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Sample records for coexisting nuclear shapes

  1. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  2. Coexistence of nuclear shapes: self-consistent mean-field and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. P.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-02-01

    A quantitative analysis of the evolution of nuclear shapes and shape phase transitions, including regions of short-lived nuclei that are becoming accessible in experiments at radioactive-beam facilities, necessitate accurate modeling of the underlying nucleonic dynamics. Important theoretical advances have recently been made in studies of complex shapes and the corresponding excitation spectra and electromagnetic decay patterns, especially in the ‘beyond mean-field’ framework based on nuclear density functionals. Interesting applications include studies of shape evolution and coexistence in N = 28 isotones, the structure of lowest 0+ excitations in deformed N ≈ 90 rare-earth nuclei, and quadrupole and octupole shape transitions in thorium isotopes.

  3. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramos, J. E.; Heyde, K.

    2015-09-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the shell-model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, Po-208190, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B (E 2 ) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B (E 2 ) 's, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that shape coexistence phenomenon is hidden in Po isotopes, very much as in the case of the Pt isotopes.

  4. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  5. Shape coexistence in atomic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Heyde, Kris; Wood, John L.

    2011-10-01

    Shape coexistence in nuclei appears to be unique in the realm of finite many-body quantum systems. It differs from the various geometrical arrangements that sometimes occur in a molecule in that in a molecule the various arrangements are of the widely separated atomic nuclei. In nuclei the various ''arrangements'' of nucleons involve (sets of) energy eigenstates with different electric quadrupole properties such as moments and transition rates, and different distributions of proton pairs and neutron pairs with respect to their Fermi energies. Sometimes two such structures will ''invert'' as a function of the nucleon number, resulting in a sudden and dramatic change in ground-state properties in neighboring isotopes and isotones. In the first part of this review the theoretical status of coexistence in nuclei is summarized. Two approaches, namely, microscopic shell-model descriptions and mean-field descriptions, are emphasized. The second part of this review presents systematic data, for both even- and odd-mass nuclei, selected to illustrate the various ways in which coexistence is observed in nuclei. The last part of this review looks to future developments and the issue of the universality of coexistence in nuclei. Surprises continue to be discovered. With the major advances in reaching to extremes of proton-neutron number, and the anticipated new ''rare isotope beam'' facilities, guidelines for search and discovery are discussed.

  6. Shape Coexistence in ^72Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, C. J.; Fischer, S. M.; McCutchan, E. A.; Ahn, T.; Casperson, R. J.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; Qian, J.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.

    2009-10-01

    One of the original candidates for shape co-existence in nuclei was ^72Se [1,2]. We have collected extensive new data, both ``in-beam'' following the ^40Ca(^36Ar,4p)^72Se reaction using Gammasphere at Argonne's ATLAS accelerator, and from the decay of ^72Br populated in the ^58Ni(^16O,pn) reaction studied at WNSL Yale. A new J^π=0^+ state was found at 1876 keV, the published [2] decay scheme was corrected, and twenty-six new levels were established. This detailed spectroscopy of low-lying states helps to delineate the two shape minima. The mixing of prolate-deformed and near-spherical states can be now quantified, and the gamma decay path from high-spin can be followed. The inferred groundstate shape is consistent with trends in experiment and calculation of the selenium isotopes [3,4]. [4pt] [1] J.H. Hamilton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letts. 32 239 (1974)[0pt] [2] W.E. Collins, et al., Phys.Rev. C9, 1457 (1974)[0pt] [3] S.M. Fischer, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 84, 4064 (2000)[0pt] [4] J. Ljungvall, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 100, 102502 (2008)

  7. Shape coexistence: the shell model view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.

    2016-02-01

    We shall discuss the meaning of the ‘nuclear shape’ in the laboratory frame proper to the spherical shell model. A brief historical promenade will bring us from Elliott’s SU3 breakthrough to today’s large scale shell model calculations. A section is devoted to the algebraic model which extends drastically the field of applicability of Elliot’s SU3, providing a precious heuristic guidance for the exploration of collectivity in the nuclear chart. Shape coexistence and shape mixing will be shown to occur as the result of the competition between the main actors in the nuclear dynamics; the spherical mean field, and the pairing and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. These ideas will be illustrated with examples in magic nuclei (40Ca and 68Ni); neutron rich semi-magic (32Mg, and 64Cr); and in proton rich N = Z (72Kr).

  8. Shape coexistence in and near 68Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchyta, Scott

    2015-10-01

    The nuclei in the vicinity of 68Ni have been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical work focused on studying the evolution of nuclear structure. Situated at the Z = 28 proton shell closure and the fragile N = 40 subshell closure, 68Ni is an important nucleus to understand as a progression is made from stable to increasingly exotic nuclei. The nature and decay of the first excited state in 68Ni has been thoroughly investigated in recent years. The first excited state has a spin and parity of 0+, can be described by the excitation of neutrons across the N = 40 gap, and has been interpreted as a moderately oblate-deformed state that coexists with the spherical ground state. A second low-energy excited 0+ state is also known to exist in 68Ni. Based on comparisons with theoretical calculations, the second excited 0+ state has been proposed to be strongly prolate deformed and based primarily on the excitation of protons across the Z = 28 gap, leading to the inference that three different 0+ states with three distinct shapes coexist below 3 MeV in 68Ni. Additional studies suggest that shape coexistence is not unique to 68Ni in this neutron-rich region near Z = 28. For instance, in the neighboring even-even isotope 70Ni, theory predicts that a prolate-deformed minimum in the potential energy surface occurs at even lower energy than in 68Ni, and experimental evidence is consistent with the theoretical prediction. The results of recent experiments studying shape coexistence in the region, particularly investigations of 68,70Ni, will be presented and theoretical interpretations will be discussed.

  9. Coulomb excitation studies of shape coexistence in atomic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgen, Andreas; Korten, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy Coulomb excitation provides a well-understood means of exciting atomic nuclei and allows measuring electromagnetic moments that can be directly related to the nuclear shape. The availability of radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at energies near the Coulomb barrier has made it possible to study shape coexistence in a variety of short-lived exotic nuclei. This review presents a short overview of the methods related to multi-step Coulomb excitation experiments, followed by a discussion of several examples. The focus is on two mass regions where recent Coulomb excitation experiments have contributed to the quantitative understanding of shape coexistence: nuclei with mass A≈ 70 near the N = Z line and nuclei with A ≈ 100 near neutron number N = 60. Experimental results are summarized and their significance for understanding shape coexistence is discussed. Experimental observables such as quadrupole moments and electromagnetic transition strengths represent furthermore important benchmarks for advancing theoretical nuclear structure models. With several new RIB facilities planned and under construction, Coulomb excitation will remain to be an important tool to extend the studies of nuclear shapes toward more exotic systems, and to obtain a more comprehensive and quantitative understanding of shape coexistence.

  10. VAMPIR describes shape coexistence in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.

    1993-12-31

    The measurements of shape coexistence of the Vanderbilt-Oak Ridge-LSU-Georgia-Tech-Group is shortly reviewed for the Hg isotopes and the mass 70 region. Then this contribution concentrates on the description of shape coexistence with the help of refined self-consistent fields plus correlations. The basic approach is VAMPIR which starts from an angular momentum, proton and neutron number and parity projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov quasi-particle Slater determinant. VAMPIR stands for Variation After Mean field Projection In Realistic models spaces. Minimization of orthogonalized projected HFB states yields also shape coexistence exited states of the same symmetries. Those states can then be diagonalized to include correlations (excited VAMPIR=EV). One can even improve on EV by adding in a second step to VAMPIR a second projected HFB-Slater determinant with unknown Bogoliubov transformation coefficients. The energy is now minimized by varying the mixing coefficients of the two Slater determinants and the Bogoliubov transformation in the second state. This can be continued step by step always using the previously fixed HFB-Slater determinants and determining only one in addition and the mixing coefficients of all the projected HFB-Slater determinants. The method is tested in sd-shell nuclei and applied in the A=70 region to the Ge and Se isotopes, where the Vanderbilt-Oak Ridge-group found a large number of different shapes in nuclei.

  11. Shape coexistence in the microscopically guided interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.; Otsuka, T.; Van Isacker, P.

    2016-02-01

    Shape coexistence has been a subject of great interest in nuclear physics for many decades. In the context of the nuclear shell model, intruder excitations may give rise to remarkably low-lying excited {0}+ states associated with different intrinsic shapes. In heavy open-shell nuclei, the dimension of the shell-model configuration space that includes such intruder excitations becomes exceedingly large, thus requiring a drastic truncation scheme. Such a framework has been provided by the interacting boson model (IBM). In this article we address the phenomenon of shape coexistence and its relevant spectroscopy from the point of view of the IBM. A special focus is placed on the method developed recently which makes use of the link between the IBM and the self-consistent mean-field approach based on the nuclear energy density functional. The method is extended to deal with various intruder configurations associated with different equilibrium shapes. We assess the predictive power of the method and suggest possible improvements and extensions, by considering illustrative examples in the neutron-deficient Pb region, where shape coexistence has been experimentally studied.

  12. Deformed Structures and Shape Coexistence in Zr-98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaizola, Bruno; 8pi Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear structure of the zirconium isotopes evolves from a mid-open neutron shell deformed region (80Zr), through a closed shell (90Zr), to a closed subshell (96Zr), and then to a sudden reappearance of deformation (100Zr). This rapid onset of deformation across the Zr isotopes is unprecedented, and the issue of how collectivity appears and disappears in these isotopes is of special interest. Until recently, only 98Zr (and maybe 100Zr) had indirect and weak evidence for shape coexistence, with only speculative interpretation of the experiments. Recent results from high precision B(E2) measurements provided direct evidence of shape coexistence in 94Zr and suggested that it may happen in many other nuclei in this region. In order to provide direct evidence of shape coexistence in 98Zr a high-statistical-quality γγ experiment was carried out with the 8 π spectrometer at ISAC-TRIUMF. The array consists of 20 Compton-suppressed hyper-pure germanium detectors plus β particle and conversion electron detectors. Excited states up to ~ 5 MeV in 98Zr were populated in the β- decay of 98Y Jπ = (0-) and 98mY J = (4,5). Preliminary results on key branching ratios will be presented. This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  13. Shape coexistence and evolution in 98Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Krücken, R.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Chester, A.; Close, A.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Glister, J.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Rand, E. T.; Sjue, S.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E.

    2016-01-01

    Shape coexistence between the strongly deformed ground state and the weakly deformed 02+ state in 98Sr has been a major topic of interest due to the energy difference of 215 keV, which is the smallest in all even-even nuclei. The electric monopole transition strength ρ2(E 0 ) is an important quantity that can relate the deformation difference and the shape mixing between the two 0+ states, which are admixtures of the vibrational (S) and the rotational (D) states in a simple mixing model. In a β -decay spectroscopy experiment, the experimental ρ2(E 0 ) was measured. A value of 0.053(5) is consistent with the previous measurement and was combined with known electric quadrupole transition strengths B (E 2 ) in calculations of a two-state mixing model. Based on a systematic study on neighboring Kr, Zr, and Mo isotopes, the mixing of the 0+ and 2+ states in 98Sr was determined to be 8.6% and 1.3%, respectively, corresponding to deformation parameters βD=0.38 (1 ) and βS=-0.23 (2 ) . These parameters reproduce experimental transition strengths well except for the 41+→21+ transition, which suggests a smaller D-band deformation for J ≥4 .

  14. Shape Co-existence in ^174Pt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, J. Tm.; Hartley, D. J.; Danchev, M.; Riedinger, L. L.; Zeidan, O.; Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K. H.; Ahmad, I.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T. L.; Lister, C. J.; Poli, G. L.; Ressler, J.; Seweryniak, D.; Wiedenhover, I.; Ma, W. C.; Amro, H.; Reviol, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Smith, M.

    2002-10-01

    Nuclei near the region of the proton drip-line and Z = 82 shell have been a subject of great interest with repect to the phenomenon of shape co-existence. In fact, evidence for the spherical, prolate and oblate shapes within the same nucleus has been presented in ^186Pbte1, ^179Hgte2 and ^175Aute3. Deformed ground-state sequences resulting from particle-hole excitations across the Z=82 gap are found to cross the near spherical vacuum structure at low spin(I6). A classic example of this, is found in ^174Ptte4. This nucleus was produced in an experiment following the bombardment of ^92,94Mo targets position with a ^84Sr beam from the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The experiment utilized the GAMMASPHERE array at the target position in conjunction with the Fragment Mass Analyzer(FMA) for mass identification. The ground-state band in ^174Pt has been extended from I = 14^+ to 26^+ and a new side band is observed up to spin greater than (20^-). Based on systematics, it is likely that this sequence is an octupole vibration at low spin, but is crossed by a two-quasiparticle configuration at higher spin. There is also evidence that the side-band in ^174Pt displays transition from a spherical to a more deformed shape, which is similar to the ground-state band. 99 1 A. N. Andreyev et al., Nature 405,430 (2000). 2 F. G. Kondev et al., Phys. Lett. B528, 221 (2002). 3 F. G. Kondev et al., Phys. Lett. B512, 268 (2001) 4 G.D. Dracoulis et al., Phys. Rev. C44, R1246 (1991). thebibliography

  15. Shape Coexistence in Neutron Deficient Po Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Helariutta, K.; Cocks, J.F.C.; Enqvist, T.; Greenlees, P.T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Jamsen, P.; Kankaanpaa, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuiusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikkui, M.; Piiparinen, M.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W.H.; Tormanen, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Allatt, R.G.; Butler, P.A.; Page, R.D.; Kapusta, M.

    1999-12-31

    The excited levels in {sup 192-195}Po have been studied using the recoil-decay tagging method. New levels have been identified. The data are in accordance with the scheme of the coexisting spherical and deformed intruder structures crossing each other with N<112.

  16. Shape coexistence in neutron deficient Po nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Helariutta, K.; Cocks, J. F. C.; Enqvist, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Jaemsen, P.; Kankaanpaeae, H.; Kettunen, H.; Kuusiniemi, P.; Leino, M.; Muikku, M.; Piiparinen, M.; Rahkila, P.; Savelius, A.; Trzaska, W. H.; Toermaenen, S.; Uusitalo, J.; Allatt, R. G.

    1999-11-16

    The excited levels in {sup 192-195}Po have been studied using the recoil-decay tagging method. New levels have been identified. The data are in accordance with the scheme of the coexisting spherical and deformed intruder structures crossing each other with N<112.

  17. Shape coexistence and triaxiality in nuclei near 80Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, S. J.; Xu, F. R.; Shen, S. F.; Liu, H. L.; Wyss, R.; Yan, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Total-Routhian-surface calculations have been performed to investigate the shape evolutions of A ˜80 nuclei: Zr-8480,Sr-8076 , and Mo,8684 . Shape coexistences of spherical, prolate, and oblate deformations have been found in these nuclei. Particularly for the nuclei 80Sr and 82Zr , the energy differences between two shape-coexisting states are less than 220 keV. At high spins, the g9 /2 shell plays an important role in shape evolutions. It has been found that the alignment of the g9 /2 quasiparticles drives nuclei to be triaxial.

  18. The role of shell evolution in shape coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, T.; Tsunoda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We first review the shell evolution in exotic nuclei driven by nuclear forces. We then demonstrate that the underlying mechanism played by the balance of the tensor and central components in the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is crucial when describing shape coexistence. This effect will be referred to as type II shell evolution, while the shell evolution passing through a series of isotopes or isotones is denoted as type I. We describe type II shell evolution in some detail for the case of the 68Ni nucleus as an example. We present how the fission dynamics can be related to enhanced deformation triggered by type II shell evolution, at its initial stage. It is suggested that the island of stability may be related to the suppression of this mechanism.

  19. E0 transitions in 106Pd: Implications for shape coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estévez, F. M.; Chakraborty, A.; Mynk, M. G.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S. N.; Crider, B. P.; Garrett, P. E.; Hicks, S. F.; Kumar, A.; Lesher, S. R.; McKay, C. J.; Orce, J. N.; Scheck, M.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Wood, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Level lifetimes in 106Pd were measured with the Doppler-shift attenuation method following inelastic neutron scattering, and electric monopole transition strengths between low-lying 2+ states were deduced. The large ρ2( E0) values obtained provide evidence for shape coexistence, extending observation of such structures in the N = 60 isotones. Included in these results is the first determination of the E0 transition strength in the Pd nuclei between levels with K = 2.

  20. Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Nickel Isotopes around N = 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; e14039 Collaboration; e14057 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Shape coexistence is a fascinating phenomenon in atomic nuclei characterized by multiple states with different intrinsic shapes coexisting at similar excitation energies. In even-even nuclei, a hallmark of shape coexistence is low-energy 0+ states. In 68Ni, the Monte-Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) employing the A3DA interaction, utilizing the fpg9/2d5 / 2 model space for protons and neutrons, predicts triple shape coexistence with three 0+ states below 3 MeV. Transitioning to 70Ni, the energy of the prolate-deformed 0+ state is predicted to drop precipitously from 2511 to 1525 keV. This is due to strengthening of the attractive νg9 / 2 - πf5 / 2 and repulsive νg9 / 2 - πf7 / 2 monopole interactions of the tensor force altering the effective single-particle energies of the πf7 / 2 and πf5 / 2 single-particle states, thereby reducing the spherical Z = 28 shell gap. Recent beta-decay spectroscopy experiments at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) have discovered a new excited 0+ state at 1567 keV in 70Ni. This result supports MCSM predictions extending the picture of shape coexistence to 70Ni and demonstrates the importance of the tensor force for describing the nuclear structure of neutron-rich nuclei. Results of the latest NSCL experiments will be presented. Supported by NSF Contract No. PHY-1102511, by the DOE NNSA Award Nos. DE-NA0000979 and DE-FG52-08NA28552, the U.S DOE SC NP Contract No. DE-AC-06CH11357 and Grant Nos. DE-FG02-94ER40834 and DE-FG02-96ER40983, and U.S. ARL Coop. Agreement W911NF-12-2-0019.

  1. Shape coexistence and triaxiality in the superheavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Cwiok, S; Heenen, P-H; Nazarewicz, W

    2005-02-17

    Superheavy nuclei represent the limit of nuclear mass and charge; they inhabit the remote corner of the nuclear landscape, whose extent is unknown. The discovery of new elements with atomic numbers Z > or = 110 has brought much excitement to the atomic and nuclear physics communities. The existence of such heavy nuclei hangs on a subtle balance between the attractive nuclear force and the disruptive Coulomb repulsion between protons that favours fission. Here we model the interplay between these forces using self-consistent energy density functional theory; our approach accounts for spontaneous breaking of spherical symmetry through the nuclear Jahn-Teller effect. We predict that the long-lived superheavy elements can exist in a variety of shapes, including spherical, axial and triaxial configurations. In some cases, we anticipate the existence of metastable states and shape isomers that can affect decay properties and hence nuclear half-lives. PMID:15716943

  2. Conversion electron spectroscopy and its role in identifying shape coexisting structures in nuclei via E0 transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-02-01

    We present, from a historical perspective, the evolution of instruments and techniques developed by our group, in conjunction with other collaborators, to establish a program in conversion electron spectroscopy that could be routinely implemented in radioactive decay studies. We focus here mainly on the investigations that bear upon the study of nuclear shape coexistence and its relation to electric monopole (E0) transitions. We show that many I π → I π (I ≠ 0){ }transitions in both even and odd nuclei with mixed shape-coexisting configurations have large E0 components accompanying their M1 + E2 strength (in some cases nearly pure E0), and that this E0 enhancement is a clear ‘signature’ for nuclear shape coexistence.

  3. Evidence for shape coexistence in the N=Z nucleus 7236Kr36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varley, B. J.; Campbell, M.; Chishti, A. A.; Gelletly, W.; Goettig, L.; Lister, C. J.; James, A. N.; Skeppstedt, O.

    1987-08-01

    Gamma rays associated with the decay of states in the N=Z nucleus 72Kr have been identified following the 16O(58Ni, 2n) 72Kr reaction at a mean beam energy of 170 MeV. Identification was made using the Daresbury Recoil Separator. The first excited state was found to be at 709.1 +/- 0.3 keV and to be populated with a cross section of 60 +/- 25 υb. The pattern of gamma rays associated with 72Kr indicates the co-existence of nuclear shapes.

  4. New Features of Shape Coexistence in {sup 152}Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P. E.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J. N.; Yates, S. W.; Dashdorj, D.

    2009-08-07

    Excited states in {sup 152}Sm have been investigated with the {sup 152}Sm(n,n{sup '}gamma) reaction. The lowest four negative-parity band structures have been characterized in detail with respect to their absolute decay properties. Specifically, a new K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band has been assigned with its 1{sup -} band head at 1681 keV. This newly observed band has a remarkable similarity in its E1 transition rates for decay to the first excited K{sup p}i=0{sup +} band at 684 keV to the lowest K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band and its decay to the ground-state band. Based on these decay properties, as well as energy considerations, this new band is assigned as a K{sup p}i=0{sup -} octupole excitation based on the K{sup p}i=0{sub 2}{sup +} state. An emerging pattern of repeating excitations built on the 0{sub 2}{sup +} level similar to those built on the ground state may indicate that {sup 152}Sm is a complex example of shape coexistence rather than a critical point nucleus.

  5. The Role of Triaxiality in Shape-Coexistence in Light Krypton Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, S. M.; Lister

    2008-04-01

    Shape co-existence in lead^1 and krypton^2-4 isotopes has become a cutting-edge topic in understanding the structure of heavier nuclei. Prediction of the relative binding energies of different shapes, and understanding the mixing between configurations presents a discriminating challenge to nuclear theory. In ^72,74,76Kr the occurrence of two well bound shapes has been demonstrated through the observation of low-lying J^π = 0^+ isomers and through radioactive beam Coulomb excitation. Roughly speaking, the shapes correspond to oblate-like and prolate-like configurations. However, the exact shapes, and the role of triaxiality has yet to be fully explored. We present new results from ``in-beam'' heavy-ion spectroscopy on ^74Kr which shows that the population of the isomer is mainly through a gamma vibrational band and that considerable mixing is involved between the states built on the isomer and the gamma band. This research was supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. ^1A. N. Andreyev et al., Nature 405, 430 (2000) ^2E. Clement et al., Phys. Rev. C 75, 054313 (2007) ^3E. Bouchez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 082502 (2003) ^4M. Bender et al., Phys. Rev. C 74, 024312 (2006)

  6. Shape coexistence at low spin in the Z = 50 region and its spectroscopic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclei in the Z = 50 region provide excellent examples of shape coexistence, the establishment of which occurred through the use of detailed spectroscopy, based not only on γ-ray spectroscopy but also conversion electron, particle transfer, Coulomb excitation, and lifetime measurements. The evidence to date strongly suggests that the presence of coexisting shapes arises from the promotion of protons across the Z = 50 closed shell and the strong correlations arising from interplay of the pairing and quadrupole interactions. The evidence for the presence of shape coexistence in the Z = 50 region, at low spin and low excitation energies, will be presented and clues for the microscopic origin explored.

  7. A microscopic study on shape transition and shape coexistence in superdeformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kanthimathi, G.; Boomadevi, N.; Rajasekaran, T. R.

    2012-08-15

    Superdeformed nuclei at high-spin states in several mass regions are investigated within a microscopic approach using cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky formalism to explore the equilibrium deformations in the ground state and their evolution with spin. Shape transition from normal deformed to superdeformed states with increasing spin is studied and a clear picture of shape coexistence is provided. Detailed information on spin, rotational energy, dynamical moment of inertia, and rotational frequency of superdeformed rotational bands is presented and the general features of superdeformed bands in certain mass regions are outlined. Rotational energy and dynamical moment of inertia are compared with available experimental data and the impact of temperature and pairing on superdeformed configuration are discussed.

  8. Examining Shape Co-existence in 116Sn via the Beta Decay of 116In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pore, J.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.; Ashley, R.; Chester, A.; Starosta, K.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P.; Churchman, R.; Voss, P.; Wang, Z.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Handinia, B.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Garrett, P. E.; Demand, G.; Laffoley, A. T.; Liblong, A.; Dunlop, R.; Svensson, C. E.; Valera, A. D.; Varela, A. D.; Kanungo, R.; Woods, J. L.; Yates, S. W.

    2012-10-01

    The stable even-even tin nuclei have a closed proton shell at Z=50 and occupy the mid-shell region of neutrons, which has led to interest in them, and they have emerged as good candidates for shape co-existence studies. The 116Sn nucleus, which sits exactly at the mid-shell (N=66), has been extensively studied in the past through fusion evaporation, coulomb excitation, neutron scattering and beta decay experiments, which has revealed an extensive level scheme and evidence for shape co-existence. However, with our advanced detection set-up and good beam intensity we are able to see additional weak transitions, some of which could yield evidence for another deformed excited state at 2545 keV. The experiment was conducted at TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for Nuclear and Particle Physics. A beam of 116In was used to populate states in 116Sn via beta decay. The resulting gamma rays were observed with the 8pi array consisting of 20 high-purity germanium detectors coupled with a suite of ancillary detectors. We will present the enhanced level scheme constructed from this experiment.

  9. Tri-axial Shape Coexistence and a New Aligned Band in 178Os

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, I. M.

    2009-03-01

    The Os nuclei lie in the beginning of the transitional region between the well deformed rare earth and spherical lead isotopes. The nuclei in this region are believed to be soft to changes in gamma deformation due to the softness of nuclear potential which may result in the shape coexistence. The neutron Fermi levels in Os nuclei from A = 170 to A = 186 lie in the middle of i13/2 orbital so that their shape in the ground state tends to take an appreciable prolate deformation. Hence collective bands with the well defined moment of inertia occur and the effect of different proton orbitals is observed as a modulation of the prolate structure. The anomalies in the yrast sequence, an effect attributed to change in moment of inertia of the ground state rotational band and the band crossing phenomena, are very important and vary strongly with neutron number in case of Os nuclei. The nuclear structure of 178Os nucleus has been studied using the reaction 165Ho (20Ne, p6n) 178Os. Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) consisting of six Clover detectors with anti Compton shields was used for the detection of resulting gamma rays. The Direction Correlation of γ-rays de-exciting Oriented states (DCO) ratio and polarization of gamma rays were measured to assign spin, parity and multipolarity of transitions. Twenty one new transitions belonging to the 178Os nucleus have been identified. The sudden and rather strong gain in aligned angular momentum is observed in the yrast band of 178Os. A new aligned rotational band similar to 180Os is also discovered in this nucleus. This band exhibits a very complex decay pattern with a single linking transition of 1778 keV to the ground state band. The tri-axial shape co-existence is also observed in this nucleus at higher excitation. The experimental results are compared with the Microscopic Hartree-Fock model calculations.

  10. Unique and complementary information on shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient Pb region derived from Coulomb excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Gaffney, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron-deficient isotopes of Pt-Hg-Pb-Po-Rn are the classic region in the investigation of shape coexistence in atomic nuclei. A large programme of Coulomb-excitation experiments has been undertaken at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN with a number of even-even isotopes in this region. These experiments have been used to probe the electromagnetic properties of yrast and non-yrast states of even-even exotic nuclei, above and below Z = 82. Amongst a large amount of different complementary techniques used to study nuclear structure, Coulomb excitation brings substantial and unique information detailing shape coexistence. In this paper we review the Coulomb-excitation campaign at REX-ISOLDE in the light-lead region together with most recently obtained results. Furthermore, we present some new interpretations that arise from this data and show testing comparisons to state-of-the-art nuclear models.

  11. Triaxiality and shape coexistence in the A ~ 30 island of inversion nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, GuoXiang; Wang, XiaoBao; Yu, ShaoYing

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the properties of nuclei inside "island of inversion" is still an interesting issue. Based on a simple Nilsson model with a new set of isospin-dependent parameters, and with non-axial deformations considered, we have performed three-dimensional potential-energy-surface calculations for Ne, Na, Mg and Al isotopes that are claimed to be in or nearby the A ~ 30 island of inversion. It is found that shape coexistence and triaxial deformation (or softness) exist in these nuclei. Large deformations are obtained by the improved Nilsson parameters, which explains the observed large electric quadrupole transition probabilities. The large deformations happening in 30Ne, 31Na, 32Mg and 33Al indicate the quenching of the spherical N = 20 neutron shell gap. The calculations of nuclear binding and two-neutron separation energies have been also improved with the isospin-dependent parameters and the inclusion of the non-axial deformation degree of freedom.

  12. New insight into the shape coexistence and shape evolution of {sup 157}Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Hua, H.; Li, X. Q.; Meng, J.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, F. R.; Shi, Y.; Liu, H. L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Ye, Y. L.; Jiang, D. X.; Zheng, T.; Lou, J. L.; Ma, L. Y.; Wang, E. H.; Cheng, Y. Y.; He, C.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.

    2011-01-15

    High-spin states in {sup 157}Yb have been populated in the {sup 144}Sm({sup 16}O,3n){sup 157}Yb fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 85 MeV. Two rotational bands built on the {nu}f{sub 7/2} and {nu}h{sub 9/2} intrinsic states, respectively, have been established for the first time. The newly observed {nu}f{sub 7/2} band and previously known {nu}i{sub 13/2} band in {sup 157}Yb are discussed in terms of total Routhian surface methods and compared with the structures in the neighboring N = 87 isotones. The structural characters observed in {sup 157}Yb provide evidence for shape coexistence of three distinct shapes: prolate, triaxial, and oblate. At higher spins, both the {nu}f{sub 7/2} band and {nu}i{sub 13/2} band in {sup 157}Yb undergo a shape evolution with sizable alignments occurring.

  13. Flexibility Coexists with Shape-Persistence in Cyanostar Macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Singharoy, Abhishek; Mayne, Christopher G; Sengupta, Arkajyoti; Raghavachari, Krishnan; Schulten, Klaus; Flood, Amar H

    2016-04-13

    Shape-persistent macrocycles are attractive functional targets for synthesis, molecular recognition, and hierarchical self-assembly. Such macrocycles are noncollapsible and geometrically well-defined, and they are traditionally characterized by having repeat units and low conformational flexibility. Here, we find it necessary to refine these ideas in the face of highly flexible yet shape-persistent macrocycles. A molecule is shape-persistent if it has a small change in shape when perturbed by external stimuli (e.g., heat, light, and redox chemistry). In support of this idea, we provide the first examination of the relationships between a macrocycle's shape persistence, its conformational space, and the resulting functions. We do this with a star-shaped macrocycle called cyanostar that is flexible as well as being shape-persistent. We employed molecular dynamics (MD), density functional theory (DFT), and NMR experiments. Considering a thermal bath as a stimulus, we found a single macrocycle has 332 accessible conformers with olefins undergoing rapid interconversion by up-down and in-out motions on short time scales (0.2 ns). These many interconverting conformations classify single cyanostars as flexible. To determine and confirm that cyanostars are shape-persistent, we show that they have a high 87% shape similarity across these conformations. To further test the idea, we use the binding of diglyme to the single macrocycle as guest-induced stimulation. This guest has almost no effect on the conformational space. However, formation of a 2:1 sandwich complex involving two macrocycles enhances rigidity and dramatically shifts the conformer distribution toward perfect bowls. Overall, the present study expands the scope of shape-persistent macrocycles to include flexible macrocycles if, and only if, their conformers have similar shapes. PMID:27014837

  14. Shape coexistence, shape evolution and Gamow-Teller {beta}-decay of neutron-rich A Asymptotically-Equal-To 100 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K. W.; Faessler, A.

    2012-11-20

    The structure of neutron-rich nuclei in the A Asymptotically-Equal-To 100 mass region relevant for the astrophysical r process manifests drastic changes in some isotopic chains and often sudden variations of particular nuclear properties have been identified. For a realistic description of the evolution in structure with increasing energy, spin, and isospin determined by shape coexistence and mixing beyond-mean-field approaches are required. Our recent studies represent an attempt to the self-consistent description of the shape coexistence phenomena in neutron-rich A Asymptotically-Equal-To 100 nuclei within the complex Excited Vampir variational model with symmetry projection before variation using a realistic effective interaction based on the Bonn A potential in a large model space. Results concerning the triple shape coexistence and the shape evolution in the N=58 Sr and Zr isotopes, the shape evolution in a chain of Zr nuclei, as well as the Gamow-Teller {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich Zr and Tc nuclei are presented.

  15. Tri-axial Shape Coexistence and a New Aligned Band in {sup 178}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, I. M.

    2009-03-10

    The Os nuclei lie in the beginning of the transitional region between the well deformed rare earth and spherical lead isotopes. The nuclei in this region are believed to be soft to changes in gamma deformation due to the softness of nuclear potential which may result in the shape coexistence. The neutron Fermi levels in Os nuclei from A = 170 to A = 186 lie in the middle of i{sub 13/2} orbital so that their shape in the ground state tends to take an appreciable prolate deformation. Hence collective bands with the well defined moment of inertia occur and the effect of different proton orbitals is observed as a modulation of the prolate structure. The anomalies in the yrast sequence, an effect attributed to change in moment of inertia of the ground state rotational band and the band crossing phenomena, are very important and vary strongly with neutron number in case of Os nuclei. The nuclear structure of {sup 178}Os nucleus has been studied using the reaction {sup 165}Ho({sup 20}Ne, p6n){sup 178}Os. Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) consisting of six Clover detectors with anti Compton shields was used for the detection of resulting gamma rays. The Direction Correlation of {gamma}-rays de-exciting Oriented states (DCO) ratio and polarization of gamma rays were measured to assign spin, parity and multipolarity of transitions. Twenty one new transitions belonging to the {sup 178}Os nucleus have been identified. The sudden and rather strong gain in aligned angular momentum is observed in the yrast band of {sup 178}Os. A new aligned rotational band similar to {sup 180}Os is also discovered in this nucleus. This band exhibits a very complex decay pattern with a single linking transition of 1778 keV to the ground state band. The tri-axial shape co-existence is also observed in this nucleus at higher excitation. The experimental results are compared with the Microscopic Hartree-Fock model calculations.

  16. Investigation of shape coexistence in 118-128Te isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, H.; Jahangiri, Z.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we have considered the vibration to gamma unstable phase transition in the 118-128Te isotopes. A transitional interacting boson model Hamiltonian in both IBM-1 and IBM-2 versions which are based on affine SU (1 , 1) ˆ Lie Algebra are employed to describe the evolution from spherical to deformed gamma unstable shapes along the chain of Te isotopes. The excitation energies, B (E 0) and B (E 2) transition rates are rather well reproduced in comparison with experimental counterparts when the weight of SO(6) limit is increased in Hamiltonian.

  17. Description of the shape coexistence in neutron-deficient 74,76Kr with IBM2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, DaLi; Mu, ChengFu

    2016-08-01

    The shape deformation and shape coexistence in 74,76Kr isotopes are investigated within the framework of the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM2). By considering the relative energy of the d proton boson to be different from that of the neutron boson, the low-lying energy spectrum is in good agreement with experimental results both qualitatively and quantitatively. In particular, the low-lying 0 2 + states associated with the shape-coexistence phenomenon are reproduced quite well. The calculated key sensitive quantities of B(E2) transition branch ratios are fairly consistent with the experimental data except for R 4. The predicated deformation parameter is very similar for the ground states in 74Kr and 76Kr, showing good agreement with the experimental result, and the calculated deformation parameter for the second 0+ state in 74Kr is close to the experimental data. The calculated results of the triaxiality parameter indicated an almost purely prolate shape for the ground state of 76Kr and a mostly prolate shape with a little triaxiality for the ground state of 74Kr. The calculations also show an oblate triaxial shape for the second 0+ state in 76Kr and maximum triaxiality for the second 0+ state in 74Kr. These results confirm the importance of the triaxial deformation for the description of such shape coexistence.

  18. Shape Coexistence and Band Terminations in N = 89 ^155Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, T. B.; Riley, M. A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Ahmad, I.; Blumenthal, D. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fallon, P.; Fischer, S. M.; Hackman, G.; Hartley, D. J.; Kalfas, C.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Nisius, D.; Ma, W. C.; Simpson, J.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Afanasiev, A.; Ragnarsson, I.

    1998-04-01

    A high spin study of the nucleus ^155_66Dy_89 has been performed using the GAMMASPHERE Spectrometer. The ^124Sn(^36S,5n) reaction was employed at beam energies of 175 and 165 MeV with thick and thin targets respectively. Eight new band sequences have been identified and the previously known sequences have been extended to higher spin. The yrast states of positive and negative parity have been identified up to spin 1/012 with quite different behavior illustrating beautifully the competition between collective prolate and terminating oblate shapes. Detailed comparisions are made with cranked Nilsson Strutinsky calculations. A new feature of the high spin calculations has been added to distinguish between neutrons in h_11/2 orbitals and other N=5 orbitals. This has been found necessary to explain the continuation of near yrast collective structures beyond spin 40 hbar. Additionally, the lowest energy negative parity sequences are observed to return to more collective behavior near spin 45 in a similar manner as N=88 ^154Dy.

  19. Nuclear collective excitations in a two-phase coexistence region

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, R. M.; De Paoli, A. L.

    2011-04-15

    The relation between collective modes and phase transitions in nuclear matter is examined. The dispersion relations for the low-lying excitations in a linear approach are evaluated within a Landau-Fermi liquid scheme by assuming coexisting phases in thermodynamical equilibrium. Temperature and isospin composition are used as relevant parameters. The in-medium nuclear interaction is provided by a recently proposed density functional model. The low density liquid-gas phase transition is taken as a typical situation for examination. We found significative modifications in the energy spectrum, within a certain range of temperatures and isospin asymmetry, due to the separation of matter into independent phases. The influence of the electromagnetic interaction over the dispersion relation of these collective excitations is also examined.

  20. Multi-quasiparticle excitation: Extending shape coexistence in A{approx}190 neutron-deficient nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Yue; Liu, H. L.; Xu, F. R.; Walker, P. M.

    2010-10-15

    Multi-quasiparticle high-K states in neutron-deficient mercury, lead, and polonium isotopes have been investigated systematically by means of configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations. An abundance of high-K states is predicted with both prolate and oblate shapes, which extends the shape coexistence of the mass region. Well-deformed shapes provide good conditions for the formation of isomers, as exemplified in {sup 188}Pb. Of particular interest is the prediction of low-lying 10{sup -} states in polonium isotopes, which indicate long-lived isomers.

  1. Multi-quasiparticle excitation: Extending shape coexistence in A~190 neutron-deficient nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yue; Xu, F. R.; Liu, H. L.; Walker, P. M.

    2010-10-01

    Multi-quasiparticle high-K states in neutron-deficient mercury, lead, and polonium isotopes have been investigated systematically by means of configuration-constrained potential-energy-surface calculations. An abundance of high-K states is predicted with both prolate and oblate shapes, which extends the shape coexistence of the mass region. Well-deformed shapes provide good conditions for the formation of isomers, as exemplified in Pb188. Of particular interest is the prediction of low-lying 10- states in polonium isotopes, which indicate long-lived isomers.

  2. Shape coexistence in 67Co, 66,68,70,72Ni, and 71Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, W. B.; Chiara, C. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Weisshaar, D.; Otsuka, T.; Tsunoda, Y.; Recchia, F.; Gade, A.; Harker, J. L.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bader, V. M.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Berryman, J. S.; Bertone, P. F.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chen, J.; Crawford, H. L.; David, H. M.; Doherty, D. T.; Hoffman, C. R.; Honma, M.; Kondev, F. G.; Korichi, A.; Langer, C.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Liddick, S. N.; Lunderberg, E.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Noji, S.; Prokop, C.; Rogers, A. M.; Seweryniak, D.; Shimizu, N.; Stroberg, S. R.; Suchyta, S.; Utsuno, Y.; Williams, S. J.; Wimmer, K.; Zhu, S.

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of data from both deep inelastic reactions at Argonne National Laboratory and single- and multiple-particle knockout reactions at Michigan State University revealed new γ-ray transitions in even-even 66,68,70,72Ni38,40,42,44 and in 67Co40 that provide strong evidence for multiple shape coexistence at N = 38 and 40 and deep prolate minima in 70Ni42 and isotonic 71Cu42. A new transition at 642 keV is proposed for 66Ni as the prolate 2+ to 0+ transition. Two new transitions in 72Ni at 915 and 1225 keV were identified in the knock-out reaction study and could represent de-population of prolate states. Taken together with recent theoretical work using the Monte Carlo shell model, a well defined region of shape coexistence can be seen existing precisely between 38 ≤ N ≤44 for Co, Ni, and Cu nuclei.

  3. New low-energy 0+ state and shape coexistence in 70Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; Crider, B. P.; Liddick, S. N.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chen, J.; Chiara, C. J.; David, H. M.; Dombos, A. C.; Go, S.; Harker, J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Larson, N.; Lauritsen, T.; Lewis, R.; Quinn, S. J.; Recchia, F.; Seweryniak, D.; Spyrou, A.; Suchyta, S.; Walters, W. B.; Zhu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent models, the neutron-rich Ni isotopes around N =40 are predicted to exhibit multiple low-energy excited 0+ states attributed to neutron and proton excitations across both the N =40 and Z =28 shell gaps. In 68Ni, the three observed 0+ states have been interpreted in terms of triple shape coexistence between spherical, oblate, and prolate deformed shapes. In the present work a new (02+) state at an energy of 1567 keV has been discovered in 70Ni by using β -delayed, γ -ray spectroscopy following the decay of 70Co. The precipitous drop in the energy of the prolate-deformed 0+ level between 68Ni and 70Ni with the addition of two neutrons compares favorably with results of Monte Carlo shell-model calculations carried out in the large f p g9 /2d5 /2 model space, which predict a 02+ state at 1525 keV in 70Ni. The result extends the shape-coexistence picture in the region to 70Ni and confirms the importance of the role of the tensor component of the monopole interaction in describing the structure of neutron-rich nuclei.

  4. Shape coexistence and the role of axial asymmetry in 72Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Wu, C. Y.; Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Zhu, S.; Albers, M.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Bucher, B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Cline, D.; Crawford, H. L.; David, H. M.; Harker, J.; Hayes, A. B.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Kolos, K.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Richard, A.; Seweryniak, D.; Wiens, A.

    2016-03-01

    The quadrupole collectivity of low-lying states and the anomalous behavior of the 02+ and 23+ levels in 72Ge are investigated via projectile multi-step Coulomb excitation with GRETINA and CHICO-2. A total of forty six E2 and M1 matrix elements connecting fourteen low-lying levels were determined using the least-squares search code, GOSIA. Evidence for triaxiality and shape coexistence, based on the model-independent shape invariants deduced from the Kumar-Cline sum rule, is presented. These are interpreted using a simple two-state mixing model as well as multi-state mixing calculations carried out within the framework of the triaxial rotor model. The results represent a significant milestone towards the understanding of the unusual structure of this nucleus.

  5. First Evidence of Shape Coexistence in the 78Ni Region: Intruder 02+ State in 80Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottardo, A.; Verney, D.; Delafosse, C.; Ibrahim, F.; Roussière, B.; Sotty, C.; Roccia, S.; Andreoiu, C.; Costache, C.; Delattre, M.-C.; Deloncle, I.; Etilé, A.; Franchoo, S.; Gaulard, C.; Guillot, J.; Lebois, M.; MacCormick, M.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Matea, I.; Mihai, C.; Mitu, I.; Olivier, L.; Portail, C.; Qi, L.; Stan, L.; Testov, D.; Wilson, J.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-05-01

    The N =48 80Ge nucleus is studied by means of β -delayed electron-conversion spectroscopy at ALTO. The radioactive 80Ga beam is produced through the isotope separation on line photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ and e- emission following β decay. An electric monopole E 0 transition, which points to a 639(1) keV intruder 02+ state, is observed for the first time. This new state is lower than the 21+ level in 80Ge, and provides evidence of shape coexistence close to one of the most neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei discovered so far, 78Ni. This result is compared with theoretical estimates, helping to explain the role of monopole and quadrupole forces in the weakening of the N =50 gap at Z =32 . The evolution of intruder 02+ states towards 78Ni is discussed.

  6. Possible shape coexistence and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Zhou, X. R.; Suzuki, Toshio; Yoshida, N.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic dipole (M1) transitions of N=11 nuclei {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne are investigated by using shell model and deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock + blocked BCS wave functions. Shell model calculations predict well observed energy spectra and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 21}Ne, while the results are rather poor to predict these observables in {sup 17}C. In the deformed HF calculations, the ground states of the two nuclei are shown to have large prolate deformations close to {beta}{sub 2}=0.4. It is also pointed out that the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 21}Ne is prolately deformed, while the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 17}C is predicted to have a large oblate deformation close to the ground state in energy, We point out that the experimentally observed large hindrance of the M1 transition between I{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +} in {sup 17}C can be attributed to a shape coexistence near the ground state of {sup 17}C.

  7. Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moments in Sr,9896 : Evidence for Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Strontium Isotopes at N =60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, E.; Zielińska, M.; Görgen, A.; Korten, W.; Péru, S.; Libert, J.; Goutte, H.; Hilaire, S.; Bastin, B.; Bauer, C.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Bruyneel, B.; Butler, P. A.; Butterworth, J.; Delahaye, P.; Dijon, A.; Doherty, D. T.; Ekström, A.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fransen, C.; Georgiev, G.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Larsen, A. C.; Ljungvall, J.; Lutter, R.; Marley, P.; Moschner, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Pakarinen, J.; Petts, A.; Reiter, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Seidlitz, M.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Sotty, C.; Srebrny, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Tveten, G. M.; Van de Walle, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wiens, A.; De Witte, H.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron-rich Sr,9896 isotopes have been investigated by safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Reduced transition probabilities and spectroscopic quadrupole moments have been extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections. These results allow, for the first time, the drawing of definite conclusions about the shape coexistence of highly deformed prolate and spherical configurations. In particular, a very small mixing between the coexisting states is observed, contrary to other mass regions where strong mixing is present. Experimental results have been compared to beyond-mean-field calculations using the Gogny D1S interaction in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism, which reproduce the shape change at N =60 .

  8. Identification of excited structures in proton unbound nuclei 173,175,177Au: shape co-existence and intruder bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K.; Ahmad, I.; Amro, H.; Cizewski, J. A.; Danchev, M.; Davids, C. N.; Hartley, D. J.; Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Ma, W. C.; Poli, G. L.; Ressler, J.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. B.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2001-07-01

    Excited states in the proton-unbound 173,175,177Au nuclei were identified for the first time. Level structures associated with three different shapes were observed in 175Au. While the yrast lines of 175Au and 177Au consist of a prolate band built upon the intruder 1/2+[660] (i13/2) proton orbital, no sign of collectivity was observed in the lighter 173Au isotope. Implications for the deformation associated with these structures are discussed with a focus on shape co-existence in the vicinity of the proton-drip line.

  9. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain  < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms. PMID:26833622

  10. In-beam spectroscopic studies of shape coexistence and collectivity in the neutron-deficient Z ≈ 82 nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, R.; Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.

    2016-02-01

    In the present paper we focus on studies of shape coexistence in even-mass nuclei in the neutron-deficient Pb region. They are based on experiments carried out using tagging techniques in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. Excited states in many of these nuclei can only be accessed via fusion-evaporation reactions employing high-intensity stable-ion beams. The key features in these experiments are high selectivity, clean spectra and instrumentation that enables high count rates. We review three spectroscopic highlights in this region.

  11. Shell Erosion and Shape Coexistence in {sub 16}{sup 43}S{sub 27}

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudefroy, L.; Daugas, J. M.; Girod, M.; Rosse, B.; Meot, V.; Morel, P.; Hass, M.; Kumar, V.; Grevy, S.; Stodel, Ch.; Thomas, J. C.; Force, C.; Angelique, J. C.; Simpson, G.; Balabanski, D. L.; Fiori, E.; Georgiev, G.; Lozeva, R. L.; Kameda, D.

    2009-03-06

    We report on the g-factor measurement of the first isomeric state in {sub 16}{sup 43}S{sub 27}[E{sub x}=320.5(5) keV, T{sub 1/2}=415(5) ns, and g=0.317(4)]. The 7/2{sup -} spin-parity of the isomer and the intruder nature of the ground state of the nucleus are experimentally established for the first time, providing direct and unambiguous evidence of the collapse of the N=28 shell closure in neutron-rich nuclei. The shell model, beyond the mean-field and semiempirical calculations, provides a very consistent description of this nucleus showing that a well deformed prolate and quasispherical states coexist at low energy.

  12. Shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Moreno, Enrique; Castanos, Octavio

    1995-01-01

    A generalization of the procedure to study shapes and stability of algebraic nuclear models introduced by Gilmore is presented. One calculates the expectation value of the Hamiltonian with respect to the coherent states of the algebraic structure of the system. Then equilibrium configurations of the resulting energy surface, which depends in general on state variables and a set of parameters, are classified through the Catastrophe theory. For one- and two-body interactions in the Hamiltonian of the interacting Boson model-1, the critical points are organized through the Cusp catastrophe. As an example, we apply this Separatrix to describe the energy surfaces associated to the Rutenium and Samarium isotopes.

  13. First Evidence of Shape Coexistence in the ^{78}Ni Region: Intruder 0_{2}^{+} State in ^{80}Ge.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, A; Verney, D; Delafosse, C; Ibrahim, F; Roussière, B; Sotty, C; Roccia, S; Andreoiu, C; Costache, C; Delattre, M-C; Deloncle, I; Etilé, A; Franchoo, S; Gaulard, C; Guillot, J; Lebois, M; MacCormick, M; Marginean, N; Marginean, R; Matea, I; Mihai, C; Mitu, I; Olivier, L; Portail, C; Qi, L; Stan, L; Testov, D; Wilson, J; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    The N=48 ^{80}Ge nucleus is studied by means of β-delayed electron-conversion spectroscopy at ALTO. The radioactive ^{80}Ga beam is produced through the isotope separation on line photofission technique and collected on a movable tape for the measurement of γ and e^{-} emission following β decay. An electric monopole E0 transition, which points to a 639(1) keV intruder 0_{2}^{+} state, is observed for the first time. This new state is lower than the 2_{1}^{+} level in ^{80}Ge, and provides evidence of shape coexistence close to one of the most neutron-rich doubly magic nuclei discovered so far, ^{78}Ni. This result is compared with theoretical estimates, helping to explain the role of monopole and quadrupole forces in the weakening of the N=50 gap at Z=32. The evolution of intruder 0_{2}^{+} states towards ^{78}Ni is discussed. PMID:27203316

  14. Recent advances in understanding nuclear size and shape.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Richik N; Chen, Pan; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-04-25

    Size and shape are important aspects of nuclear structure. While normal cells maintain nuclear size within a defined range, altered nuclear size and shape are associated with a variety of diseases. It is unknown if altered nuclear morphology contributes to pathology, and answering this question requires a better understanding of the mechanisms that control nuclear size and shape. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate nuclear morphology, focusing on nucleocytoplasmic transport, nuclear lamins, the endoplasmic reticulum, the cell cycle, and potential links between nuclear size and size regulation of other organelles. We then discuss the functional significance of nuclear morphology in the context of early embryonic development. Looking toward the future, we review new experimental approaches that promise to provide new insights into mechanisms of nuclear size control, in particular microfluidic-based technologies, and discuss how altered nuclear morphology might impact chromatin organization and physiology of diseased cells. PMID:26963026

  15. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Buck, Taraz E.; Sullivan, Devin P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  16. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1 /2+ Isomer in 30,79Zn49: Signature of Shape Coexistence near 78Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Babcock, C.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Cheal, B.; Flanagan, K. T.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Gorges, C.; Grob, L. K.; Heylen, H.; Kaufmann, S.; Kowalska, M.; Kraemer, J.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Papuga, J.; Sánchez, R.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the 30,79Zn49 isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in 79Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I =9 /2 and I =1 /2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (79Zn)=-1.1866 (10 )μN , confirms the spin-parity 9 /2+ with a ν g9/2 -1 shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (Znm79)=-1.0180 (12 )μN supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2 h -1 p neutron excitation across the N =50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ ⟨rc2⟩79 ,79 m=+0.204 (6 ) fm2 , providing first evidence of shape coexistence.

  17. Shape coexistence at N=20 and N=28: Study of 0{sub 2}{sup +} states in {sup 34}Si and {sup 44}S

    SciTech Connect

    Grévy, S.; Rotaru, F.; Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Calinescu, S.; Petrone, C.; Mrazek, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Cáceres, L.; De Oliveira, F.; Force, C.; Lebhertz, D.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Chevrier, R. [Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds , CEA and others

    2014-08-14

    It is well known that the nuclear shell structure changes for the most exotic nuclei. One of the consequences of this phenomenon is the modification of the 'classical' magic numbers, as experimentally observed at N = 20 and N = 28. Nevertheless, the mechanisms responsible for such changes are still under discussion and more experimental information is needed to better constrain the theoretical models. In these proceedings, we report on the discovery and the experimental study by precise spectroscopy experiments of the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state in {sup 34}Si and {sup 44}S. The {sup 34}Si is located between the magic spherical {sup 36}S and the deformed {sup 32}Mg, member of the so-called island of inversion, whereas {sup 44}S is located between the magic spherical {sup 48}Ca and the deformed {sup 42}Si. Therefore, the structure of these nuclei, and in particular the phenomenon of shape coexistence, is of crucial importance to understand how the intruder configurations progressively dominate the ground state structure of the most exotic nuclei at both N = 20 and N = 28.

  18. Isomer Shift and Magnetic Moment of the Long-Lived 1/2^{+} Isomer in _{30}^{79}Zn_{49}: Signature of Shape Coexistence near ^{78}Ni.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Wraith, C; Xie, L; Babcock, C; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Blaum, K; Cheal, B; Flanagan, K T; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Gins, W; Gorges, C; Grob, L K; Heylen, H; Kaufmann, S; Kowalska, M; Kraemer, J; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S; Neugart, R; Neyens, G; Nörtershäuser, W; Papuga, J; Sánchez, R; Yordanov, D T

    2016-05-01

    Collinear laser spectroscopy is performed on the _{30}^{79}Zn_{49} isotope at ISOLDE-CERN. The existence of a long-lived isomer with a few hundred milliseconds half-life is confirmed, and the nuclear spins and moments of the ground and isomeric states in ^{79}Zn as well as the isomer shift are measured. From the observed hyperfine structures, spins I=9/2 and I=1/2 are firmly assigned to the ground and isomeric states. The magnetic moment μ (^{79}Zn)=-1.1866(10)μ_{N}, confirms the spin-parity 9/2^{+} with a νg_{9/2}^{-1} shell-model configuration, in excellent agreement with the prediction from large scale shell-model theories. The magnetic moment μ (^{79m}Zn)=-1.0180(12)μ_{N} supports a positive parity for the isomer, with a wave function dominated by a 2h-1p neutron excitation across the N=50 shell gap. The large isomer shift reveals an increase of the intruder isomer mean square charge radius with respect to that of the ground state, δ⟨r_{c}^{2}⟩^{79,79m}=+0.204(6)  fm^{2}, providing first evidence of shape coexistence. PMID:27203317

  19. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  20. Low-density homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter: Disclosing dinucleons in coexisting phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Hugo F.; Delaroche, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The effect of in-medium dinucleon bound states on self-consistent single-particle fields in Brueckner, Bethe and Goldstone theory is investigated in symmetric nuclear matter at zero temperature. To this end, dinucleon bound state occurences in the 1 S 0 and 3 SD 1 channels are explicitly accounted for --within the continuous choice for the auxiliary fields-- while imposing self-consistency in Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation calculations. Searches are carried out at Fermi momenta in the range fm-1, using the Argonne bare nucleon-nucleon potential without resorting to the effective-mass approximation. As a result, two distinct solutions meeting the self-consistency requirement are found with overlapping domains in the interval 0.130 fm-1 0.285 fm-1, corresponding to mass densities between and g cm-3. Effective masses as high as three times the nucleon mass are found in the coexistence domain. The emergence of superfluidity in relationship with BCS pairing gap solutions is discussed.

  1. Spectroscopic Quadrupole Moments in {96,98}Sr: Evidence for Shape Coexistence in Neutron-Rich Strontium Isotopes at N=60.

    PubMed

    Clément, E; Zielińska, M; Görgen, A; Korten, W; Péru, S; Libert, J; Goutte, H; Hilaire, S; Bastin, B; Bauer, C; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Butterworth, J; Delahaye, P; Dijon, A; Doherty, D T; Ekström, A; Fitzpatrick, C; Fransen, C; Georgiev, G; Gernhäuser, R; Hess, H; Iwanicki, J; Jenkins, D G; Larsen, A C; Ljungvall, J; Lutter, R; Marley, P; Moschner, K; Napiorkowski, P J; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Reiter, P; Renstrøm, T; Seidlitz, M; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Sotty, C; Srebrny, J; Stefanescu, I; Tveten, G M; Van de Walle, J; Vermeulen, M; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A; De Witte, H; Wrzosek-Lipska, K

    2016-01-15

    Neutron-rich {96,98}Sr isotopes have been investigated by safe Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams at the REX-ISOLDE facility. Reduced transition probabilities and spectroscopic quadrupole moments have been extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections. These results allow, for the first time, the drawing of definite conclusions about the shape coexistence of highly deformed prolate and spherical configurations. In particular, a very small mixing between the coexisting states is observed, contrary to other mass regions where strong mixing is present. Experimental results have been compared to beyond-mean-field calculations using the Gogny D1S interaction in a five-dimensional collective Hamiltonian formalism, which reproduce the shape change at N=60. PMID:26824536

  2. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-14

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  3. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  4. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  5. Isomers And E0 Transitions As A Probe Of Triple Shape Co-existence In 188Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Byrne, A. P.; Lane, G. J.; Baxter, A. M.; Kibédi, T.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Fallon, P.; Clark, R. M.

    2003-03-01

    New structures above and below the two-particle isomeric states in 188Pb have been identified. Their properties are consistent with the presence of three minima in the nuclear potential well, associated with spherical, weakly oblate and substantial prolate deformations. The fragmented decay of the weakly populated Kπ = 8-, 1 μs prolate isomer also provides a means of identifying non-yrast low-spin structures which are otherwise inaccessible. Through this mechanism, collective bands which can be associated with the excited 0+ states have been identified and E0 transitions between them inferred. Analysis of the excitation energies, branching ratios and E2/E0 decay-width ratios through a band-mixing model provides a test of shape differences and the separability of the wave functions at low spin.

  6. Study of nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralithar, S.; Gamma spectroscopy Group in IUAC

    2013-04-01

    Studies of nuclear structure have fascinated physicists and was pursued for decades actively. Nuclear structure evolves as a function of proton and neutron ratio, energy and spin pumped into system. To facilitate nuclear structure study at high spin, a host of facilities were developed at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi and was used by users across this country for last twenty years. The tools developed, from Gamma detector array (GDA) with ancillary devices, to Indian National Gamma array (INGA) are presented with few physics cases.

  7. Nuclear hyperdeformation and the Jacobi shape transition

    SciTech Connect

    Schunck, N.; Dudek, J.

    2007-05-15

    The possibility that atomic nuclei possess stable, extremely elongated (hyperdeformed) shapes at very high angular momentum is investigated in the light of the most recent experimental results. The crucial role of the Jacobi shape transitions for the population of hyperdeformed states is discussed and emphasized. State-of-the-art mean-field calculations including the most recent parametrization of the liquid-drop energy together with thermal effects and minimization algorithms allowing the spanning of a large deformation space predict the existence of a region of hyperdeformed nuclei in the mass A{approx}120-130: Te, Cs, Xe, I, and Ba isotopes. In agreement with predictions presented in reviews by J. Dudek, K. Pomorski, N. Schunck, and N. Dubray [Eur. Phys. J. A 20, 15 (2003)] and J. Dudek, N. Schunck, and N. Dubray [Acta Phys Pol. B 36, 975 (2005)], our extended calculations predict that only very short hyperdeformed bands composed of a dozen discrete transitions at the most are to be expected-in contrast to the results known for the superdeformed bands. We stress the importance of the experimental research in terms of multiple-{gamma} correlation analysis that proved to be very efficient for the superdeformation studies and seems very helpful in the even more difficult search for the discrete transitions in hyperdeformed nuclei.

  8. Regulation of nuclear shape and size in plants.

    PubMed

    Meier, Iris; Griffis, Anna Hn; Groves, Norman R; Wagner, Alecia

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear shape and size changes have long been used by cytopathologists to diagnose, stage, and prognose cancer. However, the underlying causalities and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. The current eukaryotic tree of life groups eukaryotes into five supergroups, with all organisms between humans and yeast falling into the supergroup Opisthokonta. The emergence of model organisms with strong molecular genetic methodology in the other supergroups has recently facilitated a broader evolutionary approach to pressing biological questions. Here, we review what is known about the control of nuclear shape and size in the Archaeplastidae, the supergroup containing the higher plants. We discuss common themes as well as differences toward a more generalized model of how eukaryotic organisms regulate nuclear morphology. PMID:27030912

  9. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheehy, Sean P; Goss, Josue A; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal-nuclear-chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  10. Cytoskeletal prestress regulates nuclear shape and stiffness in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Adams, William J; Alford, Patrick W; McCain, Megan L; Feinberg, Adam W; Sheeny, Sean P; Goss, Josue A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on the myocyte nucleus have been associated with several diseases and potentially transduce mechanical stimuli into cellular responses. Although a number of physical links between the nuclear envelope and cytoplasmic filaments have been identified, previous studies have focused on the mechanical properties of individual components of the nucleus, such as the nuclear envelope and lamin network. The mechanical interaction between the cytoskeleton and chromatin on nuclear deformability remains elusive. Here, we investigated how cytoskeletal and chromatin structures influence nuclear mechanics in cardiac myocytes. Rapid decondensation of chromatin and rupture of the nuclear membrane caused a sudden expansion of DNA, a consequence of prestress exerted on the nucleus. To characterize the prestress exerted on the nucleus, we measured the shape and the stiffness of isolated nuclei and nuclei in living myocytes during disruption of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar, and chromatin structure. We found that the nucleus in myocytes is subject to both tensional and compressional prestress and its deformability is determined by a balance of those opposing forces. By developing a computational model of the prestressed nucleus, we showed that cytoskeletal and chromatin prestresses create vulnerability in the nuclear envelope. Our studies suggest the cytoskeletal–nuclear–chromatin interconnectivity may play an important role in mechanics of myocyte contraction and in the development of laminopathies by lamin mutations. PMID:25908635

  11. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  12. Irradiation-induced changes in nuclear shape and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kishino, Y.; Tsuboi, T.; Sugishita, T.; Hosokawa, T.

    1982-03-01

    Using human uterine cervical carcinoma cells transplanted in nude mice and mice leukemia L5178Y cells, changes in the cell cycle following irradiation were observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and changes in the cell nuclei during the course of irradiation were measured by FCM. Experiments in vivo as well as in vitro caused accumulation of cells in the G2 to M populations, resulting in the so-called G2 block phenomenon as revealed by FCM analysis of DNA distributions. The radiation-induced changes of nuclear shapes were dependent on abnormal mitoses, which occurred more frequently in the G2 to M phases. Therefore it is suggested that the G2 block phenomenon plays an important role in radiation-induced cell death because the process of cell death by irradiation has been shown to proceed via these abnormal mitoses.

  13. Multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories—nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES’s) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES’s with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by {β }λ μ with even μ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES’s and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole Y 32 correlations in N = 150 isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  14. Exact Analytic Study of Nuclear Shape Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Levai, G.

    2009-08-26

    The application of the sextic oscillator is proposed in the Bohr Hamiltonian to describe the phase transition between the spherical and gamma-unstable shape phases. It is shown that exact results can be obtained for the energy eigenvalues and wave functions of the low-lying levels, as well as for electric quadrupole transition rates between them. The {sup 134}Ba nucleus and the even Ru isotope chain are considered as examples. Possible generalizations of the model are also outlined.

  15. Nuclear states and shapes at high spin. [Good review

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1980-08-01

    As angular momentum is added to a nucleus, the balance of forces acting upon it to determine its shape, moment of inertia, mode of rotation, and type of level structure may undergo a series of changes. At relatively low spins a deformed nucleus will rotate collectively, and one may see the effect of Coriolis antipairing in gradually increasing the moment of inertia. Around spin 12 to 16 h-bar there may be an abrupt change (backbending) when a pair of high-j nucleons unpairs and the nucleons align with the axis of rotation; this process allows the nucleus to slow its collective rotation. This process, the start of a sharing of angular momentum between single-particle motion and the collective rotation, gives a lower total energy and corresponds to a change toward triaxiality in the shape of the nucleus. At much higher spins discrete ..gamma..-ray transitions can no longer be observed. This is the regime of continuum spectra; all the information on these high-spin states (to 65 h-bar) is contained in these continuum cascades. Knowledge is accumulating on how to study these spectra, experimentally and theoretically, and new techniques offer promise of revealing a great deal of information about the shapes and properties of very high spin states. 71 references, 34 figures.

  16. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana Victoria; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Calvo, Enrique; Aix, Esther; González-Guerra, Andrés; Logan, Angela; Bernad-Miana, María Luisa; Romanos, Eduardo; Cruz, Raquel; Cogliati, Sara; Sobrino, Beatriz; Carracedo, Ángel; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Murphy, Michael P; Flores, Ignacio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-07-28

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) shows extensive within population sequence variability. Many studies suggest that mtDNA variants may be associated with ageing or diseases, although mechanistic evidence at the molecular level is lacking. Mitochondrial replacement has the potential to prevent transmission of disease-causing oocyte mtDNA. However, extension of this technology requires a comprehensive understanding of the physiological relevance of mtDNA sequence variability and its match with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Studies in conplastic animals allow comparison of individuals with the same nuclear genome but different mtDNA variants, and have provided both supporting and refuting evidence that mtDNA variation influences organismal physiology. However, most of these studies did not confirm the conplastic status, focused on younger animals, and did not investigate the full range of physiological and phenotypic variability likely to be influenced by mitochondria. Here we systematically characterized conplastic mice throughout their lifespan using transcriptomic, proteomic,metabolomic, biochemical, physiological and phenotyping studies. We show that mtDNA haplotype profoundly influences mitochondrial proteostasis and reactive oxygen species generation,insulin signalling, obesity, and ageing parameters including telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in profound differences in health longevity between conplastic strains. PMID:27383793

  17. {alpha} transitions to coexisting 0{sup +} states in Pb and Po isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-04-15

    The {alpha}-transitions ({delta}l=0) to ground and first excited 0{sup +} states in neutron deficient Pb and Po isotopes are systematically analyzed by the density-dependent cluster model. The magnitude of nuclear deformation of the coexisting 0{sub 1}{sup +} and 0{sub 2}{sup +} states is extracted directly from the experimental {alpha}-decay energies and half-lives. The phenomenon of shape coexistence around the Z=82 shell closure is clearly demonstrated in our present analysis. The obtained deformation values from Rn {yields} Po {yields} Pb decay chains are generally consistent with both the available experimental and theoretical studies.

  18. Identification of Fasciola species based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA reveals the co-existence of intermediate Fasciola and Fasciola gigantica in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wannasan, Anchalee; Khositharattanakool, Pathamet; Chaiwong, Prasong; Piangjai, Somsak; Uparanukraw, Pichart; Morakote, Nimit

    2014-11-01

    Molecular techniques were used to identify Fasciola species collected from Chiang Mai Thailand. Morphometrically, 65 stained and 45 fresh worms collected from cattle suggested the possible occurrence of both F. gigantica and F. hepatica. Twenty-two worms comprising 15 from cattle and 7 from human patients, were identified subsequently based on three genetic markers: mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2). All of them presented the F. gigantica type in maternally inherited mitochondrial sequences (nad1 and cox1), with six types in each sequence (FgNDI-CM1 to FgNDI-CM6 and FgCOI-CM1 to FgCOI-CM6, respectively). Remarkably, the predominant nad1 type, FgNDI-CM6, was identical to that of aspermic Fasciola sp. formerly reported from Thailand, Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, and Myanmar. ITS2 sequences were analyzed successfully in 20 worms. Fifteen worms showed the F. gigantica type and five (including one worm from a patient) had mixed ITS2 sequences of both F. gigantica and F. hepatica in the same worms, with additional heterogeneity within both ITS2 types. This study revealed the intermediate form of Fasciola coexisting with F. gigantica for the first time in Thailand. PMID:25300764

  19. Masses and scaling relations for nuclear star clusters, and their co-existence with central black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Böker, Torsten; Leigh, Nathan; Lützgendorf, Nora; Neumayer, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Galactic nuclei typically host either a nuclear star cluster (NSC, prevalent in galaxies with masses ≲1010 M⊙) or a massive black hole (MBH, common in galaxies with masses ≳1012 M⊙). In the intermediate-mass range, some nuclei host both an NSC and an MBH. In this paper, we explore scaling relations between NSC mass (M_NSC) and host-galaxy total stellar mass (M_{star ,gal}) using a large sample of NSCs in late- and early-type galaxies, including a number of NSCs harbouring an MBH. Such scaling relations reflect the underlying physical mechanisms driving the formation and (co)evolution of these central massive objects. We find ˜1.5σ significant differences between NSCs in late- and early-type galaxies in the slopes and offsets of the relations reff,NSC-M_NSC, reff,NSC-M_{star ,gal} and M_NSC-M_{star ,gal}, in the sense that (i) NSCs in late types are more compact at fixed M_NSC and M_{star ,gal}; and (ii) the M_NSC-M_{star ,gal} relation is shallower for NSCs in late types than in early types, similar to the M_BH-M_{star ,bulge} relation. We discuss these results in the context of the (possibly ongoing) evolution of NSCs, depending on host-galaxy type. For NSCs with an MBH, we illustrate the possible influence of an MBH on its host NSC, by considering the ratio between the radius of the MBH sphere of influence and reff,NSC. NSCs harbouring a sufficiently massive black hole are likely to exhibit surface brightness profile deviating from a typical King profile.

  20. Phase coexistence in proton glass

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Trybula, Z.; Pinto, N.J.; Shapiro, S.M.

    1996-11-01

    Proton glasses are crystals of composition M{sub 1{minus}x}(NW{sub 4}){sub x}W{sub 2}AO{sub 4}, where M = K,Rb, W = H,D, A = P,As. For x = 0 there is a ferroelectric (FE) transition, while for x = 1 there is an antiferroelectric (AFE) transition. In both cases, the transition is from a paraelectric (PE) state of tetragonal structure with dynamically disordered hydrogen bonds to an ordered state of orthorhombic structure. For an intermediate x range there is no transition, but the hydrogen rearrangements slow down, and eventually display nonergodic behavior characteristic of glasses. The authors and other have shown from spontaneous polarization, dielectric permittivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and neutron diffraction experiments that for smaller x there is coexistence of ferroelectric and paraelectric phases, and for larger x there is coexistence of antiferroelectric and paraelectric phases. The authors present a method for analytically describing this coexistence, and the degree to which this coexistence is spatial or temporal.

  1. Self-consistent description of coexistence phenomena in medium mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovici, A.; Schmid, K. W.; Faessler, Amand; Andrei, O.

    2010-11-24

    Shape coexistence and mixing, isospin mixing, the competition between neutron-proton and like-nucleon pairing correlations have been identified as the main characteristic features of nuclei near the N = Z line in the A{approx_equal}70 mass region. The self-consistent treatment of exotic phenomena dominated by their interplay represents a challenge for the nuclear many-body models. The realistic description of tiny effects in this mass region aiming to test the fundamental interactions and symmetries as well as the required theoretical predictions concerning the nuclear properties relevant for astrophysical scenarios are still open problems of the low-energy nuclear physics today.

  2. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  3. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  4. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  5. Nuclear shape transitions in neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sarriguren, P.; Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the isotopic evolution of the ground-state nuclear shapes in neutron-rich Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo isotopic chains. Both even-even and odd-A nuclei are included in the analysis. For the latter we also study the systematics of their one-quasiparticle low-lying configurations. The theoretical approach is based on a selfconsistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism with finite range Gogny energy density functionals. Neutron separation energies, charge radii, and the spin-parity of the ground states are calculated and compared with available data. Shape-transition signatures are identified around N= 60 isotones as discontinuities in both charge radii isotopic shifts and spin-parities of the ground states. The nuclear deformation including triaxiality is shown to play a relevant role in the understanding of the bulk and spectroscopic features of the ground and low-lying one-quasiparticle states.

  6. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  7. Mito-nuclear genetic comparison in a Wolbachia infected weevil: insights on reproductive mode, infection age and evolutionary forces shaping genetic variation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Maternally inherited endosymbionts like Wolbachia pipientis are in linkage disequilibrium with the mtDNA of their hosts. Therefore, they can induce selective sweeps, decreasing genetic diversity over many generations. This sex ratio distorter, that is involved in the origin of parthenogenesis and other reproductive alterations, infects the parthenogenetic weevil Naupactus cervinus, a serious pest of ornamental and fruit plants. Results Molecular evolution analyses of mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (ITS1) sequences from 309 individuals of Naupactus cervinus sampled over a broad range of its geographical distribution were carried out. Our results demonstrate lack of recombination in the nuclear fragment, non-random association between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and the consequent coevolution of both genomes, being an indirect evidence of apomixis. This weevil is infected by a single Wolbachia strain, which could have caused a moderate bottleneck in the invaded population which survived the initial infection. Conclusions Clonal reproduction and Wolbachia infection induce the coevolution of bacterial, mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The time elapsed since the Wolbachia invasion would have erased the traces of the demographic crash in the mtDNA, being the nuclear genome the only one that retained the signal of the bottleneck. The amount of genetic change accumulated in the mtDNA and the high prevalence of Wolbachia in all populations of N. cervinus agree with the hypothesis of an ancient infection. Wolbachia probably had great influence in shaping the genetic diversity of N. cervinus. However, it would have not caused the extinction of males, since sexual and asexual infected lineages coexisted until recent times. PMID:21050430

  8. Oxydative stress alters nuclear shape through lamins dysregulation: a route to senescence.

    PubMed

    Barascu, Aurélia; Le Chalony, Catherine; Pennarun, Gaëlle; Genet, Diane; Zaarour, Nancy; Bertrand, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Progeroid phenotypes are mainly encountered in 2 types of syndromes: in laminopathies, which are characterized by nuclear shape abnormalities due to lamin A alteration, and in DNA damage response defect syndromes. Because lamin A dysregulation leads to DNA damages, it has been proposed that senescence occurs in both types of syndromes through the accumulation of damages. We recently showed that elevated oxidative stress is responsible for lamin B1 accumulation, nuclear shape alteration and senescence in the DDR syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). Interestingly, overexpression of lamin B1 in wild type cells is sufficient to induce senescence without the induction of DNA damages. Here, we will discuss the importance of controlling the lamins level in order for maintenance nuclear architecture and we will comment the relationships of lamins with other senescence mechanisms. Finally, we will describe emerging data reporting redox control by lamins, leading us to propose a general mechanism by which reactive oxygen species can induce senescence through lamin dysregulation and NSA. PMID:22895091

  9. Extreme nuclear shapes examined via giant dipole resonance lineshapes in hot light-mass systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, Deepak; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Banerjee, S. R.; De, A.; Gupta, D.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of alpha clustering on nuclear reaction dynamics is investigated using the giant dipole resonance (GDR) lineshape studies in the reactions {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=145,160 MeV) + {sup 12}C and {sup 20}Ne (E{sub lab}=160 MeV) + {sup 27}Al, populating {sup 32}S and {sup 47}V, respectively. The GDR lineshapes from the two systems are remarkably different from each other. Whereas, the non-alpha-like {sup 47}V undergoes Jacobi shape transition and matches exceptionally well with the theoretical GDR lineshape estimated under the framework rotating liquid drop model (RLDM) and thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) signifying shape equilibration, for the alpha cluster {sup 32}S an extended prolate kind of shape is observed. This unusual deformation, seen directly via gamma decay for the first time, is predicted to be due to the formation of orbiting dinuclear configuration or molecular structure of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O in the {sup 32}S superdeformed band.

  10. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  11. Alpha-particles as probes of nuclear shape and structure effects in proton evaporation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M. ); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The emission barriers and subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction on Sn and rare earth compound nuclei are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation effects in the decay process. For the Sn systems the spectral shapes and anisotropies can be examined without involving deformation. For the rare earth systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr ({sup 34}S, 2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transitions. Large shifts in proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotational bands are populated. These effects cannot be explained by statistical model calculations that do not include explicitly nuclear structure effects in the deexcitation process. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast stretched proton emission, which preferentially populates the yrast band by subbarrier protons.

  12. Software emulator of nuclear pulse generation with different pulse shapes and pile-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechousek, Jiri; Konecny, Daniel; Novak, Petr; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel; Celiktas, Cuneyt; Vujtek, Milan

    2016-08-01

    The optimal detection of output signals from nuclear counting devices represents one of the key physical factors that govern accuracy and experimental reproducibility. In this context, the fine calibration of the detector under diverse experimental scenarios, although time costly, is necessary. However this process can be rendered easier with the use of systems that work in lieu of emulators. In this report we describe an innovative programmable pulse generator device capable to emulate the scintillation detector signals, in a way to mimic the detector performances under a variety of experimental conditions. The emulator generates a defined number of pulses, with a given shape and amplitude in the form of a sampled detector signal. The emulator output is then used off-line by a spectrometric system in order to set up its optimal performance. Three types of pulse shapes are produced by our device, with the possibility to add noise and pulse pile-up effects into the signal. The efficiency of the pulse detection, pile-up rejection and/or correction, together with the dead-time of the system, are therein analyzed through the use of some specific algorithms for pulse processing, and the results obtained validate the beneficial use of emulators for the accurate calibration process of spectrometric systems.

  13. Theory of damped quantum rotation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. III. Nuclear permutation symmetry of the line shape equation.

    PubMed

    Szymański, S

    2009-12-28

    The damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory describes manifestations in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the coherent and stochastic dynamics of N-fold molecular rotors composed of indistinguishable particles. The standard jump model is only a limiting case of the DQR approach; outside this limit, the stochastic motions of such rotors have no kinematic description. In this paper, completing the previous two of this series, consequences of nuclear permutation symmetry for the properties of the DQR line shape equation are considered. The systems addressed are planar rotors, such as aromatic hydrocarbons' rings, occurring inside of molecular crystals oriented in the magnetic field. Under such conditions, oddfold rotors can have nontrivial permutation symmetries only for peculiar orientations while evenfold ones always retain their intrinsic symmetry element, which is rotation by 180 degrees about the N-fold axis; in specific orientations the latter can gain two additional symmetry elements. It is shown that the symmetry selection rules applicable to the classical rate processes in fluids, once recognized as having two diverse aspects, macroscopic and microscopic, are also rigorously valid for the DQR processes in the solid state. However, formal justification of these rules is different because the DQR equation is based on the Pauli principle, which is ignored in the jump model. For objects like the benzene ring, exploitation of these rules in simulations of spectra using the DQR equation can be of critical significance for the feasibility of the calculations. Examples of such calculations for the proton system of the benzene ring in a general orientation are provided. It is also shown that, because of the intrinsic symmetries of the evenfold rotors, many of the DQR processes, which such rotors can undergo, are unobservable in NMR spectra. PMID:20059076

  14. Brownian shape motion on five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces:nuclear fission-fragment mass distributions.

    PubMed

    Randrup, Jørgen; Möller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value. PMID:21517377

  15. Brownian Shape Motion on Five-Dimensional Potential-Energy Surfaces:Nuclear Fission-Fragment Mass Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Joergen; Moeller, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although nuclear fission can be understood qualitatively as an evolution of the nuclear shape, a quantitative description has proven to be very elusive. In particular, until now, there existed no model with demonstrated predictive power for the fission-fragment mass yields. Exploiting the expected strongly damped character of nuclear dynamics, we treat the nuclear shape evolution in analogy with Brownian motion and perform random walks on five-dimensional fission potential-energy surfaces which were calculated previously and are the most comprehensive available. Test applications give good reproduction of highly variable experimental mass yields. This novel general approach requires only a single new global parameter, namely, the critical neck size at which the mass split is frozen in, and the results are remarkably insensitive to its specific value.

  16. Nuclear Data Library Effects on Fast to Thermal Flux Shapes Around PWR Control Rod Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, A.; Ferroukhi, H.; Zhu, T.; Pautz, A.

    2014-04-01

    The development of a high-fidelity computational scheme to estimate the accumulated fluence at the tips of PWR control rods (CR) has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Both the fluence from high-energy (E>1 MeV) neutrons as well as for the thermal range (E<0.625 eV) are required as these affect the CR integrity through stresses/strains induced by coupled clad embrittlement / absorber swelling phenomena. The concept of the PSI scheme under development is to provide from validated core analysis models, the volumetric neutron source to a full core MCNPX model that is then used to compute the neutron fluxes. A particular aspect that needs scrutiny is the ability of the MCNPX-based calculation methodology to accurately predict the flux shapes along the control rod surfaces, especially for fully withdrawn CRs. In that case, the tip is located a short distance above the core/reflector interface and since this situation corresponds to a large part of reactor operation, the accumulated fluence will highly depend on the achieved calculation accuracy and precision in this non-fueled zone. The objective of the work presented in this paper is to quantify the influence of nuclear data on the calculated fluxes at the CR tips by (1) conducting a systematic comparison of modern neutron cross-section libraries, including JENDL-4.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0, and (2) by quantifying the uncertainties in the neutron flux calculations with the help of available neutron cross-section variances/covariances data. For completeness, the magnitude of these nuclear data-based uncertainties is also assessed in relation to the influence from other typical sources of modeling uncertainties/biases.

  17. N6-isopentenyladenosine improves nuclear shape in fibroblasts from humans with progeroid syndromes by inhibiting the farnesylation of prelamin A.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Maurizio; D'Alessandro, Alba; Paladino, Simona; Malfitano, Anna M; Notarnicola, Maria; Caruso, Maria G; Laezza, Chiara

    2013-12-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene that lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. The accumulation of progerin at the nuclear envelope causes mis-shapen nuclei and results in progeroid syndromes. Previous studies in cells from individuals with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome have shown that blocking of farnesylation of prelamin A ameliorates the nuclear shape abnormalities. Here we observed that an inhibitor of farnesyl diphosphate synthase, N6-isopentenyladenosine, impeded the farnesylation of prelamin A, causing a decrease in the frequency of nuclear shape abnormalities and redistribution of prelamin A away from the inner nuclear envelope. A combination of lovastatin and N6-isopentenyladenosine significantly improved nuclear shape in fibroblast cell lines from atypical progeria patients. These findings establish a paradigm for ameliorating the most obvious cellular pathology in lamin-related progeroid syndromes, and suggest a potential strategy for treating children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. PMID:24112551

  18. Pulse-shape discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils in a NaI(Tl) crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. S.; Adhikari, G.; Adhikari, P.; Choi, S.; Hahn, I. S.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, H. W.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Leonard, D. S.; Li, J.; Oh, S. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.; Park, K. S.; Shim, J. H.; So, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the response of a high light-output NaI(Tl) crystal to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from an Am-Be source and compare the results with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton-scattered 662 keV γ-rays from a 137Cs source. The measured pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) power of the NaI(Tl) crystal is found to be significantly improved because of the high light output of the NaI(Tl) detector. We quantify the PSD power with a quality factor and estimate the sensitivity to the interaction rate for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons, and the result is compared with the annual modulation amplitude observed by the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. The sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions based on 100 kg·year of data from NaI detectors is estimated with simulated experiments, using the standard halo model.

  19. Deficiencies in lamin B1 and lamin B2 cause neurodevelopmental defects and distinct nuclear shape abnormalities in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Coffinier, Catherine; Jung, Hea-Jin; Nobumori, Chika; Chang, Sandy; Tu, Yiping; Barnes, Richard H.; Yoshinaga, Yuko; de Jong, Pieter J.; Vergnes, Laurent; Reue, Karen; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal migration is essential for the development of the mammalian brain. Here, we document severe defects in neuronal migration and reduced numbers of neurons in lamin B1–deficient mice. Lamin B1 deficiency resulted in striking abnormalities in the nuclear shape of cortical neurons; many neurons contained a solitary nuclear bleb and exhibited an asymmetric distribution of lamin B2. In contrast, lamin B2 deficiency led to increased numbers of neurons with elongated nuclei. We used conditional alleles for Lmnb1 and Lmnb2 to create forebrain-specific knockout mice. The forebrain-specific Lmnb1- and Lmnb2-knockout models had a small forebrain with disorganized layering of neurons and nuclear shape abnormalities, similar to abnormalities identified in the conventional knockout mice. A more severe phenotype, complete atrophy of the cortex, was observed in forebrain-specific Lmnb1/Lmnb2 double-knockout mice. This study demonstrates that both lamin B1 and lamin B2 are essential for brain development, with lamin B1 being required for the integrity of the nuclear lamina, and lamin B2 being important for resistance to nuclear elongation in neurons. PMID:21976703

  20. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  1. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell-cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  2. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:26148352

  3. The Co-Existence Daisy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajna, Salah; Harel, Yael

    1992-01-01

    Activities that promote Arab-Jew coexistence at the English Department and Arab College at Beth Berl College are recounted. The authors' projects, each regarded as a petal in a "Coexistence Daisy," include those related to art encounters, interprofessional relationships, and inservice training. (LB)

  4. Phase coexistence far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of simple far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting phase separation leads to the conclusion that phase coexistence is not well defined in this context. This is because the properties of the coexisting nonequilibrium systems depend on how they are placed in contact, as verified in the driven lattice gas with attractive interactions, and in the two-temperature lattice gas, under (a) weak global exchange between uniform systems, and (b) phase-separated (nonuniform) systems. Thus, far from equilibrium, the notions of universality of phase coexistence (i.e., independence of how systems exchange particles and/or energy), and of phases with intrinsic properties (independent of their environment) are lost.

  5. Effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite nuclear matter in the Brueckner approach: Model {delta}-shaped NN interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Lombardo, U.; Saperstein, E.E.; Zverev, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of pairing in semi-infinite nuclear matter is considered in the Brueckner approach. Equations for effective pairing interaction in semi-infinite matter are derived for the case of the separable representation of realistic NN interaction. The propagator of two noninteracting particles in a semi-infinite potential well is calculated numerically. The equation for effective interaction is solved for a model 8-shaped NN interaction, which correctly reproduces NN scattering in the low-energy limit. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Nuclear shape transitions and some properties of aligned-particle configurations at high spin

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, T.L.; Chowdhury, P.; Emling, H.

    1982-01-01

    Two topics are addressed in this paper. First, we discuss the variation of shapes with spin and neutron number for nuclei in the N approx. = 88 transitional region. Second, we present comments on the feeding times of very high spin single-particle yrast states.

  7. Novel plant SUN–KASH bridges are involved in RanGAP anchoring and nuclear shape determination

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Graumann, Katja; Evans, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Inner nuclear membrane Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins interact with outer nuclear membrane (ONM) Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne homology (KASH) proteins, forming linkers of nucleoskeleton to cytoskeleton conserved from yeast to human and involved in positioning of nuclei and chromosomes. Defects in SUN–KASH bridges are linked to muscular dystrophy, progeria, and cancer. SUN proteins were recently identified in plants, but their ONM KASH partners are unknown. Arabidopsis WPP domain–interacting proteins (AtWIPs) are plant-specific ONM proteins that redundantly anchor Arabidopsis RanGTPase–activating protein 1 (AtRanGAP1) to the nuclear envelope (NE). In this paper, we report that AtWIPs are plant-specific KASH proteins interacting with Arabidopsis SUN proteins (AtSUNs). The interaction is required for both AtWIP1 and AtRanGAP1 NE localization. AtWIPs and AtSUNs are necessary for maintaining the elongated nuclear shape of Arabidopsis epidermal cells. Together, our data identify the first KASH members in the plant kingdom and provide a novel function of SUN–KASH complexes, suggesting that a functionally diverged SUN–KASH bridge is conserved beyond the opisthokonts. PMID:22270916

  8. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-23

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found. PMID:27558725

  9. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    PubMed

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues. PMID:23370891

  10. The role of lipid-activated nuclear receptors in shaping macrophage and dendritic cell function: From physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Mate; Czimmerer, Zsolt; Nagy, Laszlo

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors linking lipid signaling to the expression of the genome. There is increasing appreciation of the involvement of this receptor network in the metabolic programming of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), essential members of the innate immune system. In this review we focus on the role of retinoid X receptor, retinoic acid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor γ, liver X receptor, and vitamin D receptor in shaping the immune and metabolic functions of macrophages and DCs. We also provide an overview of the contribution of macrophage- and DC-expressed nuclear receptors to various immunopathologic conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, asthma, and some others. We suggest that systematic analyses of the roles of these receptors and their activating lipid ligands in immunopathologies combined with complementary and focused translational and clinical research will be crucial for the development of new therapies using the many molecules available to target nuclear receptors. PMID:23905916

  11. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  12. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  13. Coexistence of Phases in a Protein Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Liwo, Adam; Niemi, Antti J.; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    A heterodimer consisting of two or more different kinds of proteins can display an enormous number of distinct molecular architectures. The conformational entropy is an essential ingredient in the Helmholtz free energy and, consequently, these heterodimers can have a very complex phase structure. Here, it is proposed that there is a state of proteins, in which the different components of a heterodimer exist in different phases. For this purpose, the structures in the protein data bank (PDB) have been analyzed, with radius of gyration as the order parameter. Two major classes of heterodimers with their protein components coexisting in different phases have been identified. An example is the PDB structure 3DXC. This is a transcriptionally active dimer. One of the components is an isoform of the intra-cellular domain of the Alzheimer-disease related amyloid precursor protein (AICD), and the other is a nuclear multidomain adaptor protein in the Fe65 family. It is concluded from the radius of gyration that neither of the two components in this dimer is in its own collapsed phase, corresponding to a biologically active protein. The UNRES energy function has been utilized to confirm that, if the two components are separated from each other, each of them collapses. The results presented in this work show that heterodimers whose protein components coexist in different phases, can have intriguing physical properties with potentially important biological consequences. PMID:22830730

  14. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  15. Evolution of ground state nuclear shapes in tungsten nuclei in terms of interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, A. M.; El-Shal, A. O.; Taha, M. M.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten nuclei 180-190W are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model using an intrinsic coherent state formalism. The Hamiltonian operator contains only multipole operators of the subalgebra associated with the dynamical symmetries SU(3) and O(6). The study includes the behavior of potential energy surfaces (BES's) and critical points in the space of the model parameters to declare the geometric character of the tungsten isotopic chain. Some selected energy levels and reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) for each nucleus are calculated to adjust the model parameters by using a computer code PH INT and simulated computer fitting programme to fit the experimental data with the IBM calculation by minimizing the root mean square deviations. The 180-190W isotopes lies in shape transition SU(3)-O(6) region of the IBM such that the lighter isotopes comes very clare to the SU(3) limit, while the behavior ones tend to be near the γ-unstable O(6) limit.

  16. Probing nuclear shapes close to the fission limit with the giant dipole resonance in {sup 216}Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Brekiesz, M.; Krolas, W.; Meczynski, W.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Million, B.; Bracco, A.; Camera, F.; Benzoni, G.; Leoni, S.; Wieland, O.; Brambilla, S.; Herskind, B.; Kicinska-Habior, M.; Dubray, N.; Dudek, J.; Schunck, N.

    2004-12-01

    The gamma-ray decay of the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the compound nucleus {sup 216}Rn formed with the reaction {sup 18}O+{sup 198}Pt at the bombarding energy of 96 MeV was investigated. High-energy gamma-ray spectra in coincidence with both prompt and delayed low-energy transitions were measured. The obtained GDR width at the average temperature {approx_equal}1 MeV was found to be larger than that at T=0 MeV and to be approximately constant as a function of spin. The measured width value of 7 MeV is found to be consistent with the predictions based on calculations of the nuclear shape distribution using the newest approach for the treatment of the fission barrier within the liquid drop model. The present study is the first investigation of the giant dipole resonance width from the fusion-evaporation decay channel in this nuclear mass range.

  17. Competition, Competitive Repulsion, and Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    This manuscript is concerned with concepts rather than abstruse details or mathematics. Discussed are: competition; extended competition, proposed for competition in the strict sense, extended and modified by all related interactions including predation, parasitism, disease, and even cooperation, all of which can be “weapons of competition”; competitive repulsion, proposed for the sum of forces that determine spacings, including ecologic spacings, of individuals and populations; Darwin (biotic) equilibriums; competitive extinction, Gause's principle, limited and limiting resources, and single-resource competition; de facto coexistence of competing species, exemplified by green plants competing for sunlight; niche competition; the two concepts of competitive exclusion; devision of resources and of their utilizers; cause and effect in real situations; and niches, niche overlap, and coexistence. Stressed is the complexity of the real world, and the confusion that can and does arise from modeling it too simply. PMID:4508308

  18. Algebraic benchmark for prolate-oblate coexistence in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviatan, A.; Shapira, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a symmetry-based approach for prolate-oblate and spherical-prolate-oblate shape coexistence, in the framework of the interacting boson model of nuclei. The proposed Hamiltonian conserves the SU(3) and SU (3 ) ¯ symmetry for the prolate and oblate ground bands and the U(5) symmetry for selected spherical states. Analytic expressions for quadrupole moments and E 2 rates involving these states are derived and isomeric states are identified by means of selection rules.

  19. Concealed configuration mixing and shape coexistence in the platinum nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Hellemans, V.; Heyde, K.

    2012-10-20

    The role of configuration mixing in the Pt region is investigated. The nature of the ground state changes smoothly, being spherical around mass A{approx} 174 and A{approx} 192 and deformed around the mid-shell N= 104 region. Interacting Boson Model with configuration mixing calculations are presented for deformations and isotope shifts. The assumption of the existence of two configurations with very different deformation provides a simple framework to explain the observed isotope shifts systematics.

  20. Probe of Triple Shape Coexistence In Neutron Deficient Polonium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, D. R.; Page, R. D.; Darby, I. G.; Andreyev, A. N.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Kettunen, H.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Uusitalo, J.; Sandzelius, M.

    2006-04-26

    {gamma}-ray transitions in the neutron deficient 190,197Po nuclei have been identified. The yrast band of 190Po has been extended up to a spin and parity of 14+ and is found to display similar systematic behaviour to isotones 186Hg and 188Pb above the 4+ level, thus confirming its prolate nature. In 197Po the band built upon the 13/2+ isomer has been extended up to a spin and parity of 33/2+, while the non-yrast side-band has been observed for the first time. The behaviour of 197Po is found to be similar to that of the nearby even-mass isotopes, which is consistent with the model in which the i13/2 neutron is weakly coupled to the states in the even-even core.

  1. Intraspecific density dependence and a guild of consumers coexisting on one resource.

    PubMed

    McPeek, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    The importance of negative intraspecific density dependence to promoting species coexistence in a community is well accepted. However, such mechanisms are typically omitted from more explicit models of community dynamics. Here I analyze a variation of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur consumer-resource model that includes negative intraspecific density dependence for consumers to explore its effect on the coexistence of multiple consumers feeding on a single resource. This analysis demonstrates that a guild of multiple consumers can easily coexist on a single resource if each limits its own abundance to some degree, and stronger intraspecific density dependence permits a wider variety of consumers to coexist. The mechanism permitting multiple consumers to coexist works in a fashion similar to apparent competition or to each consumer having its own specialized predator. These results argue for a more explicit emphasis on how negative intraspecific density dependence is generated and how these mechanisms combine with species interactions to shape overall community structure. PMID:23431602

  2. Effects of heat input on the microstructure and toughness of the 8 MnMoNi 5 5 shape-welded nuclear steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Million, Karl; Datta, Ratan; Zimmermann, Horst

    2005-04-01

    A weld metal well proven in the German nuclear industry served as the basis for the certification of a shape-welded steel to be used as base material for manufacture of nuclear primary components. The outstanding properties of this steel are attributed to the extremely fine-grained and stable primary microstructure. Subsequent reheating cycles caused by neighbouring weld beads do neither lead to coarsened brittle structures in the heat-affected zone nor to increase in hardness and decrease in toughness, as is the case with wrought steel materials. One of the largest new reactor vessel design amongst today's advanced reactor projects is considered to be particularly suitable for the use of shape-welded parts in place of forgings. In addition the need for design and development of new shape-welded steel grades for other new generation reactor projects is emphasized, in which the experience gained with this research could make a contribution.

  3. Plant nuclear shape is independently determined by the SUN-WIP-WIT2-myosin XI-i complex and CRWN1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao; Groves, Norman Reid; Meier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei undergo dynamic shape changes during plant development, but the mechanism is unclear. In Arabidopsis, Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, WPP domain-interacting proteins (WIPs), WPP domain-interacting tail-anchored proteins (WITs), myosin XI-i, and CROWDED NUCLEI 1 (CRWN1) have been shown to be essential for nuclear elongation in various epidermal cell types. It has been proposed that WITs serve as adaptors linking myosin XI-i to the SUN-WIP complex at the nuclear envelope (NE). Recently, an interaction between Arabidopsis SUN1 and SUN2 proteins and CRWN1, a plant analog of lamins, has been reported. Therefore, the CRWN1-SUN-WIP-WIT-myosin XI-i interaction may form a linker of the nucleoskeleton to the cytoskeleton complex. In this study, we investigate this proposed mechanism in detail for nuclei of Arabidopsis root hairs and trichomes. We show that WIT2, but not WIT1, plays an essential role in nuclear shape determination by recruiting myosin XI-i to the SUN-WIP NE bridges. Compared with SUN2, SUN1 plays a predominant role in nuclear shape. The NE localization of SUN1, SUN2, WIP1, and a truncated WIT2 does not depend on CRWN1. While crwn1 mutant nuclei are smooth, the nuclei of sun or wit mutants are invaginated, similar to the reported myosin XI-i mutant phenotype. Together, this indicates that the roles of the respective WIT and SUN paralogs have diverged in trichomes and root hairs, and that the SUN-WIP-WIT2-myosin XI-i complex and CRWN1 independently determine elongated nuclear shape. This supports a model of nuclei being shaped both by cytoplasmic forces transferred to the NE and by nucleoplasmic filaments formed under the NE. PMID:25759303

  4. Species coexistence: macroevolutionary relationships and the contingency of historical interactions.

    PubMed

    Germain, Rachel M; Weir, Jason T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-30

    Evolutionary biologists since Darwin have hypothesized that closely related species compete more intensely and are therefore less likely to coexist. However, recent theory posits that species diverge in two ways: either through the evolution of 'stabilizing differences' that promote coexistence by causing individuals to compete more strongly with conspecifics than individuals of other species, or through the evolution of 'fitness differences' that cause species to differ in competitive ability and lead to exclusion of the weaker competitor. We tested macroevolutionary patterns of divergence by competing pairs of annual plant species that differ in their phylogenetic relationships, and in whether they have historically occurred in the same region or different regions (sympatric versus allopatric occurrence). For sympatrically occurring species pairs, stabilizing differences rapidly increased with phylogenetic distance. However, fitness differences also increased with phylogenetic distance, resulting in coexistence outcomes that were unpredictable based on phylogenetic relationships. For allopatric species, stabilizing differences showed no trend with phylogenetic distance, whereas fitness differences increased, causing coexistence to become less likely among distant relatives. Our results illustrate the role of species' historical interactions in shaping how phylogenetic relationships structure competitive dynamics, and offer an explanation for the evolution of invasion potential of non-native species. PMID:27009226

  5. Interference competition and species coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2002-01-01

    Interference competition is ubiquitous in nature. Yet its effects on resource exploitation remain largely unexplored for species that compete for dynamic resources. Here, I present a model of exploitative and interference competition with explicit resource dynamics. The model incorporates both biotic and abiotic resources. It considers interference competition both in the classical sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, and interference on, the other species) and in the broad sense (i.e. each species suffers a net reduction in per capita growth rate via interference from, but can experience an increase in growth rate via interference on, the other species). Coexistence cannot occur under classical interference competition even when the species inferior at resource exploitation is superior at interference. Such a trade-off can, however, change the mechanism of competitive exclusion from dominance by the superior resource exploiter to a priority effect. Now the inferior resource exploiter can exclude the superior resource exploiter provided it has a higher initial abundance. By contrast, when interference is beneficial to the interacting species, coexistence is possible via a trade-off between exploitation and interference. These results hold regardless of whether the resource is biotic or abiotic, indicating that the outcome of exploitative and interference competition does not depend on the exact nature of resource dynamics. The model makes two key predictions. First, species that engage in costly interference mechanisms (e.g. territoriality, overgrowth or undercutting, allelopathy and other forms of chemical competition) should not be able to coexist unless they also engage in beneficial interference mechanisms (e.g. predation or parasitism). Second, exotic invasive species that displace native biota should be superior resource exploiters that have strong interference effects on native species with little

  6. Coexistence: Exploration and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, P.S.; Winston, J.G.; Watt, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in our industry today is successfully meeting two needs of the planet that often appear to be conflicting: Meeting the economic needs of the people through sustainable development of natural resources while preserving the integrity and diversity of our environment. Nowhere is this more critical than in the world`s wetlands and rain forests. This presentation demonstrates the principles and practices that have fostered coexistence of environmental protection and sustainable development projects in wetlands and tropical forests in the Americas. Excerpts from two projects are shown. one in a national wildlife refuge in Louisiana, and one in the rain forests of Bolivia.

  7. Learning to coexist with wildfire.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Max A; Batllori, Enric; Bradstock, Ross A; Gill, A Malcolm; Handmer, John; Hessburg, Paul F; Leonard, Justin; McCaffrey, Sarah; Odion, Dennis C; Schoennagel, Tania; Syphard, Alexandra D

    2014-11-01

    The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions - the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services - necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for managing ecosystems and mitigating risks to human communities provide some hope, although greater recognition of their inherent variation and links is crucial. Without a more integrated framework, fire will never operate as a natural ecosystem process, and the impact on society will continue to grow. A more coordinated approach to risk management and land-use planning in these coupled systems is needed. PMID:25373675

  8. Interplay of order and chaos across a first-order quantum shape-phase transition in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leviatan, A.; Macek, M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the nature of the dynamics in a first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and prolate-deformed nuclear shapes. Classical and quantum analyses reveal a change in the system from a chaotic Henon-Heiles behavior on the spherical side into a pronounced regular dynamics on the deformed side. Both order and chaos persist in the coexistence region and their interplay reflects the Landau potential landscape and the impact of collective rotations.

  9. Coexisting Cyclic Parthenogens Comprise a Holocene Species Flock in Eubosmina

    PubMed Central

    Faustová, Markéta; Sacherová, Veronika; Sheets, H. David; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Taylor, Derek J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mixed breeding systems with extended clonal phases and weak sexual recruitment are widespread in nature but often thought to impede the formation of discrete evolutionary clusters. Thus, cyclic parthenogens, such as cladocerans and rotifers, could be predisposed to “species problems” and a lack of discrete species. However, species flocks have been proposed for one cladoceran group, Eubosmina, where putative species are sympatric, and there is a detailed paleolimnological record indicating a Holocene age. These factors make the Eubosmina system suitable for testing the hypotheses that extended clonal phases and weak sexual recruitment inhibit speciation. Although common garden experiments have revealed a genetic component to the morphotypic variation, the evolutionary significance of the morphotypes remains controversial. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we tested the hypothesis of a single polymorphic species (i.e., mixing occurs but selection maintains genes for morphology) in four northern European lakes where the morphotypes coexist. Our evidence is based on nuclear DNA sequence, mitochondrial DNA sequence, and morphometric analysis of coexisting morphotypes. We found significant genetic differentiation, genealogical exclusivity, and morphometric differentiation for coexisting morphotypes. Conclusions We conclude that the studied morphotypes represent a group of young species undergoing speciation with apparent reproductive barriers despite coexistence in the freshwater pelagic zone. PMID:20661283

  10. Competitive coexistence in antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Arnaout, R A; Nowak, M A

    2000-06-01

    Adaptive immunity to viruses in vertebrates is mediated by two distinct but complementary branches of the immune system: the cellular response, which eliminates infected cells, and the humoral response, which eliminates infectious virus. This leads to an interesting contest, since the two responses compete, albeit indirectly, for proliferative stimuli. How can a host mount a coordinated antiviral campaign? Here we show that competition may lead to a state of "competitive coexistence" in which, counterintuitively, each branch complements the other, with clinical benefit to the host. The principle is similar to free-market economics, in which firms compete, but the consumer benefits. Experimental evidence suggests this is a useful paradigm in antiviral immunity. PMID:10816366

  11. Extremes of nuclear structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    With the advent of medium and large gamma detector arrays, it is now possible to look at nuclear structure at high rotational forces. The role of pairing correlations and their eventual breakdown, along with the shell effects have showed us the interesting physics for nuclei at high spins - superdeformation, shape co-existence, yrast traps, alignments and their dramatic effects on nuclear structure and so on. Nuclear structure studies have recently become even more exciting, due to efforts and possibilities to reach nuclei far off from the stability valley. Coupling of gamma ray arrays with 'filters', like neutron wall, charged particle detector array, gamma ray total energy and multiplicity castles, conversion electron spectrometers etc gives a great handle to study nuclei produced online with 'low' cross-sections. Recently we studied, nuclei in mass region 80 using an array of 8 germanium detectors in conjunction with the recoil mass analyser, HIRA at the Nuclear Science Centre and, most unexpectedly came across the phenomenon of identical bands, with two quasi-particle difference. The discovery of magnetic rotation is another highlight. Our study of light In nucleus, 107In brought us face to face with the 'dipole' bands. I plan to discuss some of these aspects. There is also an immensely important development - that of the 'radioactive ion beams'. The availability of RIB, will probably very dramatically influence our 'conventional' concept of nuclear structure. The exotic shapes of these exotic nuclei and some of their expected properties will also be touched upon.

  12. Spatial Complementarity and the Coexistence of Species

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez, Jorge; Garrahan, Juan P.; Eichhorn, Markus P.

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of apparently similar species remains an enduring paradox in ecology. Spatial structure has been predicted to enable coexistence even when population-level models predict competitive exclusion if it causes each species to limit its own population more than that of its competitor. Nevertheless, existing hypotheses conflict with regard to whether clustering favours or precludes coexistence. The spatial segregation hypothesis predicts that in clustered populations the frequency of intra-specific interactions will be increased, causing each species to be self-limiting. Alternatively, individuals of the same species might compete over greater distances, known as heteromyopia, breaking down clusters and opening space for a second species to invade. In this study we create an individual-based model in homogeneous two-dimensional space for two putative sessile species differing only in their demographic rates and the range and strength of their competitive interactions. We fully characterise the parameter space within which coexistence occurs beyond population-level predictions, thereby revealing a region of coexistence generated by a previously-unrecognised process which we term the triadic mechanism. Here coexistence occurs due to the ability of a second generation of offspring of the rarer species to escape competition from their ancestors. We diagnose the conditions under which each of three spatial coexistence mechanisms operates and their characteristic spatial signatures. Deriving insights from a novel metric — ecological pressure — we demonstrate that coexistence is not solely determined by features of the numerically-dominant species. This results in a common framework for predicting, given any pair of species and knowledge of the relevant parameters, whether they will coexist, the mechanism by which they will do so, and the resultant spatial pattern of the community. Spatial coexistence arises from complementary combinations of traits in each

  13. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23690639

  14. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point. PMID:17902990

  15. Competitive coexistence in stoichiometric chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bo; Loladze, Irakli

    2007-09-01

    Classical predator-prey models, such as Lotka-Volterra, track the abundance of prey, but ignore its quality. Yet, in the past decade, some new and occasionally counterintuitive effects of prey quality on food web dynamics emerged from both experiments and mathematical modeling. The underpinning of this work is the theory of ecological stoichiometry that is centered on the fact that each organism is a mixture of multiple chemical elements such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P). The ratios of these elements can vary within and among species, providing simple ways to represent prey quality as its C:N or C:P ratios. When these ratios modeled to vary, as they frequently do in nature, seemingly paradoxical results can arise such as the extinction of a predator that has an abundant and accessible prey. Here, for the first time, we show analytically that the reduction in prey quality can give rise to chaotic oscillations. In particular, when competing predators differ in their sensitivity to prey quality then all species can coexist via chaotic fluctuations. The chaos generating mechanism is based on the existence of a junction-fold point on the nullcline surfaces of the species. Conditions on parameters are found for such a point, and the singular perturbation method and the kneading sequence analysis are used to demonstrate the existence of a period-doubling cascade to chaos as a result of the point.

  16. Membrane Elasticity in Giant Vesicles with Fluid Phase Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, T.; Das, S.; Webb, W. W.; Jenkins, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Biological membranes are known to contain compositional heterogeneities, often termed rafts, with distinguishable composition and function, and these heterogeneities participate in vigorous transport processes. Membrane lipid phase coexistence is expected to modulate these processes through the differing mechanical properties of the bulk domains and line tension at phase boundaries. In this contribution, we compare the predictions from a shape theory derived for vesicles with fluid phase coexistence to the geometry of giant unilamellar vesicles with coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. We find a bending modulus for the Lo phase higher than that of the Ld phase and a saddle-splay (Gauss) modulus difference with the Gauss modulus of the Lo phase being more negative than the Ld phase. The Gauss modulus critically influences membrane processes that change topology, such as vesicle fission or fusion, and could therefore be of significant biological relevance in heterogeneous membranes. Our observations of experimental vesicle geometries being modulated by Gaussian curvature moduli differences confirm the prediction by the theory of Juelicher and Lipowsky. PMID:15894634

  17. Extinction of quasiparticle interference in underdoped cuprates with coexisting order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Brian M.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements [Y. Kohsaka , Nature (London) 454, 1072 (2008)] have shown that dispersing quasiparticle interference (QPI) peaks in Fourier-transformed conductance maps disappear as the bias voltage exceeds a certain threshold corresponding to the coincidence of the contour of constant quasiparticle energy with the period-doubled (e.g., antiferromagnetic) zone boundary. Here we show that this may be caused by coexisting order present in the d -wave superconducting phase. We show explicitly how QPI peaks are extinguished in the situation with coexisting long-range spin-density wave order and discuss the connection with the more realistic case where short-range order is created by quenched disorder. Since it is the localized QPI peaks rather than the underlying antinodal states themselves which are destroyed at a critical bias, our proposal resolves a conflict between STS and photoemission spectroscopy regarding the nature of these states. We also study the momentum-summed density of states in the coexisting phase and show how the competing order produces a kink inside the “V”-shaped d -wave superconducting gap in agreement with recent STS measurements [J. W. Alldredge , Nat. Phys. 4, 319 (2008)].

  18. Coexistence in dipolar fluids in a field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark J.; Grest, Gary S.

    1994-06-01

    We examine two phase coexistence for soft sphere dipolar fluids in an applied field, H. Besides being a fundamental test system for theory, dipolar fluids are used as models for ferrofluids. Gibbs ensemble simulations were performed to determine the coexistence curve and an estimate of the critical temperature, Tc, and density, ρc, as a function of applied magnetic field. In zero field we show that coexistence most likely does not occur and if it does can only do so in a narrow range of densities much lower than predicted theoretically. We discuss the structure of soft sphere dipolar systems, which turns out to be much more complex than previously thought.

  19. Nuclear Aerosols: Direct Simulation and Elucidation of the Role of Multiple Components, Radioactivity, Charge, Shape and Spatial Inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarshan K. Loyalka

    2008-10-12

    Nuclear aerosols can originate from severe core damae in light water reactors, core disruptive accidents in fast reactors, nuclear accidents during nuclear material transport, at waste disposal sites, or explosions. These aerosols evolve under natural transport processes as well as under the influence of engineered safety features. Such aerosols can be hazardous for the equipment inside the reactor, and when leaked into the environment, pose potential risks to the public. Hence, the origin, movement and distribution of these aerosols need to be studied and controlled.

  20. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. PMID:26083451

  1. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C., Jr.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  2. Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Pigot, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other’s closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity–richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity. PMID:26974194

  3. Modification of nuclear mass formula by considering isospin effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ning; Liu Min; Wu Xizhen

    2010-04-15

    We propose a semiempirical nuclear mass formula based on the macroscopic-microscopic method in which the isospin and mass dependence of model parameters are investigated with the Skyrme energy density functional. The number of model parameters is considerably reduced compared with the finite range droplet model. The rms deviation with respect to 2149 measured nuclear masses is reduced by 21%, falling to 0.516 MeV. The new magic number N=16 in light neutron-rich nuclei and the shape coexistence phenomena for some nuclei have been examined with the model. The shell corrections of superheavy nuclei are also predicted.

  4. Physical layer simulation study for the coexistence of WLAN standards

    SciTech Connect

    Howlader, M. K.; Keiger, C.; Ewing, P. D.; Govan, T. V.

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the performance of wireless local area network (WLAN) devices in the presence of interference from other wireless devices. To understand the coexistence of these wireless protocols, simplified physical-layer-system models were developed for the Bluetooth, Wireless Fidelity (WiFi), and Zigbee devices, all of which operate within the 2.4-GHz frequency band. The performances of these protocols were evaluated using Monte-Carlo simulations under various interference and channel conditions. The channel models considered were basic additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN), Rayleigh fading, and site-specific fading. The study also incorporated the basic modulation schemes, multiple access techniques, and channel allocations of the three protocols. This research is helping the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) understand the coexistence issues associated with deploying wireless devices and could prove useful in the development of a technical basis for guidance to address safety-related issues with the implementation of wireless systems in nuclear facilities. (authors)

  5. Can pollination niches facilitate plant coexistence?

    PubMed

    Pauw, Anton

    2013-01-01

    The question of why there are so many plant species needs two kinds of answer: an explanation for the origin of plant species, and an explanation for how they can coexist. Pollinators are often implicated in the origin of plant species because adaptation to different modes of pollination can drive divergence in floral traits and bring about reproductive isolation. However, very few studies have attempted to answer the next question: 'Can plant species that differ only in their mode of pollination coexist?' Fragmentary evidence supports the idea that intraspecific competition for pollination resources can limit population growth rate, thus allowing the coexistence of species that use different pollinators, or the same pollinators at different times. PMID:22951227

  6. Solvable model for template coexistence in protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanari, J. F.; Serva, M.

    2013-02-01

    Compartmentalization of self-replicating molecules (templates) in protocells is a necessary step towards the evolution of modern cells. However, coexistence between distinct template types inside a protocell can be achieved only if there is a selective pressure favoring protocells with a mixed template composition. Here we study analytically a group selection model for the coexistence between two template types using the diffusion approximation of population genetics. The model combines competition at the template and protocell levels as well as genetic drift inside protocells. At the steady state, we find a continuous phase transition separating the coexistence and segregation regimes, with the order parameter vanishing linearly with the distance to the critical point. In addition, we derive explicit analytical expressions for the critical steady-state probability density of protocell compositions.

  7. How variation between individuals affects species coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-08-01

    Although the effects of variation between individuals within species are traditionally ignored in studies of species coexistence, the magnitude of intraspecific variation in nature is forcing ecologists to reconsider. Compelling intuitive arguments suggest that individual variation may provide a previously unrecognised route to diversity maintenance by blurring species-level competitive differences or substituting for species-level niche differences. These arguments, which are motivating a large body of empirical work, have rarely been evaluated with quantitative theory. Here we incorporate intraspecific variation into a common model of competition and identify three pathways by which this variation affects coexistence: (1) changes in competitive dynamics because of nonlinear averaging, (2) changes in species' mean interaction strengths because of variation in underlying traits (also via nonlinear averaging) and (3) effects on stochastic demography. As a consequence of the first two mechanisms, we find that intraspecific variation in competitive ability increases the dominance of superior competitors, and intraspecific niche variation reduces species-level niche differentiation, both of which make coexistence more difficult. In addition, individual variation can exacerbate the effects of demographic stochasticity, and this further destabilises coexistence. Our work provides a theoretical foundation for emerging empirical interests in the effects of intraspecific variation on species diversity. PMID:27250037

  8. Trait-based tests of coexistence mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; Fajardo, Alex; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Kraft, Nathan J B

    2013-10-01

    Recent functional trait studies have shown that trait differences may favour certain species (environmental filtering) while simultaneously preventing competitive exclusion (niche partitioning). However, phenomenological trait-dispersion analyses do not identify the mechanisms that generate niche partitioning, preventing trait-based prediction of future changes in biodiversity. We argue that such predictions require linking functional traits with recognised coexistence mechanisms involving spatial or temporal environmental heterogeneity, resource partitioning and natural enemies. We first demonstrate the limitations of phenomenological approaches using simulations, and then (1) propose trait-based tests of coexistence, (2) generate hypotheses about which plant functional traits are likely to interact with particular mechanisms and (3) review the literature for evidence for these hypotheses. Theory and data suggest that all four classes of coexistence mechanisms could act on functional trait variation, but some mechanisms will be stronger and more widespread than others. The highest priority for future research is studies of interactions between environmental heterogeneity and trait variation that measure environmental variables at within-community scales and quantify species' responses to the environment in the absence of competition. Evidence that similar trait-based coexistence mechanisms operate in many ecosystems would simplify biodiversity forecasting and represent a rare victory for generality over contingency in community ecology. PMID:23910482

  9. Environmental variation, stochastic extinction, and competitive coexistence.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; Drake, John M

    2008-11-01

    Understanding how environmental fluctuations affect population persistence is essential for predicting the ecological impacts of expected future increases in climate variability. However, two bodies of theory make opposite predictions about the effect of environmental variation on persistence. Single-species theory, common in conservation biology and population viability analyses, suggests that environmental variation increases the risk of stochastic extinction. By contrast, coexistence theory has shown that environmental variation can buffer inferior competitors against competitive exclusion through a storage effect. We reconcile these two perspectives by showing that in the presence of demographic stochasticity, environmental variation can increase the chance of extinction while simultaneously stabilizing coexistence. Our stochastic simulations of a two-species storage effect model reveal a unimodal relationship between environmental variation and coexistence time, implying maximum coexistence at intermediate levels of environmental variation. The unimodal pattern reflects the fact that the stabilizing influence of the storage effect accumulates rapidly at low levels of environmental variation, whereas the risk of extinction due to the combined effects of environmental variation and demographic stochasticity increases most rapidly at higher levels of variation. Future increases in environmental variation could either increase or decrease an inferior competitor's expected persistence time, depending on the distance between the present level of environmental variation and the optimal level anticipated by this theory. PMID:18817458

  10. Homogeneous coexistence and phase segregation in 1111 iron-based pnictides studied via NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoki; Kamihara, Yoichi; Matsuishi, Satoru; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-06-01

    We performed 75As and 51Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on LaFeAsO1- x F x (La1111), a prototype of iron-based superconductors, and on Ca(Fe1- x Co x )AsF (Ca1111), which has a small overlap between the antiferromagnetic (AF) and superconducting (SC) domes in the electronic phase diagram. We found in the Ca1111 series that AF and SC states coexist homogeneously in the overlapped region, while in the La1111 series, we found that paramagnetic (PM) and SC domains coexist around the AF-SC phase boundary. The coexistence of these domains indicates that the AF and SC domes segregate from each other in the electronic phase diagram.

  11. In vitro developmental competence of pig nuclear transferred embryos: effects of GFP transfection, refrigeration, cell cycle synchronization and shapes of donor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hai; Pan, Deng-Ke; Sun, Xiu-Zhu; Sun, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tian, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan; Dai, Yun-Ping; Li, Ning

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing pig transgenic blastocysts expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to examine the effects of shape and preparation methods of donor cells on in vitro developmental ability of pig nuclear transferred embryos (NTEs). In experiment 1, the effect of GFP transfection on development of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage and blastocyst rates showed no significant difference between NTEs derived from transfected and non-transfected donors. In experiment 2, the effect of different nuclear donor preparation methods on in vitro development of NTEs was examined. The cleavage rate showed no statistically significant differences among three preparation methods. The blastocyst rates of donor cells treated once at -4 degrees C and those of freshly digested cells were similar to each other (26.3% vs 17.9%). The lowest blastocyst rates (5.88%) were observed when cells cryopreserved at -196 degrees C were used as donors. In experiment 3, the effect of different cell cycle synchronization methods on the in vitro development potential of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage rate of NTEs derived from cycling cells was much better than that of NTEs derived from serum-starved cells (64.4% vs 50.5%, p < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the the blastocyst rates of the two groups. In experiment 4, the effect of different shapes of cultured fibroblast cells on the in vitro development of pig NTEs was examined. The fusion rate for couplets derived from rough cells was poorer than that observed in couplets derived from round smooth cells (47.8% vs 76.8%, p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences observed in the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate. In conclusion, the present study indicated that (i) refrigerated pig GFP-transfected cells could be used as donors in nuclear transfer and these NTEs could be effectively developed to blastocyst stage; (ii) serum starvation

  12. Quantitative analysis of nuclear shape in oral squamous cell carcinoma is useful for predicting the chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Maki; Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    The number of people afflicted with oral carcinoma in Japan has increased in recent years. Although preoperative neoadjuvant therapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil are performed, chemotherapeutic response varies widely among the patients. With the aim of establishing novel indices to predict the therapeutic response to chemotherapy, we investigated the relationship between morphological features of pre-treatment oral carcinoma nuclei and the chemotherapeutic response using quantifying morphology of cell nuclei in pathological specimen images. We measured 4 morphological features of the nucleus of oral squamous cell carcinoma cases classified by the response to chemotherapy: No Change (NC) group, Partial Response (PR) group and Complete Response (CR) group. Furthermore, we performed immunohistochemical staining for p53 and Ki67 and calculated their positive rates in cancer tissues. Compactness and symmetry of the nucleus were significantly higher and nuclear edge response was significantly lower in cancer cells with lower chemotherapeutic responses compared high chemotherapeutic responders. As for positive rates of p53 and Ki67, there were no significant differences between any of the response groups. Morphological features of cancer cell nuclei in pathological specimens are sensitive predictive factors for the chemotherapeutic response to oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26439725

  13. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone. PMID:27377355

  14. Alpha-particle and proton probes of nuclear shapes in the rare earth and mass 80 regions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A.; Griffin, H.C.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. To explore the possibility of a correlation between the proton emission barriers and nuclear deformation, we studied proton spectra from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S,2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction. The proton spectra were observed with the Dwarf-Ball 4{pi} CsI(Tl) array, in coincidence with 18 Compton suppressed Ge detectors operated in conjunction with the Spin Spectrometer, a 4{pi} NaI(Tl) array. We found significant changes and shifts in the proton energy spectra as we selected gating transitions from bands of different moments of inertia or transitions from states of different spin in the same band. Substantial differences were also seen as a function of the {gamma}-ray multiplicity. These results are discussed in terms of statistical model calculations incorporating deformation and structure effects of the emitting system. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Co-existence of agricultural production systems.

    PubMed

    Jank, Bernhard; Rath, Johannes; Gaugitsch, Helmut

    2006-05-01

    Strategies and best practices for the co-existence of GM and non-GM crops need to be developed and implemented with the participation of farmers and other stakeholders. According to the principle of 'subsidiarity', decisions should be made by the lowest authority possible. When applying this concept to the case of GM crops, the affected society should determine their use and management in a regional decision-making process. Public participation is better accomplished at a lower level, and democratic deficits in decision-making on GMOs are better resolved, enabling farmers to manage or avoid GM crops. Ultimately, voluntary GMO-free zones might be a tool for sustainable co-existence and GM-free production and GMO-free zones might create a specific image for marketing regional products and services, such as tourism. PMID:16545877

  16. Hospice-Where Peace and Turmoil Coexist.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that a hospice is much more than just a place providing supportive care for the terminally ill. This narrative describes Neha, a young mother who found her solace in the hospice and spent her last days there by choice. It reinforces the fact that the hospice is truly a philosophy of care where powerful and contrasting emotions do coexist. PMID:26862661

  17. How do telomeres and NHEJ coexist?

    PubMed Central

    Marcand, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The telomeres of eukaryotes are stable open double-strand ends that coexist with nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), the repair pathway that directly ligates DNA ends generated by double-strand breaks. Since a single end-joining event between 2 telomeres generates a circular chromosome or an unstable dicentric chromosome, NHEJ must be prevented from acting on telomeres. Multiple mechanisms mediated by telomere factors act in synergy to achieve this inhibition. PMID:27308342

  18. Species coexistence in a changing world

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C.; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change. PMID:26528323

  19. Species coexistence in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Fernando; Bastias, Cristina C; Godoy, Oscar; Granda, Elena; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of global change for the maintenance of species diversity will depend on the sum of each species responses to the environment and on the interactions among them. A wide ecological literature supports that these species-specific responses can arise from factors related to life strategies, evolutionary history and intraspecific variation, and also from environmental variation in space and time. In the light of recent advances from coexistence theory combined with mechanistic explanations of diversity maintenance, we discuss how global change drivers can influence species coexistence. We revise the importance of both competition and facilitation for understanding coexistence in different ecosystems, address the influence of phylogenetic relatedness, functional traits, phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variability, and discuss lessons learnt from invasion ecology. While most previous studies have focused their efforts on disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the biological diversity in species-rich ecosystems such as tropical forests, grasslands and coral reefs, we argue that much can be learnt from pauci-specific communities where functional variability within each species, together with demographic and stochastic processes becomes key to understand species interactions and eventually community responses to global change. PMID:26528323

  20. Tuberous sclerosis complex coexistent with hippocampal sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Min; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberous sclerosis and hippocampal sclerosis are both well-defined entities associated with medically intractable epilepsy. To our knowledge, there has been only one prior case of these two pathologies being co-existent. We report a 7-month-old boy who presented with intractable seizures at 2 months of age. MRI studies showed diffuse volume loss in the brain with bilateral, multiple cortical tubers and subcortical migration abnormalities. Subependymal nodules were noted without subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. Genetic testing revealed TSC2 and PRD gene deletions. Histopathology of the hippocampus showed CA1 sclerosis marked by loss of neurons in the CA1 region. Sections from the temporal, parietal and occipital lobes showed multiple cortical tubers characterized by cortical architectural disorganization, gliosis, calcifications and increased number of large balloon cells. Focal white matter balloon cells and spongiform changes were also present. The patient underwent resection of the right fronto-parietal lobe and a subsequent resection of the right temporal, parietal and occipital lobes. The patient is free of seizures on anti-epileptic medication 69 months after surgery. Although hippocampal sclerosis is well documented to be associated with coexistent focal cortical dysplasia, the specific co-existence of cortical tubers and hippocampal sclerosis appears to be rare. PMID:26498091

  1. Body Size Mediated Coexistence in Swans

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Ritchie, Mark E.; Powell, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in body sizes may create a trade-off between foraging efficiency (foraging gains/costs) and access to resources. Such a trade-off provides a potential mechanism for ecologically similar species to coexist on one resource. We explored this hypothesis for tundra (Cygnus columbianus) and trumpeter swans (Cygnus buccinator), a federally protected species, feeding solely on sago pondweed (Stuckenia pectinata) tubers during fall staging and wintering in northern Utah. Foraging efficiency was higher for tundra swans because this species experienced lower foraging and metabolic costs relative to foraging gains; however, trumpeter swans (a) had longer necks and therefore had access to exclusive resources buried deep in wetland sediments and (b) were more aggressive and could therefore displace tundra swans from lucrative foraging locations. We conclude that body size differentiation is an important feature of coexistence among ecologically similar species feeding on one resource. In situations where resources are limiting and competition for resources is strong, conservation managers will need to consider the trade-off between foraging efficiency and access to resources to ensure ecologically similar species can coexist on a shared resource. PMID:24672347

  2. Competitive coexistence of two Pneumocystis species.

    PubMed

    Icenhour, Crystal R; Arnold, Jonathan; Medvedovic, Mario; Cushion, Melanie T

    2006-05-01

    Pneumocystis are fungal pathogens of mammalian lungs that can cause lethal pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. In some mammals, coinfections of genetically distinct Pneumocystis populations have been identified, but the nature of their interaction and its significance are unknown. Two species that infect rats, Pneumocystis carinii and Pneumocystis wakefieldiae, were studied over a 6-year period, representing approximately 700 generations of Pneumocystis. Population densities of each species were analyzed within the framework of the Lotka-Volterra competition model, which revealed the two species were in competition and predicted competitive exclusion of one species. However, stable coexistence was observed in 460 replicate populations. Selected extrinsic factors that might mitigate the extinction were evaluated. Logistic-regression analyses showed that higher relative humidity and higher organism lung burdens were associated with infections comprised of P. carinii alone, while lower temperatures and an increased rat census were associated with the presence of P. wakefieldiae. PCR and immunofluorescent analysis of rat lung tissue showed that both species were present within the same alveoli, excluding habitat heterogeneity as a mechanism of coexistence. These data suggest that P. carinii and P. wakefieldiae were in competitive coexistence, which was influenced in part by extrinsic factors. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate interactions of pathogenic fungal species within a mammalian host using ecological models. PMID:15949973

  3. Revisiting the Two-Layer Hypothesis: Coexistence of Alternative Functional Rooting Strategies in Savannas

    PubMed Central

    Holdo, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    The two-layer hypothesis of tree-grass coexistence posits that trees and grasses differ in rooting depth, with grasses exploiting soil moisture in shallow layers while trees have exclusive access to deep water. The lack of clear differences in maximum rooting depth between these two functional groups, however, has caused this model to fall out of favor. The alternative model, the demographic bottleneck hypothesis, suggests that trees and grasses occupy overlapping rooting niches, and that stochastic events such as fires and droughts result in episodic tree mortality at various life stages, thus preventing trees from otherwise displacing grasses, at least in mesic savannas. Two potential problems with this view are: 1) we lack data on functional rooting profiles in trees and grasses, and these profiles are not necessarily reflected by differences in maximum or physical rooting depth, and 2) subtle, difficult-to-detect differences in rooting profiles between the two functional groups may be sufficient to result in coexistence in many situations. To tackle this question, I coupled a plant uptake model with a soil moisture dynamics model to explore the environmental conditions under which functional rooting profiles with equal rooting depth but different depth distributions (i.e., shapes) can coexist when competing for water. I show that, as long as rainfall inputs are stochastic, coexistence based on rooting differences is viable under a wide range of conditions, even when these differences are subtle. The results also indicate that coexistence mechanisms based on rooting niche differentiation are more viable under some climatic and edaphic conditions than others. This suggests that the two-layer model is both viable and stochastic in nature, and that a full understanding of tree-grass coexistence and dynamics may require incorporating fine-scale rooting differences between these functional groups and realistic stochastic climate drivers into future models. PMID

  4. Cloning and Functional Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 in Nuclear Shaping during Spermatogenesis of the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiang-Li; Kang, Xian-Jiang; Guo, Ming-Shen; Mu, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    During spermatogenesis in most animals, the basic proteins associated with DNA are continuously changing and somatic-typed histones are partly replaced by sperm-specific histones, which are then successively replaced by transition proteins and protamines. With the replacement of sperm nuclear basic proteins, nuclei progressively undergo chromatin condensation. The Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) is also known as the hairy crab or river crab (phylum Arthropoda, subphylum Crustacea, order Decapoda, and family Grapsidae). The spermatozoa of this species are aflagellate, and each has a spherical acrosome surrounded by a cup-shaped nucleus, peculiar to brachyurans. An interesting characteristic of the E. sinensis sperm nucleus is its lack of electron-dense chromatin. However, its formation is not clear. In this study, sequences encoding histones H3 and H4 were cloned by polymerase chain reaction amplification. Western blotting indicated that H3 and H4 existed in the sperm nuclei. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry demonstrated that histones H3 and H4 were both present in the nuclei of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, spermatids and mature spermatozoa. The nuclear labeling density of histone H4 decreased in sperm nuclei, while histone H3 labeling was not changed significantly. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that the mRNA expression levels of histones H3 and H4 were higher at mitotic and meiotic stages than in later spermiogenesis. Our study demonstrates that the mature sperm nuclei of E. sinensis contain histones H3 and H4. This is the first report that the mature sperm nucleus of E. sinensis contains histones H3 and H4. This finding extends the study of sperm histones of E. sinensis and provides some basic data for exploring how decapod crustaceans form uncondensed sperm chromatin. PMID:25993499

  5. Unusual coexistence of extramedullary plasmacytoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma in nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Du, Ri-Chang; Li, Hai-Nan; Huang, Wei; Tian, Xiao-Ying; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is an EBV-associated malignant tumor of nasopharynx. As extremely rare condition, the second primary cancer of nasopharynx can occur in NPC patients synchronously or subsequently. Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a rare tumor and commonly originates in the head and neck region. However, there is no report to describe a collision tumor of NPC and EMP occurring in the same nasopharyngeal mass. We report here an unusual case of synchronous coexistence of NPC and EMP occurring in the nasopharynx of an old male patient. A 63-year-old male patient presented with a 3-month history of right-sided nasal obstruction and recently intermittent epistaxis without enlargement of cervical lymph nodes. The solitary mass of nasopharynx was found by radiological and nasopharyngeal examination. Histologically, the mass contained two separated portions and displayed typically histological features of NPC and EMP, respectively. In EMP portion, the tumor was composed of monomorphic plasmacytoid-appearing cells with immuno-positive to CD79a, CD138, CD38, MUM-1 and CD56, but lack immunoreactivity to pan-CK (AE1/AE3), CD20, CD21 and EBERs. In NPC portion, the tumor cells formed irregular-shaped islands with diffusely immuno-positive to pan-CK (AE1/AE3), EMA and EBERs, but lack expressions of lymphoplasmacytic markers. A diagnosis of simultaneous occurrence of EMP and NPC in nasopharynx was made. There was no evidence of tumor recurrence or metastasis 18-month follow-up after radiotherapy. To our knowledge, it may be the first case of coexistence of EMP and NPC synchronously. In addition, the histological differential diagnosis and relevant potential mechanism of this unusual collision tumor were also discussed. PMID:26376733

  6. Two Types of Coexistence in Cross-Feeding Microbial Consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, Shinji; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2008-07-01

    Exploitative competition of two cross-feeding strains is studied. We found that two types of coexistence of two cross-feeding strains, type-I coexistence (cultivated type) and type-II coexistence (self-sufficiency type) are possible for microbial cross-feeding strains. In all cases of coexistence, trade-off in nutrient availability is required. However, trade-off is necessary but is not sufficient for the coexistence of two strains. Over-production of metabolite can induce competitive exclusion on one hand (cultivated regime) whereas do support the coexistence of two strain on the other hand (self-sufficiency regime). Coexistence of two strains is evaluated by invasibility and permanence criteria and numerical simulations.

  7. Midpoint Shapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welchman, Rosamond; Urso, Josephine

    2000-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of children exploring hands-on and minds-on mathematics. Presents a midpoint shape activity for students to explore the midpoint shape of familiar quadrilaterals, such as squares and rectangles. (KHR)

  8. Measurements of the Coexistence Curve near the Liquid-Gas Critical Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob

    2003-01-01

    The shape of the liquid-gas coexistence curve of He-3 very near the critical point (-2x10(exp -6) < t < -5x10(exp -3) was measured using the quasi-static thermogram method. The study was performed in Earth s gravitational field using two different height calorimetry cells, both originally designed for simultaneous measurements of the isochoric heat capacity, isothermal compressibility, and PVT. The heights of two cells were 0.5 mm and 4.8 cm. The uncertainty in measuring the phase transition temperature was typically +/-2 micro-K. The measured coexistence curve near the critical point was strongly affected by the gravitational field. Away from the critical point, the coexistence curve obtained using this technique was also consistent with the earlier work using the local density measurements of Pittman et al. The recent crossover parametric model of the equation-of-state are used to analyze the height-dependent measured coexistence curves. Data analyses have indicated that microgravity will permit measurements within two additional decades in reduced temperatures beyond the best gravity-free data obtained in Earth-bound experiments.

  9. Resident commensals shaping immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    All animals coexist with myriad commensal microorganisms in a symbiotic relationship that plays a key role in health and disease. Continuous commensal–host interactions profoundly affect the development and regulation of the host’s immune system. The complex interaction of the commensal microbiota with the immune system is a topic of substantial interest. An understanding of these interactions and the mechanisms through which commensal microbes actively shape host immunity may yield new insights into the pathogenesis of many immune-mediated diseases and lead to new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. This review examines recent advances in this field and their potential implications not just for the colonized tissues but also for the entire immune system. PMID:23830047

  10. Coexistence of psoriasis with bullous pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Gupta, Akash; Yunis, Fousiya; Handettu, Sripathi; Chandrashekar, Balachandran

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid (BP) represent two clinically well-characterized, chronic, inflammatory skin conditions. The concomitant occurrence of these two entities in a patient is rare. Here we report a 57-year-old male suffering from psoriasis vulgaris for 15 years on irregular medication who noticed eruption of blisters all over the body. We believe that this is the first case report of psoriasis vulgaris coexistent with bullous pemphigoid in Indian literature. Please check where you want bullous pemphigoid and where you want psoriasis pemphigoides. PMID:23130285

  11. Bidisperse colloids: nanoparticles and microemulsions in coexistence.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Eastoe, Julian; Dowding, Peter J; Grillo, Isabelle; Rogers, Sarah E

    2010-04-15

    Mixed 'hard-soft' colloidal systems have been generated in which the 'hard' components (80 nm diameter silica nanoparticles) coexist with a population of 'soft' microemulsion droplets, both structures stabilised by the anionic surfactant sodium bis(ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) with toluene as solvent. The addition of water to swell the inverse micelles to form microemulsion droplets appears to increase attractive interactions between the silica particles (determined by DLS), possibly due to adsorption of some water at the silica-toluene interface; however, long-term stability of the dispersions is maintained. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to examine the structures present in these new colloidal systems. PMID:20144832

  12. Microscopic description of nuclear shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Egido, J.L.; Robledo, L.M.; Valor, A.; Villafranca, A.

    1996-12-31

    The approximate particle number theory for density dependent forces is sketched, the theory is applied to discuss properties of the superdeformed ground state and excited bands of {sup 192}Hg. The force used in the calculations is the finite range density dependent Gogny force. The agreement with the available experimental results is very satisfactory.

  13. Coexistence Curve of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane-Isopropyl Alcohol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, D. T.; Kuhl, D. E.; Selby, C. E.

    1996-01-01

    The coexistence curve of the binary fluid mixture perfluoromethylcyclohexane-isopropyl alcohol was determined by precisely measuring the refractive index both above and below its upper critical consolute point. Sixty-seven two-phase data points were obtained over a wide range of reduced temperatures, 10(exp -5) less than t less than 2.5 x 10(exp -1), to determine the location of the critical point: critical temperature=89.901 C, and critical composition = 62.2% by volume perfluoromethylcyclohexane. These data were analyzed to determine the critical exponent 8 close to the critical point, the amplitude B, and the anomaly in the diameter. The volume-fraction coexistence curve is found to be as symmetric as any composition like variable. Correction to scaling is investigated as well as the need for a crossover theory. A model is proposed that describes the asymptotic approach to zero of the effective exponent Beta, which allows an estimation of the temperature regime free of crossover effects.

  14. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  15. How can flexibility be integrated into coexistence regulations? A review.

    PubMed

    Devos, Yann; Dillen, Koen; Demont, Matty

    2014-02-01

    Member states in the European Union (EU) implemented both ex ante coexistence regulations and ex post liability schemes to ensure that genetically modified (GM) and non-GM crops can be cultivated side by side without excluding any agricultural option. Although proportionate coexistence is best achieved if regulated in a flexible manner, most implemented coexistence regulations merely rely on rigid measures. Flexible coexistence regulations, however, would reduce the regulatory burden on certain agricultural options and avoid jeopardizing economic incentives for coexistence. Flexibility can be integrated at: (i) the regulatory level by relaxing the rigidity of coexistence measures in ex ante regulations, yet without offsetting incentives to implement coexistence measures; (ii) the farm level by recommending the use of pollen barriers instead of large and fixed isolation distances; and (iii) the national/regional level by allowing diversified coexistence measures, which are adapted to the heterogeneity of farming in the EU. Owing to difficulties of implementation, the adoption of flexible and proportionate coexistence regulations will inevitably entail challenges. PMID:23965758

  16. Meningioma and occlusive vasculopathy: coexisting complications of past extracranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Montanera, W.; Chui, M.; Hudson, A.

    1985-07-01

    Two cases are reported in which a meningioma and occlusion of the internal carotid artery with development of transdural collateral circulation coexisted following extracranial radiation in childhood.

  17. The Lion King and the Hyaena Queen: large carnivore interactions and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Périquet, Stéphanie; Fritz, Hervé; Revilla, Eloy

    2015-11-01

    Interactions among species, which range from competition to facilitation, have profound effects on ecosystem functioning. Large carnivores are of particular importance in shaping community structure since they are at the top of the food chain, and many efforts are made to conserve such keystone species. Despite this, the mechanisms of carnivore interactions are far from understood, yet they are key to enabling or hindering their coexistence and hence are highly relevant for their conservation. The goal of this review is thus to provide detailed information on the extents of competition and facilitation between large carnivores and their impact in shaping their life histories. Here, we use the example of spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta) and lions (Panthera leo) and provide a comprehensive knowledge of their interactions based on meta-analyses from available literature (148 publications). Despite their strong potential for both exploitation and interference competition (range and diet overlap, intraguild predation and kleptoparasitism), we underline some mechanisms facilitating their coexistence (different prey-age selection and scavenging opportunities). We stress the fact that prey abundance is key to their coexistence and that hyaenas forming very large groups in rich ecosystems could have a negative impact on lions. We show that the coexistence of spotted hyaenas and lions is a complex balance between competition and facilitation, and that prey availability within the ecosystem determines which predator is dominant. However, there are still many gaps in our knowledge such as the spatio-temporal dynamics of their interactions. As both species' survival becomes increasingly dependent on protected areas, where their densities can be high, it is critical to understand their interactions to inform both reintroduction programs and protected area management. PMID:25530248

  18. Coexisting Liquid Phases Underlie Nucleolar Subcompartments.

    PubMed

    Feric, Marina; Vaidya, Nilesh; Harmon, Tyler S; Mitrea, Diana M; Zhu, Lian; Richardson, Tiffany M; Kriwacki, Richard W; Pappu, Rohit V; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2016-06-16

    The nucleolus and other ribonucleoprotein (RNP) bodies are membrane-less organelles that appear to assemble through phase separation of their molecular components. However, many such RNP bodies contain internal subcompartments, and the mechanism of their formation remains unclear. Here, we combine in vivo and in vitro studies, together with computational modeling, to show that subcompartments within the nucleolus represent distinct, coexisting liquid phases. Consistent with their in vivo immiscibility, purified nucleolar proteins phase separate into droplets containing distinct non-coalescing phases that are remarkably similar to nucleoli in vivo. This layered droplet organization is caused by differences in the biophysical properties of the phases-particularly droplet surface tension-which arises from sequence-encoded features of their macromolecular components. These results suggest that phase separation can give rise to multilayered liquids that may facilitate sequential RNA processing reactions in a variety of RNP bodies. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27212236

  19. Emergence of coexisting percolating clusters in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faqeeh, Ali; Melnik, Sergey; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Gleeson, James P.

    2016-06-01

    It is commonly assumed in percolation theories that at most one percolating cluster can exist in a network. We show that several coexisting percolating clusters (CPCs) can emerge in networks due to limited mixing, i.e., a finite and sufficiently small number of interlinks between network modules. We develop an approach called modular message passing (MMP) to describe and verify these observations. We demonstrate that the appearance of CPCs is an important source of inaccuracy in previously introduced percolation theories, such as the message passing (MP) approach, which is a state-of-the-art theory based on the belief propagation method. Moreover, we show that the MMP theory improves significantly over the predictions of MP for percolation on synthetic networks with limited mixing and also on several real-world networks. These findings have important implications for understanding the robustness of networks and in quantifying epidemic outbreaks in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model of disease spread.

  20. Emergence of coexisting percolating clusters in networks.

    PubMed

    Faqeeh, Ali; Melnik, Sergey; Colomer-de-Simón, Pol; Gleeson, James P

    2016-06-01

    It is commonly assumed in percolation theories that at most one percolating cluster can exist in a network. We show that several coexisting percolating clusters (CPCs) can emerge in networks due to limited mixing, i.e., a finite and sufficiently small number of interlinks between network modules. We develop an approach called modular message passing (MMP) to describe and verify these observations. We demonstrate that the appearance of CPCs is an important source of inaccuracy in previously introduced percolation theories, such as the message passing (MP) approach, which is a state-of-the-art theory based on the belief propagation method. Moreover, we show that the MMP theory improves significantly over the predictions of MP for percolation on synthetic networks with limited mixing and also on several real-world networks. These findings have important implications for understanding the robustness of networks and in quantifying epidemic outbreaks in the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model of disease spread. PMID:27415281

  1. Coexistent digital gouty and infective flexor tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Akram, Qasim; Hughes, Michael; Muir, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is often caused by trauma or infection. Gouty tenosynovitis is an uncommon presentation of the condition and is usually misdiagnosed as infection with the patient undergoing surgery. The coexistence of infection and gout causing flexor tenosynovitis has never been described before in the literature; we report the first ever case and emphasise the importance of its awareness for optimal treatment. A 54-year-old man was initially diagnosed and treated as having infective flexor tenosynovitis and, later, due to a lack of improvement in his symptoms, was discovered to also have gout. We review the literature and suggest management strategy for use in daily clinical practice, including an algorithm, for this presentation. PMID:27358092

  2. Surgical consequences in coexisting cataract and glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, M; Glovinsky, Y

    1995-04-01

    Of the three classical approaches to surgery for coexisting cataract and glaucoma, last year's publications dealt with the surgical consequences of combined cataract and glaucoma operations only. When used in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery, a small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with phacoemulsification (PHACO) was found to be only slightly superior to the standard manual ECCE in terms of postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) control. Injections of 5-fluorouracil postoperatively did not improve IOP control in PHACO-ECCE-trabeculectomy or manual ECCE-trabeculectomy. A preliminary uncontrolled report suggests, however, that intraoperative mitomycin C application in PHACO-ECCE-trabeculectomy may result in excellent postoperative IOP control without antiglaucomatous medications, and with no significant mitomycin C-related complications. Controlled studies on mitomycin C application in small-incision cataract and glaucoma surgery are needed to assess its long-term effect on IOP and astigmatism. PMID:10150852

  3. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Paweł; Dura, Marta; Zalewska, Joanna; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS – according to our best knowledge – are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  4. Bronchial pleomorphic adenoma coexisting with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Akanabe, Kumi; Hamaguchi, Reo; Wakaki, Misa; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma usually occurs in the salivary glands but rarely in the trachea or bronchi. A 71-year-old man had abnormal shadows on a chest X-ray. Chest CT revealed one tumor in the right basal segment of the lung and another, in the left main bronchus. Bronchoscopic biopsy of the right tumor revealed well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Right lower lobectomy and lymph node dissection were performed (pT2N0M0, stage IB). At the orifice of the left main bronchus, bronchoscopy identified a polypoid lesion nearly obstructing the airway. The lesion was resected with hot snare ablation. The histological examination revealed a mixture of epithelial and myxoid mesenchymal elements, characterized by ductal structures, squamous metaplasia, and cartilage tissue. The diagnosis was bronchial pleomorphic adenoma coexisting with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. PMID:21597416

  5. Coexistence of peptides with classical neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hökfelt, T; Millhorn, D; Seroogy, K; Tsuruo, Y; Ceccatelli, S; Lindh, B; Meister, B; Melander, T; Schalling, M; Bartfai, T

    1987-07-15

    In the present article the fact is emphasized that neuropeptides often are located in the same neurons as classical transmitters such as acetylcholine, 5-hydroxy-tryptamine, catecholamines, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) etc. This raises the possibility that neurons produce, store and release more than one messenger molecule. The exact functional role of such coexisting peptides is often difficult to evaluate, especially in the central nervous system. In the periphery some studies indicate apparently meaningful interactions of different types with the classical transmitter, but other types of actions including trophic effects have been observed. More recently it has been shown that some neurons contain more than one classical transmitter, e.g. 5-HT plus GABA, further underlining the view that transfer of information across synapses may be more complex than perhaps hitherto assumed. PMID:2885215

  6. Early Mesozoic Coexistence of Amniotes and Hepadnaviridae

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Weber, Claudia C.; Kehlmaier, Christian; Braun, Edward L.; Green, Richard E.; Fritz, Uwe; Ray, David A.; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Hepadnaviridae are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect some species of birds and mammals. This includes humans, where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) are prevalent pathogens in considerable parts of the global population. Recently, endogenized sequences of HBVs (eHBVs) have been discovered in bird genomes where they constitute direct evidence for the coexistence of these viruses and their hosts from the late Mesozoic until present. Nevertheless, virtually nothing is known about the ancient host range of this virus family in other animals. Here we report the first eHBVs from crocodilian, snake, and turtle genomes, including a turtle eHBV that endogenized >207 million years ago. This genomic “fossil” is >125 million years older than the oldest avian eHBV and provides the first direct evidence that Hepadnaviridae already existed during the Early Mesozoic. This implies that the Mesozoic fossil record of HBV infection spans three of the five major groups of land vertebrates, namely birds, crocodilians, and turtles. We show that the deep phylogenetic relationships of HBVs are largely congruent with the deep phylogeny of their amniote hosts, which suggests an ancient amniote–HBV coexistence and codivergence, at least since the Early Mesozoic. Notably, the organization of overlapping genes as well as the structure of elements involved in viral replication has remained highly conserved among HBVs along that time span, except for the presence of the X gene. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the tumor-promoting X protein of mammalian HBVs lacks a homolog in all other hepadnaviruses and propose a novel scenario for the emergence of X via segmental duplication and overprinting of pre-existing reading frames in the ancestor of mammalian HBVs. Our study reveals an unforeseen host range of prehistoric HBVs and provides novel insights into the genome evolution of hepadnaviruses throughout their long-lasting association with amniote hosts. PMID:25501991

  7. Schapiro Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Emily

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson on Schapiro Shapes. Schapiro Shapes is based on the art of Miriam Schapiro, who created a number of works of figures in action. Using the basic concepts of this project, students learn to create their own figures and styles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  8. Graphite-diamond phase coexistence study employing a neural-network mapping of the ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Eshet, Hagai; Kühne, Thomas D.; Behler, Jörg; Parrinello, Michele

    2010-03-01

    An interatomic potential for the diamond and graphite phases of carbon has been created using a neural-network (NN) representation of the ab initio potential energy surface. The NN potential combines the accuracy of a first-principles description of both phases with the efficiency of empirical force fields and allows one to perform a molecular-dynamics study, of ab initio quality, of the thermodynamics of graphite-diamond coexistence. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated coexistence curves is achieved if nuclear quantum effects are included in the simulation.

  9. Octocoral Species Assembly and Coexistence in Caribbean Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Johanna; Sánchez, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background What are the determinant factors of community assemblies in the most diverse ecosystem in the ocean? Coral reefs can be divided in continental (i.e., reefs that develop on the continental shelf, including siliciclastic reefs) and oceanic (i.e., far off the continental shelf, usually on volcanic substratum); whether or not these habitat differences impose community-wide ecological divergence or species exclusion/coexistence with evolutionary consequences, is unknown. Methods Studying Caribbean octocorals as model system, we determined the phylogenetic community structure in a coral reef community, making emphasis on species coexistence evidenced on trait evolution and environmental feedbacks. Forty-nine species represented in five families constituted the species pool from which a phylogenetic tree was reconstructed using mtDNA. We included data from 11 localities in the Western Caribbean (Colombia) including most reef types. To test diversity-environment and phenotype-environment relationships, phylogenetic community structure and trait evolution we carried out comparative analyses implementing ecological and evolutionary approaches. Results Phylogenetic inferences suggest clustering of oceanic reefs (e.g., atolls) contrasting with phylogenetic overdispersion of continental reefs (e.g., reefs banks). Additionally, atolls and barrier reefs had the highest species diversity (Shannon index) whereas phylogenetic diversity was higher in reef banks. The discriminant component analysis supported this differentiation between oceanic and continental reefs, where continental octocoral species tend to have greater calyx apertures, thicker branches, prominent calyces and azooxanthellate species. This analysis also indicated a clear separation between the slope and the remaining habitats, caused by the presence or absence of Symbiodinium. K statistic analysis showed that this trait is conserved as well as the branch shape. Discussion There was strong octocoral

  10. China and the Global Uranium Market: Prospects for Peaceful Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Massot, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    China's recent reemergence has resulted in a significant increase in the global demand of commodities and is already having major impacts on the dynamics of global commodity markets. In the case of the global uranium market, we stand at the very beginning of a period of change. However, interesting trends are already emerging. Whereas China has had many policy reversals, and some difficulties in taking control of its procurement strategy in other commodity markets, it is seemingly more successful in managing its uranium procurement strategy. Why? The argument presented here is that a mixture of domestic and international level variables has allowed China more room for maneuver in fulfilling its uranium procurement strategy. On the domestic level, a centralized industry, and, on the international level, a geographically dispersed and uncoordinated market have allowed China to forge ahead with an ambitious civilian nuclear power plan and triple its total uranium imports, all within the span of a few years. Many challenges remain, not the least that of negative public opinion, which has surged since the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Nevertheless, should uranium demand continue to grow, this paper will consider the potential for continued peaceful coexistence among uranium market participants worldwide. PMID:23606818

  11. China and the global uranium market: prospects for peaceful coexistence.

    PubMed

    Massot, Pascale; Chen, Zhan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    China's recent reemergence has resulted in a significant increase in the global demand of commodities and is already having major impacts on the dynamics of global commodity markets. In the case of the global uranium market, we stand at the very beginning of a period of change. However, interesting trends are already emerging. Whereas China has had many policy reversals, and some difficulties in taking control of its procurement strategy in other commodity markets, it is seemingly more successful in managing its uranium procurement strategy. Why? The argument presented here is that a mixture of domestic and international level variables has allowed China more room for maneuver in fulfilling its uranium procurement strategy. On the domestic level, a centralized industry, and, on the international level, a geographically dispersed and uncoordinated market have allowed China to forge ahead with an ambitious civilian nuclear power plan and triple its total uranium imports, all within the span of a few years. Many challenges remain, not the least that of negative public opinion, which has surged since the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Nevertheless, should uranium demand continue to grow, this paper will consider the potential for continued peaceful coexistence among uranium market participants worldwide. PMID:23606818

  12. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  13. Nuclear shape descriptors by automated morphometry may distinguish aggressive variants of squamous cell carcinoma from relatively benign skin proliferative lesions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weixi; Tian, Rong; Xue, Tongqing

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated whether degrees of dysplasia may be consistently accessed in an automatic fashion, using different kinds of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) as a validatory model. Namely, we compared Bowen disease, actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, low-grade squamous cell carcinoma, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We hypothesized that characterizing the shape of nuclei may be important to consistently diagnose the aggressiveness of a skin tumor. While basal cell carcinoma is comparatively relatively benign, management of squamous cell carcinoma is controversial because of its potential to recur and intraoperative dilemma regarding choice of the margin or the depth for the excision. We provide evidence here that progressive nuclear dysplasia may be automatically estimated through the thresholded images of skin cancer and quantitative parameters estimated to provide a quasi-quantitative data, which can thenceforth guide the management of the particular cancer. For circularity, averaging more than 2500 nuclei in each group estimated the means ± SD as 0.8 ± 0.007 vs. 0.78 ± 0.0063 vs. 0.42 ± 0.014 vs. 0.63 ± 0.02 vs. 0.51 ± 0.02 (F = 318063.56, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). The mean aspect ratios were (means ± SD) 0.97 ± 0.0014 vs. 0.95 ± 0.002 vs. 0.38 ± 0.018 vs. 0.84 ± 0.0035 vs. 0.74 ± 0.019 (F = 1022631.931, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). The Feret diameters averaged over 2500 nuclei in each group were the following: 1 ± 0.0001 vs. 0.9 ± 0.002 vs. 5 ± 0.031 vs. 1.5 ± 0.01 vs. 1.9 ± 0.004 (F = 33105614.194, p < 0.0001, one-way analyses of variance). Multivariate analyses of composite parameters potentially detect aggressive variants of squamous cell carcinoma as the most dysplastic form, in comparison to locally occurring squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma, or benign skin lesions. PMID:25753477

  14. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coexisting abdominal conditions. 4.113 Section 4.113 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal conditions. There are diseases of the...

  15. Co-Adaptation Is Key to Coexisting with Large Carnivores.

    PubMed

    Carter, Neil H; Linnell, John D C

    2016-08-01

    There is a pressing need to integrate large carnivore species into multi-use landscapes outside protected areas. However, an unclear understanding of coexistence hinders the realization of this goal. Here, we provide a comprehensive conceptualization of coexistence in which mutual adaptations by both large carnivores and humans have a central role. PMID:27377600

  16. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal conditions. There are diseases of the digestive system, particularly within the abdomen, which, while... coexisting diseases in this area, as indicated in the instruction under the title “Diseases of the...

  17. 38 CFR 4.113 - Coexisting abdominal conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Digestive System § 4.113 Coexisting abdominal conditions. There are diseases of the digestive system, particularly within the abdomen, which, while... coexisting diseases in this area, as indicated in the instruction under the title “Diseases of the...

  18. 78 FR 65960 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Office of the Secretary Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input ACTION: Request for... agricultural production systems in order to further agricultural coexistence. We are taking this action in... to Docket No. APHIS-2013-0047, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8,...

  19. Coexisting Disorders and Academic Achievement among Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Sulak, Tracey N.; Fearon, Danielle D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is a commonly diagnosed neuropsychological disorder among school-aged children with reported high rates of coexisting or comorbid disorders. As ADHD has been associated with academic underachievement, the current study examines this association in view of the presence of coexisting disorders. The purpose of the current study is to…

  20. Double Jeopardy for Children Who Stutter: Race and Coexisting Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Gordon W.; Blood, Ingrid; Kreiger, Jennifer; O'Connor, Shelah; Qualls, Constance Dean

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the influence of racial and ethnic backgrounds in children who stutter (CWS) with 18 specific coexisting disorders. A sample of 1,184 speech-language pathologists responded to a detailed questionnaire designed to answer questions about the type and prevalence of coexisting disorders in 2,535 CWS.…

  1. Environmental stress, facilitation, competition, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Hart, Simon P; Marshall, Dustin J

    2013-12-01

    The major theories regarding the combined influence of the environment and species interactions on population and community dynamics appear to conflict. Stress/ disturbance gradient models of community organization, such as the stress gradient hypothesis, emphasize a diminished role for competition in harsh environments whereas modern coexistence theory does not. Confusion about the role of species interactions in harsh environments is perpetuated by a disconnect between population dynamics theory and data. We linked theory and data using response surface experiments done in the field to parameterize mathematical, population-dynamic competition models. We replicated our experiment across two environments that spanned a common and important environmental stress gradient for determining community structure in benthic marine systems. We generated quantitative estimates of the effects of environmental stress on population growth rates and the direction and strength of intra- and interspecific interactions within each environment. Our approach directly addressed a perpetual blind spot in this field by showing how the effects of competition can be intensified in stressful environments even though the apparent strength of competition remains unchanged. Furthermore, we showed how simultaneous, reciprocal competitive and facilitative effects can stabilize population dynamics in multispecies communities in stressful environments. PMID:24597219

  2. Management of coexisting Hodgkin's disease and pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Nisce, L.Z.; Tome, M.A.; He, S.; Lee, B.J. III; Kutcher, G.J.

    1986-04-01

    The management of pregnant women with active Hodgkin's disease (H.D.) should be individualized depending on the stage, the presence of infradiaphragmatic involvement, and age of gestation. Seventeen women aged 16-31 years with coexisting H.D. and pregnancy were followed between 1969 and 1982. H.D. was diagnosed during pregnancy in 15 patients and two became pregnant while on treatment. Seven women whose pregnancies were allowed to proceed uninterrupted were irradiated to supradiaphragmatic sites to doses of 1500-2000 rad during the second or third trimester; all had full term spontaneous normal deliveries and normal infants. Fetal doses ranged from 2-50 rad. Two patients treated with Vinblastine throughout three pregnancies delivered normal full term infants. Pregnancy was interrupted in six patients at 6-20 weeks of gestation for various reasons. In spite of several months delay in initiation of definitive therapy, the outcome of H.D. was not adversely affected in the majority of uninterrupted pregnancies as evidenced by long term disease-free survivals of 6-11 years in four of seven patients who were irradiated; the children now aged 6-11 years are also alive and reported normal.

  3. Coexistence in a predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droz, Michel; Pȩkalski, Andrzej

    2001-05-01

    We propose a lattice model of two populations, predators and prey. The model is solved via Monte Carlo simulations. Each species moves randomly on the lattice and can live only a certain time without eating. The lattice cells are either grass (eaten by prey) or tree (giving cover for prey). Each animal has a reserve of food that is increased by eating (prey or grass) and decreased after each Monte Carlo step. To breed, a pair of animals must be adjacent and have a certain minimum of food supply. The number of offspring produced depends on the number of available empty sites. We show that such a predator-prey system may finally reach one of the following three steady states: coexisting, with predators and prey; pure prey; or an empty one, in which both populations become extinct. We demonstrate that the probability of arriving at one of the above states depends on the initial densities of the prey and predator populations, the amount of cover, and the way it is spatially distributed.

  4. Aggression and coexistence in female caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weckerly, Floyd W.; Ricca, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) are highly gregarious, yet there has been little study of the behavioral mechanisms that foster coexistence. Quantifying patterns of aggression between male and female, particularly in the only cervid taxa where both sexes grow antlers, should provide insight into these mechanisms. We asked if patterns of aggression by male and female caribou followed the pattern typically noted in other polygynous cervids, in which males display higher frequencies and intensity of aggression. From June to August in 2011 and 2012, we measured the frequency and intensity of aggression across a range of group sizes through focal animal sampling of 170 caribou (64 males and 106 females) on Adak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. Males in same-sex and mixed-sex groups and females in mixed-sex groups had higher frequencies of aggression than females in same-sex groups. Group size did not influence frequency of aggression. Males displayed more intense aggression than females. Frequent aggression in mixed-sex groups probably reflects lower tolerance of males for animals in close proximity. Female caribou were less aggressive and more gregarious than males, as in other polygynous cervid species.

  5. Coexistence of phage and bacteria on the boundary of self-organized refuges.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Silja; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2012-07-31

    Bacteriophage are voracious predators of bacteria and a major determinant in shaping bacterial life strategies. Many phage species are virulent, meaning that infection leads to certain death of the host and immediate release of a large batch of phage progeny. Despite this apparent voraciousness, bacteria have stably coexisted with virulent phages for eons. Here, using individual-based stochastic spatial models, we study the conditions for achieving coexistence on the edge between two habitats, one of which is a bacterial refuge with conditions hostile to phage whereas the other is phage friendly. We show how bacterial density-dependent, or quorum-sensing, mechanisms such as the formation of biofilm can produce such refuges and edges in a self-organized manner. Coexistence on these edges exhibits the following properties, all of which are observed in real phage-bacteria ecosystems but difficult to achieve together in nonspatial ecosystem models: (i) highly efficient virulent phage with relatively long lifetimes, high infection rates and large burst sizes; (ii) large, stable, and high-density populations of phage and bacteria; (iii) a fast turnover of both phage and bacteria; and (iv) stability over evolutionary timescales despite imbalances in the rates of phage vs. bacterial evolution. PMID:22807479

  6. Coexistence of phage and bacteria on the boundary of self-organized refuges

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Silja; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage are voracious predators of bacteria and a major determinant in shaping bacterial life strategies. Many phage species are virulent, meaning that infection leads to certain death of the host and immediate release of a large batch of phage progeny. Despite this apparent voraciousness, bacteria have stably coexisted with virulent phages for eons. Here, using individual-based stochastic spatial models, we study the conditions for achieving coexistence on the edge between two habitats, one of which is a bacterial refuge with conditions hostile to phage whereas the other is phage friendly. We show how bacterial density-dependent, or quorum-sensing, mechanisms such as the formation of biofilm can produce such refuges and edges in a self-organized manner. Coexistence on these edges exhibits the following properties, all of which are observed in real phage–bacteria ecosystems but difficult to achieve together in nonspatial ecosystem models: (i) highly efficient virulent phage with relatively long lifetimes, high infection rates and large burst sizes; (ii) large, stable, and high-density populations of phage and bacteria; (iii) a fast turnover of both phage and bacteria; and (iv) stability over evolutionary timescales despite imbalances in the rates of phage vs. bacterial evolution. PMID:22807479

  7. Sizing and shaping the nucleus: mechanisms and significance

    PubMed Central

    Jevtić, Predrag; Edens, Lisa J.; Vuković, Lidija D.; Levy, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The size and shape of the nucleus are tightly regulated, indicating the physiological significance of proper nuclear morphology, yet the mechanisms and functions of nuclear size and shape regulation remain poorly understood. Correlations between altered nuclear morphology and certain disease states have long been observed, most notably many cancers are diagnosed and staged based on graded increases in nuclear size. Here we review recent studies investigating the mechanisms regulating nuclear size and shape, how mitotic events influence nuclear morphology, and the role of nuclear size and shape in subnuclear chromatin organization and cancer progression. PMID:24503411

  8. Pollinator Foraging Adaptation and Coexistence of Competing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Tomás A.; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    We use the optimal foraging theory to study coexistence between two plant species and a generalist pollinator. We compare conditions for plant coexistence for non-adaptive vs. adaptive pollinators that adjust their foraging strategy to maximize fitness. When pollinators have fixed preferences, we show that plant coexistence typically requires both weak competition between plants for resources (e.g., space or nutrients) and pollinator preferences that are not too biased in favour of either plant. We also show how plant coexistence is promoted by indirect facilitation via the pollinator. When pollinators are adaptive foragers, pollinator’s diet maximizes pollinator’s fitness measured as the per capita population growth rate. Simulations show that this has two conflicting consequences for plant coexistence. On the one hand, when competition between pollinators is weak, adaptation favours pollinator specialization on the more profitable plant which increases asymmetries in plant competition and makes their coexistence less likely. On the other hand, when competition between pollinators is strong, adaptation promotes generalism, which facilitates plant coexistence. In addition, adaptive foraging allows pollinators to survive sudden loss of the preferred plant host, thus preventing further collapse of the entire community. PMID:27505254

  9. Long-Term Coexistence of Rotifer Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Manuel; Gómez, Africa

    2011-01-01

    Despite their high morphological similarity, cryptic species often coexist in aquatic habitats presenting a challenge in the framework of niche differentiation theory and coexistence mechanisms. Here we use a rotifer species complex inhabiting highly unpredictable and fluctuating salt lakes to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in stable coexistence in cryptic species. We combined molecular barcoding surveys of planktonic populations and paleogenetic analysis of diapausing eggs to reconstruct the current and historical coexistence dynamics of two highly morphologically similar rotifer species, B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas. In addition, we carried out laboratory experiments using clones isolated from eight lakes where both species coexist to explore their clonal growth responses to salinity, a challenging, highly variable and unpredictable condition in Mediterranean salt lakes. We show that both species have co-occurred in a stable way in one lake, with population fluctuations in which no species was permanently excluded. The seasonal occurrence patterns of the plankton in two lakes agree with laboratory experiments showing that both species differ in their optimal salinity. These results suggest that stable species coexistence is mediated by differential responses to salinity and its fluctuating regime. We discuss the role of fluctuating salinity and a persistent diapausing egg banks as a mechanism for species coexistence in accordance with the ‘storage effect’. PMID:21738691

  10. Pollinator Foraging Adaptation and Coexistence of Competing Plants.

    PubMed

    Revilla, Tomás A; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    We use the optimal foraging theory to study coexistence between two plant species and a generalist pollinator. We compare conditions for plant coexistence for non-adaptive vs. adaptive pollinators that adjust their foraging strategy to maximize fitness. When pollinators have fixed preferences, we show that plant coexistence typically requires both weak competition between plants for resources (e.g., space or nutrients) and pollinator preferences that are not too biased in favour of either plant. We also show how plant coexistence is promoted by indirect facilitation via the pollinator. When pollinators are adaptive foragers, pollinator's diet maximizes pollinator's fitness measured as the per capita population growth rate. Simulations show that this has two conflicting consequences for plant coexistence. On the one hand, when competition between pollinators is weak, adaptation favours pollinator specialization on the more profitable plant which increases asymmetries in plant competition and makes their coexistence less likely. On the other hand, when competition between pollinators is strong, adaptation promotes generalism, which facilitates plant coexistence. In addition, adaptive foraging allows pollinators to survive sudden loss of the preferred plant host, thus preventing further collapse of the entire community. PMID:27505254

  11. Composite bulges: the coexistence of classical bulges and discy pseudo-bulges in S0 and spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Peter; Saglia, Roberto P.; Fabricius, Maximilian; Thomas, Jens; Nowak, Nina; Rusli, Stephanie; Bender, Ralf; Vega Beltrán, Juan Carlos; Beckman, John E.

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of nine S0-Sb galaxies which have (photometric) bulges consisting of two distinct components. The outer component is a flattened, kinematically cool, disc-like structure: a `discy pseudo-bulge'. Embedded inside is a rounder, kinematically hot spheroidal structure: a `classical bulge'. This indicates that pseudo-bulges and classical bulges are not mutually exclusive phenomena: some galaxies have both. The discy pseudo-bulges almost always consist of an exponential disc (scalelengths = 125-870 pc, mean size ˜440 pc) with one or more disc-related subcomponents: nuclear rings, nuclear bars, and/or spiral arms. They constitute 11-59 per cent of the galaxy stellar mass (mean PB/T = 0.33), with stellar masses ˜7 × 109-9 × 1010 M⊙. The classical-bulge components have Sérsic indices of 0.9-2.2, effective radii of 25-430 pc and stellar masses of 5 × 108-3 × 1010 M⊙; they are usually <10 per cent of the galaxy's stellar mass (mean B/T = 0.06). The classical bulges do show rotation, but are clearly kinematically hotter than the discy pseudo-bulges. Dynamical modelling of three systems indicates that velocity dispersions are isotropic in the classical bulges and equatorially biased in the discy pseudo-bulges. In the mass-radius and mass-stellar mass density planes, classical-bulge components follow sequences defined by ellipticals and (larger) classical bulges. Discy pseudo-bulges also fall on this sequence; they are more compact than large-scale discs of similar mass. Although some classical bulges are quite compact, they are as a class clearly distinct from nuclear star clusters in both size and mass; in at least two galaxies they coexist with nuclear clusters. Since almost all the galaxies in this study are barred, they probably also host boxy/peanut-shaped bulges (vertically thickened inner parts of bars). NGC 3368 shows isophotal evidence for such a zone just outside its discy pseudo-bulge, making it a clear case of a galaxy with all three

  12. Full jet evolution in quark-gluon plasma and nuclear modification of jet production and jet shape in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ning-Bo; Qin, Guang-You

    2016-08-01

    We study the evolution of the full jet shower in quark-gluon plasma by solving a set of coupled differential transport equations for the three-dimensional momentum distributions of quarks and gluons contained in full jets. In our jet evolution equations, we include all partonic splitting processes as well as the collisional energy loss and transverse momentum broadening for both the leading and radiated partons of the full jets. Combining with a realistic (2 +1 )-dimensional viscous hydrodynamic simulation for the spacetime profiles of the hot and dense nuclear medium produced in heavy-ion collisions, we apply our formalism to calculate the nuclear modification of single inclusive full jet spectra, the momentum imbalance of photon-jet and dijet pairs, and the jet shape function (at partonic level) in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 A TeV. The roles of various jet-medium interaction mechanisms on the full jet modification are studied. We find that the nuclear modification of jet shape is sensitive to the interplay of different interaction mechanisms as well as the energies of the full jets.

  13. Coexistence of reef organisms in the Abrolhos Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lins de Barros, M M; Castro, C B; Pires, D O; Segal, B

    2000-12-01

    The first study on coexistence of reef benthic organisms in Brazilian coral reefs was done in three localities of the Abrolhos Archipelago. Organisms were recorded in concentric circle samples (10 and 20 cm in diameter) randomly laid on transects. Type and frequency of "coexistence events" between pairs of organisms were determined. Most frequent organisms (massive and branched coralline algae, Favia gravida, and Agaricia agaricites) also had many significant positive coexistence events. These results might be related to the abundances of these organisms. The most frequent coral (Siderastrea stellata), however, exhibited only a few significant coexistence events (9% of 32 tests). Since the great majority of events were positive, and since there was high variation in the species/groups involved in significant events in different localities, benthic communities of Abrolhos Archipelago may well be structured primarily by abiotic rather than biotic factors. PMID:11487922

  14. Mixed evolutionary strategies imply coexisting opinions on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lang; Li, Xiang

    2008-01-01

    An evolutionary battle-of-the-sexes game is proposed to model the opinion formation on networks. The individuals of a network are partitioned into different classes according to their unaltered opinion preferences, and their factual opinions are considered as the evolutionary strategies, which are updated with the birth-death or death-birth rules to imitate the process of opinion formation. The individuals finally reach a consensus in the dominate opinion or fall into (quasi)stationary fractions of coexisting mixed opinions, presenting a phase transition at the critical modularity of the multiclass individuals’ partitions on networks. The stability analysis on the coexistence of mixed strategies among multiclass individuals is given, and the analytical predictions agree well with the numerical simulations, indicating that the individuals of a community (or modular) structured network are prone to form coexisting opinions, and the coexistence of mixed evolutionary strategies implies the modularity of networks.

  15. Stable phase separation and heterogeneity away from the coexistence curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Belitz, D.

    2016-04-01

    Phase separation, i.e., the coexistence of two different phases, is observed in many systems away from the coexistence curve of a first-order transition, leading to a stable heterogeneous phase or region. Examples include various quantum ferromagnets, heavy-fermion systems, rare-earth nickelates, and others. These observations seem to violate basic notions of equilibrium thermodynamics, which state that phase separation can occur only on the coexistence curve. We show theoretically that quenched disorder allows for phase separation away from the coexistence curve even in equilibrium due to the existence of stable minority-phase droplets within the majority phase. Our scenario also answers a related question: How can a first-order transition remain sharp in the presence of quenched disorder without violating the rigorous lower bound ν ≥2 /d for the correlation-length exponent? We discuss this scenario in the context of experimental results for a large variety of systems.

  16. Infantile Perianal Pyramidal Protrusion with Coexisting Perineal and Perianal Hemangiomas: A Fortuitous Association or Incomplete PELVIS Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shyam B; Wollina, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Two cases of infantile perianal pyramidal protrusions (IPPP), one pyramidal in shape and one leaf shaped, are being described by us. Both were notable for coexisting hemangiomas in the close vicinity. To the best of our knowledge we are reporting these two variants of IPPP with the associated neighboring hemangiomas for the first time in Indian dermatologic literature. We suggest that this presentation may be a part of one of the syndromes that comprise anorectal malformations with hemangiomas like PELVIS syndrome and others mentioned in the table. PMID:24470664

  17. Intraspecific genetic variation and species coexistence in plant communities.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Bodil K; Damgaard, Christian F; Laroche, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Many studies report that intraspecific genetic variation in plants can affect community composition and coexistence. However, less is known about which traits are responsible and the mechanisms by which variation in these traits affect the associated community. Focusing on plant-plant interactions, we review empirical studies exemplifying how intraspecific genetic variation in functional traits impacts plant coexistence. Intraspecific variation in chemical and architectural traits promotes species coexistence, by both increasing habitat heterogeneity and altering competitive hierarchies. Decomposing species interactions into interactions between genotypes shows that genotype × genotype interactions are often intransitive. The outcome of plant-plant interactions varies with local adaptation to the environment and with dominant neighbour genotypes, and some plants can recognize the genetic identity of neighbour plants if they have a common history of coexistence. Taken together, this reveals a very dynamic nature of coexistence. We outline how more traits mediating plant-plant interactions may be identified, and how future studies could use population genetic surveys of genotype distribution in nature and methods from trait-based ecology to better quantify the impact of intraspecific genetic variation on plant coexistence. PMID:26790707

  18. Coexistence of structured populations with size-based prey selection.

    PubMed

    Hartvig, Martin; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2013-11-01

    Species with a large adult-offspring size ratio and a preferred predator-prey mass ratio undergo ontogenetic trophic niche shift(s) throughout life. Trophic interactions between such species vary throughout life, resulting in different species-level interaction motifs depending on the maximum adult sizes and population size distributions. We explore the assembly and potential for coexistence of small communities where all species experience ontogenetic trophic niche shifts. The life-history of each species is described by a physiologically structured model and species identity is characterised by the trait: size at maturation. We show that a single species can exist in two different states: a 'resource driven state' and a 'cannibalistic state' with a large scope for emergent Allee effects and bistable states. Two species can coexist in two different configurations: in a 'competitive coexistence' state when the ratio between sizes at maturation of the two species is less than a predator-prey mass ratio and the resource level is low to intermediate, or in a 'trophic ladder' state if the ratio of sizes at maturation is larger than the predator-prey mass ratio at all resource levels. While there is a large scope for coexistence of two species, the scope for coexistence of three species is limited and we conclude that further trait differentiation is required for coexistence of more species-rich size-structured communities. PMID:23927897

  19. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  20. Non-yrast states and shape co-existence in light Pt isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. M.; Dracoulis, G. D.; Kibédi, T.; Byrne, A. P.; Anderssen, S. S.; Baxter, A. M.; Fabricius, B.; Lane, G. J.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    1999-09-01

    Low-lying states in the even-even light platinum isotopes 176Pt, 178Pt, 180Pt and 182Pt have been populated using β+ /EC decay from parent gold nuclei, created in (HI, xn) reactions. State energies, spins and parities and γ-ray branching ratios were determined using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy. Whereas non-yrast states were observed in 178Pt, 180Pt and 182Pt, none were seen in 176Pt. The excitation energies of the observed states are analysed in terms of a band-mixing model, yielding the moments of inertia of the unperturbed bands. Branching ratios and ground-state-band quadrupole moments are calculated and compared with experimental values. The results indicate that the two lowest-lying 0 + states in each of the light Pt isotopes are formed from the mixing of two intrinsic states of different deformation, and other low-lying states can be described as admixtures of rotational states built on these intrinsic states, and on γ-vibrational states.

  1. Decay-out of 151Tb Yrast Superdeformed Band and Shape Coexistence

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G.; Robin, J.; Odahara, A.; Byrski, Th.; Beck, F.A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Curien, D.; Courtin, S.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Joshi, P.; Nourreddine, A.; Pachoud, E.; Piqueras, I.; Vivien, J.P.; Twin, P.J.; Cullen, D.M.; Ertueck, S.; King, S.L.; Paul, E.S.

    2004-02-27

    Linking transitions between the superdeformed (SD) and the normal deformed (ND) wells have been searched in 151Tb nucleus. Two experiments of 5 and 17 days have been performed with EUROBALL IV. Transitions of 2818 keV and 3748 keV with intensities of about 1 % relative to the yrast SD band have been observed. Their decay-out properties are discussed in the text. In addition the eight known SD bands have been extended towards higher rotational frequencies where orbital crossings are observed. For the first time, weakly populated collective ND structures, likely triaxial, similar to the ones recently identified in 152Dy, 153Ho and 155Er nuclei have been observed in 151Tb. The SD and ND structures are interpreted in the frame of Woods-Saxon theoretical calculations.

  2. Triaxial shape coexistence and new aligned band in {sup 178}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajesh; Govil, I. M.; Dhal, A.; Chaturvedi, L.; Praharaj, C. R.; Rath, A. K.; Kumar, G. Kiran; Basu, S. K.; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pattabiraman, N. S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.

    2009-11-15

    High spin states in {sup 178}Os were studied by means of {sup 165}Ho({sup 20}Ne,p6n){sup 178}Os fusion evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 150 MeV, using a clover detector array. Several new transitions belonging to {sup 178}Os were placed in a level scheme and a new aligned rotational band was observed in addition to earlier known bands. Spin-parity assignments for most of the proposed levels were made using the deduced directional correlation orientation and polarization measurements for the de-exciting transitions. Experimental results are compared with the projected angular momentum deformed Hartree-Fock model calculations and cranked Woods-Saxon model calculations. This nucleus is predicted to be prolate deformed in the ground state but the {gamma}-softness at higher excitation is revealed by the cranked Woods-Saxon model and the geometrical asymmetric model calculations.

  3. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-01

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in α-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyväskylä) are also highlighted. The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region — spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  4. Shape Coexistence in Pb-Rn Nuclei Studied by Particle Decay Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreyev, A. N.

    2006-08-14

    This contribution reviews the results of recent experiments at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt) in which a number of very neutron-deficient nuclei with Z=83-88 and N< 126 were studied in detail and new nuclides 186,187Po, 192At and 193,194Rn were identified. Complete fusion reactions at beam energies close to the Coulomb barrier were used, followed by particle detection with various detection systems. Peculiarities in {alpha}-decay characteristics of the 186-191Po isotopes are discussed in detail. Very recent results for the neutron-deficient At-Ra nuclei from the gas-filled separator RITU (JYFL, Jyvaeskylae) are also highlighted.The application of a new method to reach nuclei in this region - spallation-evaporation reactions of 238U ions at 1 AGeV on a Be target, followed by the separation with the FRS at GSI is discussed as well.

  5. Shape coexistence in {sup 180}Hg studied through the {beta} decay of {sup 180}Tl

    SciTech Connect

    Elseviers, J.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Seliverstov, M.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseyev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Franchoo, S.; Page, R. D.

    2011-09-15

    The {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 180}Tl and excited states in the daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg have been investigated at the CERN On-Line Isotope Mass Separator (ISOLDE) facility. Many new low-lying energy levels were observed in {sup 180}Hg, of which the most significant are the 0{sub 2}{sup +} at 419.6 keV and the 2{sub 2}{sup +} at 601.3 keV. The former is the bandhead of an excited band in {sup 180}Hg assumed originally to be of prolate nature. From the {beta} feeding to the different states in {sup 180}Hg, the ground-state spin of {sup 180}Tl was deduced to be (4{sup -},5{sup -}).

  6. Deformation and mixing of coexisting shapes in neutron-deficient polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesteloot, N.; Bastin, B.; Gaffney, L. P.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Auranen, K.; Bauer, C.; Bender, M.; Bildstein, V.; Blazhev, A.; Bönig, S.; Bree, N.; Clément, E.; Cocolios, T. E.; Damyanova, A.; Darby, I.; De Witte, H.; Di Julio, D.; Diriken, J.; Fransen, C.; García-Ramos, J. E.; Gernhäuser, R.; Grahn, T.; Heenen, P.-H.; Hess, H.; Heyde, K.; Huyse, M.; Iwanicki, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Konki, J.; Kröll, T.; Laurent, B.; Lecesne, N.; Lutter, R.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Piselli, E.; Próchniak, L.; Rahkila, P.; Rapisarda, E.; Reiter, P.; Scheck, M.; Seidlitz, M.; Sferrazza, M.; Siebeck, B.; Sjodin, M.; Tornqvist, H.; Traykov, E.; Van De Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Vermeulen, M.; Voulot, D.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wimmer, K.; Zielińska, M.

    2015-11-01

    Coulomb-excitation experiments are performed with postaccelerated beams of neutron-deficient Po 196 ,198 ,200 ,202 isotopes at the REX-ISOLDE facility. A set of matrix elements, coupling the low-lying states in these isotopes, is extracted. In the two heaviest isotopes, Po,202200, the transitional and diagonal matrix elements of the 21+ state are determined. In Po,198196 multistep Coulomb excitation is observed, populating the 41+,02+ , and 22+ states. The experimental results are compared to the results from the measurement of mean-square charge radii in polonium isotopes, confirming the onset of deformation from 196Po onwards. Three model descriptions are used to compare to the data. Calculations with the beyond-mean-field model, the interacting boson model, and the general Bohr Hamiltonian model show partial agreement with the experimental data. Finally, calculations with a phenomenological two-level mixing model hint at the mixing of a spherical structure with a weakly deformed rotational structure.

  7. Spatial variation and density-dependent dispersal in competitive coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that dispersal from localities favourable to a species' growth and reproduction (sources) can prevent competitive exclusion in unfavourable localities (sinks). What is perhaps less well known is that too much emigration can undermine the viability of sources and cause regional competitive exclusion. Here, I investigate two biological mechanisms that reduce the cost of dispersal to source communities. The first involves increasing the spatial variation in the strength of competition such that sources can withstand high rates of emigration; the second involves reducing emigration from sources via density-dependent dispersal. I compare how different forms of spatial variation and modes of dispersal influence source viability, and hence source-sink coexistence, under dominance and pre-emptive competition. A key finding is that, while spatial variation substantially reduces dispersal costs under both types of competition, density-dependent dispersal does so only under dominance competition. For instance, when spatial variation in the strength of competition is high, coexistence is possible (regardless of the type of competition) even when sources experience high emigration rates; when spatial variation is low, coexistence is restricted even under low emigration rates. Under dominance competition, density-dependent dispersal has a strong effect on coexistence. For instance, when the emigration rate increases with density at an accelerating rate (Type III density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is possible even when spatial variation is quite low; when the emigration rate increases with density at a decelerating rate (Type II density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is restricted even when spatial variation is quite high. Under pre-emptive competition, density-dependent dispersal has only a marginal effect on coexistence. Thus, the diversity-reducing effects of high dispersal rates persist under pre-emptive competition even when dispersal is density

  8. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R. A.; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008), 10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged.

  9. Phase coexistence of a Stockmayer fluid in an applied field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Mark J.; Grest, Gary S.

    1995-06-01

    We examine two apects of Stockmayer fluids, which consist of point dipoles that additionally interact via an attractive Lennard-Jones potential. We perform Monte Carlo simulations to examine the effect of an applied field on the liquid-gas phase coexistence and show that a magnetic fluid phase does exist in the absence of an applied field. As part of the search for the magnetic fluid phase, we perform Gibbs ensemble simulations to determine phase coexistence curves at large dipole moments, μ. The critical temperature is found to depend linearly on μ2 for intermediate values of μ beyond the initial nonlinear behavior near μ=0 and less than the μ where no liquid-gas phase coexistence has been found. For phase coexistence in an applied field, the critical temperatures as a function of the applied field for two different μ are mapped onto a single curve. The critical densities change very little as a function of applied field. We also verify that in an applied field the liquid droplets within the two-phase coexistence region become elongated in the direction of the field.

  10. Coexistence of competing metabolic pathways in well-mixed populations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lenin; Amado, André; Campos, Paulo R A; Ferreira, Fernando Fagundes

    2016-05-01

    Understanding why strains with different metabolic pathways that compete for a single limiting resource coexist is a challenging issue within a theoretical perspective. Previous investigations rely on mechanisms such as group or spatial structuring to achieve a stable coexistence between competing metabolic strategies. Nevertheless, coexistence has been experimentally reported even in situations where it cannot be attributed to spatial effects [Heredity 100, 471 (2008)HDTYAT0018-067X10.1038/sj.hdy.6801073]. According to that study a toxin expelled by one of the strains can be responsible for the stable maintenance of the two strain types. We propose a resource-based model in which an efficient strain with a slow metabolic rate competes with a second strain type which presents a fast but inefficient metabolism. Moreover, the model assumes that the inefficient strain produces a toxin as a by-product. This toxin affects the growth rate of both strains with different strength. Through an extensive exploration of the parameter space we determine the situations at which the coexistence of the two strains is possible. Interestingly, we observe that the resource influx rate plays a key role in the maintenance of the two strain types. In a scenario of resource scarcity the inefficient is favored, though as the resource influx rate is augmented the coexistence becomes possible and its domain is enlarged. PMID:27300918

  11. SAFSTOR and License Renewal: Making Them Coexist

    SciTech Connect

    Henries, William PE

    2008-01-15

    The Indian Point Energy Center is located on the eastern shore of the Hudson River in the town of Buchanan, New York. It lies approximately thirty miles north of New York City, and thus, holds the distinction of being the closest nuclear facility to a major metropolitan area. Units 1 and 2 were constructed and operated by Consolidated Edison and Unit 3 was owned and operated by the New York State Power Authority. All three units are now owned and operated by Entergy Nuclear- Northeast. Indian Point Unit 1 was powered by a pressurized water reactor which operated with an authorized maximum steady state power level of 615 thermal megawatts until October 31, 1974. On June 19, 1980, the Commission issued an order revoking authority to operate the facility. Although 244 spent fuel assemblies were successfully shipped offsite to a spent fuel reprocessing facility, 160 assemblies remain in the Unit 1 spent fuel pool awaiting relocation to dry cask storage. Units 2 and 3 are also pressurized water reactors which each produce slightly in excess of 1,000 MWe. Since 1974, Unit 1 has been maintained in a Safe Store Mode (SAFSTOR). For the purposes of this document, the term 'SAFSTOR' is intended to mean 'Custodial SAFSTOR' as described in section 2.4.3 of NUREG 0586 (Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (GEIS) as follows: 'Custodial SAFSTOR requires a minimum cleanup and decontamination effort initially, followed by a period of continuing care with the active protection systems (principally the ventilation system) kept in service throughout the storage period. Full-time onsite surveillance by operating and security forces is required to carry out radiation monitoring, to maintain the equipment, and to prevent accidental or deliberate intrusion into the facility and the subsequent exposure to radiation or the disposal of radioactivity beyond the confines of the facility'. The decision to enter SAFSTOR was based upon the immediate

  12. [Coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children].

    PubMed

    Krawiec, Paulina; Pawłowska-Kamieniak, Agnieszka; Pac-Kożuchowska, Elżbieta; Mroczkowska-Juchkiewcz, Agnieszka; Kominek, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease are chronic inflammatory conditions of gastrointestinal tract with complex aetiology with genetic, environmental and immunological factors contributing to its pathogenesis. It was noted that immune-mediated disorders often coexist. There is well-known association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes and ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, growing body of literature suggests the association between coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, particularly ulcerative colitis. This is an extremely rare problem in paediatric gastroenterology. To date there have been reported several cases of children with coexisting coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Herewith we present review of current literature on coexistence of coeliac disease and inflammatory bowel disease in children. PMID:26891438

  13. The Coexistence of Rathke Cleft Cyst and Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingtong; An, Yanyan; Huang, Zhihong; Niu, Jianyi; Yuan, Xunhui; Bai, Yun'an; Guo, Liemei

    2016-03-01

    Both of Pituitary adenoma (PA) and Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) are the most common and benign sellar lesions. Generally, the origin of RCC is considered to be derived from remnants of Rathke punch, while PA is formed by proliferation of the anterior wall of Rathke pouch. Although they have a possibility to share a common embryological origin, the coexistence of PA and RCC is extremely rare. Here, the authors report a 50-year-old male patient who was found to have a large cystic sellar lesion, and surgical resection revealed components of a RCC coexisting with a PA. This collision reminded us of the possibility of RCC coexisting with PA. Furthermore, a clinicopathologic relation of them were reviewed and investigated. PMID:26845092

  14. Diversity and becoming: implications of human existence as coexistence.

    PubMed

    Cody, William K

    2003-07-01

    Better ways of understanding and working with human diversity are needed in the healthcare and human service disciplines. Nursing, as the discipline that cares for whole persons throughout their lives and meets people where they are, is ideally suited to provide leadership to this effort. In this column, the author explores human diversity by explicating human existence as coexistence, with implications for nursing. The author locates his worldview within the human becoming school of thought. Human diversity and human existence as coexistence are explored within this context, with implications for nursing as a discipline identified. Ideas that are crucial in the explication of human existence as coexistence are difference, imagination, creativity, and wholeness. PMID:12876874

  15. Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Busch, Justin T A; Legare, Cristine H

    2015-10-01

    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due to the lack of industrialization and the relatively recent introduction of Christianity and Western education. We argue for the integration of interdisciplinary methodologies from cognitive science and anthropology to inform research on explanatory coexistence. PMID:26350158

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of guest species in clathrate hydrates: Line-shape anisotropies, chemical shifts, and the determination of cage occupancy ratios and hydration numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Ratcliffe, C.I.; Ripmeester, J.A. )

    1990-01-11

    NMR spectra of the guest molecules PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}Se, D{sub 2}Se, D{sub 2}S, CD{sub 3}F, CD{sub 3}Cl, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}D{sub 4} in their structure I clathrate hydrates have been obtained by use of {sup 2}H, {sup 19}F, {sup 31}P, and {sup 77}Se nuclei. Components due to guests in the small and large cages have been distinguished by using isotropic chemical shift and static line-shape anisotropy differences. Low-temperature magic angle spinning was used in some cases to resolve the two components. Guests in the small cages are invariably found to have a lower field isotropic shift than those in the large cage. The static line shapes are isotropic for guests in the small spherical cages, whereas in the large oblate cages they have a residual anisotropy. Relative cage occupancy ratios {theta}{sub S}/{theta}{sub L} have been obtained from the observed NMR intensities, and together with similar results from previous NMR studies, these have been used to derive hydration numbers. This represents a new and nondestructive method of determining structure I hydrate compositions.

  17. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy coexists with acquired chronic hepatocerebral degeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng-Zhen; Hou, Xuan; Zhou, Tie-Qiao; Chen, Si

    2015-07-01

    Hyperkinetic extrapyramidal syndrome is the typical clinical characteristic of acquired hepatocerebral degeneration (AHD), but is usually not observed with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). We present a case of AHD coexisting with HE. Both conditions were secondary to liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus infection. The brain MRI showed bilateral and symmetric high T1 signal-intensity in the globus pallidus, and diffuse high signal-intensity of the hemispheric white matter on T2-FLAIR images. As we usually neglect the existence of AHD, the diagnosis is often ignored, especially when it coexists with HE. This case highlights the need to distinguish irreversible AHD from HE. PMID:26166598

  19. Evolution of Dispersal with Starvation Measure and Coexistence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Jung; Kwon, Ohsang

    2016-02-01

    Many biological species increase their dispersal rate if starvation starts. To model such a behavior, we need to understand how organisms measure starvation and response to it. In this paper, we compare three different ways of measuring starvation by applying them to starvation-driven diffusion. The evolutional selection and coexistence of such starvation measures are studied within the context of Lotka-Volterra-type competition model of two species. We will see that, if species have different starvation measures and different motility functions, both the coexistence and selection are possible. PMID:26817757

  20. Boundary of Phase Co-existence in Docosahexaenoic Acid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda S.

    2011-11-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a highly polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that exhibits six double bonds in the hydrocarbon tail. It induces phase separation of the membrane into liquid order and liquid disorder in mixtures containing other lipids with more saturation and cholesterol. With the utilization of atomic force microscopy, phase co-existence is observed in lipid mixtures containing DHA on a single supported lipid bilayer. The boundary of phase co-existence with decreasing DHA concentration is explored. The elastic force, thickness, and roughness of the different phases are investigated.

  1. Biodefense research: can secrecy and safety coexist?

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laura H

    2004-01-01

    Over the next 10 years, the United States will spend 6 billion US dollars to develop countermeasures against biological and chemical weapons. Much of this research on highly virulent pathogens will be done in academic settings around the country. This article explores the challenges in ensuring secrecy to protect national security while accommodating the right of local communities to have access to safety information regarding select agents and laboratory-acquired infections. Secrecy has been defended as being vital for protecting national security. Problems with secrecy can include the misinterpretation of intentions, particularly in laboratories located in nuclear weapons design facilities, and the restricted access to information relevant to public health and safety. While federal select agent legislation requires laboratories to have emergency plans in place with first responders, these plans do not necessarily include public health professionals, who will be responsible for any future public health action, such as quarantine, surveillance, or mass vaccinations, in the unlikely event that a laboratory-acquired infection spreads into a community. Laboratory-acquired infections do occur, even with the best safety mechanisms in place; however, the epidemiology of the incidence and severity of these infections are not known since there is no national surveillance reporting system. Evidence suggests that many of these infections occur in the absence of an actual laboratory accident. The best emergency plans and surveillance systems are only as good as the participation and vigilance of the laboratory workers themselves. Thus, laboratory workers have a responsibility to themselves and others to report all laboratory accidents and spills, regardless how minor. In addition, they should have a lower threshold than normal in seeking medical attention when feeling ill, and their physicians should be aware of what pathogens they work with to reduce the risk of a delay in

  2. Alpha-particles as probes of nuclear shape in the rare earths and structure effects on proton emission in the mass 80 region

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantites, D.G.; Nicolis, N.G.; Abenante, V.; Majka, Z.; Semkow, T.M. . Dept. of Internal Medicine); Baktash, C.; Beene, J.R.; Garcia-Bermudez, G.; Halbert, M.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Johnson, N.R.; Lee, I.Y.; McGowan, F.K.; Riley, M.A.; Virtanen, A. ); Griffin, H.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Low emission barriers and large subbarrier anisotropies in the alpha-particle decay with respect to the spin direction, of Sn and rare earth compound nuclei, are examined in the light of recent calculations incorporating deformation. For the rare earth systems deformation which increases with spin is necessary to explain the data. Energy spectra and angular correlations of evaporated protons from the {sup 52}Cr({sup 34}S, 2p2n){sup 82}Sr reaction were measured in coincidence with discrete transition. Large changes in the shape of the proton spectra were observed when high spin states in different rotation al bands are populated. These effects cannot be explained by phase space arguments in the deexcitation process. They are interpreted as due to near-yrast to near-yrast stretched proton emission, which preferentially populates the yrast band by subbarrier protons. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Coexistence of Bulk and Surface Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations in Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Qu, Fanming; Du, Rui-Rui; Lu, Li

    2013-03-01

    Topological insulator possesses insulating bulk state and spin-momentum interlocked conducting topological surface state. Among many materials, bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) is an important candidate, which hosts a single Dirac cone in the surface energy spectrum. In electron transport measurements, 3-dimensional Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations of bulk state were observed. Under a very high magnetic field, our rotating sample experimental results exhibit the coexistence of bulk and surface SdH oscillations: Hall bar shape device based on Bi2Se3 nano-plate was fabricated and studied at a dilution temperature with a tilted magnetic field up to 45 T. Three types of carrier, one of 3-dimensional and two of 2-dimensional, were identified by analyzing the angular dependence of SdH oscillations, which confirmed the coexistence of bulk carrier and band bending induced two-dimensional electron gas in transport experiment. The co-contributions to quantum oscillations indicated the independence of these states, without smearing out by scattering with each other, which may pave off the way for studying topological surface states with residual bulk carriers in Bi2Se3. The data analysis and experimental results are included in the presentation. We would like to thank National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) in Florida, in which the high magnetic field measurements were conducted.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of CO2 hydrates: Prediction of three phase coexistence line.

    PubMed

    Míguez, J M; Conde, M M; Torré, J-P; Blas, F J; Piñeiro, M M; Vega, C

    2015-03-28

    The three phase equilibrium line (hydrate-liquid water-liquid carbon dioxide) has been estimated for the water + carbon dioxide binary mixture using molecular dynamics simulation and the direct coexistence technique. Both molecules have been represented using rigid nonpolarizable models. TIP4P/2005 and TIP4P/Ice were used for the case of water, while carbon dioxide was considered as a three center linear molecule with the parameterizations of MSM, EPM2, TraPPE, and ZD. The influence of the initial guest occupancy fraction on the hydrate stability has been analyzed first in order to determine the optimal starting configuration for the simulations, paying attention to the influence of the two different cells existing in the sI hydrate structure. The three phase coexistence temperature was then determined for a pressure range from 2 to 500 MPa. The qualitative shape of the equilibrium curve estimated is correct, including the high pressure temperature maximum that determines the hydrate re-entrant behaviour. However, in order to obtain quantitative agreement with experimental results, a positive deviation from the classical Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules must be considered. PMID:25833594

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of CO2 hydrates: Prediction of three phase coexistence line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Míguez, J. M.; Conde, M. M.; Torré, J.-P.; Blas, F. J.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Vega, C.

    2015-03-01

    The three phase equilibrium line (hydrate-liquid water-liquid carbon dioxide) has been estimated for the water + carbon dioxide binary mixture using molecular dynamics simulation and the direct coexistence technique. Both molecules have been represented using rigid nonpolarizable models. TIP4P/2005 and TIP4P/Ice were used for the case of water, while carbon dioxide was considered as a three center linear molecule with the parameterizations of MSM, EPM2, TraPPE, and ZD. The influence of the initial guest occupancy fraction on the hydrate stability has been analyzed first in order to determine the optimal starting configuration for the simulations, paying attention to the influence of the two different cells existing in the sI hydrate structure. The three phase coexistence temperature was then determined for a pressure range from 2 to 500 MPa. The qualitative shape of the equilibrium curve estimated is correct, including the high pressure temperature maximum that determines the hydrate re-entrant behaviour. However, in order to obtain quantitative agreement with experimental results, a positive deviation from the classical Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules must be considered.

  6. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices. PMID:27325441

  7. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  8. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices. PMID:27325441

  9. High-spin nuclear structure studies with radioactive ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1992-12-31

    Two important developments in the sixties, namely the advent of heavy-ion accelerators and fabrication of Ge detectors, opened the way for the experimental studies of nuclear properties at high angular momentum. Addition of a new degree of freedom, namely spin, made it possible to observe such fascinating phenomena as occurrences and coexistence of a variety of novel shapes, rise, fall and occasionally rebirth of nuclear collectivity, and disappearance of pairing correlations. Today, with the promise of development of radioactive ion beams (RIB) and construction of the third-generation Ge-detection systems (GAMMASPHERE and EUROBALL), the authors are poised to explore new and equally fascinating phenomena that have been hitherto inaccessible. With the addition of yet another dimension, namely the isospin, they will be able to observe and verify predictions for exotic shapes as varied as rigid triaxiality, hyperdeformation and triaxial octupole shapes, or to investigate the T = 0 pairing correlations. In this paper, they shall review, separately for neutron-deficient and neutron-rich nuclei, these and a few other new high-spin physics opportunities that may be realized with RIB. Following this discussion, they shall present a list of the beam species, intensities and energies that are needed to fulfill these goals. The paper will conclude with a description of the experimental techniques and instrumentations that are required for these studies.

  10. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jonas S; Røder, Henriette L; Russel, Jakob; Sørensen, Helle; Burmølle, Mette; Sørensen, Søren J

    2016-09-01

    Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However, the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when co-culturing bacteria from environments where long-term coexistence was unlikely to have occurred. Phylogenetic diversity was not found to be a strong underlying factor but a relation between biofilm induction and phylogenetic history was found. The data indicates that biofilm reduction is typically correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence. PMID:27119650

  11. Beyond Coexistence: Toward a More Reflective Religious Pluralism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblith, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    If a pluralistic democratic state such as the United States wishes to move beyond coexistence and toward a more reflective religious pluralism, then public schools must take epistemic issues seriously. Taking a cue from multicultural education, many have called for including the study of religion from a cultural perspective. I argue instead that,…

  12. Tracking neighbours promotes the coexistence of large carnivores

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Mattisson, Jenny; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Andrén, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The study of competition and coexistence among similar interacting species has long been considered a cornerstone in evolutionary and community ecology. However, understanding coexistence remains a challenge. Using two similar and sympatric competing large carnivores, Eurasian lynx and wolverines, we tested the hypotheses that tracking among heterospecifics and reactive responses to potential risk decreases the probability of an agonistic encounter when predators access shared food resources, thus facilitating coexistence. Lynx and wolverines actively avoided each other, with the degree of avoidance being greater for simultaneous than time-delayed predator locations. Wolverines reacted to the presence of lynx at relatively short distances (mean: 383 m). In general, lynx stayed longer, and were more stationary, around reindeer carcasses than wolverines. However, when both predators were present at the same time around a carcass, lynx shortened their visits, while wolverine behavior did not change. Our results support the idea that risk avoidance is a reactive, rather than a predictive, process. Since wolverines have adapted to coexist with lynx, exploiting lynx-killed reindeer carcasses while avoiding potential encounters, the combined presence of both predators may reduce wolverine kill rate and thus the total impact of these predators on semi-domestic reindeer in Scandinavia. Consequently, population management directed at lynx may affect wolverine populations and human-wolverine conflicts. PMID:26979573

  13. Tracking neighbours promotes the coexistence of large carnivores.

    PubMed

    López-Bao, José Vicente; Mattisson, Jenny; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Andrén, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The study of competition and coexistence among similar interacting species has long been considered a cornerstone in evolutionary and community ecology. However, understanding coexistence remains a challenge. Using two similar and sympatric competing large carnivores, Eurasian lynx and wolverines, we tested the hypotheses that tracking among heterospecifics and reactive responses to potential risk decreases the probability of an agonistic encounter when predators access shared food resources, thus facilitating coexistence. Lynx and wolverines actively avoided each other, with the degree of avoidance being greater for simultaneous than time-delayed predator locations. Wolverines reacted to the presence of lynx at relatively short distances (mean: 383 m). In general, lynx stayed longer, and were more stationary, around reindeer carcasses than wolverines. However, when both predators were present at the same time around a carcass, lynx shortened their visits, while wolverine behavior did not change. Our results support the idea that risk avoidance is a reactive, rather than a predictive, process. Since wolverines have adapted to coexist with lynx, exploiting lynx-killed reindeer carcasses while avoiding potential encounters, the combined presence of both predators may reduce wolverine kill rate and thus the total impact of these predators on semi-domestic reindeer in Scandinavia. Consequently, population management directed at lynx may affect wolverine populations and human-wolverine conflicts. PMID:26979573

  14. Factors determining crystal--liquid coexistence under shear.

    PubMed

    Butler, Scott; Harrowell, Peter

    2002-02-28

    The interaction between an imposed shear flow and an order--disorder transition underlies a broad range of phenomena. Under the influence of shear flow, a variety of soft matter is observed to spontaneously form bands characterized by different local order---for example, thermotropic liquid crystals subjected to shear flow exhibit rich phase behaviour. The stability of order under the influence of shear flow is also fundamental to understanding frictional wear and lubrication. Although there exists a well developed theoretical approach to the influence of shear flow on continuous transitions in fluid mixtures, little is known about the underlying principles governing non-equilibrium coexistence between phases of different symmetry. Here we show, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a system of spherical particles, that a stationary coexistence exists between a strained crystal and the shearing liquid, and that this coexistence cannot be accounted for by invoking a non-equilibrium analogue of the chemical potential. Instead of such thermodynamic arguments, we argue that a balancing of the crystal growth rate with the rate of surface erosion by the shearing melt can account for the observed coexistence. PMID:11875564

  15. Coexistence of continuous variable QKD with intense DWDM classical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rupesh; Qin, Hao; Alléaume, Romain

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the feasibility of continuous variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) in dense-wavelength-division multiplexing networks (DWDM), where QKD will typically have to coexist with several co-propagating (forward or backward) C-band classical channels whose launch power is around 0 dBm. We have conducted experimental tests of the coexistence of CV-QKD multiplexed with an intense classical channel, for different input powers and different DWDM wavelengths. Over a 25 km fiber, a CV-QKD operated over the 1530.12 nm channel can tolerate the noise arising from up to 11.5 dBm classical channel at 1550.12 nm in the forward direction (9.7 dBm in backward). A positive key rate (0.49 kbits s-1) can be obtained at 75 km with classical channel power of respectively -3 and -9 dBm in forward and backward. Based on these measurements, we have also simulated the excess noise and optimized channel allocation for the integration of CV-QKD in some access networks. We have, for example, shown that CV-QKD could coexist with five pairs of channels (with nominal input powers: 2 dBm forward and 1 dBm backward) over a 25 km WDM-PON network. The obtained results demonstrate the outstanding capacity of CV-QKD to coexist with classical signals of realistic intensity in optical networks.

  16. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses. PMID:23077484

  17. Tracking the Roundup Ready® gene: implications for coexistence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA has been conducting research to address concerns voiced by the alfalfa industry regarding the coexistence of genetically engineered and non-GE alfalfa seed production. In 2011 a survey was conducted to get a baseline estimate of the presence of transgenic roadside alfalfa plants. We surveye...

  18. 78 FR 79660 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... period for the notice published on November 4, 2013 (78 FR 65960) is extended. We will consider all... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On November 4, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 65960-65962, Docket... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Extension of...

  19. Climate change threatens coexistence within communities of Mediterranean forested wetlands.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Arianna; Valentini, Riccardo; Paparella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what are the conditions sustaining tree diversity in Mediterranean wet forests under future scenarios of altered hydrological regimes. The core of the work is a quantitative, dynamic model describing the coexistence of different Mediterranean tree species, typical of arid or semi-arid wetlands. Two kind of species, i.e. Hygrophilous (drought sensitive, flood resistant) and Non-hygrophilous (drought resistant, flood sensitive), are broadly defined according to the distinct adaptive strategies of trees against water stress of summer drought and winter flooding. We argue that at intermediate levels of water supply the dual role of water (resource and stress) results in the coexistence of the two kind of species. A bifurcation analysis allows us to assess the effects of climate change on the coexistence of the two species in order to highlight the impacts of predicted climate scenarios on tree diversity. Specifically, the model has been applied to Mediterranean coastal swamp forests of Central Italy located at Castelporziano Estate and Circeo National Park. Our results show that there are distinct rainfall thresholds beyond which stable coexistence becomes impossible. Regional climatic projections show that the lower rainfall threshold may be approached or crossed during the XXI century, calling for an urgent adaptation and mitigation response to prevent biodiversity losses. PMID:23077484

  20. Coexistence in a multispecies assemblage of eagles in central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzner, Todd; Bragin, E.; Knick, Steven T.; Smith, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated factors that permit species coexistence in an exceptional assemblage of similar raptor species at the Naurzum Zapovednik (a national nature reserve) in north-central Kazakhstan. White-tailed Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), Golden Eagle (A. chrysaetos), and Steppe Eagle (A. nipalensis) all breed at the Zapovednik. Steppe Eagle use of nesting resources was distinct from that of tree-nesting species. We evaluated differences in nest tree and nest habitat characteristics, nest dimensions and positions, and nest spacing among the three forest-dwelling eagle species to distinguish between the effects of inter- and intraspecific resource limitations on species coexistence. Although the different species bred in similar habitat and sometimes reused other species' nests, the dimensions, positions and locations of their nests often differed. These differences did not appear to result from interspecific competition. Nest spacing trends were also species specific; Imperial Eagles generally nested farther from other eagle nests than did Golden Eagles and White-tailed Sea-Eagles. Intraspecific variation in habitat, physical characteristics, and spacing patterns of Imperial Eagle nests was extensive throughout the nature reserve. Although interspecific partitioning of nesting habitat may allow coexistence of ground-nesting Steppe Eagles, interspecific competition did not appear to be a primary determinant of the use of nest habitat, space, or nests by tree-nesting species. Rather, interspecific effects appeared secondary to intraspecific effects in determining coexistence of tree-nesting eagles at this site.

  1. Coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There is a selective review of the literature concerning the coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses on the principles of serological tests towards coeliac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and metabolic control measures as a result of a gluten-free diet. PMID:24868293

  2. Physical properties, structure, and shape of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident derived from soil, bamboo and shiitake mushroom measurements.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tuyen, Ninh Duc; Komatsuzaki, Masakazu; Motohashi, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an elution experiment with contaminated soils using various aqueous reagent solutions and autoradiography measurements of contaminated bamboo shoots and shiitake mushrooms to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Based on our study results and data in the literature, we conclude that the active Cs emitted by the accident fell to the ground as granular non-ionic materials. Therefore, they were not adsorbed or trapped by minerals in the soil, but instead physically adhere to the rough surfaces of the soil mineral particles. Granular Cs* can be transferred among media, such as soils and plants. The physical properties and dynamic behavior of the granular Cs* is expected to be helpful in considering methods for decontamination of soil, litter, and other media. PMID:24445055

  3. Coexistence of Bulk and Surface Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations in Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Fanming; Zhang, Chi; Du, Rui-Rui; Lu, Li

    2013-03-01

    Our Hall bar shape device based on Bi2Se3 nano-plate was fabricated and studied at a dilution temperature with a tilted magnetic field up to 45 Tesla. It is found that, three types of carriers, one of three-dimensional (3D) and two of two-dimensional (2D), were identified by analyzing the angular dependence of Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations, which confirmed the coexistence of bulk carriers and band bending induced two-dimensional electron gas in our transport experiment. The co-contributions to quantum oscillations indicated the independence of these states, without smearing out by scattering between each other, which may lay the foundations for detecting topological surface states (TSS) with residual bulk carriers in Bi2Se3.

  4. Superconductivity and Magnetism in iron-pnictides: co-existence or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Anton

    2011-03-01

    In this talk I will review the weak-coupling approach to describe the interplay of two electronic orders: superconductivity (SC) in the form of Cooper pairs, and magnetism in the form of the spin-density waves (SDW). The two orders, traditionally thought as incompatible, are close neighbors in magnetically-active Fe-based superconductors with surprisingly high Tc . Complex multi-band structure, multiple interactions and many families of these materials create a range of possible states of mingling between superconductivity and magnetism. I will present a list of different parameters, including (a) the Fermi surface shape, (b) the order parameter structure, (c) the relative strength of SC and SDW interactions, (d) the external magnetic field, and describe which properties, or their combinations, lead to co-existence or avoidance of SC and SDW orders, and how transition between the two orders occurs upon doping.

  5. Aggregation and species coexistence of ectoparasites of marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Morand, S; Poulin, R; Rohde, K; Hayward, C

    1999-05-01

    Interspecific interaction may lead to species exclusion but there are several ways in which species can coexist. One way is by reducing the overall intensity of competition via aggregated utilisation of fragmented resources. Known as the 'aggregation model of coexistence', this system assumes saturation and an equilibrium number of species per community. In this study we tested the effects of interspecific aggregation on the level of intraspecific aggregation among ectoparasites of marine fishes (36 communities of gill and head ectoparasite species). If parasite species are distributed in a way that interspecific aggregation is reduced relative to intraspecific aggregation then species coexistence is facilitated. We found a positive relationship between parasite species richness and fish body size, controlling for host phylogeny. A positive relationship between infracommunity species richness and total parasite species richness was also found, providing no evidence for saturation. This result supports the view that infracommunities of parasites are not saturated by local parasite residents. The observed lack of saturation implies that we are far from a full exploitation of the fish resource by parasites. Ectoparasites were aggregated at both population and species levels. However, only half of the ectoparasite communities were dominated by negative interspecific aggregation. We found that infracommunity parasite species richness was positively correlated with the level of intraspecific aggregation versus interspecific aggregation. This means that intraspecific aggregation increases compared with interspecific aggregation when total parasite species richness increases, controlling fish size and phylogeny. This supports one assumption of the 'aggregation model of coexistence', which predicts that interspecific interactions are reduced relative to intraspecific interactions, facilitating species coexistence. PMID:10404260

  6. Superordinate Shape Classification Using Natural Shape Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, John; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the classification of shapes into broad natural categories such as "animal" or "leaf". We asked whether such coarse classifications can be achieved by a simple statistical classification of the shape skeleton. We surveyed databases of natural shapes, extracting shape skeletons and tabulating their parameters within each…

  7. The role of Pleistocene glaciations in shaping the evolution of polar and brown bears. Evidence from a critical review of mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses.

    PubMed

    Hassanin, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    In this report, I review recent molecular studies dealing with the origin and evolution of polar bears (Ursus maritimus), with special emphasis on their relationships with brown bears (U. arctos). On the basis of mitochondrial and nuclear data, different hypotheses have been proposed, including rapid morphological differentiation of U. maritimus, genetic introgression from U. arctos into U. maritimus, or inversely from U. maritimus into U. arctos, involving either male- or female-mediated gene flow. In the light of available molecular and eco-ethological data, I suggest, firstly, that all divergences among major clades of large bears can be linked to glacial periods, secondly, that polar bears diverged from brown bears before 530 thousand years ago (ka), during one of the three glacial marine isotope stages (MIS) 14, 15.2 or 16, and, thirdly, that genetic introgression had occurred from female polar bears into brown bear populations during at least two glacial periods, at 340 ± 10 ka (MIS 10) in western Europe, and at 155 ± 5 ka (MIS 6) on the ABC islands of southeastern Alaska, and probably also in Beringia and Ireland based on ancient DNA sequences. PMID:26026577

  8. Coexisting static magnetic ordering and superconductivity in CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a heavy fermion system CeCu2.1 Si2 have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T(M) approximately 0.8 K, which coexists with superconductivity below T(c) = 0.7 K. The line shapes of the observed muon spin depolarization functions suggest an ordering in either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state, with a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit at T approaches 0.

  9. Coexistence of axial spondyloarthritis and thromboangiitis obliterans in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, G; Iannone, F; Rigante, D; Vitale, A; Mancini, M E; Covelli, M; Lapadula, G; Cantarini, L

    2015-01-01

    A peculiar coexistence of axial spondyloarthritis and ischemia of the feet and the fourth finger of the left hand in a young woman, who was a heavy smoker, is discussed in this report. This picture was considered within the context of thromboangiitis obliterans. Positivity of anti-nuclear antibodies and mild elevation of inflammatory parameters were noted. Computed tomography angiograms of upper and lower limbs showed luminal narrowing and occlusion of the left humeral, left anterior/posterior tibial and right anterior tibial arteries. Daily iloprost perfusions were started, and smoking cessation was strongly recommended. Coldness and rest pain in the distal extremities improved within a few weeks. The possibility that spondyloarthritis might precede the clinical picture of thromboangiitis obliterans should be considered in heavy smokers. PMID:26150270

  10. Field Evolution of Coexisting Superconducting and Magnetic Orders in CeCoIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroulakis, G.; Stewart, M. D., Jr.; Mitrović, V. F.; Horvatić, M.; Berthier, C.; Lapertot, G.; Flouquet, J.

    2010-02-01

    We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on the three distinct In sites of CeCoIn5 with a magnetic field applied in the [100] direction. We identify the microscopic nature of the long range magnetic order (LRO) stabilized at low temperatures in fields above 10.2 T while still in the superconducting (SC) state. We infer that the ordered moment is oriented along the c^ axis and map its field evolution. The study of the field dependence of the NMR shift for the different In sites indicates that the LRO likely coexists with a modulated SC phase, possibly that predicted by Fulde, Ferrell, Larkin, and Ovchinnikov. Furthermore, we discern a field region dominated by strong spin fluctuations where static LRO is absent and propose a revised phase diagram.

  11. Coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism by chemical design.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Eugenio; Martí-Gastaldo, Carlos; Navarro-Moratalla, Efrén; Ribera, Antonio; Blundell, Stephen J; Baker, Peter J

    2010-12-01

    Although the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in one compound is rare, some examples of such materials are known to exist. Methods to physically prepare hybrid structures with both competing phases are also known, which rely on the nanofabrication of alternating conducting layers. Chemical methods of building up hybrid materials with organic molecules (superconducting layers) and metal complexes (magnetic layers) have provided examples of superconductivity with some magnetic properties, but not fully ordered. Now, we report a chemical design strategy that uses the self assembly in solution of macromolecular nanosheet building blocks to engineer the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism in [Ni(0.66)Al(0.33)(OH)(2)][TaS(2)] at ∼4 K. The method is further demonstrated in the isostructural [Ni(0.66)Fe(0.33)(OH)(2)][TaS(2)], in which the magnetic ordering is shifted from 4 K to 16 K. PMID:21107366

  12. Coexistence of multiple metastable polytypes in rhombohedral bismuth

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yu; Hu, Wentao; Liu, Zhongyuan; Shen, Guoyin; Xu, Bo; Zhao, Zhisheng; He, Julong; Wang, Yanbin; Tian, Yongjun; Yu, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Derivative structural polytypes coexisting with the rhombohedral A7 structure of elemental bismuth (Bi) have been discovered at ambient condition, based on microstructure analyses of pure Bi samples treated under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Three structures with atomic positions close to those of the A7 structure have been identified through first-principles calculations, showing these polytypes energetically comparable to the A7 structure under ambient condition. Simulated diffraction data are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. We argue that previously reported some variations of physical properties (e.g., density, electrical conductivity, and magnetism) in bismuth could be due to the formation of these polytypes. The coexistence of metastable derivative structural polytypes may be a widely occurring phenomenon in other elemental materials. PMID:26883895

  13. Killer-sensitive coexistence in metapopulations of micro-organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Czárán, Tamás L; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2003-01-01

    Many micro-organisms are known to produce efficient toxic substances against conspecifics and closely related species. The widespread coexistence of killer (toxin producer) and sensitive (non-producer) strains is a puzzle calling for a theoretical explanation. Based on stochastic cellular automaton simulations and the corresponding semi-analytical configuration-field approximation models, we suggest that metapopulation dynamics offers a plausible rationale for the maintenance of polymorphism in killer-sensitive systems. A slight trade-off between toxin production and population growth rate is sufficient to maintain the regional coexistence of toxic and sensitive strains, if toxic killing is a local phenomenon restricted to small habitat patches and local populations regularly go extinct and are renewed via recolonizations from neighbouring patches. Pattern formation on the regional scale does not play a decisive part in this mechanism, but the local manner of interactions is essential. PMID:12965028

  14. What Coexists with the Ferromagnetic Metallic Phase in Manganites?

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, Mark H.; Hossain, M.A.; Sarkar, S.; Achkar, A.J.; Hawthorn, D.G.; Sutarto, R.; Chuang, 5 Y.-D.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Choi, Y.J.; Cheong, S.-W.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-07-25

    Colossal magnetoresistance, whereby the application of a magnetic field reduces the resistivity of a manganite by orders of magnitude, is generally believed to occur because of coexisting phases. Development of a complete theory to explain the phenomenon requires that the exact nature of these phases be known. We used resonant elastic soft x-ray scattering to examine the superlattice order that exists in La{sub 0.35}Pr{sub 0.275}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3} above and below the Curie temperature. By measuring the resonance profile of the scattered x-rays at different values of q, we disentangle the contributions of orbital order and antiferromagnetism to the scattering signal above the Curie temperature. Below the Curie temperature, we see no signal from orbital order, and only antiferromagnetism coexists with the dominant ferromagnetic metallic phase.

  15. Multiple myeloma presenting with coexisting severe marrow hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Medhi, K; Kalita, Dipti; Chopra, Anita; Anand, Mona; Raina, Vinod; Kumar, Rajive

    2008-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to us with clinical and bone marrow (BM) features compatible with aplastic anemia. The correct diagnosis, hypoplasia of the BM coexisting with multiple myeloma, became apparent after noting rouleaux in the peripheral blood (PB) and approximately 50% plasma cells in the touch imprint of one of the two BM biopsies done. As standard therapy was precluded, the patient was put on dexamethasone but died within 4 days. This first case of the coexistence of untreated myeloma with aplastic BM shows that even apparently straightforward hypoplasia seen on the BM biopsy should be interpreted in conjunction with the PB smear and the BM touch imprint findings. Among other things, the BM biopsy and imprint should be repeated if the PB has findings such as rouleaux that do not fit with straightforward aplastic anemia. The combination of myeloma and BM aplasia precludes standard therapy and is rapidly fatal. PMID:19008591

  16. Shape of Ar44: Onset of deformation in neutron-rich nuclei near Ca48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, M.; Görgen, A.; Clément, E.; Delaroche, J.-P.; Girod, M.; Korten, W.; Bürger, A.; Catford, W.; Dossat, C.; Iwanicki, J.; Libert, J.; Ljungvall, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Obertelli, A.; Piętak, D.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Sletten, G.; Srebrny, J.; Theisen, Ch.; Wrzosek, K.

    2009-07-01

    The development of deformation and shape coexistence in the vicinity of doubly magic Ca48, related to the weakening of the N=28 shell closure, was addressed in a low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment using a radioactive Ar44 beam from the SPIRAL facility at GANIL. The 21+ and 22+ states in Ar44 were excited on Pb208 and Ag109 targets at two different beam energies. B(E2) values between all observed states and the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the 21+ state were extracted from the differential Coulomb excitation cross sections, indicating a prolate shape of the Ar44 nucleus and giving evidence of an onset of deformation already two protons and two neutrons away from doubly magic Ca48. New Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov based configuration mixing calculations have been performed with the Gogny D1S interaction for Ar44 and neighboring nuclei using two different approaches: the angular momentum projected generator coordinate method considering axial quadrupole deformations and a five-dimensional approach including the triaxial degree of freedom. The experimental values and new calculations are furthermore compared to shell-model calculations and to relativistic mean-field calculations. The new results give insight into the weakening of the N=28 shell closure and the development of deformation in this neutron-rich region of the nuclear chart.

  17. Coexistence between wildlife and humans at fine spatial scales

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Neil H.; Shrestha, Binoj K.; Karki, Jhamak B.; Pradhan, Narendra Man Babu; Liu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Many wildlife species face imminent extinction because of human impacts, and therefore, a prevailing belief is that some wildlife species, particularly large carnivores and ungulates, cannot coexist with people at fine spatial scales (i.e., cannot regularly use the exact same point locations). This belief provides rationale for various conservation programs, such as resettling human communities outside protected areas. However, quantitative information on the capacity and mechanisms for wildlife to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales is scarce. Such information is vital, because the world is becoming increasingly crowded. Here, we provide empirical information about the capacity and mechanisms for tigers (a globally endangered species) to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales inside and outside Nepal’s Chitwan National Park, a flagship protected area for imperiled wildlife. Information obtained from field cameras in 2010 and 2011 indicated that human presence (i.e., people on foot and vehicles) was ubiquitous and abundant throughout the study site; however, tiger density was also high. Surprisingly, even at a fine spatial scale (i.e., camera locations), tigers spatially overlapped with people on foot and vehicles in both years. However, in both years, tigers offset their temporal activity patterns to be much less active during the day when human activity peaked. In addition to temporal displacement, tiger–human coexistence was likely enhanced by abundant tiger prey and low levels of tiger poaching. Incorporating fine-scale spatial and temporal activity patterns into conservation plans can help address a major global challenge—meeting human needs while sustaining wildlife. PMID:22949642

  18. Co-existent eosinophilic gastroenteritis and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Haeney, M. R.; Wilson, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    A case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 42-year-old man is described. The patient had diarrhoea, faecal blood loss, a protein-losing enteropathy, malabsorption of fat, xylose and vitamin B12. Co-existent hypopituitarism, diabetes insipidus and hypothalamic dysfunction was demonstrated. Complete clinical recovery occurred with pituitary replacement therapy alone. The association of this endocrine abnormality with the picture of eosinophilic gastroenteritis has not previously been described. Images Fig. 1 PMID:882484

  19. Coexistence between wildlife and humans at fine spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Carter, Neil H; Shrestha, Binoj K; Karki, Jhamak B; Pradhan, Narendra Man Babu; Liu, Jianguo

    2012-09-18

    Many wildlife species face imminent extinction because of human impacts, and therefore, a prevailing belief is that some wildlife species, particularly large carnivores and ungulates, cannot coexist with people at fine spatial scales (i.e., cannot regularly use the exact same point locations). This belief provides rationale for various conservation programs, such as resettling human communities outside protected areas. However, quantitative information on the capacity and mechanisms for wildlife to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales is scarce. Such information is vital, because the world is becoming increasingly crowded. Here, we provide empirical information about the capacity and mechanisms for tigers (a globally endangered species) to coexist with humans at fine spatial scales inside and outside Nepal's Chitwan National Park, a flagship protected area for imperiled wildlife. Information obtained from field cameras in 2010 and 2011 indicated that human presence (i.e., people on foot and vehicles) was ubiquitous and abundant throughout the study site; however, tiger density was also high. Surprisingly, even at a fine spatial scale (i.e., camera locations), tigers spatially overlapped with people on foot and vehicles in both years. However, in both years, tigers offset their temporal activity patterns to be much less active during the day when human activity peaked. In addition to temporal displacement, tiger-human coexistence was likely enhanced by abundant tiger prey and low levels of tiger poaching. Incorporating fine-scale spatial and temporal activity patterns into conservation plans can help address a major global challenge-meeting human needs while sustaining wildlife. PMID:22949642

  20. Parental harsh discipline in mainland China: prevalence, frequency, and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meifang; Liu, Li

    2014-06-01

    The study examined the prevalence, frequency, and coexistence of psychological aggression (PA), corporal punishment (CP), and severe physical abuse (SPA) in mainland China. Using a sample of 2,518 father-mother dyads of 3-15-year-old children, the findings revealed that parental harsh discipline was prevalent in mainland China. The rates of harsh discipline in the current study fell in the middle of the ranges of rates found in other studies. Harsh discipline was most likely directed at boys or children aged 7 years and committed by mothers, young fathers, or high and low socioeconomic status (SES) parents. The prevalence of maternal and paternal PA and CP declined with the children's age. Maternal and paternal SPA first increased and then decreased with child age. The frequency of the three types of maternal and paternal harsh discipline fluctuated depending on the age of the children. In addition, approximately 50% of the mothers and fathers who reported using severe forms of disciplinary practices also engaged in less severe forms of harsh disciplinary practices against their children. SPA generally coexisted with CP and PA, and CP was usually accompanied by PA; however, PA was more likely to occur independently compared with CP and SPA. Moreover, maternal harsh discipline coexisted with paternal harsh discipline to some extent. The coexistence decreased with increasing severity of parental harsh discipline and differed according to child gender. These findings highlight the importance of studying these three types of parental harsh discipline simultaneously and intervening in harsh discipline by mothers and fathers within the same family. PMID:24661692

  1. Acyl chain composition and coexisting fluid phases in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Bradley, Miranda; Mitchell, Drake

    2011-10-01

    At room temperature phospholipid bilayers enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol may form a solid phase as well as two coexisting fluid phases. These are the standard fluid phase, or the liquid-disordered phase, ld, and the liquid-ordered phase, lo, which is commonly associated with lipid rafts. Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form coexisting lo, ld and solid phases over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes to detect these 2 phases: NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions strongly into the lo phase and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions strongly into the ld phase. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the ternary phase diagram of POPC/SPM/Chol with particular focus on the functionally important lo/ld coexistence region. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of these two fluorescent probes.

  2. Digital Ecology: Coexistence and Domination among Interacting Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-01-01

    The overwhelming success of Web 2.0, within which online social networks are key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of Web 2.0 services has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns for the first time. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at the system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of multiple digital services naturally raises questions concerning which conditions these services can coexist under. Analogously to the case of population dynamics, the digital world forms a complex ecosystem of interacting networks. The fitness of each network depends on its capacity to attract and maintain users’ attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits stable coexistence of several networks as well as the dominance of an individual one, in contrast to the competitive exclusion principle. Interestingly, our theory also predicts that the most probable outcome is the coexistence of a moderate number of services, in agreement with empirical observations. PMID:25988318

  3. Coexistence of charge and ferromagnetic order in fcc Fe

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pin-Jui; Kügel, Jens; Kemmer, Jeannette; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Mauerer, Tobias; Vogt, Matthias; Assaad, Fakher; Bode, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Phase coexistence phenomena have been intensively studied in strongly correlated materials where several ordered states simultaneously occur or compete. Material properties critically depend on external parameters and boundary conditions, where tiny changes result in qualitatively different ground states. However, up to date, phase coexistence phenomena have exclusively been reported for complex compounds composed of multiple elements. Here we show that charge- and magnetically ordered states coexist in double-layer Fe/Rh(001). Scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements reveal periodic charge-order stripes below a temperature of 130 K. Close to liquid helium temperature, they are superimposed by ferromagnetic domains as observed by spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy. Temperature-dependent measurements reveal a pronounced cross-talk between charge and spin order at the ferromagnetic ordering temperature about 70 K, which is successfully modelled within an effective Ginzburg–Landau ansatz including sixth-order terms. Our results show that subtle balance between structural modifications can lead to competing ordering phenomena. PMID:26971713

  4. Niche partitioning and species coexistence in a Neotropical felid assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S.; De Angelo, Carlos D.; Di Blanco, Yamil E.; Paviolo, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Carnivores have been used as a model to understand the effects of competition in community structure. Behavioral mechanisms that facilitate species coexistence have been poorly explored and may explain the lack of community-wide morphological character displacement in some carnivore assemblages. We use the results of large-scale and intensive camera-trap surveys conducted in the Atlantic Forest of NE Argentina between 2003 and 2008 to describe the spatial patterns of detection and the daily pattern of records of the six wild cat species present in the region (jaguar Panthera onca, puma Puma concolor, ocelot Leopardus pardalis, jaguarundi Puma yagouaroundi, margay Leopardus wiedii, and oncilla Leopardus tigrinus). We use these patterns to generate hypotheses about behavioral differences that may facilitate species coexistence. The larger species were more frequently recorded in the better-protected areas, probably as a result of anthropogenic effects (poaching of cats and their prey). Competitive release from ocelots and jaguarundis may explain why the oncilla and the margay showed the opposite pattern. Morphologically similar species had the most contrasting activity patterns: the margay was exclusively nocturnal and the jaguarundi diurnal. The other species were cathemeral, but alternated their peaks of activity in relation to the relative order of their body weights. The contrasting temporal patterns observed and the ability of pumas and oncillas to adjust their activity patterns to local conditions may facilitate the coexistence of these cat species and explain the lack of character displacement in this assemblage.

  5. Spatial coexistence of synchronized oscillation and death: A chimeralike state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2015-10-01

    We report an interesting spatiotemporal state, namely the chimeralike incongruous coexistence of synchronized oscillation and stable steady state (CSOD) in a network of nonlocally coupled oscillators. Unlike the chimera and chimera death state, in the CSOD state identical oscillators are self-organized into two coexisting spatially separated domains: In one domain neighboring oscillators show synchronized oscillation and in another domain the neighboring oscillators randomly populate either a synchronized oscillating state or a stable steady state (we call it a death state). We consider a realistic ecological network and show that the interplay of nonlocality and coupling strength results in two routes to the CSOD state: One is from a coexisting mixed state of amplitude chimera and death, and another one is from a globally synchronized state. We provide a qualitative explanation of the origin of this state. We further explore the importance of this study in ecology that gives insight into the relationship between spatial synchrony and global extinction of species. We believe this study will improve our understanding of chimera and chimeralike states.

  6. Digital Ecology: Coexistence and Domination among Interacting Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-05-01

    The overwhelming success of Web 2.0, within which online social networks are key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of Web 2.0 services has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns for the first time. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at the system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of multiple digital services naturally raises questions concerning which conditions these services can coexist under. Analogously to the case of population dynamics, the digital world forms a complex ecosystem of interacting networks. The fitness of each network depends on its capacity to attract and maintain users’ attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits stable coexistence of several networks as well as the dominance of an individual one, in contrast to the competitive exclusion principle. Interestingly, our theory also predicts that the most probable outcome is the coexistence of a moderate number of services, in agreement with empirical observations.

  7. Cholesteatoma and coexisting findings diagnosed incidentally on MRI.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Gahl; Eyal, Ana; Yakirevitch, Arkadi; Wolf, Michael; Migirov, Lela

    2016-06-01

    The explosive growth in the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre- and postoperative evaluations of patients with cholesteatoma has led to a concomitant increase in the number of incidental findings in this population. We describe our retrospective examination of MRI studies in cholesteatoma patients to look for the presence of other coexisting abnormalities. We examined the brain MRIs of 103 patients-45 males and 58 females, aged 3 to 81 years (mean: 31.9 ± 21.3)-who had undergone pre- or postoperative imaging during the management of a cholesteatoma. The MRIs revealed the presence of at least one other anomaly in 79 of these patients (76.7%)-36 males and 43 females, aged 3 to 81 years (mean: 43.5 ± 18.2). These 79 MRIs detected a total of 124 lesions that had been coexisting with cholesteatomas; some of these lesions had overlapped with the cholesteatoma. The two most common findings were sinonasal mucoperiosteal thickening and polyposis (n = 66) and white-matter changes (n = 29). Our results establish the need for routine skilled interpretation of brain MRIs by expert neuroradiologists to ensure that findings coexisting with cholesteatoma are detected so that appropriate management can be provided. PMID:27304447

  8. Coexistence of superconductivity, ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism in iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Raminder

    2016-05-01

    Coexistence of Superconductivity and magnetism have always been the fascinating area of interest for condensed-matter physicists. A variety of systems, such as cuprates, heavy fermions, and iron pnictides showed superconductivity in a narrow region near the border to antiferromagnetism (AFM)as a function of pressure or doping. However, the coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism (FM) has seen in URhGe, UGe2, ErRh4B4 and many compounds. Here, we present a third situation where superconductivity coexists with FM and AFM. The recent experimental finding of interplay of ferromagnetism,antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 impressed us to discuss this problem in detail. Ironpnictides are high Tc magnetic superconductors and could be very useful in finding many new superconductorswith high Tc probably near to room temperature. In this paper, we have theoretically calculated the superconducting order parameter of EuFe2(As1-xPx)2 where magnetic ordering is due to Eu+ moments and superconductivity is due to Fe3+ moments. The Eu ions order antiferromagnetically for x≤0.13, while a crossover is observed for x≥0.22 whereupon the Eu ions order ferromagnetically.

  9. Coexisting aggregates in mixed aerosol OT and cholesterol microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Myles A; Trujillo, Alejandro M; Hendricks, Noah; Levinger, Nancy E; Crans, Debbie C

    2011-02-01

    Dynamic light scattering and NMR spectroscopic experimental evidence suggest the coexistence of two compositionally different self-assembled particles in solution. The self-assembled particles form in solutions containing water, Aerosol OT (AOT, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate) surfactant, and cholesterol in cyclohexane. In a similar series of studies carried out in 1-octanol only one aggregate type, that is, reverse micelles, is observed. Dynamic light scattering measurements reveal the presence of two different types of aggregates in the microemulsions formed in cyclohexane, demonstrating the coexistence of two compositionally distinct structures with very similar Gibbs energies. One particle type consists of standard AOT reverse micelles while the second type of particle consists of submicellar aggregates including cholesterol as well as small amounts of AOT and water. In microemulsions employing 1-octanol as the continuous medium, AOT reverse micelles form in a dispersed solution of cholesterol in 1-octanol. Although the size distribution of self-assembled particles is well-known for many different systems, evidence for simultaneous formation of two distinctly sized particles in solution that are chemically different is unprecedented. The ability to form microemulsion solutions that contain coexisting particles may have important applications in drug formulation and administration, particularly as applied to drug delivery using cholesterol as a targeting agent. PMID:21188993

  10. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  11. Networks with dispersed degrees save stable coexistence of species in cyclic competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Konno, Norio

    2006-12-01

    Coexistence of individuals with different species or phenotypes is often found in nature in spite of competition between them. Stable coexistence of multiple types of individuals have implications for maintenance of ecological biodiversity and emergence of altruism in society, to name a few. Various mechanisms of coexistence including spatial structure of populations, heterogeneous individuals, and heterogeneous environments, have been proposed. In reality, individuals disperse and interact on complex networks. We examine how heterogeneous degree distributions of networks influence coexistence, focusing on models of cyclically competing species. We show analytically and numerically that heterogeneity in degree distributions promotes stable coexistence.

  12. Co-existence of porokeratosis variants concurrent with Bowen's disease: two rare cases report.

    PubMed

    Korviriyakamol, Tarinee; Kattipathananpong, Pinnaree; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong; Wessagowit, Vesarat; Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt

    2014-03-01

    Coexisting variants of porokeratosis rarely occurs. Disseminated superficial porokeratosis (DSP) is characterized by multiple uniform small annular papules distributed all over body. DSP commonly coexist with linear porokeratosis (LP), but it is uncommon for DSP to coexist with porokeratosis of Mibelli (PM). PM presents with central atrophic erythematous plaques and thread-like elevated border. It occurs mainly on extremities. Although malignant transformation can be found in the porokeratosis, there is still no report case of coexisting variants of porokeratosis concurrent with Bowen's disease. The clinical and histopathologic finding of rare coexisting variants of porokeratosis (PM and DSP) concurrent with squamous dysplasia is described. PMID:25123017

  13. Finite-Size Effects on Liquid-Solid Phase Coexistence and the Estimation of Crystal Nucleation Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statt, Antonia; Virnau, Peter; Binder, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    A fluid in equilibrium in a finite volume V with particle number N at a density ρ =N /V exceeding the onset density ρf of freezing may exhibit phase coexistence between a crystalline nucleus and surrounding fluid. Using a method suitable for the estimation of the chemical potential of dense fluids, we obtain the excess free energy due to the surface of the crystalline nucleus. There is neither a need to precisely locate the interface nor to compute the (anisotropic) interfacial tension. As a test case, a soft version of the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures is treated. While our analysis is appropriate for crystal nuclei of arbitrary shape, we find the nucleation barrier to be compatible with a spherical shape and consistent with classical nucleation theory.

  14. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  15. Dynamics of microbial growth and coexistence on variably saturated rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Long, Tao; Or, Dani

    2009-08-01

    The high degree of microbial diversity found in soils is attributed to the highly heterogeneous pore space and the dynamic aqueous microenvironments. Previous studies have shown that spatial and temporal variations in aqueous diffusion pathways play an important role in shaping microbial habitats and biological activity in unsaturated porous media. A new modeling framework was developed for the quantitative description of diffusion-dominated microbial interactions focusing on competitive growth of two microbial species inhabiting partially saturated rough surfaces. Surface heterogeneity was represented by patches with different porosities and water retention properties, yielding heterogeneous distribution of water contents that varies with changes in relative humidity or soil matric potential. Nutrient diffusion and microbial growth on the variably hydrated and heterogeneous surface was modeled using a hybrid method that combines a reaction diffusion method for nutrient field with individual based model for microbial growth and expansion. The model elucidated the effects of hydration dynamics and heterogeneity on nutrient fluxes and mobility affecting microbial population growth, expansion, and coexistence at the microscale. In contrast with single species dominance under wet conditions, results demonstrated prolonged coexistence of two competing species under drier conditions where nutrient diffusion and microbial movement were both limited. The uneven distribution of resources and diffusion pathways in heterogeneous surfaces highlighted the importance of position in the landscape for survival that may compensate for competitive disadvantages conferred by physiological traits. Increased motility was beneficial for expansion and survival. Temporal variations in hydration conditions resulted in fluctuations in microbial growth rate and population size. Population growth dynamics of the dominant species under wet-dry cycles were similar to growth under average value

  16. Coexistence of a self-induced transparency soliton and a Bragg soliton.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hong-Yih; Chi, Sien

    2002-11-01

    We theoretically show that a self-induced transparency (SIT) soliton and a Bragg soliton can coexist in a nonlinear photonic band gap (PBG) medium doped uniformly with inhomogeneous-broadening two-level atoms. The Maxwell-Bloch equations for the pulse propagating through such a uniformly doped PBG structure are derived first and further reduced to an effective nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This model describes an equivalent physical mechanism for a Bragg-soliton propagation resulting from the effective quadratic dispersion balancing with the effective third-order nonlinearity. Because the resonant atoms are taken into account, the original band gap can be shifted both by the dopants and the instantaneous nonlinearity response originating from an intense optical pulse. As a result, even if a SIT soliton with its central frequency deep inside the original forbidden band, it still can propagate through the resonant PBG medium as long as this SIT soliton satisfies the effective Bragg-soliton propagation. An approximate soliton solution describing such coexistence is found. We also show that the pulse width and group velocity of this soliton solution can be uniquely determined for given material parameters, atomic transition frequency, and input central frequency of the soliton. The numerical examples of the SIT soliton in a one-dimensional As2S3-based PBG structure doped uniformly with Lorentzian line-shape resonant atoms are shown. It is found that a SIT soliton with approximately 100-ps width in such a resonant PBG structure can travel with the velocity being two orders of magnitude slower than the light speed in an unprocessed host medium. PMID:12513622

  17. Triple shape memory effect of star-shaped polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xifeng; Wang, Lin; Wang, Wenxi; Chen, Hongmei; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we synthesized one type of star-shaped polyurethane (SPU) with star-shaped poly(ε-caprolactone) (SPCL) containing different arm numbers as soft segment and 4,4'-diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) as well as chain extender 1,4-butylene glycol (BDO) as hard segment. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) confirmed the chemical structure of the material. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that both the melting temperature (Tm) and transition temperature (Ttrans) of SPU decreased with the hard segment composition increase. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrated that the increase of the crystallinity of SPU following the raised arm numbers endowed a high shape fixity of six-arm star-shaped polyurethane (6S-PU) and a wide melting temperature range, which resulted in an excellent triple-shape memory effect of 6S-PU. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay evaluated with osteoblasts through Alamar blue assay demonstrates that this copolymer possessed good cytocompatibility. This material can be potentially used as a new smart material in the field of biomaterials. PMID:24617646

  18. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  19. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  20. Molecular Simulation of Solid-Fluid Phase Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Rupal

    1995-01-01

    A novel molecular simulation technique--Gibbs -Duhem integration method--provides the framework for the study of phase equilibria involving ordered phases, particularly solids. The technique allows coexistence to be determined by just one simulation, without ever attempting or performing particle insertions. This is achieved by thermodynamic integration along a path that coincides with the saturation line. This thesis aims at the development of simulation tools--in particular the Gibbs-Duhem technique--that can be used by researchers in molecular thermodynamics especially for the study of solids. The effect of both repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces on transitions involving two and three-phases for various model systems has been studied. We demonstrate how the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique may be modified to determine the phase diagram along a path in which the intermolecular potential itself varies. In particular, the method has been applied to evaluate solid-fluid coexistence for the inverse-power potential as a function of potential softness. Freezing into both fcc and bcc crystals has been investigated. The complete phase diagram for the Lennard-Jones model has also been determined and several semi-empirical 'melting rules' are examined in the light of these results. We also evaluate three-phase equilibria as a function of the intermolecular potential (a path that transforms the Lennard-Jones model into a square well model is defined). The first estimate of solid-liquid equilibrium for a square well model is also given. Solid-liquid-vapor triple point as a function of square well width has been computed. Isotropic -nematic transition for hard-ellipsoid mixtures as a model for liquid crystalline systems has also been studied. In addition, a thorough error analysis has been performed for the Gibbs-Duhem integration technique. We have also introduced a new simulation technique which is capable of determining the entire phase coexistence curve in a

  1. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  2. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  3. Thermophysical properties of hydrogen along the liquid-vapor coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, S. M.; Sulaiman, N.; Bahaa Khedr, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present Theoretical Calculations for the Liquid-Vapor Coexistence (LVC) curve of fluid Hydrogen within the first order perturbation theory with a suitable first order quantum correction to the free energy. In the present equation of state, we incorporate the dimerization of H2 molecule by treating the fluid as a hard convex body fluid. The thermophysical properties of fluid H2 along the LVC curve, including the pressure-temperature dependence, density-temperature asymmetry, volume expansivity, entropy and enthalpy, are calculated and compared with computer simulation and empirical results.

  4. Coexistence of meandering and bunching of steps on vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan-Mei; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2006-01-01

    We simulate morphology and its evolution of vicinal surfaces in epitaxy by using the phase-field model. For usual parameters of Cu vicinal surfaces, a pure in-phase meandering pattern consistent to the experimental images is obtained. Nevertheless, vicinal surfaces grow into more complex hierarchy for a small kink energy. In addition to step meandering, step bunching happens due to competition of local step fluctuation and interlayer Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier in the presence of the step meandering. This implies that step meandering and step bunching can coexist in some growing epitaxial vicinal surfaces.

  5. Co-Existence of Multicentric Castleman's Disease and Kaposi's Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Reza; Pazyar, Nader; Tavakoli, Sadigheh

    2015-01-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) or giant lymph node hyperplasia is a rare disorder that can be unicentric or multicentric. Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is manifested by generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, hematological abnormality, and constitutional symptoms. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection is present in nearly 100% MCD associated with HIV-1 infection, but in about 50% of cases of HIV negative. Herein, we report a 77-year-old man with systemic involvement and skin lesions on the anterior aspect of both legs in the previous site of saphenous vein angioplasty. Co-existence of MCD with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) led us to present this rare case. PMID:26120185

  6. Coal and climate regulations can co-exist

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.

    2006-07-15

    Jim Rogers, president and chief executive officer of Duke Energy Corporation, examines how coal and climate change regulations can co-exist. He addresses the need for economically sound choices for future energy needs, which is complicated by what he refers to as 'the elephant in the room'climate change. He observes that new CO{sub 2} regulations would increase the USA's cost of generating electricity over time and result in higher prices for customers, and he advocates that a gradual, economy-wide, market-based U.S. climate policy is the best option. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  7. Multiple Subsets of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Coexist in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Achrol, Achal S; Januszyk, Michael; Kahn, Suzana A; Liu, Tiffany T; Liu, Yi; Sahoo, Debashis; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Cheshier, Samuel H; Chang, Steven D; Steinberg, Gary K; Harsh, Griffith R; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are self-renewing multipotent cells critical for tumor maintenance and growth. Using single-cell microfluidic profiling, we identified multiple subpopulations of BTICs coexisting in human glioblastoma, characterized by distinct surface marker expression and single-cell molecular profiles relating to divergent bulk tissue molecular subtypes. These data suggest BTIC subpopulation heterogeneity as an underlying source of intra-tumoral bulk tissue molecular heterogeneity, and will support future studies into BTIC subpopulation-specific therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:1702-1707. PMID:26991945

  8. Co-existence of Bronchiectasis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nitin; Gupta, Pawan; Singh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with cough and breathlessness. Chest radiograph (postero-anterior view) showed bulla and signs of hyperinflation in the right upper zone with cystic shadows in the left lower zone. Spirometry showed severe irreversible airflow obstruction with restriction and decreased diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. On high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), right upper lobe bulla with emphysematous changes and left lower lobe cystic bronchiectasis were seen. Considering its rarity of occurrence and paucity of data in literature regarding co-existence of bronchiectasis with emphysema, this case is being reported. PMID:26591975

  9. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Coexisting with Acute Pericarditis and Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Sezavar, Seyed Hashem; Riahi Beni, Hassan; Ghanavati, Reza; Hajahmadi, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is a stress-induced cardiomyopathy that occurs primarily in postmenopausal women. It mimics clinical picture of acute coronary syndrome with nonobstructive coronary arteries and a characteristic transient left (or bi-) ventricular apical ballooning at angiography. The exact pathogenesis of TCM is not well recognized. Hereby we present an unusual case of TCM that presents with signs and symptoms of acute pericarditis and was also found to have a coexisting coronary muscle bridge on coronary angiography. We discuss the impact of these associations in better understanding of the pathogenesis of TCM. PMID:27437150

  10. Direct observation of an isomeric state in 98Rb and nuclear properties of exotic rubidium isotopes measured by laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procter, T. J.; Behr, J. A.; Billowes, J.; Buchinger, F.; Cheal, B.; Crawford, J. E.; Dilling, J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Leary, A.; Levy, C. D. P.; Mané, E.; Pearson, M. R.; Shelbaya, O.; Stolz, M.; Al Tamimi, W.; Voss, A.

    2015-02-01

    Fast-beam collinear laser spectroscopy experiments on rubidium have been performed at the ISAC radioactive ion beam facility at TRIUMF. Most recently, the neutron-rich 98Rb isotope has been studied for the investigation of shape coexistence. Two long-lived nuclear states in 98Rb have been clearly observed for the first time: a low-spin state, assigned a spin of I = 0, and a high-spin state. The high-spin state is tentatively assigned a spin of I = 3 based on this analysis in combination with gamma decay results. The measured nuclear properties of the two states are presented, alongside unpublished values of the neutron-deficient isotopes investigated previously. The mean-square charge radii of both states in 98Rb are observed to continue along the isodeformation line present after the N = 60 onset of deformation.

  11. Fluctuations in the shape transitions of hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J. M.; Yannouleas, C.; Broglia, R. A.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of quantal and thermal quadrupole shape fluctuations in the giant dipole response function of hot nuclei at high spin is studied within the Landau theory of phase transitions. The effects are found to be important in the relation of the nuclear shape to the experimental findings and in the identification of shape phase transitions.

  12. Analysis of potential factors allowing coexistence in a sexual/asexual minnow complex.

    PubMed

    Barron, James N; Lawson, Troy J; Jensen, Philip A

    2016-03-01

    The northern redbelly dace (Chrosomus eos) and the finescale dace (C. neogaeus) have hybridized to produce an all-female, asexual hybrid (C. eos-neogaeus) that reproduces by sperm-limited parthenogenesis (gynogenesis). However, in this system, gynogenesis is not 100 % efficient; triploid females are occasionally formed which reproduce as sexuals, producing nuclear males and females of the paternal species (generally C. eos). Thus, the asexual lineage continually produces occasional males that can serve as a sperm source. Because (almost) all hybrid offspring are females, the hybrid population has the potential to grow more quickly and even outcompete the sexuals, thus eliminating their own sperm source. The current research uses behavioral testing, ovarian analyses, and modeling to examine three hypotheses for the maintenance of the sexual/asexual complex: male discrimination against hybrid females, fecundity differences between sexual and asexual females, and production of nuclear male sexuals from the asexual lineage. Results suggest that males do not discriminate against asexual females, and that both sexual and asexual females have similar fecundities, eliminating these hypotheses as potential coexistence mechanisms. However, computer simulations of population growth support the hypothesis that occasional triploidy within the hybrid population supplies enough breeding males to maintain the sexual/asexual complex. PMID:26650583

  13. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  14. Soil Nematode Diversity: Species Coexistence and Ecosystem Function

    PubMed Central

    Ettema, Christien H.

    1998-01-01

    Soil nematode species diversity is often high, both at ecosystem and single soil-core scales. First, how can so many species coexist? There is evidence of niche partitioning, notably of physical space, but vast interspecific overlaps and trait plasticity seem equally common. It appears that coexistence of species with similar resource needs is made possible by small-scale disturbance and predation, which likely reduce local population sizes and interspecific competition. Regional processes such as dispersal, large-scale disturbance, and aggregation, which govern ecosystem level diversity, may also affect local species interactions and soil-core scale diversity. Second, what is the significance of having so many species, with so few trophic functions, for ecosystem processes? Focusing on bacterivore diversity, it is clear that species contributions to decomposition, likely to differ as a function of individual biologies, are concealed by the trophic group approach. However, considerable functional redundancy probably exists, which may explain why decomposition processes are maintained in highly disturbed soils despite the extinction of many species. Thus, soil nematode diversity is important for the long-term stability of soil functioning, and merits protection and further study. PMID:19274206

  15. Requirements for plant coexistence through pollination niche partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Benadi, Gita

    2015-01-01

    Plant–pollinator interactions are often thought to have been a decisive factor in the diversification of flowering plants, but to be of little or no importance for the maintenance of existing plant diversity. In a recent opinion paper, Pauw (2013 Trends Ecol. Evol. 28, 30–37. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2012.07.019)) challenged this view by proposing a mechanism of diversity maintenance based on pollination niche partitioning. In this article, I investigate under which conditions the mechanism suggested by Pauw can promote plant coexistence, using a mathematical model of plant and pollinator population dynamics. Numerical simulations show that this mechanism is most effective when the costs of searching for flowers are low, pollinator populations are strongly limited by resources other than pollen and nectar, and plant–pollinator interactions are sufficiently specialized. I review the empirical literature on these three requirements, discuss additional factors that may be important for diversity maintenance through pollination niche partitioning, and provide recommendations on how to detect this coexistence mechanism in natural plant communities. PMID:26108627

  16. Plant functional traits and the multidimensional nature of species coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Nathan J. B.; Godoy, Oscar; Levine, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the processes maintaining species diversity is a central problem in ecology, with implications for the conservation and management of ecosystems. Although biologists often assume that trait differences between competitors promote diversity, empirical evidence connecting functional traits to the niche differences that stabilize species coexistence is rare. Obtaining such evidence is critical because traits also underlie the average fitness differences driving competitive exclusion, and this complicates efforts to infer community dynamics from phenotypic patterns. We coupled field-parameterized mathematical models of competition between 102 pairs of annual plants with detailed sampling of leaf, seed, root, and whole-plant functional traits to relate phenotypic differences to stabilizing niche and average fitness differences. Single functional traits were often well correlated with average fitness differences between species, indicating that competitive dominance was associated with late phenology, deep rooting, and several other traits. In contrast, single functional traits were poorly correlated with the stabilizing niche differences that promote coexistence. Niche differences could only be described by combinations of traits, corresponding to differentiation between species in multiple ecological dimensions. In addition, several traits were associated with both fitness differences and stabilizing niche differences. These complex relationships between phenotypic differences and the dynamics of competing species argue against the simple use of single functional traits to infer community assembly processes but lay the groundwork for a theoretically justified trait-based community ecology. PMID:25561561

  17. Sensitivity analysis of coexistence in ecological communities: theory and application.

    PubMed

    Barabás, György; Pásztor, Liz; Meszéna, Géza; Ostling, Annette

    2014-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis, the study of how ecological variables of interest respond to changes in external conditions, is a theoretically well-developed and widely applied approach in population ecology. Though the application of sensitivity analysis to predicting the response of species-rich communities to disturbances also has a long history, derivation of a mathematical framework for understanding the factors leading to robust coexistence has only been a recent undertaking. Here we suggest that this development opens up a new perspective, providing advances ranging from the applied to the theoretical. First, it yields a framework to be applied in specific cases for assessing the extinction risk of community modules in the face of environmental change. Second, it can be used to determine trait combinations allowing for coexistence that is robust to environmental variation, and limits to diversity in the presence of environmental variation, for specific community types. Third, it offers general insights into the nature of communities that are robust to environmental variation. We apply recent community-level extensions of mathematical sensitivity analysis to example models for illustration. We discuss the advantages and limitations of the method, and some of the empirical questions the theoretical framework could help answer. PMID:25252135

  18. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  19. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Michael M; Moskalenko, Olga I; Kurkin, Semen A; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10(6)) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed. PMID:27369869

  20. Predicting future coexistence in a North American ant community

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Sharon; Stuble, Katharine L; Lessard, Jean-Phillipe; Dunn, Robert R; Adler, Frederick R; Sanders, Nathan J

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change will remodel ecological communities worldwide. However, as a consequence of biotic interactions, communities may respond to climate change in idiosyncratic ways. This makes predictive models that incorporate biotic interactions necessary. We show how such models can be constructed based on empirical studies in combination with predictions or assumptions regarding the abiotic consequences of climate change. Specifically, we consider a well-studied ant community in North America. First, we use historical data to parameterize a basic model for species coexistence. Using this model, we determine the importance of various factors, including thermal niches, food discovery rates, and food removal rates, to historical species coexistence. We then extend the model to predict how the community will restructure in response to several climate-related changes, such as increased temperature, shifts in species phenology, and altered resource availability. Interestingly, our mechanistic model suggests that increased temperature and shifts in species phenology can have contrasting effects. Nevertheless, for almost all scenarios considered, we find that the most subordinate ant species suffers most as a result of climate change. More generally, our analysis shows that community composition can respond to climate warming in nonintuitive ways. For example, in the context of a community, it is not necessarily the most heat-sensitive species that are most at risk. Our results demonstrate how models that account for niche partitioning and interspecific trade-offs among species can be used to predict the likely idiosyncratic responses of local communities to climate change. PMID:24963378

  1. Temperature and kairomone induced life history plasticity in coexisting Daphnia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernot, R.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Quist, M.C.; Guy, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the life history alterations of coexisting Daphnia species responding to environmental temperature and predator cues. In a laboratory experiment, we measured Daphnia life history plasticity under different predation risk and temperature treatments that simulate changing environmental conditions. Daphnia pulicaria abundance and size at first reproduction (SFR) declined, while ephippia (resting egg) formation increased at high temperatures. Daphnia mendotae abundance and clutch size increased with predation risk at high temperatures, but produced few ephippia. Thus, each species exhibited phenotypic plasticity, but responded in sharply different ways to the same environmental cues. In Glen Elder reservoir, Kansas USA, D. pulicaria dominance shifted to D. mendotae dominance as temperature and predation risk increased from March to June in both 1999 and 2000. Field estimates of life history shifts mirrored the laboratory experiment results, suggesting that similar phenotypic responses to seasonal cues contribute to seasonal Daphnia population trends. These results illustrate species-specific differences in life history plasticity among coexisting zooplankton taxa. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  2. Requirements for plant coexistence through pollination niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Benadi, Gita

    2015-07-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions are often thought to have been a decisive factor in the diversification of flowering plants, but to be of little or no importance for the maintenance of existing plant diversity. In a recent opinion paper, Pauw (2013 Trends Ecol. Evol. 28, 30-37. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2012.07.019)) challenged this view by proposing a mechanism of diversity maintenance based on pollination niche partitioning. In this article, I investigate under which conditions the mechanism suggested by Pauw can promote plant coexistence, using a mathematical model of plant and pollinator population dynamics. Numerical simulations show that this mechanism is most effective when the costs of searching for flowers are low, pollinator populations are strongly limited by resources other than pollen and nectar, and plant-pollinator interactions are sufficiently specialized. I review the empirical literature on these three requirements, discuss additional factors that may be important for diversity maintenance through pollination niche partitioning, and provide recommendations on how to detect this coexistence mechanism in natural plant communities. PMID:26108627

  3. Embryonic thermosensitivity and hatchling morphology differ between two coexisting lizards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yan-Fu; Li, Hong; Gao, Jian-Fang; Ji, Xiang

    2011-07-01

    We incubated eggs of two coexisting lizards, Phrynocephalus frontalis and Phrynocephalus versicolor, at three constant temperatures (24, 28 and 32 °C) to examine whether they differ in embryonic thermosensitivity and hatchling morphology. Eggs incubated at the three temperatures produced morphologically different hatchlings in P. versicolor but not in P. frontalis. Snout-vent length (SVL), body mass and head width were greater in P. versicolor hatchlings from the 24 °C treatment than those from the 32 °C treatment when accounting for differences in initial egg mass, and tail length was smaller in P. versicolor hatchlings from the 24 °C treatment than those from the 32 °C treatment when accounting for differences in final egg mass. Body mass, head length, head width, tail length, fore-limb length and hind-limb length were greater in P. frontalis hatchlings than in P. versicolor hatchling when accounting for differences in initial or final egg mass. Moreover, P. frontalis females produce larger hatchlings than do P. versicolor females of the same SVL not only by laying larger eggs, but also by investing more dry materials (and thus, more energy) into the egg. Given a link between interspecific competition (and niche restriction) and morphology, it seems likely that morphological differences at hatching may facilitate the coexistence of the two lizards. The two lizards differed in embryonic thermosensitivity and water uptake by eggs during incubation, suggesting that they use different microhabitats in the area of sympatry.

  4. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danziger, Michael M.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ˜ 106) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  5. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in YBCO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhonghua; Gao, Daqiang; Dong, Chunhui; Yang, Guijin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jinlin; Shi, Zhenhua; Gao, Hua; Luo, Honggang; Xue, Desheng

    2012-03-21

    Nanoparticles of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) were synthesized via a citrate pyrolysis technique. Room temperature ferromagnetism was revealed in the samples by a vibrating sample magnetometer. Electron spin resonance spectra at selected temperatures indicated that there is a transition from the normal to the superconducting state at temperatures below 100 K. The M-T curves with various applied magnetic fields showed that the superconducting transition temperatures are 92 K and 55 K for the air-annealed and the post-annealed samples, respectively. Compared to the air-annealed sample, the saturation magnetization of the sample by reheating the air-annealed one in argon atmosphere is enhanced but its superconductivity is weakened, which implies that the ferromagnetism maybe originates from the surface oxygen defects. By superconducting quantum interference device measurements, we further confirmed the ferromagnetic behavior at high temperatures and interesting upturns in field cooling magnetization curves within the superconducting region are found. We attributed the upturn phenomena to the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity at low temperatures. Room temperature ferromagnetism of superconducting YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-δ) nanoparticles has been observed in some previous related studies, but the issue of the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity within the superconducting region is still unclear. In the present work, it will be addressed in detail. The cooperation phenomena found in the spin-singlet superconductors will help us to understand the nature of superconductivity and ferromagnetism in more depth. PMID:22327377

  6. The Ecohydrologic Role of Coexistence and Competition in Semiarid Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanjalili, M. J.; Saco, P. M.; Willgoose, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Through its influence on runoff and erosion-deposition processes, vegetation remarkably regulates different aspects of landscape dynamics. Here, the influence of different plant functional traits on the coexistence of different species in arid and semi-arid regions with patchy vegetation is investigated using an ecohydrology model. The model simulates coevolving changes in biomass patterns for two species, as well as overland flow and soil moisture dynamics. Vegetation patterns emerge as a result of facilitation (shading and infiltration) and competition mechanisms as well as varying seed dispersal strategies. The results show that the survival of only one species or the coexistence of both species not only strongly depends on environmental stresses, but also on differences in hillslope micro and macro topography. These vegetation patterns have very different hydrologic signatures and the potential to trigger remarkably different geomorphic responses. Based on these results we establish new hypothesis that will be used to further investigate the role of plant interspecific and intraspecific feedbacks on landscape coevolution processes.

  7. Role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence of mobile populations in spatially extended ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-06-01

    Evolutionary-game based models of nonhierarchical, cyclically competing populations have become paradigmatic for addressing the fundamental problem of species coexistence in spatially extended ecosystems. We study the role of intraspecific competition in the coexistence and find that the competition can strongly promote the coexistence for high individual mobility in the sense that stable coexistence can arise in parameter regime where extinction would occur without the competition. The critical value of the competition rate beyond which the coexistence is induced is found to be independent of the mobility. We derive a theoretical model based on nonlinear partial differential equations to predict the critical competition rate and the boundaries between the coexistence and extinction regions in a relevant parameter space. We also investigate pattern formation and well-mixed spatiotemporal population dynamics to gain further insights into our findings.

  8. Thin-thick coexistence behavior of 8CB liquid crystalline films on silicon.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R; Subashi, E; Fukuto, M

    2008-05-16

    The wetting behavior of thin films of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) on Si is investigated via optical and x-ray reflectivity measurement. An experimental phase diagram is obtained showing a broad thick-thin coexistence region spanning the bulk isotropic-to-nematic (T(IN)) and the nematic-to-smectic-A (T(NA)) temperatures. For Si surfaces with coverages between 47 and 72 +/- 3 nm, reentrant wetting behavior is observed twice as we increase the temperature, with separate coexistence behaviors near T(IN) and T(NA). For coverages less than 47 nm, however, the two coexistence behaviors merge into a single coexistence region. The observed thin-thick coexistence near the second-order NA transition is not anticipated by any previous theory or experiment. Nevertheless, the behavior of the thin and thick phases within the coexistence regions is consistent with this being an equilibrium phenomenon. PMID:18518487

  9. Coexistence: Threat to the Performance of Heterogeneous Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Neetu; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2010-11-01

    Wireless technology is gaining broad acceptance as users opt for the freedom that only wireless network can provide. Well-accepted wireless communication technologies generally operate in frequency bands that are shared among several users, often using different RF schemes. This is true in particular for WiFi, Bluetooth, and more recently ZigBee. These all three operate in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz band, also known as ISM band, which has been key to the development of a competitive and innovative market for wireless embedded devices. But, as with any resource held in common, it is crucial that those technologies coexist peacefully to allow each user of the band to fulfill its communication goals. This has led to an increase in wireless devices intended for use in IEEE 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs) and wireless personal area networks (WPANs), both of which support operation in the crowded 2.4-GHz industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) band. Despite efforts made by standardization bodies to ensure smooth coexistence it may occur that communication technologies transmitting for instance at very different power levels interfere with each other. In particular, it has been pointed out that ZigBee could potentially experience interference from WiFi traffic given that while both protocols can transmit on the same channel, WiFi transmissions usually occur at much higher power level. In this work, we considered a heterogeneous network and analyzed the impact of coexistence between IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.11b. To evaluate the performance of this network, measurement and simulation study are conducted and developed in the QualNet Network simulator, version 5.0.Model is analyzed for different placement models or topologies such as Random. Grid & Uniform. Performance is analyzed on the basis of characteristics such as throughput, average jitter and average end to end delay. Here, the impact of varying different antenna gain & shadowing model for this

  10. Relatedness among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi drives plant growth and intraspecific fungal coexistence.

    PubMed

    Roger, Aurélien; Colard, Alexandre; Angelard, Caroline; Sanders, Ian R

    2013-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with most plant species. They are ecologically important determinants of plant growth and diversity. Considerable genetic variation occurs in AMF populations. Thus, plants are exposed to AMF of varying relatedness to each other. Very little is known about either the effects of coexisting AMF on plant growth or which factors influence intraspecific AMF coexistence within roots. No studies have addressed whether the genetics of coexisting AMF, and more specifically their relatedness, influences plant growth and AMF coexistence. Relatedness is expected to influence coexistence between individuals, and it has been suggested that decreasing ability of symbionts to coexist can have negative effects on the growth of the host. We tested the effect of a gradient of AMF genetic relatedness on the growth of two plant species. Increasing relatedness between AMFs lead to markedly greater plant growth (27% biomass increase with closely related compared to distantly related AMF). In one plant species, closely related AMF coexisted in fairly equal proportions but decreasing relatedness lead to a very strong disequilibrium between AMF in roots, indicating much stronger competition. Given the strength of the effects with such a shallow relatedness gradient and the fact that in the field plants are exposed to a steeper gradient, we consider that AMF relatedness can have a strong role in plant growth and the ability of AMF to coexist. We conclude that AMF relatedness is a driver of plant growth and that relatedness is also a strong driver of intraspecific coexistence of these ecologically important symbionts. PMID:23823490

  11. Doubly twisted Neimark-Sacker bifurcation and two coexisting two-dimensional tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekikawa, Munehisa; Inaba, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a complicated bifurcation structure involving several quasiperiodic bifurcations generated in a three-coupled delayed logistic map where a doubly twisted Neimark-Sacker bifurcation causes a transition from two coexisting periodic attractors to two coexisting invariant closed circles (ICCs) corresponding to two two-dimensional tori in a vector field. Such bifurcation structures are observed in Arnol'd tongues. Lyapunov and bifurcation analyses suggest that the two coexisting ICCs and the two coexisting periodic solutions almost overlap in the two-parameter bifurcation diagram.

  12. Solid-liquid coexistence of polydisperse fluids via simulation.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Nigel B

    2009-03-14

    We describe a simulation method for the accurate study of the equilibrium freezing properties of polydisperse fluids under the experimentally relevant condition of fixed polydispersity. The approach is based on the phase switch Monte Carlo method of Wilding and Bruce [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5138 (2000)]. This we have generalized to deal with particle size polydispersity by incorporating updates which alter the diameter sigma of a particle, under the control of a distribution of chemical potential differences mu(sigma). Within the resulting isobaric semi-grand-canonical ensemble, we detail how to adapt mu(sigma) and the applied pressure such as to study coexistence, while ensuring that the ensemble averaged density distribution rho(sigma) matches a fixed functional form. Results are presented for the effects of small degrees of polydispersity on the solid-liquid transition of soft spheres. PMID:19292519

  13. Coexisting chaotic and periodic dynamics in clock escapements.

    PubMed

    Moon, Francis C; Stiefel, Preston D

    2006-09-15

    This paper addresses the nature of noise in machines. As a concrete example, we examine the dynamics of clock escapements from experimental, historical and analytical points of view. Experiments on two escapement mechanisms from the Reuleaux kinematic collection at Cornell University are used to illustrate chaotic-like noise in clocks. These vibrations coexist with the periodic dynamics of the balance wheel or pendulum. A mathematical model is presented that shows how self-generated chaos in clocks can break the dry friction in the gear train. This model is shown to exhibit a strange attractor in the structural vibration of the clock. The internal feedback between the oscillator and the escapement structure is similar to anti-control of chaos models. PMID:16893802

  14. Fair and unfair punishers coexist in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M.; Exadaktylos, Filippos; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    In the Ultimatum Game, a proposer suggests how to split a sum of money with a responder. If the responder rejects the proposal, both players get nothing. Rejection of unfair offers is regarded as a form of punishment implemented by fair-minded individuals, who are willing to impose the cooperation norm at a personal cost. However, recent research using other experimental frameworks has observed non-negligible levels of antisocial punishment by competitive, spiteful individuals, which can eventually undermine cooperation. Using two large-scale experiments, this note explores the nature of Ultimatum Game punishers by analyzing their behavior in a Dictator Game. In both studies, the coexistence of two entirely different sub-populations is confirmed: prosocial punishers on the one hand, who behave fairly as dictators, and spiteful (antisocial) punishers on the other, who are totally unfair. The finding has important implications regarding the evolution of cooperation and the behavioral underpinnings of stable social systems. PMID:25113502

  15. Coexistence and B (E 2 ) values in 72Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortune, H. T.

    2016-08-01

    An earlier coexistence model of Ge nuclei is applied to E 2 strengths connecting low-lying 0+ and 2+ states in 72Ge. New data have smaller uncertainties and, for the first time, a value for the transition strength from the third 2+ state to the second 0+ state. This B (E 2 ) for the third 2+ state clearly indicates that it is the one that should be included in the mixing, rather than the second 2+ state. My results confirm that the 0+ states are maximally mixed, the 2+ states are weakly mixed, and the E 2 matrix element involving the lower 0+ basis state is significantly larger than the one involving the second 0+ basis state.

  16. Coexisting coherent and incoherent domains near saddle-node bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V. K.; Suresh, R.; Senthilkumar, D. V.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-09-01

    A common external forcing can cause a saddle-node bifurcation in an ensemble of identical Duffing oscillators by breaking the symmetry of the individual bistable (double-well) unit. The strength of the forcing determines the separation between the saddle and the node, which in turn dictates different dynamical transitions depending on the distribution of the initial states of the oscillators. In particular, chimera-like states appear in the vicinity of the saddle-node bifurcation for which theoretical explanation is provided from the stability of the steady state of the slow-scale dynamics of the original system of equations. Further, we have also established similar states by replacing the external forcing with an appropriate coupling between the oscillators in the same parameter space. Additionally, we have also designed an appropriate coupling that can lead to saddle-node bifurcation due to symmetry breaking of the bistable systems in the vicinity of which the synchronized and desynchronized domains coexist.

  17. Supercooling and phase coexistence in cosmological phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Megevand, Ariel; Sanchez, Alejandro D.

    2008-03-15

    Cosmological phase transitions are predicted by particle physics models, and have a variety of important cosmological consequences, which depend strongly on the dynamics of the transition. In this work we investigate in detail the general features of the development of a first-order phase transition. We find thermodynamical constraints on some quantities that determine the dynamics, namely, the latent heat, the radiation energy density, and the false-vacuum energy density. Using a simple model with a Higgs field, we study numerically the amount and duration of supercooling and the subsequent reheating and phase coexistence. We analyze the dependence of the dynamics on the different parameters of the model, namely, the energy scale, the number of degrees of freedom, and the couplings of the scalar field with bosons and fermions. We also inspect the implications for the cosmological outcomes of the phase transition.

  18. Do Electrons and Ions Coexist in an EBIT?

    SciTech Connect

    Lapierre, A.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Braun, J.; Brenner, G.; Bruhns, H.; Fischer, D.; Gonzalez Martinez, A.J.; Mironov, V.; Osborne, C. J.; Sikler, G.; Soria Orts, R.; Tawara, H.; Ullrich, J.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2005-10-19

    Detailed analysis of an extended exponential tail observed in the decay curve of the 2P3/2-2P1/2 magnetic dipole (M1) transition in boron-like Ar13+ provides evidence that electrons and ions might coexist in the same spatial region in the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap (HD-EBIT). On this basis, new trapping-cooling-recombination schemes for positron-antiproton plasmas are envisioned, integrated in a magnetic bottle configuration that should be able to trap the subsequently formed recombined cold antihydrogen. Moreover, the EBIT configuration, providing excellent spectroscopic access to the trapping region via seven view ports is shown to be well suited for performing precision spectroscopy of antiprotonic ions. Those might be generated either by recombination of antiprotons with neutral gas atoms or through radiative recombination and state-selective dielectronic-recombination-like processes with highly charged ions produced and stored in the EBIT simultaneously in a nested trap configuration.

  19. Fair and unfair punishers coexist in the Ultimatum Game.

    PubMed

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M; Exadaktylos, Filippos; Herrmann, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    In the Ultimatum Game, a proposer suggests how to split a sum of money with a responder. If the responder rejects the proposal, both players get nothing. Rejection of unfair offers is regarded as a form of punishment implemented by fair-minded individuals, who are willing to impose the cooperation norm at a personal cost. However, recent research using other experimental frameworks has observed non-negligible levels of antisocial punishment by competitive, spiteful individuals, which can eventually undermine cooperation. Using two large-scale experiments, this note explores the nature of Ultimatum Game punishers by analyzing their behavior in a Dictator Game. In both studies, the coexistence of two entirely different sub-populations is confirmed: prosocial punishers on the one hand, who behave fairly as dictators, and spiteful (antisocial) punishers on the other, who are totally unfair. The finding has important implications regarding the evolution of cooperation and the behavioral underpinnings of stable social systems. PMID:25113502

  20. Coexistence of negative photoconductivity and hysteresis in semiconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Shendong; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Tang, Nujiang; Xu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Jingguo; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed graphene quantum dots (GQDs) possess a moderate bandgap, which make them a promising candidate for optoelectronics devices. However, negative photoconductivity (NPC) and hysteresis that happen in the photoelectric conversion process could be harmful to performance of the GQDs-based devices. So far, their origins and relations have remained elusive. Here, we investigate experimentally the origins of the NPC and hysteresis in GQDs. By comparing the hysteresis and photoconductance of GQDs under different relative humidity conditions, we are able to demonstrate that NPC and hysteresis coexist in GQDs and both are attributed to the carrier trapping effect of surface adsorbed moisture. We also demonstrate that GQDs could exhibit positive photoconductivity with three-order-of-magnitude reduction of hysteresis after a drying process and a subsequent encapsulation. Considering the pervasive moisture adsorption, our results may pave the way for a commercialization of semiconducting graphene-based and diverse solution-based optoelectronic devices.

  1. Coexistent mesenteric and ovarian mature cystic teratomas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the first documented case of coexistent mesenteric and gonadal teratomas in an adult female patient. Physical examination of a 51-year-old Korean woman referred for treatment of abdominal distension and pain revealed two masses in both the right upper abdomen and in the right pelvic region. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed the presence of well-defined, complex, fat-dense mass lesions in the upper abdomen and pelvic cavity. A large cystic mass located in the retroperitoneal space extending from the mesenteric border at the level of the transverse colon, and a goose-egg sized right ovarian mass were founded on exploratory laparotomy. The entire abdominal tumor was excised and total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Examination of the macroscopic and microscopic findings led to diagnosis of mature cystic teratomas of the ovary and the mesentery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27352571

  2. Towards a coexistence of paradigms in nursing knowledge development.

    PubMed

    Cull-Wilby, B L; Pepin, J I

    1987-07-01

    During the last 35 years, nursing knowledge has known a surge in its development. Following the evolution of the scientific world, nursing first embraced the logical empiricist perspective of discovering and knowing. Historicism and, more recently, critical social theory have been explored as alternative ways of making knowledge in nursing. This paper discusses the evolution of nursing knowledge, considering its past and present activities. The authors suggest that a cooperative attitude amongst nurses, and a coexistence of various paradigms of knowledge development characterize the future of nursing. Nursing knowledge should be understood as a stage in its evolution and growth. The result of this process will never be a final static body of knowledge. Knowledge expansion will be encouraged through a process of integrating components from different research traditions, such that a multidimensional understanding of phenomena will be realised. PMID:3308993

  3. Coexistence and transition between shear zones in slow granular flows.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Robabeh; Shaebani, M Reza; Maleki, Maniya; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    We report experiments on slow granular flows in a split-bottom Couette cell that show novel strain localization features. Nontrivial flow profiles have been observed which are shown to be the consequence of simultaneous formation of shear zones in the bulk and at the boundaries. The fluctuating band model based on a minimization principle can be fitted to the experiments over a large variation of morphology and filling height with one single fit parameter, the relative friction coefficient μ(rel) between wall and bulk. The possibility of multiple shear zone formation is controlled by μ(rel). Moreover, we observe that the symmetry of an initial state, with coexisting shear zones at both side walls, breaks spontaneously below a threshold value of the shear velocity. A dynamical transition between two asymmetric flow states happens over a characteristic time scale which depends on the shear strength. PMID:24138274

  4. Coexistence of metallic and insulating-like states in graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Huang, Jing; Li, Qunxiang; Deng, Kaiming; Kan, Erjun

    2015-01-01

    Since graphene has been taken as the potential host material for next-generation electric devices, coexistence of high carrier mobility and an energy gap has the determining role in its real applications. However, in conventional methods of band-gap engineering, the energy gap and carrier mobility in graphene are seemed to be the two terminals of a seesaw, which limit its rapid development in electronic devices. Here we demonstrated the realization of insulating-like state in graphene without breaking Dirac cone. Using first-principles calculations, we found that ferroelectric substrate not only well reserves the Dirac fermions, but also induces pseudo-gap states in graphene. Calculated transport results clearly revealed that electrons cannot move along the ferroelectric direction. Thus, our work established a new concept of opening an energy gap in graphene without reducing the high mobility of carriers, which is a step towards manufacturing graphene-based devices. PMID:25754862

  5. Magnetic properties of Mn3O4 film with a coexistence of two preferential orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lizhu; Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yunjia; Meng, Meng; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-07-01

    A Mn3O4 film with a coexistence of two preferential orientations has been grown on a Pt(111)//Si(100) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The structural characteristics and chemical compositions of the film are investigated by using X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectra in detail. Together with the magnetic tests, the film is demonstrated to be a polycrystalline hausmannite Mn3O4 with no other impurities. Moreover, the hysteresis loops of the film are found to display a step or a characteristic shrinking at low fields. On the other hand, similar magnetic characteristics have also been discovered on the film with two phases grown on a MgAl2O4(001) substrate. In our opinion, considering the large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy of the single crystal Mn3O4 film reported in previous works, the special structures and phases of the two films result in both of them as soft+hard magnetic composites, in agreement with some other reports.

  6. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  7. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  8. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  9. Interactions between coexisting intracellular genomes: mitochondrial density and Wolbachia infection.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Fleury, F

    2009-04-01

    Many arthropods are infected with maternally transmitted microorganisms, leading to the coexistence of several intracellular genomes within the host cells, including their own mitochondria. As these genomes are cotransmitted, their patterns of evolution have been intimately linked, with possible consequences for the diversity and evolution of the host mitochondrial DNA. The evolutionary aspects of the situation have been thoroughly investigated, especially the selective sweep on the mitochondria as a result of Wolbachia invasion, whereas direct interactions between mitochondria and intracellular symbionts within the host cells or body have received little attention. Since endosymbionts exploit host resources but mitochondria supply energy to meet the bioenergetic demands of organisms, an unanswered question concerns the correlation between their densities. Here, we investigated the influence of Wolbachia symbiosis on mitochondrial density in two parasitic wasps of Drosophila species, both of which are naturally infected by three Wolbachia strains, but they differ in their degree of dependency on these bacteria. In Leptopilina heterotoma, all Wolbachia strains are facultative, whereas Asobara tabida requires a strain of Wolbachia for oogenesis to occur. In both species, Wolbachia infections are stable and well regulated, since the density of each strain does not depend on the presence or absence of other strains. Using lines that harbor various Wolbachia infection statuses, we found that mitochondrial density was not affected by the infection regardless of the sex and age of the host, which is strongly reminiscent of the independent regulation of specific Wolbachia strains and suggest that the protagonists coexist independently of each other as the result of a long-term coevolutionary interaction. PMID:19181828

  10. Non-equilibrium nature of two-dimensional isotropic and nematic coexistence in amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Sophia; Isa, Lucio; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional alignment of shape-anisotropic colloids is ubiquitous in nature, ranging from interfacial virus assembly to amyloid plaque formation. The principles governing two-dimensional self-assembly have therefore long been studied, both theoretically and experimentally, leading, however, to diverging fundamental interpretations on the nature of the two-dimensional isotropic-nematic phase transition. Here we employ single-molecule atomic force microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and passive probe particle tracking to study the adsorption and liquid crystalline ordering of semiflexible β-lactoglobulin fibrils at liquid interfaces. Fibrillar rigidity changes on increasing interfacial density, with a maximum caused by alignment and a subsequent decrease stemming from crowding and domain bending. Coexistence of nematic and isotropic regions is resolved and quantified by a length scale-dependent order parameter S(2D)(d). The nematic surface fraction increases with interfacial fibril density, but depends, for a fixed interfacial density, on the initial bulk concentration, ascribing the observed two-dimensional isotropic-nematic coexistence to non-equilibrium phenomena. PMID:23715276

  11. Non-equilibrium nature of two-dimensional isotropic and nematic coexistence in amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Sophia; Isa, Lucio; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional alignment of shape-anisotropic colloids is ubiquitous in nature, ranging from interfacial virus assembly to amyloid plaque formation. The principles governing two-dimensional self-assembly have therefore long been studied, both theoretically and experimentally, leading, however, to diverging fundamental interpretations on the nature of the two-dimensional isotropic-nematic phase transition. Here we employ single-molecule atomic force microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and passive probe particle tracking to study the adsorption and liquid crystalline ordering of semiflexible β-lactoglobulin fibrils at liquid interfaces. Fibrillar rigidity changes on increasing interfacial density, with a maximum caused by alignment and a subsequent decrease stemming from crowding and domain bending. Coexistence of nematic and isotropic regions is resolved and quantified by a length scale-dependent order parameter S2D(d). The nematic surface fraction increases with interfacial fibril density, but depends, for a fixed interfacial density, on the initial bulk concentration, ascribing the observed two-dimensional isotropic-nematic coexistence to non-equilibrium phenomena.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  13. Fragment oriented molecular shapes.

    PubMed

    Hain, Ethan; Camacho, Carlos J; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Molecular shape is an important concept in drug design and virtual screening. Shape similarity typically uses either alignment methods, which dynamically optimize molecular poses with respect to the query molecular shape, or feature vector methods, which are computationally less demanding but less accurate. The computational cost of alignment can be reduced by pre-aligning shapes, as is done with the Volumetric-Aligned Molecular Shapes (VAMS) method. Here, we introduce and evaluate fragment oriented molecular shapes (FOMS), where shapes are aligned based on molecular fragments. FOMS enables the use of shape constraints, a novel method for precisely specifying molecular shape queries that provides the ability to perform partial shape matching and supports search algorithms that function on an interactive time scale. When evaluated using the challenging Maximum Unbiased Validation dataset, shape constraints were able to extract significantly enriched subsets of compounds for the majority of targets, and FOMS matched or exceeded the performance of both VAMS and an optimizing alignment method of shape similarity search. PMID:27085751

  14. The Hue of Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  15. The Shape of Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markson, Lori; Diesendruck, Gil; Bloom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    When children learn the name of a novel object, they tend to extend that name to other objects similar in shape--a phenomenon referred to as the shape bias. Does the shape bias stem from learned associations between names and categories of objects, or does it derive from more general properties of children's understanding of language and the…

  16. Reversible shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; Zhou, Jing; White, Sarah; Ashby, Valerie

    2012-02-01

    An ``Achilles' heel'' of shape memory materials is that shape transformations triggered by an external stimulus are usually irreversible. Here we present a new concept of reversible transitions between two well-defined shapes by controlling hierarchic crystallization of a dual-network elastomer. The reversibility was demonstrated for different types of shape transformations including rod bending, winding of a helical coil, and widening an aperture. The distinct feature of the reversible shape alterations is that both counter-shapes are infinitely stable at a temperature of exploitation. Shape reversibility is highly desirable property in many practical applications such as non-surgical removal of a previously inserted catheter and handfree wrapping up of an earlier unraveled solar sail on a space shuttle.

  17. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  18. Gause's Principle and the Effect of Resource Partitioning on the Dynamical Coexistence of Replicating Templates

    PubMed Central

    Szilágyi, András; Zachar, István; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2013-01-01

    Models of competitive template replication, although basic for replicator dynamics and primordial evolution, have not yet taken different sequences explicitly into account, neither have they analyzed the effect of resource partitioning (feeding on different resources) on coexistence. Here we show by analytical and numerical calculations that Gause's principle of competitive exclusion holds for template replicators if resources (nucleotides) affect growth linearly and coexistence is at fixed point attractors. Cases of complementary or homologous pairing between building blocks with parallel or antiparallel strands show no deviation from the rule that the nucleotide compositions of stably coexisting species must be different and there cannot be more coexisting replicator species than nucleotide types. Besides this overlooked mechanism of template coexistence we show also that interesting sequence effects prevail as parts of sequences that are copied earlier affect coexistence more strongly due to the higher concentration of the corresponding replication intermediates. Template and copy always count as one species due their constraint of strict stoichiometric coupling. Stability of fixed-point coexistence tends to decrease with the length of sequences, although this effect is unlikely to be detrimental for sequences below 100 nucleotides. In sum, resource partitioning (niche differentiation) is the default form of competitive coexistence for replicating templates feeding on a cocktail of different nucleotides, as it may have been the case in the RNA world. Our analysis of different pairing and strand orientation schemes is relevant for artificial and potentially astrobiological genetics. PMID:23990769

  19. Moral Education and Improvement of Coexistence in Secondary Education (12-16 Years) in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Conde, M. J.; Olmos Miguelanez, S.; Perochena Gonzalez, P.; Herrera Garcia, E.

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence and moral education are areas of great interest in Spanish compulsory education, especially in the period that comprises between 12 and 16 years of age, named "compulsory secondary education" in Spain. With the aim to improve the processes of coexistence within this level, this research team on education from the University of…

  20. Conditions for coexistence of freshwater mussel species via partitioning of fish host resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rashleigh, B.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    Riverine freshwater mussel species can be found in highly diverse communities where many similar species coexist. Mussel species potentially compete for food and space as adults, and for fish host resources during the larval (glochidial) stage. Resource partitioning at the larval stage may promote coexistence. A model of resource utilization was developed for two mussel species and analyzed to determine conditions for coexistence. Mussel species were predicted to coexist when they differed in terms of their success in contacting different fish host species; very similar strategies offered limited possibilities for coexistence. Differences in the mussel species' maximum infestation loads on the fish hosts that coincided with differences in their fish host contact success promoted coexistence. Mussel species with a given set of trade-offs in fish host use were predicted to coexist only for a subset of relative fish host abundances, so a shift in relative fish host abundances could result in the loss of a mussel species. An understanding of the conditions for freshwater mussel species coexistence can help explain high mussel diversity in rivers and guide ongoing conservation activities. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The coexistence of alternative and scientific conceptions in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Omer F.

    The purpose of this study was to inquire about the simultaneous coexistence of alternative and scientific conceptions in the domain of physics. This study was particularly motivated by several arguments put forward in opposition to the Conceptual Change Model. In the simplest form, these arguments state that people construct different domains of knowledge and different modes of perception in different situations. Therefore, holding different conceptualizations is unavoidable and expecting a replacement in an individual's conceptual structure is not plausible in terms of instructional practices. The following research questions were generated to inquire about this argument: (1) Do individuals keep their alternative conceptions after they have acquired scientific conceptions? (2) Assuming that individuals who acquired scientific conceptions also have alternative conceptions, how are these different conceptions nested in their conceptual structure? (3) What kind of knowledge, skills, and reasoning are necessary to transfer scientific principles instead of alternative ones in the construction of a valid model? Analysis of the data collected from the non-physics group indicated that the nature of alternative conceptions is framed by two types of reasoning: reasoning by mental simulation and semiformal reasoning. Analysis of the data collected from the physics group revealed that mental images or scenes feeding reasoning by mental simulation had not disappeared after the acquisition of scientific conceptions. The analysis of data also provided enough evidence to conclude that alternative principles feeding semiformal reasoning have not necessarily disappeared after the acquisition of scientific conceptions. However, in regard to semiformal reasoning, compartmentalization was not as clear as the case demonstrated in reasoning by mental simulation; instead semiformal and scientific reasoning are intertwined in a way that the components of semiformal reasoning can easily

  2. Nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, U.; Reviol, W.; Kaczarowski, R.

    1995-08-01

    Several groups from the University of Notre Dame are playing an important role in developing the research program at ATLAS. One of their main interests is the study, in collaboration with ANL staff members, of the behavior of nuclei at high spin in the transitional region near A=180 (i.e. the Hg-Pt-Os nuclei), and A=100 (i.e. the Ru-Tc nuclei) with emphasis on shape coexistence and configuration mixing. This group has also participated in many other experiments performed with the BGO gamma-ray facility, especially in the investigation of superdeformation. The {gamma}-ray groups at ANL and Notre Dame have also had collaborative experiments at Gammasphere. The Notre Dame group has built, tested and extensively used a state-of-the-art plunger device for lifetime measurements in conjunction with the ATLAS {gamma}-ray facility. An adapted version of this device is now under construction at Notre Dame, under contract with ANL, for use at the Gammasphere facility.

  3. Spatial–Numerical and Ordinal Positional Associations Coexist in Parallel

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian; Willmes, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence for a systematic association of numbers and space. A prominent finding supporting this notion is the spatial-numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect describing relatively faster responses to smaller numbers using a left-hand key and to larger numbers using a right-hand key. However, the assumption of the SNARC effect reflecting spatial-numerical associations was challenged recently. A working memory account was proposed suggesting that not numbers per se but their position in a memorized sequence is associated with space. Yet, there is also first evidence suggesting that this ordinal position and the SNARC effect may not be mutually exclusive. In the present study, we further examined the relationship between the ordinal position and the SNARC effect. We manipulated the number of items in the memorized ordered sequence and the number range employed. Results revealed both a significant ordinal position effect, but also a significant SNARC effect, substantiating the view that both effects are not mutually exclusive but may co-exist. Furthermore, we found that the SNARC effect was reduced when numbers ranging from 1 to 10 versus numbers ranging from 1 to 9 were employed. Thus, our results question a pure working memory account for the SNARC effect. Additionally, they highlight the critical role of the number range employed in research about the SNARC effect. PMID:27064216

  4. Hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations coexistent in nano-metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takahiro; Lich, Le Van; Nagano, Koyo; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    Tailoring materials to obtain unique, or significantly enhanced material properties through rationally designed structures rather than chemical constituents is principle of metamaterial concept, which leads to the realization of remarkable optical and mechanical properties. Inspired by the recent progress in electromagnetic and mechanical metamaterials, here we introduce the concept of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and demonstrate through an experiment in silico with hierarchical nanostructures of ferroelectrics using sophisticated real-space phase-field techniques. This new concept enables variety of unusual and complex yet controllable domain patterns to be achieved, where the coexistence between hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations establishes a new benchmark for exploration of complexity in spontaneous polarization ordering. The concept opens a novel route to effectively tailor domain configurations through the control of internal structure, facilitating access to stabilization and control of complex domain patterns that provide high potential for novel functionalities. A key design parameter to achieve such complex patterns is explored based on the parity of junctions that connect constituent nanostructures. We further highlight the variety of additional functionalities that are potentially obtained from ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and provide promising perspectives for novel multifunctional devices. This study proposes an entirely new discipline of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, further driving advances in metamaterials research.

  5. Coexistence of epileptic nocturnal wanderings and an arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro; Díaz-Galviz, John L; García-Reyna, Juan Carlos; Avila-Ordoñez, Mario U

    2007-06-15

    Episodic nocturnal wanderings (ENWs) have rarely been associated with gross abnormalities of brain structures. We describe the case of a patient with ENWs in coexistence with an arachnoid cyst (AC). The patient was a 15-year-old boy who presented with nocturnal attacks characterized by complex motor behaviors. An MRI revealed a left temporal cyst and a SPECT Tc99 scan showed left temporal hypoperfusion and bilateral frontal hyperperfusion, more evident on the right side. During an all-night polysomnographic recording with audiovisual monitoring, dystonic posture followed by sleepwalking-like behavior was documented. The sleepwalking-like behavior was preceded by a spike discharge over the left frontocentral region with contralateral projection and secondary generalization during stage 2 sleep. Treatment with levetiracetam produced a striking remission of seizures. This supports a conservative management of an AC, considering that it may be an incidental finding. In epileptic patients, an AC may not necessarily be related to the location of the seizure focus. PMID:17694730

  6. Beyond Peaceful Coexistence: The Emergence of Space, Time and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Ignazio

    A physical theory consists of a formal structure and one or more interpretations. The latter can come out from cultural and cognitive tension going far beyond any sound operational pact between theoretical constructs and empirical data. We have no reason to doubt about the consistency and efficacy of syntaxes if properly used in the right range. The formal side of Physics has grown in a strongly connected and stratified way through an almost autopoietic, self-dual procedure (let's think of the extraordinary success of the gauge theories), whereas the foundational debate is still blustering about the two pillars of such monumental construction. The general relativity (GR) and the quantum mechanics (QM), which still appear to be greatly incompatible and stopped in a limited peaceful coexistence between local causality in space-time and quantum non-locality [1]. The formidable challenges waiting for us beyond the Standard Model seem to require a new semantic consistency [2] within the two theories, so as to build a new way to look at them, to work and to relate them...

  7. [Ecomorphological explanations of passerines coexistence in alpine meadow].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Cheng; Chu, Hui; Sun, Jia-Chen; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Zhao, Liang

    2013-06-01

    Species ecomorphological characteristics are the evolutionary results of selective pressures that have enabled individuals of a given species to survive and reproduce. Closely related species co-occurring in homogeneous environments should be morphologically distinct to partition limited resources, so as to minimize interspecific competition. From 1983 to 2012, we studied the ecomorphological characteristics of nine passerine species in alpine meadow. Results showed six ecomorphological characteristics of the nine species were significantly different. Approximately, 92.0% of samples were correctly classified and the correct rates ranged from 84.5% to 100.0%, except for the Oriental Skylark (Eremophila alpestris), which was 79.2%. Accordingly, the nine species were divided into five guilds based on their characteristics. Results indicated that the niches of all species were divergent, and the ecomorphological characteristics of the specific species in each guild were related to their habitats and foraging behaviors. These results also explained the possible mechanisms of different species coexistence in alpine meadow. PMID:23775990

  8. Hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations coexistent in nano-metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Takahiro; Lich, Le Van; Nagano, Koyo; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring materials to obtain unique, or significantly enhanced material properties through rationally designed structures rather than chemical constituents is principle of metamaterial concept, which leads to the realization of remarkable optical and mechanical properties. Inspired by the recent progress in electromagnetic and mechanical metamaterials, here we introduce the concept of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and demonstrate through an experiment in silico with hierarchical nanostructures of ferroelectrics using sophisticated real-space phase-field techniques. This new concept enables variety of unusual and complex yet controllable domain patterns to be achieved, where the coexistence between hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations establishes a new benchmark for exploration of complexity in spontaneous polarization ordering. The concept opens a novel route to effectively tailor domain configurations through the control of internal structure, facilitating access to stabilization and control of complex domain patterns that provide high potential for novel functionalities. A key design parameter to achieve such complex patterns is explored based on the parity of junctions that connect constituent nanostructures. We further highlight the variety of additional functionalities that are potentially obtained from ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and provide promising perspectives for novel multifunctional devices. This study proposes an entirely new discipline of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, further driving advances in metamaterials research. PMID:26424484

  9. Hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations coexistent in nano-metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Takahiro; Lich, Le Van; Nagano, Koyo; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring materials to obtain unique, or significantly enhanced material properties through rationally designed structures rather than chemical constituents is principle of metamaterial concept, which leads to the realization of remarkable optical and mechanical properties. Inspired by the recent progress in electromagnetic and mechanical metamaterials, here we introduce the concept of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and demonstrate through an experiment in silico with hierarchical nanostructures of ferroelectrics using sophisticated real-space phase-field techniques. This new concept enables variety of unusual and complex yet controllable domain patterns to be achieved, where the coexistence between hierarchical ferroelectric and ferrotoroidic polarizations establishes a new benchmark for exploration of complexity in spontaneous polarization ordering. The concept opens a novel route to effectively tailor domain configurations through the control of internal structure, facilitating access to stabilization and control of complex domain patterns that provide high potential for novel functionalities. A key design parameter to achieve such complex patterns is explored based on the parity of junctions that connect constituent nanostructures. We further highlight the variety of additional functionalities that are potentially obtained from ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, and provide promising perspectives for novel multifunctional devices. This study proposes an entirely new discipline of ferroelectric nano-metamaterials, further driving advances in metamaterials research. PMID:26424484

  10. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  11. Ultrafast studies of coexisting electronic order in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, James; Thewalt, Eric; Alpichshev, Zhanybek; Sternbach, Aaron; McLeod, Alex; Ji, L.; Veit, Mike; Dorrow, Chelsey; Koralek, Jake; Xhao, Xudong; Barisic, Neven; Kemper, Alexander; Gedik, Nuh; Greven, Martin; Basov, Dimitri; Orenstein, Joe

    The cuprate family of high temperature superconductors displays a variety of electronic phases which emerge when charge carriers are added to the antiferromagnetic parent compound. These electronic phases are characterized by subtle differences in the low energy electronic excitations. Ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity (TRR) provides an ideal tool for investigating the cuprate phase diagram, as small changes in the electronic structure can produce significant contrast in the non-equilibrium reflectivity. Here we present TRR measurements of cuprate superconductors, focusing on the model single-layer cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ. We observe a cusp-like feature in the quasiparticle lifetime near the superconducting transition temperature Tc. This feature can be understood using a model of coherently-mixed charge-density wave and superconducting pairing. We propose extending this technique to the nanoscale using ultrafast scattering scanning near-field microscopy (u-SNOM). This will allow us to explore how these electronic phases coexist and compete in real-space.

  12. Pessimal shapes for packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2014-03-01

    The question of which convex shapes leave the most empty space in their densest packing is the subject of Reinhardt's conjecture in two dimensions and Ulam's conjecture in three dimensions. Such conjectures about pessimal packing shapes have proven notoriously difficult to make progress on. I show that the regular heptagon is a local pessimum among all convex shapes, and that the 3D ball is a local pessimum among origin-symmetric shapes. Any shape sufficiently close in the space of shapes to these local pessima can be packed at a greater efficiency than they. In two dimensions and in dimensions above three, the ball is not a local pessimum, so the situation in 3D is unusual and intriguing. I will discuss what conditions conspire to make the 3D ball a local pessimum and whether we can prove that it is also a global pessimum.

  13. Learning Deformable Shape Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Samuel; Martinez, Aleix

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach to shape detection of highly deformable shapes in images via manifold learning with regression. Our method does not require shape key points be defined at high contrast image regions, nor do we need an initial estimate of the shape. We only require sufficient representative training data and a rough initial estimate of the object position and scale. We demonstrate the method for face shape learning, and provide a comparison to nonlinear Active Appearance Model. Our method is extremely accurate, to nearly pixel precision and is capable of accurately detecting the shape of faces undergoing extreme expression changes. The technique is robust to occlusions such as glasses and gives reasonable results for extremely degraded image resolutions. PMID:22308002

  14. Large-amplitude quadrupole collective dynamics of shape coexistence phenomena in proton-rich Se and Kr isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinohara, Nobuo; Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2010-06-01

    The five-dimensional quadrupole collective Hamiltonian for large-amplitude collective dynamics is microscopically constructed by the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (CHFB) method and local quasiparticle random phase approximation (LQRPA). The excitation spectra and the electric quadrupole transitions between the low-lying states in {sup 68}Se are calculated by solving the collective Schroedinger equation.

  15. The Shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Looking at a few pictures of Eros under the right lighting conditions gives a reasonable idea of the shape of the asteroid, but analysis of NEAR Shoemaker data requires a very accurate digital model of Eros' shape. This 'shape model' helps the NEAR team analyze images and other types of data. For example, comparing the brightness of imaged regions with the orientation of the corresponding parts of the surface, taken from the shape model, allows scientists to determine whether bright areas are due to just surface orientation or also to surface properties. By 'filling

  16. DISJUNCTIVE NORMAL SHAPE MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Mesadi, Fitsum; Cetin, Mujdat; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    A novel implicit parametric shape model is proposed for segmentation and analysis of medical images. Functions representing the shape of an object can be approximated as a union of N polytopes. Each polytope is obtained by the intersection of M half-spaces. The shape function can be approximated as a disjunction of conjunctions, using the disjunctive normal form. The shape model is initialized using seed points defined by the user. We define a cost function based on the Chan-Vese energy functional. The model is differentiable, hence, gradient based optimization algorithms are used to find the model parameters. PMID:27403233

  17. Shape optimization for DSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouaknin, Gaddiel; Laachi, Nabil; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn; Gibou, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    Directed self-assembly using block copolymers for positioning vertical interconnect access in integrated circuits relies on the proper shape of a confined domain in which polymers will self-assemble into the targeted design. Finding that shape, i.e., solving the inverse problem, is currently mainly based on trial and error approaches. We introduce a level-set based algorithm that makes use of a shape optimization strategy coupled with self-consistent field theory to solve the inverse problem in an automated way. It is shown that optimal shapes are found for different targeted topologies with accurate placement and distances between the different components.

  18. Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xuan; Yang, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2010-12-01

    Microscopic models based on evolutionary games on spatially extended scales have recently been developed to address the fundamental issue of species coexistence. In this pursuit almost all existing works focus on the relevant dynamical behaviors originated from a single but physically reasonable initial condition. To gain comprehensive and global insights into the dynamics of coexistence, here we explore the basins of coexistence and extinction and investigate how they evolve as a basic parameter of the system is varied. Our model is cyclic competitions among three species as described by the classical rock-paper-scissors game, and we consider both discrete lattice and continuous space, incorporating species mobility and intraspecific competitions. Our results reveal that, for all cases considered, a basin of coexistence always emerges and persists in a substantial part of the parameter space, indicating that coexistence is a robust phenomenon. Factors such as intraspecific competition can, in fact, promote coexistence by facilitating the emergence of the coexistence basin. In addition, we find that the extinction basins can exhibit quite complex structures in terms of the convergence time toward the final state for different initial conditions. We have also developed models based on partial differential equations, which yield basin structures that are in good agreement with those from microscopic stochastic simulations. To understand the origin and emergence of the observed complicated basin structures is challenging at the present due to the extremely high dimensional nature of the underlying dynamical system.

  19. Functional equivalence, competitive hierarchy and facilitation determine species coexistence in highly invaded grasslands.

    PubMed

    Gross, Nicolas; Liancourt, Pierre; Butters, Robyn; Duncan, Richard P; Hulme, Philip E

    2015-04-01

    Alien and native plant species often differ in functional traits. Trait differences could lead to niche differences that minimize competitive interactions and stabilize coexistence. However, trait differences could also translate into average fitness differences, leading to a competitive hierarchy that prevents coexistence. We tested whether trait differences between alien and native species translated into average fitness or stabilizing niche differences, and whether competition could explain observed coexistence within invaded grassland communities (New Zealand). Trait differences reflected marked competitive hierarchy, suggesting average fitness differences. Species coexistence was determined by a trade-off between species susceptibility to herbivory vs competitive hierarchy and facilitation. Importantly, although aliens and natives differed in their trait values, they did not differ in their competitive response, highlighting the importance of equalizing mechanisms in structuring invaded communities. Only a few alien species with a particular set of traits were able to jeopardize species coexistence when grazing was ceased. Our study explains why some alien species coexist with natives, whereas others have strong impacts on native communities. It highlights that trait differences can underlie several coexistence processes and that the demonstration of trait differences between aliens and natives is only a first step to understanding the role of biotic interactions in structuring invaded communities. PMID:25388949

  20. Cachers, scavengers, and thieves: a novel mechanism for desert rodent coexistence.

    PubMed

    Price, Mary V; Mittler, John E

    2006-08-01

    A biologically explicit simulation model of resource competition between two species of seed-eating heteromyid rodent indicates that stable coexistence is possible on a homogeneous resource if harvested food is stored and consumers steal each other's caches. Here we explore the coexistence mechanisms involved by analyzing how consumer phenotypes and presence of a noncaching consumer affect the competitive outcome. Without cache exchange, the winning consumer is better at harvesting seeds and produces more offspring per gram of stored food. With cache exchange, coexistence is promoted by interspecific trade-offs between harvest ability, metabolic efficiency, and ability to pilfer defended caches of heterospecifics or scavenge undefended caches of dead conspecifics or heterospecifics. Cache exchange via pilferage can equalize competitor fitnesses but has little stabilizing effect and leads to stable coexistence only in the presence of a noncaching consumer. In contrast, scavenging is both equalizing and stabilizing and promotes coexistence without a third consumer. Because body size affects a heteromyid rodent's metabolic rate, seed harvest rate, caching strategy, and ability to steal caches, interspecific differences in body size should produce the trade-offs necessary for coexistence. The observation that coexisting heteromyids differ in body size therefore indicates that cache exchange may promote diversity in heteromyid communities. PMID:16874629

  1. Shell and Shapes in the N = 28 Isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Caceres, L.; Force, C.; Grevy, S.; Sorlin, O.; Gaudefroy, L.; Nowacki, F.

    2010-06-01

    New experimental results on {sup 43}S and {sup 44}S reveal that these nuclei are located in a transitional region of shape coexistence between the spherical {sup 48}Ca and the oblate {sup 42}Si. The origin of the deformation is discussed in terms of the evolution of the single particle energy levels leading to the compression of the energy difference of the orbitals in the sd and pf shells for protons and neutrons, respectively. Therefore, due to quadrupole excitations across the Z = 14 and N = 28 gaps, the intruder configuration in the neutron rich S isotopes became the ground state.

  2. Osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: which coexisting disorders are disabling?

    PubMed

    Reeuwijk, Kerstin G; de Rooij, Mariëtte; van Dijk, Gabriella M; Veenhof, Cindy; Steultjens, Martijn P; Dekker, Joost

    2010-07-01

    Exercise therapy is generally recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. However, coexisting disorders may bring additional impairments, which may necessitate adaptations to exercise for OA of the hip or knee. For the purpose of developing an adapted protocol for exercise therapy in OA patients with coexisting disorders, information is needed on which specific coexisting disorders in OA are associated with activity limitations and pain. To describe the relationship between specific coexisting disorders, activity limitations, and pain in patients with OA of the hip or knee, a cross-sectional cohort study among 288 older adults (50-85 years of age) with OA of hip or knee was conducted. Subjects were recruited from three rehabilitation centers and two hospitals. Demographic data, clinical data, information about coexisting disorders (i.e., comorbidity and other disorders), activity limitations (WOMAC: physical functioning domain), and pain (visual analogue scale (VAS)) were collected by questionnaire. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analysis. Coexisting disorders associated with activity limitations were chronic back pain or hernia, arthritis of the hand or feet, and other chronic rheumatic diseases (all musculoskeletal disorders); diabetes and chronic cystitis (non-musculoskeletal disorders); hearing impairments in a face-to-face conversation, vision impairments in long distances, and dizziness in combination with falling (all sensory impairments); and overweight and obesity. Coexistent disorders associated with pain were arthritis of the hand or feet, other chronic rheumatic diseases (musculoskeletal disorders), and diabetes (non-musculoskeletal disorder). Specific disorders coexisting next to OA and associated with additional activity limitations and pain were identified. These coexisting disorders need to be addressed in exercise therapy and rehabilitation for patients with OA of the hip or knee. PMID

  3. Rollercoaster Loop Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  4. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  5. Crystal Shape Bingo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    This document describes a game that provides students with practice in recognizing three dimensional crystal shapes and planar geometric shapes of crystal faces. It contains information on the objective of the game, game preparation, and rules for playing. Play cards are included (four to a page). (ASK)

  6. Alleviation of Podophyllotoxin Toxicity Using Coexisting Flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Sun, Hua; Jin, Lu; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jin; Guo, Chong-Yi; Ding, Ke; Luo, Cheng; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2013-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (POD) is a lignan-type toxin existing in many herbs used in folk medicine. Until now, no effective strategy is available for the management of POD intoxication. This study aims to determine the protective effects of flavonoids (quercetin and kaempferol) on POD-induced toxicity. In Vero cells, both flavonoids protected POD-induced cytotoxicity by recovering alleviating G2/M arrest, decreasing ROS generation and changes of membrane potential, and recovering microtubule structure. In Swiss mice, the group given both POD and flavonoids group had significantly lower mortality rate and showed less damages in the liver and kidney than the group given POD alone. As compared to the POD group, the POD plus flavonoids group exhibited decreases in plasma transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, plasma urea, creatinine and malondialdehyde levels, and increases in superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels. Histological examination of the liver and kidney showed less pathological changes in the treatment of POD plus flavonoids group. The protective mechanisms were due to the antioxidant activity of flavonoids against the oxidative stress induced by POD and the competitive binding of flavonoids against POD for the same colchicines-binding sites. The latter binding was confirmed by the tubulin assembly assay in combination with molecular docking analyses. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that the coexisting flavonoids have great protective effects against the POD toxicity, and results of this study highlighted the great potential of searching for effective antidotes against toxins based on the pharmacological clues. PMID:23991049

  7. Good fences: the importance of setting boundaries for peaceful coexistence.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Harmon, Dion; Werfel, Justin; Gard-Murray, Alexander S; Bar-Yam, Shlomiya; Gros, Andreas; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2014-01-01

    We consider the conditions of peace and violence among ethnic groups, testing a theory designed to predict the locations of violence and interventions that can promote peace. Characterizing the model's success in predicting peace requires examples where peace prevails despite diversity. Switzerland is recognized as a country of peace, stability and prosperity. This is surprising because of its linguistic and religious diversity that in other parts of the world lead to conflict and violence. Here we analyze how peaceful stability is maintained. Our analysis shows that peace does not depend on integrated coexistence, but rather on well defined topographical and political boundaries separating groups, allowing for partial autonomy within a single country. In Switzerland, mountains and lakes are an important part of the boundaries between sharply defined linguistic areas. Political canton and circle (sub-canton) boundaries often separate religious groups. Where such boundaries do not appear to be sufficient, we find that specific aspects of the population distribution guarantee either sufficient separation or sufficient mixing to inhibit intergroup violence according to the quantitative theory of conflict. In exactly one region, a porous mountain range does not adequately separate linguistic groups and that region has experienced significant violent conflict, leading to the recent creation of the canton of Jura. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that violence between groups can be inhibited by physical and political boundaries. A similar analysis of the area of the former Yugoslavia shows that during widespread ethnic violence existing political boundaries did not coincide with the boundaries of distinct groups, but peace prevailed in specific areas where they did coincide. The success of peace in Switzerland may serve as a model to resolve conflict in other ethnically diverse countries and regions of the world. PMID:24847861

  8. Good Fences: The Importance of Setting Boundaries for Peaceful Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Harmon, Dion; Werfel, Justin; Gard-Murray, Alexander S.; Bar-Yam, Shlomiya; Gros, Andreas; Xulvi-Brunet, Ramon; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2014-01-01

    We consider the conditions of peace and violence among ethnic groups, testing a theory designed to predict the locations of violence and interventions that can promote peace. Characterizing the model's success in predicting peace requires examples where peace prevails despite diversity. Switzerland is recognized as a country of peace, stability and prosperity. This is surprising because of its linguistic and religious diversity that in other parts of the world lead to conflict and violence. Here we analyze how peaceful stability is maintained. Our analysis shows that peace does not depend on integrated coexistence, but rather on well defined topographical and political boundaries separating groups, allowing for partial autonomy within a single country. In Switzerland, mountains and lakes are an important part of the boundaries between sharply defined linguistic areas. Political canton and circle (sub-canton) boundaries often separate religious groups. Where such boundaries do not appear to be sufficient, we find that specific aspects of the population distribution guarantee either sufficient separation or sufficient mixing to inhibit intergroup violence according to the quantitative theory of conflict. In exactly one region, a porous mountain range does not adequately separate linguistic groups and that region has experienced significant violent conflict, leading to the recent creation of the canton of Jura. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that violence between groups can be inhibited by physical and political boundaries. A similar analysis of the area of the former Yugoslavia shows that during widespread ethnic violence existing political boundaries did not coincide with the boundaries of distinct groups, but peace prevailed in specific areas where they did coincide. The success of peace in Switzerland may serve as a model to resolve conflict in other ethnically diverse countries and regions of the world. PMID:24847861

  9. Metastable liquid-liquid coexistence and density anomalies in a core-softened fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, H. M.; Wilding, N. B.

    2006-06-01

    Linearly sloped or “ramp” potentials belong to a class of core-softened models which possess a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) in addition to the usual liquid-gas critical point. Furthermore, they exhibit thermodynamic anomalies in their density and compressibility, the nature of which may be akin to those occurring in water. Previous simulation studies of ramp potentials have focused on just one functional form, for which the LLCP is thermodynamically stable. In this work we construct a series of ramp potentials, which interpolate between this previously studied form and a ramp-based approximation to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. By means of Monte Carlo simulation, we locate the LLCP, the first order high density liquid (HDL)-low density liquid (LDL) coexistence line, and the line of density maxima for a selection of potentials in the series. We observe that as the LJ limit is approached, the LLCP becomes metastable with respect to freezing into a hexagonal close packed crystalline solid. The qualitative nature of the phase behavior in this regime shows a remarkable resemblance to that seen in simulation studies of accurate water models. Specifically, the density of the liquid phase exceeds that of the solid; the gradient of the metastable LDL-HDL line is negative in the pressure (p) -temperature (T) plane; while the line of density maxima in the p-T plane has a shape similar to that seen in water and extends into the stable liquid region of the phase diagram. As such, our results lend weight to the “second critical point” hypothesis as an explanation for the anomalous behavior of water.

  10. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  11. Pulse shaping system

    DOEpatents

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  12. Wing shape variation associated with mimicry in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert T; Le Poul, Yann; Whibley, Annabel C; Mérot, Claire; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Joron, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    Mimetic resemblance in unpalatable butterflies has been studied by evolutionary biologists for over a century, but has largely focused on the convergence in wing color patterns. In Heliconius numata, discrete color-pattern morphs closely resemble comimics in the distantly related genus Melinaea. We examine the possibility that the shape of the butterfly wing also shows adaptive convergence. First, simple measures of forewing dimensions were taken of individuals in a cross between H. numata morphs, and showed quantitative differences between two of the segregating morphs, f. elegans and f. silvana. Second, landmark-based geometric morphometric and elliptical Fourier outline analyses were used to more fully characterize these shape differences. Extension of these techniques to specimens from natural populations suggested that, although many of the coexisting morphs could not be discriminated by shape, the differences we identified between f. elegans and f. silvana hold in the wild. Interestingly, despite extensive overlap, the shape variation between these two morphs is paralleled in their respective Melinaea comimics. Our study therefore suggests that wing-shape variation is associated with mimetic resemblance, and raises the intriguing possibility that the supergene responsible for controlling the major switch in color pattern between morphs also contributes to wing shape differences in H. numata. PMID:23888854

  13. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie˜ 3 K and TS˜ 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS˜ 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  14. Nuclear Structure in China 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Meng, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2011-08-01

    Personal view on nuclear physics research / Jie Meng -- High-spin level structures in [symbol]Zr / X. P. Cao ... [et al.] -- Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes / Lie-Wen Chen ... [et al.] -- Wobbling rotation in atomic nuclei / Y. S. Chen and Zao-Chun Gao -- The mixing of scalar mesons and the possible nonstrange dibaryons / L. R. Dai ... [et al.] -- Net baryon productions and gluon saturation in the SPS, RHIC and LHC energy regions / Sheng-Qin Feng -- Production of heavy isotopes with collisions between two actinide nuclides / Z. Q. Feng ... [et al.] -- The projected configuration interaction method / Zao-Chun Gao and Yong-Shou Chen -- Applications of Nilsson mean-field plus extended pairing model to rare-earth nuclei / Xin Guan ... [et al.] -- Complex scaling method and the resonant states / Jian-You Guo ... [et al.] -- Probing the equation of state by deep sub-barrier fusion reactions / Hong-Jun Hao and Jun-Long Tian -- Doublet structure study in A[symbol]105 mass region / C. Y. He ... [et al.] -- Rotational bands in transfermium nuclei / X. T. He -- Shape coexistence and shape evolution [symbol]Yb / H. Hua ... [et al.] -- Multistep shell model method in the complex energy plane / R. J. Liotta -- The evolution of protoneutron stars with kaon condensate / Ang Li -- High spin structures in the [symbol]Lu nucleus / Li Cong-Bo ... [et al.] -- Nuclear stopping and equation of state / QingFeng Li and Ying Yuan -- Covariant description of the low-lying states in neutron-deficient Kr isotopes / Z. X. Li ... [et al.] -- Isospin corrections for superallowed [symbol] transitions / HaoZhao Liang ... [et al.] -- The positive-parity band structures in [symbol]Ag / C. Liu ... [et al.] -- New band structures in odd-odd [symbol]I and [symbol]I / Liu GongYe ... [et al.] -- The sd-pair shell model and interacting boson model / Yan-An Luo ... [et al.] -- Cross-section distributions of fragments in the calcium isotopes projectile

  15. Nuclear Structure in China 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hong-Bo; Meng, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2011-08-01

    Personal view on nuclear physics research / Jie Meng -- High-spin level structures in [symbol]Zr / X. P. Cao ... [et al.] -- Constraining the symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes / Lie-Wen Chen ... [et al.] -- Wobbling rotation in atomic nuclei / Y. S. Chen and Zao-Chun Gao -- The mixing of scalar mesons and the possible nonstrange dibaryons / L. R. Dai ... [et al.] -- Net baryon productions and gluon saturation in the SPS, RHIC and LHC energy regions / Sheng-Qin Feng -- Production of heavy isotopes with collisions between two actinide nuclides / Z. Q. Feng ... [et al.] -- The projected configuration interaction method / Zao-Chun Gao and Yong-Shou Chen -- Applications of Nilsson mean-field plus extended pairing model to rare-earth nuclei / Xin Guan ... [et al.] -- Complex scaling method and the resonant states / Jian-You Guo ... [et al.] -- Probing the equation of state by deep sub-barrier fusion reactions / Hong-Jun Hao and Jun-Long Tian -- Doublet structure study in A[symbol]105 mass region / C. Y. He ... [et al.] -- Rotational bands in transfermium nuclei / X. T. He -- Shape coexistence and shape evolution [symbol]Yb / H. Hua ... [et al.] -- Multistep shell model method in the complex energy plane / R. J. Liotta -- The evolution of protoneutron stars with kaon condensate / Ang Li -- High spin structures in the [symbol]Lu nucleus / Li Cong-Bo ... [et al.] -- Nuclear stopping and equation of state / QingFeng Li and Ying Yuan -- Covariant description of the low-lying states in neutron-deficient Kr isotopes / Z. X. Li ... [et al.] -- Isospin corrections for superallowed [symbol] transitions / HaoZhao Liang ... [et al.] -- The positive-parity band structures in [symbol]Ag / C. Liu ... [et al.] -- New band structures in odd-odd [symbol]I and [symbol]I / Liu GongYe ... [et al.] -- The sd-pair shell model and interacting boson model / Yan-An Luo ... [et al.] -- Cross-section distributions of fragments in the calcium isotopes projectile

  16. The exchangeability of shape

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM) allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes. PMID:20964872

  17. Coexistence of tinnitus and hyperacusis in individuals with auditory dys-synchrony: A single case study

    PubMed Central

    Megha, K. N.; Adithya, Sugathan; Keerthana, K. P.; Konadath, Sreeraj

    2016-01-01

    Summary Certain clinical pathologies affecting the ear and hearing mechanism may co-exist. It is necessary to probe in detail into such conditions so that the pathophysiology is well understood. This research paper through a single case study tries to explain the probable pathophysiology behind coexistence of three different clinical conditions namely auditory dys-synchrony, hyperacusis and tinnitus. These conditions are common in the clinics, but the coexistence of all the three is rare and demands explanation beyond what is available in the literature. The assumed model highlights involvement of the outer hair cell's motor function in the cochlea along with the auditory central gain mechanism to explain possible pathophysiology behind coexistence of the three conditions. This model will provide insight into the probable link between the contribution of peripheral and central structures of hearing in generating tinnitus and hyperacusis in individuals having auditory dys-synchrony. PMID:26989651

  18. Theoretical study on phase coexistence in ferroelectric solid solutions near the tricritical point

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaoyan E-mail: dzk@psu.edu; Li, Hui; Zheng, Limei; Cao, Wenwu

    2015-04-07

    Phase coexistence in ferroelectric solid solutions near the tricritical point has been theoretically analyzed by using the Landau-Devonshire theory. Results revealed that different phases having similar potential wells could coexist in a narrow composition range near the tricritical point in the classical Pb(Zr{sub 1−x}Ti{sub x})O{sub 3} system. The potential barrier between potential wells increases with the decrease of temperature. Coexisting phases or different domains of the same phase can produce adaptive strains to maintain atomic coherency at the interfaces or domain walls. Such compatibility strains have influence on the energy potential as well as the stability of relative phases, leading to the appearance of energetically unfavorable monoclinic phases. Those competing and coexisting phases also construct an easy phase transition path with small energy barrier in between, so that very small stimuli can produce large response in compositions near the morphotropic phase boundary, especially near the tricritical point.

  19. Distance-limited dispersal promotes coexistence at habitat boundaries: reconsidering the competitive exclusion principle.

    PubMed

    Débarre, Florence; Lenormand, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the conditions for the stable coexistence of different alleles or species is a central topic in theoretical evolution and ecology. Different causes for stable polymorphism or species coexistence have already been identified but they can be grouped into a limited number of general processes. This article is devoted to the presentation and illustration of a new process, which we call 'habitat boundary polymorphism', and which relies on two key ingredients: habitat heterogeneity and distance-limited dispersal. Under direct competition and with fixed population densities, we show that this process allows for the equilibrium coexistence of more than n types in a n-habitat environment. Distance-limited dispersal indeed creates local maladaptation at habitat edges, which leaves room for the invasion of more generalist alleles or species. This mechanism provides a generic yet neglected process for the maintenance of polymorphism or species coexistence. PMID:21265974

  20. The Shapes of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2013-12-01

    I have used many ploys to start a course in introductory physics, but one of the more interesting ones was to spend 20 minutes describing some of the curves and shapes that we would encounter in our year together. The students saw parabolas, catenaries, hyperbolas, cycloids, circles, ellipses, and helices, and were shown examples, either live or on slides, of these shapes. The world of physics is three-dimensional, and students need to see what curves and trajectories span it. Once they see these shapes in nature, they look at the world around them in fresh ways.

  1. Shaping light with MOEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, W.; Weber, S.; Masson, J.; Extermann, J.; Bonacina, L.; Bich, A.; Bitterli, R.; Herzig, H. P.; Kiselev, D.; Scharf, T.; Voelkel, R.; Weible, K. J.; Wolf, J.-P.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2011-03-01

    Shaping light with microtechnology components has been possible for many years. The Texas Instruments digital micromirror device (DMD) and all types of adaptive optics systems are very sophisticated tools, well established and widely used. Here we present, however, two very dedicated systems, where one is an extremely simple MEMS-based tunable diffuser, while the second device is complex micromirror array with new capabilities for femtosecond laser pulse shaping. Showing the two systems right next to each other demonstrates the vast options and versatility of MOEMS for shaping light in the space and time domain.

  2. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  3. Coexistence of Incommensurate Magnetism and Superconductivity in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Eberlein, Andreas; Metzner, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the competition of magnetism and superconductivity in the two-dimensional Hubbard model with a moderate interaction strength, including the possibility of incommensurate spiral magnetic order. Using an unbiased renormalization group approach, we compute magnetic and superconducting order parameters in the ground state. In addition to previously established regions of Néel order coexisting with d-wave superconductivity, the calculations reveal further coexistence regions where superconductivity is accompanied by incommensurate magnetic order. PMID:26991188

  4. Trait adaptation promotes species coexistence in diverse predator and prey communities.

    PubMed

    Klauschies, Toni; Vasseur, David A; Gaedke, Ursula

    2016-06-01

    Species can adjust their traits in response to selection which may strongly influence species coexistence. Nevertheless, current theory mainly assumes distinct and time-invariant trait values. We examined the combined effects of the range and the speed of trait adaptation on species coexistence using an innovative multispecies predator-prey model. It allows for temporal trait changes of all predator and prey species and thus simultaneous coadaptation within and among trophic levels. We show that very small or slow trait adaptation did not facilitate coexistence because the stabilizing niche differences were not sufficient to offset the fitness differences. In contrast, sufficiently large and fast trait adaptation jointly promoted stable or neutrally stable species coexistence. Continuous trait adjustments in response to selection enabled a temporally variable convergence and divergence of species traits; that is, species became temporally more similar (neutral theory) or dissimilar (niche theory) depending on the selection pressure, resulting over time in a balance between niche differences stabilizing coexistence and fitness differences promoting competitive exclusion. Furthermore, coadaptation allowed prey and predator species to cluster into different functional groups. This equalized the fitness of similar species while maintaining sufficient niche differences among functionally different species delaying or preventing competitive exclusion. In contrast to previous studies, the emergent feedback between biomass and trait dynamics enabled supersaturated coexistence for a broad range of potential trait adaptation and parameters. We conclude that accounting for trait adaptation may explain stable and supersaturated species coexistence for a broad range of environmental conditions in natural systems when the absence of such adaptive changes would preclude it. Small trait changes, coincident with those that may occur within many natural populations, greatly enlarged

  5. Coexistence of resistance to thyroid hormone and papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Igata, Motoyuki; Tsuruzoe, Kaku; Kawashima, Junji; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kondo, Tatsuya; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Shimoda, Seiya; Furukawa, Noboru; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Miyamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a syndrome of reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormones. RTH is majorly caused by mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (THRB) gene. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. Here, we report a rare case of RTH with a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A 26-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a thyroid tumor and hormonal abnormality. She had elevated serum thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels. Genetic analysis of THRB identified a missense mutation, P452L, leading to a diagnosis of RTH. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor and lymph nodes enabled the cytological diagnosis of PTC with lymph node metastases. Total thyroidectomy and neck lymph nodes dissection were performed. Following surgery, thyroxine replacement (≥500 μg) was necessary to avoid the symptoms of hypothyroidism and to maintain her TSH levels within the same range as before the operation. During the follow-up, basal thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were around 6 ng/ml and TSH-stimulated Tg levels were between 12 and 20 ng/ml. Up to present, the patient has had no recurrence of PTC. This indicates that these Tg values are consistent with a biochemical incomplete response or an indeterminate response. There is no consensus regarding the management of thyroid carcinoma in patients with RTH, but aggressive treatments such as total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine (RAI) and TSH suppression therapy are recommended. Learning points There are only a few cases reporting the coexistence of RTH and thyroid carcinoma. Moreover, our case would be the first case presenting one with lymph node metastases. Recent studies indicated a close association of THRB mutations with human cancers, but the role of THRB mutation in carcinogenesis is still unclear. When total thyroidectomy is performed in

  6. Solar Radiation Determines Site Occupancy of Coexisting Tropical and Temperate Deer Species Introduced to New Zealand Forests.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert B; Forsyth, David M; Allen, Roy K J; Affeld, Kathrin; MacKenzie, Darryl I

    2015-01-01

    Assemblages of introduced taxa provide an opportunity to understand how abiotic and biotic factors shape habitat use by coexisting species. We tested hypotheses about habitat selection by two deer species recently introduced to New Zealand's temperate rainforests. We hypothesised that, due to different thermoregulatory abilities, rusa deer (Cervus timorensis; a tropical species) would prefer warmer locations in winter than red deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus; a temperate species). Since adult male rusa deer are aggressive in winter (the rut), we also hypothesised that rusa deer and red deer would not use the same winter locations. Finally, we hypothesised that in summer both species would prefer locations with fertile soils that supported more plant species preferred as food. We used a 250 × 250 m grid of 25 remote cameras to collect images in a 100-ha montane study area over two winters and summers. Plant composition, solar radiation, and soil fertility were also determined for each camera location. Multiseason occupancy models revealed that direct solar radiation was the best predictor of occupancy and detection probabilities for rusa deer in winter. Multistate, multiseason occupancy models provided strong evidence that the detection probability of adult male rusa deer was greater in winter and when other rusa deer were present at a location. Red deer mostly vacated the study area in winter. For the one season that had sufficient camera images of both species (summer 2011) to allow two-species occupancy models to be fitted, the detection probability of rusa deer also increased with solar radiation. Detection probability also varied with plant composition for both deer species. We conclude that habitat use by coexisting tropical and temperate deer species in New Zealand likely depends on the interplay between the thermoregulatory and behavioural traits of the deer and the abiotic and biotic features of the habitat. PMID:26061426

  7. Solar Radiation Determines Site Occupancy of Coexisting Tropical and Temperate Deer Species Introduced to New Zealand Forests

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert B.; Forsyth, David M.; Allen, Roy K. J.; Affeld, Kathrin; MacKenzie, Darryl I.

    2015-01-01

    Assemblages of introduced taxa provide an opportunity to understand how abiotic and biotic factors shape habitat use by coexisting species. We tested hypotheses about habitat selection by two deer species recently introduced to New Zealand’s temperate rainforests. We hypothesised that, due to different thermoregulatory abilities, rusa deer (Cervus timorensis; a tropical species) would prefer warmer locations in winter than red deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus; a temperate species). Since adult male rusa deer are aggressive in winter (the rut), we also hypothesised that rusa deer and red deer would not use the same winter locations. Finally, we hypothesised that in summer both species would prefer locations with fertile soils that supported more plant species preferred as food. We used a 250 × 250 m grid of 25 remote cameras to collect images in a 100-ha montane study area over two winters and summers. Plant composition, solar radiation, and soil fertility were also determined for each camera location. Multiseason occupancy models revealed that direct solar radiation was the best predictor of occupancy and detection probabilities for rusa deer in winter. Multistate, multiseason occupancy models provided strong evidence that the detection probability of adult male rusa deer was greater in winter and when other rusa deer were present at a location. Red deer mostly vacated the study area in winter. For the one season that had sufficient camera images of both species (summer 2011) to allow two-species occupancy models to be fitted, the detection probability of rusa deer also increased with solar radiation. Detection probability also varied with plant composition for both deer species. We conclude that habitat use by coexisting tropical and temperate deer species in New Zealand likely depends on the interplay between the thermoregulatory and behavioural traits of the deer and the abiotic and biotic features of the habitat. PMID:26061426

  8. Petrous apex cephalocoele: contribution of coexisting intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Duran, S; Hatipoglu, H G; Cılız, D S; Elverici, E; Sakman, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to show the MRI findings of petrous apex cephalocoele (PAC) and the other intracranial pathologies that coexist with PAC, and to discuss the contribution of the co-existing pathologies to aetiopathogenesis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of our imaging archive for the period from January 2012 to October 2013 revealed 13 patients with PAC (12 females and 1 male; age range, 26–69 years). 11 patients underwent MRI examination of the cranium, and 2 patients underwent MRI examination of the sellar region. We evaluated the lesions for content, signal intensity, enhancement, relation to petrous apex and Meckel's cave. Images were also evaluated for coexisting pathologies. Results: The presenting symptoms included headache, vertigo, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and trigeminal neuropathy. All patients had PAC. All lesions were located posterolateral to the Meckel's cave and were isointense with CSF signal on all pulse sequences. All lesions were continuous with Meckel's cave. Coexisting pathologies included intracranial aneurysmal dilatation, empty sella, mass in hypophysis, arachnoid cyst, inferior herniation of parahippocampal gyrus and optic nerve sheath CSF distension. Conclusion: Coexistence with other intracranial pathologies supports the possibility of CSF imbalance and/or intracranial hypertension in the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. Advances in knowledge: This study examined the contribution of the co-existing intracranial pathologies to the aetiopathogenesis of PAC. PMID:25651410

  9. Zealotry promotes coexistence in the rock-paper-scissors model of cyclic dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Chan, Kevin; Swami, Ananthram

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic dominance models, such as the classic rock-paper-scissors (RPS) game, have found real-world applications in biology, ecology, and sociology. A key quantity of interest in such models is the coexistence time, i.e., the time until at least one population type goes extinct. Much recent research has considered conditions that lengthen coexistence times in an RPS model. A general finding is that coexistence is promoted by localized spatial interactions (low mobility), while extinction is fostered by global interactions (high mobility). That is, there exists a mobility threshold which separates a regime of long coexistence from a regime of rapid collapse of coexistence. The key finding of our paper is that if zealots (i.e., nodes able to defeat others while themselves being immune to defeat) of even a single type exist, then system coexistence time can be significantly prolonged, even in the presence of global interactions. This work thus highlights a crucial determinant of system survival time in cyclic dominance models.

  10. Free energy landscapes and volumes of coexisting phases for a colloidal dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Trinh Hoa; Wang, G. F.; Lai, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Treating the repulsive part of a pairwise potential by the hard-sphere form and its attractive part by the effective depletion potential form, we calculate using this model potential the colloidal domains of phase separation. Differing from the usual recipe of applying the thermodynamic conditions of equal pressure and equal chemical potential where the branches of coexisting phases are the ultimate target, we employ the free energy density minimization approach [G. F. Wang and S. K. Lai, Phys. Rev. E 70, 051402 (2004)] to crosshatch the domains of equilibrium phases, which consist of the gas, liquid, and solid homogeneous phases as well as the coexistence of these phases. This numerical procedure is attractive since it yields naturally the colloidal volume of space occupied by each of the coexisting phases. In this work, we first examine the change in structures of the fluid and solid free energy density landscapes with the effective polymer concentration. We show by explicit illustration the link between the free energy density landscapes and the development of both the metastable and stable coexisting phases. Then, attention is paid to the spatial volumes predicted at the triple point. It is found here that the volumes of spaces of the three coexisting phases at the triple point vary one dimensionally, whereas for the two coexisting phases, they are uniquely determined.

  11. Microhabitat locality allows multi-species coexistence in terrestrial plant communities.

    PubMed

    Tubay, Jerrold M; Suzuki, Keisuke; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Mori, Shigeta; Rabajante, Jomar F; Morita, Satoru; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Most terrestrial plant communities exhibit relatively high species diversity and many competitive species are ubiquitous. Many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the coexistence of a few competitive species and in most cases they suggest competitive exclusion. Theoretical studies have revealed that coexistence of even three or four species can be extremely difficult. It has been suggested that the coexistence of many species has been achieved by the fine differences in suitable microhabitats for each species, attributing to niche-separation. So far there is no explicit demonstration of such a coexistence in mathematical and simulation studies. Here we built a simple lattice Lotka-Volterra model of competition by incorporating the minute differences of suitable microhabitats for many species. By applying the site variations in species-specific settlement rates of a seedling, we achieved the coexistence of more than 10 species. This result indicates that competition between many species is avoided by the spatial variations in species-specific microhabitats. Our results demonstrate that coexistence of many species becomes possible by the minute differences in microhabitats. This mechanism should be applicable to many vegetation types, such as temperate forests and grasslands. PMID:26483077

  12. Microhabitat locality allows multi-species coexistence in terrestrial plant communities

    PubMed Central

    Tubay, Jerrold M.; Suzuki, Keisuke; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ishida, Atsushi; Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Mori, Shigeta; Rabajante, Jomar F.; Morita, Satoru; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Most terrestrial plant communities exhibit relatively high species diversity and many competitive species are ubiquitous. Many theoretical studies have been carried out to investigate the coexistence of a few competitive species and in most cases they suggest competitive exclusion. Theoretical studies have revealed that coexistence of even three or four species can be extremely difficult. It has been suggested that the coexistence of many species has been achieved by the fine differences in suitable microhabitats for each species, attributing to niche-separation. So far there is no explicit demonstration of such a coexistence in mathematical and simulation studies. Here we built a simple lattice Lotka-Volterra model of competition by incorporating the minute differences of suitable microhabitats for many species. By applying the site variations in species-specific settlement rates of a seedling, we achieved the coexistence of more than 10 species. This result indicates that competition between many species is avoided by the spatial variations in species-specific microhabitats. Our results demonstrate that coexistence of many species becomes possible by the minute differences in microhabitats. This mechanism should be applicable to many vegetation types, such as temperate forests and grasslands. PMID:26483077

  13. Reversible Shape Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Li, Qiaoxi; Turner, Sara; Brosnan, Sarah; Tippets, Cary; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Nykypnachuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Dobrynin, Andrey; Lopez, Rene; Ashby, Valerie; Sheiko, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Reversible shape memory has been achieved on various shapes, e.g. hairpin, origami, coil, robotic gripper and flow rate control device, allowing for multiple switching between encoded shapes without applying any external force. Also, the reversible photonic structure molded in dielectric elastomers has been designed. Maximum reversibility can be achieved by tuning the crosslinking density and the degree of crystallinity of semi-crystalline elastomers. Different crystallization protocols including isothermal and cooling crystallization have been applied to develop a universal picture integrating different shape memory (SM) behaviors: conventional one-way SM, two-way reversible SM, and one-way reversible SM. Acknowledge financial support from the NSF DMR-1122483, DMR- 1004576, and DMR-1206957.

  14. Shape memory polyurethane nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Feina

    Shape memory polymers are smart materials which can remember their original shapes. However, the low recovery stress and low mechanical strength limit the commercial applications of shape memory polymers. In this study, nanoclays were introduced to shape memory polyurethanes (SMPU) to augment these properties by enhance the network of SMPU. Several factors which influence the shape recovery stress were evaluated, including the nature of polymer chain by using different monomers, type of clay particles, extent of filler dispersion, clay content and deformation conditions. It was found that only reactive clay particles were well dispersed into polyurethane matrix by the tethering between --CH2CH 2OH functional groups in clay surfactants and polyurethane chains. Two different shape memory polyurethanes (Systems I & II) prepared by bulk polymerization were compared. The shape memory effect of System I was triggered by melting of the soft segment crystals, while that of System II was by glass transition of the soft segments. It was seen that the reactive clay particles dispersed well in both polyurethane matrices and augmented the recovery stress, e.g., 20% increase with 1 wt % nanoclay in System I and 40% increase with 5 wt % nanoclay in System II were observed. In System I, clay particles interfered with soft segment crystallization, and promoted phase mixing between the hard and soft segments, thus affecting the fixity and recovery ratio. Nevertheless, the soft segment crystallinity was still enough and in some cases increased due to stretching to exhibit excellent shape fixity and shape recovery ratio. The higher loading of clay particles accelerated the stress relaxation, resulting in reduction of recovery stress. In System II, no significant effect of clay particles in phase separation was observed, so there was no influence of clay on shape fixity and recovery ratio. The recovery stress increased with reactive nanoclay content. It was also found that the recovery

  15. Studies of the shapes of heavy pear-shaped nuclei at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    For certain combinations of protons and neutrons there is a theoretical expectation that the shape of nuclei can assume octupole deformation, which would give rise to reflection asymmetry or a "pear-shape" in the intrinsic frame, either dynamically (octupole vibrations) or statically (permanent octupole deformation). I will briefly review the historic evidence for reflection asymmetry in nuclei and describe how recent experiments carried out at REX-ISOLDE have constrained nuclear theory and how they contribute to tests of extensions of the Standard Model. I will also discuss future prospects for measuring nuclear shapes from Coulomb Excitation: experiments are being planned that will exploit beams from HIE-ISOLDE that are cooled in the TSR storage ring and injected into a solenoidal spectrometer similar to the HELIOS device developed at the Argonne National Laboratory.

  16. Universality of fragment shapes.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  17. On Characterizing Particle Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennis, Bryan J.; Rickman, Douglas; Rollins, A. Brent; Ennis, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that particle shape affects flow characteristics of granular materials, as well as a variety of other solids processing issues such as compaction, rheology, filtration and other two-phase flow problems. The impact of shape crosses many diverse and commercially important applications, including pharmaceuticals, civil engineering, metallurgy, health, and food processing. Two applications studied here include the dry solids flow of lunar simulants (e.g. JSC-1, NU-LHT-2M, OB-1), and the flow properties of wet concrete, including final compressive strength. A multi-dimensional generalized, engineering method to quantitatively characterize particle shapes has been developed, applicable to both single particle orientation and multi-particle assemblies. The two-dimension, three dimension inversion problem is also treated, and the application of these methods to DEM model particles will be discussed. In the case of lunar simulants, flow properties of six lunar simulants have been measured, and the impact of particle shape on flowability - as characterized by the shape method developed here -- is discussed, especially in the context of three simulants of similar size range. In the context of concrete processing, concrete construction is a major contributor to greenhouse gas production, of which the major contributor is cement binding loading. Any optimization in concrete rheology and packing that can reduce cement loading and improve strength loading can also reduce currently required construction safety factors. The characterization approach here is also demonstrated for the impact of rock aggregate shape on concrete slump rheology and dry compressive strength.

  18. Universality of fragment shapes

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-01-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism. PMID:25772300

  19. Universality of fragment shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Kun, Ferenc; Sipos, András Árpád; Szabó, Tímea

    2015-03-01

    The shape of fragments generated by the breakup of solids is central to a wide variety of problems ranging from the geomorphic evolution of boulders to the accumulation of space debris orbiting Earth. Although the statistics of the mass of fragments has been found to show a universal scaling behavior, the comprehensive characterization of fragment shapes still remained a fundamental challenge. We performed a thorough experimental study of the problem fragmenting various types of materials by slowly proceeding weathering and by rapid breakup due to explosion and hammering. We demonstrate that the shape of fragments obeys an astonishing universality having the same generic evolution with the fragment size irrespective of materials details and loading conditions. There exists a cutoff size below which fragments have an isotropic shape, however, as the size increases an exponential convergence is obtained to a unique elongated form. We show that a discrete stochastic model of fragmentation reproduces both the size and shape of fragments tuning only a single parameter which strengthens the general validity of the scaling laws. The dependence of the probability of the crack plan orientation on the linear extension of fragments proved to be essential for the shape selection mechanism.

  20. Shapes of Interacting RNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Benjamin M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops. This shape projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex, and for fixed topological genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows for computing the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. PMID:25075750

  1. Compressibility, the measurement of surface tension, and particle size in molecular or nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Dixmier, Marc

    2006-02-15

    It is shown that the interface shrinkage resulting from the capillary pressure difference between both sides of a curved interface is the product of a "standard shrinkage"kappagamma (kappa is the isothermal compressibility, gamma the interfacial tension) by a dimensionless factor that depends only on the shape of the sample of matter under study. The behaviour of the standard shrinkage in the critical domain shows that it cannot be a measure of the thickness of the liquid-vapour interface in that domain. The standard shrinkage of classical liquids somewhat above triple point is usually near to 0.048 v(c)(1/3) (v(c) is the critical molecular volume); exceptions to this rule are discussed. The variation of the standard shrinkage along the liquid-vapour coexistence curves of water and argon is presented; the effect of the interface shrinkage on the measured surface tension of liquids can become important within about 15% of the critical temperature. The standard shrinkage of solids is less than that of the corresponding liquids, and is of no consequence when measuring the surface tension of solids. The standard shrinkage of the nuclear fluid is 0.23 fm=0.09 v(c)(1/3). The saturation density of infinite nuclear matter is about 9% less than its value in atomic nuclei, and a term proportional to A(1/3) (A is the mass number) must be added to the nuclear binding energy formula. PMID:16266717

  2. Robust impedance shaping telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, J.E.

    1993-08-01

    When a human operator performs a task via a bilateral manipulator, the feel of the task is embodied in the mechanical impedance of the manipulator. Traditionally, a bilateral manipulator is designed for transparency; i.e., so that the impedance reflected through the manipulator closely approximates that of the task. Impedance shaping bilateral control, introduced here, differs in that it treats the bilateral manipulator as a means of constructively altering the impedance of a task. This concept is particularly valuable if the characteristic dimensions (e.g., force, length, time) of the task impedance are very different from those of the human limb. It is shown that a general form of impedance shaping control consists of a conventional power-scaling bilateral controller augmented with a real-time interactive task simulation (i.e., a virtual environment). An approach to impedance shaping based on kinematic similarity between tasks of different scale is introduced and illustrated with an example. It is shown that an important consideration in impedance shaping controller design is robustness; i.e., guaranteeing the stability of the operator/manipulator/task system. A general condition for the robustness of a bilateral manipulator is derived. This condition is based on the structured singular value ({mu}). An example of robust impedance shaping bilateral control is presented and discussed.

  3. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  4. Physics of the Jagla model as the liquid-liquid coexistence line slope varies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiayuan; Xu, Limei; Angell, C Austen; Stanley, H Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V

    2015-06-14

    The slope of the coexistence line of the liquid-liquid phase transition can be positive, negative, or zero. All three possibilities have been found in Monte-Carlo simulations of a modified spherically symmetric two-scale Jagla model. Since the liquid-liquid critical point frequently lies in a region of the phase diagram that is difficult to access experimentally, it is of great interest to study critical phenomena in the supercritical region. We therefore study the properties of the Widom line, defined in the one-phase region above the critical point as an extension of the coexistence line near which the loci of various response functions extrema asymptotically converge with each other. This phenomenon is predicted by the scaling theory according to which all response functions can be expressed asymptotically in the vicinity of a critical point as functions of the diverging correlation length. We find that the method of identifying the Widom line as the loci of heat capacity maxima becomes unfruitful when the slope of the coexistence line approaches zero in the T-P plane. In this case, the specific heat displays no maximum in the one-phase region because, for a horizontal phase coexistence line, according to the Clapeyron equation, the enthalpy difference between the coexisting phases is zero, and thus the critical fluctuations do not contribute to enthalpy fluctuations. The extension of the coexistence line beyond the critical point into the one-phase region must in this case be performed using density fluctuations. Although the line of compressibility maxima bifurcates into a symmetrical pair of lines, it remains well-defined. We also study how the glass transition changes as the slope of the coexistence line in the T-P plane approaches zero. We find that for the case of positive slopes, diffusivity shows a fragile-to-strong transition upon crossing the Widom line, while for horizontal slope, diffusivity shows the behavior typical for fragile liquids. PMID

  5. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan; Benett, William J.; Bearinger, Jane P.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, IV, Ward; Schumann, Daniel L.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Ortega, Jason M.; Marion, III, John E.; Loge, Jeffrey M.

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  6. Laser beam shaping techniques

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; WEICHMAN,LOUIS S.; SHAGAM,RICHARD N.

    2000-03-16

    Industrial, military, medical, and research and development applications of lasers frequently require a beam with a specified irradiance distribution in some plane. A common requirement is a laser profile that is uniform over some cross-section. Such applications include laser/material processing, laser material interaction studies, fiber injection systems, optical data image processing, lithography, medical applications, and military applications. Laser beam shaping techniques can be divided into three areas: apertured beams, field mappers, and multi-aperture beam integrators. An uncertainty relation exists for laser beam shaping that puts constraints on system design. In this paper the authors review the basics of laser beam shaping and present applications and limitations of various techniques.

  7. The shape of Eros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Rosema, K. D.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are presently used to optimize estimation, ascertain associated errors, and guide bias-correction procedures, for the Eros polar silhouette convex hull that has been estimated from radar echo spectra. This hull is trapezoidal; this nonaxisymmetric shape may account for odd harmonics in Eros' echo spectral signature as a function of rotation phase. Additional constraints have been obtained for the figure of Eros through the inversion of the optical lightcurve to estimate the asteroid's two-dimensional average of the three-dimensional shape. This 'mean cross-section' and the polar silhouette exhibit similar elongations.

  8. Testing for effects of climate change on competitive relationships and coexistence between two bird species

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Durant, Joël M.; Fowler, Mike S.; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Jonzén, Niclas; Chan, Kung-Sik; Liu, Hai; De Laet, Jenny; Sheldon, Ben C.; Visser, Marcel E.; Dhondt, André A.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have profound ecological effects, yet shifts in competitive abilities among species are rarely studied in this context. Blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) and great tits (Parus major) compete for food and roosting sites, yet coexist across much of their range. Climate change might thus change the competitive relationships and coexistence between these two species. Analysing four of the highest-quality, long-term datasets available on these species across Europe, we extend the textbook example of coexistence between competing species to include the dynamic effects of long-term climate variation. Using threshold time-series statistical modelling, we demonstrate that long-term climate variation affects species demography through different influences on density-dependent and density-independent processes. The competitive interaction between blue tits and great tits has shifted in one of the studied sites, creating conditions that alter the relative equilibrium densities between the two species, potentially disrupting long-term coexistence. Our analyses show that long-term climate change can, but does not always, generate local differences in the equilibrium conditions of spatially structured species assemblages. We demonstrate how long-term data can be used to better understand whether (and how), for instance, climate change might change the relationships between coexisting species. However, the studied populations are rather robust against competitive exclusion. PMID:25904659

  9. The impact of coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis on lymph node metastasis and prognosis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ning; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Dao-Zhe; Ji, Qing-Hai; Zhu, Yong-Xue; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The impact of coexistent Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) on lymph node metastasis (LNM) and prognosis in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) remains controversial. We evaluated the association of coexistent HT with clinicopathologic parameters, LNM, and prognosis by retrospectively reviewing a series of consecutive patients treated for PTMC at Fudan University Cancer Center from January 2005 to December 2010. Of all 1,250 patients with complete data for analysis, 364 (29.1 %) had coexistent HT (HT group) and 886 patients (70.9 %) had no evidence of HT (control group). The HT group had higher proportion of female (87.9 vs 70.1 %) patients, higher mean level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (2.39 vs 2.00 mIU/L), and lower incidence of extrathyroidal extension (7.4 vs 11.7 %) than those in the control group. However, the incidence of LNM and recurrence was similar between the two groups, and HT was not associated with LNM and recurrence. A series of clinicopathologic factors identified for predicting LNM and recurrence in the control group did not show any prediction in the HT group. In summary, this study suggested that coexistent HT had insignificant protective effect on LNM and prognosis in PTMC, which was inconsistent with prior studies. Further studies aiming to determine novel predictors are recommended in PTMC patients with coexistent HT. PMID:26692097

  10. Fallacies and fantasies: the theoretical underpinnings of the Coexistence Approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, G. W.; Potts, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Coexistence Approach has been used infer palaeoclimates for many Eurasian fossil plant assemblage. However, the theory that underpins the method has never been examined in detail. Here we discuss acknowledged and implicit assumptions, and assess the statistical nature and pseudo-logic of the method. We also compare the Coexistence Approach theory with the active field of species distribution modelling. We argue that the assumptions will inevitably be violated to some degree and that the method has no means to identify and quantify these violations. The lack of a statistical framework makes the method highly vulnerable to the vagaries of statistical outliers and exotic elements. In addition, we find numerous logical inconsistencies, such as how climate shifts are quantified (the use of a "center value" of a coexistence interval) and the ability to reconstruct "extinct" climates from modern plant distributions. Given the problems that have surfaced in species distribution modelling, accurate and precise quantitative reconstructions of palaeoclimates (or even climate shifts) using the nearest-living-relative principle and rectilinear niches (the basis of the method) will not be possible. The Coexistence Approach can be summarised as an exercise that shoe-horns a plant fossil assemblages into coexistence and then naively assumes that this must be the climate. Given the theoretical issues, and methodological issues highlighted elsewhere, we suggest that the method be discontinued and that all past reconstructions be disregarded and revisited using less fallacious methods.

  11. Body size mediated coexistence of consumers competing for resources in space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basset, A.; Angelis, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    Body size is a major phenotypic trait of individuals that commonly differentiates co-occurring species. We analyzed inter-specific competitive interactions between a large consumer and smaller competitors, whose energetics, selection and giving-up behaviour on identical resource patches scaled with individual body size. The aim was to investigate whether pure metabolic constraints on patch behaviour of vagile species can determine coexistence conditions consistent with existing theoretical and experimental evidence. We used an individual-based spatially explicit simulation model at a spatial scale defined by the home range of the large consumer, which was assumed to be parthenogenic and semelparous. Under exploitative conditions, competitive coexistence occurred in a range of body size ratios between 2 and 10. Asymmetrical competition and the mechanism underlying asymmetry, determined by the scaling of energetics and patch behaviour with consumer body size, were the proximate determinant of inter-specific coexistence. The small consumer exploited patches more efficiently, but searched for profitable patches less effectively than the larger competitor. Therefore, body-size related constraints induced niche partitioning, allowing competitive coexistence within a set of conditions where the large consumer maintained control over the small consumer and resource dynamics. The model summarises and extends the existing evidence of species coexistence on a limiting resource, and provides a mechanistic explanation for decoding the size-abundance distribution patterns commonly observed at guild and community levels. ?? Oikos.

  12. GM crop co-existence: a question of choice, not prejudice.

    PubMed

    Pearsall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The rapid uptake of biotech crops around the world demonstrates not only strong producer and consumer demand for the technology and its products, but also that where regulatory regimes function effectively and markets are allowed to operate as normal, co-existence between genetically modified (GM) and non-GM supply chains is readily achievable. However, the polarized debate over GMOs within the European Union over the past 15 years has resulted in a highly politicized and progressively impractical approach to the issue of GM crop co-existence, which in itself has become a further barrier to the technology's development. This article argues that co-existence should not be treated as a pro- or anti-GM issue, and that the aim of co-existence measures should be to permit consumer choice and freedom to operate whatever the production method involved. It suggests that supply chain-based solutions to co-existence, rather than Government prescription, offer the most pragmatic and flexible response to the commercial realities of servicing differentiated market demands. PMID:23988874

  13. Feedback mechanisms control coexistence in a stem cell model of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Helena L; MacLean, Adam L; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-07-21

    Haematopoietic stem cell dynamics regulate healthy blood cell production and are disrupted during leukaemia. Competition models of cellular species help to elucidate stem cell dynamics in the bone marrow microenvironment (or niche), and to determine how these dynamics impact leukaemia progression. Here we develop two models that target acute myeloid leukaemia with particular focus on the mechanisms that control proliferation via feedback signalling. It is within regions of parameter space permissive of coexistence that the effects of competition are most subtle and the clinical outcome least certain. Steady state and linear stability analyses identify parameter regions that allow for coexistence to occur, and allow us to characterise behaviour near critical points. Where analytical expressions are no longer informative, we proceed statistically and sample parameter space over a coexistence region. We find that the rates of proliferation and differentiation of healthy progenitors exert key control over coexistence. We also show that inclusion of a regulatory feedback onto progenitor cells promotes healthy haematopoiesis at the expense of leukaemia, and that - somewhat paradoxically - within the coexistence region feedback increases the sensitivity of the system to dominance by one lineage over another. PMID:27130539

  14. Climate variability has a stabilizing effect on the coexistence of prairie grasses.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Kyriakidis, Phaedon C; Guan, Qingfeng; Levine, Jonathan M

    2006-08-22

    How expected increases in climate variability will affect species diversity depends on the role of such variability in regulating the coexistence of competing species. Despite theory linking temporal environmental fluctuations with the maintenance of diversity, the importance of climate variability for stabilizing coexistence remains unknown because of a lack of appropriate long-term observations. Here, we analyze three decades of demographic data from a Kansas prairie to demonstrate that interannual climate variability promotes the coexistence of three common grass species. Specifically, we show that (i) the dynamics of the three species satisfy all requirements of "storage effect" theory based on recruitment variability with overlapping generations, (ii) climate variables are correlated with interannual variation in species performance, and (iii) temporal variability increases low-density growth rates, buffering these species against competitive exclusion. Given that environmental fluctuations are ubiquitous in natural systems, our results suggest that coexistence based on the storage effect may be underappreciated and could provide an important alternative to recent neutral theories of diversity. Field evidence for positive effects of variability on coexistence also emphasizes the need to consider changes in both climate means and variances when forecasting the effects of global change on species diversity. PMID:16908862

  15. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands. PMID:27466448

  16. The role of competition--colonization tradeoffs and spatial heterogeneity in promoting trematode coexistence.

    PubMed

    Mordecai, Erin A; Jaramillo, Alejandra G; Ashford, Jacob E; Hechinger, Ryan F; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2016-06-01

    Competition - colonization tradeoffs occur in many systems, and theory predicts that they can strongly promote species coexistence. However, there is little empirical evidence that observed competition - colonization tradeoffs are strong enough to maintain diversity in natural systems. This is due in part to a mismatch between theoretical assumptions and biological reality in some systems. We tested whether a competition - colonization tradeoff explains how a diverse trematode guild coexists in California horn snail populations, a system that meets the requisite criteria for the tradeoff to promote coexistence. A field experiment showed that subordinate trematode species tended to have higher colonization rates than dominant species. This tradeoff promoted coexistence in parameterized models but did not fully explain trematode diversity and abundance, suggesting a role of additional diversity maintenance mechanisms. Spatial heterogeneity is an alternative way to promote coexistence if it isolates competing species. We used scale transition theory to expand the competition - colonization tradeoff model to include spatial variation. The parameterized model showed that spatial variation in trematode prevalence did not isolate most species sufficiently to explain the overall high diversity, but could benefit some rare species. Together, the results suggest that several mechanisms combine to maintain diversity, even when a competition - colonization tradeoff occurs. PMID:27459779

  17. How Disturbance Influences Community Composition at Hydrothermal Vents: a Theoretical Model of Macrofaunal Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.; Hsing, P.; Roxburgh, S. H.; Shea, K.; Fisher, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Biological communities at spreading centers experience a continuum of disturbance regimes, with fast spreading ridges characterized by relatively frequent tectonic and magmatic events, and slow spreading ridges displaying more stable environmental conditions. We develop a theoretical model to show how disturbance (or lack thereof) can influence the composition of biological communities at hydrothermal vents. Our model assumptions are based on empirical data, which show that macrofaunal species of interest (Riftia pachyptila, Bathymodiolus thermophilus, Calyptogena magnifica) establish in distinct microhabitats, based on availability of vent fluids that nourish endosymbiotic chemoautotrophs. We focus on how these establishment strategies interact with species fecundity, and with disturbance frequency and intensity, to determine what types of strategies can coexist in the system. We find that species must adopt sufficiently different fecundity-establishment strategies to coexist in the community, though strict tradeoffs between fecundity and establishment ability are not required. Additionally, we describe how the strategies that lead to coexistence depend on habitat availability and disturbance regime. Though other coexistence mechanisms may also play a role, our findings suggest why communities within a single biogeographic province may vary with spreading rate (as from N to S along the East Pacific Rise), and what strategies will allow coexistence under different disturbance regimes. Understanding how changes to disturbance regimes influence community composition is very important, as commercial mining interests are rapidly developing plans to exploit the rich mineral resources associated with hydrothermal vents and their activities will change the disturbance regime.

  18. Hydraulic lift as a determinant of tree-grass coexistence on savannas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas is determined by a complex set of interacting factors that determine access to resources and demographic dynamics, under the control of external drivers and vegetation feedbacks with the physical environment. Existing theories explain coexistence mainly as an effect of competitive relations and/or disturbances. However, theoretical studies on the way facilitative interactions resulting from hydraulic lift affect tree-grass coexistence and the range of environmental conditions in which savannas are stable are still lacking. We investigated the role of hydraulic lift in the stability of tree-grass coexistence in savannas. To that end, we developed a new mechanistic model that accounts for both competition for soil water in the shallow soil and fire-induced disturbance. We found that hydraulic lift favors grasses, which scavenge the water lifted by woody plants. Thus, hydraulic lift expands (at the expenses of woodlands) the range of environmental conditions in which savannas are stable. These results indicate that hydraulic lift can be an important mechanism responsible for the coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas. Grass facilitation by trees through the process of hydraulic lift could allow savannas to persist stably in mesic regions that would otherwise exhibit a forest cover. PMID:25925655

  19. Life-Cycle Switching and Coexistence of Species with No Niche Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Pau, Javier; Serra, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The increasing evidence of coexistence of cryptic species with no recognized niche differentiation has called attention to mechanisms reducing competition that are not based on niche-differentiation. Only sex-based mechanisms have been shown to create the negative feedback needed for stable coexistence of competitors with completely overlapping niches. Here we show that density-dependent sexual and diapause investment can mediate coexistence of facultative sexual species having identical niches. We modelled the dynamics of two competing cyclical parthenogens with species-specific density-dependent sexual and diapause investment and either equal or different competitive abilities. We show that investment in sexual reproduction creates an opportunity for other species to invade and become established. This may happen even if the invading species is an inferior competitor. Our results suggests a previously unnoticed mechanism for species coexistence and can be extended to other facultative sexual species and species investing in diapause where similar density-dependent life-history switches could act to promote coexistence. PMID:21625466

  20. The role of competition – colonization tradeoffs and spatial heterogeneity in promoting trematode coexistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mordecai, Erin A.; Jaramillo, Alejandra G.; Ashford, Jacob E.; Hechinger, Ryan F.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Competition – colonization tradeoffs occur in many systems, and theory predicts that they can strongly promote species coexistence. However, there is little empirical evidence that observed competition – colonization tradeoffs are strong enough to maintain diversity in natural systems. This is due in part to a mismatch between theoretical assumptions and biological reality in some systems. We tested whether a competition – colonization tradeoff explains how a diverse trematode guild coexists in California horn snail populations, a system that meets the requisite criteria for the tradeoff to promote coexistence. A field experiment showed that subordinate trematode species tended to have higher colonization rates than dominant species. This tradeoff promoted coexistence in parameterized models but did not fully explain trematode diversity and abundance, suggesting a role of additional diversity maintenance mechanisms. Spatial heterogeneity is an alternative way to promote coexistence if it isolates competing species. We used scale transition theory to expand the competition – colonization tradeoff model to include spatial variation. The parameterized model showed that spatial variation in trematode prevalence did not isolate most species sufficiently to explain the overall high diversity, but could benefit some rare species. Together, the results suggest that several mechanisms combine to maintain diversity, even when a competition – colonization tradeoff occurs.

  1. Plant functional coexistence and influence on the eco-hydrologic response of semiarid hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanjalili, Mohammadjafar; Saco, Patricia M.; Willgoose, Garry

    2016-04-01

    Through its influence on rainfall-runoff and erosion-deposition processes, vegetation remarkably regulates different aspects of landscape processes. Here, the influence of different plant functional dynamics on the coexistence of different species in arid and semi-arid regions with banded vegetation patterns is investigated. Simulations capture the coevolution and coexistence of two different species interacting with hydrology in hillslopes with gentle slopes. The dynamic vegetation model simulates the dynamics of overland runoff, soil moisture, facilitation mechanisms (evaporation reduction through shading and enhanced infiltration by vegetation), local and non-local seed dispersal, competition through water uptake and changes in the biomass of the two species. Here for simplicity the two species are assumed to use water from the same soil depth. Results of the coexistence of the two species capture differences in facilitation-competition interactions caused by specific types of vegetation with varying hydrologic traits. The results illustrate that the dominance of facilitation or competition feedbacks which determine either the coexistence of the two species or survival of only one of them strongly depends on the characteristics and hydrologic traits of the coexisting species and the severity of water stresses. We therefore argue that our results should stimulate further research into the role of interspecific and intraspecific feedbacks between different plant species and specifically the influence of the resulting vegetation community on landform evolution processes.

  2. Within-Host Niche Differences and Fitness Trade-offs Promote Coexistence of Plant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Mordecai, Erin A; Gross, Kevin; Mitchell, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens live in diverse, competitive communities, yet the processes that maintain pathogen diversity remain elusive. Here, we use a species-rich, well-studied plant virus system, the barley yellow dwarf viruses, to examine the mechanisms that regulate pathogen diversity. We empirically parameterized models of three viruses, their two aphid vectors, and one perennial grass host. We found that high densities of both aphids maximized virus diversity and that competition limited the coexistence of two closely related viruses. Even limited ability to simultaneously infect (coinfect) host individuals strongly promoted virus coexistence; preventing coinfection led to priority effects. Coinfection generated stabilizing niche differences by allowing viruses to share hosts. However, coexistence also required trade-offs between vector generalist and specialist life-history strategies. Our predicted outcomes broadly concur with previous field observations. These results show how competition within individual hosts and vectors may lead to unexpected population-level outcomes between pathogens, including coexistence, competitive exclusion, and priority effects, and how contemporary coexistence theory can help to predict these outcomes. PMID:27277413

  3. Shape Aftereffects Reflect Shape Constancy Operations: Appearance Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storrs, Katherine R.; Arnold, Derek H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the oldest known visual aftereffects is the shape aftereffect, wherein looking at a particular shape can make subsequent shapes seem distorted in the opposite direction. After viewing a narrow ellipse, for example, a perfect circle can look like a broad ellipse. It is thought that shape aftereffects are determined by the dimensions of…

  4. Influence of particle shape on the nematic—isotropic transition of colloidal platelet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Martin A.

    1999-07-01

    We study the nematic-isotropic transition in model colloidal systems composed of platelets of various shapes using grand canonical simulations. This is of relevance for recently synthesized hard platelet systems, since the platelets in such systems are found to be not circular but irregular hexagons, and so cannot be described by the simulation data currently available. We show that the coexistence densities scale with an effective volume related to the isotropic orientation-averaged excluded volume of a pair of platelets. This excluded volume can be obtained from the perimeter of the face of the particles and so can be easily calculated for both regular and irregular particle shapes.

  5. Morphological Evolution of Coexisting Amphipod Species Pairs from Sulfidic Caves Suggests Competitive Interactions and Character Displacement, but No Environmental Filtering and Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Fišer, Cene; Luštrik, Roman; Sarbu, Serban; Flot, Jean-François; Trontelj, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypically similar species coexisting in extreme environments like sulfidic water are subject to two opposing eco-evolutionary processes: those favoring similarity of environment-specific traits, and those promoting differences of traits related to resource use. The former group of processes includes ecological filtering and convergent or parallel evolution, the latter competitive exclusion, character displacement and divergent evolution. We used a unique eco-evolutionary study system composed of two independent pairs of coexisting amphipod species (genus Niphargus) from the sulfidic caves Movile in Romania and Frasassi in Italy to study the relative contribution and interaction of both processes. We looked at the shape of the multifunctional ventral channel as a trait ostensibly related to oxygenation and sulfide detoxification, and at body size as a resource-related trait. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the sulfidic caves were colonized separately by ancestors of each species. Species within pairs were more dissimilar in their morphology than expected according to a null model based on regional species pool. This might indicate competitive interactions shaping the morphology of these amphipod species. Moreover, our results suggest that the shape of the ventral channel is not subject to long-term convergent selection or to the process of environmental filtering, and as such probably does not play a role in sulfide tolerance. Nevertheless, the ancestral conditions reconstructed using the comparative method tended to be more similar than null-model expectations. This shift in patterns may reflect a temporal hierarchy of eco-evolutionary processes, in which initial environmental filtering became later on superseded by character displacement or other competition-driven divergent evolutionary processes. PMID:25905793

  6. Substrate Diffusion Heterogeneity Controls Bacterial Competition and Coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechesne, A.; Or, D.; Smets, B. F.

    2005-12-01

    Diffusion has long been recognized as a key process affecting bacterial physiological functions ranging from nutrient uptake to removal of metabolic waste products. In the vadose zone, significant convective flows are limited and bacteria rely primarily on diffusion for nutrient supply. Even under relatively "wet" conditions (e.g. matric potentials -20 J/kg), soil water is fragmented and exists as thin liquid films or held in crevices imposing constraints on substrate diffusion. Our objective was to investigate the role of diffusion on soil microbial diversity, by focusing on one of the processes that shapes the structure of bacterial communities: competitive interactions. We used a simplified setup, in which the substrate (citrate) fluxes were controlled by different agar gels thicknesses and spatially heterogeneous diffusive pathways were created by an impermeable film with prescribed hole sizes and patterns. Our competition experiments involved two soil bacteria: Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which were tagged with different constitutive fluorescent markers, allowing for their on line microscopic detection. The growth parameters on citrate of these strains were thoroughly assessed. B. xenovorans LB400 is the weaker competitor. As a result, this strain was outcompeted by KT2440 under high substrate diffusivity and homogeneous conditions. Conversely, the disadvantage of the weakest competitor was not so marked under low substrate diffusivity condition. These results suggest that dry conditions in soil would provide conditions allowing the sustaining of weak bacterial competitors, resulting in the maintenance of high bacterial diversity.

  7. Comments on comet shapes and aggregation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.

    1989-01-01

    An important question for a comet mission is whether comet nuclei preserve information clarifying aggregation processes of planetary matter. New observational evidence shows that Trojan asteroids, as a group, display a higher fraction of highly-elongated objects than the belt. More recently evidence has accumulated that comet nuclei, as a group, also display highly-elongated shapes at macro-scale. This evidence comes from the several comets whose nuclear lightcurves or shapes have been well studied. Trojans and comet nuclei share other properties. Both groups have extremely low albedos and reddish-to neutral-black colors typical of asteroids of spectral class D, P, and C. Both groups may have had relatively low collision frequencies. An important problem to resolve with spacecraft imaging is whether these elongated shapes are primordial, or due to evolution of the objects. Two hypotheses that might be tested by a combination of global-scale and close-up imaging from various directions are: (1) The irregular shapes are primordial and related to the fact that these bodies have had lower collision frequencies than belt asteroids; or (2) The irregular shapes may be due to volatile loss.

  8. How life shaped Earth.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet. PMID:26726334

  9. Coordination of hand shape.

    PubMed

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-03-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor, and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In the first experiment, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, and pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support, or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus, somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial-coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  10. The Shapes of Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    I have used many ploys to start a course in introductory physics, but one of the more interesting ones was to spend 20 minutes describing some of the curves and shapes that we would encounter in our year together. The students saw parabolas, catenaries, hyperbolas, cycloids, circles, ellipses, and helices, and were shown examples, either live or…

  11. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  12. Trends Shaping Education 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Trends Shaping Education 2010" brings together evidence showing the effects on education of globalisation, social challenges, changes in the workplace, the transformation of childhood, and ICT. To make the content accessible, each trend is presented on a double page, containing an introduction, two charts with brief descriptive text and a set of…

  13. Interactive shape metamorphosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, David T.; State, Andrei; Banks, David

    1994-01-01

    A technique for controlled metamorphosis between surfaces in 3-space is described. Well-understood techniques to produce shape metamorphosis between models in a 2D parametric space is applied. The user selects morphable features interactively, and the morphing process executes in real time on a high-performance graphics multicomputer.

  14. Majorana approach to the stochastic theory of line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komijani, Yashar; Coleman, Piers

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by recent Mössbauer experiments on strongly correlated mixed-valence systems, we revisit the Kubo-Anderson stochastic theory of spectral line shapes. Using a Majorana representation for the nuclear spin we demonstrate how to recast the classic line-shape theory in a field-theoretic and diagrammatic language. We show that the leading contribution to the self-energy can reproduce most of the observed line-shape features including splitting and line-shape narrowing, while the vertex and the self-consistency corrections can be systematically included in the calculation. This approach permits us to predict the line shape produced by an arbitrary bulk charge fluctuation spectrum providing a model-independent way to extract the local charge fluctuation spectrum of the surrounding medium. We also derive an inverse formula to extract the charge fluctuation from the measured line shape.

  15. Observing shape in spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryb, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The notion of reference frame is a central theoretical construct for interpreting the physical implications of spacetime diffeomorphism invariance in General Relativity. However, the alternative formulation of classical General Relativity known as Shape Dynamics suggest that a subset of spacetime diffeomorphisms—namely hypersurface deformations—are, in a precise sense, dual to spatial conformal (or Weyl) invariance. Moreover, holographic gauge/gravity dualities suggest that bulk spacetime diffeomorphism invariance can be replaced by the properties of boundary CFTs. How can these new frameworks be compatible with the traditional notion of reference frame so fundamental to our interpretation of General Relativity? In this paper, we address this question by investigating the classical case of maximally symmetric spacetimes with a positive cosmological constant. We find that it is possible to define a notion of Shape Observer that represents a conformal reference frame dual to the notion of inertial reference frame in spacetime and provide a precise dictionary relating the two notions. We explicitly calculate the Hamilton-Jacobi functional for a theory of reparametrization invariant shape configurations dual to a theory of free inertial observers in de Sitter. These Shape Observers are holographic in the sense that they are defined on the asymptotic conformal boundaries of spacetime but know about bulk physics, and show that the dual theory is conformally invariant at the classical level. This leads to a first principles derivation of an exact classical holographic correspondence that can easily be generalized to more complicated situations and may lead to insights regarding the interpretation of the conformal invariance manifest in Shape Dynamics.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  17. Endoplasmatic reticulum shaping by generic mechanisms and protein-induced spontaneous curvature.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, Erich

    2014-06-01

    The endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) comprises flattened vesicles (cisternae) with worm holes dubbed with ribosomes coexisting with a network of interconnected tubes which can extend to the cell periphery or even penetrate nerve axons. The coexisting topologies enclose a continuous luminal space. The complex ER topology is specifically controlled by a group of ER-shaping proteins often called reticulons (discovered by the group of Tom Rapoport). They include atlastin, reticulon, REEP and the MT severing protein spastin. A generic ER shape controlling factor is the necessity to maximize the area-to-volume ratio of ER membranes in the highly crowded cytoplasmic space. I present a model of the ER-shaping function of the reticulons based on the Helfrich bending elasticity concept of soft shell shape changes. Common structural motifs of the reticulons are hydrophobic sequences forming wedge shaped hairpins which penetrate the lipid bilayer of the cell membranes. The wedge-like hydrophobic anchors can both induce the high curvature of the tubular ER fraction and ensure the preferred distribution of the reticulons along the tubules. Tubular junctions may be stabilized by the reticulons forming two forceps twisted by 90°. The ER extensions to the cell periphery and the axons are mediated by coupling of the tubes to the microtubules which is mediated by REEP and spastin. At the end I present a model of the tension driven homotype fusion of ER-membranes by atlastin, based on analogies to the SNARE-complexin-SNARE driven heterotype fusion process. PMID:24607001

  18. Spin wave mode coexistence: A consequence of the Oersted field induced asymmetric energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Randy; Iacocca, Ezio; Bonetti, Stefano; Sani, Sohrab; Mohseni, Majid; Eklund, Anders; Persson, Johan; Heinonen, Olle; Akerman, Johan

    2013-03-01

    The emerging field of magnonics relies on the systematic generation, manipulation, and detection of spin waves (SWs). Nanocontact spin torque oscillators (NC-STOs) provide an ideal platform to study spin transfer torque induced SW emission. In analogy to two species competing for the same food supply it has been argued that only one SW mode can survive in the steady state. However, as evidenced in many experiments clear signatures of mode-hopping are often observed. We present a third possibility, namely that under the correct experimental conditions, mode coexistence can be realized. Micromagnetic simulations reveal that the SW modes are spatially separated under the NC. Mode coexistence is facilitated by the local field asymmetries induced by the spatially inhomogeneous Oersted field in the vicinity of the NC and further promoted by SW localization. Finally, both simulation and experiment reveal a weak low frequency signal exactly at the difference of the mode frequencies, consistent with inter-modulation of two coexistent modes.

  19. Hydraulic Lift As a Determinant of Tree-Grass Coexistence on Savannas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K.; D'Odorico, P.

    2014-12-01

    The coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas is determined by a complex set of interacting factors, including resource availability and disturbance. Existing theories explaining coexistence focus on competitive relations or disturbances preventing the system from attaining a state with complete grass or tree dominance. The effect of hydraulic lift on interactions between woody plants and grasses and the dynamics of savanna ecosystems remains poorly understood. Here, we develop a mechanistic model to investigate the role of hydraulic lift on the stability of savannas. The model accounts both for competition for soil water in the shallow soil layer and fire-induced disturbance. We find that hydraulic lift expands the parameter range in which savannas are stable at the expense of woodlands. Our study shows that hydraulic lift can be an important mechanism responsible for coexistence of woody plants and grasses in savannas.

  20. A possible four-phase coexistence in a single-component system.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Kenji; Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    For different phases to coexist in equilibrium at constant temperature T and pressure P, the condition of equal chemical potential μ must be satisfied. This condition dictates that, for a single-component system, the maximum number of phases that can coexist is three. Historically this is known as the Gibbs phase rule, and is one of the oldest and venerable rules of thermodynamics. Here we make use of the fact that, by varying model parameters, the Gibbs phase rule can be generalized so that four phases can coexist even in single-component systems. To systematically search for the quadruple point, we use a monoatomic system interacting with a Stillinger-Weber potential with variable tetrahedrality. Our study indicates that the quadruple point provides flexibility in controlling multiple equilibrium phases and may be realized in systems with tunable interactions, which are nowadays feasible in several soft matter systems such as patchy colloids. PMID:27558452

  1. Performance analysis of coexisting IEEE 802.15.4-based health monitoring WBANs.

    PubMed

    Deylami, Mohammad; Jovanov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs) for health monitoring systems are required to meet stringent performance demands regarding the tradeoff between reliability, latency, and power efficiency. WBANs feature limited range and bandwidth and they are prone to interference. Considering the life-critical nature of some WBAN systems, we present an in-depth investigation of the situations where the dynamic coexistence of multiple WBANs may severely affect their performances. In this paper, we analytically study the effect of coexistence on the operation of WBANs. We present a mathematical analysis to precisely obtain the probabilities of successful communication and validate this analysis through simulation. Our simulation analysis indicates that in the default mode of operation, coexistence of three WBANs can lead to the loss of 20-85% of data transmissions for typical sensor configurations. PMID:23366424

  2. A possible four-phase coexistence in a single-component system

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Kenji; Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    For different phases to coexist in equilibrium at constant temperature T and pressure P, the condition of equal chemical potential μ must be satisfied. This condition dictates that, for a single-component system, the maximum number of phases that can coexist is three. Historically this is known as the Gibbs phase rule, and is one of the oldest and venerable rules of thermodynamics. Here we make use of the fact that, by varying model parameters, the Gibbs phase rule can be generalized so that four phases can coexist even in single-component systems. To systematically search for the quadruple point, we use a monoatomic system interacting with a Stillinger–Weber potential with variable tetrahedrality. Our study indicates that the quadruple point provides flexibility in controlling multiple equilibrium phases and may be realized in systems with tunable interactions, which are nowadays feasible in several soft matter systems such as patchy colloids. PMID:27558452

  3. Influence of the range of attractive forces on vapor/liquid phase coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K.; Rajagopalan, Raj

    1994-12-01

    The influence of the range of interparticle attractions on vapor/liquid coexistence in spherically symmetric systems has been investigated by mapping the pair potential on to the adhesive-hard-sphere model. Comparisons of our analytical predictions with recent Gibbs-Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations for the Yukawa potential show a very good agreement. The temperature range over which vapor/liquid coexistence is thermodynamically preferred shrinks as the range of attraction decreases, and for short ranges the coexistence curve flattens, consistent with the results of the simulations. Using the Sutherland potential model we also show that for very small ranges of attraction the liquid state is unstable down to very small temperatures and that a fluid/solid transition is preferred.

  4. Twin Pregnancy with a Complete Hydatidiform Mole and a Coexisting Live Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Sheik, Shahila; Al-Riyami, Nihal; Mathew, Namitha R.; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Qureshi, Asim; Mathew, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    A hydatidiform mole with a coexisting live fetus is a rare occurrence and the optimal management for this condition is not yet known. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman (gravida 3, para 2) who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in March 2012 at 13 gestational weeks with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. An ultrasound examination revealed a hydatidiform mole pregnancy coexisting with a live fetus. After extensive counselling, the patient and her husband opted for a conservative management approach. Unfortunately, a hysterotomy had to be performed at 17 gestational weeks due to severe haemorrhage. The postoperative period was uneventful and histopathology results confirmed one complete mole with a coexisting fetus and normal placenta. The patient’s serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin level remained normal for 18 months following her surgery. PMID:26629386

  5. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems based on PS-request protocols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol. PMID:22163721

  6. Parameter-dependent synchronization transition of coupled neurons with co-existing spiking and bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hua-Guang; Li, Yu-Ye; Jia, Bing; Chen, Guan-Rong

    2013-08-01

    A firing pattern transition is simulated in the Leech neuron model, firstly from bursting to co-existence of spiking and bursting and then to spiking. The attraction domain of spiking and bursting for three different parameter values are calculated. Synchronization transition processes of two coupled Leech neurons, one is bursting and the other the co-existing spiking, are simulated for the three parameters. The three synchronization processes appear similar as the coupling strength increases, beginning from non-synchronization to complete synchronization through a complex dynamical procedure, but their detailed processes are different depending on the parameter values. The transition procedure is complex and the complete synchronization is in bursting for larger parameter values, while the process is simple with complete synchronization of spiking for smaller values. The potential relationship between complete synchronization and the attraction domain is also discussed. The results are instructive to understanding the synchronization behaviors of the coupled neuronal system with co-existing attractors.

  7. Coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX Systems Based on PS-Request Protocols†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongwoo; Park, Suwon; Rhee, Seung Hyong; Choi, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Young-uk; Hwang, Ho Young

    2011-01-01

    We introduce both the coexistence zone within the WiMAX frame structure and a PS-Request protocol for the coexistence of WiFi and WiMAX systems sharing a frequency band. Because we know that the PS-Request protocol has drawbacks, we propose a revised PS-Request protocol to improve the performance. Two PS-Request protocols are based on the time division operation (TDO) of WiFi system and WiMAX system to avoid the mutual interference, and use the vestigial power management (PwrMgt) bit within the Frame Control field of the frames transmitted by a WiFi AP. The performance of the revised PS-Request protocol is evaluated by computer simulation, and compared to those of the cases without a coexistence protocol and to the original PS-Request protocol. PMID:22163721

  8. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  9. Interleukin-37 gene variants segregated anciently coexist during hominid evolution.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bin; Cheng, Shimeng; Peng, Jinbiao; Yan, Jingjing; Zhang, Shuye

    2015-10-01

    IL37 is a member of IL-1 cytokine family but conveys anti-inflammatory functions. The biological characteristic and genetic heterogeneity of IL37 are not fully understood yet. Here using the whole-genome sequencing data from 1000 Genomes Project, we performed population and evolutionary genetic analysis of human IL37 gene. First, 2184 IL37 gene sequences from different human populations were retrieved. The IL37 protein sequences were inferred from the coding DNA sequences and multiple species alignment was made. Then, the phylogenetic tree of IL37 was built and dN/dS ratios were calculated for each evolutionary branch, the classic McDonald and Kreitman test was also performed. Next, we conducted intraspecific evolutionary genetic analysis and built the genealogy network of 116 unique IL37 haplotypes through median-joining network analysis. Finally, we compared IL37 sequences between the modern and archaic humans. Our results for the first time provide solid evidence that common IL37 variants other than NCBI reference sequence are present worldwide. Our data also supports that IL37 variants are shaped and maintained by selection instead of neutral evolution. We further identified that human IL37 variants consist of two major haplogroups and their presence in archaic humans corroborates its ancient origin in hominid evolution. In conclusion, these data indicate that common IL37 variants are maintained among human populations by selective force, suggesting their potential involvements in immune regulation and human diseases. In addition, the ancient history of IL37 variants reveals interesting insight into the complicated human evolutionary history. PMID:25626704

  10. Stand dynamics and tree coexistence in an analytical structured model: the role of recruitment.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Óscar; Bravo de la Parra, Rafael; López-Marcos, Juan C; Zavala, Miguel A

    2013-09-21

    Understanding the mechanisms of coexistence and niche partitioning in plant communities is a central question in ecology. Current theories of forest dynamics range between the so-called neutral theories which assume functional equivalence among coexisting species to forest simulators that explain species assemblages as the result of tradeoffs in species individual strategies at several ontogenetic stages. Progress in these questions has been hindered by the inherent difficulties of developing analytical size-structured models of stand dynamics. This precludes examination of the relative importance of each mechanism on tree coexistence. In previous simulation and analytical studies emphasis has been given to interspecific differences at the sapling stage, and less so to interspecific variation in seedling recruitment. In this study we develop a partial differential equation model of stand dynamics in which competition takes place at the recruitment stage. Species differ in their size-dependent growth rates and constant mortality rates. Recruitment is described as proportional to the basal area of conspecifics, to account for fecundity and seed supply per unit of basal area, and is corrected with a decreasing function of species specific basal area to account for competition. We first analyze conditions for population persistence in monospecific stands and second we investigate conditions of coexistence for two species. In the monospecific case we found a stationary stand structure based on an inequality between mortality rate and seed supply. In turn, intra-specific competition does not play any role on the asymptotic extinction or population persistence. In the two-species case we found that coexistence can be attained when the reciprocal negative effect on recruitment follows a given relation with respect to intraspecific competition. Specifically a tradeoff between recruitment potential (i.e. shade tolerance or predation avoidance) and fecundity or growth rate

  11. Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species: conspecific aggregation via reproductive interference.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Lasse; Hanski, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    Stable coexistence of ecologically identical species is not possible according to the established ecological theory. Many coexistence mechanisms have been proposed, but they all involve some form of ecological differentiation among the competing species. The aggregation model of coexistence would predict coexistence of identical species if there would be a mechanism that generates spatially aggregated distributions that are not completely correlated among the species. Our aim is to demonstrate that continued dispersal, triggered by reproductive interference between ecologically identical species, is such a mechanism. This study has been motivated by species using ephemeral patchy resources, such as decomposing fruits, fungal sporophores, carrion, and dung. We analyse an individual-based model with sexual reproduction, in which the progeny develops in ephemeral resource patches and the new generation disperses to a new set of patches. We assume spatially restricted dispersal, that patches differ in detectability, and that unmated females continue dispersal. In the model, reproductive interference (males spend some time searching for and/or attempting to mate with heterospecific females) reduces the mating rate of females, especially in the less common species, which leads to increased dispersal and reduces spatial correlation in species' distributions. For a wide range of parameter values, coexisting species show a systematic difference in their relative abundances due to two opposing forces: (1) uncommon species have reduced growth rate (Allee effect), which decreases abundance; (2) an abundance difference between the species reduces interspecific spatial correlation, which in turn reduces interspecific competition and allows the rarer species to persist at low density. Our results demonstrate a new mechanism for coexistence that is not based on ecological differentiation between species. PMID:26781758

  12. Synchronization transition of a coupled system composed of neurons with coexisting behaviors near a Hopf bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bing

    2014-05-01

    The coexistence of a resting condition and period-1 firing near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation point, lying between the monostable resting condition and period-1 firing, is often observed in neurons of the central nervous systems. Near such a bifurcation point in the Morris—Lecar (ML) model, the attraction domain of the resting condition decreases while that of the coexisting period-1 firing increases as the bifurcation parameter value increases. With the increase of the coupling strength, and parameter and initial value dependent synchronization transition processes from non-synchronization to compete synchronization are simulated in two coupled ML neurons with coexisting behaviors: one neuron chosen as the resting condition and the other the coexisting period-1 firing. The complete synchronization is either a resting condition or period-1 firing dependent on the initial values of period-1 firing when the bifurcation parameter value is small or middle and is period-1 firing when the parameter value is large. As the bifurcation parameter value increases, the probability of the initial values of a period-1 firing neuron that lead to complete synchronization of period-1 firing increases, while that leading to complete synchronization of the resting condition decreases. It shows that the attraction domain of a coexisting behavior is larger, the probability of initial values leading to complete synchronization of this behavior is higher. The bifurcations of the coupled system are investigated and discussed. The results reveal the complex dynamics of synchronization behaviors of the coupled system composed of neurons with the coexisting resting condition and period-1 firing, and are helpful to further identify the dynamics of the spatiotemporal behaviors of the central nervous system.

  13. On the sympatric evolution and evolutionary stability of coexistence by relative nonlinearity of competition.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Florian; Münkemüller, Tamara; Johst, Karin; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    If two species exhibit different nonlinear responses to a single shared resource, and if each species modifies the resource dynamics such that this favors its competitor, they may stably coexist. This coexistence mechanism, known as relative nonlinearity of competition, is well understood theoretically, but less is known about its evolutionary properties and its prevalence in real communities. We address this challenge by using adaptive dynamics theory and individual-based simulations to compare community stabilization and evolutionary stability of species that coexist by relative nonlinearity. In our analysis, evolution operates on the species' density-compensation strategies, and we consider a trade-off between population growth rates at high and low resource availability. We confirm previous findings that, irrespective of the particular model of density dependence, there are many combinations of overcompensating and undercompensating density-compensation strategies that allow stable coexistence by relative nonlinearity. However, our analysis also shows that most of these strategy combinations are not evolutionarily stable and will be outcompeted by an intermediate density-compensation strategy. Only very specific trade-offs lead to evolutionarily stable coexistence by relative nonlinearity. As we find no reason why these particular trade-offs should be common in nature, we conclude that the sympatric evolution and evolutionary stability of relative nonlinearity, while possible in principle, seems rather unlikely. We speculate that this may, at least in part, explain why empirical demonstrations of this coexistence mechanism are rare, noting, however, that the difficulty to detect relative nonlinearity in the field is an equally likely explanation for the current lack of empirical observations, and that our results are limited to communities with non-overlapping generations and constant resource supply. Our study highlights the need for combining ecological and

  14. Alpha shapes applied to molecular shape characterization exhibit novel properties compared to established shape descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. Anthony; Bender, Andreas; Kaya, Taner; Clemons, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, description of molecular shape is still largely an unresolved problem. Given the importance of molecular shape in the description of spatial interactions in crystals or ligand-target complexes, this is not a satisfying state. In the current work, we propose a novel application of alpha shapes to the description of the shapes of small molecules. Alpha shapes are parameterized generalizations of the convex hull. For a specific value of α, the alpha shape is the geometric dual of the space-filling model of a molecule, with the parameter α allowing description of shape in varying degrees of detail. To date, alpha shapes have been used to find macromolecular cavities and to estimate molecular surface areas and volumes. We developed a novel methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. In this work, we show that alpha-shape descriptors reveal aspects of molecular shape that are complementary to other shape descriptors, and that accord well with chemists’ intuition about shape. While our implementation of alpha-shape descriptors is not computationally trivial, we suggest that the additional shape characteristics they provide can be used to improve and complement shape-analysis methods in domains such as crystallography and ligand-target interactions. In this communication, we present a unique methodology for computing molecular shape characteristics from the alpha shape. We first describe details of the alpha-shape calculation, an outline of validation experiments performed, and a discussion of the advantages and challenges we found while implementing this approach. The results show that, relative to known shape calculations, this method provides a high degree of shape resolution with even small changes in atomic coordinates. PMID:19775113

  15. Osteoma and Ectopic Tooth of the Left Maxillary Sinus: A Unique Coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Ümit; Aşık, Burak; Ahmedov, Asif; Durmaz, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ectopic eruption of a tooth or osteoma rarely occurs within the maxillary sinus. Coexistence of these two rare entities in the maxillary sinus has never been reported in the English literature. Case Report: Herein, we present a 21 year-old male patient with osteoma and ectopic tooth in the left maxillary sinus treated with the removal of the ectopic tooth by endoscopic sinus surgery and excision of the osteoma by the Caldwell-Luc procedure. Conclusion: Unique coexistence of two different entities in the maxillary sinus is most likely due to pediatric facial trauma. Pediatric patients with maxillofacial trauma should be carefully watched for dental injury both clinically and radiologically.

  16. Pregnancy outcome with coexisting mole after intracytoplasmic sperm injection: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Asha R.; Dafle, Karishma; Padmashri, G.; Rao, Damodar R.; Sivakumar, N. C.

    2015-01-01

    Partial/complete hydatidiform mole with coexisting fetus is a rare condition. Optimal management is a challenge that remains a dilemma since these pregnancies are associated with maternal as well as fetal complications including hemorrhage, preeclampsia, thromboembolic disease, intra uterine demise and increased risk of persistent trophoblastic disease. Here we report 2 cases of partial mole with live fetus after ICSI and a case of complete mole with coexisting fetus after ICSI in a turner mosaic that resulted in a live birth. PMID:26538863

  17. Coexistence of a nonfunctioning thyroid nodule in Plummer's disease demonstrated by thallium-201 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiya, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Gunasekera, R.; Kuwabara, Y.; Ayabe, Z.; Sakurai, T.; Masuda, K.

    1988-02-01

    A patient with Plummer's disease in whom a coexisting nonfunctioning thyroid nodule was detected by TI-201 imaging is presented. I-123 imaging revealed a hot nodule corresponding to the functioning nodule and little uptake in the rest of the thyroid. In contrast, two areas of abnormalities were noted on a TI-201 image: one corresponded to the hot nodule in I-123 imaging and the other was visualized in the suppressed part of the thyroid in the same lobe. This case revealed that TI-201 imaging is clinically useful in detecting coexisting nodules in the suppressed part of the thyroid.

  18. Co-existence of Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus and Morphoea Along Lines of Blaschko

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Bikash Ranjan; Dash, Kanakalata

    2014-01-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is an inflammatory dermatitis of unknown etiology that mostly affects the genital region in both the sexes. In active cases the histopathologic changes differentiate between LS and morphoea though in chronic cases it is very difficult to diagnose with certainty. Coexistence of both the conditions in a single patient indicates that these lesions represent a spectrum of similar pathologic process. Coexistence of both the conditions along Blaschko's lines is so far not described in literature. We report an Indian patient with both LS and morphoea occurring along Blaschko's lines. PMID:24470666

  19. Coexistence of Solid (Nodular) and Differentiated (Adenoid) Basal Cell Carcinoma at the Same Anatomical Site

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2015-01-01

    Coexistence of two different histopathological types of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) in the same anatomical site is rare and interesting. Herein, we report a case of coexistence of nodular and adenoid BCC in a 78-year-old peasant who presented with a plaque and a globular swelling on left paranasal region of few years duration. Histopathology of skin biopsy with immunohistochemistry study using antibodies to S100, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and cytokeratin 7 (CK 7) from the margin of the ulcer and globular swelling confirmed the diagnosis that revealed features of nodular and adenoid basal cell carcinoma, respectively. Investigative work up did not reveal evidence of metastasis. PMID:26538745

  20. Vapor-liquid equilibrium, coexistence curve, and critical locus for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125)

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Yukihiro

    1997-11-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibrium for difluoromethane + pentafluoroethane (R-32 + R-125) was measured by the static method in the temperature range between 283 K and 313 K. The vapor-liquid coexistence curve near the critical point was measured by the observation of the meniscus disappearance. The critical temperatures and critical densities of a 30 mass % R-32 and a 60 mass % R-32 mixture were determined on the basis of the saturation densities along the coexistence curve in the critical region. In addition, the critical locus for the R-32 + R-125 mixture is correlated as the function of composition.

  1. Prior irradiation and the development of coexistent differentiated thyroid cancer and hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Prinz, R.A.; Barbato, A.L.; Braithwaite, S.S.; Brooks, M.H.; Lawrence, A.M.; Paloyan, E.

    1982-03-01

    Twelve patients with coexistent well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and primary hyperparathyoidism were studied to determine the frequency of previous radiation exposure. Eight were found to have received prior irradiation. External radiation was administered to the head and neck region for benign conditions such as tonsillar enlargement, acne, scrofula, and thyroid enlargement. One patient received 131I therapy for carcinoma of the thyroid. The observation that 67% of the patients in this series had previous radiation to the head and neck strongly implicates radiation exposure in the development of coexistent well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and hyperparathyroidism.

  2. Coherent coexistence of nanodiamonds and carbon onions in icosahedral core-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir Ya. Madison, Alexey E.; Mackay, Alan L.

    2007-03-01

    In icosahedral carbon nanoparticles, the diamond-like core can undergo a reversible topological transition into and coexist coherently with the onion shells. The general approach for describing and designing complex hierarchical icosahedral structures is discussed. Structural models of icosahedral carbon nanoparticles in which the local arrangement of atoms is virtually identical to that in diamond are derived. It is shown that icosahedral diamond-like particles can be transformed into onion-like shell structures (and vice versa) by the consecutive smoothing (puckering) of atomic networks without disturbance of their topological integrity. The possibility of coherent coexistence of icosahedral diamond-like core with onion shells is shown.

  3. Superior coexistence: systematicALLY regulatING land subsidence BASED on set pair theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Gong, S.-L.

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic land subsidence is an environmental side effect of exploring and using natural resources in the process of economic development. The key points of the system for controlling land subsidence include cooperation and superior coexistence while the economy develops, exploring and using natural resources, and geological environmental safety. Using the theory and method of set pair analysis (SPA), this article anatomises the factors, effects, and transformation of land subsidence. Based on the principle of superior coexistence, this paper promotes a technical approach to the system for controlling land subsidence, in order to improve the prevention and control of geological hazards.

  4. Coexistence and asymptotic periodicity in a competitor-competitor-mutualist model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wenzhen; Lin, Zhigui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the competitor-competitor-mutualist three-species Lotka-Volterra model is discussed. Firstly, by Schauder fixed point theory, the coexistence state of the strongly coupled system is given. Applying the method of upper and lower solutions and its associated monotone iterations, the true solutions are constructed. Our results show that this system possesses at least one coexistence state if cross-diffusions and cross-reactions are weak. Secondly, the existence and asymptotic behavior of T-periodic solutions for the periodic reaction-diffusion system under homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions are investigated. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of T-periodic solution are also obtained.

  5. Chimera states: coexistence of coherence and incoherence in networks of coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaggio, Mark J.; Abrams, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    A chimera state is a spatio-temporal pattern in a network of identical coupled oscillators in which synchronous and asynchronous oscillation coexist. This state of broken symmetry, which usually coexists with a stable spatially symmetric state, has intrigued the nonlinear dynamics community since its discovery in the early 2000s. Recent experiments have led to increasing interest in the origin and dynamics of these states. Here we review the history of research on chimera states and highlight major advances in understanding their behaviour.

  6. Selected Highlights in Nuclear Research in the Southeast by Vanderbilt and ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    On the one hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the nucleus, selected highlights in nuclear research by Vanderbilt scientists and by Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists as well as their joint research are described. These will include the earliest work involving the first confirmation of neutron induced fission and classic papers on the fission process. This was followed by the development of the barrier for the gaseous diffusion separation of ^235U from ^238U. In the 1940's the first working nuclear reactor became operational at ORNL, to make ^239Pu followed by the first radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, neutron scattering to probe materials leading to a Nobel Prize and the first observation of the β decay of the free neutron. In 1953 Hill and Wheeler published their classic nuclear theory paper that has over 2000 citations. In the 1960's large E0 transitions were observed in decays of β but not γ vibrational bands to confirm the predictions of Bohr and Mottelson that β vibrations change the nuclear deformation. Then the first failures of the B-M model were observed. In the 1970's the paradigm that each nucleus had one fixed shape was changed when the discovery of the coexistence of overlapping bands built on different deformations were observed. This was made possible, in part, by universities building the first isotope separator on-line to the Oak Ridge cyclotron. This was followed by the discovery of the reinforcement of proton and neutron shell gaps at the same deformation to give superdeformed double magic nuclei. Other highlights will be presented, including the recent discovery of the new element 117 and confirmation of new elements 113 and 115.

  7. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  8. Tree competition and species coexistence in a Quercus--Betula forest in the Dongling Mountains in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ji-hua; Mi, Xiang-cheng; Liu, Can-ran; Ma, Ke-ping

    2006-09-01

    The population size structure, growth dynamics and mode of competition among adult trees (≥ 4 cm DBH) of six abundant tree species in a 5 ha study plot of a temperate deciduous forest in the Dongling Mountains in northern China were investigated using diffusion and growth dynamics models. In the year of 2000, two dominant species, Quercus liaotungensis and Betula dahurica accounted for ca. 68.69% of the total basal area and 52.71% of the total density of adult plants. Q. liaotungensis, Populus davidiana and Acer mono exhibited inverse J-shaped DBH distributions whereas Betula dahurica, B. platyphylla and Salix caprea had unimodal DBH distributions. One-sided interspecific competition was detected between some species combinations at the scale of the 5 ha study plot, and the competitive effect was mainly size-dependent rather than from species-specific interactions with large individuals in the canopy layer out competing smaller individuals in the understory. Symmetric competition was found between Q. liaotungensis and A. mono only. However, considering the straight line relationship of G ( t, x) - √{D(t, x)}, which suggests that competitive asymmetry is very low or absent, combined with the relatively low mortality of trees with a DBH larger than 4 cm, we speculate that asymmetric interspecific competition was not important in structuring this tree community. Regeneration characteristics of each species are most likely important in regulating species coexistence and stand dynamics in this forest.

  9. Detection of lipid phase coexistence and lipid interactions in sphingomyelin/cholesterol membranes by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The phase behavior of binary mixtures of egg sphingomyelin and cholesterol has been inspected by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in the amide I' band region of the spectrum. Because cholesterol does not have any major absorption bands in this region, effects seen in the spectra of mixtures of sphingomyelin and cholesterol can be attributed to the change in the lipid phase and to the interaction with cholesterol. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the overall bandwidth of the amide I' band displays a phase-specific behavior. In addition, it is observed that the amide I' band for a sample exhibiting phase coexistence can be described by a linear combination of the spectra of the individual lipid phases. Description of changes in the amide I' band shape and by that the study of possible hydrogen bonding interactions of sphingomyelin with cholesterol was assisted by the use of curve fitting. It turns out that the presence of hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group of cholesterol and carbonyl group of sphingomyelin is obscured by the complexity of different possible hydrogen bonding and coupling between the N-H (N-D) and the CO group vibrations. PMID:18191633

  10. Super-resolution fluorescence of huntingtin reveals growth of globular species into short fibers and coexistence of distinct aggregates.

    PubMed

    Duim, Whitney C; Jiang, Yan; Shen, Koning; Frydman, Judith; Moerner, W E

    2014-12-19

    Polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin, the protein encoded by HTT mutations associated with Huntington's disease, forms aggregate species in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the mechanism of growth of fibrillar aggregates from soluble monomeric protein is critical to understanding the progression of Huntington's disease and to designing therapeutics for the disease, as well as for aggregates implicated in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We used the technique of multicolor single-molecule, super-resolution fluorescence imaging to characterize the growth of huntingtin exon 1 aggregates. The huntingtin exon 1 aggregation followed a pathway from exclusively spherical or globular species of ∼80 nm to fibers ∼1 μm in length that increased in width, but not length, over time with the addition of more huntingtin monomers. The fibers further aggregated with one another into aggregate assemblies of increasing size. Seeds created by sonication, which were comparable in shape and size to the globular species in the pathway, were observed to grow through multidirectional elongation into fibers, suggesting a mechanism for growth of globular species into fibers. The single-molecule sensitivity of our approach made it possible to characterize the aggregation pathway across a large range of size scales, from monomers to fiber assemblies, and revealed the coexistence of different aggregate species (globular species, fibers, fiber assemblies) even at late time points. PMID:25330023

  11. Super-Resolution Fluorescence of Huntingtin Reveals Growth of Globular Species into Short Fibers and Coexistence of Distinct Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin, the protein encoded by HTT mutations associated with Huntington’s disease, forms aggregate species in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the mechanism of growth of fibrillar aggregates from soluble monomeric protein is critical to understanding the progression of Huntington’s disease and to designing therapeutics for the disease, as well as for aggregates implicated in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. We used the technique of multicolor single-molecule, super-resolution fluorescence imaging to characterize the growth of huntingtin exon 1 aggregates. The huntingtin exon 1 aggregation followed a pathway from exclusively spherical or globular species of ∼80 nm to fibers ∼1 μm in length that increased in width, but not length, over time with the addition of more huntingtin monomers. The fibers further aggregated with one another into aggregate assemblies of increasing size. Seeds created by sonication, which were comparable in shape and size to the globular species in the pathway, were observed to grow through multidirectional elongation into fibers, suggesting a mechanism for growth of globular species into fibers. The single-molecule sensitivity of our approach made it possible to characterize the aggregation pathway across a large range of size scales, from monomers to fiber assemblies, and revealed the coexistence of different aggregate species (globular species, fibers, fiber assemblies) even at late time points. PMID:25330023

  12. Magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} film with a coexistence of two preferential orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Lizhu; Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yunjia; Meng, Meng; Wu, Shuxiang; Li, Shuwei

    2014-07-14

    A Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} film with a coexistence of two preferential orientations has been grown on a Pt(111)//Si(100) substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The structural characteristics and chemical compositions of the film are investigated by using X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectra in detail. Together with the magnetic tests, the film is demonstrated to be a polycrystalline hausmannite Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} with no other impurities. Moreover, the hysteresis loops of the film are found to display a step or a characteristic shrinking at low fields. On the other hand, similar magnetic characteristics have also been discovered on the film with two phases grown on a MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(001) substrate. In our opinion, considering the large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy of the single crystal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} film reported in previous works, the special structures and phases of the two films result in both of them as soft+hard magnetic composites, in agreement with some other reports.

  13. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  14. Breathing Life into Shapes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Alec

    2015-01-01

    Shape articulation transforms a lifeless geometric object into a vibrant character. Computers enrich artists' toolsets dramatically. They not only endow artists with the power to manipulate virtual 2D and 3D scenes, but they also eliminate tedium and expedite prototyping, freeing artists to focus on creative aspects. With such power comes a temptation to lean entirely on the computer. Computationally intensive animation systems sacrifice real-time feedback for physical accuracy. How can we leverage modern computational power to create the best possible shape deformations while maintaining real-time performance as a mandatory invariant? This article summarizes efforts to answer this, culminating in a deformation system with the quality of slow, nonlinear optimization, but at lightning speed. PMID:26416366

  15. Shaping up for action

    PubMed Central

    Denholm, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The Malpighian tubule is the main organ for excretion and osmoregulation in most insects. During a short period of embryonic development the tubules of Drosophila are shaped, undergo differentiation and become precisely positioned in the body cavity, so they become fully functional at the time of larval hatching a few hours later. In this review I explore three developmental events on the path to physiological maturation. First, I examine the molecular and cellular mechanisms that generate organ shape, focusing on the process of cell intercalation that drives tubule elongation, the roles of the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix and how intercalation is coordinated at the tissue level. Second, I look at the genetic networks that control the physiological differentiation of tubule cells and consider how distinctive physiological domains in the tubule are patterned. Finally, I explore how the organ is positioned within the body cavity and consider the relationship between organ position and function. PMID:23445869

  16. Shape Changing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  17. L-shaped prey isocline in the Gause predator-prey experiments with a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Křivan, Vlastimil; Priyadarshi, Anupam

    2015-04-01

    Predator and prey isoclines are estimated from data on yeast-protist population dynamics (Gause et al., 1936). Regression analysis shows that the prey isocline is best fitted by an L-shaped function that has a vertical and a horizontal part. The predator isocline is vertical. This shape of isoclines corresponds with the Lotka-Volterra and the Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey models that assume a prey refuge. These results further support the idea that a prey refuge changes the prey isocline of predator-prey models from a horizontal to an L-shaped curve. Such a shape of the prey isocline effectively bounds amplitude of predator-prey oscillations, thus promotes species coexistence. PMID:25644756

  18. A Modified Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (mTI-RADS) For Thyroid Nodules in Coexisting Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hang; Yue, Wen-Wen; Du, Lin-Yao; Xu, Jun-Mei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Li, Xiao-Long; Wang, Dan; Zhou, Xian-Li; Xu, Hui-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    To develop a conventional ultrasound (US) modified Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data System (mTI-RADS) to stratify the malignancy risk of thyroid nodule in coexisting Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). The study included 138 malignant and 292 benign thyroid nodules confirmed by cytological or histopathological results. The risk score (RS) for each significant US feature was estimated by multiplying corresponding regression coefficient and the total score for each nodule was defined as the sum of these individual scores. The mTI-RADS was established according to the total RS and divided into category 3, 4a, 4b, 4c and 5. Marked hypoechogenicity, taller-than-wide shape, poorly-defined margin, microcalcification or macrocalcification and halo sign absence were statistically significant US features in prediction of thyroid malignancy (all p < 0.05). The total RS for each nodule was defined as following: RS = 2.1× (if marked hypoechogenicity) + 1.2× (if taller-than-wide shape) + 1.7× (if no halo sign) + 0.6× (if poorly-defined margin) + 1.2× (if microcalcification or macrocalcification). The malignancy rates in mTI-RADS category 3, 4a, 4b, 4c and 5 nodules were 3.7%, 19.3%, 38.1%, 62.7% and 94.1%, respectively, with significant differences among different categories (P < 0.001). The mTI-RADS category may facilitate subsequent treatment management in HT patients. PMID:27194206

  19. Tube-shape verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. N.; Christ, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Inexpensive apparatus checks accuracy of bent tubes. Assortment of slotted angles and clamps is bolted down to flat aluminum plate outlining shape of standard tube bent to desired configuration. Newly bent tubes are then checked against this outline. Because parts are bolted down, tubes can be checked very rapidly without disturbing outline. One verifier per tube-bending machine can really speed up production in tube-bending shop.

  20. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.