Science.gov

Sample records for cogeneration des batiments

  1. Controle sismique d'un batiment en acier de 1 etage par amortisseurs elastomeres et contreventements en Chevron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Olivier

    Actuellement, le principe de dimensionnement a la capacite est fortement utilise dans le domaine du genie parasismique. De maniere simplifiee, cette methode de dimensionnement consiste a dissiper l'energie injectee a une structure lors d'une secousse sismique par la deformation inelastique d'un element structural sacrificiel. Cette methode de dimensionne-ment permet d'obtenir des structures economiques, car cette dissipation d'energie permet de reduire substantiellement les efforts qui se retrouvent a l'interieur de la structure. Or, la consequence de ce dimensionnement est la presence de degats importants a la structure qui suivent a la secousse sismique. Ces degats peuvent engendrer des couts superieurs aux couts d'erection de la structure. Bien entendu, sachant que les secousses sismiques d'importances sont des phenomenes rares, l'ingenieur est pret a accepter ce risque afin de diminuer les couts initiaux de construction. Malgre que cette methode ait permis d'obtenir des constructions economiques et securitaires, il serait interessant de developper un systeme qui permettrait d'obtenir des performances de controle des efforts sismiques comparables a un systeme dimensionne selon un principe de dimensionnement a la capacite sans les consequences negatives de ces systemes. En utilisant les principes d'isolation a la base, il a ete possible de developper un systeme de reprise des forces sismiques (SRFS). qui permet d'obtenir un controle des efforts sismiques concurrentiels tout en gardant une structure completement elastique. Ce systeme consiste u inserer un materiel elastomere entre l'assemblage de la poutre et des contreventements a l'interieur d'un cadre contrevente conventionnel. Cette insertion permet de diminuer substantiellement la rigidite laterale du batiment, ce qui a pour consequence d'augmenter la valeur de la periode fondamentale du batiment dans lequel ces cadres sont inseres. Ce phenomene est appele le saut de periode. Ce saut de periode permet de

  2. Survey of cogeneration: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The consumption of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil was surveyed. The potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology was estimated. It was found that an estimated 3700 MWe could potentially be generated in Southern California using cogenerated technology. It is suggested that current technology could provide 2600 MWe and advanced technology could provide 1100 MWe. Approximately 1600 MWt is considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  3. Industrial cogeneration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Friedman, N. R.

    1980-09-01

    Studies were performed on a number of operating cogeneration systems to determine application, economics, and attitudes of industrial and utility executives toward cogeneration. A literature survey was conducted and an identification of candidate cogeneration sites was carried out. This was followed by a screening of these sites down to 20 to 30 candidate sites. The screening was carried out on the basis of cogeneration capacity, geographical diversity, generation type, and industrial diversity. The remaining sites were contacted as to their willingness to work with EPRI, and an industrial questionnaire was developed on technical, economic, and institutional cogeneration issues. Each of the seventeen sites was visited during this task. A utility questionnaire was developed and utilities with cogeneration systems studied in this survey were contacted as to their attitudes toward cogeneration. In addition, a compilation of a list of operating cogeneration systems was performed.

  4. Industrial and commercial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    The central issues surrounding cogeneration are highlighted and OTA's findings on those issues are summarized. The context in which cogenerators will operate is reviewed, including the national energy situation, current electric utility operation, and the regulation and financing of cogeneration systems. An overview of the cogeneration technologies is presented, including their operating and fuel use characteristics, projected costs, and requirements for interconnection with the utility grid. The opportunities for cogeneration in industry, commercial buildings, and rural areas are analyzed. The impacts of cogeneration on electric utilities' planning and operation and on the environment, as well as on general economic and institutional factors such as capital requirements, employment, and the decentralization of energy supply are assessed. Policy considerations for the use of cogeneration technologies are discussed. The appendices include a description of the model used to analyze commercial cogeneration and of the methods used to calculate emissions balances for air quality analysis, as well as a glossary of terms and a list of abbreviations used. (MHR)

  5. Industrial cogeneration optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

  6. Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

  7. Thermionic cogeneration burner design

    SciTech Connect

    Miskolczy, G.; Goodale, D.; Moffat, A.L.; Morgan, D.T.

    1983-08-01

    Since thermionic converters receive heat at very high temperatures (approximately 1800 K) and reject heat at moderately high temperatures (approximately 800 K), they are useful for cogeneration applications involving high temperature processes. The electric power from thermionic converters is produced as a high amperage, low-voltage direct current. An ideal cogeneration application would be to utilize the reject heat at the collector temperature and the electricity without power conditioning. A cogeneration application in the edible oil industry fulfills both of these requirements since both direct heat and hydrogen gas are required in the hydrogenation of the oils. In this application, the low voltage direct current would be used in a hydrogen electrolyzer.

  8. Cogeneration and utility diversification

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Niagara Mohawk saw cogeneration and utility diversification as an opportunity to break away from the traditional model of a public utility and avoid the fate of the railroads. The author reviews how HYDRA-CO Enterprises evaluated the risks and opportunities of diversification and the steps it took to diversify, which included a joint venture cogeneration project. The company sees a future with ever expanding opportunities for utility subsidiaries for those with courage and imagination.

  9. Cogeneration on a southeastern dairy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.C.; Walsh, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a 5 year study on cogeneration on a dairy operation in Georgia are summarized. Details of system operation and performance are given. Discussion of practical and economic viability of a cogeneration system is provided.

  10. Proceedings of cogeneration power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, J.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Cogeneration Power Plants. Topics as diverse as extended operational performance findings, updating of control systems, the complex relationships involved in cogeneration projects, and correction of station noise complaints are covered.

  11. Cogeneration for resort hotels

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    Resort Hotels should be considered for application of co-generation to take advantage of higher thermal efficiency and consequent energy cost avoidance. Modern resort hotels require comfort and reliability from mechanical and electrical systems on an around the clock basis. Load profiling reveals simultaneous process heating and electricity use requirements that aid in the selection and sizing of co-generation equipment. Resort Hotel needs include electrical loads for lighting, fan motors, elevators, escalators and receptacle uses. Process heat demands arise from kitchen, servery, banquet, restaurant, laundry, and bakery functions. Once the loads requiring service have been quantified and realigned (shifted) to maximize simultaneous demands the engineering task of co-generation application becomes one of economics. National legislation is now in place to foster the use of co-generating central utility plants. Serving utility companies are now by law required to buy back excess energy during periods of reduced hotel demands. Resort Hotel loads, converted into electricity and heat demands are tabulated in terms of savings (positive cash flow) or costs (negative cash flows). Cash flow tabulations expressed in graphs are included. The graphs show the approximate simple payback on initial costs of co-generation systems based on varying electricity charges.

  12. Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1983-01-01

    Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

  13. Integrating district cooling with cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Spurr, M.

    1996-11-01

    Chillers can be driven with cogenerated thermal energy, thereby offering the potential to increase utilization of cogeneration throughout the year. However, cogeneration decreases electric output compared to condensing power generation in power plants using a steam cycle (steam turbine or gas turbine combined cycle plants). The foregone electric production increases with increasing temperature of heat recovery. Given a range of conditions for key variables (such as cogeneration utilization, chiller utilization, cost of fuel, value of electricity, value of heat and temperature of heat recovered), how do technology alternatives for combining district cooling with cogeneration compare? This paper summarizes key findings from a report recently published by the International Energy Agency which examines the energy efficiency and economics of alternatives for combining cogeneration technology options (gas turbine simple cycle, diesel engine, steam turbine, gas turbine combined cycle) with chiller options (electric centrifugal, steam turbine centrifugal one-stage steam absorption, two-stage steam absorption, hot water absorption).

  14. Fuel cell cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, J.G.; Archer, D.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) sponsors the research and development of engineered systems which utilize domestic fuel supplies while achieving high standards of efficiency, economy, and environmental performance. Fuel cell systems are among the promising electric power generation systems that METC is currently developing. Buildings account for 36 percent of U.S. primary energy consumption. Cogeneration systems for commercial buildings represent an early market opportunity for fuel cells. Seventeen percent of all commercial buildings are office buildings, and large office buildings are projected to be one of the biggest, fastest-growing sectors in the commercial building cogeneration market. The main objective of this study is to explore the early market opportunity for fuel cells in large office buildings and determine the conditions in which they can compete with alternative systems. Some preliminary results and conclusions are presented, although the study is still in progress.

  15. Computer aided cogeneration feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anaya, D.A.; Caltenco, E.J.L.; Robles, L.F.

    1996-12-31

    A successful cogeneration system design depends of several factors, and the optimal configuration can be founded using a steam and power simulation software. The key characteristics of one of this kind of software are described below, and its application on a process plant cogeneration feasibility analysis is shown in this paper. Finally a study case is illustrated. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Bronx Zoo cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rivet, P.H.

    1988-09-01

    The New York Zoological Society commenced feasibility studies for a proposed cogeneration and district heating system for the Bronz Zoo in spring 1982. Early studies focused on evaluating the Zoo's energy loads, infrastructure, and energy delivery and financing systems. The Zoological Society and New York City joined in the decision to support the construction of a system which would serve not only the Bronx Zoo but also five nearby City-funded installations, including the adjacent New York Botanical Garden. Since the submission of that study, the project has been modified in scope, scaling back to a generating capacity designed to serve only the Bronz Zoo.

  17. Advanced cogeneration research study. Survey of cogeneration potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-five facilities that consumed substantial amounts of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil were surveyed by telephone in 1983. The primary objective of the survey was to estimate the potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology. An estimated 3667 MW sub e could potentially be generated using cogenerated technology. Of this total, current technology could provide 2569 MW sub p and advanced technology could provide 1098 MW sub e. Approximately 1611 MW sub t was considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  18. Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Western, E.R. ); Nass, D.W. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

  19. Cogeneration: A Campus Option? A Cogeneration Manual for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Robert Lloyd; Goble, Wendy Coleman

    Guidelines for colleges who may want to implement cogeneration on their campuses are presented. Cogeneration has been defined as "the simultaneous production of electric power and other forms of useful energy--such as heat or process steam--from the same facility." The history of cogeneration, current and future technologies, and cogeneration and…

  20. Advanced Cogeneration Technology Economic Optimization Study (ACTEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanda, P.; Ansu, Y.; Manuel, E. H., Jr.; Price, W. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced cogeneration technology economic optimization study (ACTEOS) was undertaken to extend the results of the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS). Cost comparisons were made between designs involving advanced cogeneration technologies and designs involving either conventional cogeneration technologies or not involving cogeneration. For the specific equipment cost and fuel price assumptions made, it was found that: (1) coal based cogeneration systems offered appreciable cost savings over the no cogeneration case, while systems using coal derived liquids offered no costs savings; and (2) the advanced cogeneration systems provided somewhat larger cost savings than the conventional systems. Among the issues considered in the study included: (1) temporal variations in steam and electric demands; (2) requirements for reliability/standby capacity; (3) availability of discrete equipment sizes; (4) regional variations in fuel and electricity prices; (5) off design system performance; and (6) separate demand and energy charges for purchased electricity.

  1. Wastewater treatment plant cogeneration options

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfield, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reviews municipal sewage cogeneration and digester gas utilization options available to wastewater treatment plants, and will focus on utilizing the digester gas in combustion turbines and engine-generator systems. Defining the digestion and gas generation process is crucial to understanding the best gas utilization system. In municipal wastewater treatment plants biosolids (sludge) reduction is accomplished using aerobic or anaerobic digestion. The basic process of treating sewage solids with digestion is not new and has been practiced as far back as the nineteenth century. High energy usage consumed by aerobic blow systems supplying air to the process and the potential ``free`` energy generated by anaerobic digesters sometimes sways designers to select anaerobic over aerobic digestion. The following areas will be covered in this paper: gas utilization and cogeneration; definition of digestion process; sizing the cogeneration system and reviewing the systems components; emissions requirements and options; and capital, and O and M cost analysis.

  2. Analyse des transferts de chaleur et de masse transitoires dans un arena a l'aide de la methode zonale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Ahmed

    Cette these presente les resultats d'une etude sur le mouvement de l'air et les transferts thermiques et massiques dans les arenas en regime transitoire et en 3D. Pour la partie aeraulique, il a ete question de developper un modele base sur la methode zonale qui permet de calculer les debits de l'air (dus a la ventilation et aux gradients de temperature) et de l'humidite entre les differentes zones du batiment et de determiner l'age de l'air dans chacune des zones. Pour la partie thermique, un modele de calcul du rayonnement entre les surfaces interieures du batiment qui a ete couple a TRNSYS afin de calculer sur une base annuelle les charges de chauffage et de refrigeration; ces dernieres tiennent compte des transferts radiatif et convectif, de la chaleur latente due a la condensation de l'humidite sur la glace et du surfacage. Le document presente est constitue de 7 chapitres qui peuvent etre resumes comme suit: Les chapitres 1, 2 et 3 sont consacres respectivement: a l'introduction generale, a la revue bibliographique et a la description du batiment modelise. Le chapitre 4 decrit l'approche developpee et la contribution importante qui y est apportee. Il presente l'utilisation de la methode zonale comme une alternative pratique aux methodes CFD car elle permet de realiser des simulations dynamiques sur une annee avec des temps de simulation tres courts et une precision acceptable. Il s'agit d'une approche intermediaire entre les modeles CFD et les modeles a un noeud d'air (considerant la temperature homogene dans un local). Le chapitre 5 est consacre a la methode de resolution numerique. L'outil de simulation a ete developpe en utilisant l'interface du logiciel TRNSYS: Le type 56 de ce logiciel a ete adopte comme modele energetique tandis que les autres modeles ont ete developpes et programmes en utilisant le logiciel MATLAB. Le chapitre 6 presente les resultats de simulation pour un arena sans faux plafond et avec un faux plafond et les resultats de mesures

  3. Advanced cogeneration research study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.; Moore, N.; Rosenberg, L.; Slonski, M.

    1983-01-01

    This study provides a broad based overview of selected areas relevant to the development of a comprehensive Southern California Edison (SCE) advanced cogeneration project. The areas studied are: (1) Cogeneration potential in the SCE service territory; (2) Advanced cogeneration technologies; and (3) Existing cogeneration computer models. An estimated 3700 MW sub E could potentially be generated from existing industries in the Southern California Edison service territory using cogeneration technology. Of this total, current technology could provide 2600 MW sub E and advanced technology could provide 1100 MW sub E. The manufacturing sector (SIC Codes 20-39) was found to have the highest average potential for current cogeneration technology. The mining sector (SIC Codes 10-14) was found to have the highest potential for advanced technology.

  4. Cogeneration for existing alfalfa processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This study is designed to look at the application of gas-turbine generator cogeneration to a typical Nebraska alfalfa processing mill. The practicality is examined of installing a combustion turbine generator at a plant site and modifying existing facilities for generating electricity, utilizing the electricity generated, selling excess electricity to the power company and incorporating the turbine exhaust flow as a drying medium for the alfalfa. The results of this study are not conclusive but the findings are summarized.

  5. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37 Cogeneration. The following table may be used to determine eligibility for a permanent exemption based on oil and natural gas savings. Average...

  6. Cogeneration development and market potential in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J.; Xin, D.

    1996-05-01

    China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

  7. Building Maintenance Mechanic. Apprenticeship Training Standards = Mecanicien d'entretien des batiments. Normes de formation en apprentissage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    These training standards for building maintenance mechanics are intended to be used by apprentice/trainees, instructors, and companies in Ontario, Canada, as a blueprint for training or as a prerequisite for accreditation/certification. The training standards identify skills required for this occupation and its related training program. They are…

  8. Modelisation des systemes geothermiques a boucles horizontales pour chauffer les batiments et prevenir la fonte du pergelisol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Pier-Olivier

    2011-12-01

    In northern regions, due to climate change, the increase in the annual mean air temperature increases the depth at which the permanently frozen ground (permafrost) is located. This melting causes soil instability and therefore, the instability of the buildings and transport structures above it. These regions are highly dependent on fossil fuels as a large quantity is used to heat buildings and generate electricity. A solution to these problems is presented in this memoir. It involves using a heat exchanger coupled to a horizontal geothermal heat pump for both heating a building and maintaining the integrity of the permafrost beneath it. A new analytical model for horizontal ground heat exchanger based on the finite line source is presented. This model extends to the transient case in the soil and to any desired pipe layout the steady state results for parallel horizontal pipes of Claesson et Dunand (1983). The heat transfer ratio can change along the pipe. The analytical model can not account for the groundwater phase change given the complexity of the phenomenon. When there is no phase change the analytical model is validated by a 3D finite element numerical model. When the phase change is accounted for in the numerical model, for weather data from northern regions, the analytical model still provides good approximations to the ground temperature during the intensive heating season, hence allowing to compute the heat extracted by the ground heat exchanger (GHE). However, summer ground temperature and thaw depth are overestimated by the analytical model, so that the analytical model gives conservative results. A case study using a geoexchange thermal system is presented. It consists in freezing the ground under a building and heat it at the same time. A typical building in Kuujjuaq (northern Canada) is analyzed. The GHE layout follows a spiral pattern characterized globally by 3 parameters : length L, depth D and spacing S. The influence of each parameter on the amount of heat extracted from the ground and on the maximum ground temperature at a control point is assessed. This study shows that the proposed solution is feasible. An impact analysis shows the most important external parameters for the system design. The thermal properties of the frozen ground prove to be decisive parameters. The model, the case study and the impact analysis provide useful GHE design guidelines in cold regions for the double purpose of ground freezing and heat extraction.

  9. Coal gasifier cogeneration powerplant project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. I.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Industrial cogeneration and utility pr systems were analyzed and a conceptual design study was conducted to evaluate the economic feasibility of a coal gasifier power plant for NASA Lewis Research Center. Site location, plant size, and electric power demand were considered in criteria developed for screening and selecting candidates that could use a wide variety of coals, including that from Ohio. A fluidized bed gasifier concept was chosen as the baseline design and key components of the powerplant were technically assessed. No barriers to environmental acceptability are foreseen. If funded, the powerplant will not only meet the needs of the research center, but will reduce the commercial risk for utilities and industries by fully verifying and demonstrating the technology, thus accelerating commercialization.

  10. Cogeneration of water and power

    SciTech Connect

    Sephton, H.H.; Frank, K.F.

    1997-09-01

    Need of pure water in areas of limited supply has driven the development of technologies to permit recycling of available water and to generate new water supplies by purifying saline resources. These technologies include sedimentation, filtration, softening, ion exchange, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and distillation. Some of these developments serve needs of the power industry, others evolved due to the synergistic relationship between generating water and power. Large plant seawater desalination depend on this synergism for best economy, especially in Southern California and the Middle East. Applying new processes promise to drive down the cost of desalinated water, based on recently improved thermal efficiencies and on capital cost reductions. Cogeneration with these processes provides new mutual benefits for power and water technologies.

  11. Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, M. K.; Antoniak, Z. I.

    1992-04-01

    Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be decoupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

  12. Retrofit cogeneration system increases refrigeration capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Amberger, R.F. ); DeFrees, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    This article describes a retrofit cogeneration systems for increasing refrigeration capacity at a milk processing plant in Queens, New York. The natural gas/ammonia cogeneration and subcooling systems reduce CO[sub 2] emissions and provide cost and energy savings. The topics of the article include the innovative aspects, computer modeling for system analysis, analysis technique, system configuration, refrigeration loads, operations and maintenance, cost effectiveness and environmental benefits.

  13. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 5: Cogeneration systems results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems is examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. The methodology and results of matching the cogeneration energy conversion systems to approximately 50 industrial processes are described. Results include fuel energy saved, levelized annual energy cost saved, return on investment, and operational factors relative to the noncogeneration base cases.

  14. Electrical system for a large cogeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Arvay, G.J. ); Smith, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The electrical system, interface, commissioning, and operations requirements of a major multiunit cogeneration plant interconnected with a large utility system through a 230-kV sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) gas-insulated substation (GIS) are complex and demanding. This paper describes the electrical requirements, including utility interfaces, engineering, and on-site testing, as applied to the execution of a large, multiunit turnkey cogeneration project in California. The benefits of careful engineering efforts are shown to result in timely and cost effective completion of engineering, manufacturing, installation, testing, and commercial operation.

  15. Texasgulf solar cogeneration program, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisantz, D. J.; Bishop, K. D.; Herrington, W.; Jones, H. E.; Karnoski, P.; Schwartz, S. I.

    1981-06-01

    A site specific conceptual design was generated for a near term Solar Cogeneration Facility based upon solar central receiver technology. Various system trade studies were conducted to select an optimum system configuration for the selected industrial site, as well as a configuration with the potential for wide industrial applicability. System performance and cost estimates were prepared and utilized to assess the economics of the near term facility, as well as a similar commercial size facility. A development plan was then generated with the objective of efficiency achieving facility operation by 1985. The selected industrial site is Texasgulf's Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine near Fort Stockton, Texas. The Solar Cogeneration Facility will operate 24 hours per day, 365 day per year in the hybrid (solar and fossil) or fossil only modes of operation. High reliability, a definite requirement for Frasch process sulfur mining as well as other industrial process heat operations, is incorporated into the design.

  16. Development of Residential SOFC Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takashi; Miyachi, Itaru; Suzuki, Minoru; Higaki, Katsuki

    2011-06-01

    Since 2001 Kyocera has been developing 1kW class Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for power generation system. We have developed a cell, stack, module and system. Since 2004, Kyocera and Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. have been developed SOFC residential co-generation system. From 2007, we took part in the "Demonstrative Research on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" Project conducted by New Energy Foundation (NEF). Total 57 units of 0.7kW class SOFC cogeneration systems had been installed at residential houses. In spite of residential small power demand, the actual electric efficiency was about 40%(netAC,LHV), and high CO2 reduction performance was achieved by these systems. Hereafter, new joint development, Osaka Gas, Toyota Motors, Kyocera and Aisin Seiki, aims early commercialization of residential SOFC CHP system.

  17. Micro cogeneration: roadblocks to mass markets

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    The market for micro cogeneration using units of 30 kW or less is in its infancy, and is currently limited to health care, recreation, lodging, and multi-unit residential facilities. There have been some inroads into the restaurant and fast food outlets, light industry, and some supermarkets. A mass market potential will require the industry to produce a module that is as generic as a home air conditioner or heat pump. In order for modular cogenerators to be look upon as appliances, they must be assembled as a package at the factory for easy installation and maintenance. Some utilities can create barriers to interconnections, which would have a negative effect on the market.

  18. Closed cycle cogeneration for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, W.M.; Fraize, W.E.; Kinney, G.; Malone, G.A.

    1984-06-01

    While present energy needs can be met with available supplies of fossil fuels, the need to plan for the eventual elimination of dependence on premium fuels in utility and industrial applications remains urgent. One of the most promising power conversion technologies for these needs is the closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) configured for power and heat production. Closed cycle gas turbines have been in commercial use, principally in Europe, for over four decades. That experience base, combined with emerging awareness of potential CCGT applications, could lead to the operation of coal-fired CCGT cogeneration systems in the U.S. within the next decade. This paper discusses the multi-fuel capability of the CCGT and compares its performance as a flexible cogeneration system with that of a more conventional steam turbine system.

  19. Biomass externally fired gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Eidensten, L.; Yan, J.; Svedberg, G.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is a presentation of a systematic study on externally fired gas turbine cogeneration fueled by biomass. The gas turbine is coupled in series with a biomass combustion furnace in which the gas turbine exhaust is used to support combustion. Three cogeneration systems have been simulated. They are systems without a gas turbine, with a non-top-fired gas turbine, and a top-fired gas turbine. For all systems, three types of combustion equipment have been selected: circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, grate fired steam boiler, and grate fired hot water boiler. The sizes of biomass furnaces have been chosen as 20 MW and 100 MW fuel inputs. The total efficiencies based on electricity plus process heat, electrical efficiencies, and the power-to-heat ratios for various alternatives have been calculated. For each of the cogeneration systems, part-load performance with varying biomass fuel input is presented. Systems with CFB boilers have a higher total efficiency and electrical efficiency than other systems when a top-fired gas turbine is added. However, the systems with grate fired steam boilers allow higher combustion temperature in the furnace than CFB boilers do. Therefore, a top combustor may not be needed when high temperature is already available. Only one low-grade fuel system is then needed and the gas turbine can operate with a very clean working medium.

  20. Second analysis of a cogeneration cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Benelmir, R.

    1989-01-01

    Decentralized design methods will always greatly facilitate the optimum design of large engineering systems whenever a high degree of decentralization (H.D.D.) is achieved. H.D.D. allows optimization of each component by itself without significantly sacrificing the overall system optimum. In this thesis, primary engineering component costing expressions are introduced, resulting in a significant H.D.D.-called primary decentralization--for the design of gas turbines with or without co-generation by a steam power bottoming cycle. These cost expressions are a compromise between simplicity and a representative model for engineering component costing. A requirement for such expressions is that they provide a balance not only between the capital cost expenditures and the dissipation of exergy, but also between the capital cost and the dissipation of heat removal capacity. In fact, additional exergy dissipation always results in the dissipation of more heat, which in turn must be removed from the overall power generation cycle. Applied to a gas turbine cogeneration cycle, such decentralization serves to show how the steam power bottoming cycle assists the gas turbine cycle. The results are compared to the decentralization of the system with the gas turbine acting as a topping cycle which assists the steam power cycle. The compromise between these two approaches produces a significant H.D.D. which allows engineers to study many more possible improvements in co-generation than could otherwise be considered.

  1. New cogeneration plant provides steam for Oxnard papermaking facility

    SciTech Connect

    Price, K.R. ); Anderson, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    In January 1990, the Proctor and Gamble Co.'s Oxnard, Calif., papermaking facility started up Cogen Two, the newest of the company's four gas-turbine-based cogeneration plants. In addition to reviewing Cogen Two project specifics, this article demonstrates the success of state-of-the-art cogeneration systems and the important role these systems play in the pulp and paper industry.

  2. Analysis of indicators characterizing the reliability of cogeneration turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmanskii, B. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Valamin, A. E.; Kogan, P. V.; Ioffe, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    Results from an analysis of indicators characterizing the reliability of cogeneration turbines produced by the ZAO Ural Turbine Works for a long time of their operation are presented. The most typical defects of cogeneration turbines that revealed themselves under field conditions are presented together with the main factors causing failures of the turbine as a whole and failures of its individual assemblies (parts).

  3. Industrial Cogeneration Optimization Program: A summary of two studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    Two industrial cogeneration optimization programs were performed to examine the economic and energy saving impacts of adding cogeneration to site specific plants in the chemical, food, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, and textile industries. Industrial cogeneration is reviewed. The two parallel ICOP studies are described. The five industrial sectors are also described, followed by highlights of each of the site specific case studies. Steam turbine cogeneration systems fired by coal or alternative fuels are generally the most attractive in terms of economic performance and oil/gas savings potential. Of the 15 cogeneration systems selected as optimum in the ICOP studies, 11 were coal or wood fired steam turbines. By contrast, gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines, which are limited to oil or gas firing, are usually less economical.

  4. Efficient Use of Cogeneration and Fuel Diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunickis, M.; Balodis, M.; Sarma, U.; Cers, A.; Linkevics, O.

    2015-12-01

    Energy policy of the European Community is implemented by setting various goals in directives and developing support mechanisms to achieve them. However, very often these policies and legislation come into contradiction with each other, for example Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources and Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency, repealing Directive 2004/8/EC on the promotion of cogeneration based on a useful heat demand. In this paper, the authors attempt to assess the potential conflicts between policy political objectives to increase the share of high-efficiency co-generation and renewable energy sources (RES), based on the example of Riga district heating system (DHS). If a new heat source using biomass is built on the right bank of Riga DHS to increase the share of RES, the society could overpay for additional heat production capacities, such as a decrease in the loading of existing generating units, thereby contributing to an inefficient use of existing capacity. As a result, the following negative consequences may arise: 1) a decrease in primary energy savings (PES) from high-efficiency cogeneration in Riga DHS, 2) an increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Baltic region, 3) the worsening security situation of electricity supply in the Latvian power system, 4) an increase in the electricity market price in the Lithuanian and Latvian price areas of Nord Pool power exchange. Within the framework of the research, calculations of PES and GHG emission volumes have been performed for the existing situation and for the situation with heat source, using biomass. The effect of construction of biomass heat source on power capacity balances and Nord Pool electricity prices has been evaluated.

  5. Benefits of advanced technology in industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    This broad study is aimed at identifying the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration for the 1985 to 2000 time period and assessing the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to using today's commercially available technology. Energy conversion systems being studied include those using steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, closed cycle gas turbines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Specific cases using today's commercially available technology are being included to serve as a baseline for assessing the advantages of advanced technology.

  6. Chemical, power firms team up in cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.

    1994-02-21

    US chemical producers are more eager than ever to free up any available capital by shedding operation that are not central to their businesses. As part of this soul searching, chemical companies are questioning whether they should continue to invest the time and tie up capital necessary to operate on-site power generation facilities. Many chemical firms have long produced their own power through the process of cogeneration--which allows for the simultaneous production of electricity and steam from the same energy source--because it provides reliable power at low cost. But in this back-to-basics environment, petrochemical producers want the benefits of self-generation without the headaches. Recognizing this, electric utilities are spinning off independent power subsidiaries. These companies can venture out of the utility's traditional service area to aggressively seek to own or operate cogeneration facilities and then supply other companies with an economical source of power. Providing such services is an attractive way for power companies to diversify their business and buoy return on investment enough to satisfy restless shareholders. Companies in the chemical and related industries pose a prime opportunity because their plants have relatively large requirements for both electricity and steam. As these two trends converge, industry consultants predict an increasing number of chemical and power companies will form mutually beneficial partnerships.

  7. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Volume II. Appendix A. Conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications. Appendix B. Characterization of cogeneration systems (near-term technology). Appendix C. Optimized cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This appendix to a report which evaluates the technical, economic, and institutional aspects of industrial cogeneration for conserving energy in the food, chemical, textile, paper, and petroleum industries contains data, descriptions, and diagrams on conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications for cogeneration facilities; characterization of cogeneration systems in terms of fuel utilization, performance, air pollution control, thermal energy storage systems, and capital equipment costs; and optimized cogeneration systems for specific industrial plants. (LCL)

  8. Regional characteristics relevant to advanced technology cogeneration development. [industrial energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    To assist DOE in establishing research and development funding priorities in the area of advanced energy conversion technoloy, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory studied those specific factors within various regions of the country that may influence cogeneration with advanced energy conversion systems. Regional characteristics of advanced technology cogeneration possibilities are discussed, with primary emphasis given to coal derived fuels. Factors considered for the study were regional industry concentration, purchased fuel and electricity prices, environmental constraints, and other data of interest to industrial cogeneration.

  9. Analysis of carbon dioxide emission of gas fuelled cogeneration plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Adzuieen; Amin, M.; Majid, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gas turbines are widely used for power generation. In cogeneration system, the gas turbine generates electricity and the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam or chilled water. Besides enhancing the efficiency of the system, the process assists in reducing the emission of CO2 to the environment. This study analyzes the amount of CO2 emission by Universiti Teknologi Petronas gas fuelled cogeneration system using energy balance equations. The results indicate that the cogeneration system reduces the CO2 emission to the environment by 60%. This finding could encourage the power plant owners to install heat recovery systems to their respective plants.

  10. Modular cogeneration in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Aalto, P.; Gleason, T.C.J.; Skalafuris, A.J.

    1987-12-01

    The use of prepackaged cogeneration systems of modular size (100 kWe - 10 MWe) in conjunction with district heating and cooling is proposed as a way to enhance the energy conservation potential of both cogeneration and district energy systems. This report examines the technical and institutional aspects of this marriage of technologies, and develops a research agenda whose goal is to define this potential use of cogeneration more accurately and to develop the generic technology base needed to bring it to actuality. 11 refs.

  11. Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

  12. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  13. Decision making for best cogeneration power integration into a grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Asmar, Joseph; Zakhia, Nadim; Kouta, Raed; Wack, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Cogeneration systems are known to be efficient power systems for their ability to reduce pollution. Their integration into a grid requires simultaneous consideration of the economic and environmental challenges. Thus, an optimal cogeneration power are adopted to face such challenges. This work presents a novelty in selectinga suitable solution using heuristic optimization method. Its aim is to optimize the cogeneration capacity to be installed according to the economic and environmental concerns. This novelty is based on the sensitivity and data analysis method, namely, Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). This later establishes a compromise between power, economy, and pollution, which leads to find asuitable cogeneration power, and further, to be integrated into a grid. The data exploited were the results of the Genetic Algorithm (GA) multi-objective optimization. Moreover, the impact of the utility's subsidy on the selected power is shown.

  14. Energy Integrated Dairy Farm digester and cogeneration system installation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.C.; Walsh, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Georgia Tech finished in December, 1983 Phase II (system installation and startup) of its four year Energy Integrated Dairy Farm System (EIDFS) program. This paper outlines the selection and installation of the anaerobic digestion and cogeneration components of the EIDFS.

  15. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  16. New cogeneration plant to supply needs of a city

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, R.S. ); Betts, K.H.

    1992-10-01

    Vineland, N.J. finds that it will be less costly to buy power from a QF cogeneration plant than to build its own plant. Since August 8, 1899, the City of Vineland Electric Utility (CVEU) has continually met the needs of its customers with utility-owned generating equipment. However, on May 30, 1991, it reached a handshake agreement with Cogeneration Partners of America (CPA), the agent for Vineland Cogeneration Limited Partnership (VCLP). On August 13, 1991, the Vineland city council approved the contract to purchase energy and capacity from a non-utility generator. This paper reports that under the provisions of the contract CVEU will purchase 46.5 MW from VCLP's cogeneration project at Progresso Foods in Vineland.

  17. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  18. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Final report, September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jerry; McWhinney, Jr., Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    This study program is part of the DOE Integrated Industry Cogeneration Program to optimize, evaluate, and demonstrate cogeneration systems, with direct participation of the industries most affected. One objective is to characterize five major energy-intensive industries with respect to their energy-use profiles. The industries are: petroleum refining and related industries, textile mill products, paper and allied products, chemicals and allied products, and food and kindred products. Another objective is to select optimum cogeneration systems for site-specific reference case plants in terms of maximum energy savings subject to given return on investment hurdle rates. Analyses were made that define the range of optimal cogeneration systems for each reference-case plant considering technology applicability, economic factors, and energy savings by type of fuel. This study also provides guidance to other parts of the program through information developed with regard to component development requirements, institutional and regulatory barriers, as well as fuel use and environmental considerations. (MCW)

  19. Riegel Textile Corporation, Ware Shoals cogeneration. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-31

    Riegel signed a cooperative cost sharing agreement with the Department of Energy to design, purchase, install, and operate a new cogeneration system in which a new turbine/generator unit exhausts steam at 225/sup 0/PSIG. The background of Riegel's previous cogeneration experience is presented; this project is described; and problems experienced in getting the boiler on-line and the turbine/generator up to speed are summarized. The project cost, operating cost, savings, and return on investment are presented. (MHR)

  20. Exergy analysis and simulation of a 30MW cogeneration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Nikhil; Samsher; Kachhwaha, S. S.; Attri, Rajesh

    2013-06-01

    Cogeneration cycle is an efficient mean to recover the waste heat from the flue gases coming out of gas turbine. With the help of computer simulation, design parameters may be selected for the best performance of cogeneration cycle. In the present work a program is executed in software EES on the basis of mathematical modelling described in paper to study cogeneration cycle performance for different parameters. Results obtained are compared with the results available in literature and are found in good agreement with them. Real gas and water properties are inbuilt in the software. Results show that enthalpy of air entering the combustion chamber is higher than that of the flue gases at combustion chamber outlet. For different operative conditions, energy and exergy efficiencies follow similar trends; although, exergy efficiency values are always lower than the corresponding energy efficiency ones. From the results it is found that turbine outlet temperature (TIT) of 524°C is uniquely suited to efficient cogeneration cycle because it enables the transfer of heat from exhaust gas to the steam cycle to take place over a minimal temperature difference. This temperature range results in the maximum thermodynamic availability while operating with highest temperature and highest efficiency cogeneration cycle. Effect of cycle pressure ratio (CR), inlet air temperature (IAT) and water pressure at heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) inlet on the 30MW cogeneration cycle is also studied.

  1. An assessment of advanced technology for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of advanced fuel utilization and energy conversion technologies to enhance the outlook for the increased use of industrial cogeneration was assessed. The attributes of advanced cogeneration systems that served as the basis for the assessment included their fuel flexibility and potential for low emissions, efficiency of fuel or energy utilization, capital equipment and operating costs, and state of technological development. Over thirty advanced cogeneration systems were evaluated. These cogeneration system options were based on Rankine cycle, gas turbine engine, reciprocating engine, Stirling engine, and fuel cell energy conversion systems. The alternatives for fuel utilization included atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustors, gasifiers, conventional combustion systems, alternative energy sources, and waste heat recovery. Two advanced cogeneration systems with mid-term (3 to 5 year) potential were found to offer low emissions, multi-fuel capability, and a low cost of producing electricity. Both advanced cogeneration systems are based on conventional gas turbine engine/exhaust heat recovery technology; however, they incorporate advanced fuel utilization systems.

  2. Methodologie d'evaluation de la demande de chaleur des groupes de batiments dans le cadre d'une etude de faisabilite du chauffage urbain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirion-Blais, Olivier

    In the context of energy efficiency improvements to pulp and paper mills, process modifications allow to free low quality steam. This kind of low pressure and temperature steam is often found to be in excess in mills. New opportunities to use this energy could be created by gathering plants along with local communities and other enterprises into eco-industrial clusters. Following this proposition, district heating is an interesting technology that could be developed. It consists in supplying buildings with steam or hot water from one or more central heating plants through a series of canalization, generally underground. The supplied energy is used mostly for space heating but it can also be used with appliances specially designed for this purpose. Under certain conditions, this type of heating is cheaper and more environmentally friendly for several reasons including the facts that one central boiler plant is more efficient and has lower pollutant emissions due to better combustion control. Moreover, it can be adapted to multiple fuels that are locally available such as biomass around some pulp and paper mills. However, to insure that the savings occur, the heat demand must be sufficiently high and concentrated. Therefore, detailed feasibility studies shall be conducted to justify significant investments. Such studies require a lot of time not to mention that they necessitate a lot of data which can be difficult to obtain. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology that can assess the feasibility of district heating quickly and using easily accessible data. It was mainly designed to determine the heat consumption, which is especially critical as to decide whether or not to implement this technology. The focus is primarily directed on residential buildings, but another methodology is also developed to take into account the commercial and institutional buildings demand. An analysis of the sources of data revealed a certain redundancy among them. Therefore, four different computation procedures were developed to obtain the heat consumption of residential buildings: • C1, the first procedure, is the most time consuming one. It is also the one that uses the most specific information from the case: aerial photographs, census data (building year of construction and type (single family detached, single family attached, apartments or mobile homes)) and punctual on-site verification from the target area. National estimates of thermal requirements values are also used. • C2, the second procedure, is less specific than C1, but is much less time consuming to achieve. The local data sources used are: aerial photographs and census data from the case. While the national ones are: estimates of the building heating surfaces and thermal requirements. • C3 and C4, are the easiest procedures. Those two are very similar. The specific data used in these cases are census data from the locations under study. National data used for C3 are building surface estimates and thermal requirements values while C4 only uses thermal requirement values which are slightly different from those of C3. A further analysis revealed later that these two calculations yielded the same results. Therefore, since C3 is slightly more complicated to implement, it was removed from further analysis. Using three procedures thus ensures the stability of the methodology when the three results are the same order of magnitude. An average of the three results gives a good estimation of the consumption. The methodology was then applied to four study cases. One of them has already been the subject of a detailed district heating assessment feasibility study. It is used to validate the results obtained with the new methodology. The three other cases are rather used to test different conditions (number, density, type and year of construction of buildings). The validation results showed that the methodology can determine the heat consumption to about 20% of the baseline value. It also determines the total heating surface to about 5%. The three other study cases, A, B

  3. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D. R.; Drost, M. K.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following significant advantages: (1) electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25 and 40 percent lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15 and 35 percent lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

  4. 77 FR 2717 - Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC's application...

  5. Cogeneration in the Hawaiian sugar industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    For nearly a century the Hawaiian sugar industry has produced most of the steam and electricity needed to process sugarcane and to power its factories and irrigation pumps. Judicious use of bagasse and cane trash has made the Hawaiian sugar industry among the most efficient in the world in converting biomass into electricity --- in comparison with typical worldwide cane-to-electricity productivities of {approximately}10 kWh per ton of cane, Hawaiian sugar factories today generate, on average, about 60 kWh per ton of cane and, in some factories, 100 kWh or more. Plantations in Hawaii produce about 800 million kWh annually, and, after satisfying virtually all of their internal power requirements, export roughly 400 million kWh to public utility companies. To attain world prominence in generating and exporting power from bagasse, Hawaiian sugar companies have had to address numerous technical, operational, regulatory, and contractual issues relating to the production and distribution of steam and electricity. Prior to 1970 the development of electricity generation in the Hawaiian sugar industry was shaped almost entirely by technical developments --- better utilization of the available biomass resources; consolidation of steam-generation facilities into fewer, larger, and more efficient units; and increased operating pressures and temperatures of steam and electrical generating units and better heat recovery to achieve higher thermal efficiency in the cogeneration plant. In more recent years, however, non-technical issues have influenced electricity generation and sale more than technical factors. 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Fort Drum Cogeneration Partners overview November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Fort Drum Cogeneration Facility is a steam/electric generating plant powered by three circulating fluidized bed boilers producing a total of approximately 525,000 pounds per hour of superheated steam including steam used to heat the high temperature water supplied to the military base. This steam load varies from a low of approximately 15,000 lbs/hr in the summer to a high of approximately 120,000 lbs/hr in the winter. Included in the design of the facility is redundancy required to assure a continuous supply of heat to the Army Base. This redundance requirement is why we have three independent boilers each capable of supplying the total Army heat load; and we have three hot water supply pumps and three hot water heaters, two pumps and two heaters are required to supply the maximum heat load. The single turbine (Dresser Rand) and generator (Electric Machinery) are capable of generating 58.5 mw gross. Electrical power is sold to Niagara Mohawk under a long term Power Purchase Agreement high temperature water (HTW) is sold to the Fort Drum Army Base to provide heat for their buildings.

  7. An integrated approach to cogeneration policy in Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.L.; Jensen, V.R.

    1986-05-01

    Increasingly, states are developing aggressive cogeneration promotion policies as a response to the perceived failures of the electric utility system in meeting the public's expectations. It is hoped that these policies will reduce the need for new central station power plants, and in so doing bring relatively lower power costs, environmental benefits, and increased competition. These policy aims may be sound, but the policies designed to serve them have not necessarily had the intended impact. Promotional policies have encouraged excess cogeneration, brought about higher retail rates, are raising questions about reliability, and are leading to increased reliance on fuels which are extremely sensitive to market conditions. In general, these policies are characteristic of a ''singular'' approach to cogeneration policy development, wherein a problem is identified and a technological or economic solution is proposed without full consideration of the possible ramifications of the policy. The result is often policies that produce impacts that are counter-intuitive and inefficient, and which may push the electric utility system in a direction that is ultimately unsatisfactory. An integrated approach to cogeneration policy development would reduce the likelihood of policymakers falling victim to the environmental fallacy of the singular approach, by forcing consideration of cogeneration policies within the context of the system in which the policies must be implemented.

  8. 76 FR 4648 - PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Filing January 19, 2011. Take notice that on January 13, 2011, PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP (PowerSmith), pursuant to section... Regulations for the topping-cycle cogeneration facility owned and operated by PowerSmith located in...

  9. Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

  10. Bagasse-based cogeneration projects in Kenya. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Kenda, W.; Shrivastava, V.K.

    1992-03-01

    A Definitional Mission team evaluated the prospects of the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) funding a feasibility study that would assist the Government of Kenya in developing power cogeneration plants in three Kenyan sugar factories and possibly two more that are now in the planning stage or construction. The major Kenyan sugar producing region around Kisumu, on Lake Victoria has climatic conditions that permit cane growing operations ideally suitable for cogeneration of power in sugar factories. The total potentially available capacity from the proposed rehabilitation of the three mills will be approximately 25.15 MW, or 5.7 percent of total electricity production.

  11. Okeelanta Cogeneration Project: Electricity and steam from sugar cane

    SciTech Connect

    Schaberg, D.

    1994-12-31

    The Okeelanta Cogeneration Project is a Bagasse- and wood chip-fired cogeneration project with a net electrical output of approximately 70MW, located at the Okeelanta Corporation`s sugar mill in South Bay, Florida. The Project is comprised of three stoker type boilers each capable of producing 440,000 lbs/hr of steam at 1455 psia, 955F, and a single extraction/condensing steam turbine with a gross output of 75 MW. The electrical output will be sold to Florida Power and Light under the terms of an executed power purchase agreement and delivered at 138kV.

  12. Cogeneration handbook for the pulp and paper industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, E.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the pulp and paper industry. Appendices B and O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  13. Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  14. Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  15. Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the textile industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  16. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  17. Island Cogeneration Project Inc. (ICP) island cogeneration plant: Report and recommendations of the Island Cogeneration Project committee with respect to the issuance of a project approval certificate

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The proposed Island Cogeneration Project would produce about 245 megawatts of electricity for sale to BC Hydro, and cogenerate process steam for sale to an adjacent pulp and paper mill in Campbell River, British Columbia. This report reviews the application for approval of the project under the Environmental Assessment Act. The report begins with an overview of the project, the environmental assessment process, the application and subsequent information distribution and consultation activities, and First Nations considerations and concerns. It then discusses public considerations and issues of concern, including site access, road traffic, project noise, and effects on property values. This is followed by assessment of potential effects of the project and means of preventing or mitigating adverse effects, including environmental, socio-economic, health, and cultural/heritage effects. Finally, requirements for permits, licenses, and approvals are listed and recommendations are made regarding project approval.

  18. Technical assessment of an oil-fired residential cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The definition of cogeneration, within the context of this project, is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat energy from a single machine. This report will present the results of an engineering analysis of the efficiency and energy-conservation potential associated with a unique residential oil-fired cogeneration system that provides both heat and electric power. The system operates whenever a thermostat signals a call for heat in the home, just as a conventional heating system. However, this system has the added benefit of cogenerating electricity whenever it is running to provide space heating comfort. The system is designed to burn No. 2 heating oil, which is consumed in an 11-horsepower, two cylinder, 56.75-cubic-inch, 1850-RPM diesel engine. This unit is the only pre-production prototype residential No. 2 oil-fired cogeneration system known to exist in the world. As such, it is considered a landmark development in the field of oil-heat technology.

  19. Cogeneration: a winning game for the players who risk it

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    Cogeneration holds out the tantalizing prospect of lower utility rates and affordable energy. But the stakes are high. Now an expert player - the cogen developer - offers to negotiate the gameboard and guarantee a win to those willing to take a chance on his services.

  20. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities. 292.205 Section 292.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY REGULATORY POLICIES ACT OF 1978 REGULATIONS UNDER SECTIONS...

  1. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... total energy input of natural gas and oil to the facility; or (B) If the useful thermal energy output is... standard. For any topping-cycle cogeneration facility, the useful thermal energy output of the facility must be no less than 5 percent of the total energy output during the 12-month period beginning with...

  2. 78 FR 43198 - Watson Cogeneration Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... interventions in lieu of paper using the ``eFiling'' link at http://www.ferc.gov . Persons unable to file... Energy Regulatory Commission Watson Cogeneration Company; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 12... desiring to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of...

  3. Innovative hybrid gas/electric chiller cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, G.

    2000-04-01

    January Progress--A kick-off meeting was held in San Diego with Alturdyne on January 21st. The proposed hybrid gas/electric chiller/cogenerator design concept was discussed in detail. The requirements and functionality of the key component, a variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator was presented. Variations of the proposed design were also discussed based on their technical feasibility, cost and market potential. The discussion is documented in a Trip Report. February Progress--After significant GRI/Alturdyne discussion regarding alternative product design concepts, the team made a decision to continue with the proposed product design, a hybrid chiller capable of also providing emergency power. The primary benefits are: (a) the flexibility and operating cost savings associated with the product's dual fuel capability and (b) the emergency power feature. A variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator would significantly increase the cost of the product while providing marginal benefit. (The variable speed, constant frequency motor generator is estimated to cost $25,000 versus $4,000 for a constant speed version). In addition, the interconnection requirements to the electric grid would significantly limit market penetration of the product. We will proceed with a motor/generator design capable of serving as the electric prime mover for the compressor as well as the generator for emergency power needs. This component design is being discussed with two motor manufacturers. The first generation motor/generator will not be a variable speed, constant frequency design. The variable speed, constant frequency capability can be an advancement that is included at a later time. The induction motor/synchronous generator starts as a wound rotor motor with a brushless exciter and control electronics to switch between induction mode and synchronous mode. The exciter is a three-phase exciter with three phase rotating diode assembly. In the induction motor mode, the

  4. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsch, Marek; Čaja, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  5. Performance optimization of a gas turbine-based cogeneration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Tamer

    2006-06-01

    In this paper an exergy optimization has been carried out for a cogeneration plant consisting of a gas turbine, which is operated in a Brayton cycle, and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the analysis, objective functions of the total produced exergy and exergy efficiency have been defined as functions of the design parameters of the gas turbine and the HRSG. An equivalent temperature is defined as a new approach to model the exergy rate of heat transfer from the HRSG. The optimum design parameters of the cogeneration cycle at maximum exergy are determined and the effects of these parameters on exergetic performance are investigated. Some practical mathematical relations are also derived to find the optimum values of the adiabatic temperature ratio for given extreme temperatures and consumer temperature.

  6. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

  7. The Mulberry Cogeneration Facility: Design features and operating success

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, W.M.; Wierschem, R.A.; Gray, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mulberry Cogeneration Facility is in successful, reliable, and profitable service, with the complex requirements of zero discharge, extensive water treatment, process steam supply, and inlet chillers having been reduced to routine, automated operation. What was initially visualized by the developer as a straightforward combined cycle plant became much more than that as the various requirements for environmental and regulatory compliance became necessities, along with the desire to maximize output and revenues in response to growing power demands. A delicate balance exists between a financially successful cogeneration project and the Owners` obligation to the community and the environment. As competitive pressures grow and expectations of investors, insurers, operators, and the public increase, still more creativity will be required to provide a safe, reliable, cost-effective plant on ever shorter schedules.

  8. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.; Sagerman, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications were compared to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler. Also included in the comparisons and evaluations are results extrapolated to the national level.

  9. Cogeneration upgrades. The time is ripe in California

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, S.R.; Bitting, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    With a life of 20 to 30 years or more, energy facilities represent a significant investment. Therefore, keeping facilities up-to-date is a sound capital investment, extending the life of the plant and increasing its economic efficiency. The following is an overview of several retrofit projects with which International Power Technology has recently been involved. Included is a discussion of the technical as well as economic logic behind each decision to retrofit. Most of the projects discussed here have a payback period of one to two years. International Power Technology (IPT), an energy service company in Redwood City, California, has over 500000 hours of plant operating experience, and is well acquainted with the benefits and challenges of cogeneration. IPT offers a broad range of services to parties interested in cogeneration, independent power, and thermal energy production. These activities can be tailored to the specific needs of a facility or plant owner, and include retrofit services.

  10. Gas engines provide cogeneration service for Fantoni MDF plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    1996-12-01

    A large MDF (medium density fiberboard) plant recently started industrial production at the headquarters of Fantoni, in Osoppo (UDINE) Italy. Providing electric power and thermal energy to the process is a cogeneration plant based on four large spark-ignited gas engines. The new Osoppo MDF plant processes 800 m{sup 3} of finished boards per day in a manufacturing line that combines the most advanced technologies available from several European equipment manufacturers. The cogeneration plant features four type 12VA32G spark-ignited gas engines from Fincantieri`s Diesel Engine Division, driving 50Hz, 6.3 kV, 5400 kVA Ansaldo generators at 750 r/min. The turbocharged and intercooled engines are a spark-ignited version of the company`s A32 diesel. They feature 12 Vee-arranged cylinders with 320 mm bore and 390 mm stroke. 5 figs.

  11. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  12. Investigations on an oriented cooling design for thermoelectric cogenerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. F.; Liu, C. X.; Yan, Y. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In thermoelectric application, it is widely known that the material limitation has still been the chief barrier of lifting its application to a higher level. Continuous efforts are extensively being made in developing novel material structures and constructions for thermoelectric modules with higher conversion efficiency. However, the overall system efficiency, which is one of the major parameters that most of the engineer and users care about, is not only ruled by the properties of applied thermoelectric materials, but also decided by the design of heat exchangers used on both sides of thermoelectric modules. Focusing on the cooling capacity and hydraulic characteristics of heat exchanger, this paper introduces an oriented cooling method for the domestic thermoelectric cogeneration, which delivers system efficiency up to 80%. This purpose-oriented cooling plate is designed for thermoelectric cogeneration for the residential houses installed with boiler or other heating facilities with a considerable amount of unused heat. The design enables Thermoelectric Cogeneration System (TCS) to be flexibly integrated into the existing hydraulic system. The mathematical model for the cooling plate has been established for a well understanding at the theoretical level. The performance of cooling plate has been investigated in a series of experimental studies which have been conducted under different coolant inlet velocity and temperature. The economic operating zone in which a good system performance could be achieved has been discussed and identified for the current configuration.

  13. Assessment of Training Needs for Cogeneration Technology in Schuylkill County. Project Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Passmore, David L.

    This paper reports an assessment of the education and training program needs stimulated by investment in cogeneration technology in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. (Cogeneration technology would convert raw culm, a byproduct of anthracite coal mining, into a fuel source for steam power generation.) After plant tours and interviews with plant…

  14. Potential for cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.; Gurfield, R. M.; Moretti, V. C.; Slonski, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    Information collected during an industrial survey of 12 selected plants was organized into four categories: technical, economic, environmental, and institutional. The technical aspects of industrial cogeneration are examined on a site-specific basis. The site-specific economics, environmental constraints, and institutional barriers that impact industrial cogeneration will be further investigated.

  15. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume II. System specification. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The characteristics and design and the environmental requirements for a solar cogeneration facility at a Texas military facility are specified. In addition, the conceptual design and performance characteristics, cost and economic data and other information for the cogeneration facility designed to meet the requirements are summarized. (LEW)

  16. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume 2: System specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    The characteristics and design and the environmental requirements for a solar cogeneration facility at a Texas military facility are specified. In addition, the conceptual design and performance characteristics, cost and economic data and other information for the cogeneration facility designed to meet the requirements are summarized.

  17. Prospects for constructing cogeneration stations equipped with back-pressure steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskii, A. A.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The possibilities of using back-pressure cogeneration turbines developed on the basis of serially produced ones are considered together with the thermal process circuits in which such turbines are applied. Design versions and advantages of cogeneration stations in which the proposed process circuits are implemented are described.

  18. 77 FR 13593 - PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver Take... Act of 1978 (PURPA), as amended, 18 CFR 292.205(c), PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP (PowerSmith... operated by PowerSmith located in Oklahoma. PowerSmith makes such a request because of a delay in...

  19. Analyse des interactions energetiques entre un arena et son systeme de refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghouani, Lotfi

    La presente these s'inscrit dans le cadre d'un projet strategique sur les arenas finance par le CRSNG (Conseil de Recherche en Sciences Naturelles et en Genie du Canada) qui a pour but principal le developpement d'un outil numerique capable d'estimer et d'optimiser la consommation d'energie dans les arenas et curlings. Notre travail s'inscrit comme une suite a un travail deja realise par DAOUD et coll. (2006, 2007) qui a developpe un modele 3D (AIM) en regime transitoire de l'arena Camilien Houde a Montreal et qui calcule les flux de chaleur a travers l'enveloppe du batiment ainsi que les distributions de temperatures et d'humidite durant une annee meteorologique typique. En particulier, il calcule les flux de chaleur a travers la couche de glace dus a la convection, la radiation et la condensation. Dans un premier temps nous avons developpe un modele de la structure sous la glace (BIM) qui tient compte de sa geometrie 3D, des differentes couches, de l'effet transitoire, des gains de chaleur du sol en dessous et autour de l'arena etudie ainsi que de la temperature d'entree de la saumure dans la dalle de beton. Par la suite le BIM a ete couple le AIM. Dans la deuxieme etape, nous avons developpe un modele du systeme de refrigeration (REFSYS) en regime quasi-permanent pour l'arena etudie sur la base d'une combinaison de relations thermodynamiques, de correlations de transfert de chaleur et de relations elaborees a partir de donnees disponibles dans le catalogue du manufacturier. Enfin le couplage final entre l'AIM +BIM et le REFSYS a ete effectue sous l'interface du logiciel TRNSYS. Plusieurs etudes parametriques on ete entreprises pour evaluer les effets du climat, de la temperature de la saumure, de l'epaisseur de la glace, etc. sur la consommation energetique de l'arena. Aussi, quelques strategies pour diminuer cette consommation ont ete etudiees. Le considerable potentiel de recuperation de chaleur au niveau des condenseurs qui peut reduire l'energie requise par

  20. Multiagent Analysis for Effect of Cogeneration Spread in an Electricity Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hidenori; Kurumatani, Koichi; Ohuchi, Azuma

    In this paper, in order to investigate the effect of cogeneration spread senario in electricity market we constructed a multiagent model of an electricity trade market with distributor and power generator agents. In this model, we analyzed the effect of reducing generators' surplus facilities to market price formation and stability through some computer experiments. As a result of the experimental simulations, the market price was decreased by the increase of sell bids according to the demand reduction by congeneration spread, and by the increase of commercial use of cogeneration facilities, the market price was more economical and stable because such agents supplied more electricity generated by surplus cogenerations. However, if power generators diminished power generating facilities in the situation that distributors' cogeneration facilities were not major; the fluctuation of market price took large. We confirmed that cogeneration spread played the important role for stabilizing market price formation.

  1. Feasibility of a small central cogenerated energy facility: Energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. N.

    1982-10-01

    The thermal economic feasibility of a small cogenerated energy facility designed to serve several industries in the Stockyards area was investigated. Cogeneration options included two dual fuel diesels and two gas turbines, all with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired boiler cases, also low sulphur coal and municipal refuse. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The fired boiler cogeneration systems employed back pressure steam turbines. The refuse fired cases utilized electrical capacities, 8500 to 52,400 lbm/hr and 0 to 9.9 MW (e), respectively. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which was displaced was sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act). The facility was operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users.

  2. Des Moines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Deborah, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This document, intended for elementary students, contains articles and activities designed to acquaint young people with the history of Des Moines, Iowa. The articles are short, and new or difficult words are highlighted and defined for young readers. "The Raccoon River Indian Agency" discusses the archeological exploration of the indian…

  3. Electrical studies for an industrial gas turbine cogeneration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, R.L.; Kalkstein, E.W. and Co., Newark, DE . Engineering Dept. Parsons Co., Pasadena, CA ); Willoughby, R.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Electrical studies are required to assure the proper integration of a gas-turbine cogeneration facility into an existing industrial-plant electrical system and the connected utility grid. Details of such a study effort are presented, including boundary-limit definition for the system model, individual component modeling, load-flow and short-circuit studies, stability studies, and simulation of on-line isolation from the electric utility during system undervoltage or underfrequency conditions. The impact of the studies on the design process and plant system reliability is discussed.

  4. A compact MCFC power plant for industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, P.

    1998-12-31

    Of all existing or emerging fuel cell technologies the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) is specifically suited for stationary cogeneration applications in small to medium power range (several hundred kilowatts up to several megawatts). At a temperature level of 650 C the MCFC incorporates all the advantages of high temperature fuel cells: internal reforming of hydrocarbons for simplest system design and highest efficiency and useful high temperature heat for industrial steam generation, without having to cope with the problems of ceramic fuel cell manufacturing. The paper describes the fuel cell, the European MCFC development consortium, optimization by simplification and integration, scope of applications, and qualification and future development.

  5. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Analytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems were compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. The ground rules established by NASA and assumptions made by the General Electric Company in performing this cogeneration technology alternatives study are presented. The analytical methodology employed is described in detail and is illustrated with numerical examples together with a description of the computer program used in calculating over 7000 energy conversion system-industrial process applications. For Vol. 1, see 80N24797.

  6. Thermoeconomic analysis: A criterion for the selection of cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luz-Silveira, J.; Balestieri, J.A.P.; Santos, A.H.M.; Almeida, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    The economical viability of three cogeneration schemes as supplying alternatives for a hypothetical industrial process has been studied. A cost appropriation method based on Valero`s studies (1986) has been used. This method enables the determination of exergetic flows, the Second Law efficiency of equipment and the monetary costs of the products acquired by the industrial process (steam and electrical energy). The criterion adopted for the selection is the global cost of the supplied products to the industrial process as regarding in Brazilian conditions.

  7. Thermoeconomic analysis and design of a cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Benelmir, R. ); Evans, R.B. ); von Spakovsky, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Decentralized design methods will always greatly facilitate the optimum design of large engineering systems whenever a High Degree of Decentralization, H.D.D., is achieved. H.D.D. allows the optimization of each component by itself without significantly sacrificing the overall system optimum. In this paper primary engineering component costing expressions are introduced, resulting in a significant H.D.D. - called primary decentralization - for the design of a gas turbine with cogeneration by a steam power bottoming cycle. These cost expressions are a compromise between simplicity and a representative model for engineering component costing.

  8. The T-125/150-12.8 cogeneration steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Gol'dberg, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Bilan, V. N.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Polyaeva, E. N.; Shekhter, M. V.; Shibaev, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the design, the economic indicators, and the main solutions on the thermal process circuit and layout of the T-125/150-12.8 turbine, a new design version of the T-100-12.8 turbine, which is one of the best known, unique and widely used cogeneration turbines in Russia and abroad. The project of the new turbine is supposed to be used both for renovating and upgrading already installed turbines of the T-100 family and for supplying it as a full set for replacing obsolete equipment or constructing new one.

  9. Biomass-gasifer steam-injected gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.D.; Williams, R.H. . Center for Energy and Environmental Studies)

    1990-04-01

    Steam injection for power and efficiency augmentation in aeroderivative gas turbines is now commercially established for natural gas-fired cogeneration. Steam-injected gas turbines fired with coal and biomass are being developed. In terms of efficiency, capital cost, and commercial viability, the most promising was to fuel steam-injected gas turbines with biomass is via the biomass-integrated gasifier/steam-injected gas turbine (BIG/STIG). The R and D effort required to commercialize the Big/STIG is modest because it can build on extensive previous coal-integrated gasifier/gas turbine development efforts. An economic analysis of BIG/STIG cogeneration is presented for cane sugar factories, where sugar cane residues would be the fuel. A BIG/STIG investment would be attractive for sugar producers, who could sell large quantities of electricity, or for the local electric utility, as a low-cost generating option. Worldwide, the cane sugar industry could support some 50,000 MW of BIG/STIG capacity, and there are many potential applications in the forest products and other biomass-based industries.

  10. Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

  11. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  12. Thermal-economic analysis of organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-12-01

    An evaluation of organic rankine cycles (ORC) as combined with topping incorporating gas turbines or diesel engines, and with subsequent waste heat utilization is presented. It is found that the potential benefit of the proposed organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration of useful heat and electricity is more flexible in meeting demands for the two products, by varying the mode of operation of the system. A thermal-economic analysis is developed and illustrated with cost and performance data for commercially available equipment, and with general economic parameters reflecting current regulations and market conditions. The performance of the ORC and of the entire combined cycle is described. Equations to evaluate the various thermodynamic and economic parameter, and the resultant case flows are presented. Criteria are developed to assess the addition of an ORC to a cogeneration system without ORC is viable based on rate of return on incremental investment. It is indicated that the proposed system is potentially viable, however, it is not viable under conditions prevailing in Chicago for the selected case studies.

  13. Industrial application of fluidized-bed cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, W.R.; Mullin, D.E.; Rourke, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years development work and pilot-plant studies into the concept of fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) have given way to ever larger and more ambitious commercial projects. This technology moved rapidly from the laboratory into industrial application due to its two primary advantages: 1) the ability to burn low-grade inexpensive fuel; and 2) to burn it in an environmentally acceptable manner. In a major contribution to its commercialization, Shell Nederland Raffinadeij (SNR) awarded a contract to Foster Wheeler (FW) for the design, fabrication and erection management of the world's first commercial cogeneration, coalfired atmospheric fluidized-bed boiler capable of generating superheated steam. The fluidized-bed steam generator facility is located at the SNR's Europoort Tank Farm near Rotterdam in the Netherlands. It is designed as a cogeneration facility in which high-pressure steam passes to a back-pressure turbine which generates 6.6 MW of electricity, Figure 1. The 710 kPa (103 psig) back-pressure steam is then fed to twin heat exchangers, which provide 37 MW of thermal heat energy via mediumpressure hot water to satisfy the heat demand of the tank farm. This article describes the design of the steam generator and subsystems, as well as the modifications of the previous units' designs done to improve performance and reliability.

  14. UEM boosts cogeneration activity with frame 6 gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Boissenin, Y.; Moliere, M.; Remyl, P.

    1995-05-01

    In 1991, after EC directives allowed the use of natural gas for electricity production, Usine d`Electricite de Metz (UEM) decided to install a new combined-cycle plant based on a 38 MW MS6001B gas turbine supplied by European Gas Turbines. This selection was made after a screening of twenty or so solutions. The cogeneration/combined-cycle system based on a heavy-duty gas turbine was found to be the best because it ensured high efficiency, low environment impact and a profitability ratio of 20%, providing a payback of five years. The system consisting of the gas turbine, HRSG and other structures of the Chambiere plant has an efficiency of over 80% in cogeneration mode and approaching 50% in the combined-cycle configuration. A major factor in this flexibility is the Frame 6 gas turbine. The UEM Frame 6 gas turbine at site conditions has a rated ISO output of 38.15 MW without steam injection, 40.5 MW with 10.5 t/h of steam and 43.5 MW with 24.7 t/h of steam. NO{sub x} emissions are 152, 42 and less than 42 ppm respectively, at 15% O{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} emissions are below 100 g/MJ at base load, and a 14% increase in output by steam injection will only cause a 7% increase in CO{sub 2} emissions.

  15. Modern fluidized bed combustion in Ostrava-Karvina cogeneration plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mazac, V.; Novacek, A.; Volny, J.

    1995-12-01

    The contemporary situation of our environment claims the sensitive approach to solving effective conversion of energy. Limited supplies of noble fuels and their prices evoke the need to use new combustion technologies of accessible fuels in given region without negative ecological influences. Energoproject participates in the preparation of the two projects in Ostrava-Karvin{acute a} black coal field in Czech Republic. The most effective usage of fuel energy is the combined of electricity and heat. If this physical principle is supported by a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) one obtains a high electricity/heat ratio integrated steam-gas cycle on the basis of solid fuel. Cogeneration plant Toebovice is the dominant source (600 MW{sub th}) of Ostrava district heating system (1100 MW{sub th}). The high utilization of the installed output and utilization of the clean, compact and efficient of the PFBC technology is the principal but not the single reason for the selection of the Toebovice power plant as the first cogeneration plant for installation of the PFBC in Czech Republic. The boiler will burn black coal from the neighboring coal basin.

  16. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information in the area of advanced energy conversion systems for industrial congeneration applications in the 1985-2000 time period was studied. Six current and thirty-one advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance-of-plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a framework for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. Various cogeneration strategies were analyzed and both topping and bottoming (using industrial by-product heat) applications were included. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Typically fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on-site furnaces and utility electricity. With the variety of industrial requirements, each advanced technology had attractive applications. Overall, fuel cells indicated the greatest fuel energy savings and emission reductions. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual cost savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal-derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on-site gasification systems.

  17. Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-31

    This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

  18. Comparison of alternative cogeneration power systems for three industrial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Three alternative on-site cogeneration power systems were evaluated against technical and economic criteria for three industrial sites. Technical factors included plant sizing to meet process thermal loads, fuel utilization, power output, siting consideration, fuel savings, etc. Economic factors included capital cost, return on equity, and ownership/financing options among others. Each cogeneration plant was evaluated by comparison with the current separate generation scheme. The technologies considered were conventional coal-fired, steam topping cycles; coal-fired, atmospheric fluidized bed/closed-cycle gas turbines; and coal-fired, atmospheric fluidized bed/open cycle gas turbines. These approaches were optimized for three sites: an agricultural chemical plant, a brewery, and a kraft paper mill. The results showed that the closed cycle gas turbines yielded the best economics, primarily due to a lower initial cost. The open cycle gas turbine, when combined with a steam bottoming cycle, resulted in larger power outputs than would be realized in the closed cycle or steam turbine cases. None of the plants studied matched the plant electrical load while following the thermal load.

  19. CELCAP: A Computer Model for Cogeneration System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A description of the CELCAP cogeneration analysis program is presented. A detailed description of the methodology used by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory in developing the CELCAP code and the procedures for analyzing cogeneration systems for a given user are given. The four engines modeled in CELCAP are: gas turbine with exhaust heat boiler, diesel engine with waste heat boiler, single automatic-extraction steam turbine, and back-pressure steam turbine. Both the design point and part-load performances are taken into account in the engine models. The load model describes how the hourly electric and steam demand of the user is represented by 24 hourly profiles. The economic model describes how the annual and life-cycle operating costs that include the costs of fuel, purchased electricity, and operation and maintenance of engines and boilers are calculated. The CELCAP code structure and principal functions of the code are described to how the various components of the code are related to each other. Three examples of the application of the CELCAP code are given to illustrate the versatility of the code. The examples shown represent cases of system selection, system modification, and system optimization.

  20. Diesel cogeneration plant using oxygen enriched air and emulsified fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, T.J.; Cole, R.L.; Sekar, R.R.; Stodolsky, F. ); Eustis, J.N. )

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen-enriched combustion of alternative fuels in diesel engines at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is based on information gathered from two previous Department of Energy programs. The first was the slow-speed diesel engine program which used fuels such as coal-water slurry and coal derived liquid fuels in a slow speed diesel engine. The second was the development of membrane oxygen separation equipment. The results of these programs indicated that using the new membrane oxygen enrichment technology with medium- and high-speed diesel engines would do two things. First, oxygen enrichment could reduce some emissions from stationary diesel engines, particularly smoke, particulates and hydrocarbons while significantly increasing power output. The second, was that it might be possible to use less expensive liquid fuels such as No. 4, No. 6 and residual oil emulsified with water in medium- to high-speed diesel engines. The water would (1) help to eliminate the undesirable increase in nitrogen oxide production when enriched oxygen is used, and (2) by reducing the viscosity of the heavier liquid fuels, make them easier to use in smaller industrial cogeneration applications. This program consists of four steps: preliminary feasibility study, exploratory experiments, system development, and demonstration and commercialization of an industrial cogeneration system. 3 refs., 13 figs.

  1. BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-09-19

    BP West Coast Products, LLC (BP or the Applicant) proposes to construct and operate a nominal 720-megawatt (MW), natural-gas-fired, combined-cycle cogeneration facility next to the existing BP Cherry Point Refinery in Whatcom County, Washington. The Applicant also owns and operates the refinery, but the cogeneration facility and the refinery would be operated as separate business units. The cogeneration facility and its ancillary infrastructure would provide steam and 85 MW of electricity to meet the operating needs of the refinery and 635 MW of electrical power for local and regional consumption. The proposed cogeneration facility would be located between Ferndale and Blaine in northwestern Whatcom County, Washington. The Canadian border is approximately 8 miles north of the proposed project site. The Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has jurisdiction over the evaluation of major energy facilities including the proposed project. As such, EFSEC will recommend approval or denial of the proposed cogeneration facility to the governor of Washington after an environmental review. On June 3, 2002, the Applicant filed an Application for Site Certification (ASC No. 2002-01) with EFSEC in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 463-42. On April 22, 2003, the Applicant submitted an amended ASC that included, among other things, a change from air to water cooling. With the submission of the ASC and in accordance with the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) (WAC 463-47), EFSEC is evaluating the siting of the proposed project and conducting an environmental review with this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Because the proposed project requires federal agency approvals and permits, this EIS is intended to meet the requirements under both SEPA and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) also will use this EIS as part of their

  2. Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Burns, R. K.; Easley, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

  3. The performance of residential micro-cogeneration coupled with thermal and electrical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, John

    Over 80% of residential secondary energy consumption in Canada and Ontario is used for space and water heating. The peak electricity demands resulting from residential energy consumption increase the reliance on fossil-fuel generation stations. Distributed energy resources can help to decrease the reliance on central generation stations. Presently, distributed energy resources such as solar photovoltaic, wind and bio-mass generation are subsidized in Ontario. Micro-cogeneration is an emerging technology that can be implemented as a distributed energy resource within residential or commercial buildings. Micro-cogeneration has the potential to reduce a building's energy consumption by simultaneously generating thermal and electrical power on-site. The coupling of a micro-cogeneration device with electrical storage can improve the system's ability to reduce peak electricity demands. The performance potential of micro-cogeneration devices has yet to be fully realized. This research addresses the performance of a residential micro-cogeneration device and it's ability to meet peak occupant electrical loads when coupled with electrical storage. An integrated building energy model was developed of a residential micro-cogeneration system: the house, the micro-cogeneration device, all balance of plant and space heating components, a thermal storage device, an electrical storage device, as well as the occupant electrical and hot water demands. This model simulated the performance of a micro-cogeneration device coupled to an electrical storage system within a Canadian household. A customized controller was created in ESP-r to examine the impact of various system control strategies. The economic performance of the system was assessed from the perspective of a local energy distribution company and an end-user under hypothetical electricity export purchase price scenarios. It was found that with certain control strategies the micro-cogeneration system was able to improve the

  4. Industrial cogeneration case study No. 3: Mead Corporation Paper Mill, Kingsport, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The design, operation, performance, economics and energy efficiency of the 25,000 kW co-generating power plant at the Mead Co. paper mill in Kingsport, TN are described, and compared with the efficiency of producing only process heat at the plant while importing electric power from a local utility. It was established that on-site co-generation consumed 2/3 of the energy that would have been required for on-site process heat generation plus purchased off-site-generated electric power and that co-generation resulted in more than $2.8 million saved during the period from 1975 through 1978. (LCL)

  5. Study of technical and economic feasibility of fuel cell cogeneration applications by electric utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, W. S.; Wakefield, R. A.

    1981-10-01

    A previous EPRI study showed significant potential penetrations of fuel cells into the future generation mixes of U.S. electric utilities. A new EPRI-sponsored study was conducted to investigate the possible additional benefits of operating these utility-owned fuel cells as cogeneration facilities. Three classes of applications were evaluated: residential and commercial buildings, industrial processes and utility power plants. Incremental breakeven capital costs between cogenerating and electric-only fuel cells were determined with respect to conventional thermal energy supply alternatives. The results showed that there are sufficient economic incentives for fuel cell cogeneration in all three classes of applications.

  6. Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

  7. Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof

    2010-04-15

    Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key

  8. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 6: Computer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential technical capabilities of energy conversion systems in the 1985 - 2000 time period were defined with emphasis on systems using coal, coal-derived fuels or alternate fuels. Industrial process data developed for the large energy consuming industries serve as a framework for the cogeneration applications. Ground rules for the study were established and other necessary equipment (balance-of-plant) was defined. This combination of technical information, energy conversion system data ground rules, industrial process information and balance-of-plant characteristics was analyzed to evaluate energy consumption, capital and operating costs and emissions. Data in the form of computer printouts developed for 3000 energy conversion system-industrial process combinations are presented.

  9. Thermal analysis of solar biomass hybrid co-generation plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushika, N. D.; Mishra, Anuradha; Chakravarty, M. N.

    2005-12-01

    This article describes a co-generation plant based on the biogas being produced from the waste of distillery plant and highlights the possible configuration in which the plant can be hybridized with auxiliary solar energy source having the advantage of using financial incentives in several countries. In hybridization, the solar heat is used for heating the boiler feed water. The solar heat-generating unit consists of line focus parabolic trough collector, heat transportation system and heat delivery unit such as heat exchanger. The simulation model of heat and mass transfer processes in the solar field as well as the balance of the system is developed to investigate the technological feasibility of the concept in terms of plant yield and matching of subsystems.

  10. A simulation model for Carson Ice Co-Generation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, N.K.W.; Elmasri, M.; Brownell, G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a software system to simulate the performance of the Carson Ice Co-gen Facility operated by the Carson Energy Group. This 100 MW plant consists of a cogeneration combined cycle and a simple cycle unit powered by LM6000 gas turbine generators. Features of the system include inlet heating/absorption chilling for the gas turbines, supplementary firing capability, and a broad range of steam turbine extractions and admissions. The software enables the operator to model complex operating scenarios. It predicts technical and economic performance under a wide range of conditions, taking into account various equipment constraints and operation preferences. For any set of user-specified operating inputs, the corresponding heat and mass balance diagrams as well as economic figures may be viewed virtually instantaneously. Interactive plots of plant heat rate, incremental heat rate, operating income, and other parameters reveal issues and trade-offs involved in performance and economic optimization.

  11. System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

  12. Preliminary assessment of Fort Hood solar cogeneration plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ator, J.

    1981-04-01

    An analysis has been performed to enable a preliminary assessment of the performance that can be expected of a solar thermal cogeneration system designed to serve a selected group of buildings at Fort Hood, Texas. A central receiver system utilizing a molten salts mixture as the receiver coolant, heat transfer fluid, and storage medium is assumed. The system is to supply a large share of the space heating, air conditioning, domestic hot water, and electricity needs of a 20-building Troop Housing Complex. Principal energy loads are graphed and tabulated, and the principal electric parasitic loads are tabulated and the methodology by which they are estimated is reviewed. The plant model and the performance calculations are discussed. Annual energy displacement results are given. (LEW)

  13. Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crego, D. F.; Eller, V. L.; Stephenson, J. W.

    1982-02-01

    An existing 727 TPD incinerator burning mixed municipal refuse was deemed to be a feasible candidate for a cogeneration energy retrofit. It is indicated that equipment and construction of the retrofit will cost $17.6 million or $24,200/rated tonne in 1980 dollars; air pollution control equipment will cost 10.4 million or $14,300/tonne. Furnace temperature and gas samplings along with pilot air pollution control equipment tests were conducted. Refuse was characterized on both wet and dry seasons. Final design is based upon burning 155,000 TPY of refuse from which can be generated, sufficient steam and electricity for inhouse use and an additional amount of 64 million kWh for sale.

  14. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 4: Energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed-cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum-based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. The advanced and commercially available cogeneration energy conversion systems studied in CTAS are fined together with their performance, capital costs, and the research and developments required to bring them to this level of performance.

  15. PV/cogeneration hybrid system nets large contract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Alpha Solarco Inc. announced on May 18, 1987 the signing of two $175 million exclusive development contracts with the Pawnee and Otoe-Missouria Tribes of Oklahoma to build two 70,000-kilowatt photovoltaic electric generating stations on Tribal lands in Oklahoma to supply Indian and other requirements. The projects, to be built in four phases, will each consists of 35,000 kilowatts of photovoltaic generating capacity to be supplied by the company's proprietary Modular Solar-Electric Photovoltaic Generator (MSEPG), and 35,000 kilowatts of gas-fired cogeneration. Alpha Solarco is starting to build and finance itself a 500-kilowatt demonstration plant as the initial step in the first project. This plant will be used to demonstrate that proven MSEPG design and technology can be integrated in electric utility systems, either as a base-load generator for small utilities, or as a peak-shaving device for large ones.

  16. Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power

    SciTech Connect

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

    1994-08-01

    Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

  17. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  18. Case study of McCormick place cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    In the authors business of providing district energy services, competition is the key to his being able to have a positive impact on the environment, business stability, and economic activity. In the district energy industry, the competitive options are for property owners to continue to self generate energy to meet their needs, purchase energy from a company that utilizes electricity during off-peak hours to produce chilled water or take advantage of a total solution of purchasing tri-generation energy from Trigen-Peoples District Energy Company. Tri-generation is an innovative technology which involves the simultaneous production of steam, chilled water, and electricity. The McCormick Place cogeneration project calls for producing steam and chilled water (co-) for use by the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (MPEA). The plant will produce electricity (tri-) to run the production equipment.

  19. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  20. Modelling Residential-Scale Combustion-Based Cogeneration in Building Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, A.; Kelly, N.; Weber, A.; Griffith, B.

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development, calibration and validation of a combustion-cogeneration model for whole-building simulation. As part of IEA Annex 42, we proposed a parametric model for studying residentialscale cogeneration systems based on both Stirling and internal combustion engines. The model can predict the fuel use, thermal output and electrical generation of a cogeneration device in response to changing loads, coolant temperatures and flow rates, and control strategies. The model is now implemented in the publicly-available EnergyPlus, ESP-r and TRNSYS building simulation programs. We vetted all three implementations using a comprehensive comparative testing suite, and validated the model's theoretical basis through comparison to measured data. The results demonstrate acceptable-to-excellent agreement, and suggest the model can be used with confidence when studying the energy performance of cogeneration equipment in non-condensing operation.

  1. Micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine for heating and their real operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čierny, Jaroslav; Patsch, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This article was deal with micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine. We watched problematic of real working Stirling engine. The article also contain hookup of unit constructed at University of Zilina.

  2. Feasibility of cogenerated district heating and cooling for North Loop project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-03-01

    A thermal-economic analysis was performed in order to determine feasibility of cogeneration with central heating and cooling for Chicago's North Loop Development Project. Heating, cooling and electrical loads were predicted by using energy data according to use and floor area, representative of downtown Chicago. The central facility proposed would supply cogenerated heating for a part of the development's demand and about one half of the cooling demand by means of combined conventional and cogeneration equipment together on the 4-pipe distribution system. Electricity would also be distributed and used to substantially displace purchases. Additional options are also discussed and, if economical, could make implementation more attractive. Four alternatives involving gas turbines and diesels were selected for study and are reported. Energy savings extend over the assumed 25 years of the project and are indexed to inflation and fuel-cost escalation. It would appear that cogeneration could assist economic development of the North Loop Project.

  3. Cogeneration steam turbines for combined-cycle installations of 170 230 MW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barinberg, G. D.; Valamin, A. E.; Kogan, P. V.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.

    2008-06-01

    Design specifics, principal thermal schemes, and efficiency of cogeneration steam turbines operating as part of combined-cycle installations are considered. These turbines are developed on the basis of serially manufactured steam turbines of ZAO Ural Turbine Works.

  4. Cogeneration of electricity using wood waste as a replacement for fossil fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The experiences of a wood products company in their efforts to work out a cogeneration system using wood wastes are reviewed. Negotiations with the public utility and result of equipment search are described. (MHR)

  5. Advanced technology cogeneration system conceptual design study: Closed cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, E. A. T.; Daudet, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a three task study performed for the Department of Energy under the direction of the NASA Lewis Research Center are documented. The thermal and electrical energy requirements of three specific industrial plants were surveyed and cost records for the energies consumed were compiled. Preliminary coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed heated closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration system designs were developed for each industrial plant. Preliminary cost and return-on-equity values were calculated and the results compared. The best of the three sites was selected for more detailed design and evaluation of both closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems during Task II. Task III involved characterizing the industrial sector electrical and thermal loads for the 48 contiguous states, applying a family of closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems to these loads, and conducting a market penetration analysis of the closed cycle gas turbine cogeneration system.

  6. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 4: Heat Sources, balance of plant and auxiliary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information established for heat sources balance of plant items, thermal energy storage, and heat pumps are presented. Design case descriptions are given along with projected performance values. Capital cost estimates for representative cogeneration plants are also presented.

  7. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  8. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume II. Comparison and evaluation of results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-08-01

    The specific objectives of the overall CTAS effort were: (1) to identify and evaluate the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems, for implementation in industrial cogeneration systems between 1985 and 2000, that could permit increased use of coal or coal-derived fuels, and (2) to quantify and assess the advantages of using advanced systems in industrial cogeneration. CTAS was concerned exclusively with providing technical and economic comparisons and evaluations of advanced systems as applied to industrial cogeneration rather than with evaluating the merits of the cogeneration concept. At the request of DOE, nine types of energy conversion systems were evaluated in CTAS: (1) steam turbines, (2) diesel engines, (3) open-cycle gas turbines, (4) combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycles, (5) Stirling engines, (6) closed-cycle gas turbines, (7) phosphoric acid fuel cells, (8) molten carbonate fuel cells, and (9) thermionics. Each type of system was examined with a variety of fuels and over a range of parameters and levels of technological advancement that could be made available for implementation between 1985 and 2000. In addition, for the steam turbine, diesel engine, open-cycle gas turbine, and combined-cycle systems, cogeneration results for technology levels and fuels representative of current commercially available equipment were estimated in order to serve as a baseline for evaluating the advantages of advanced systems. The systems were examined in cogeneration applications in a wide variety of representative industrial process plants selected from the highest energy-consuming industries.

  9. Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

    2004-04-30

    This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

  10. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

  11. Seventh Harmonic Co-Generation by Cyclotron Resonance Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changbiao; Hirshfield, J. L.; Ganguly, Achintya K.

    1997-05-01

    The TE_72 mode in cylindrical waveguide has group velocity nearly equal to that of the TE_11 mode if the operating frequency of TE_72 is seven times of that of TE_11.(C. Wang, J. L. Hirshfield, and A. K. Ganguly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77), 3819 (1996). This allows coherent radiation to be generated at the seventh harmonic while the TE_11 mode interacts with an electron beam via cyclotron autoresonance.(C. Wang and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. E 51), 2456 (1995); M. A. LaPointe, R. B. Yoder, C. Wang, A. K. Ganguly, and J. L. Hirshfield, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2718 (1996). For a 300 kV, 30 A warm beam pumped by 20 MW rf power at 2.856 GHz, simulations indicate that careful choice of the magnetic field profile and suppression of TE_11 mode after it is completely depleted can increase the seventh harmonic output up to 10 MW at 20 GHz. It is furthermore shown that injection can also benefit co-generation, both increasing harmonic output up to 16 MW and improving spent beam quality, which is helpful to beam energy recovery for efficiency enhancement.

  12. Supercritical biodiesel production and power cogeneration: technical and economic feasibilities.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Anitescu, G; Rice, P A; Tavlarides, L L

    2010-03-01

    An integrated supercritical fluid technology with power cogeneration to produce biodiesel fuels, with no need for the costly separations involved with the conventional technology, is proposed, documented for technical and economic feasibility, and preliminarily designed. The core of the integrated system consists of the transesterification of various triglyceride sources (e.g., vegetable oils and animal fats) with supercritical methanol/ethanol. Part of the reaction products can be combusted by a diesel power generator integrated in the system which, in turn, provides the power needed to pressurize the system and the heat of the exhaust gases necessary in the transesterification step. The latter energy demand can also be satisfied by a fired heater, especially for higher plant capacities. Different versions of this system can be implemented based on the main target of the technology: biodiesel production or diesel engine applications, including power generation. The process options considered for biodiesel fuel production estimate break-even processing costs of biodiesel as low as $0.26/gal ($0.07/L) with a diesel power generator and $0.35/gal ($0.09/L) with a fired heater for a plant capacity of 15,000 gal/day (56,775 L/day). Both are significantly lower than the current processing costs of approximately $0.51/gal ($0.13/L) of biodiesel produced by conventional catalytic methods. A retail cost of biodiesel produced by the proposed method is likely to be competitive with the prices of diesel fuels. PMID:19939671

  13. Energy balance model of a SOFC cogenerator operated with biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Maréchal, F.; Leuenberger, S.; Favrat, D.

    A small cogeneration system based on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) fed on the renewable energy source biogas is presented. An existing farm biogas production site (35 m 3 per day), currently equipped with a SOFC demonstration stack, is taken for reference. A process flow diagram was defined in a software package allowing to vary system operating parameters like the fuel inlet composition, reforming technology, stack temperature and stack current (or fuel conversion). For system reforming simplicity, a base case parameter set was defined as the fuel inlet of 60% CH 4:40% CO 2 mixed with air in a 1:1 ratio, together with 800 °C operating temperature and 80% fuel conversion. A model stack, consisting of 100 series elements of anode supported electrolyte cells of 100 cm 2 each, was calculated to deliver 3.1 kW el and 5.16 kW th from an input of 1.5 N m 3/h of biogas (8.95 kW LHV), corresponding to 33.8 and 57.6% electrical and thermal efficiencies (Lower Heating Values (LHVs)), respectively. The incidence on the efficiencies of the model system was examined by the variation of a number of parameters such as the CO 2 content in the biogas, the amount of air addition to the biogas stream, the addition of steam to the fuel inlet, the air excess ratio λ and the stack operating temperature, and the results discussed.

  14. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Large savings can be made in industry by cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed-cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum-based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules for determining performance and cost in individual plants and on a national level. It was found that: (1) atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed steam turbine systems were the most attractive of the direct coal-fired systems; and (2) open-cycle gas turbines with heat recovery steam generators and combined-cycles with NO(x) emission reduction and moderately increased firing temperatures were the most attractive of the coal-derived liquid-fired systems.

  15. Biogas as a fuel source for SOFC co-generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Membrez, Yves; Bucheli, Olivier

    This study reports on the combination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generators fueled with biogas as renewable energy source, recoverable from wastes but at present underexploited. From a mobilisable near-future potential in the European Union (EU-15) of 17 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe), under 15% appears to be converted today into useful heat and power (2 Mtoe). SOFCs could improve and promote the exploitation of biogas on manifold generation sites as small combined heat and power (5-50 kW el), especially for farm and sewage installations, raising the electrical conversion efficiency on such reduced and variable power level. Larger module packs of the high temperature ceramic converter would also be capable of operating on contaminated fuel of low heating value (less than 40% that of natural gas) which can emanate from landfill sites (MW-size). Landfill gas delivers 80% of current world biogas production. This document compiles and estimates biogas data on actual production and future potential and presents the thermodynamics of the biogas reforming and electrochemical conversion processes. A case study is reported of the energy balance of a small SOFC co-generator operated with agricultural biogas, the largest potential source.

  16. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  17. Development of micro-cogeneration system with porous catalyst microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ieda, N.; Ihara, T.

    2015-10-01

    A self-standing micro-cogeneration system was developed by coupling a microcombustor, thermoelectric (TE) modules, and an air supply device. The microcombustor has a porous monolithic Pt catalyst layer, and a combustion efficiency of 90% was achieved. A microblower is used to supply air to the combustor, and it is driven by electricity from the Bi-Te TE modules through a dc-dc converter. We investigated the optimal point where the output became maximal and the system was self-standing. At the optimal point, the input fuel enthalpy was 13.2 W, and 440 mW of electricity was generated from the TE modules. The microblower consumed 280 mW, and the net generated electricity was 160 mW. Therefore, the final thermal efficiency was 1.21%. The net thermal efficiency of the developed system was the same magnitude as that of TeeDee01 (COX Co. Ltd.), the world’s smallest model plane engine (0.163 cc), even though the magnitude of the output power was less than 1/20 in comparison.

  18. Development of Micro Cogeneration System with a Porous Catalyst Microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ieda, N.; Ihara, T.

    2014-11-01

    The self-standing micro cogeneration system by coupling a microcombustor, thermoelectric modules and an air supply device was developed. The microcombustor has a porous monolithic Pt catalyst layer and the combustion efficiency of 90% was attained. A micro-blower was used to supply air to the combustor, and it was driven by a part of the electricity from the Bi-Te TE modules through a DC-DC converter. We investigated the optimal point where the output became maximal and the system stood by itself. At the optimal point, the input fuel enthalpy was 13.2W and the electricity of 403mW was generated from the TE modules. The micro blower used 280mW and the net electricity was 123mW. Therefore the final thermal efficiency was 0.93%. The efficiency was the same magnitude of the world smallest model plane engine TeeDee01 (COX Co. Ltd.) although the thermal input was less than its 1/20.

  19. Cogeneration energy-recovery facility feasibility study: environmental rport

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    Analyses are given of the impacts on the broad environment that will result from the construction and operation of the Nashville Electric Service Cogeneration Energy Recovery facility (NES CERF). Analyses are presented for water, waste-water, air and solid waste environmental impacts, as well as safety, health and socioeconomic considerations. The environmental, safety, health and socioeconomic impacts of the project will be minimal particularly when the positive secondary energy and landfill impacts are considered. All legal and administrative demands resulting from the proposed construction have and will be met. The time frame required to obtain necessary environmental permits will not require an extension of the construction schedule set up for the project. Based on the analysis, the following recommendations can be made: owner should monitor the CERF environmental responses and output as necessary in order to keep all environmental, safety, health and socioeconomic impacts at satisfactory levels; owner management should remain abreast of legislative developments in the areas of water, air and solid waste, in order to anticipate any necessary changes in procedures and operations; and frameworks should be set up to insure and maintain employee safety and operational training at peak levels.

  20. Technical and economic analysis of steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.D.; Williams, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Industrial cogeneration is gaining popularity as an energy and money saving alternative to separate steam and electricity generation. Among cogeneration technologies, gas-turbine systems are attractive largely because of their lower capital cost and high thermodynamic efficiency. However, at industrial plants where steam and electricity loads vary daily, seasonally, or unpredictably, the economics of conventional gas turbines are often unfavorable due to low capacity utilization. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration overcomes the part-load problem by providing for excess steam to be injected back into the turbine to raise electrical output and generating efficiency. Under provisions of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, any excess electricity can be sold to the local grid at the prevailing avoided cost of electricity. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration can result in a consistently high rate of return on investment over a wide range of variation in process steam loads. Moreover, this technology can also give rise to greater annual electricity production and fuel savings per unit of process steam generated, compared to simple-cycle cogeneration, making the technology attractive form the perspective of society, as well as that of the user. Steam-injected gas-turbines may soon find applications in electric utility base-load generation. 39 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Feasibility study for retrofitting biogas cogeneration systems to district heating in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mo; Park, Hwa-Choon

    2015-08-01

    A feasibility study was performed to assess the technical and economic merits of retrofitting biogas-based cogeneration systems to district heating networks. Three district heating plants were selected as candidates for accommodating heat recovery from nearby waste treatment stations, where a massive amount of biogas can be produced on a regular basis. The scenario involves constructing cogeneration systems in each waste treatment station and producing electricity and heat. The amounts of biogas production for each station are estimated based on the monthly treatment capacities surveyed over the most recent years. Heat produced by the cogeneration system is first consumed on site by the waste treatment system to keep the operating temperature at a proper level. If surplus heat is available, it will be transported to the nearest district heating plant. The year-round operation of the cogeneration system was simulated to estimate the electricity and heat production. We considered cost associated with the installation of the cogeneration system and piping as initial investments. Profits from selling electricity and recovering heat are counted as income, while costs associated with buying biogas are expenses. Simple payback periods of 2-10 years were projected under the current economic conditions of South Korea. We found that most of the proposed scenarios can contribute to both energy savings and environmental protection. PMID:26159562

  2. Technical and economic analysis of steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Eric D.; Williams, Robert H.

    1985-11-01

    Industrial cogeneration is gaining popularity as an energy and money saving alternative to separate steam and electricity generation. Among cogeneration technologies, gas-turbine systems are attractive largely because of their lower capital cost and high thermodynamic efficiency. However, at industrial plants where steam and electricity loads vary daily, seasonally, or unpredictably, the economics of conventional gas turbines are often unfavorable due to low capacity utilization. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration overcomes the part-load problem by providing for excess steam to be injected back into the turbine to raise electrical output and generating efficiency. Under provisions of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act, any excess electricity can be sold to the local grid at the prevailing avoided cost of electricity. Steam-injected gas-turbine cogeneration can result in a consistently high rate of return on investment over a wide range of variation in process steam loads. Moreover, this technology can also give rise to greater annual electricity production and fuel savings per unit of process steam generated, compared to simple-cycle cogeneration, making the technology attractive from the perspective of society, as well as that of the user. Steam-injected gas-turbines may soon find applications in electric utility base-load generation, as well, since it appears that electrical generating efficiencies in excess of 50% can be obtained from turbines producing of the order of 100 MW of electricity at a fully-installed capital cost as low as 500/kW.

  3. Feasibility of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility, energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The thermal-economic feasibility was studied of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility designed to serve five varied industries. Generation options included one dual-fuel diesel and one gas turbine, both with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired-boiler cases, also low-sulphur coal and municipal refuse. The fired-boiler cogeneration systems employed back-pressure steam turbines. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The refuse-fired cases utilized modular incinerators. The options provided for a wide range of steam and electrical capacities. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which could be displaced was assumed sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulator Policies Act). The facility was assumed operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users. The economic analysis was predicted on currently applicable energy-investment tax credits and accelerated depreciation for a January 1985 startup date. Based on 100% equity financing, the results indicated that the best alternative was the modular-incinerator cogeneration system.

  4. Development of the first demonstration CFB boiler for gas and steam cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M; Luo, Z.; Li, X.; Wang, Q.; Shi, Z.; Ni, M.; Cen, K.

    1997-12-31

    To solve the shortage of gas and steam supply in the small towns of the country, a new gas steam cogeneration system has been developed. On the basis of the fundamental research on the system, a demonstration gas steam cogeneration system has been designed. As the phase 1 of the project, a 75t/h demonstration CFB boiler for gas steam cogeneration has been erected and operated at Yangzhong Thermal Power Plant of China. This paper introduces the first 75t/h demonstration CFB boiler for gas steam cogeneration. Due to the need of gas steam cogeneration process, the boiler has the features of high temperature cyclone separation, high solid recycle ratio, staged combustion and an external heat exchanger adjusting bed temperature and heat load. The operation results show that the boiler has wide fuel adaptability and the heating value of the coal changes from 14MJ/Kg to 25MJ/Kg. The heat load changes from 85t/h to 28t/h while steam parameter is maintained at the normal conditions. The combustion efficiency of the boiler attain 98%. The boiler design and operation experiences may be a guide to the design and operation of larger CFB units in the future.

  5. Efficiency Assessment of Support Mechanisms for Wood-Fired Cogeneration Development in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, Anna; Siirde, Andres

    2010-01-01

    There are various support mechanisms for wood-fired cogeneration plants, which include both support for cogeneration development and stimulation for increasing consumption of renewable energy sources. The efficiency of these mechanisms is analysed in the paper. Overview of cogeneration development in Estonia is given with the focus on wood-fired cogeneration. Legislation acts and amendments, related to cogeneration support schemes, were described. For evaluating the efficiency of support mechanisms an indicator - fuel cost factor was defined. This indicator includes the costs related to the chosen fuel influence on the final electricity generation costs without any support mechanisms. The wood fuel cost factors were compared with the fuel cost factors for peat and oil shale. For calculating the fuel cost factors, various data sources were used. The fuel prices data were based on the average cost of fuels in Estonia for the period from 2000 till 2008. The data about operating and maintenance costs, related to the fuel type in the case of comparing wood fuel and oil shale fuel were taken from the CHP Balti and Eesti reports. The data about operating and maintenance costs used for peat and wood fuel comparison were taken from the Tallinn Elektrijaam reports. As a result, the diagrams were built for comparing wood and its competitive fuels. The decision boundary lines were constructed on the diagram for the situation, when no support was provided for wood fuels and for the situations, when various support mechanisms were provided during the last 12 years.

  6. Definitional study for district heating and cogeneration prospects in Turkey. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The United States Trade and Development Program (US TDP) sponsored a definitional study to Turkey to assess the potential market for U.S. cogeneration and district heating (DH) technologies. The overall goal of the study was to carry out an assessment of the market for self-generation, DH, and cogeneration in Turkey and to develop initial perceptions about the role of the Turkish Government and industry, vis-a-vis the involvement of US and Turkish companies in the implementation of the above technologies. The opportunities for US firms to market cogeneration and DH technologies in Turkey are developing against a background of Government policies pertaining to foreign investments, energy demand and the role of the private sector. It is also developing within a private sector framework, which is dynamic, welcomes foreign technology and can secure Government support and participation in key projects.

  7. Energy and cost saving results for advanced technology systems from the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerman, G. D.; Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the organization and methodology of the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study is presented. The objectives of the study were to identify the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the future and to assess the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to those systems commercially available today. Advanced systems studied include steam turbines, open and closed cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines were also analyzed in versions typical of today's commercially available technology to provide a base against which to measure the advanced systems. Cogeneration applications in the major energy consuming manufacturing industries were considered. Results of the study in terms of plant level energy savings, annual energy cost savings and economic attractiveness are presented for the various energy conversion systems considered.

  8. Potential for cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.; Edelson, E.; Kashani, A. K.; Slonski, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The nontechnical issues of industrial cogeneration for 12 California firms were analyzed under three categories of institutional settings: (1) industrial ownership without firm sales of power; (2) industrial ownership with firm sales of power; and (3) utility or third party ownership. Institutional issues were analyzed from the independent viewpoints of the primary parties of interest: the industrial firms, the electric utilities and the California Public utilities Commission. Air quality regulations and the agencies responsible for their promulgation were examined, and a life cycle costing model was used to evaluate the economic merits of representative conceptual cogeneration systems at these sites. Specific recommendations were made for mitigating measures and regulatory action relevant to industrial cogeneration in California.

  9. Build your own cogeneration plant. [Santa Clara, Ca 5. 8-MW plant

    SciTech Connect

    Von Raesfeld, D.

    1981-11-01

    Santa Clara, California's new municipal cogeneration plant generates 5.8 MW of power for the utility and 38,000 pounds of steam per hour for a papermaking firm. A third gas-fired combustion turbine generator can be added to the original two to boost plant output. Santa Clara undertook the one-year construction project to increase its non-renewable fuel efficiency and save fuel costs. The city manager outlines Santa Clara's planning for the projects and the benefits the city will experience from its aggressive pursuit of cogeneration. 1 figure. (DCK)

  10. Shared-savings cogeneration to save firm $40K/yr

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, L.

    1984-04-09

    A $1 million 500 kW cogenerator, financed and operated by Cogenic Energy Systems Inc. on a shared-savings basis, will save a uniform rental company $40,000 a year by reducing annual energy costs by $200,000. Cogenic retains 80% of the savings for four years or when payback is achieved. Sizing of the cogeneration system is geared to the plant's electrical rather than its heating needs to eliminate buyback negotiations. Cogenic's system operates at 75-80% efficiency compared to the 30-35% efficiency of utilities.

  11. Utility reduces fuel cost with heat recovery, industrial byproduct fuel, cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    A 50-MW North Dakota power plant is refurbished to recover major waste-heat sources. Use of agricultural byproduct fuel and cogeneration also helps to cut future costs. The plant is saving on fuel costs by burning 150-200 tons/day of sunflower seed hulls from a local processing plant. The hulls are pulverized and mixed with the primary fuel, North Dakota lignite. At the same time, the processing plant that supplies the sunflower hulls buys steam from the power plant, thus giving the utility some of the economic benefits of cogeneration.

  12. Reserves for improving the utilization efficiency of regenerative extractions from turbines at cogeneration stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamaleev, M. M.; Sharapov, V. I.

    2008-04-01

    It is shown that considerable reserves for improving energy efficiency are available at the majority of Russian cogeneration stations, because the arrangements using which heat is supplied for the needs of water treatment plants are far from being optimal. New solutions are proposed that allow heat to be supplied to these loads in a more economically efficient manner with the use of low-potential regenerative extractions from cogeneration steam turbines, as well as technologies for improving the efficiency of combined-cycle plants the exhaust gases from which are discharged into a boiler.

  13. Cogeneration : A Regulatory Guide to Leasing, Permitting, and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Deshaye, Joyce; Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1992-12-01

    This guidebook focuses on cogeneration development. It is one of a series of four guidebooks recently prepared to introduce the energy developer to the federal, state and local agencies that regulate energy facilities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington (the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory). It was prepared specifically to help cogeneration developers obtain the permits, licenses and approvals necessary to construct and operate a cogeneration facility. The regulations, agencies and policies described herein are subject to change. Changes are likely to occur whenever energy or a project becomes a political issue, a state legislature meets, a preexisting popular or valuable land use is thought threatened, elected and appointed officials change, and new directions are imposed on states and local governments by the federal government. Accordingly, cogeneration developers should verify and continuously monitor the status of laws and rules that might affect their plans. Developers are cautioned that the regulations described herein may only be a starting point on the road to obtaining all the necessary permits.

  14. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  15. Thermodynamic analysis and optimization of fuel cell based Combined Cycle Cogeneration plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odukoya, Adedoyin

    Power plants operating in combined cycle cogeneration configuration are becoming increasingly popular because of high energy conversion efficiency and reduced pollutant and green-house gas emissions. On the other hand, fuel cell technology continues to be of global interest because it can operate with very low to 0% green-house gas emission depending on the fuel. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of co-firing of natural gas with synthetic gas generated from coal gasification on the thermodynamic performance of an air blown coal gasification Combined Cycle Cogeneration unit with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement. The effects of the operating temperature of the SOFC and the pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine on the net work output and efficiency of the power cycles on the cogeneration unit are simulated. Simulations are also conducted on the thermal and cogeneration efficiencies of the individual power cycle as well as the overall plants respectively. The optimal pressure ratio, temperature of operation of the SOFC and, gas turbine inlet temperature was determined using a sequential quadratic program solver base on the Quasi-Newton algorithm.

  16. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

  17. Influence of biomass cofiring on the optimal coefficient of the cogeneration share in a district heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Gładysz, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents a modified algorithm for choosing the optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems taking into account additional benefits concerning the promotion of highefficiency cogeneration and biomass cofiring. The optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration depends first of all on the share of the heat required for preparing the hot tap water. The final result of investigations is an empirical equation describing the influence of the ratio of the heat flux for the production of hot tap water to the maximum flux for space heating and ventilation, as well as the share of chemical energy of biomass in the fuel mixture on the optimal value of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems. The approach presented in the paper may be applied both in back-pressure combined heat and power (CHP) plants and in extraction-condensing CHP plants.

  18. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 2: Residual-fired nocogeneration process boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Computer generated data on the performance of the cogeneration energy conversion system are presented. Performance parameters included fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics, and emissions of residual fired process boilers.

  19. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analyses of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, use by utilities, and fuel cell cogeneration. The citations explore steam power station, gas turbine and steam turbine technology, district heating, refuse derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar energy conversion, waste heat and waste product recycling, and performance analysis. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-03-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  1. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  2. Development of advanced concepts for DIR-MCFC cogeneration applications in the European Market

    SciTech Connect

    Kortbeek, P.J.; Ottervanger, R.G.; Dicks, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Early 1996 a three year (1996 - 1998) joint European project was launched under the name {open_quote}Advanced DIR-MCFC Development{close_quote}, aiming at the development of Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) systems for cogeneration applications for the European market. In this project participate: Brandstofcel Nederland BV (BCN), British Gas pic (BG), Gaz de France (GDF), Netherlands Energy Research foundation (ECN), Stork, Royal Schelde and Sydkraft AB. The European Fuel Cell User Group (EFCUG) supports the project as an advisory board. Whereas the US and Japanese programmes are aimed at large-scale demonstrations of the MCFC technology, this project focusses on the development of concepts and technology, required for MCFC systems that will be competative on the cogeneration market. The project partners provide the essential expertise: from end-user, system engineering, stack development up to fundamental material research.

  3. Cogeneration feasibility study at the Paul Masson Vineyards Winery in Saratoga, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report evaluated the feasibility of installing a cogeneration system at the Paul Masson Vineyards Winery in Saratoga, California. The feasibility study explores the technical and economic features of a variety of cogeneration systems. The system recommended is a 290 kilowatt natural gas fired rich burning Otto cycle internal combustion engine-generator set. Waste heat recovery would produce an average of 1500 gallons per hour of 180F. process water and provide for a peak of 4500 gallons per hour for four hours per day. The system would produce 1,670,000 kilowatt-hours of electric energy per year, have a capital cost of $191,000, and have a payback period of 2.3 years. The project would save over 18 billion BTU's per year compared to separate generation of steam by Paul Masson and electricity by the utility. Atmospheric emissions can be sufficiently controlled by using a non-selective reduction catalytic converter.

  4. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Comparison and evaluation of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CTAS compared and evaluated various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications. The principal aim of the study was to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development (R&D) funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for a wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment (ROI) as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler.

  5. Electric co-generation units equipped with wood gasifier and Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.; Pelagalli, L.

    1998-07-01

    The disposal of industrial waste such as oil sludges, waste plastic, lubricant oils, paper and wood poses serious problems due to the ever increasing amount of material to be disposed of and to the difficulty in finding new dumping sites. The interest in energy recovery technologies is accordingly on the increase. In particular, large amounts of waste wood are simply burned or thrown away causing considerable environmental damage. In this context the co-generation technique represents one of the possible solutions for efficient energy conversion. The present paper proposes the employment of a Stirling engine as prime mover in a co-generation set equipped with a wood gasifier. A Stirling engine prototype previously developed in a joint project with Mase Generators, an Italian manufacturer of fixed and portable electrogenerators, is illustrated and its design is described.

  6. Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A.; McClean, G.

    1995-12-31

    Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

  7. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A solar heated heat transfer salt provides heat to a steam generation and provides space heating and air conditioning and hot water for the complex. The site and its climate are described briefly. Candidate site specific system configurations, technology assessments, system sizing, and the results of numerous trade studies leading toward the selection of the preferred system configuration are presented. A system level conceptual design of the cogeneration facility is presented, and the conceptual design of the subsystems (heliostats, receiver, tower, energy transport and storage, fossil energy subsystem, electric power generation subsystem, control, space conditioning and domestic hot water subsystem) are described. Results of the economic analysis of the cogeneration facility are presented, including a description of analysis methods used, assumptions and rationale, simulation models used, a brief summary of capital and operations and maintenance costs, fuel savings, results of the economic evaluations and an economic scenario for future applications.

  8. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Comparison and evaluation of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-08-01

    CTAS compared and evaluated various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications. The principal aim of the study was to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development (R&D) funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for a wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment (ROI) as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler.

  9. Design of the atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustor for cogeneration gas-turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.S.; Berman, P.A.; Gorrell, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The AFB Coal Combustor for Cogeneration Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has as its objective the development of the technology for a fluidized bed coal combustion system to provide a source of high-temperature air for power generation with gas turbines and for process heating in industrial plants. The program is directed toward systems in the size range of 5 to 50 MW(e) and is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its subcontractors. The major effort in the program is the design of a generic reference plant cogeneration system and the design and construction of a test system that will incorporate the salient features of the reference plant. The design work was initiated in June 1980.

  10. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

    1981-07-01

    The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

  11. Kakira Sugar Works (1985) Limited, Kakira biomass cogeneration: Volume 3 -- Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report, conducted by John H. Payne, Inc., was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study concerns the technical and financial feasibility of the Kakira Sugar Works Limited to increase its capacity to 5,000 TCD and to sell its surplus power to the Uganda Electricity Board. This is Volume 3, the Purchase Energy Contract between Kakira Cogeneration Company Limited and Uganda Electricity Board.

  12. Truck co-generation system based on combustion heated thermoelectric conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Meleta, Ye.A.; Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    Among the micro-co-generation systems using direct conversion of combustion heat into electricity (thermionic, thermoelectric converters) and fuel cells with an electric power of up to several kW, only the thermoelectric co-generation systems have a demonstrated life-time of up to 10 years. This is one of the most important factors making these systems a more likely commercialization candidate. The report deals with a conceptual design of a combustion heated thermoelectric cogeneration system to be applied in vehicles (truck, trailer, yacht, etc.). The authors named these systems the Thermoelectric Transport Co-generation Systems (TTCS). The report is concerned with one example of these systems--the Thermoelectric Truck Co-generation System (TT-kCS) designed to support the lives of both the driver and the car, when operating in the northern regions. In particular, the TT-kCS should provide the start-up of the cold engine of a truck at an ambient temperature of down to 50 C below zero and create comfortable conditions for a driver during the long-term halts and in emergency situations. The estimates made for a standard truck with an engine of 210 HP employed in Russia showed that the TT-kCS should generate {approximately}600 W of electrical power and {approximately}18 kW of heat. The report deals with two options for the thermoelectric converter design: one of them using the planar geometry of thermoelectric batteries, and the other one using a radial-cylindrical thermoelectric battery configuration. The economic feasibility of the TT-kCS application is based on a considerable reduction in fuel consumption of the TT-kCS equipped truck as compared to that of a conventional truck when the engine is idling. Another advantage is the prolongation of the engine`s service life.

  13. An assessment of the industrial cogeneration market for parabolic dish systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The value analysis technique used is straightforward. Maximum allowable life-cycle system cost for the cogeneration system is determined as the sum of the present value of fuels displaced plus the present value of revenues from exported power. Each conventional fuel displaced is described by a unit cost in the first year, a uniform annual consumption rate, and a uniform annual escalation rate for unit cost. Exported energy flows are treated the same as displaced energy.

  14. Combined biomass and black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration at pulp and paper mills

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E.D.; Kreutz, T.G.; Consonni, S.

    1999-07-01

    Kraft pulp and paper mills generate large quantities of black liquor and byproduct biomass suitable for gasification. These fuels are used today for onsite cogeneration of heat and power in boiler/steam turbine systems. Gasification technologies under development would enable these fuels to be used in gas turbines. This paper reports results of detailed full-load performance modeling of pulp-mill cogeneration systems based on gasifier/gas turbine technologies. Pressurized, oxygen-blown black liquor gasification, the most advanced of proposed commercial black liquor gasifier designs, is considered, together with three alternative biomass gasifier designs under commercial development (high-pressure air-blown, low-pressure air-blown, and low-pressure indirectly-heated). Heavy-duty industrial gas turbines of the 70-MW{sub e} and 25-MW {sub e} class are included in the analysis. Results indicate that gasification-based cogeneration with biomass-derived fuels would transform a typical pulp mill into significant power exporter and would also offer possibilities for net reductions in emissions of carbon dioxide relative to present practice.

  15. Partners assume risks, lower finance costs of delayed coker-cogeneration project in Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Alveal, E.D.; Karpenski, M.J.

    1997-03-31

    Foster Wheeler Power Systems Inc., and its partners--Petrox SA Refineria de Petroleo and Empresa Nacional de Petroleo (ENAP), the Chilean national oil company--closed on the financing of Petropower Energia Limitada, a $237 million financed combination delayed coker-cogeneration facility. The facility is now under construction adjacent to Petrox`s 84,000 b/d Talcahuano refinery, near Concepcion. In addition to the low interest rate of 7.36%--only 170 basis points over the 10 year US Treasury yield--the project was rated investment-grade by Standard and Poor`s. The Petropower project also has the distinction of having the longest term--18 years--for any project financing in Latin America. The project is unique in other ways: it is the Republic of Chile`s first public/private partnership and also the first project to combine petroleum coking technology with cogeneration technology in a single project financing. The paper discusses risk assumption, the Petropower project, organization, delayed coker facility, hydrotreater unit, cogeneration facility, environmental assessment, Chile`s changing market, and project benefit.

  16. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS) Volume 5: Analytical approach and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information in the area of advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the 1985 to 2000 time period are provided. Six current and thirty-six advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance of plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a framework for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. Various cogeneration strategies were analyzed and both topping and bottoming (using industrial by-product heat) applications were included. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Typically fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on site furnaces and utility electricity. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual cost savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on site gasification systems.

  17. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume 1. Technical report. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A central receiver cogeneration facility is studied for a Texas military facility. A solar-heated heat-transfer salt provides heat to a steam generator and providing space heating and air conditioning and hot water for the complex. The site and its climate are described briefly. Candidate site-specific system configurations, technology assessments, system sizing, and the results of numerous trade studies leading toward the selection of the preferred system configuration are presented. A system level conceptual design of the cogeneration facility is presented, and the conceptual design of the major subsystems (heliostats, receiver, tower, energy transport and storage, fossil energy subsystem, electric power generation subsystem, control, space conditioning and domestic hot water subsystem) are described. Results of the economic analysis of the cogeneration facility are presented, including a description of analysis methods used, assumptions and rationale, simulation models used, a brief summary of capital and operations and maintenance costs, fuel savings, results of the economic evaluations and an economic scenario for future applications. The results of the development planning are presented, including all major activities required during the detailed design, construction, and initial operational phases. An assessment of the proposed facility by the Department of the Army at Fort Hood is presented. (LEW)

  18. Energy and cost savings results for advanced technology systems from the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study /CTAS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerman, G. D.; Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS), a program undertaken to identify the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the 1985-2000 time period, is described, and preliminary results are presented. Two cogeneration options are included in the analysis: a topping application, in which fuel is input to the energy conversion system which generates electricity and waste heat from the conversion system is used to provide heat to the process, and a bottoming application, in which fuel is burned to provide high temperature process heat and waste heat from the process is used as thermal input to the energy conversion system which generates energy. Steam turbines, open and closed cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics are examined. Expected plant level energy savings, annual energy cost savings, and other results of the economic analysis are given, and the sensitivity of these results to the assumptions concerning fuel prices, price of purchased electricity and the potential effects of regional energy use characteristics is discussed.

  19. Acidogenic fermentation of food waste for volatile fatty acid production with co-generation of biohydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shikha; Sarkar, Omprakash; Swamy, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-04-01

    Fermentation experiments were designed to elucidate the functional role of the redox microenvironment on volatile fatty acid (VFA, short chain carboxylic acid) production and co-generation of biohydrogen (H2). Higher VFA productivity was observed at pH 10 operation (6.3g/l) followed by pH 9, pH 6, pH 5, pH 7, pH 8 and pH 11 (3.5 g/l). High degree of acidification, good system buffering capacity along with co-generation of higher H2 production from food waste was also noticed at alkaline condition. Experiments illustrated the role of initial pH on carboxylic acids synthesis. Alkaline redox conditions assist solubilization of carbohydrates, protein and fats and also suppress the growth of methanogens. Among the carboxylic acids, acetate fraction was higher at alkaline condition than corresponding neutral or acidic operations. Integrated process of VFA production from waste with co-generation of H2 can be considered as a green and sustainable platform for value-addition. PMID:25682230

  20. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration at the Anheuser-Busch Los Angeles brewery

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, R.M.; Corea, V.A.; Sorensen, J.C.; Duncan, J.M.; Rudawitz, L.; Verdes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The results of a feasibility study undertaken in support of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) goal to develop fuel cell power plants for industrial cogeneration are described. Use of a single 4.5 MW fuel cell power plant like that manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and currently being constructed on the Consolidated Edison of New York System was examined. The technical feasibility of using such a plant in a cogeneration mode at the Anheuser-Busch, Los Angeles brewery was affirmed by the study. Break-even capital costs for UTC supplied equipment were calculated for various conditions. Based upon the assumption that UTC supplied equipment could be provided for the $350 to $400/kW projected for first generation fuel cells, the economic feasibility of fuel cell cogeneration was demonstrated for nearly all assumed conditions. The most economical case was found to be a municipal utility owned, base loaded power plant where economic credit is taken for reduced environmental emissions. Acceptable fuels were evaluated for their availability, and the fuels identified for use were natural gas with propane as a backup. Phosphoric acid is the selected electrolyte. The Demonstration Program Plan is described. (WHK)

  1. Des ballons pour demain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régipa, R.

    A partir d'une théorie sur la détermination des formes et des contraintes globales d'un ballon de révolution, ou s'en rapprochant, une nouvelle famille de ballons a été définie. Les ballons actuels, dits de ``forme naturelle'', sont calculés en général pour une tension circonférencielle nulle. Ainsi, pour une mission donnée, la tension longitudinale et la forme de l'enveloppe sont strictement imposées. Les ballons de la nouvelle génération sont globalement cylindriques et leurs pôles sont réunis par un câble axial, chargé de transmettre une partie des efforts depuis le crochet (pôle inférieur), directement au pôle supérieur. De plus, la zone latérale cylindrique est soumise à un faible champ de tensions circonférencielles. Ainsi, deux paramètres permettent de faire évoluer la distribution des tensions et la forme de l'enveloppe: - la tension du câble de liaison entre pôles (ou la longueur de ce câble) - la tension circonférencielle moyenne désirée (ou le rayon du ballon). On peut donc calculer et réaliser: - soit des ballons de forme adaptée, comme les ballons à fond plat pour le bon fonctionnement des montgolfières infrarouge (projet MIR); - soit des ballons optimisés pour une bonne répartition des contraintes et une meilleure utilisation des matériaux d'enveloppe, pour l'ensemble des programmes stratosphériques. Il s'ensuit une économie sensible des coûts de fabrication, une fiabilité accrue du fonctionnement de ces ballons et une rendement opérationnel bien supérieur, permettant entre autres, d'envisager des vols à très haute altitude en matériaux très légers.

  2. Amputation des quatre membres

    PubMed Central

    Feruzi, Maruis Kitembo; Milindi, Cédrick Sangwa; Zabibu, Mireille Kakinga; Mulefu, Jules Panda; Katombe, Francois Tshilombo

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs présentent les cas d'amputation des quatre membres réalisée chez trois patients différents. Ce sont des amputations réalisées pour chaque patient au cours d'une seule hospitalisation et en un seul temps opératoire. Deux patients pour gangrène sèche infectée et un pour amputation traumatique des quatre membres. L'amputation d'urgence a été pratiquée en premier temps suivie de remodelage des moignons d'amputation en second temps. L’évolution de tous les patients a été bonne. PMID:25469177

  3. Thermodynamic evaluation of the possibility to increase cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a heat pump operating with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Datsenko, V. V.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    Cogeneration turbines operate in different operation modes that considerably differ as to the working process conditions. In summer time, when heat demand is minimal, almost all steam flow passes through all turbine stages and enters into the condenser (condensing mode of operation). When heat supply is needed, the steam bleed-offs are used. The several last stages of the turbine (low-pressure part—LPP) have a control diaphragm at the inlet. When the heat supply is large, the diaphragm is maximally closed, and the entire steam flow, with an exception for a minimal ventilation flow is delivered to the steam bleed-offs (cogeneration mode). LPP flow path is designed for the optimal operation in the condensing mode. While running in cogeneration mode, the LPP operating conditions are far from optimal. Depending on the ventilation steam flow rate and outlet pressure, the LPP power can drop to zero or even become negative (ventilation mode). It is proposed to control an outlet steam pressure by using the heat pump that operates with steam. The heat pump energy consumption can be compensated and even exceeded by optimizing the steam expansion process in LPP. In this respect, operating conditions of cogeneration turbine LPPs during the cold season are analyzed. A brief description of a heat pump operating with steam is made. The possibility of increasing cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a steam heat pump is shown.

  4. Development of small gas-turbine-based steam cogeneration system. Phase 1. Final report, July 1987-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing cost of electricity, the availability of low-cost natural gas and the promotion of cogeneration by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has increased the attractiveness of cogeneration as an alternate energy source. A study of the commercial/military/industrial segments indicates a viable market for the proposed system in hotels/motels, hospitals, nursing homes, shopping centers, district-heating plants, military bases, and light manufacturing. Design analysis indicates that a packaged cogeneration system utilizing the Teledyne Continental Motors TP500 gas-turbine engine, developed as a low-cost aircraft engine, when modified to include an industrial gearbox, exhaust recuperator with variable bypass and single can combustor with dual fuel capability can compete favorably in cost, durability and fuel consumption with current converted diesel engine powered systems with the advantage of producing 100 psig steam at variable rates.

  5. Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commerical Buildings across the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the technical potential for micro-cogeneration in small commercial buildings throughout the United States. The cogeneration devices are simulated with the computer program EnergyPlus using models developed by Annex 42, a working group of the International Energy Agency's Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Community Systems (IEA/ECBCS). Although the Annex 42 models were developed for residential applications, this study applies them to small commercial buildings, assumed to have a total floor area of 500 m2 or less. The potential for micro-cogeneration is examined for the entire existing stock of small U.S. commercial buildings using a bottom-up method based on 1,236 EnergyPlus models.

  6. Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Vasenda, S.K.; Hassler, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.

  7. The Design and Commissioning of a Micro-cogeneration Testing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Evan

    The simultaneous production of heat and electricity onsite to serve residential loads can potentially yield a reduction in operating costs, primary energy use and related emissions over traditional technologies which meet these loads separately. Proper sizing and operation of units along with their required buffering and auxiliary systems are critical to the realization of both economical and environmental performance objectives. Further research is required to develop strategies to integrate micro-cogeneration technologies into Canadian residences as issues related to device type, capacity, design of balance of plant components, and controls remain largely unresolved. Building performance simulation is a highly flexible, and time-efficient method to systematically explore and evaluate different design options; however, the validity of the conclusions resulting from simulation based studies are dependent on the accuracy and reliability of the models employed. In order to support ongoing research relating to micro-cogeneration technologies through simulation based activities, a facility capable of subjecting units to controlled electrical and thermal loading was designed and commissioned to collect performance data suitable for device-specific model calibration. The facility can also be configured to provide realistic thermal and electrical loading to complete micro-cogeneration systems including thermal storage and auxiliary heating to evaluate the performance of complete systems. It provides a platform to experimentally investigate appropriate configurations to integrate units into residences through variations in the balance of plant components and control strategies. This thesis describes the design of the facility including its hardware, instrumentation, data acquisition and controls systems. Also described are experiments that were conducted during the commissioning phase to assess system level performance, to identify and correct hardware integration issues

  8. High-power microwave production by gyroharmonic conversion and co-generation

    SciTech Connect

    LaPointe, M.A.; Yoder, R.B.; Wang, M.; Ganguly, A.K.; Wang, C.; Hafizi, B.; Hirshfield, J.L.

    1997-03-01

    An rf accelerator that adds significant gyration energy to a relativistic electron beam, and mechanisms for extracting coherent radiation from the beam, are described. The accelerator is a cyclotron autoresonance accelerator (CARA), underlying theory and experimental tests of which are reviewed. The measurements illustrate the utility of CARA in preparing beams for high harmonic gyro interactions. Examples of preparation of gyrating axis-encircling beams of {approximately}400kV, 25 A with 1{lt}a{lt}2 using a 2.856 GHz CARA are discussed. Generation of MW-level harmonic power emanating from a beam prepared in CARA into an output cavity structure is predicted by theory. First measurements of intense superradiant 2nd through 6th harmonic emission from a CARA beam are described. Gyroharmonic conversion (GHC) at MW power levels into an appropriate resonator can be anticipated, in view of the results described here. Another radiation mechanism, closely related to GHC, is also described. This mechanism, dubbed {open_quotes}co-generation,{close_quotes} is based on the fact that the lowest TE{sub sm} mode in a cylindrical waveguide at frequency sw with group velocity nearly identical to group velocity for the TE{sub 11} mode at frequency w is that with s=7, m=2. This allows coherent radiation to be generated at the 7th harmonic co-existent with CARA and in the self-same rf structure. Conditions are found where co-generation of 7th harmonic power at 20 GHz is possible with overall efficiency greater than 80{percent}. It is shown that operation of a cw co-generator can take place without need of a power supply for the gun. Efficiency for a multi-MW 20 GHz co-generator is predicted to be high enough to compete with other sources, even after taking into account the finite efficiency of the rf driver required for CARA. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Advanced cogeneration and absorption chillers potential for service to Navy bases. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.W.; McDonald, R.J.; Pierce, B.L.

    1996-04-01

    The US military uses millions of Btu`s of thermal energy to heat, cool and deliver process thermal energy to buildings on military bases, much of which is transmitted through a pipeline system incorporating thousands of miles of pipe. Much of this pipeline system is in disrepair and is nearing the end of its useful life, and the boilers which supply it are old and often inefficient. In 1993, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposed to SERDP a three-year effort to develop advanced systems of coupled diesel cogenerators and absorption chillers which would be particularly useful in providing a continuation of the services now provided by increasingly antiquated district systems. In mid-February, 1995, BNL learned that all subsequent funding for our program had been canceled. BNL staff continued to develop the Program Plan and to adhere to the requirements of the Execution Plan, but began to look for ways in which the work could be made relevant to Navy and DoD energy needs even without the extensive development plan formerly envisioned. The entire program was therefore re-oriented to look for ways in which small scale cogeneration and absorption chilling technologies, available through procurement rather than development, could provide some solutions to the problem of deteriorated district heating systems. The result is, we believe, a striking new approach to the provision of building services on military bases: in many cases, serious study should be made of the possibility that the old district heating system should be removed or abandoned, and small-scale cogenerators and absorption chillers should be installed in each building. In the remainder of this Summary, we develop the rationale behind this concept and summarize our findings concerning the conditions under which this course of action would be advisable and the economic benefits which will accrue if it is followed. The details are developed in the succeeding sections of the report.

  10. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-01

    At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

  11. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

  12. Borax spends $30M for cogeneration system. [US Borax and Chemical Corp

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1982-09-20

    A $30 million natural-gas-fired turbine power plant will provide all the electricity and steam needed at the US Borax and Chemical Corp. plant in Los Angeles. The cogeneration facility will come on line in 1984, and will pay for itself in about five years. The plant will use only half the 46 megawatts produced, the 22 megawatt surplus being sold to Southern California Edison Co. on a 20-year contract at a price pegged to the utility's avoided costs. Natural gas consumption at the plant will remain about the same. (DCK)

  13. Final environmental impact statement, Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon - appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Portland General Electric Company (PGE) has submitted an Application for Site Certification (ASC) to the Oregon Department of Energy for development of the Coyote Springs cogeneration power plant in the Port of Morrow, Oregon. This document includes the appendixes for the Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix topics include the following: A-Wildlife and vegetation surveys; B-EMF Supplement; C-Biological Assessment; D-Oregon DOE proposed order, in the matter of the Application for Site Certificate of Portland General Electric Company; E-Ecological Monitoring Program; F-Air contaminant Discharge permit; G-National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Storm Water Discharge Permit; H-Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan.

  14. 250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.

  15. Cogeneration and beyond: The need and opportunity for high efficiency, renewable community energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, T.C.J.

    1992-06-01

    The justification, strategies, and technology options for implementing advanced district heating and cooling systems in the United States are presented. The need for such systems is discussed in terms of global warming, ozone depletion, and the need for a sustainable energy policy. Strategies for implementation are presented in the context of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act and proposed new institutional arrangements. Technology opportunities are highlighted in the areas of advanced block-scale cogeneration, CFC-free chiller technologies, and renewable sources of heating and cooling that are particularly applicable to district systems.

  16. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-01

    At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

  17. Des Vents et des Jets Astrophysiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, C.

    well expected result from the theory. Although, collimation may be conical, paraboloidal or cylindrical (Part 4), cylindrical collimation is the more likely to occur. The shape of outflows may then be used as a tool to predict physical conditions on the flows or on their source. L'éjection continue de plasma autour d'objets massifs est un phénomène largement répandu en astrophysique, que ce soit sous la forme du vent solaire, de vents stellaires, de jets d'étoiles en formation, de jets stellaires autour d'objets compacts ou de jets extra-galactiques. Cette zoologie diversifiée fait pourtant l'objet d'un commun effort de modélisation. Le but de cette revue est d'abord de présenter qualitativement le développement, depuis leur origine, des diverses théories de vents (Partie 1) et l'inter disciplinarité dans ce domaine. Il s'agit d'une énumération, plus ou moins exhaustive, des idées proposées pour expliquer l'accélération et la morphologie des vents et des jets, accompagnée d'une présentation sommaire des aspects observationnels. Cette partie s'abstient de tout aspect faisant appel au formalisme mathématique. Ces écoulements peuvent être décrits, au moins partiellement, en résolvant les équations magnétohydrodynamiques, axisymétriques et stationnaires. Ce formalisme, à la base de la plupart des théories, est exposé dans la Partie 2. Il permet d'introduire quantitativement les intégrales premières qu'un tel système possède. Ces dernières sont amenées à jouer un rôle important dans la compréhension des phénomènes d'accélération ou de collimation, en particulier le taux de perte de masse, le taux de perte de moment angulaire ou l'énergie du rotateur magnétique. La difficulté de modélisation réside dans l'existence de points critiques, propres aux équations non linéaires, qu'il faut franchir. La nature physique et la localisation de ces points critiques fait l'objet d'un débat important car ils sont la clef de voute de la r

  18. Electrochemical gas-electricity cogeneration through direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yongmin; Cai, Weizi; Xiao, Jie; Tang, Yubao; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Meilin

    2015-03-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), with yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as electrolyte, composite of strontium-doped lanthanum manganate (LSM) and YSZ as cathode, and cermet of silver and gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) as anode, are prepared and tested with 5wt% Fe-loaded activated carbon as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. It is found that electricity and CO gas can be cogenerated in the direct carbon SOFCs through the electrochemical oxidation of CO and the Boudouard reaction. The gas-electricity cogeneration performances are investigated by taking the operating time of the DC-SOFCs as a measure of rate decrease of the Boudouard reaction. Three single cells and a two-cell-stack are tested and characterized in terms of electrical power output, CO production rate, electrical conversion efficiency, and overall conversion efficiency. It turns out that a rapid rate of the Boudouard reaction is necessary for getting high electrical power and CO production. Taking the emitted CO as part of the power output, an overall efficiency of 76.5% for the single cell, and of 72.5% for the stack, is obtained.

  19. Renewable Fuel Utilization in a Cogeneration Arrangement with Hydrate Storage Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naing, Soe; Yamada, Takanobu; Nakanishi, Kimio

    According to the third conference of parties (COP3), Japan has set a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 6% by the year 2010. Many believe that the bulk utilization of fossil fuel influences to the damaging environmental effect. The objective of this paper is to propose an effective method for this goad which is possible to clarify a noticeable utilization of renewable fuel in a micro gas turbine cogeneration system in cold region. Moreover, analysis of renewable fuel, biogas production indicates that production amount becomes largest in hot season, while the total heat energy demand is lowest on during three years. Biogas storage is also adapted for the delay between peak energy supply and demand. Biogas hydrate formation is examined by resource from laboratory experiments and simulation of integration into an existing cogeneration arrangement. The proposed system can be successfully supported the use and reuse of renewable fuel for providing to substantial emission and clean development mechanism for reducing greenhouse gas emission.

  20. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Young-Deuk; Choon, Ng Kim

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  1. JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-11-01

    Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

  2. Performance and economic enhancement of cogeneration gas turbines through compressor inlet air cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delucia, M.; Bronconi, R.; Carnevale, E.

    1994-04-01

    Gas turbine air cooling systems serve to raise performance to peak power levels during the hot months when high atmospheric temperatures cause reductions in net power output. This work describes the technical and economic advantages of providing a compressor inlet air cooling system to increase the gas turbine's power rating and reduce its heat rate. The pros and cons of state-of-the-art cooling technologies, i.e., absorption and compression refrigeration, with and without thermal energy storage, were examined in order to select the most suitable cooling solution. Heavy-duty gas turbine cogeneration systems with and without absorption units were modeled, as well as various industrial sectors, i.e., paper and pulp, pharmaceuticals, food processing, textiles, tanning, and building materials. The ambient temperature variations were modeled so the effects of climate could be accounted for in the simulation. The results validated the advantages of gas turbine cogeneration with absorption air cooling as compared to other systems without air cooling.

  3. The integrated approach to a gas turbine topping cycle cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, H.; Tabb, E.

    1984-06-01

    Under Gas Research Institute (GRI) sponsorship, a new gas turbine cogeneration system was developed by Mechanical Technology, Inc., (MTI) for installation at a General Motors plant in early 1985. Specific emphasis was placed on system integration. A single, prime-reliable drive train and a single control center replace a wide assortment of nonintegrated, free-standing power drives and control centers. On-line availability, installation costs, and overall user acceptance are improved. The cogeneration set produces 3 MW /SUB e/ and 8,860 kg/hr (19,500 lb/hr) of 1825 kPa (250 psig) saturated steam using an Allison 501-KH gas turbine and a natural circulation waste heat boiler. The system is designed for multifuel operation using either natural gas or distillate oil. A steam injection feature is employed to increase output to 4 MW /SUB e/ when process steam demand diminishes. The system is prepackaged, skid mounted, and delivered in four modules: one each for the machinery, duct burner, waste heat boiler, and controls.

  4. 18 CFR 381.505 - Certification of qualifying status as a small power production facility or cogeneration facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at... qualifying status as a small power production facility or cogeneration facility. 381.505 Section 381.505 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  5. 18 CFR 381.505 - Certification of qualifying status as a small power production facility or cogeneration facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and on... qualifying status as a small power production facility or cogeneration facility. 381.505 Section 381.505 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  6. Development of a system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of a cogeneration steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Novoselov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Generalized results from the work on developing elements of a comprehensive system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of cogeneration turbines are presented. The parameters of the electrohydraulic turbine control system are considered together with a number of problems concerned with assessing the state of condensers and delivery water heaters.

  7. Analysis of an industrial cogeneration unit driven by a gas engine. Part 1: Experimental testing under full and part-load operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    De Lucia, M.; Lanfranchi, C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes and analyzes an industrial cogeneration plant driven by a gas fueled reciprocating engine installed in a textile factory. It presents the results of experimental testing conducted under full and part-load operating conditions, as well as first-law energy considerations. The experimental tests conducted on the cogeneration unit proved the validity of the plant design and also enabled evaluation of part-load performance, which is the most common operating mode in cogeneration plants in the small-size industries which typical of central Italy.

  8. Economic effectiveness of using super-high values of initial steam parameters in cogeneration power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Zakharenkov, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper reports the results of numerical investigations into both thermodynamic and economic components of the effect of an increase in the initial steam parameters to super-high values for cogeneration power units. As an initial variant, the heat flow diagram of the turbine plant equipped with the T-250/300-23.5 TMZ steam turbine was adopted. In the course of investigations, the ranges of initial steam pressure p 0 = 23.5-30.0 MPa, steam temperature t 0 = 540-600°C, and steam pressure after single reheat p rh = 3.6-4.5 MPa were considered. In the calculations of the thermodynamic efficiency, the extent of the effect of an increase in steam parameters on the out and the electric efficiency of a power unit when a cogeneration steam turbine operates in condensing and heat-extraction modes were estimated. In the economic part of the calculations, indicators of the commercial efficiency of investments into appropriate projects and the levels of total investment and production costs were determined. The results of the calculations made it possible to estimate the optimum level of super-high values of the initial steam parameters for a cogeneration power unit equipped with the T-280/335-26.1 steam turbine. The best indicators of the commercial efficiency were achieved for the variant with the following parameters of live steam and steam in the reheater: p 0 = 26.1 MPa, p rh = 4.035 MPa, t 0/ t rh = 575/575°C. In this case, the following values were obtained: 42.56% gross efficiency, 40.94% net efficiency, 334 MW rated capacity in the condensing operation mode, and 279.1 MW in the heat-extraction mode at Q T = 1381.6 GJ/h (330 Gcal/h). The use of higher steam parameters would result in a significant increase in the cost of projects. It has been shown that the restoration of initial design values of both live steam temperature and its temperature after reheat t 0/ t rh = 565/560°C may be advisable at the upgrading of power units equipped with T-250

  9. Microturbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, R.J.; Snoek, C.W.

    2000-07-01

    A Canadian government research agency has developed a heat recovery system, in partnership with a commercial firm, for use with microturbines. These small recuperated gas turbines are becoming commercially available and offer potential as the basis for small-scale combined heat and power (CHP) systems. The agency has developed a series of microturbine field trial projects with several Canadian gas and electric utilities. This paper reports results from the heat recovery prototype testing together with a description of the planned field trial program and the heat recovery system design.

  10. The MS6001FA gas turbine in mid-size combined cycle and cogeneration applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegger, W.A.; Anderson, R.O.

    1994-12-31

    The MS6001FA gas turbine is the latest addition to the F-technology family of gas turbines. The design is based on an aerodynamic scaling of the proven MS7001FA and MS9001FA products and is available in both 50 and 60 Hz configurations. As a result of its higher F-technology firing temperature, the 6FA is ideally suited for combined cycle and other heat recovery applications where its performance represents a significant improvement over previously available mid-size gas turbines. This paper describes the basic design of the MS6001FA, including its auxiliary systems. The gas turbine`s performance in simple cycle, combined cycle, repowering, and cogeneration applications is also reviewed.

  11. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Sherrell R; Flanagan, George F; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2009-03-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  12. Kakira Sugar Works (1985) Limited, Kakira biomass cogeneration: Volume 2 -- Final report, attachments. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report, conducted by John H. Payne, Inc., was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study concerns the technical and financial feasibility of the Kakira Sugar Works Limited to increase its capacity to 5,000 TCD and to sell its surplus power to the Uganda Electricity Board. This is Volume 2, the Attachments, and it includes the following: (1) Layout Drawings; (2) Factory Steam Balance; (3) Evaporator and Juice Heater Arrangements; (4) Historical Production Data and Assumptions for Study; (5) Model Production Schedule; (6) Weather Data; (7) Solids Balance and Steam/Vapor Requirements for Pan Floor Boiling; (8) Boiler Efficiency and Steam Production; (9) Turbo Machinery Water Rate Calculations; (10) List of US Equipment Suppliers; (11) Capital Cost Estimate-Cogeneration; and (12) Capital Cost Estimate -- Mill Expansion.

  13. CSP cogeneration of electricity and desalinated water at the Pentakomo field facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolas, C. N.; Bonanos, A. M.; Georgiou, M. C.; Guillen, E.; Jarraud, N.; Marakkos, C.; Montenon, A.; Stiliaris, E.; Tsioli, E.; Tzamtzis, G.; Votyakov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    The Cyprus Institute's Pentakomo Field Facility (PFF) is a major infrastructure for research, development and testing of technologies relating to concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar seawater desalination. It is located at the south coast of Cyprus near the sea and its environmental conditions are fully monitored. It provides a test facility specializing in the development of CSP systems suitable for island and coastal environments with particular emphasis on small units (<25 MWth) endowed with substantial storage, suitable for use in isolation or distributed in small power grids. The first major experiment to take place at the PFF concerns the development of a pilot/experimental facility for the co-generation of electricity and desalinated seawater from CSP. Specifically, the experimental plant consists of a heliostat-central receiver system for solar harvesting, thermal energy storage in molten salts followed by a Rankine cycle for electricity production and a multiple-effect distillation (MED) unit for desalination.

  14. Numerical Analysis on Air Ingress Behavior in GTHTR300-Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Tetsuaki; Yan, Xing; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    The objective of this study is to clarify safety characteristics of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) for the pipe rupture accident. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing the analytical code for the safety characteristics of the HTGR and carrying out design study of the gas turbine high temperature reactor of 300MWe nominal-capacity for hydrogen production, the GTHTR300C (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 for Cogeneration). A numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer fluid flow with multi-component gas mixture has been performed to obtain the variation of the density of the gas mixture, and the onset time of natural circulation of air. From the results obtained in this analysis, it was found that the duration time of the air ingress by molecular diffusion would increase due to the existence of the recuperator in the GTHTR300C system.

  15. An overview of the value of parabolic dish solar thermal systems in industrial cogeneration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The essential elements of the cogeneration system configuration to be captured were the displacement of thermal energy by collection and use of the Brayton exhaust stream, and the sale back to the utility of any electricity production in excess of on-site requirements. In contrast to simply dumping these energy flows, their use or sale obviously serves, by itself, to increase gross value of the solar thermal energy system. Net allowable cost of the parabolic dish modules may or may not be increased, however. A consideration is that the waste heat capture and delivery subsystems are not free. This study does not address the incremental cost of adding waste heat capture, transport, and conversion (to steam, if necessary). It does compute a value for the thermal energy thereby displaced. This value can serve as a first-round input to any detailed economic evaluation of waste heat recovery.

  16. Considerations for ground fault protection in medium-voltage industrial and cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.J.; Hashemi, N.

    1988-07-01

    Industrial plants utilize medium-voltage systems for in-plant distribution of purchased and cogenerated electrical energy. During the planning stage, system protection is generally specified, including the type of source neutral grounding and ground fault protection. Where medium-voltage systems have expanded, circuit-breaker interrupting ratings have also been increased. Accordingly, grounding consideration should be reviewed, particularly because charging and/or ground fault current values have also increased. The typical methods for grounding of medium-voltage neutral systems - high resistance, low resistance, and ungrounded, as well as methods used to detect the presence of a ground fault - are reviewed. Also, the effects of charging current and how the ground fault protection method could affect conductor ratings are analyzed.

  17. 1170 MW/sub t/ HTGR steamer cogeneration plant: design and cost study

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    A conceptual design and cost study is presented for intermediate size high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) for industrial energy applications performed by United Engineers and Constructors Inc., (UE and C) and The General Atomic Company (GAC). The study is part of a program at ORNL and has the objective to provide support in the evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of a single unit 1170 MW/sub t/ HTGR steam cycle cogeneration plant (referred to as the Steamer plant) for the production of industrial process energy. Inherent in the achievement of this objective, it was essential to perform a number of basic tasks such as the development of plant concept, capital cost estimate, project schedule and annual operation and maintenance (O and M) cost.

  18. Cogeneration system using digester gas for Macon-Bibb county water and sewerage authority

    SciTech Connect

    Priester, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    With rise in energy cost, there is renewed focus on alternate energy sources, and especially sources that previously were not feasible to utilize, but were readily available. One of these is methane gas generated in biomass conversion in wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digestion process. The gas generated has been historically wasted and only used where it has been convenient. Now it is economically feasible to engineer systems to make the best use of the gas. The combination of cogeneration and digester gas utilization is particularly attractive for medium to large wastewater treatment plants. This paper describes the system designed for the Poplar Street Water Pollution Control Plant of the Macon-Bibb County Water and Sewerage Authority. The system consists of gas collection, cleaning and drying systems, storage vessel, and a utilization system of gas turbine generators.

  19. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

  20. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  1. Feasibility study: Fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschenhofer, J. H.; Baillieul, D. B.; Barton, L. M.; Brumberg, R. J.; Hannan, C. E.; Fiedler, H. H.; Kile, M. G.; Klett, M. G.; Malone, G. A.; Milliron, H. P.

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility.

  2. Combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources and electrochemical hydrogen systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, S. A.; Grigor'ev, A. S.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Fateev, V. N.; Kuleshov, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The layout of a combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources (RESs) and hydrogen electrochemical systems for the accumulation of energy via the direct and inverse conversion of the electrical energy from RESs into the chemical energy of hydrogen with the storage of the latter is described. Some efficient technical solutions on the use of electrochemical hydrogen systems in power engineering for the storage of energy with a cyclic energy conversion efficiency of more than 40% are proposed. It is shown that the storage of energy in the form of hydrogen is environmentally safe and considerably surpasses traditional accumulator batteries by its capacitance characteristics, being especially topical in the prolonged absence of energy supply from RESs, e.g., under the conditions of polar night and breathless weather. To provide the required heat consumption of an object during the peak period, it is proposed to burn some hydrogen in a boiler house.

  3. York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

  4. Eco-operation of co-generation systems optimized by environmental load value

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Seizo; Nomura, Nobukazu; Maruyama, Naoki

    1998-07-01

    In this paper the authors introduce a life cycle assessment scheme with the aid of the environmental load value (ELV) as a numerical measure to estimate the quantitative load of any industrial activity on the environment. The value is calculated from the total summation of the respective environmental load indexes through the life cycle activity from cradle to grave. An algorithm and a software using a combined simplex and branch-bound technique are accomplished to give the numerical ELV and its optimization. This ELV scheme is applied to co-generation energy systems consisting of gas turbines, waste-heat boilers, auxiliary boilers, steam turbines, electricity operated turbo refrigerators, steam absorption refrigerators and heat exchangers, which can be easily set up on the computer display in an ICON and Q and A style, including various kinds of parameters. The two kinds of environmental loads respecting the fossil fuel depletion and the CO{sub 2} global warming due to electricity generation from power stations in Japan are chosen as the ELV criterion. The ELV optimization is calculated corresponding to the hourly energy demands for electricity, air cooling, air heating, and hot water from a district consisting eight office buildings and four hotels. As a result, the ELV scheme constructed here is found to be an attractive and powerful tool to quantitatively estimate the LCA environmental loads of any industrial activity like co-generation energy systems and to propose the eco-operation of the industrial activity of interest. The cost estimation can be made as well.

  5. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    In the Third Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 240 to 258, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,547 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 416 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Of the 258 signed contracts and committed projects, 83 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 779 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 38 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 797 MW to 848 MW, and 19 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 152 MW to 159 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 21, with a generating capability of 528 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind farm projects, totaling 257 to 262 MW. There are 94 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There are 50 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 112 MW, as well as 67 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E is planning to construct.

  6. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

  7. Reticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landrevy, Christel

    Pour faire face à la crise économique la conception de papier à valeur ajoutée est développée par les industries papetières. Le but de se projet est l'amélioration des techniques actuelles de réticulation des fibres lignocellulosiques de la pâte à papier visant à produire un papier plus résistant. En effet, lors des réactions de réticulation traditionnelles, de nombreuses liaisons intra-fibres se forment ce qui affecte négativement l'amélioration anticipée des propriétés physiques du papier ou du matériau produit. Pour éviter la formation de ces liaisons intra-fibres, un greffage sur les fibres de groupements ne pouvant pas réagir entre eux est nécessaire. La réticulation des fibres par une réaction de « click chemistry » appelée cycloaddition de Huisgen entre un azide et un alcyne vrai, catalysée par du cuivre (CuAAC) a été l'une des solutions trouvée pour remédier à ce problème. De plus, une adaptation de cette réaction en milieux aqueux pourrait favoriser son utilisation en milieu industriel. L'étude que nous désirons entreprendre lors de ce projet vise à optimiser la réaction de CuAAC et les réactions intermédiaires (propargylation, tosylation et azidation) sur la pâte kraft, en milieu aqueux. Pour cela, les réactions ont été adaptées en milieu aqueux sur la cellulose microcristalline afin de vérifier sa faisabilité, puis transférée à la pâte kraft et l'influence de différents paramètres comme le temps de réaction ou la quantité de réactifs utilisée a été étudiée. Dans un second temps, une étude des différentes propriétés conférées au papier par les réactions a été réalisée à partir d'une série de tests papetiers optiques et physiques. Mots Clés Click chemistry, Huisgen, CuAAC, propargylation, tosylation, azidation, cellulose, pâte kraft, milieu aqueux, papier.

  8. Cogeneration: Economic and technical analysis. February 1988-December 1989 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for February 1988-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning economic and technical analysis of cogeneration systems. Topics include electric power generation, industrial cogeneration, electricity-supply industry, and fuel-cell cogeneration. Steam power station, gas-turbine and steam-turbine technology, district heating, refuse-derived fuels, environmental effects and regulations, bioenergy and solar-energy conversion, waste-heat and -waste product utilization, and performance analysis are presented. (This updated bibliography contains 332 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Micro-Cogeneration Incl. The Conversion of Chemical Energy of Biomass to Electric Energy and the Low Potential Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzvar, Jozef; Kapjor, Andrej

    2011-06-01

    This article deals with combined production of heat and electricity for small premises, such as households, where energy consumption is around few kilowatts. This proposal of micro co-generation unit uses as a heat source an automatic burner for combustion of wood pellets. Construction of an equipment for the heat transport can be designed using different basic ways of heat transfer. Electricity is produced by the two-stroke steam engine and the generator.

  10. A major cogeneration system goes in at JFK International Airport. Low-visibility privatization in a high-impact environment

    SciTech Connect

    Leibler, J.; Luxton, R.; Ostberg, P.

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growing energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.