the code is illustrated by simple examples. Subroutine descriptions are also given.

  17. Code optimization for tagged-token data flow machines

    SciTech Connect

    WimBohm, A.P.; Sargeant, J. . Computer Center)

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of dataflow code generated from a high-level language can be improved dramatically by both conventional and dataflow-specific optimizations. Such techniques are used in implementing the single-assignment language SISAL on the Manchester Dataflow Machine. The quality of code generated for numeric applications can be measured in terms of the ratio of total number of instructions executed to floating point operations: the MIPS/MFLOPS ratio. Relevant features of the general purpose single-assignment language SISAL and the Manchester Dataflow Machine are introduced. After an assessment of the initial SISAL implementation, showing it to be very expensive, a range of optimizations are described.

  18. Code optimization for tagged-token dataflow machines

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, A.P.W.; Sargeant, J.

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of dataflow code generated from a high-level language can be improved dramatically by both conventional and dataflow-specific optimizations. Such techniques are used in implementing the single-assignment language SISAL on the Manchester Dataflow Machine. The quality of code generated for numeric applications can be measured in terms of the ratio of total number of instructions executed to floating point operations: the MIPS/MFLOPS ratio. Relevant features of the general purpose single-assignment language SISAL and the Manchester Dataflow are introduced. After an assessment of the initial SISAL implementation, showing it to be very expensive, a range of optimizations are described.

  19. Weighted SAW reflector gratings for orthogonal frequency coded SAW tags and sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puccio, Derek (Inventor); Malocha, Donald (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Weighted surface acoustic wave reflector gratings for coding identification tags and sensors to enable unique sensor operation and identification for a multi-sensor environment. In an embodiment, the weighted reflectors are variable while in another embodiment the reflector gratings are apodized. The weighting technique allows the designer to decrease reflectively and allows for more chips to be implemented in a device and, consequently, more coding diversity. As a result, more tags and sensors can be implemented using a given bandwidth when compared with uniform reflectors. Use of weighted reflector gratings with OFC makes various phase shifting schemes possible, such as in-phase and quadrature implementations of coded waveforms resulting in reduced device size and increased coding.

  20. Manchester Coding Option for SpaceWire: Providing Choices for System Level Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakow, Glenn; Kisin, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an optional coding scheme for SpaceWire in lieu of the current Data Strobe scheme for three reasons. First reason is to provide a straightforward method for electrical isolation of the interface; secondly to provide ability to reduce the mass and bend radius of the SpaceWire cable; and thirdly to provide a means for a common physical layer over which multiple spacecraft onboard data link protocols could operate for a wide range of data rates. The intent is to accomplish these goals without significant change to existing SpaceWire design investments. The ability to optionally use Manchester coding in place of the current Data Strobe coding provides the ability to DC balanced the signal transitions unlike the SpaceWire Data Strobe coding; and therefore the ability to isolate the electrical interface without concern. Additionally, because the Manchester code has the clock and data encoded on the same signal, the number of wires of the existing SpaceWire cable could be optionally reduced by 50. This reduction could be an important consideration for many users of SpaceWire as indicated by the already existing effort underway by the SpaceWire working group to reduce the cable mass and bend radius by elimination of shields. However, reducing the signal count by half would provide even greater gains. It is proposed to restrict the data rate for the optional Manchester coding to a fixed data rate of 10 Megabits per second (Mbps) in order to make the necessary changes simple and still able to run in current radiation tolerant Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Even with this constraint, 10 Mbps will meet many applications where SpaceWire is used. These include command and control applications and many instruments applications with have moderate data rate. For most NASA flight implementations, SpaceWire designs are in rad-tolerant FPGAs, and the desire to preserve the heritage design investment is important for cost and risk considerations. The

  1. Input parameters to codes which analyze LMFBR wire-wrapped bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, J.T.; Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-12-01

    This report provides a current summary of recommended values of key input parameters required by ENERGY code analysis of LMFBR wire wrapped bundles. This data is based on the interpretation of experimental results from the MIT and other available laboratory programs.

  2. Proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi developmental stages using isotope-coded affinity tag reagents.

    PubMed

    Paba, Jaime; Ricart, Carlos A O; Fontes, Wagner; Santana, Jaime M; Teixeira, Antonio R L; Marchese, Jason; Williamson, Brian; Hunt, Tony; Karger, Barry L; Sousa, Marcelo V

    2004-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis of developmental stages of the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi was carried out by isotope-coded affinity tag technology (ICAT) associated with liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Protein extracts of the protozoan trypomastigote and amastigote stages were labeled with heavy (D8) and light (D0) ICAT reagents and subjected to cation exchange and avidin affinity chromatographies followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. High confidence sequence information and expression levels for 41 T. cruzi polypeptides, including metabolic enzymes, paraflagellar rod components, tubulins, and heat-shock proteins were reported. Twenty-nine proteins displayed similar levels of expression in both forms of the parasite, nine proteins presented higher levels in trypomastigotes, whereas three were more expressed in amastigotes. PMID:15253433

  3. 78 FR 14531 - Availability of E-Tag Information to Commission Staff; Notice Specifying Webregistry Code

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... Commission as an addressee on the e- Tags. \\1\\ Availability of E-Tag Information to Commission Staff, 77 FR... Authors (through their Agent Service) and Balancing Authorities (through their Authority Service) to...

  4. Mapping peptide thiol accessibility in membranes using a quaternary ammonium isotope-coded mass tag (ICMT)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chiao-Yung; London, Erwin; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane contains a diverse array of proteins, including receptors, channels, and signaling complexes, that serve as decision-making centers. Investigation of membrane protein topology is important for understanding the function of these types of protein. Here, we report a method to determine protein topology in the membrane that utilizes labeling of cysteine with isotope-coded mass tags. The mass tags contain a thiol reactive moiety, linker, and a quaternary ammonium group to aid ionization in the mass spectrometer and were synthesizes as both light and heavy (deuterated) forms. The probes were found to be membrane impermeable when applied to lipid vesicles. To assess the utility of the probes for mapping peptide thiol topology, we employed a two-step labeling procedure. Vesicles containing α-helical transmembrane peptides were labeled with heavy (or light) probe, solubilized by detergent, and then labeled by an excess of the complementary probe. Peptide for which the cysteine was oriented in the center of the lipid bilayer was not labeled until the lipid vesicles were lysed with detergent, consistent with the membrane impermeability of the probes and reduced ionization of the thiol in the hydrophobic membrane. Peptide for which the cysteine was positioned in the head group zone of the lipid bilayer was labeled rapidly. Peptide for which the cysteine was positioned below the head group abutting the hydrocarbon region was labeled at a reduced rate compared to the fully accessible cysteine. Moreover, the effect of lipid bilayer structure on the kinetics of peptide and lipid flipping in the bilayer was readily measured with our two-step labeling method. The small sample size required, the ease and rapidity of sample preparation, and the amenability of MALDI-TOF mass spectral to analysis in the presence of lipids will enable future facile investigation of membrane proteins in a cellular context. PMID:23725486

  5. Phosphoprotein Isotope-Coded Solid-Phase Tag Approach for Enrichment and Quantitative Analysis of Phosphopeptides from Complex Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun ); Goshe, Michael B.; Camp, David G. ); Yu, Li-Rong ); Tang, Keqi ); Smith, Richard D. )

    2003-10-15

    Many cellular processes are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation and the ability to identify and quantify phosphoproteins from proteomes is essential for gaining a better understanding of these dynamic cellular processes. However, a sensitive, efficient and global method capable of addressing the phosphoproteome has yet to be developed. Here we describe an improved stable-isotope labeling method using a Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Solid-phase Tag (PhIST) for isolating and measuring the relative abundance of phosphorylated peptides from complex peptide mixtures resulting from the enzymatic digestion of extracted proteins. The PhIST approach is an extension of the previously reported Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Affinity Tag (PhIAT)approach developed by our laboratory1-2, where the O-phosphate moiety on phosphoseryl or phosphothreonyl residues were derivatized by hydroxide ion-medated B-elimination followed by the addition of 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT). Instead of using the biotin affinity tag, peptides containing the EDT moiety were captured and labeled in one step using isotope-coded solid-phase reagents containing either light (12C6, 14N) or heavy (13C6, 15N) stable isotopes. The captured peptides labeled with the isotope-coded tags were released from the solid-phase support by UV photocleavage and analyzed by capillary LC-MS/MS. The efficiency and sensitivity of the PhIST labeling approach for identification of phosphopeptides from mixtures was demonstrated using casein phosphoproteins. Its utility for proteomic applications is demonstrated by the labeling of soluble proteins from human breast cancer cell line.

  6. Research efforts in support of resonance extraction studies. Volume 1: Improvement and validation of TWFD (Thin-Wire Frequency-Domain): A thin-wire frequency-domain scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, J. R.; Larry, T. L.; Vanblaricum, M. L.

    1984-11-01

    The development of a thin-wire frequency-domain (TWFD) method of moments code was discussed in a previous report 1. Since that time this code has undergone further development and numerical testing. The purpose of the code is to provide a theoretical and numerical basis to aid in understanding the resonance region electromagnetic scattering from thin-wire stick models. This frequency domain code augments a time-domain code (TWTD) which calculates the scattered transient response for an impulsive incident field. The outputs from both of these codes have provided numerical predictions which have been indispensible in assessing our ability to extract resonance information from actual scattering range data.

  7. Interactive Video Coding and Transmission over Heterogeneous Wired-to-Wireless IP Networks Using an Edge Proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong; Modestino, James W.

    2004-12-01

    Digital video delivered over wired-to-wireless networks is expected to suffer quality degradation from both packet loss and bit errors in the payload. In this paper, the quality degradation due to packet loss and bit errors in the payload are quantitatively evaluated and their effects are assessed. We propose the use of a concatenated forward error correction (FEC) coding scheme employing Reed-Solomon (RS) codes and rate-compatible punctured convolutional (RCPC) codes to protect the video data from packet loss and bit errors, respectively. Furthermore, the performance of a joint source-channel coding (JSCC) approach employing this concatenated FEC coding scheme for video transmission is studied. Finally, we describe an improved end-to-end architecture using an edge proxy in a mobile support station to implement differential error protection for the corresponding channel impairments expected on the two networks. Results indicate that with an appropriate JSCC approach and the use of an edge proxy, FEC-based error-control techniques together with passive error-recovery techniques can significantly improve the effective video throughput and lead to acceptable video delivery quality over time-varying heterogeneous wired-to-wireless IP networks.

  8. Bar codes and intrinsic-surface-roughness tag: Accurate and low-cost accountability for CFE. [Conventional force equipment (CFE)

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.; Palm, R.

    1990-01-01

    CFE poses a number of verification challenges that could be met in part by an accurate and low-cost means of aiding in accountability of treaty-limited equipment. Although the treaty as signed does not explicitly call for the use of tags, there is a provision for recording serial numbers'' and placing special marks'' on equipment subject to reduction. There are approximately 150,000 residual items to be tracked for CFE-I, about half for each alliance of state parties. These highly mobile items are subject to complex treaty limitations: deployment limits and zones, ceilings subceilings, holdings and allowances. There are controls and requirements for storage, conversion, and reduction. In addition, there are national security concerns regarding modernization and mobilization capability. As written into the treaty, a heavy reliance has been placed on human inspectors for CFE verification. Inspectors will mostly make visual observations and photographs as the means of monitoring compliance; these observations can be recorded by handwriting or keyed into a laptop computer. CFE is now less a treaty between two alliances than a treaty among 22 state parties, with inspection data an reports to be shared with each party in the official languages designated by CSCE. One of the potential roles for bar-coded tags would be to provide a universal, exchangable, computer-compatible language for tracking TLE. 10 figs.

  9. A New Protocol of Analyzing Isotope Coded Affinity Tag Data from High Resolution LC-MS Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weichuan; Liu, Junfeng; Colangelo, Chris; Gulcicek, Erol; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Isotope Coded Affinity Tags (ICAT) is a labeling technique that provides insights into quantitative molecular changes. In this paper, we propose a new protocol to identify and analyze ICAT labeled peak pairs in high-resolution LC-MS data. Our major contributions are: 1. We use isotope distance constraint, ICAT distance constraint, and LC-span constraint to identify ICAT labeled peak pairs; and 2. We propose to trigger tandem MS/MS scanning based on the ratio estimation value of identified ICAT peak pairs instead of the peak intensity values. Compared with current approaches that choose peaks with high intensity values for tandem MS/MS scanning, the new protocol can improve the scanning efficiency and accuracy. PMID:17499548

  10. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5'-tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-06-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5'-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  11. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5′-tag sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5′-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  12. 78 FR 5797 - Availability of e-Tag Information to Commission Staff; Notice Specifying webRegistry Code

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ...-Tags. \\1\\ Availability of E-Tag Information to Commission Staff, 77 FR 76367 (Dec. 28. 2012), 141 FERC ] 61,235 (2012) (FR). In Order No. 771, the Commission stated that, ``following issuance of this...

  13. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  14. Integration of expressed sequence tag data flanking predicted RNA secondary structures facilitates novel non-coding RNA discovery.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Price, Feodor D; Muro, Enrique M; Rudnicki, Michael A; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  15. A Study of Interior Wiring, Color Coding, and Switching Principles by Simulation and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, B. G.; McCormick, Robert S.

    After a preliminary introduction and a chapter on wiring and electricity safety procedures, this study text proceeds to offer a general coverage of single and polyphase alternating current electrical systems used to power factories, farms, small businesses, and homes. Electrical power, from its generation to its application, is discussed, with the…

  16. Windows: Life after Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Although wired glass is extremely common in school buildings, the International Building Code adopted new standards that eliminate the use of traditional wired glass in K-12 schools, daycare centers, and athletic facilities. Wired glass breaks easily, and the wires can cause significant injuries by forming dangerous snags when the glass breaks.…

  17. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamhane, Tripti; Wolters, Brit K.; Illukkumbura, Rukshala; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M.; Haugen, Mads H.; Brix, Klaudia

    2015-01-01

    The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015) [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP) in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed. PMID:26594658

  18. Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Affinity Tags: Application to the Enrichment and Identification of Low-Abundance Phosphoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael; Veenstra, Timothy D. ); Panisko, Ellen A.; Conrads, Thomas P. ); Angell, Nicolas H.; Smith, Richard D. )

    2002-02-01

    A novel approach using different isotopic labeling and biotinylation has been developed for the enrichment and quantitation of phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl-peptides. The phosphoprotein isotope-coded affinity tag (PhIAT) exploits the high affinity biotin-avidin interaction to isolate modified phosphopeptides from a complex mixture of peptides. The PhIAT strategy for quantifying and enriching mixtures for phosphopeptides was demonstrated using a commercially available sample of the phosphoprotein B-casein. A denatured solution of B-casein was labeled using the PhIAT method and after proteolytic digestion, the labeled peptides were isolated using immobilize avidin. The recovered peptides were separated by capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. PhIAT-labeled peptides corresponding to known O-phosphorylated peptides from B-casein were identified as were phosphorylated peptides from as1-casein and ase-casein, known low-level (< 5%) contaminants of commercially available B-casein. All of the identified phosphopeptides from these caseins have been previously documented to be phosphorylated at the sites elucidated by the PhIAT approach. The results illustrate the efficancy of the PhIAT-labeling strategy to enrich mixtures for phosphopeptides and permit the detection and identification of low abundance phosphopeptides. In addition, experiments using light and heavy isotopic version of the PhIAT reagents demonstrated that a 10% difference in phosphorylation state could be determined between phosphopeptides in comparative samples.

  19. A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments.

    PubMed

    Drenner, S Matthew; Clark, Timothy D; Whitney, Charlotte K; Martins, Eduardo G; Cooke, Steven J; Hinch, Scott G

    2012-01-01

    This paper synthesizes tagging studies to highlight the current state of knowledge concerning the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in the marine environment. Scientific literature was reviewed to quantify the number and type of studies that have investigated behaviour and survival of anadromous forms of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). We examined three categories of tags including electronic (e.g. acoustic, radio, archival), passive (e.g. external marks, Carlin, coded wire, passive integrated transponder [PIT]), and biological (e.g. otolith, genetic, scale, parasites). Based on 207 papers, survival rates and behaviour in marine environments were found to be extremely variable spatially and temporally, with some of the most influential factors being temperature, population, physiological state, and fish size. Salmonids at all life stages were consistently found to swim at an average speed of approximately one body length per second, which likely corresponds with the speed at which transport costs are minimal. We found that there is relatively little research conducted on open-ocean migrating salmonids, and some species (e.g. masu [O. masou] and amago [O. rhodurus]) are underrepresented in the literature. The most common forms of tagging used across life stages were various forms of external tags, coded wire tags, and acoustic tags, however, the majority of studies did not measure tagging/handling effects on the fish, tag loss/failure, or tag detection probabilities when estimating survival. Through the interdisciplinary application of existing and novel technologies, future research examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids could incorporate important drivers such as oceanography, tagging/handling effects, predation, and physiology. PMID:22431962

  20. A Synthesis of Tagging Studies Examining the Behaviour and Survival of Anadromous Salmonids in Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Drenner, S. Matthew; Clark, Timothy D.; Whitney, Charlotte K.; Martins, Eduardo G.; Cooke, Steven J.; Hinch, Scott G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper synthesizes tagging studies to highlight the current state of knowledge concerning the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in the marine environment. Scientific literature was reviewed to quantify the number and type of studies that have investigated behaviour and survival of anadromous forms of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). We examined three categories of tags including electronic (e.g. acoustic, radio, archival), passive (e.g. external marks, Carlin, coded wire, passive integrated transponder [PIT]), and biological (e.g. otolith, genetic, scale, parasites). Based on 207 papers, survival rates and behaviour in marine environments were found to be extremely variable spatially and temporally, with some of the most influential factors being temperature, population, physiological state, and fish size. Salmonids at all life stages were consistently found to swim at an average speed of approximately one body length per second, which likely corresponds with the speed at which transport costs are minimal. We found that there is relatively little research conducted on open-ocean migrating salmonids, and some species (e.g. masu [O. masou] and amago [O. rhodurus]) are underrepresented in the literature. The most common forms of tagging used across life stages were various forms of external tags, coded wire tags, and acoustic tags, however, the majority of studies did not measure tagging/handling effects on the fish, tag loss/failure, or tag detection probabilities when estimating survival. Through the interdisciplinary application of existing and novel technologies, future research examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids could incorporate important drivers such as oceanography, tagging/handling effects, predation, and physiology. PMID:22431962

  1. Study and full simulation of ten different gases on sealed Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) by using Garfield and Maxwell codes.

    PubMed

    Shohani, M Ebrahimi; Golgoun, S M; Aminipour, M; Shabani, A; Mazoochi, A R; Akbari, R Maghsoudi; Mohammadzadeh, M; Davarpanah, M R; Sardari, D; Sadeghi, M; Mofrad, F Babapour; Jafari, A

    2016-09-01

    In this research gas sealed Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) including blades between anode wires and beta particles of (90)Sr with 196keV mean energy were considered. Ten different gases such as Noble gases mixtures with methane and several other pure gases were studied. In this type of detector, by using Garfield and Maxwell codes and for each of the gases, variation of different parameters such as first Townsend, electron attachment coefficients with variable electric field and their effects on pulse height or collected charge and in turn on Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) were studied. Also the effect of anode voltage and its diameter and the pressure of gas on the pulse height were studied. Results show that Garfield and Maxwell codes can be used to study and improve the design of other gaseous detectors. PMID:27451113

  2. Ultrasensitive immunoassay of protein biomarker based on electrochemiluminescent quenching of quantum dots by hemin bio-bar-coded nanoparticle tags.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dajie; Wu, Jie; Yan, Feng; Deng, Shengyuan; Ju, Huangxian

    2011-07-01

    A hemin bio-bar-coded nanoparticle probe labeled antibody was designed by the assembly of antibody and alkylthiol-capped bar-code G-quadruplex DNA on gold nanoparticles and the interaction of hemin with the DNA to form a G-quadruplex/hemin bio-bar-code. An ultrasensitive immunoassay method was developed by combining the labeled antibody with an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunosensor for protein. The ECL immunosensor was constructed by a layer-by-layer modification of carbon nanotubes, CdS quantum dots (QDs), and capture antibody on a glassy carbon electrode. In air-saturated pH 8.0 PBS the immunosensor showed a carbon-nanotube-enhanced cathodic ECL emission of QDs. Upon the formation of immunocomplex, the ECL intensity decreased owing to the consumption of ECL coreactant in bio-bar-code electrocatalyzed reduction of dissolved oxygen. Using α-fetoprotein as model analyte, the quenched ECL could be used for immunoassay with a linear range of 0.01 pg mL(-1) to 1 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit of 1.0 fg mL(-1). The wide detection range and high sensitivity resulted from the enhanced ECL emission and highly efficient catalysis of the bio-bar-code. The immunosensor exhibited good stability and acceptable fabrication reproducibility and accuracy, showing great promise for clinical application. PMID:21599023

  3. Ear tag

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: An inherited tendency to have this facial feature A genetic syndrome that includes having these pits or tags A sinus tract problem (an abnormal connection between the skin and tissue underneath) When to Contact a Medical Professional Your provider will usually find the skin tag ...

  4. Fine-Mapping the HOXB Region Detects Common Variants Tagging a Rare Coding Allele: Evidence for Synthetic Association in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Edward J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F.; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-01-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10−14). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  5. Fine-mapping the HOXB region detects common variants tagging a rare coding allele: evidence for synthetic association in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Edward J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Wiklund, Fredrik; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Gronberg, Henrik; Aly, Markus; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Canzian, Federico; Campa, Daniele; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Xu, Jianfeng; Mikropoulos, Christos; Goh, Chee; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Easton, Douglas F; Muir, Ken; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2014-02-01

    The HOXB13 gene has been implicated in prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility. We performed a high resolution fine-mapping analysis to comprehensively evaluate the association between common genetic variation across the HOXB genetic locus at 17q21 and PrCa risk. This involved genotyping 700 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array (iCOGS) followed by imputation of 3195 SNPs in 20,440 PrCa cases and 21,469 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. We identified a cluster of highly correlated common variants situated within or closely upstream of HOXB13 that were significantly associated with PrCa risk, described by rs117576373 (OR 1.30, P = 2.62×10(-14)). Additional genotyping, conditional regression and haplotype analyses indicated that the newly identified common variants tag a rare, partially correlated coding variant in the HOXB13 gene (G84E, rs138213197), which has been identified recently as a moderate penetrance PrCa susceptibility allele. The potential for GWAS associations detected through common SNPs to be driven by rare causal variants with higher relative risks has long been proposed; however, to our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence for this phenomenon of synthetic association contributing to cancer susceptibility. PMID:24550738

  6. Dynamic analysis of the parallel-plate EMP (Electromagnetic Pulse) simulator using a wire-mesh approximation and the numerical electromagnetics code. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gedney, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    The electromagnetic pulse (EMP) produced by a high-altitude nuclear blast presents a severe threat to electronic systems due to its extreme characteristics. To test the vulnerability of large systems, such as airplanes, missiles, or satellites, they must be subjected to a simulated EMP environment. One type of simulator that has been used to approximate the EMP environment is the Large Parallel-Plate Bounded-Wave Simulator. It is a guided-wave simulator which has properties of a transmission line and supports a single TEM model at sufficiently low frequencies. This type of simulator consists of finite-width parallel-plate waveguides, which are excited by a wave launcher and terminated by a wave receptor. This study addresses the field distribution within a finite-width parallel-plate waveguide that is matched to a conical tapered waveguide at either end. Characteristics of a parallel-plate bounded-wave EMP simulator were developed using scattering theory, thin-wire mesh approximation of the conducting surfaces, and the Numerical Electronics Code (NEC). Background is provided for readers to use the NEC as a tool in solving thin-wire scattering problems.

  7. Tagging as a Social Literacy Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGillivray, Laurie; Curwen, Margaret Sauceda

    2007-01-01

    Tagging is not simply an act of vandalism or violence; it is a social practice with its own rules and codes--a literacy practice imbued with intent and meaning. Three aspects of tagging reflect its nature as a literate practice: (1) The purpose of tagging to achieve particular social goals and group affiliations; (2) The role of talent to be…

  8. Basic Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This module is the first in a series of three wiring publications; it serves as the foundation for students enrolled in a wiring program. It is a prerequisite to either "Residential Wiring" or "Commercial and Industrial Wiring." The module contains 16 instructional units that cover the following topics: occupational introduction; general safety;…

  9. Dosimetry characterization of 32P intravascular brachytherapy source wires using Monte Carlo codes PENELOPE and GEANT4.

    PubMed

    Torres, Javier; Buades, Manuel J; Almansa, Julio F; Guerrero, Rafael; Lallena, Antonio M

    2004-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric parameters of the new 20 mm long catheter-based 32P beta source manufactured by the Guidant Corporation. The dose distribution along the transverse axis and the two-dimensional dose rate table have been calculated. Also, the dose rate at the reference point, the radial dose function, and the anisotropy function were evaluated according to the adapted TG-60 formalism for cylindrical sources. PENELOPE and GEANT4 codes were first verified against previous results corresponding to the old 27 mm Guidant 32P beta source. The dose rate at the reference point for the unsheathed 27 mm source in water was calculated to be 0.215 +/- 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for PENELOPE, and 0.2312 +/- 0.0008 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), for GEANT4. For the unsheathed 20 mm source, these values were 0.2908 +/- 0.0009 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1) and 0.311 0.001 cGy s(-1) mCi(-1), respectively. Also, a comparison with the limited data available on this new source is shown. We found non-negligible differences between the results obtained with PENELOPE and GEANT4. PMID:15000615

  10. Residential Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark

    The second in a series of three curriculum packages on wiring, these materials for a five-unit course were developed to prepare postsecondary students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. The five units are: (1) blueprint reading and load calculations; (2) rough-in; (3) service; (4) trim out and troubleshooting; and (5) load…

  11. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  12. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  13. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid residue. We expect to extend

  14. Wire Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanquist, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how today's technology is encouraging schools to invest in furnishings that are adaptable to computer use and telecommunications access. Explores issues concerning modularity, wiring management, ergonomics, durability, price, and aesthetics. (GR)

  15. No Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California at Santa Cruz has completed a successful test of a wireless computer network that would enable students and professors to get on line from anywhere on campus. The network, linked by radio waves, could save millions of dollars in campus wiring costs and would better meet student and faculty information needs. (MSE)

  16. High security optical tags for automotive/avionics parts anticounterfeiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisdur, Enrick; Gesbert, Denis; Kress, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Horus technologies develops novel optical tags based on planar digital micro-optics. These tags are calculated by computer, fabricated as masters via optical microlithography and replicated in mass by plastic embossing. Such tags are composed of several different levels of anti-counterfeating features, ranging from traditional holographic patterns, to OVIDs, to micro-holograms, to machine readable digital holograms storing holographic 1D and 2D bar codes. These tags have a double aim: anti-counterfeating of automotive/avionic parts and providing the engineer using an appropriate tag reader with all the technical information referring to these parts.

  17. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  18. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  19. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  20. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  1. Extracting Tag Hierarchies

    PubMed Central

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the “flat” organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search

  2. Extracting tag hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Tagging items with descriptive annotations or keywords is a very natural way to compress and highlight information about the properties of the given entity. Over the years several methods have been proposed for extracting a hierarchy between the tags for systems with a "flat", egalitarian organization of the tags, which is very common when the tags correspond to free words given by numerous independent people. Here we present a complete framework for automated tag hierarchy extraction based on tag occurrence statistics. Along with proposing new algorithms, we are also introducing different quality measures enabling the detailed comparison of competing approaches from different aspects. Furthermore, we set up a synthetic, computer generated benchmark providing a versatile tool for testing, with a couple of tunable parameters capable of generating a wide range of test beds. Beside the computer generated input we also use real data in our studies, including a biological example with a pre-defined hierarchy between the tags. The encouraging similarity between the pre-defined and reconstructed hierarchy, as well as the seemingly meaningful hierarchies obtained for other real systems indicate that tag hierarchy extraction is a very promising direction for further research with a great potential for practical applications. Tags have become very prevalent nowadays in various online platforms ranging from blogs through scientific publications to protein databases. Furthermore, tagging systems dedicated for voluntary tagging of photos, films, books, etc. with free words are also becoming popular. The emerging large collections of tags associated with different objects are often referred to as folksonomies, highlighting their collaborative origin and the "flat" organization of the tags opposed to traditional hierarchical categorization. Adding a tag hierarchy corresponding to a given folksonomy can very effectively help narrowing or broadening the scope of search. Moreover

  3. Application of isotope coded affinity tag (ICAT) analysis for the identification of differentially expressed proteins following infection of atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (BKD).

    PubMed

    Booy, A T; Haddow, J D; Ohlund, L B; Hardie, D B; Olafson, R W

    2005-01-01

    Aquaculture and commercial fisheries worldwide suffer from significant economic loss due to diseases of net-pen reared fish. In British Columbia, infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and bacterial kidney disease (BKD) epidemics occur because there are currently no commercially available drugs or fully licensed vaccines to treat these diseases. With a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases, this circumstance might be significantly improved. In the present study, we have used a proteomics approach in an effort to identify and quantitate differentially expressed proteins in the liver and kidneys of diseased and healthy Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Isotope coded affinity tagging (ICAT), 2D gel electrophoresis, and multidimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC MS/MS) were used to identify hundreds of differentially expressed proteins. While the direct significance of changes in expression levels of many proteins remains to be elucidated, others appear to be more clearly related to the infectious process. Examples of the latter are discussed here and include, a natural killer cell enhancement factor (NKEF), procathepsin L, superoxide-producing NADPH oxidase and interferon-induced viral resistance protein Mx (IFI-Mx). PMID:15822907

  4. Phase modulation in RF tag

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2007-02-20

    A radio frequency (RF) communication system employs phase-modulated backscatter signals for RF communication from an RF tag to an interrogator. The interrogator transmits a continuous wave interrogation signal to the RF tag, which based on an information code stored in a memory, phase-modulates the interrogation signal to produce a backscatter response signal that is transmitted back to the interrogator. A phase modulator structure in the RF tag may include a switch coupled between an antenna and a quarter-wavelength stub; and a driver coupled between the memory and a control terminal of the switch. The driver is structured to produce a modulating signal corresponding to the information code, the modulating signal alternately opening and closing the switch to respectively decrease and increase the transmission path taken by the interrogation signal and thereby modulate the phase of the response signal. Alternatively, the phase modulator may include a diode coupled between the antenna and driver. The modulating signal from the driver modulates the capacitance of the diode, which modulates the phase of the response signal reflected by the diode and antenna.

  5. 24 CFR 3280.808 - Wiring methods and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wiring methods and materials. 3280... § 3280.808 Wiring methods and materials. (a) Except as specifically permitted by this part, the wiring methods and materials specified in the National Electrical Code, NFPA No. 70-2005, must be used...

  6. Effects of routine handling and tagging procedures on physiological stress responses in juvenile chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharpe, C.S.; Thompson, D.A.; Blankenship, H.L.; Schreck, C.B.

    1998-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were subjected to handling and tagging protocols typical of normal hatchery operations and monitored for their physiological response to stress. Treatments included coded-wire-tagging, counting, ventral fin clipping, adipose fin clipping, and a procedure simulating a pond split. Treatment fish were also subjected to a standardized stress challenge (1 h confinement) to evaluate their ability to deal with disturbances subsequent to a handling or tagging procedure. Circulating levels of cortisol and glucose were used as indicators of stress. Each of the treatments elicited very similar responses among treatment groups. Cortisol increased from resting levels of about 20 ng/mL to about 90 ng/mL by 1 h poststress and returned to near resting levels by 8 h poststress. Glucose levels increased from 50 mg/dL to about 80 mg/dL by 1 h poststress and remained elevated for much of the experiment. The cortisol and glucose responses to the confinement stress did not differ over time or among treatments. However, the confinement stress results do suggest a small but significant cumulative response, indicating small residual effects of the original handling protocols. No deaths were noted among treatment groups.

  7. A traffic analyzer for multiple SpaceWire links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Scige J.; Giusi, Giovanni; Di Giorgio, Anna M.; Vertolli, Nello; Galli, Emanuele; Biondi, David; Farina, Maria; Pezzuto, Stefano; Spinoglio, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    Modern space missions are becoming increasingly complex: the interconnection of the units in a satellite is now a network of terminals linked together through routers, where devices with different level of automation and intelligence share the same data-network. The traceability of the network transactions is performed mostly at terminal level through log analysis and hence it is difficult to verify in real time the reliability of the interconnections and the interchange protocols. To improve and ease the traffic analysis in a SpaceWire network we implemented a low-level link analyzer, with the specific goal to simplify the integration and test phases in the development of space instrumentation. The traffic analyzer collects signals coming from pod probes connected in-series on the interested links between two SpaceWire terminals. With respect to the standard traffic analyzers, the design of this new tool includes the possibility to internally reshape the LVDS signal. This improvement increases the robustness of the analyzer towards environmental noise effects and guarantees a deterministic delay on all analyzed signals. The analyzer core is implemented on a Xilinx FPGA, programmed to decode the bidirectional LVDS signals at Link and Network level. Successively, the core packetizes protocol characters in homogeneous sets of time ordered events. The analyzer provides time-tagging functionality for each characters set, with a precision down to the FPGA Clock, i.e. about 20nsec in the adopted HW environment. The use of a common time reference for each character stream allows synchronous performance measurements. The collected information is then routed to an external computer for quick analysis: this is done via high-speed USB2 connection. With this analyzer it is possible to verify the link performances in terms of induced delays in the transmitted signals. A case study focused on the analysis of the Time-Code synchronization in presence of a SpaceWire Router is

  8. Automated tag reading system for material tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Larry E.; Rosenberry-Friend, Kimberly A.; Pertl, Franz A.

    1997-09-01

    An automated product tag reading system based on CCD cameras and computer image processing has been developed by West Virginia University, and demonstrated at the Weirton Steel Corporation. The system was developed to read painted steel identification tags which are fastened to the ends of steel slabs. The prototype was mounted on a slab hauler and tested in a steel mill environment. It demonstrated the ability to survey a wide-angle image of a scene, locate the target tags in the image, pan and zoom on each one in turn, and read the contents of the tag -- both bar code and alphanumeric code. The system could communicate via radio modem to a stationary computer which could be interfaced to the plant's inventory management database. We are aware of no other system which can both point and read a bar code scanner. The pointing function is important, in that it allows operation in bright sunlight or at long distances: two conditions where humans encounter difficulties in aiming. Our system can read 50-mil bar codes at distances of 30 feet without the use of retro reflective targets. This paper provides an overview of the technical approach used, and the results of stem testing.

  9. Friction induced skin tags.

    PubMed

    Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

    2008-01-01

    Skin tags are common benign neoplasm located predominantly in intertriginous skin. Generally of cosmetic concern, they can be easily treated with cryotherapy, electrodessication or snip-excision. Despite their high incidence data about their etiopathogenesis are scarce in the medical literature. We describe a patient who developed multiple skin tags arranged in a linear fashion suggesting an etiopathogenic role for friction. PMID:18627719

  10. Electronic tagging and integrated product intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swerdlow, Martin; Weeks, Brian

    1996-03-01

    The advent of 'intelligent,' electronic data bearing tags is set to revolutionize the way industrial and retail products are identified and tracked throughout their life cycles. The dominant system for unique identification today is the bar code, which is based on printed symbology and regulated by the International Article Numbering Association. Bar codes provide users with significant operational advantages and generate considerable added value to packaging companies, product manufacturers, distributors and retailers, across supply chains in many different sectors, from retailing, to baggage handling and industrial components, e.g., for vehicles or aircraft. Electronic tags offer the potential to: (1) record and store more complex data about the product or any modifications which occur during its life cycle; (2) access (and up-date) stored data in real time in a way which does not involve contact with the product or article; (3) overcome the limitations imposed by systems which rely on line-of-sight access to stored data. Companies are now beginning to consider how electronic data tags can be used, not only to improve the efficiency of their supply chain processes, but also to revolutionize the way they do business. This paper reviews the applications and business opportunities for electronic tags and outlines CEST's strategy for achieving an 'open' standard which will ensure that tags from different vendors can co-exist on an international basis.

  11. Chemically etched modulation in wire radius for wire array Z-pinch perturbation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Deeney, C.; McKenney, J.L.; Garrity, J.E.; Lobley, D.K.; Martin, K.L.; Griego, A.E.; Ramacciotti, J.P.; Bland, S.N.; Lebedev, S.V.; Bott, S.C.; Ampleford, D.J.; Palmer, J.B.A.; Rapley, J.; Hall, G.

    2004-11-01

    A technique for manufacturing wires with imposed modulation in radius with axial wavelengths as short as 1 mm is presented. Extruded aluminum 5056 with 15 {mu}m diameter was masked and chemically etched to reduce the radius by {approx}20% in selected regions. Characterized by scanning electron microscopy, the modulation in radius is a step function with a {approx}10 {mu}m wide conical transition between thick and thin segments, with some pitting in etched regions. Techniques for mounting and aligning these wires in arrays for fast z-pinch experiments will be discussed. Axially mass-modulated wire arrays of this type will allow the study of seeded Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in z pinches, corona formation, wire initiation with varying current density in the wire core, and correlation of perturbations between adjacent wires. This tool will support magnetohydrodynamics code validation in complex three-dimensional geometries, and perhaps x-ray pulse shaping.

  12. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  13. Spiral MR myocardial tagging.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Kissinger, Kraig V; Spiegel, Marcus A; Börnert, Peter; Manning, Warren J; Boesiger, Peter; Stuber, Matthias

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, complementary spatial modulation of magnetization (CSPAMM) myocardial tagging was extended with an interleaved spiral imaging sequence. The use of a spiral sequence enables the acquisition of grid-tagged images with a tagline distance as low as 4 mm in a single breath-hold. Alternatively, a high temporal resolution of 77 frames per second was obtained with 8-mm grid spacing. Ten healthy adult subjects were studied. With this new approach, high-quality images can be obtained and the tags persist throughout the entire cardiac cycle. PMID:14755646

  14. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  15. TAG Advertisement Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    LaRc SI Material Overall photograph showing the material specimens, the graphite composite, the gold composite and the molded gears on a black background. These photos were used for the TAG CO-OP Public Relations and promotions

  16. Wire Test Grip Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Wire-testing issues, such as the gripping strains imposed on the wire, play a critical role in obtaining clean data. In a standard test frame fitted with flat wedge grips, the gripping action alone creates stresses on the wire specimen that cause the wire to fail at the grip location. A new test frame, which is outfitted with a vacuum chamber, negated the use of any conventional commercially available wire test fixtures, as only 7 in. (17.8 cm) existed between the grip faces. An innovative grip fixture was designed to test thin gauge wire for a variety of applications in an existing Instron test frame outfitted with a vacuum chamber.

  17. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  18. POLYFAIL: a program for identification of multiple fuel failures with gas tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K. C.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes the development of the computer code POLYFAIL for identification of fuel failures in fast reactors or light-water reactors that use gas tagging. POLYFAIL implements a sophisticated numerical algorithm known as the method of barycentric coordinates. The code can treat problems involving up to four simultaneous tag releases in a tagging system characterized by three independent tag ratios. The sensitivity of the multiple-failure-resolution technique has been optimized by incorporation of a newly developed ratio weighting scheme. Several example problems are provided to demonstrate operation of the code under single-leaker and various postulated multiple-leaker situations.

  19. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  20. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  1. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  2. Tags to Track Illicit Uranium and Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M. Jonathan; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-07-01

    With the expansion of nuclear power, it is essential to avoid nuclear materials from falling into the hands of rogue nations, terrorists, and other opportunists. This paper examines the idea of detection and attribution tags for nuclear materials. For a detection tag, it is proposed to add small amounts [about one part per billion (ppb)] of {sup 232}U to enriched uranium to brighten its radioactive signature. Enriched uranium would then be as detectable as plutonium and thus increase the likelihood of intercepting illicit enriched uranium. The use of rare earth oxide elements is proposed as a new type of 'attribution' tag for uranium and thorium from mills, uranium and plutonium fuels, and other nuclear materials. Rare earth oxides are chosen because they are chemically compatible with the fuel cycle, can survive high-temperature processing operations in fuel fabrication, and can be chosen to have minimal neutronic impact within the nuclear reactor core. The mixture of rare earths and/or rare earth isotopes provides a unique 'bar code' for each tag. If illicit nuclear materials are recovered, the attribution tag can identify the source and lot of nuclear material, and thus help police reduce the possible number of suspects in the diversion of nuclear materials based on who had access. (authors)

  3. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  4. A High-Gain Passive UHF-RFID Tag with Increased Read Range.

    PubMed

    Zuffanelli, Simone; Aguila, Pau; Zamora, Gerard; Paredes, Ferran; Martin, Ferran; Bonache, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a passive ultra-high frequency radio-frequency identification UHF-RFID tag based on a 1.25 wavelengths thin dipole antenna is presented for the first time. The length of the antenna is properly chosen in order to maximize the tag read range, while maintaining a reasonable tag size and radiation pattern. The antenna is matched to the RFID chip by means of a very simple matching network based on a shunt inductance. A tag prototype, based on the Alien Higgs-3 chip, is designed and fabricated. The overall dimensions are 400 mm × 14.6 mm, but the tag width for most of its length is delimited by the wire diameter (0.8 mm). The measured read range exhibits a maximum value of 17.5 m at the 902-928 MHz frequency band. This represents an important improvement over state-of-the-art passive UHF-RFID tags. PMID:27455274

  5. A High-Gain Passive UHF-RFID Tag with Increased Read Range

    PubMed Central

    Zuffanelli, Simone; Aguila, Pau; Zamora, Gerard; Paredes, Ferran; Martin, Ferran; Bonache, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a passive ultra-high frequency radio-frequency identification UHF-RFID tag based on a 1.25 wavelengths thin dipole antenna is presented for the first time. The length of the antenna is properly chosen in order to maximize the tag read range, while maintaining a reasonable tag size and radiation pattern. The antenna is matched to the RFID chip by means of a very simple matching network based on a shunt inductance. A tag prototype, based on the Alien Higgs-3 chip, is designed and fabricated. The overall dimensions are 400 mm × 14.6 mm, but the tag width for most of its length is delimited by the wire diameter (0.8 mm). The measured read range exhibits a maximum value of 17.5 m at the 902–928 MHz frequency band. This represents an important improvement over state-of-the-art passive UHF-RFID tags. PMID:27455274

  6. A Reliable Tag Anti-Collision Algorithm for Mobile Tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaodong; Rong, Mengtian; Liu, Tao

    As RFID technology is being more widely adopted, it is fairly common to read mobile tags using RFID systems, such as packages on conveyer belt and unit loads on pallet jack or forklift truck. In RFID systems, multiple tags use a shared medium for communicating with a reader. It is quite possible that tags will exit the reading area without being read, which results in tag leaking. In this letter, a reliable tag anti-collision algorithm for mobile tags is proposed. It reliably estimates the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot when new tags continually enter the reader's reading area and no tag leaves without being read. In addition, it gives priority to tags that arrived early among read cycles and applies the expectation of the number of tags arriving during a time slot to the determination of the number of slots in the initial inventory round of the next read cycle. Simulation results show that the reliability of the proposed algorithm is close to that of DFSA algorithm when the expectation of the number of tags entering the reading area during a time slot is a given, and is better than that of DFSA algorithm when the number of time slots in the initial inventory round of next read cycle is set to 1 assuming that the number of tags arriving during a time slot follows Poisson distribution.

  7. Method for protein tagging in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Petrescu-Dănilă, Elena; Voicu, Pia-Manuela; Poiţelea, M; Stoica, B; Stănescu, Raluca; Rusu, M

    2006-01-01

    Tagging is a useful method for the investigation of proteins. It allows the localization of the proteins in the cell, their purification in order to investigate their function and the determination of their expression. The aim of the present study was to tag the Rad32 protein of fission yeast (which is the homologue of Mre11 protein from humans) at its N-terminus. Rad32p as well as Mre11p are involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and in the DNA damage checkpoint. We carried out this tagging using the Cre-loxp recombination system. In a first step, a 2 kb DNA fragment was integrated upstream of the initiating codon of rad32 gene. This fragment encoded the TAP-tag (tandem affinity purification), a loxp site, a selectable marker (sup3-5), an exogenous promoter (nmt1) and a second loxp site, in this sequence. Following transformation of this DNA fragment into S. pombe cells, rad32 was under the control of the artificial promotor, which allows a controlled expression of the gene by thiamine. In a second step, the cells were transformed with a plasmid coding for Cre recombinase, which catalyses the excision of the DNA sequence between the two loxp sites, removing the marker and the artificial promotor. Thus the tag became attached to the rad32 gene upstream of the ATG, placing the gene under the control of its native promotor. The strain thus obtained will be subsequently used for evidencing the tagged protein by Western blotting and then for its purification in order to investigate its function. PMID:17802953

  8. Tag Completion for Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K

    2013-03-01

    Many social image search engines are based on keyword/tag matching. This is because tag-based image retrieval (TBIR) is not only efficient but also effective. The performance of TBIR is highly dependent on the availability and quality of manual tags. Recent studies have shown that manual tags are often unreliable and inconsistent. In addition, since many users tend to choose general and ambiguous tags in order to minimize their efforts in choosing appropriate words, tags that are specific to the visual content of images tend to be missing or noisy, leading to a limited performance of TBIR. To address this challenge, we study the problem of tag completion, where the goal is to automatically fill in the missing tags as well as correct noisy tags for given images. We represent the image-tag relation by a tag matrix, and search for the optimal tag matrix consistent with both the observed tags and the visual similarity. We propose a new algorithm for solving this optimization problem. Extensive empirical studies show that the proposed algorithm is significantly more effective than the state-of-the-art algorithms. Our studies also verify that the proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and scales well to large databases. PMID:22641703

  9. Project 8 Tags

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos-Burrows, Michele

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes 8 Tags, a project that she used with her eighth-grade studio art students to encourage them to come up with original and creative solutions to an assignment. She also wanted to incorporate their knowledge of the elements of art and principles of design. In this project, students were challenged to create an…

  10. Ontologies and tag-statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibély, Gergely; Pollner, Péter; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2012-05-01

    Due to the increasing popularity of collaborative tagging systems, the research on tagged networks, hypergraphs, ontologies, folksonomies and other related concepts is becoming an important interdisciplinary area with great potential and relevance for practical applications. In most collaborative tagging systems the tagging by the users is completely ‘flat’, while in some cases they are allowed to define a shallow hierarchy for their own tags. However, usually no overall hierarchical organization of the tags is given, and one of the interesting challenges of this area is to provide an algorithm generating the ontology of the tags from the available data. In contrast, there are also other types of tagged networks available for research, where the tags are already organized into a directed acyclic graph (DAG), encapsulating the ‘is a sub-category of’ type of hierarchy between each other. In this paper, we study how this DAG affects the statistical distribution of tags on the nodes marked by the tags in various real networks. The motivation for this research was the fact that understanding the tagging based on a known hierarchy can help in revealing the hidden hierarchy of tags in collaborative tagging systems. We analyse the relation between the tag-frequency and the position of the tag in the DAG in two large sub-networks of the English Wikipedia and a protein-protein interaction network. We also study the tag co-occurrence statistics by introducing a two-dimensional (2D) tag-distance distribution preserving both the difference in the levels and the absolute distance in the DAG for the co-occurring pairs of tags. Our most interesting finding is that the local relevance of tags in the DAG (i.e. their rank or significance as characterized by, e.g., the length of the branches starting from them) is much more important than their global distance from the root. Furthermore, we also introduce a simple tagging model based on random walks on the DAG, capable of

  11. Apoferritin-Templated Synthesis of Encoded Metallic Phosphate Nanoparticle Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Dohnalkova, Alice; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-31

    Encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags, with distinct encoding patterns, have been prepared using an apoferritin template. A center-cavity structure as well as the disassociation and reconstructive characteristics of apoferritin at different pH environments provide a facile route for preparing such encoded nanoparticle tags. Encapsulation and diffusion approaches have been investigated during the preparation. The encapsulation approach, which is based on the dissociation and reconstruction of apoferritin at different pHs, exhibits an effective route to prepare such encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags. The compositionally encoded nanoparticle tag leads to a high coding capacity with a large number of distinguishable voltammetric signals, reflecting the predetermined composition of the metal mixture solution (and hence the nanoparticle composition). Releasing the metal components from the nanoparticle tags at pH 4.6 acetate buffer avoids harsh dissolution conditions, such as strong acids. Such a synthesis of encoded nanoparticle tags, including single-component and compositionally encoded nanoparticle tags, is substantially simple, fast, and convenient compared to that of encoded metal nanowires and semiconductor nanoparticle (CdS, PbS, and ZnS) incorporated polystyrene beads. The encoded metallic-phosphate nanoparticle tags thus show great promise for bioanalytical or product-tracking/identification/protection applications.

  12. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  19. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  20. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  2. Thin wire pointing method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, G.; Mattauch, R. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for forming sharp tips on thin wires, in particular phosphor bronze wires of diameters such as one-thousandth inch used to contact micron size Schottky barrier diodes, which enables close control of tip shape and which avoids the use of highly toxic solutions. The method includes dipping an end of a phosphor bronze wire into a dilute solution of sulfamic acid and applying a current through the wire to electrochemically etch it. The humidity in the room is controlled to a level of less than 50%, and the voltage applied between the wire and another electrode in the solutions is a half wave rectified voltage. The current through the wire is monitored, and the process is stopped when the current falls to a predetermined low level.

  3. Sintered wire annode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2007-12-25

    A plurality of high atomic number wires are sintered together to form a porous rod that is parted into porous disks which will be used as x-ray targets. A thermally conductive material is introduced into the pores of the rod, and when a stream of electrons impinges on the sintered wire target and generates x-rays, the heat generated by the impinging x-rays is removed by the thermally conductive material interspersed in the pores of the wires.

  4. Zinc wired rebar

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.G.; Hwang, J.

    1997-02-01

    A novel method for corrosion protection of rebar in concrete is reported wherein it is galvanically protected by attaching a zinc wire along its length. The self-corrosion and galvanic-corrosion loss of the zinc wire is dependent on the water/cement ratio, the size of the cathode, and the concrete cover thickness. The wire acts as a sacrificial anode when the rebar embedded in concrete is exposed to corrosive environments.

  5. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  6. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  7. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  8. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  9. VIEW SOUTHEASTBUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST-BUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING MACHINE - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  10. Social Tagging Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars; Jäschke, Robert; Hotho, Andreas; Stumme, Gerd; Symeonidis, Panagiotis

    The new generation of Web applications known as (STS) is successfully established and poised for continued growth. STS are open and inherently social; features that have been proven to encourage participation. But while STS bring new opportunities, they revive old problems, such as information overload. Recommender Systems are well known applications for increasing the level of relevant content over the "noise" that continuously grows as more and more content becomes available online. In STS however, we face new challenges. Users are interested in finding not only content, but also tags and even other users. Moreover, while traditional recommender systems usually operate over 2-way data arrays, STS data is represented as a third-order tensor or a hypergraph with hyperedges denoting (user, resource, tag) triples. In this chapter, we survey the most recent and state-of-the-art work about a whole new generation of recommender systems built to serve STS.We describe (a) novel facets of recommenders for STS, such as user, resource, and tag recommenders, (b) new approaches and algorithms for dealing with the ternary nature of STS data, and (c) recommender systems deployed in real world STS. Moreover, a concise comparison between existing works is presented, through which we identify and point out new research directions.

  11. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  12. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  13. 2016 MOST WIRED.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul; Butcher, Lola; Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2016-07-01

    This year's IT survey shows that hospitals are aggressively fighting cyber crime and looking for ways to use data to help in the transition to value-based care. Find out who made the 2016 lists of Most Wired, Most Advanced, Most Improved and Most Wired-Small and Rural. PMID:27526506

  14. The exploding wire phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, H.

    1985-02-01

    Graneau's recent interpretation of the exploding wire phenomenon as an electrodynamic effect verifying Ampère's classical formulation is questioned. Instead, it is shown that the rupturing force arising from the imbalance of the self-induced electromotive force and the ohmic potential during an explosive current surge will account for the wire breaking into several segments, as is observed.

  15. Water Desalination with Wires.

    PubMed

    Porada, S; Sales, B B; Hamelers, H V M; Biesheuvel, P M

    2012-06-21

    We show the significant potential of water desalination using a novel capacitive wire-based technology in which anode/cathode wire pairs are constructed from coating a thin porous carbon electrode layer on top of electrically conducting rods (or wires). By alternately dipping an array of electrode pairs in freshwater with and in brine without an applied cell voltage, we create an ion adsorption/desorption cycle. We show experimentally how in six subsequent cycles we can reduce the salinity of 20 mM feed (brackish) water by a factor of 3, while application of a cation exchange membrane on the cathode wires makes the desalination factor increase to 4. Theoretical modeling rationalizes the experimental findings, and predicts that system performance can be significantly enhanced by material modifications. To treat large volumes of water, multiple stacks of wire pairs can be used simultaneously in a "merry-go-round" operational mode. PMID:26285717

  16. International space station wire program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd

    1995-01-01

    Hardware provider wire systems and current wire insulation issues for the International Space Station (ISS) program are discussed in this viewgraph presentation. Wire insulation issues include silicone wire contamination, Tefzel cold temperature flexibility, and Russian polyimide wire insulation. ISS is a complex program with hardware developed and managed by many countries and hundreds of contractors. Most of the obvious wire insulation issues are known by contractors and have been precluded by proper selection.

  17. Social Tagging of Mission Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Powell, Mark W.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Mittman, David S.; Abramyan, Lucy; Crockett, Thomas M.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Fox, Jason M.; Pyrzak, Guy; Vaughn, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Mars missions will generate a large amount of data in various forms, such as daily plans, images, and scientific information. Often, there is a semantic linkage between images that cannot be captured automatically. Software is needed that will provide a method for creating arbitrary tags for this mission data so that items with a similar tag can be related to each other. The tags should be visible and searchable for all users. A new routine was written to offer a new and more flexible search option over previous applications. This software allows users of the MSLICE program to apply any number of arbitrary tags to a piece of mission data through a MSLICE search interface. The application of tags creates relationships between data that did not previously exist. These tags can be easily removed and changed, and contain enough flexibility to be specifically configured for any mission. This gives users the ability to quickly recall or draw attention to particular pieces of mission data, for example: Give a semantic and meaningful description to mission data; for example, tag all images with a rock in them with the tag "rock." Rapidly recall specific and useful pieces of data; for example, tag a plan as"driving template." Call specific data to a user s attention; for example, tag a plan as "for:User." This software is part of the MSLICE release, which was written in Java. It will run on any current Windows, Macintosh, or Linux system.

  18. Towards an "Intelligent" Tagging Tool for Blogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Juraj; Motschnig, Renate; Homola, Martin

    Tagging allows people to effectively organize web resources such as images, bookmarks or blog articles. Things are found easier by browsing tag clouds relying on the tags that have been assigned before. The success is by large determined by the quality and relevance of tags assigned to content - and so it is dependent on people who do the tagging. We investigate mental processes that underlie tagging. In order to improve quality of tagging, we provide guidelines for users of tagging systems and in addition we suggest features that an "intelligent" tagging tool should bear in order to facilitate the tagging process.

  19. Next Generation Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Petro; Jolley, Scott; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Vinje, Rubiela; Williams, Martha; Clayton, LaNetra; Roberson, Luke; Smith, Trent; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Wiring is a major operational component on aerospace hardware that accounts for substantial weight and volumetric space. Over time wire insulation can age and fail, often leading to catastrophic events such as system failure or fire. The next generation of wiring must be reliable and sustainable over long periods of time. These features will be achieved by the development of a wire insulation capable of autonomous self-healing that mitigates failure before it reaches a catastrophic level. In order to develop a self-healing insulation material, three steps must occur. First, methods of bonding similar materials must be developed that are capable of being initiated autonomously. This process will lead to the development of a manual repair system for polyimide wire insulation. Second, ways to initiate these bonding methods that lead to materials that are similar to the primary insulation must be developed. Finally, steps one and two must be integrated to produce a material that has no residues from the process that degrades the insulating properties of the final repaired insulation. The self-healing technology, teamed with the ability to identify and locate damage, will greatly improve reliability and safety of electrical wiring of critical systems. This paper will address these topics, discuss the results of preliminary testing, and remaining development issues related to self-healing wire insulation.

  20. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  1. Orbiter Kapton wire operational requirements and experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The agenda of this presentation includes the Orbiter wire selection requirements, the Orbiter wire usage, fabrication and test requirements, typical wiring installations, Kapton wire experience, NASA Kapton wire testing, summary, and backup data.

  2. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer; Deland, Sharon M.

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  3. STRS SpaceWire FPGA Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Taylor, Gregory H.; Lang, Minh; Stern, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    An FPGA module leverages the previous work from Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) relating to NASA s Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) project. The STRS SpaceWire FPGA Module is written in the Verilog Register Transfer Level (RTL) language, and it encapsulates an unmodified GSFC core (which is written in VHDL). The module has the necessary inputs/outputs (I/Os) and parameters to integrate seamlessly with the SPARC I/O FPGA Interface module (also developed for the STRS operating environment, OE). Software running on the SPARC processor can access the configuration and status registers within the SpaceWire module. This allows software to control and monitor the SpaceWire functions, but it is also used to give software direct access to what is transmitted and received through the link. SpaceWire data characters can be sent/received through the software interface, as well as through the dedicated interface on the GSFC core. Similarly, SpaceWire time codes can be sent/received through the software interface or through a dedicated interface on the core. This innovation is designed for plug-and-play integration in the STRS OE. The SpaceWire module simplifies the interfaces to the GSFC core, and synchronizes all I/O to a single clock. An interrupt output (with optional masking) identifies time-sensitive events within the module. Test modes were added to allow internal loopback of the SpaceWire link and internal loopback of the client-side data interface.

  4. Micro Wire-Drawing: Experiments And Modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, G. A.; Monti, M.; Bietresato, M.; D'Angelo, L.

    2007-05-17

    In the paper, the authors propose to adopt the micro wire-drawing as a key for investigating models of micro forming processes. The reasons of this choice arose in the fact that this process can be considered a quasi-stationary process where tribological conditions at the interface between the material and the die can be assumed to be constant during the whole deformation. Two different materials have been investigated: i) a low-carbon steel and, ii) a nonferrous metal (copper). The micro hardness and tensile tests performed on each drawn wire show a thin hardened layer (more evident then in macro wires) on the external surface of the wire and hardening decreases rapidly from the surface layer to the center. For the copper wire this effect is reduced and traditional material constitutive model seems to be adequate to predict experimentation. For the low-carbon steel a modified constitutive material model has been proposed and implemented in a FE code giving a better agreement with the experiments.

  5. Dual wire weld feed proportioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, R. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dual feed mechanism enables proportioning of two different weld feed wires during automated TIG welding to produce a weld alloy deposit of the desired composition. The wires are fed into the weld simultaneously. The relative feed rates of the wires and the wire diameters determine the weld deposit composition.

  6. An Overview of Social Tagging and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manish; Li, Rui; Yin, Zhijun; Han, Jiawei

    Social tagging on online portals has become a trend now. It has emerged as one of the best ways of associating metadata with web objects. With the increase in the kinds of web objects becoming available, collaborative tagging of such objects is also developing along new dimensions. This popularity has led to a vast literature on social tagging. In this survey paper, we would like to summarize different techniques employed to study various aspects of tagging. Broadly, we would discuss about properties of tag streams, tagging models, tag semantics, generating recommendations using tags, visualizations of tags, applications of tags, integration of different tagging systems and problems associated with tagging usage. We would discuss topics like why people tag, what influences the choice of tags, how to model the tagging process, kinds of tags, different power laws observed in tagging domain, how tags are created and how to choose the right tags for recommendation. Metadata generated in the form of tags can be efficiently used to improve web search, for web object classification, for generating ontologies, for enhanced browsing etc. We would discuss these applications and conclude with thoughts on future work in the area.

  7. Sample size requirements and analysis of tag recoveries for paired releases of lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; Frank, Anthony

    1990-01-01

    A simple chi-square test can be used to analyze recoveries from a paired-release experiment to determine whether differential survival occurs between two groups of fish. The sample size required for analysis is a function of (1) the proportion of fish stocked, (2) the expected proportion at recovery, (3) the level of significance (a) at which the null hypothesis is tested, and (4) the power (1-I?) of the statistical test. Detection of a 20% change from a stocking ratio of 50:50 requires a sample of 172 (I?=0.10; 1-I?=0.80) to 459 (I?=0.01; 1-I?=0.95) fish. Pooling samples from replicate pairs is sometimes an appropriate way to increase statistical precision without increasing numbers stocked or sampling intensity. Summing over time is appropriate if catchability or survival of the two groups of fish does not change relative to each other through time. Twelve pairs of identical groups of yearling lake trout Salvelinus namaycush were marked with coded wire tags and stocked into Lake Ontario. Recoveries of fish at ages 2-8 showed differences of 1-14% from the initial stocking ratios. Mean tag recovery rates were 0.217%, 0.156%, 0.128%, 0.121%, 0.093%, 0.042%, and 0.016% for ages 2-8, respectively. At these rates, stocking 12,100-29,700 fish per group would yield samples of 172-459 fish at ages 2-8 combined.

  8. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  9. Surface acoustic wave coding for orthogonal frequency coded devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Kozlovski, Nikolai (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and systems for coding SAW OFC devices to mitigate code collisions in a wireless multi-tag system. Each device producing plural stepped frequencies as an OFC signal with a chip offset delay to increase code diversity. A method for assigning a different OCF to each device includes using a matrix based on the number of OFCs needed and the number chips per code, populating each matrix cell with OFC chip, and assigning the codes from the matrix to the devices. The asynchronous passive multi-tag system includes plural surface acoustic wave devices each producing a different OFC signal having the same number of chips and including a chip offset time delay, an algorithm for assigning OFCs to each device, and a transceiver to transmit an interrogation signal and receive OFC signals in response with minimal code collisions during transmission.

  10. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging.

    PubMed

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-30

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  11. Semiotic dynamics and collaborative tagging

    PubMed Central

    Cattuto, Ciro; Loreto, Vittorio; Pietronero, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative tagging has been quickly gaining ground because of its ability to recruit the activity of web users into effectively organizing and sharing vast amounts of information. Here we collect data from a popular system and investigate the statistical properties of tag cooccurrence. We introduce a stochastic model of user behavior embodying two main aspects of collaborative tagging: (i) a frequency-bias mechanism related to the idea that users are exposed to each other's tagging activity; (ii) a notion of memory, or aging of resources, in the form of a heavy-tailed access to the past state of the system. Remarkably, our simple modeling is able to account quantitatively for the observed experimental features with a surprisingly high accuracy. This points in the direction of a universal behavior of users who, despite the complexity of their own cognitive processes and the uncoordinated and selfish nature of their tagging activity, appear to follow simple activity patterns. PMID:17244704

  12. Simulations of beam-wire experiments at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIM) is used to study the compensation of long range beam-beam effects by current carrying wires at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Tune footprints and tune scans of diffusive aperture are presented for various wire separation distances. Beam life time is estimated using the dependence of the transverse diffusion coefficients on initial action. Comparison of the loss rate from tracking with that measured by BNL is presented.

  13. Second NASA Workshop on Wiring for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Second NASA Workshop on Wiring for Space Applications held at NASA LeRC in Cleveland, OH, 6-7 Oct. 1993. The workshop was sponsored by NASA Headquarters Code QW Office of Safety and Mission Quality, Technical Standards Division and hosted by NASA LeRC, Power Technology Division, Electrical Components and Systems Branch. The workshop addressed key technology issues in the field of electrical power wiring for space applications. Speakers from government, industry, and academia presented and discussed topics on arc tracking phenomena, wiring system design, insulation constructions, and system protection. Presentation materials provided by the various speakers are included in this document.

  14. Identification coding schemes for modulated reflectance systems

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don M.; Briles, Scott D.; Neagley, Daniel L.; Platts, David; Clark, David D.

    2006-08-22

    An identifying coding apparatus employing modulated reflectance technology involving a base station emitting a RF signal, with a tag, located remotely from the base station, and containing at least one antenna and predetermined other passive circuit components, receiving the RF signal and reflecting back to the base station a modulated signal indicative of characteristics related to the tag.

  15. Bar-Code-Scribing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badinger, Michael A.; Drouant, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed hand-held tool applies indelible bar code to small parts. Possible to identify parts for management of inventory without tags or labels. Microprocessor supplies bar-code data to impact-printer-like device. Device drives replaceable scribe, which cuts bar code on surface of part. Used to mark serially controlled parts for military and aerospace equipment. Also adapts for discrete marking of bulk items used in food and pharmaceutical processing.

  16. D-TAG: erasing the tag of gang membership.

    PubMed

    Gurke, B; Armstrong, M L

    1997-04-01

    Gangs are noted for establishing their territory, flaunting gang affiliation, intimidating nonmembers, and documenting their "services performed." These examples are a few reasons for the practice of "tagging," the labeling of an area, person, or object with gang-related graffiti or markings, such as tattoos. This article describes a school nurse's response to gang "tagging" and her efforts to assist former gang members who request removal of their tattoos, to get them removed-in essence to D-TAG themselves from their gang affiliation. D-TAG is a volunteer rehabilitation program utilizing family and community interaction to support gang tattoo removal and direct activities away from gang affiliations toward alternative educational programs and life styles. PMID:9146217

  17. Tagging insulin in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobeck, Michael; Nelson, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the exact subcellular sites of action of insulin in the body has the potential to give basic science investigators a basis from which a cause and cure for this disease can be approached. The goal of this project is to create a test reagent that can be used to visualize these subcellular sites. The unique microgravity environment of the Shuttle will allow the creation of a reagent that has the possibility of elucidating the subcellular sites of action of insulin. Several techniques have been used in an attempt to isolate the sites of action of items such as insulin. One of these is autoradiography in which the test item is obtained from animals fed radioactive materials. What is clearly needed is to visualize individual insulin molecules at their sites of action. The insulin tagging process to be used on G-399 involves the conjugation of insulin molecules with ferritin molecules to create a reagent that will be used back on Earth in an attempt to elucidate the sites of action of insulin.

  18. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  19. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  20. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect

    Meigs, R.A.

    1993-08-31

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  1. Dielectric coated wire antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. H.; Newman, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    An electrically thin dielectric insulating shell on an antenna composed of electrically thin circular cylindrical wires is examined. A moment method solution is obtained, and the insulating shell is modeled by equivalent volume polarization currents. These polarization currents are related in a simple manner to the surface charge density on the wire antenna. In this way the insulating shell causes no new unknowns to be introduced, and the size of the impedance matrix is the same as for the uninsulated wires. The insulation is accounted for entirely through a modification of the symmetric impedance matrix. This modification influences the current distribution, impedance, efficiency, field patterns, and scattering properties. The theory is compared with measurement for dielectric coated antennas in air.

  2. 2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. TYPICAL OVERHEAD WIRE CONSTRUCTION - CURVE GUY WIRE ARRANGEMENT (ABANDONED WEST LEG OF WYE AT SIXTH AVENUE AND PINE STREET) - Yakima Valley Transportation Company Interurban Railroad, Trackage, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  3. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Adrian

    2011-08-15

    Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

  4. Cellular tagging as a neural network mechanism for behavioural tagging

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, Masanori; Ohkawa, Noriaki; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Yokose, Jun; Suzuki, Akinobu; Matsuo, Mina; Tsujimura, Shuhei; Takahashi, Yukari; Nagase, Masashi; Watabe, Ayako M.; Kato, Fusao; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural tagging is the transformation of a short-term memory, induced by a weak experience, into a long-term memory (LTM) due to the temporal association with a novel experience. The mechanism by which neuronal ensembles, each carrying a memory engram of one of the experiences, interact to achieve behavioural tagging is unknown. Here we show that retrieval of a LTM formed by behavioural tagging of a weak experience depends on the degree of overlap with the neuronal ensemble corresponding to a novel experience. The numbers of neurons activated by weak training in a novel object recognition (NOR) task and by a novel context exploration (NCE) task, denoted as overlapping neurons, increases in the hippocampal CA1 when behavioural tagging is successfully achieved. Optical silencing of an NCE-related ensemble suppresses NOR–LTM retrieval. Thus, a population of cells recruited by NOR is tagged and then preferentially incorporated into the memory trace for NCE to achieve behavioural tagging. PMID:27477539

  5. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Behavioral tagging of extinction learning.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Iván

    2013-01-15

    Extinction of contextual fear in rats is enhanced by exposure to a novel environment at 1-2 h before or 1 h after extinction training. This effect is antagonized by administration of protein synthesis inhibitors anisomycin and rapamycin into the hippocampus, but not into the amygdala, immediately after either novelty or extinction training, as well as by the gene expression blocker 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole administered after novelty training, but not after extinction training. Thus, this effect can be attributed to a mechanism similar to synaptic tagging, through which long-term potentiation can be enhanced by other long-term potentiations or by exposure to a novel environment in a protein synthesis-dependent fashion. Extinction learning produces a tag at the appropriate synapses, whereas novelty learning causes the synthesis of plasticity-related proteins that are captured by the tag, strengthening the synapses that generated this tag. PMID:23277583

  7. Method of remote powering and detecting multiple UWB passive tags in an RFID system

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, Farid U.; Nekoogar, Faranak; Benzel, David M.; Dallum, Gregory E.; Spiridon, Alex

    2012-05-29

    A new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), tracking, powering apparatus/system and method using coded Ultra-wideband (UWB) signaling is introduced. The proposed hardware and techniques disclosed herein utilize a plurality of passive UWB transponders in a field of an RFID-radar system. The radar system itself enables multiple passive tags to be remotely powered (activated) at about the same time frame via predetermined frequency UWB pulsed formats. Once such tags are in an activated state, an UWB radar transmits specific "interrogating codes" to put predetermined tags in an awakened status. Such predetermined tags can then communicate by a unique "response code" so as to be detected by an UWB system using radar methods.

  8. Wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    The insulation testing and analysis consists of: identifying and prioritizing NASA wiring requirements; selecting candidate wiring constructions; developing test matrix and formulating test program; managing, coordinating, and conducting tests; and analyzing and documenting data, establishing guidelines and recommendations.

  9. Magnetic micro-barcodes for molecular tagging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, T. J.; Hong, B.; Vyas, K. N.; Palfreyman, J. J.; Cooper, J. F. K.; Jiang, Z.; Jeong, J. R.; Llandro, J.; Mitrelias, T.; Bland, J. A. C.; Barnes, C. H. W.

    2010-05-01

    We present proof-of-principle experiments and simulations that demonstrate a new biological assay technology in which microscopic tags carrying multi-bit magnetic codes are used to label probe biomolecules. It is demonstrated that these 'micro-barcode tags' can be encoded, transported using micro-fluidics and are compatible with surface chemistry. We also present simulations and experimental results which suggest the feasibility of decoding the micro-barcode tags using magnetoresistive sensors. Together, these results demonstrate substantial progress towards meeting the critical requirements of a magnetically encoded, high-throughput and portable biological assay platform. We also show that an extension of our technology could potentially be used to label libraries consisting of ~104 distinct probe molecules, and could therefore have a strong impact on mainstream medical diagnostics.

  10. Strep-Tagged Protein Purification.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Barbara; Spriestersbach, Anne; Kubicek, Jan; Schäfer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The Strep-tag system can be used to purify recombinant proteins from any expression system. Here, protocols for lysis and affinity purification of Strep-tagged proteins from E. coli, baculovirus-infected insect cells, and transfected mammalian cells are given. Depending on the amount of Strep-tagged protein in the lysate, a protocol for batch binding and subsequent washing and eluting by gravity flow can be used. Agarose-based matrices with the coupled Strep-Tactin ligand are the resins of choice, with a binding capacity of up to 9 mg ml(-1). For purification of lower amounts of Strep-tagged proteins, the use of Strep-Tactin magnetic beads is suitable. In addition, Strep-tagged protein purification can also be automated using prepacked columns for FPLC or other liquid-handling chromatography instrumentation, but automated purification is not discussed in this protocol. The protocols described here can be regarded as an update of the Strep-Tag Protein Handbook (Qiagen, 2009). PMID:26096503

  11. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  12. Basic Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a foundation course to prepare students for additional courses of training for entry-level employment in either the residential or commercial and industrial wiring trades. Included in the guide are 17 instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using…

  13. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  14. Residential Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. Included in the guide are six instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using the unit components; academic and workplace skills classifications and…

  15. A World without Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The wireless bandwagon is rolling across Mississippi, picking up a fresh load of converts and turning calamity into opportunity. Traditional wired school networks, many of which unraveled during Hurricane Katrina, are giving way to advanced wireless mesh networks that frequently include voice-over-IP (VoIP) capabilities. Vendor funding is helping…

  16. Caroviologens: Towards molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard-Desce, M.; Arrhenius, T. S.; Dvolaïtzky, M.; Kugimiya, S.-I.; Lazrak, T.; Lehn, J.-M.

    1992-07-01

    Bispyridinium conjugated polyenes of different lengths and charges have been synthesized. Since they combine the features of carotenoids and of viologens, they have been termed caroviologens. Such molecules, possessing an extended conjugated chain fitted with polar electroactive endgroups, and having a length sufficient to span a lipid membrane could function as transmembrane electron channels, i.e., as molecular wires.

  17. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  18. Wire EDM for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellars, G. R.; Harris, F. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Pollman, W. M.; Rys, V. J.; Wills, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fabrication time and costs, Wire Electrical Discharge Machine (Wire EDM) method was investigated as tool for fabricating matched blade roots and disk slots. Eight high-strength nickel-base superalloys were used. Computer-controlled Wire EDM technique provided high quality surfaces with excellent dimensional tolerances. Wire EDM method offers potential for substantial reductions in fabrication costs for "hard to machine" alloys and electrically conductive materials in specific high-precision applications.

  19. Production of hot-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, S. C.

    1983-04-01

    Several methods for producing hot-wire probes are described. Discussion includes the manufacture of probe bodies, soldering plated wires to the prongs etching Walaston type wires, and finishing the probe. This report is written as an instruction manual for researchers who desire to produce or repair their own sensors.

  20. 1997 wire development workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This conference is divided into the following sections: (1) First Generation Wires I; (2) First Generation Wires II; (3) Coated conductors I; and (4) Coated conductors II. Applications of the superconducting wires include fault current limiters, superconducting motors, transformers, and power transmission lines.

  1. Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

    SciTech Connect

    Palm, R.G.; De Volpi, A.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.

  2. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  3. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... locate and reapply the tag to the proper animal. If the lost tag is not located, the dealer or exhibitor shall affix another official tag to the animal in the manner prescribed in § 2.50, and record the tag... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54...

  4. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Sondek, John

    2004-09-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, and for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:18429272

  5. Overview of affinity tags for protein purification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Michelle E; Brill, Allison L; Pasker, Renee L

    2013-01-01

    Addition of an affinity tag is a useful method for differentiating recombinant proteins expressed in bacterial and eukaryotic expression systems from the background of total cellular proteins, as well as for detecting protein-protein interactions. This overview describes the historical basis for the development of affinity tags, affinity tags that are commonly used today, how to choose an appropriate affinity tag for a particular purpose, and several recently developed affinity tag technologies that may prove useful in the near future. PMID:24510596

  6. Improved Lower Bounds of DNA Tags Based on a Modified Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Wei, Xiaopeng; Dong, Jing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The well-known massively parallel sequencing method is efficient and it can obtain sequence data from multiple individual samples. In order to ensure that sequencing, replication, and oligonucleotide synthesis errors do not result in tags (or barcodes) that are unrecoverable or confused, the tag sequences should be abundant and sufficiently different. Recently, many design methods have been proposed for correcting errors in data using error-correcting codes. The existing tag sets contain small tag sequences, so we used a modified genetic algorithm to improve the lower bound of the tag sets in this study. Compared with previous research, our algorithm is effective for designing sets of DNA tags. Moreover, the GC content determined by existing methods includes an imprecise range. Thus, we improved the GC content determination method to obtain tag sets that control the GC content in a more precise range. Finally, previous studies have only considered perfect self-complementarity. Thus, we considered the crossover between different tags and introduced an improved constraint into the design of tag sets. PMID:25693135

  7. Silver-sheathed multifilament wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Goretta, K. C.; Shi, D.; Lanagan, M. T.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1991-01-01

    The process for manufacturing Ag-sheathed multifilament superconducting wires was investigated. Bi2Sr(1.7)CaCu2O(x), Pb-doped Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x), or YBa2Cu3O(x) powders were packed into Ag tubes and swaged into long wires. Pieces were cut from each wire, packed into a second Ag tube and swaged or rolled into multifilament wires. Each wire was then sintered to produce a superconductor. Processing considerations included the sheath workability, effects of compacting and residual stresses, and heat treatment schedules. The superconducting properties of the Bi-based wires were superior to those of the YBa2Cu3O(x) wires at 4.2 K, but not at 77 K.

  8. Design and Optimization of Passive UHF RFID Tag Antenna for Mounting on or inside Material Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Shuai

    proximity and designing broad band and mechanically robust RFID tag antennas for elastic materials. As a first step, the effects of dielectric materials on an antenna's impedance match and radiation pattern are investigated. The detuning effect is quantified based on the theoretical frequency scaling and effective permittivity of a dielectric material of finite thickness. Using simple formulas, the operational range of a tag can be predicted without intensive full-wave simulations of different materials. Next, a spectral domain Green's function is applied to compute the antenna pattern when the tag is mounted on or inside a layered medium. The optimal placement of the tag is found based on the focusing effect that the material has on the gain pattern of the antenna. For tires, the steel ply in the sidewall of a tire looks like a periodic wire grating. The performance of an antenna placed close to a wire grating is predicted using Floquet theory. The results indicate that steel plies embedded in the tire can be utilized as a reflector to further focus the gain pattern and increase the read range of a tag. Using these design tools and theoretical analysis, several broadband RFID tag antennas are designed for multi-layered materials. A novel stretchable conductive textile (E-fiber) based tag antenna is also developed for placement in elastic materials. Prototype antennas are fabricated and embedded in a tire during the tire manufacturing process. Experimental results indicate that tags with the new antennas achieve significant improvement compared with commercially available tags.

  9. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  10. From wires to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Baumann, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We provide a statistical framework for characterizing stochastic particle production in the early universe via a precise correspondence to current conduction in wires with impurities. Our approach is particularly useful when the microphysics is uncertain and the dynamics are complex, but only coarse-grained information is of interest. We study scenarios with multiple interacting fields and derive the evolution of the particle occupation numbers from a Fokker-Planck equation. At late times, the typical occupation numbers grow exponentially which is the analog of Anderson localization for disordered wires. Some statistical features of the occupation numbers show hints of universality in the limit of a large number of interactions and/or a large number of fields. For test cases, excellent agreement is found between our analytic results and numerical simulations.

  11. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  12. Wiring for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. L., Jr.; Dickman, J. E.; Bercaw, R. W.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.; Stavnes, M.; Evans, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the current state of knowledge of arc propagation in aerospace power wiring and efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) towards the understanding of the arc tracking phenomena in space environments. Recommendations will be made for additional testing. A database of the performance of commonly used insulating materials will be developed to support the design of advanced high power missions, such as Space Station Freedom and Lunar/Mars Exploration.

  13. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  14. Using WIRED to study Simulated Linear Collider Detector Events

    SciTech Connect

    George, A

    2004-02-05

    The purpose of this project is to enhance the properties of the LCD WIRED Event Display. By extending the functionality of the display, physicists will be able to view events with more detail and interpret data faster. Poor characteristics associated with WIRED can severely affect the way we understand events, but by bringing attention to specific attributes we open doors to new ideas. Events displayed inside of the LCD have many different properties; this is why scientists need to be able to distinguish data using a plethora of symbols and other graphics. This paper will explain how we can view events differently using clustering and displaying results with track finding. Different source codes extracted from HEP libraries will be analyzed and tested to see which codes display the information needed. It is clear that, through these changes certain aspects of WIRED will be recognized more often allowing good event display which lead to better physics results.

  15. Social image tagging with diverse semantics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xueming; Hua, Xian-Sheng; Tang, Yuan Yan; Mei, Tao

    2014-12-01

    We have witnessed the popularity of image-sharing websites for sharing personal experiences through photos on the Web. These websites allow users describing the content of their uploaded images with a set of tags. Those user-annotated tags are often noisy and biased. Social image tagging aims at removing noisy tags and suggests new relevant tags. However, most existing tag enrichment approaches predominantly focus on tag relevance and overlook tag diversity problem. How to make the top-ranked tags covering a wide range of semantic is still an opening, yet challenging, issue. In this paper, we propose an approach to retag social images with diverse semantics. Both the relevance of a tag to image as well as its semantic compensations to the already determined tags are fused to determine the final tag list for a given image. Different from existing image tagging approaches, the top-ranked tags are not only highly relevant to the image but also have significant semantic compensations with each other. Experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25415950

  16. Synaptic Tagging During Memory Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Rogerson, Thomas; Cai, Denise; Frank, Adam; Sano, Yoshitake; Shobe, Justin; Aranda, Manuel L.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the allocation of memory to specific neurons (neuronal allocation) and synapses (synaptic allocation) in a neurocircuit is not random and that instead specific mechanisms, such as increases in neuronal excitability and synaptic tagging and capture, determine the exact sites where memories are stored. We propose an integrated view of these processes, such that neuronal allocation, synaptic tagging and capture, spine clustering and metaplasticity reflect related aspects of memory allocation mechanisms. Importantly, the properties of these mechanisms suggest a set of rules that profoundly affect how memories are stored and recalled. PMID:24496410

  17. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  18. WebTag: Web Browsing into Sensor Tags over NFC

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Álvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  19. WebTag: Web browsing into sensor tags over NFC.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Juan Jose; Ruiz-de-Garibay, Jonathan; Legarda, Jon; Alvarez, Maite; Ayerbe, Ana; Vazquez, Juan Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) continue to overcome many of the challenges related to wireless sensor monitoring, such as for example the design of smarter embedded processors, the improvement of the network architectures, the development of efficient communication protocols or the maximization of the life cycle autonomy. This work tries to improve the communication link of the data transmission in wireless sensor monitoring. The upstream communication link is usually based on standard IP technologies, but the downstream side is always masked with the proprietary protocols used for the wireless link (like ZigBee, Bluetooth, RFID, etc.). This work presents a novel solution (WebTag) for a direct IP based access to a sensor tag over the Near Field Communication (NFC) technology for secure applications. WebTag allows a direct web access to the sensor tag by means of a standard web browser, it reads the sensor data, configures the sampling rate and implements IP based security policies. It is, definitely, a new step towards the evolution of the Internet of Things paradigm. PMID:23012511

  20. Wire detecting apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receiver`s position with respect to the wiring. The receiver`s audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receiver`s coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring`s concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  1. Manually Operated Welding Wire Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A manual welding wire feeder apparatus comprising a bendable elongate metal frame with a feed roller mounted at the center thereof for rotation about an axis transverse to the longitudinal axis of the frame. The frame ends are turned up as tabs and each provided with openings in alignment with each other and the mid-width center of the roller surface. The tab openings are sized to accommodate welding wire and each extends to a side edge of the tab, both opening on the same side of the frame, whereby welding wire can be side-loaded onto the frame. On the side of the frame, opposite the roller a lock ring handle is attached tangentially and is rotatable about the attachment point and an axis perpendicular to the frame. The device is grasped in the hand normally used to hold the wire. A finger is placed through the loop ring and the frame positioned across the palm and lower fingers. The thumb is positioned atop the wire so it can be moved from the back of the frame across the roller, and towards the front. In doing so, the wire is advanced at a steady rate in axial alignment with the tab openings and roller. To accommodate different wire diameters the frame is bendable about its center in the plane of the frame axis and wire so as to keep the wire in sufficient tension against the roller and to keep the wire fixed when the frame is tilted and thumb pressure released.

  2. A laboratory evaluation of tagging-related mortality and tag loss in juvenile humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, David L.; Persons, William R.; Young, Kirk; Stone, Dennis M.; Van Haverbeke, Randy; Knight, William R.

    2015-01-01

    We quantified tag retention, survival, and growth in juvenile, captive-reared Humpback Chub Gila cypha marked with three different tag types: (1) Biomark 12.5-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected into the body cavity with a 12-gauge needle; (2) Biomark 8.4-mm, 134.2-kHz, full duplex PIT tags injected with a 16-gauge needle; and (3) Northwest Marine Technology visible implant elastomer (VIE) tags injected under the skin with a 29-gauge needle. Estimates of tag loss, tagging-induced mortality, and growth were evaluated for 60 d with each tag type for four different size-groups of fish: 40–49 mm, 50–59 mm, 60–69 mm, and 70–79 mm TL. Total length was a significant predictor of the probability of PIT tag retention and mortality for both 8-mm and 12-mm PIT tags, and the smallest fish had the highest rates of tag loss (12.5–30.0%) and mortality (7.5–20.0%). Humpback Chub of sizes 40–49 mm TL and tagged with VIE tags had no mortality but did have a 17.5% tag loss. Growth rates of all tagged fish were similar to controls. Our data indicate Humpback Chub can be effectively tagged using either 8-mm or 12-mm PIT tags with little tag loss or mortality at sizes as low as 65 mm TL.

  3. Multiple scattering of metallic wire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, T. R.; Chui, S. T.; Lin, Z. F.

    2015-10-01

    We describe how the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents can be studied with multiple scattering theory. The t matrix of individual structures is calculated with our recently developed rigorous equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account. We illustrate our method with the example of a planar periodic array of split ring resonators. The transmission is calculated as a function of frequency. The result is found to agree well with that obtained by a commercial code (COMSOL) but our result is two orders of magnitude faster and requires much less memory.

  4. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  5. Performance of commercially available Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag systems used for fish identification and interjurisdictional fisheries management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag systems are commonly used for identification and monitoring programs with fisheries applications. Transponders of different frequencies, sizes, and code formats are available from numerous manufacturers, and there is an increasing concern regarding the need ...

  6. REVIEW ARTICLE: A soft magnetic wire for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M.; Hernando, A.

    1996-04-01

    The main magnetic characteristics regarding the domain structure and magnetization processes (axial, circular and Matteucci and inverse Wiedemann effects) of amorphous wires and glass-coated microwires are analysed. Magnetic bistability, spontaneously observed in samples with large enough ratio magneto-elastic anisotropy with axial easy axis to shape anisotropy, is the main source for a number of sensor applications in pulse generators, position and field sensors, encoded security tags, rotational counters, magnetostrictive delay lines, and so on. The relevant perspectives of the novel giant magneto-impedance effect recently reported and observed in non-magnetostrictive samples are also introduced.

  7. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. What Do Tag Games Teach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belka, David

    2006-01-01

    Tag games have been described as "Chasing, fleeing, and dodging" type activities. Most "fleeing" activities involve dramatic play, use of movement concepts (such as quick and light), or movement changes without a partner, while many of the chasing and dodging activities utilize dodging concepts between partners or within small groups and are…

  9. SRNL Tagging and Tracking Video

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-06-15

    SRNL generates a next generation satellite base tracking system. The tagging and tracking system can work in remote wilderness areas, inside buildings, underground and other areas not well served by traditional GPS. It?s a perfect response to customer needs and market demand.

  10. Droplet Formation in Wire Array Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, J. S.; Rosenthal, S.; Cochrane, K.; Haill, T.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2003-10-01

    Wires in high power z-pinch wire array implosions are heated so rapidly that the liquid metal is heated beyond the normal boiling temperature and becomes metastable. The metastable liquid is heated to a point close to the spinodal, where explosive, homogeneous boiling rapidly ( ns) transforms the liquid to a mixed phase consisting of liquid fragments, droplets, and vapor. It is important to understand this process since the metastable liquid and the mixed state have an EOS and resistivity that can be quite different than equilibrium models. In addition, the liquid droplets can pass through the confining magnetic field so that mass is left behind the imploding plasma. We have modified the 3-D MHD code Alegra to incorporate of the nonequilibrium state. Initial 1-D Alegra calculations of the heating of a tungsten wire indicates that the explosive boiling occurs first near the outside of the plasma and then occurs successively into the center of the plasma. We are also using models to calculate the dynamics of the mixed state and to predict the fraction of the mass that is left behind. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy Under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Numerical investigation on the implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, {theta}) geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Ding Ning; Ning Cheng; Sun Shunkai; Zhang Yang; Xiao Delong; Xue Chuang

    2012-06-15

    The implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches are investigated numerically in 2D (r, {theta}) geometry by using a resistive MHD code. It is assumed that the wires have expanded to plasmas with diameter d{sub 0}, which is used as the initial condition for the consequent implosion process. In fact, the explosion process of individual wires is not included. By changing d{sub 0}, the effects of the wire expansion degree on the implosion dynamics are analyzed. When d{sub 0} is larger, the current density is more concentrated at the outer side of the wires and the fraction of current flow around the wire plasmas is nearly in proportion to d{sub 0}. As a result, the ablation rate of wires is increased and the implosion phase starts earlier. This conclusion agrees with the simulation works of other authors [Chittenden et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(3), 1118 (2004)]. When the array radius and initial wire plasma diameter are fixed, the increase of wire number leads to the azimuthal merge of wires during implosion. When the wires number exceed a critical value, which is related to d{sub 0}, wire plasmas can merge to a continuous shell with an azimuthal perturbation in density, which depends on the initial wires number.

  12. Numerical investigation on the implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Ding, Ning; Ning, Cheng; Sun, Shun-Kai; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, De-Long; Xue, Chuang

    2012-06-01

    The implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches are investigated numerically in 2D (r, θ) geometry by using a resistive MHD code. It is assumed that the wires have expanded to plasmas with diameter d0, which is used as the initial condition for the consequent implosion process. In fact, the explosion process of individual wires is not included. By changing d0, the effects of the wire expansion degree on the implosion dynamics are analyzed. When d0 is larger, the current density is more concentrated at the outer side of the wires and the fraction of current flow around the wire plasmas is nearly in proportion to d0. As a result, the ablation rate of wires is increased and the implosion phase starts earlier. This conclusion agrees with the simulation works of other authors [Chittenden et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(3), 1118 (2004)]. When the array radius and initial wire plasma diameter are fixed, the increase of wire number leads to the azimuthal merge of wires during implosion. When the wires number exceed a critical value, which is related to d0, wire plasmas can merge to a continuous shell with an azimuthal perturbation in density, which depends on the initial wires number.

  13. Advances in Tagging Methods for Lifetimes of Isomeric- and Proton-Unbound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.

    2008-11-11

    This paper summarises the programme of Recoil-isomer tagging that has been performed over the last ten years at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The nuclei studied lie in the mass 130-140 region of the Segre chart very close to the proton drip line. The evolution of the isomer character is seen to change from K-isomers, at N = 74, to shape-isomers in the gamma soft N = 77 nuclei to seniority-isomers around N = 82. The influence of the proton drip line on the N = 74 isomers and possible critical-point symmetries in the N = 77 nuclei are discussed and the latest results presented. Developments of the isomer-tagging technique, using large beam currents with a dual Multi-Wire Proportional Counter setup, and an Isomer-tagged Differential-Plunger setup are discussed along with a future programme of work at Jyvaeskylae.

  14. Neural wiring optimization.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial network optimization theory concerns minimization of connection costs among interconnected components in systems such as electronic circuits. As an organization principle, similar wiring minimization can be observed at various levels of nervous systems, invertebrate and vertebrate, including primate, from placement of the entire brain in the body down to the subcellular level of neuron arbor geometry. In some cases, the minimization appears either perfect, or as good as can be detected with current methods. One question such best-of-all-possible-brains results raise is, what is the map of such optimization, does it have a distinct neural domain? PMID:22230636

  15. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  16. Texture development in Galfenol wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesenberg, A. J.; Restorff, J. B.; Wun-Fogle, M.; Sailsbury, H.; Summers, E.

    2013-05-01

    Galfenol (Fe-Ga alloy) wire fabrication provides a low cost alternative to directional solidification methods. This work evaluates the compositional dependence of the wire drawing suitability of Fe-Ga and characterizes the microstructural and magnetic properties of these wires. Wire has been produced with Ga contents between 10 at. % and 17 at. % to allow determination of the ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) in wire manufacture. Published results on chill cast bend specimens indicated that a DTBT occurs at roughly 15 at. % Ga. This DTBT was observed under tensile loading with a corresponding change in fracture behavior from transverse fracture to intergranular fracture. For improved magnetostrictive performance, higher Ga contents are desired, closer to the 17 at. % Ga evaluated in this work. Electron backscattered diffraction B-H loop and resonance measurements as a function of magnetic field (to determine modulus and coupling factor) are presented for as-drawn, furnace, and direct current (DC) annealed wire. Galfenol wire produced via traditional drawing methods is found to have a strong <110> (α) texture parallel to the drawing direction. As-drawn wire was observed to have a lower magnetic permeability and larger hysteresis than DC annealed wire. This is attributed to the presence of a large volume of crystalline defects; such as vacancies and dislocations.

  17. Circuit model for the inverse Z-pinch wire array switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Harvey-Thompson, A.; Lebedev, Sergey V.

    2010-06-01

    A 0D circuit code is introduced to study the wire array switch concept introduced in. It has been implemented and researched at Imperial College. An exploding wire array, the switch, is in parallel with the load, an imploding wire array. Most of the current flows in the exploding array until it expands and becomes highly resistive. The 0D code contains simple models of Joule energy deposition and plasma expansion for W and Al wires. The purpose of the device is to produce fast Z-pinch implosion, below 100ns on MAGPIE and the Sandia Z machine. Self and mutual inductances are taken into consideration as well as the rocket model for wire ablation. The switch characteristics of the exploding array are prescribed and tuned up to agree with MAGPIE shots. The dependence of the device on the configuration of the arrays is studied and scaling to ZR conditions is explored.

  18. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X=ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  19. Wire array z-pinch insights for high x-ray power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mock, R.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1997-12-31

    The discovery that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x-ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities on Saturn and Z. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. X-ray measurement comparisons with analytic models and 2-D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic (RMHC) code simulations in the x-y and r-z planes provide confidence in the ability of the models and codes to predict future x-ray performance with very-large-number wire arrays.

  20. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  1. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must obtain... catch, possess, retain, and land an Atlantic HMS in which an archival tag has been implanted or...

  2. Freedom System Text and Graphics System (TAGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Text and Graphics System (TAGS) is a high-resolution facsimile system that scans text or graphics material and converts the analog SCAN data into serial digital data. This video shows the TAGS in operation.

  3. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  4. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  5. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from...

  6. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  7. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  8. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from...

  9. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  10. Construction and pilot screening of a signature-tagged mutant library of Sinorhizobium fredii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Yuan Chun; Wu, Li Juan; Liu, Jian Xin; Zhang, Pan; Jiao, Jian; Yan, Hui; Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2016-03-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii is well known for its ability to establish symbiosis with diverse legumes such as Glycine max (soybean, determinate nodules) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea, indeterminate nodules). In order to make screening of S. fredii genes related to symbiosis cost-effective, we constructed a large Tn5 insertion mutant library of S. fredii CCBAU45436 using the signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) technique. This STM library contains a total of 25,500 independent mutants distributed in 17 sublibraries tagged by corresponding distinct DNA bar-code sequences. After the pilot screening of 255 mutants in 15 batches, Tag85-4, Tag4-17, Tag4-11 and Tag10-13 were found to have attenuated competitiveness (0-30 % in nodule occupation) compared to the wild-type strain when inoculated on soybean. Further characterization of these mutants suggests that Tag4-11 (a pyrC mutant) and Tag10-13 (a nrdJ mutant) are defective in establishing symbiosis with soybean. The pyrC mutant induced uninfected pseudonodules while the nrdJ mutant formed significantly more nodules containing bacteroids with poor persistence ability. When these two mutants were tested on pigeon pea, host-specific symbiotic defects were found. These results demonstrated the STM library as a valuable resource for identifying S. fredii genes relevant to symbiosis. PMID:26472206

  11. Two-Wire to Four-Wire Audio Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, G. L., Jr; Seale, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    Simple circuit provides interface between normally incompatible voicecommunication lines. Circuit maintains 40 dB of isolation between input and output halves of four-wire line permitting two-wire line to be connected. Balancing potentiometer, Rg, adjusts gain of IC2 to null feed through from input to output. Adjustment is done on workbench just after assembly.

  12. Soft magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M.

    2001-06-01

    An overview of the present state of the art on the preparation techniques, outstanding magnetic properties and applications of soft magnetic micro and nanowires is presented. Rapid solidification techniques (in-rotating-water quenching and drawing methods) to fabricate amorphous microwires with diameter in the range from 100 down to 1 μm are first described. Electrodeposition is also employed to prepare composite microtubes (magnetic coatings) and to fill porous membranes (diameter of the order of 0.1 μm). Magnetic behaviours of interest are related to the different hysteresis loops of samples: square-shaped loops typical of bistable behaviour, and nearly non-hysteretic loop with well-defined transverse anisotropy field. The role played by magnetic dipolar interactions in the magnetic behaviour of arrays of micro and nanowires is described. A particular analysis is done on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect in the radio and microwave frequency ranges exhibited by ultrasoft microwires. Finally, a few examples of applications are introduced for magnetostrictive and non-magnetostrictive wires, they are: “magnetoelastic pens”, micromotors; DC current-sensors based on GMI, and sharpened amorphous wire tips in spin polarised scanning tunneling microscopy.

  13. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  14. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.

    1995-01-01

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

  15. 9 CFR 2.54 - Lost tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lost tags. 2.54 Section 2.54 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Identification of Animals § 2.54 Lost tags. Each dealer or exhibitor shall be held accountable for all official tags acquired. In...

  16. Method for designing gas tag compositions

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.

    1995-04-11

    For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

  17. 50 CFR 635.33 - Archival tags.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Archival tags. 635.33 Section 635.33..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ATLANTIC HIGHLY MIGRATORY SPECIES Management Measures § 635.33 Archival tags. (a) Implantation report. Any person affixing or implanting an archival tag into a regulated species must...

  18. Charged particle tracking through electrostatic wire meshes using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, L. J.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Wire meshes are used across many disciplines to accelerate and focus charged particles, however, analytical solutions are non-exact and few codes exist which simulate the exact fields around a mesh with physical sizes. A tracking code based in Matlab-Simulink using field maps generated using finite element software has been developed which tracks electrons or ions through electrostatic wire meshes. The fields around such a geometry are presented as an analytical expression using several basic assumptions, however, it is apparent that computational calculations are required to obtain realistic values of electric potential and fields, particularly when multiple wire meshes are deployed. The tracking code is flexible in that any quantitatively describable particle distribution can be used for both electrons and ions as well as other benefits such as ease of export to other programs for analysis. The code is made freely available and physical examples are highlighted where this code could be beneficial for different applications.

  19. The Current in a Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    This little problem arose because I was frustrated with the standard electromagnetism texts, which show the magnetic field due to a current-bearing wire outside the wire [proportional to] 1/r and inside [proportional to] r. However, they never point out that the moving electrons must be influenced by the magnetic field created by the other moving…

  20. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.

  1. First Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved Treats irregular heartbeat without wired leads To use the sharing features on this ... said in a news release. In traditional pacemakers, wired leads may malfunction and require the device to ...

  2. B-tagging and the search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, Tim; /Imperial Coll., London

    2006-10-01

    A search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons and work relating to the improvement of the b-tagging and trigger capabilities at the D0 detector during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider is presented. The search for evidence of the Higgs sector in the Standard Model (SM) and supersymmetric extensions of the SM are a high priority for the D0 collaboration, and b-tagging and good triggers are a vital component of these searches. The development and commissioning of the first triggers at D0 which use b-tagging is outlined, along with the development of a new secondary vertex b-tagging tool for use in the Level 3 trigger. Upgrades to the Level 3 trigger hit finding code, which have led to significant improvements in the quality and efficiency of the tracking code, and by extension the b-tagging tools, are also presented. An offline Neural Network (NN) b-tagging tool was developed, trained on Monte Carlo and extensively tested and measured on data. The new b-tagging tool significantly improves the b-tagging performance at D0, for a fixed fake rate relative improvements in signal efficiency range from {approx} 40% to {approx} 15%. Fake rates, for a fixed signal efficiency, are typically reduced to between a quarter and a third of their value. Finally, three versions of the search for neutral supersymmetric Higgs bosons are presented. The latest version of the analysis makes use of almost 1 fb{sup -1} of data, the new NN b-tagger and the new b-tagging triggers, and has set one of the world's best limits on the supersymmetric parameter tan{beta} in the mass range 90 to 150 GeV.

  3. Electronic Tag and Position Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-20

    The intent of this study phase program was to adequately define the Electronic Tag and Position Sensor chip so as to be able to price and schedule the full design and development culminating in a silicon IC. Therefore, even though Hughes Aircraft Company feels that the approach submitted in this document is what should be developed, it is still considered preliminary and could change as the full design is developed.

  4. Infrared tag and track technique

    DOEpatents

    Partin, Judy K.; Stone, Mark L.; Slater, John; Davidson, James R.

    2007-12-04

    A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

  5. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  6. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Timothy B.; Milly, Peter F.; White, J. Kevin

    1993-05-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  7. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Timothy B.; Milly, Peter F., Sr.; White, J. Kevin

    1994-04-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  8. Electrode carrying wire for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a hollow tungsten electrode including a ceramic liner and forms the filler metal wire guide. The wire is fed through the tungsten electrode thereby reducing the size of the torch to eliminate clearance problems which exist with external wire guides. Since the wire is preheated from the tungsten more wire may be fed into the weld puddle, and the wire will not oxidize because it is always within the shielding gas.

  9. Internal wire guide for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a filler metal wire guide positioned within the torch, and within the shielding gas nozzle. The wire guide is adjacent to the tungsten electrode and has a ceramic liner through which the wire is fed. This reduces the size of the torch and eliminates the outside clearance problems that exit with external wire guides. Additionally, since the wire is always within the shielding gas, oxidizing of the wire is eliminated.

  10. Apollo experience report: Electrical wiring subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general requirements of the electrical wiring subsystems and the problem areas and solutions that occurred during the major part of the Apollo Program are detailed in this report. The concepts and definitions of specific requirements for electrical wiring; wire-connecting devices; and wire-harness fabrication, checkout, and installation techniques are discussed. The design and development of electrical wiring and wire-connecting devices are described. Mission performance is discussed, and conclusions and recommendations for future programs are presented.