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Sample records for coinage metal surfaces

  1. Chemical transformations drive complex self-assembly of uracil on close-packed coinage metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Fischer, Sybille; Reichert, Joachim; Diller, Katharina; Blobner, Florian; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Seitsonen, Ari P; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-03-27

    We address the interplay of adsorption, chemical nature, and self-assembly of uracil on the Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces as a function of molecular coverage (0.3 to 1 monolayer) and temperature. We find that both metal surfaces act as templates and the Cu(111) surface acts additionally as a catalyst for the resulting self-assembled structures. With a combination of STM, synchrotron XPS, and NEXAFS studies, we unravel a distinct polymorphism on Cu(111), in stark contrast to what is observed for the case of uracil on the more inert Ag(111) surface. On Ag(111) uracil adsorbs flat and intact and forms close-packed two-dimensional islands. The self-assembly is driven by stable hydrogen-bonded dimers with poor two-dimensional order. On Cu(111) complex structures are observed exhibiting, in addition, a strong annealing temperature dependence. We determine the corresponding structural transformations to be driven by gradual deprotonation of the uracil molecules. Our XPS study reveals unambiguously the tautomeric signature of uracil in the contact layer and on Cu(111) the molecule's deprotonation sites. The metal-mediated deprotonation of uracil and the subsequent electron localization in the molecule determine important biological reactions. Our data show a dependence between molecular coverage and molecule-metal interaction on Cu(111), as the molecules tilt at higher coverages in order to accommodate a higher packing density. After deprotonation of both uracil N atoms, we observe an adsorption geometry that can be understood as coordinative anchoring with a significant charge redistribution in the molecule. DFT calculations are employed to analyze the surface bonding and accurately describe the pertaining electronic structure. PMID:22356544

  2. The carbon-tolerance mechanism of Ni-based alloy with coinage metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyang; Fu, Zhaoming; Yang, Zongxian

    2013-11-01

    Using the first-principles calculations, we investigate the successive dehydrogenation of CH4, as well as the diffusion of CH (the most important carbon-containing intermediate), on the Ni(111) surfaces doped with coinage metals. It is found that, although alloying of Ni with coinage metals can to some extent affect the CH4 dehydrogenation, the coking inhibition on the alloy surface mainly roots in the large diffusion barrier of CH, as well as the reduction of the number of active adsorption sites for CHx. These results give a clue for designing new catalyst with higher coking resistance.

  3. Special Issue: Coinage Metal (Copper, Silver, and Gold) Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, Sónia Alexandra Correia

    2016-01-01

    The subject of catalysis by coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold) comes up increasingly day-by-day. This Special Issue aims to cover the numerous aspects of the use of these metals as catalysts for several reactions. It deals with synthesis and characterization of copper, silver and gold based catalysis, their characterization and use, both for heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, and some of their potential applications. PMID:27338316

  4. Theoretical study of the adsorption of benzene on coinage metals

    PubMed Central

    Reckien, Werner; Eggers, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Summary The adsorption of benzene on the M(111), M(100) and M(110) surfaces of the coinage metals copper (M = Cu), silver (M = Ag) and gold (M = Au) is studied on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an empirical dispersion correction (D3). Variants of the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof functionals (PBE, RPBE and RevPBE) in combination with different versions of the dispersion correction (D3 and D3(BJ)) are compared. PBE-D3, PBE-D3(BJ) and RPBE-D3 give similar results which exhibit a good agreement with experimental data. RevPBE-D3 and RevPBE-D3(BJ) tend to overestimate adsorption energies. The inclusion of three-center terms (PBE-D3(ABC)) leads to a slightly better agreement with the experiment in most cases. Vertical adsorbate–substrate distances are calculated and compared to previous theoretical results. The observed trends for the surfaces and metals are consistent with the calculated adsorption energies. PMID:25161736

  5. Scrutinizing individual CoTPP molecule adsorbed on coinage metal surfaces from the interplay of STM experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houwaart, Torsten; Le Bahers, Tangui; Sautet, Philippe; Auwärter, Willi; Seufert, Knud; Barth, Johannes V.; Bocquet, Marie-Laure

    2015-05-01

    The cobalt tetraphenyl porphyrin (CoTPP) molecule and its adsorption on clean Cu and Ag surfaces are comparatively analyzed within the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework. Different sets of exchange-correlation functionals - the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Gradient Generalized Approximation (along with the PBE functional and the semi-empirical Grimme's corrections of dispersion) - are compared. Two prominent structural adsorption properties are disclosed in all sets of calculations: an asymmetric saddle deformation of CoTPP with an enhanced tilting of the upwards bent pyrroles and a single adsorption site where the Co center occupies a bridge position and one molecular axis (along the direction of the lowered pair of opposite pyrroles) is aligned with the dense-packed < 1 1 bar 0 > substrate direction. The similarities between Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces extend to the interfacial electronic structure with similar electronic redistribution and molecular charging. However subtle differences between the two substrates are revealed with bias-dependent STM simulations, especially in the low-bias imaging range. The STM calculations underline the difficulty for the commonly used GGA + D2 DFT framework to quantitatively predict the energy positions of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs).

  6. Quantitative Prediction of Molecular Adsorption: Structure and Binding of Benzene on Coinage Metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Maaß, Friedrich; Willenbockel, Martin; Bronner, Christopher; Schulze, Michael; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F Stefan; Tegeder, Petra; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-07-17

    Interfaces between organic molecules and solid surfaces play a prominent role in heterogeneous catalysis, molecular sensors and switches, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaics. The properties and the ensuing function of such hybrid interfaces often depend exponentially on molecular adsorption heights and binding strengths, calling for well-established benchmarks of these two quantities. Here we present systematic measurements that enable us to quantify the interaction of benzene with the Ag(111) coinage metal substrate with unprecedented accuracy (0.02 Å in the vertical adsorption height and 0.05 eV in the binding strength) by means of normal-incidence x-ray standing waves and temperature-programed desorption techniques. Based on these accurate experimental benchmarks for a prototypical molecule-solid interface, we demonstrate that recently developed first-principles calculations that explicitly account for the nonlocality of electronic exchange and correlation effects are able to determine the structure and stability of benzene on the Ag(111) surface within experimental error bars. Remarkably, such precise experiments and calculations demonstrate that despite different electronic properties of copper, silver, and gold, the binding strength of benzene is equal on the (111) surface of these three coinage metals. Our results suggest the existence of universal binding energy trends for aromatic molecules on surfaces. PMID:26230807

  7. Assessing the influence of van der Waals corrected exchange-correlation functionals on the anisotropic mechanical properties of coinage metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hwan; Park, Jong-Hun; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-07-01

    Current materials-related calculations employ density-functional theory (DFT), commonly using the (semi-)local-density approximations for the exchange-correlation (xc) functional. The difficulties in arriving at a reasonable description of van der Waals (vdW) interactions by DFT-based models is to date a big challenge. In this work, we use various flavors of vdW-corrected DFT xc functionals—ranging from the quasiempirical force-field add-on vdW corrections to self-consistent nonlocal correlation functionals—to study the bulk lattice and mechanical properties (including the elastic constants and anisotropic indices) of the coinage metals (copper, silver, and gold). We critically assess the reliability of the different vdW-corrected DFT methods in describing their anisotropic mechanical properties which have been less reported in the literature. In the context of this work, we regard that our results reiterate the fact that advocating a so-called perfect vdW-inclusive xc functional for describing the general physics and chemistry of these coinage metals could be a little premature. These challenges to modern-day functionals for anisotropically strained coinage metals (e.g., at the faceted surfaces of nanostructures) may well be relevant to other strained material systems.

  8. The chemical origin and catalytic activity of coinage metals: from oxidation to dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Syu, Cih-Ying; Yang, Hao-Wen; Hsu, Fu-Hsing; Wang, Jeng-Han

    2014-04-28

    The high oxidation activity of coinage metals (Cu, Ag and Au) has been widely applied in various important reactions, such as oxidation of carbon monoxide, alkenes or alcohols. The catalytic behavior of those inert metals has mostly been attributable to their size effect, the physical effect. In the present study, the chemical effects on their high oxidation activity have been investigated. We mechanistically examine the direct and oxidative dehydrogenation (partial oxidation) reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde on a series of transition metals (groups 9, 10 and 11) with identical physical characteristics and varied chemical origins using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electronic structure analyses at the GGA-PW91 level. The energetic results show that coinage metals have much lower activation energies and higher exothermicities for the oxidative dehydrogenation steps although they have higher energy for the direct dehydrogenation reaction. In the electronic structure analyses, coinage metals with saturated d bands can efficiently donate electrons to O* and OH*, or other electronegative adspecies, and better promote their p bands to higher energy levels. The negatively charged O* and OH* with high-lying p bands are responsible for lowering the energies in oxidative steps. The mechanistic understanding well explains the better oxidation activity of coinage metals and provides valuable information on their utilization in other useful applications, for example, the dehydrogenation process. PMID:24626959

  9. Resistance to sulfur poisoning of Ni-based alloy with coinage (IB) metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaopei; Zhang, Yanxing; Yang, Zongxian

    2015-12-01

    The poisoning effects of S atom on the (1 0 0), (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) metal surfaces of pure Ni and Ni-based alloy with IB (coinage) metals (Cu, Ag, Au) are systematically studied. The effects of IB metal dopants on the S poisoning features are analyzed combining the density functional theory (DFT) results with thermodynamics data using the ab initio atomistic thermodynamic method. It is found that introducing IB doping metals into Ni surface can shift the d-band center downward from the Fermi level and weaken the adsorption of S on the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) surfaces, and the S tolerance ability increases in the order of Ni, Cu/Ni, Ag/Ni and Au/Ni. Nevertheless, on the (1 1 1) surface, the S tolerance ability increases in the order of Ag/Ni (or Cu/Ni), Ni, and Au/Ni. When we increase the coverage of the IB metal dopants, we found that not only Au, but Cu and Ag can increase its S tolerance. We therefore propose that alloying can increase its S tolerance and alloying with Au would be a better way to increase the resistance to sulfur poisoning of the Ni anode as compared with the pure Ni and the Ag- or, Cu-doped Ni materials.

  10. Surface acidity scales: Experimental measurements of Brønsted acidities on anatase TiO2 and comparison with coinage metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbaugh, Trent L.; Boaventura, Jaime S.; Barteau, Mark A.

    2016-08-01

    The first quantitative surface acidity scale for Brønsted acids on a solid surface is presented through the use of titration-displacement and equilibrium experiments on anatase TiO2. Surface acidities of species on TiO2 correlated with gas phase acidities, as was previously observed in qualitative studies of Brønsted acid displacement on Ag(110), Cu(110) and Au(111). A 90% compression of the surface acidity scale relative to the gas phase was observed due to compensation from the covalent component of the conjugate base - surface bond. Adsorbed conjugate bases need not be completely anionic for correlations with gas phase acidities to hold. Positive and negative substituent effects, such as substituted fluorine and hydrocarbon sidechain dispersion interactions with the surface, may modify the surface acidity scale, in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical work on Au(111).

  11. Sonochemical procedures; the main synthetic method for synthesis of coinage metal ion supramolecular polymer nano structures.

    PubMed

    Shahangi Shirazi, Fatemeh; Akhbari, Kamran

    2016-07-01

    During the last two decades, supramolecular polymers have received great attention and the number of their synthesized compounds is still growing. Although people have long been interested in their crystalline network form it was only until 2005 that the first examples of nano- or microscale coordination polymers particles be demonstrated. This review tries to give an overview of all nano supramolecular compounds which were reported from coinage metal ions, their attributed synthetic procedures and to investigate the relation between the dimensions of coinage metal ions (Cu, Ag and Au) coordination and supramolecular polymers with their nano-structural morphologies and dimensions. Eleven compounds (from twenty compounds) with nano-structure morphology were prepared by sonochemical process and Ag(I) coordination and supramolecular polymer nano-structures can be easily prepared by sonochemical procedures. PMID:26964923

  12. Widely applicable coinage metal window electrodes on flexible polyester substrates applied to organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Stec, Helena M; Hatton, Ross A

    2012-11-01

    The fabrication, exceptional properties, and application of 8 nm thick Cu, Ag, Au, and Cu/Ag bilayer electrodes on flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrates is reported. These electrodes are fabricated using a solvent free process in which the plastic surface is chemically modified with a molecular monolayer of thiol and amine terminated alkylsilanes prior to metal deposition. The resulting electrodes have a sheet resistance of ≤14 Ω sq⁻¹, are exceptionally robust and can be rapidly thermally annealed at 200 °C to reduce their sheet resistance to ≤9 Ω sq⁻¹. Notably, annealing Au electrodes briefly at 200 °C causes the surface to revert almost entirely to the {111} face, rendering it ideal as a model electrode for fundamental science and practical application alike. The power conversion efficiency of 1 cm² organic photovoltaics (OPVs) employing 8 nm Ag and Au films as the hole-extracting window electrode exhibit performance comparable to those on indium-tin oxide, with the advantage that they are resistant to repeated bending through a small radius of curvature and are chemically well-defined. OPVs employing Cu and bilayer Cu:Ag electrodes exhibit inferior performance due to a lower open-circuit voltage and fill factor. Measurements of the interfacial energetics made using the Kelvin probe technique provide insight into the physical reason for this difference. The results show how coinage metal electrodes offer a viable alternative to ITO on flexible substrates for OPVs and highlight the challenges associated with the use of Cu as an electrode material in this context. PMID:23127805

  13. Coinage metal complexes supported by the tri- and tetraphosphine ligands.

    PubMed

    Dau, Minh Thuy; Shakirova, Julia R; Karttunen, Antti J; Grachova, Elena V; Tunik, Sergey P; Melnikov, Alexey S; Pakkanen, Tapani A; Koshevoy, Igor O

    2014-05-01

    A series of tri- and tetranuclear phosphine complexes of d(10) metal ions supported by the polydentate ligands, bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)phenylphosphine (PPP) and tris(diphenylphosphinomethyl)phosphine (PPPP), were synthesized. All the compounds under study, [AuM2(PPP)2](3+) (M = Au (1), Cu (2), Ag (3)), [M4(PPPP)2](4+) (M = Ag (4), Au (5)), [AuAg3(PPPP)2](4+) (6), and [Au2Cu2(PPPP)2(NCMe)4](4+) (7), were characterized crystallographically. The trinuclear clusters 1-3 contain a linear metal core, while in the isostructural tetranuclear complexes 4-6 the metal framework has a plane star-shaped arrangement. Cluster 7 adopts a structural motif that involves a digold unit bridged by two arms of the PPPP phosphines and decorated two spatially separated Cu(I) ions chelated by the remaining P donors. The NMR spectroscopic investigation in DMSO solution revealed the heterometallic clusters 2, 3, and 6 are stereochemically nonrigid and undergo reversible metal ions redistribution between several species, accompanied by their solvation-desolvation. The complexes 1-3 and 5-7 exhibit room temperature luminescence in the solid state (Φem = 6-64%) in the spectral region from 450 to 563 nm. The phosphorescence observed originates from the triplet excited states, determined by the metal cluster-centered dσ* → pσ transitions. PMID:24750114

  14. Probing the Structure, Dynamics, and Bonding of Coinage Metal Complexes of White Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Forfar, Laura C; Zeng, Dihao; Green, Michael; McGrady, John E; Russell, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    A series of cationic white phosphorus complexes of the coinage metals Au and Cu have been synthesised and characterised both in the solid state and in solution. All complexes feature a P4 unit coordinated through an edge P-P vector (η(2)-like), although the degree of activation (as measured by the coordinated P-P bond length) is greater in the gold species. All of the cations are fluxional on the NMR timescale at room temperature, but in the case of the gold systems fluxionality is frozen out at -90 °C. Electronic structure calculations suggest that this fluxionality proceeds via an η(1)-coordinated M-P4 intermediate. PMID:26918670

  15. Metal effect on the supramolecular structure, photophysics, and acid-base character of trinuclear pyrazolato coinage metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Omary, Mohammad A; Rawashdeh-Omary, Manal A; Gonser, M W Alexander; Elbjeirami, Oussama; Grimes, Tom; Cundari, Thomas R; Diyabalanage, Himashinie V K; Gamage, Chammi S Palehepitiya; Dias, H V Rasika

    2005-11-14

    Varying the coinage metal in cyclic trinuclear pyrazolate complexes is found to significantly affect the solid-state packing, photophysics, and acid-base properties. The three isoleptic compounds used in this study are [[3,5-(CF3)2Pz]M]3 with M = Cu, Ag, and Au (i.e., Cu3, Ag3, and Au3, respectively). They form isomorphous crystals and exist as trimers featuring nine-membered M3N6 rings with linear two-coordinate metal sites. On the basis of the M-N distances, the covalent radii of two-coordinate Cu(I), Ag(I), and Au(I) were estimated as 1.11, 1.34, and 1.25 angstroms, respectively. The cyclic [[3,5-(CF3)2Pz]M]3 complexes pack as infinite chains of trimers with a greater number of pairwise intertrimer M...M interactions upon proceeding to heavier coinage metals. However, the intertrimer distances are conspicuously short in Ag3 (3.204 angstroms) versus Au3 (3.885 angstroms) or Cu3 (3.813 angstroms) despite the significantly larger covalent radius of Ag(I). Remarkable luminescence properties are found for the three M3 complexes, as manifested by the appearance of multiple unstructured phosphorescence bands whose colors and lifetimes change qualitatively upon varying the coinage metal and temperature. The multiple emissions are assigned to different phosphorescent excimeric states that exhibit enhanced M...M bonding relative to the ground state. The startling luminescence thermochromic changes in crystals of each compound are related to relaxation between the different phosphorescent excimers. The trend in the lowest energy phosphorescence band follows the relative triplet energy of the three M(I) atomic ions. DFT calculations indicate that [[3,5-(R)2Pz]M]3 trimers with R = H or Me are bases with the relative basicity order Ag < Cu < Au while fluorination (R = CF3) renders even the Au trimer acidic. These predictions were substantiated experimentally by the isolation of the first acid-base adduct, [[Au3]2:toluene]infinity, in which a trinuclear Au(I) complex acts as

  16. Well-defined coinage metal transfer agents for the synthesis of NHC-based nickel, rhodium and palladium macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rhiann E; Storey, Caroline M; Chaplin, Adrian B

    2016-06-01

    With a view to use as carbene transfer agents, well-defined silver(i) and copper(i) complexes of a macrocyclic NHC-based pincer ligand, bearing a central lutidine donor and a dodecamethylene spacer [CNC-(CH2)12, 1], have been prepared. Although the silver adduct is characterised by X-ray diffraction as a dinuclear species anti-[Ag(μ-1)]2(2+), variable temperature measurements indicate dynamic structural interchange in solution involving fragmentation into mononuclear [Ag(1)](+) on the NMR time scale. In contrast, a mononuclear structure is evident in both solution and the solid-state for the analogous copper adduct partnered with the weakly coordinating [BAr(F)4](-) counter anion. A related copper derivative, bearing instead the more coordinating cuprous bromide dianion [Cu2Br4](2-), is notable for the adoption of an interesting tetranuclear assembly in the solid-state, featuring two cuprophilic interactions and two bridging NHC donors, but is not retained on dissolution. Coinage metal precursors [M(1)]n[BAr(F)4]n (M = Ag, n = 2; M = Cu, n = 1) both act as carbene transfer agents to afford palladium, rhodium and nickel complexes of 1 and the effectiveness of these precursors has been evaluated under equivalent reaction conditions. PMID:27157720

  17. Coinage metal complexes with bridging hybrid phosphine-NHC ligands: synthesis of di- and tetra-nuclear complexes.

    PubMed

    Simler, Thomas; Braunstein, Pierre; Danopoulos, Andreas A

    2016-03-28

    A series of P-NHC-type hybrid ligands containing both PR2 and N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors on meta-bis-substituted phenylene backbones, L(Cy), L(tBu) and L(Ph) (R = Cy, tBu, Ph, respectively), was accessed through a modular synthesis from a common precursor, and their coordination chemistry with coinage metals was explored and compared. Metallation of L(Ph)·n(HBr) (n = 1, 2) with Ag2O gave the pseudo-cubane [Ag4Br4(L(Ph))2], isostructural to [Ag4Br4(L(R))2] (R = Cy, tBu) (T. Simler, P. Braunstein and A. A. Danopoulos, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 13691), whereas metallation of ·HBF4 (R = Ph, tBu) led to the dinuclear complexes [Ag2(L(R))2](BF4)2 which, in the solid state, feature heteroleptic Ag centres and a 'head-to-tail' (HT) arrangement of the bridging ligands. In solution, interconversion with the homoleptic 'head-to-head' (HH) isomers is facilitated by ligand fluxionality. 'Head-to-tail' [Cu2Br2(L(R))2] (R = Cy, tBu) dinuclear complexes were obtained from L(R)·HBr and [Cu5(Mes)5], Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl, which also feature bridging ligands and heteroleptic Cu centres. Although the various ligands L(R)l ed to structurally analogous complexes for R = Cy, tBu and Ph, the rates of dynamic processes occurring in solution are dependent on R, with faster rates for R = Ph. Transmetallation of both NHC and P donor groups from [Ag4Br4(L(tBu))2] to AuI by reaction with [AuCl(THT)] (THT = tetrahydrothiophene) led to L(tBu) transfer and to the dinuclear complex [Au2Cl2L(tBu)] with one L(tBu) ligand bridging the two Au centres. Except for the silver pseudo-cubanes, all other complexes do not exhibit metallophilic interactions. PMID:26886084

  18. Electron correlation and relativistic effects in the coinage metal compounds. II. Heteronuclear dimers: CuAg, CuAu, and AgAu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellö, Vladimir; Sadlej, Andrzej J.

    1995-08-01

    Electric properties of heteronuclear dimers of the coinage metals are calculated at the level of the CCSD(T) approximation applied to 38 electrons of the valence and next-to-valence atomic shells. The relativistic effects are accounted for by using the scalar approximation to the Pauli hamiltonian. Both the pure relativistic and mixed relativistic-correlation contributions to energies and electric properties are computed. All calculations have been carried out by using the recently developed first-order polarized basis sets of the coinage metal atoms. In the non-relativistic approximation all studied dimers show only a moderate degree of polarity; the non-relativistic CuAg turns out to be the most polar dimer with the Cu(-)Ag(+) polarity. The relativistic effects considerably reduce the negative value of the CuAg dipole moment, change the sign of the CuAu dipole moment, and make the AgAu molecule the most polar species in the series. Simultaneously, the parallel component of the dipole polarizability shows only a small relativistic contraction. The calculated quasirelativistic interaction potentials have a correct behavior in the vicinity of their minima and give the Re and ωe values in complete agreement with experiment. Much less satisfactory are the dissociation energy data which seem to suffer from the single reference configuration approximation.

  19. Spin and orbital magnetism of coinage metal trimers (Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3}, Au{sub 3}): A relativistic density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mahdi; Sargolzaei, Mohsen

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated electronic structure and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3} and Au{sub 3} trimers using a full potential local orbital method in the framework of relativistic density functional theory. We have also shown that the non-relativistic generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional gives reliable magnetic properties in coinage metal trimers compared to experiment. In addition we have indicated that the spin-orbit coupling changes the structure and magnetic properties of gold trimer while the structure and magnetic properties of copper and silver trimers are marginally affected. A significant orbital moment of 0.21μ{sub B} was found for most stable geometry of the gold trimer whereas orbital magnetism is almost quenched in the copper and silver trimers.

  20. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI–CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kamiński, Radosław; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, Elżbieta; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies. PMID:25238405

  1. High performance Au-Cu alloy for enhanced visible-light water splitting driven by coinage metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingyang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ting; Wang, Defa; Liu, Lequan; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-03-17

    A Au-Cu alloy strategy is, for the first time, demonstrated to be effective in enhancing visible-light photocatalytic H2 evolution via promoting metal interband transitions. Au3Cu/SrTiO3, in which oxidation of Cu was successfully restrained, showed the highest visible-light H2 evolution activity. PMID:26952932

  2. Shedding Light on the Photochemistry of Coinage-Metal Phosphorescent Materials: A Time-Resolved Laue Diffraction Study of an AgI-CuI Tetranuclear Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzembska, Katarzyna N.; Kami,; #324; ski, Radoslaw; Fournier, Bertrand; Trzop, El; #380; bieta,; Sokolow, Jesse D.; Henning, Robert; Chen, Yang; Coppens, Philip

    2014-11-14

    The triplet excited state of a new crystalline form of a tetranuclear coordination d10–d10-type complex, Ag2Cu2L4 (L = 2-diphenylphosphino-3-methylindole ligand), containing AgI and CuI metal centers has been explored using the Laue pump–probe technique with ≈80 ps time resolution. The relatively short lifetime of 1 μs is accompanied by significant photoinduced structural changes, as large as the Ag1···Cu2 distance shortening by 0.59(3) Å. The results show a pronounced strengthening of the argentophilic interactions and formation of new Ag···Cu bonds on excitation. Theoretical calculations indicate that the structural changes are due to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) strengthening the Ag···Ag interaction, mainly occurring from the methylindole ligands to the silver metal centers. QM/MM optimizations of the ground and excited states of the complex support the experimental results. Comparison with isolated molecule optimizations demonstrates the restricting effect of the crystalline matrix on photoinduced distortions. The work represents the first time-resolved Laue diffraction study of a heteronuclear coordination complex and provides new information on the nature of photoresponse of coinage metal complexes, which have been the subject of extensive studies.

  3. 76 FR 57806 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  4. 76 FR 34811 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage... 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) public... CONTACT: Greg Weinman, Acting United States Mint Liaison to the CCAC; 801 9th Street, NW.; Washington,...

  5. 75 FR 70363 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC...: 8th Floor Board Room, United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  6. 77 FR 57645 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  7. 78 FR 59426 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  8. 78 FR 57221 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC... meeting at the United States Mint; 801 9th Street NW.; Washington, DC; Conference Room A. Subject:...

  9. 76 FR 2754 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage..., section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC...: 8th Floor Board Room, United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  10. The Role of Weak Interactions in Strong Intermolecular M···Cl Complexes of Coinage Metal Pyrazolates: Spectroscopic and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Titov, Aleksei A; Guseva, Ekaterina A; Filippov, Oleg A; Babakhina, Galina M; Godovikov, Ivan A; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Shubina, Elena S

    2016-09-01

    The nondestructive reversible complexation of the macrocyclic group 11 metal pyrazolates {[3,5-(CF3)2Pz]M}3 (M = Cu(I), Ag(I)) to the halogen atom X = Cl, Br of η(3)-allyliron tricarbonyl halides (η(3)-2-R-C3H4)Fe(CO)3X is revealed by the variable-temperature spectroscopic (IR, NMR) study combined with density functional theory calculations. The composition of all complexes at room temperature is determined as 1:1. In the case of the [AgL]3 macrocycle, complexes 1:2 are observed at low temperature (<260 K). The complex's stability depends on the substituents in the allyl fragment and halide ligand as well as on the metal atom (Ag(I), Cu(I)) in the macrocycle. For bulky substituents (Me and Ph) the endo/exo equilibrium of the parent (η(3)-2-R-C3H4)Fe(CO)3X shifts upon the complex formation in favor of the exo isomer due to additional noncovalent interactions of the substituent with macrocycle. PMID:27529380

  11. 78 FR 36034 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens... 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  12. 77 FR 67736 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens..., Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory... 4:00 p.m. Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC...

  13. 78 FR 14154 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens... 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  14. 78 FR 23635 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee; Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens... 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  15. SURFACE TREATMENT OF METALLIC URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.; Schweikher, E.W.

    1958-05-27

    The treatment of metallic uranium to provide a surface to which adherent electroplates can be applied is described. Metallic uranium is subjected to an etchant treatment in aqueous concentrated hydrochloric acid, and the etched metal is then treated to dissolve the resulting black oxide and/or chloride film without destroying the etched metal surface. The oxide or chloride removal is effected by means of moderately concentrated nitric acid in 3 to 20 seconds.

  16. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  17. METAL SURFACE TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-12

    Improved flux baths are described for use in conjunction with hot dipped coatings for uranium. The flux bath consists of molten alkali metal, or alkaline earth metal halides. One preferred embodiment comprises a bath containing molten KCl, NaCl, and LiCl in proportions approximating the triple eutectic.

  18. 77 FR 35480 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 26, 2012, Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 26, 2012, Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 26, 2012, Public Meeting. SUMMARY... Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) public meeting scheduled for June 26, 2012. DATES: June 26,...

  19. 75 FR 34215 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 28, 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 28, 2010 Public Meeting ACTION: Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee June 28, 2010 Public Meeting. ] SUMMARY... Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) public meeting scheduled for June 28, 2010. Date: June 28,...

  20. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Childs, E.L.

    1984-01-23

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

  1. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Childs, Everett L.

    1984-11-06

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

  2. Lotus-like effect for metal filings recovery and particle removal on heated metal surfaces using Leidenfrost water droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Lin Clara; Sapiha, Kostantyn; Leong, Yoke Fun Hannah; Choi, Siwon; Anariba, Franklin; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald

    2015-07-21

    A "lotus-like" effect is applied to demonstrate the ability of the Leidenfrost water droplets to recover Cu particles on a heated Al substrate. Cu particles on the heated surface adhere to the rim of the Leidenfrost droplets and eventually coat the droplets' surface to form an aggregation. When Fe filings are added to the Cu particles, the aggregated mixture can then be collected using a strong rare earth magnet (NdFeB) upon evaporation of the water. We also show that the Leidenfrost effect can be effectively utilized to recover both hydrophobic (dust and activated carbon) and hydrophilic (SiO2 and MgO) particles from heated Al surfaces without any topographical modification or surfactant addition. Our results show that hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials can be collected with >92% and >96% effectiveness on grooved and smooth Al surfaces, respectively. Furthermore, we observed no significant differences in the amount of material collected above the Leidenfrost point within the tested temperature range (240 °C vs. 340 °C) as well as when the Al sheet was replaced with a Cu sheet as the substrate. However, we did observe that the Leidenfrost droplets were able to collect a greater amount of material when the working liquid was water than when it was ethanol. Our findings show promise in the development of an effective precious coinage metal filings recovery technology for application in the mint industry, as well as the self-cleaning of metallic and semiconductor surfaces where manual cleaning is not amenable. PMID:26053932

  3. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    response effects enables reliable modeling of structure and stability for a broad class of organic molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. This method was demonstrated to achieve quantitative accuracy for aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and diindenoperylene), C60, and sulfur/oxygen-containing molecules (thiophene, NTCDA, and PTCDA) on close-packed and stepped metal surfaces, leading to an overall accuracy of 0.1 Å in adsorption heights and 0.1 eV in binding energies with respect to state-of-the-art experiments. An unexpected finding is that vdW interactions contribute more to the binding of strongly bound molecules on transition-metal surfaces than for molecules physisorbed on coinage metals. The accurate inclusion of vdW interactions also significantly improves tilting angles and adsorption heights for all the studied molecules, and can qualitatively change the potential-energy surface for adsorbed molecules with flexible functional groups. Activation barriers for molecular switches and reaction precursors are modified as well. PMID:24915492

  4. Molecular Architectonic on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Johannes V.

    2007-05-01

    The engineering of highly organized systems from instructed molecular building blocks opens up new vistas for the control of matter and the exploration of nanodevice concepts. Recent investigations demonstrate that well-defined surfaces provide versatile platforms for steering and monitoring the assembly of molecular nanoarchitectures in exquisite detail. This review delineates the principles of noncovalent synthesis on metal substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and briefly assesses the pertaining terminology—self-assembly, self-organization, and self-organized growth. It presents exemplary scanning-tunneling-microscopy observations, providing atomistic insight into the self-assembly of organic clusters, chains, and superlattices, and the metal-directed assembly of low-dimensional coordination architectures. This review also describes hierarchic-assembly protocols leading to intricate multilevel order. Molecular architectonic on metal surfaces represents a versatile rationale to realize structurally complex nanosystems with specific shape, composition, and functional properties, which bear promise for technological applications.

  5. Magnetoelectric coupling at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Yamada, T.K.; Balashov, T.; Takacs, A. F.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Daene, Markus W; Fechner, M.; Ostanin, S.; Ernst, Arthur; Mertig, I.; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2010-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling allows the magnetic state of a material to be changed by an applied electric field. To date, this phenomenon has mainly been observed in insulating materials such as complex multiferroic oxides. Bulk metallic systems do not exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, because applied electric fields are screened by conduction electrons. We demonstrate strong magnetoelectric coupling at the surface of thin iron films using the electric field from a scanning tunnelling microscope, and are able to write, store and read information to areas with sides of a few nanometres. Our work demonstrates that high-density, non-volatile information storage is possible in metals.

  6. METHOD OF CLEANING METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Winkler, H.W.; Morfitt, J.W.; Little, T.H.

    1959-05-19

    Cleaning fluids for removing deposits from metal surfaces are described. The cleaning agents of the invention consist of aqueous nitric acid and an amhydrous nitrate salt of a metal which is lower in the electromotive series than the element of the deposit to be removed. In general, the salt content of thc cleaning agents ranged from 10 to 90%, preferably from 10 to 40% by weight; and the balance of the composition comprises nitric acid of any strength from extremely dilute up to concentrated strength.

  7. Photochemistry on rough metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Goncher, G.M.; Parsons, C.A.; Harris, C.B.

    1984-09-13

    The general question of laser-induced photochemistry on metal surfaces is addressed. Specifically, the authors have studied resonant photodecomposition of a variety of aromatic molecules on roughened silver surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum. A continuous ion laser source at a number of different wavelengths in the region 350-410 nm was used to produce graphitic carbon on the surface which was monitored by Raman spectroscopy at the 1580-cm/sup -1/ band of surface carbon. Laser power-dependence studies of fragmentation rate for several molecules at 406.7nm indicate that the initial absorption step is a two-photon process. Energetic considerations imply that photochemistry for other molecules studied is also due to multiphoton absorption, except for benzaldehyde fragmentation at 350.7-nm excitation, where the photodecomposition rate is linear. Distance-dependence studies of photofragmentation rates by use of an inert spacer layer to separatte the molecule undergoing photochemistry from the surface indicate that energy transfer to the metal surface is important in determining the reaction rate. Decomposition mechanism has not been fully evaluated.

  8. Detecting contamination on a metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.; Marcus, H. L.; Smith, T.

    1977-01-01

    Thin layers of contaminant on metal surface are detected by measuring surface-potential difference between reference electrode and surface of interest. Procedure does not require mechanical contact with surface under examination.

  9. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Bray, L.A.

    1996-08-13

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  10. Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Bray, Lane A.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

  11. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Michael H.; Varrin, Jr., Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  12. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  13. Surface chemistry of liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Peebles, Henry; Peebles, Diamond; Rye, Robert; Yost, Fred

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental surface chemistry of the behavior of liquid metals spreading on a solid substrate is not at all well understood. Each of these questions involves knowing the details of the structure of interfaces and their dynamics. For example the structure of a monolayer of tin oxide on pure liquid tin is unknown. This is in contrast to the relatively large amount of data available on the structure of copper oxide monolayers on solid, pure copper. However, since liquid tin has a vapor pressure below 10(exp -10)torr for a reasonable temperature range above its melting point, it is possible to use the techniques of surface science to study the geometric, electronic and vibrational structures of these monolayers. In addition, certain techniques developed by surface chemists for the study of liquid systems can be applied to the ultra-high vacuum environment. In particular we have shown that light scattering spectroscopy can be used to study the surface tension tensor of these interfaces. The tin oxide layer in particular is very interesting in that the monolayer is rigid but admits of bending. Ellipsometric microscopy allows the visualization of monolayer thick films and show whether island formation occurs at various levels of dosing.

  14. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOEpatents

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  15. 75 FR 11228 - Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee March 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... United States Mint Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee March 2010 Public Meeting AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notification. SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage Advisory...

  16. 75 FR 1684 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee January 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee January 2010 Public Meeting ACTION... States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens Coinage....m. Location: Conference Room 5 North, United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC...

  17. Refractory thermal insulation for smooth metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    To protect rocket metal surfaces from engine exhaust heat, a refractory thermal insulation mixture, which adheres to smooth metals, has been developed. Insulation protection over a wide temperature range can be controlled by thickness of the applied mixture.

  18. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  19. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  20. Surface polaritons of a metal-insulator-metal curved slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2016-09-01

    The properties of s- and p-polarized surface polariton modes propagating circumferentially around a portion of a cylindrical metal-insulator-metal structure are studied, theoretically. By using the Maxwell equations in conjunction with the Drude model for the dielectric function of the metals and applying the appropriate boundary conditions, the dispersion relations of surface waves for two types of modes, are derived and numerically solved. The effects of the slab curvature and insulator thickness on the propagation of electromagnetic modes are investigated. The differences of the s- and p-polarized surface modes are also shown.

  1. Detecting hydrogen-containing contaminants on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.; Losele, W. A.

    1969-01-01

    Spark emission spectroscopy analyzes surface contamination of metals. This technique controls the quality of surface preparations and is useful in fundamental investigations of surface properties of metals.

  2. The interaction of a metal deactivator with metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schreifels, J.A. ); Morris, R.E.; Turner, N.H.; Mowery, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    In modern aircraft fuel systems, the fuel is used as a heat transfer medium to dissipate heat from the avionics and hydraulic systems. Under these conditions, the fuel can undergo autooxidations. Autooxidations of net fuel can result in the formation of insoluble gum and sediment which can impair operation of the jet engine. Metal deactivator additives (MDA) were developed to counteract the catalytic activity of dissolved metals. The authors have directed their efforts at ascertaining the various mechanisms by which MDA can act, particularly in accelerated stability testing. One objective of this study was to determine to what extent interactions with metal surfaces of the test apparent govern the effectiveness of metal deactivators. This paper describes an examination of metal surfaces exposed to MDA solutions to determine under what, if any, conditions metal passivation can occur.

  3. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  4. Frictional effects near a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Nitzan, Abraham

    2015-08-07

    When a classical master equation (CME) is used to describe the nonadiabatic dynamics of a molecule at metal surfaces, we show that in the regime of reasonably strong molecule-metal couplings, the CME can be reduced to a Fokker-Planck equation with an explicit form of electronic friction. For a single metal substrate at thermal equilibrium, the electronic friction and random force satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. When we investigate the time scale for an electron transfer (ET) event between the molecule and metal surface, we find that the ET rates show a turnover effect (just as in Kramer’s theory) as a function of frictional damping.

  5. Frictional effects near a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-08-01

    When a classical master equation (CME) is used to describe the nonadiabatic dynamics of a molecule at metal surfaces, we show that in the regime of reasonably strong molecule-metal couplings, the CME can be reduced to a Fokker-Planck equation with an explicit form of electronic friction. For a single metal substrate at thermal equilibrium, the electronic friction and random force satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. When we investigate the time scale for an electron transfer (ET) event between the molecule and metal surface, we find that the ET rates show a turnover effect (just as in Kramer's theory) as a function of frictional damping. PMID:26254638

  6. Laser surface modification of metallic biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Roy, Mangal; Bose, Susmita

    2011-06-01

    Load-bearing metal implants often fail prematurely due to inadequate biocompatibility, mechanical/tribological properties, and poor osseointegration. It is well known that biomaterials' surface plays a vital role in the response to these metal implants in the biological environment. The biological effectiveness of artificial implants is determined mainly by their surface characteristics such as surface morphology, microstructure, composition, mechanical properties, wettabilility, and surface free energy. Hence, there is significant interest toward surface modification and effective design of load-bearing metal implants so as to improve their surface properties and thereby elicit a specific, desired, and timely response from the surrounding cells and tissues. In this article, we provide an insight into laser surface modification of Ti/Ti6Al4V alloy with or without functional gradation in composition and their microstructural, in vitro wear and biological properties for various loadbearing orthopedic applications.

  7. THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-10-01

    In coordinately unsaturated molecular metal complexes, carbon-hydrogen bonds of the peripheral ligands may, if the stereochemistry allows, closely approach a metal center so as to develop a three-center two-electron bond between the carbon, the hydrogen, and the metal atoms, C-H-M. In some instances, the interaction .is followed by a scission of the C-H bond whereby the metal is effectively oxidized and discrete M-H and M-C {sigma} bonds are forrned. This class of metal-hydrogen-carbon interactions and reactions is shown to be a common phenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuum studies of nickel and platinum with simple organic molecules like olefins, and arenes are described. These surface chemistry studies were done as a function of surface crystallography and surface composition. The discussion is largely limited to the chemistry of methyl isocyanide, acetonitrile, benzene and toluene. Molecular orbital calculations are presented that support the experimental identification of the importance of C-H-M metal bonding for metal surfaces.

  8. 75 FR 6791 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee February 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject: Review 2011 First Spouse Gold Coin and Medal Program..., bullion coinage, Congressional Gold Medals, and national and other medals. Advises the Secretary of...

  9. Metal complexes as "protein surface mimetics".

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sarah H; Wilson, Andrew J

    2016-07-28

    A key challenge in chemical biology is to identify small molecule regulators for every single protein. However, protein surfaces are notoriously difficult to recognise with synthetic molecules, often having large flat surfaces that are poorly matched to traditional small molecules. In the surface mimetic approach, a supramolecular scaffold is used to project recognition groups in such a manner as to make multivalent non-covalent contacts over a large area of protein surface. Metal based supramolecular scaffolds offer unique advantages over conventional organic molecules for protein binding, including greater stereochemical and geometrical diversity conferred through the metal centre and the potential for direct assessment of binding properties and even visualisation in cells without recourse to further functionalisation. This feature article will highlight the current state of the art in protein surface recognition using metal complexes as surface mimetics. PMID:27353704

  10. An extensive computational study of the adsorption of thiophene on transition metal surfaces: role of van der Waals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Tomas; Kara, Abdelkader

    2014-03-01

    Van der Waals (vdWs) interactions play a significant role in the determination of the adsorption characteristics at the interface between a molecule and a substrate. In this study, self-consistent inclusion of vdW interactions in density functional theory provides a good perspective to understand the interaction between organic adsorbates and inorganic interfaces. We present the results of adsorption of thiophene (C4H4S) on various transition metal surfaces with the goal of comparing the performance of five different vdW functionals (optB86, optB88, optPBE, revPBE, rPW86). Seven metallic substrates (100) are used for our study; three coinage metals (Au, Ag, Cu) and four reactive metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ni). The results show that vdWs inclusion enhances the interaction for Ag (0.08 to 0.73 eV), Au (0.14 to 0.86 eV), Cu (0.12 eV to 0.77 eV), Ni(1.56 to 2.34 eV), Pt (1.6 to 2.51 eV), Pd (1.67 to 2.54), Rh (1.74 to 2.96 eV). In addition, we performed calculations for adsorption heights along with analysis of the electronic changes (charge transfer, changes in the d-band of the substrate, and change in the work function) to complement our understanding of these systems. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Science under Contract No DE-FG02-11ER16243.

  11. Surface treatment using metal foil liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvey, Ray

    1989-01-01

    A metal foil liner can be used to seal large area surfaces. Characteristics of the two-layer foil liner are discussed. Micrographs for foil-to-foil, foil-to-composite, visible seams, and hidden seams are examined.

  12. Localized spoof surface plasmons in textured open metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that textured open metal surfaces, i.e., the ultrathin fan-shaped metallic strips, are able to support spoof localized surface plasmons (spoof-LSPs) in the microwave frequencies. Unlike conventional spoof-LSPs supported on textured closed metal surfaces, which originate from the interference of clockwise and counterclockwise propagating surface modes, spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances due to the terminations of the open surfaces. We show that both the number of modes and the resonance frequencies of spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces can be engineered through tuning the grating numbers (or total length) of the structured fan-shaped metallic strip. This enables the tuning of the spoof-plasmonic resonator by simply changing its length, rather than the complete geometry, simplifying the design to just one degree of freedom. Experimental evidence of the spoof-LSP Fabry-Perot resonators in the microwave regimes is presented with near-field response spectra and mode profiles imaged directly. PMID:27176957

  13. Method of boronizing transition-metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, K.; Shimotake, H.

    1981-08-28

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB/sub 2/, or CrB/sub 2/. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700/sup 0/C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  14. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB.sub.2, or CrB.sub.2. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700.degree. C. and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface.

  15. Method of boronizing transition metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Koyama, Koichiro; Shimotake, Hiroshi.

    1983-08-16

    A method is presented for preparing a boride layer on a transition metal substrate for use in corrosive environments or as a harden surface in machine applications. This method is particularly useful in treating current collectors for use within a high temperature and corrosive electrochemical cell environment. A melt of a alkali metal boride tetrafluoride salt including such as KF to lower its melting point is prepared including a dissolved boron containing material, for instance NiB, MnB[sub 2], or CrB[sub 2]. A transition metal to be coated is immersed in the melt at a temperature of no more than 700 C and a surface boride layer of that transition metal is formed within a period of about 24 hours on the substrate surface. 4 figs.

  16. Insights into metal-ligand and metal-metal interaction in coinage metal triangles. Insights of d10-d10, d10-d8 and d8-d8 contacts from [Au3In(CH3Ndbnd COCH3)3] (n = 2, 4, 6) via relativistic DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guajardo Maturana, R.; Muñoz-Castro, A.

    2016-05-01

    The successive addition of one, two and three equivalents of iodide to [Au3(CH3Ndbnd COCH3)3], gives rise to the [Au3In(CH3Ndbnd COCH3)3] (n = 2, 4, 6) oxidized systems. Such structures have been studied by using scalar relativistic DFT calculations and TD-DFT. Our results demonstrate a stronger ligand-to-metal charge donation, which increases in covalency. The long metal-metal contacts observed through the series result from the similarly population of bonding, non-bonding and slightly anti-bonding combinations of the 6s-Au atomic shells in the [Au3]n+ core, leading to distances in the range of the sum of their van der Waals radii for all the systems.

  17. Attachment of hyaluronan to metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William G; Morris, Robert N; Mason, Mitchell L; Hall, Matthew W; Luo, Yi; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2004-01-01

    Metal implants are in general not compatible with the tissues of the human body, and in particular, blood exhibits a severe hemostatic response. Herein we present results of a technique to mask the surface of metals with a natural biopolymer, hyaluronan (HA). HA has minimal adverse interactions with blood and other tissues, but attachment of bioactive peptides can promote specific biological interactions. In this study, stainless steel was cleaned and then surface-modified by covalent attachment of an epoxy silane. The epoxy was subsequently converted to an aldehyde functional group and reacted with hyaluronan through an adipic dihydrazide linkage, thus covalently immobilizing the HA onto the steel surface. Fluorescent labeling of the HA showed that the surface had a fairly uniform covering of HA. When human platelet rich plasma was placed on the HA-coated surface, there was no observable adhesion of platelets. HA derivatized with a peptide containing the RGD peptide sequence was also bound to the stainless steel. The RGD-containing peptide was bioactive as exemplified by the attachment and spreading of platelets on this surface. Furthermore, when the RGD peptide was replaced with the nonsense RDG sequence, minimal adhesion of platelets was observed. This type of controlled biological activity on a metal surface has potential for modulating cell growth and cellular interactions with metallic implants, such as vascular stents, orthopedic implants, heart valve cages, and more. PMID:14661254

  18. Biological interactions at metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Douglas C.

    2011-06-01

    Adsorption of biomolecules, whether it is a consequence of a material being put into service in a biological medium such as a biomedical implant device or a heat exchanger tube, are governed by fundamental interactions and surface conditions that are well characterized (and in some cases not so well). This work reviews those fundamental interactions and also describes a study of the adsorption of a naturally occurring biological polymer onto a stainless steel alloy.

  19. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    Combustion of metals has been widely studied in the past, primarily because of their high oxidation enthalpies. A general understanding of metal combustion has been developed based on the recognition of the existence of both vapor-phase and surface reactions and involvement of the reaction products in the ensuing heterogeneous combustion. However, distinct features often observed in metal particle combustion, such as brightness oscillations and jumps (spearpoints), disruptive burning, and non-symmetric flames are not currently understood. Recent metal combustion experiments using uniform high-temperature metal droplets produced by a novel micro-arc technique have indicated that oxygen dissolves in the interior of burning particles of certain metals and that the subsequent transformations of the metal-oxygen solutions into stoichiometric oxides are accompanied with sufficient heat release to cause observed brightness and temperature jumps. Similar oxygen dissolution has been observed in recent experiments on bulk iron combustion but has not been associated with such dramatic effects. This research addresses heterogeneous metal droplet combustion, specifically focusing on oxygen penetration into the burning metal droplets, and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. A unique feature of the experimental approach is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc Generator of Monodispersed Metal Droplets (GEMMED), ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with controllable initial temperature and velocity. The droplet initial temperatures can be adjusted within a wide range from just above the metal melting point, which provides means to ignite droplets instantly upon entering an oxygen containing environment. Initial droplet velocity will be set equal to zero allowing one to organize metal combustion microgravity experiments in a fashion similar to usual microgravity

  20. Theory of sum frequency generation from metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, A.

    The time-dependent density functional approach is used to evaluate the optical sum frequency generation from metal surfaces. Attention is focussed on the magnitude and frequency variation of the element χzzz(ω1,ω2). Four types of metal surfaces are considered: simple metals, alkali metal overlayers, noble metals, and charged metal surfaces. Differences and similarities with respect to second harmonic generation from these surfaces are pointed out.

  1. Terahertz NDE for Metallic Surface Roughness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic surface roughness in a nominally smooth surface is a potential indication of material degradation or damage. When the surface is coated or covered with an opaque dielectric material, such as paint or insulation, then inspecting for surface changes becomes almost impossible. Terahertz NDE is a method capable of penetrating the coating and inspecting the metallic surface. The terahertz frequency regime is between 100 GHz and 10 THz and has a free space wavelength of 300 micrometers at 1 THz. Pulsed terahertz radiation, can be generated and detected using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. The resulting time domain signal is 320 picoseconds in duration. In this application, samples are inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scans the sample and generates a set of time-domain signals that are a function of the backscatter from the metallic surface. Post processing is then performed in the time and frequency domains to generate C-scan type images that show scattering effects due to surface non-uniformity.

  2. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule–metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule–metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  3. Rigid multipodal platforms for metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valášek, Michal; Lindner, Marcin; Mayor, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    In this review the recent progress in molecular platforms that form rigid and well-defined contact to a metal surface are discussed. Most of the presented examples have at least three anchoring units in order to control the spatial arrangement of the protruding molecular subunit. Another interesting feature is the lateral orientation of these foot structures which, depending on the particular application, is equally important as the spatial arrangement of the molecules. The numerous approaches towards assembling and organizing functional molecules into specific architectures on metal substrates are reviewed here. Particular attention is paid to variations of both, the core structures and the anchoring groups. Furthermore, the analytical methods enabling the investigation of individual molecules as well as monomolecular layers of ordered platform structures are summarized. The presented multipodal platforms bearing several anchoring groups form considerably more stable molecule-metal contacts than corresponding monopodal analogues and exhibit an enlarged separation of the functional molecules due to the increased footprint, as well as restrict tilting of the functional termini with respect to the metal surface. These platforms are thus ideally suited to tune important properties of the molecule-metal interface. On a single-molecule level, several of these platforms enable the control over the arrangement of the protruding rod-type molecular structures (e.g., molecular wires, switches, rotors, sensors) with respect to the surface of the substrate. PMID:27335731

  4. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  5. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  6. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  7. Modelling the appearance of heritage metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, L.; Hindmarch, J.; Robson, S.; Terras, M.

    2014-06-01

    Polished metallic surfaces exhibit a high degree of specularity, which makes them difficult to reproduce accurately. We have applied two different techniques for modelling a heritage object known as the Islamic handbag. Photogrammetric multi-view stereo enabled a dense point cloud to be extracted from a set of photographs with calibration targets, and a geometrically accurate 3D model produced. A new method based on photometric stereo from a set of images taken in an illumination dome enabled surface normals to be generated for each face of the object and its appearance to be rendered, to a high degree of visual realism, when illuminated by one or more light sources from any angles. The specularity of the reflection from the metal surface was modelled by a modified Lorentzian function.

  8. The Surface Chemistry of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas Charles

    The surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is explored through several interrelated analytical investigations. After a brief discussion of the nanocrystal history and applications, molecular orbital theory is used to describe the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how these materials behave on the nanoscale. Quantum confinement plays a major role in dictating the optical properties of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, however surface states also have an equally significant contribution to the electronic properties of nanocrystals due to the high surface area to volume ratio of nanoscale semiconductors. Controlling surface chemistry is essential to functionalizing these materials for biological imaging and photovoltaic device applications. To better understand the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanocrystals, three competing surface chemistry models are presented: 1.) The TOPO model, 2.) the Non-stoichiometric model, and 3.) the Neutral Fragment model. Both the non-stoichiometric and neutral fragment models accurately describe the behavior of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. These models rely on the covalent bond classification system, which divides ligands into three classes: 1.) X-type, 1-electron donating ligands that balance charge with excess metal at the nanocrystal surface, 2.) L-type, 2-electron donors that bind metal sites, and 3.) Z-type, 2-electron acceptors that bind chalcogenide sites. Each of these ligand classes is explored in detail to better understand the surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. First, chloride-terminated, tri-n-butylphosphine (Bu 3P) bound CdSe nanocrystals were prepared by cleaving carboxylate ligands from CdSe nanocrystals with chlorotrimethylsilane in Bu3P solution. 1H and 31P{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the isolated nanocrystals allowed assignment of distinct signals from several free and bound species, including surface-bound Bu3P and [Bu3P-H]+[Cl]- ligands as well as a Bu

  9. Surface engineering: a low wearing solution for metal-on-metal hip surface replacements.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian J; Williams, Sophie; Brown, Chris; Anderson, James; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2009-08-01

    Increased patient blood and serum levels of Co and Cr and dissemination of metal wear particles throughout organs and tissues are the primary concerns with metal-on-metal surface replacements. Surface engineering, providing a ceramic bearing surface on a metal substrate, could provide a solution. This study investigated thick (>10 microm) arc evaporation plasma vapor deposition chromium nitride (CrN) coated surface replacements in terms of wear, ion levels, and wear particles in a 10 million cycle hip simulator study, compared to a contemporary metal-on-metal surface replacement. The ion levels were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The wear particles were imaged by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy. The CrN-coated bearings had 80% lower wear than the MoM controls. The Cr and Co ion levels in the lubricant of the CrN bearings were 73 and 98% lower than in the MoM controls. The wear particles produced were in the nanometer size range and round to oval in morphology. The CrN coating could provide a reduction in the wear and ion release of MoM surface replacements, thereby reducing the perceived risks to the patient associated with these prostheses. PMID:19195030

  10. Superoleophobic Surfaces Obtained via Hierarchical Metallic Meshes.

    PubMed

    Grynyov, Roman; Bormashenko, Edward; Whyman, Gene; Bormashenko, Yelena; Musin, Albina; Pogreb, Roman; Starostin, Anton; Valtsifer, Viktor; Strelnikov, Vladimir; Schechter, Alex; Kolagatla, Srikanth

    2016-05-01

    Hierarchical metallic surfaces demonstrating pronounced water and oil repellence are reported. The surfaces were manufactured with stainless-steel microporous meshes, which were etched with perfluorononanoic acid. As a result, a hierarchical relief was created, characterized by roughness at micro- and sub-microscales. Pronounced superoleophobicity was registered with regard to canola, castor, sesame, flax, crude (petroleum), and engine oils. Relatively high sliding angles were recorded for 5 μL turpentine, olive, and silicone oil droplets. The stability of the Cassie-like air trapping wetting state, established with water/ethanol solutions, is reported. The omniphobicity of the surfaces is due to the interplay of their hierarchical relief and surface fluorination. PMID:27077637

  11. Hybridization of ionic levels at metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürpick, P.; Thumm, U.

    1998-09-01

    We investigated the hybridization of He+, Li2+, and Be3+ ionic levels and the creation of surface resonances for nuclear charges Z=2, 3, and 4 near an Al surface. Starting from a two-center basis set expansion with hydrogenic wave functions on the ion site and jellium wave functions in the metal half space, we calculate the self-energy for ion-surface system in the fixed-ion approximation. We obtain convergence by using a rather small set of bound ionic states. This ideally suits this method for the generation of adiabatic basis states that can be used in time-dependent close-coupling calculations for slow ion-surface collisions. We compare our resonance energies and widths with other theoretical approaches, discuss electronic density profiles, and analyze resonances in terms of Stark states.

  12. Water molecule conformation outside a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, F.; Gabbay, I.; March, N. H.

    1981-05-01

    The effect of a metal surface on the conformation of a water molecule has been analyzed by discussing two independent effects: (i) the screening of the proton-proton repulsion, (ii) the interaction of the lone-pair orbitals with the surface. Both effects tend to increase the HOH angle. However, the interaction between the lone-pairs with the surface is the dominant effect for a water molecule approaching the surface. In particular, for a chemisorbed state this interaction is responsible for the major part of the molecule deformation. We have estimated that for H 2O chemisorbed on Ru, the HOH angle must increase from the free molecule value of 104.5° by 3.1 ± 0.5° in good agreement with the experimental evidence.

  13. Surface plasmon polaritons in artificial metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Jayson Lawrence

    Surface plasmon polaritons have been the focus of intense research due to their many unique properties such as high electromagnetic field localization, extreme sensitivity to surface conditions, and subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic waves. The area of potential impact is vast and includes promising advancements in photonic circuits, high speed photodetection, hyperspectral imaging, spectroscopy, enhanced solar cells, ultra-small scale lithography, and microscopy. My research has focused on utilizing these properties to design and demonstrate new phenomena and implement real-world applications using artificial metallic nanostructures. Artificial metallic nanostructures employed during my research begin as thin planar gold films which are then lithographically patterned according to previously determined dimensions. The result is a nanopatterned device which can excite surface plasmon polaritons on its surface under specific conditions. Through my research I characterized the optical properties of these devices for further insight into the interesting properties of surface plasmon polaritons. Exploration of these properties led to advancements in biosensing, development of artificial media to enhance and control light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and hybrid plasmonic cavities. Demonstrations from these advancements include: label-free immunosensing of Plasmodium in a whole blood lysate, low part-per-trillion detection of microcystin-LR, enhanced refractive index sensitivity of novel resonant plasmonic devices, a defect-based plasmonic crystal, spontaneous emission modification of colloidal quantum dots, and coupling of plasmonic and optical Fabry-Perot resonant modes in a hybrid cavity.

  14. Ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikie, Iain D.; Grain, Angela C.; Sutherland, James; Law, Jamie

    2014-12-01

    We describe a novel photoemission technique utilizing a traditional Kelvin probe as a detector of electrons/atmospheric ions ejected from metallic surfaces (Au, Ag, Cu, Fe, Ni, Ti, Zn, Al) illuminated by a deep ultra-violet (DUV) source under ambient pressure. To surmount the limitation of electron scattering in air the incident photon energy is rastered rather than applying a variable retarding electric field as is used with UPS. This arrangement can be applied in several operational modes: using the DUV source to determine the photoemission threshold (Φ) with 30-50 meV resolution and also the Kelvin probe, under dark conditions, to measure contact potential difference (CPD) between the Kelvin probe tip and the metallic sample with an accuracy of 1-3 meV. We have studied the relationship between the photoelectric threshold and CPD of metal surfaces cleaned in ambient conditions. Inclusion of a second spectroscopic visible source was used to confirm a semiconducting oxide, possibly Cu2O, via surface photovoltage measurements with the KP. This dual detection system can be easily extended to controlled gas conditions, relative humidity control and sample heating/cooling.

  15. Process Of Bonding A Metal Brush Structure To A Planar Surface Of A Metal Substrate

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Wille; Gerald W.

    1999-11-02

    Process for bonding a metal brush structure to a planar surface of a metal substrate in which an array of metal rods are retained and immobilized at their tips by a common retention layer formed of metal, and the brush structure is then joined to a planar surface of a metal substrate via the retention layer.

  16. METHOD OF FORMING A PROTECTIVE COATING ON FERROUS METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Weeks, J.R.; Kammerer, O.F.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1960-02-23

    A method is described of protecting ferrous metal surfaces from corrosive attack by liquid metals, such as liquid bismuth or lead-bismuth alloys. The nitrogen content of the ferrous metal surface is first reduced by reacting the metal surface with a metal which forms a stable nitride. Thereafter, the surface is contacted with liquid metal containing at least 2 ppm zirconium at a temperature in the range of 550 to 1100 deg C to form an adherent zirconium carbide layer on the ferrous surface.

  17. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  18. Adsorption of pentacene on (100) vicinal surfaces: role of coordination, surface chemistry and vdWs effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to low miller index surfaces, vicinal surfaces are characterized by steps and step edges that not only present an interesting atomic landscape for the adsorption organic molecules, but also a unique electronic structure resulting in part from the low coordinated atoms at the step edges. The adsorption of pentacene on the stepped (511), (711), (911) surfaces (respectively 3, 4 and 5-atom wide terraces) of Cu and Ag (coinage transition metals); Pt (reactive transition metal); and Ni (reactive, magnetic transition metal) are studied using density functional theory, in order to investigate the support effects arising from differing surface chemistry. We compare the adsorption energy, adsorption geometry and electronic structure predicted by the PBE functional with those obtained from one of the optimized vdW-DF methods: optB88-vdW. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Science under Contract No. DE-FG02-11ER16243.

  19. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  20. 75 FR 62184 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee October 26, 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... 2012 America the Beautiful Quarter-Dollar Coins, designs for the Arnold Palmer Congressional Gold Medal, and designs for the New Frontier Congressional Gold Medal. Interested persons should call 202-354-6700..., bullion coinage, Congressional Gold Medals, and national and other medals. Advises the Secretary of...

  1. 78 FR 42592 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee July 23 and 24, 2013, Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee July 23 and 24, 2013, Public.... SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces.... Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220. Subject:...

  2. 76 FR 24959 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee, Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee, Public Meeting ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces..., 2011. Time: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Conference Room A, United States Mint, 801 9th Street,...

  3. 75 FR 22187 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee April 27, 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee April 27, 2010 Public Meeting SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces... Northup, United States Mint Liaison to the CCAC; 801 9th Street, NW.; Washington, DC 20220; or call...

  4. 75 FR 13344 - Revised Meeting Time for Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee March 2010 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... United States Mint Revised Meeting Time for Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee March 2010 Public Meeting AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notification. SUMMARY: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the Citizens...

  5. 76 FR 44400 - Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee July 26, 2011 Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... United States Mint Notification of Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee July 26, 2011 Public Meeting...: Pursuant to United States Code, Title 31, section 5135(b)(8)(C), the United States Mint announces the.... Time: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: United States Mint, 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC,...

  6. Nanoscopy Reveals Surface-Metallic Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Yohannes

    Nanolayer and two-dimensional (2D) materials............. 1 such as graphene... 2,3 , boron nitride... 1,4 , transition metal dichalcogenides... 1 , 5 - 8 (TMDCs), and black phosphorus (BP)... 1 , 9 - 13 have intriguing fundamental physical properties and bear promise of important applications in electronics and optics... 9 , 14 , 15 . Of them, BP... 11 , 12 , 16 is a novel layered material that has been theoretically predicted... 10 to acquire plasmonic behavior for frequencies below ~0.4 eV when highly doped. The electronic properties of BP are unique due to its anisotropic structure . Advantages of BP as a material for nanoelectronics and nanooptics are due to the fact that, in contrast to metals, the free carrier density in it can be dynamically controlled by chemical or electrostatic gating, which has been demonstrated by its use in field-effect transistors.... 9 , 14 , 15 Despite all the interest that BP attracts, near-field and plasmonic properties of BP have not yet been investigated experimentally. Here we report the first observation of nanoscopic near-field properties of BP. We have discovered near-field patterns of outside bright fringes and high surface polarizability of nanofilm BP consistent with its surface-metallic, plasmonic behavior at mid-infrared (mid-IR) frequencies below critical frequency ωm ~ 1176 cm -1 . This has allowed us to estimate plasma frequency ωp ~ 0 . 4 eV, carrier density n ~ 1 . 1 × 1011 nm-1 and the thickness of the surface metallic layer of ~ 1 nm . We have also observed similar behavior in other nanolayer semiconductors such as TMDC MoS 2 and topological insulator Bi 2 Te 3 but not in insulators such as boron nitride. This new phenomenon is attributed to surface band-bending and charging of the semiconductor nanofilms. The surface plasmonic behavior has been found for 10-40 nm BP thickness but absent for 4 nm BP thickness. This discovery opens up a new field of research and potential applications in nanoelectronics

  7. Enantioselective recognition at mesoporous chiral metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wattanakit, Chularat; Côme, Yémima Bon Saint; Lapeyre, Veronique; Bopp, Philippe A.; Heim, Matthias; Yadnum, Sudarat; Nokbin, Somkiat; Warakulwit, Chompunuch; Limtrakul, Jumras; Kuhn, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Chirality is widespread in natural systems, and artificial reproduction of chiral recognition is a major scientific challenge, especially owing to various potential applications ranging from catalysis to sensing and separation science. In this context, molecular imprinting is a well-known approach for generating materials with enantioselective properties, and it has been successfully employed using polymers. However, it is particularly difficult to synthesize chiral metal matrices by this method. Here we report the fabrication of a chirally imprinted mesoporous metal, obtained by the electrochemical reduction of platinum salts in the presence of a liquid crystal phase and chiral template molecules. The porous platinum retains a chiral character after removal of the template molecules. A matrix obtained in this way exhibits a large active surface area due to its mesoporosity, and also shows a significant discrimination between two enantiomers, when they are probed using such materials as electrodes. PMID:24548992

  8. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  9. Paper surfaces for metal nanoparticle inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhlund, Thomas; Örtegren, Jonas; Forsberg, Sven; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2012-10-01

    The widespread usage of paper and board offer largely unexploited possibilities for printed electronics applications. Reliability and performance of printed devices on comparatively rough and inhomogenous surfaces of paper does however pose challenges. Silver nanoparticle ink has been deposited on ten various paper substrates by inkjet printing. The papers are commercially available, and selected over a range of different types and construction. A smooth nonporous polyimide film was included as a nonporous reference substrate. The substrates have been characterized in terms of porosity, absorption rate, apparent surface energy, surface roughness and material content. The electrical conductivity of the resulting printed films have been measured after drying at 60 °C and again after additional curing at 110 °C. A qualitative analysis of the conductivity differences on the different substrates based on surface characterization and SEM examination is presented. Measurable parameters of importance to the final conductivity are pointed out, some of which are crucial to achieve conductivity. When certain criteria of the surfaces are met, paper media can be used as low cost, but comparably high performance substrates for metal nanoparticle inks in printed electronics applications.

  10. Surface passivation of metal hydrides for applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, S.; Li, Z.P.; Sun, Y.M.; Liu, B.H.; Gao, X.P.

    1998-12-31

    Properties and characteristics of hydriding alloys are strongly dependent on surface compositions and morphologies. For instance, oxides such as La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on AB{sub 5} alloys and ZrO{sub 2} on AB{sub 2}, AB, and body-centered-cubic (BCC) alloys act as the barriers for the conversion of molecular and ionic hydrogen to atomic hydrogen at the surface, thus reducing the kinetics in both the gas-solid and electrochemical reactions. Alloy surfaces chemically treated by an aqueous F-ion containing solution have been developed to solve such problems. F-treated surfaces exhibit significantly improved characteristics in regard to the hydrogen uptakes and the protection against impurities and electrolyte solution. In addition, highly conductive metallic Ni layers can be formed on the surface of the alloy particles by the fluorination. The authors report the properties and characteristics of fluorinated hydriding alloys, mainly of a typical AB{sub 2} Laves phase material which represents the difficult activation characteristics and poor long-term durability during electrochemical charge/discharge cycles.

  11. Nano-donuts on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Abhishek; Nayak, Jayita; Roy Barman, Sudipta

    2015-03-01

    Nano-structures comprising of a pit surrounded by a circular ridge that resemble nano-donuts have been observed on flat terraces of both Au(1 1 1) and Al(1 0 0) surfaces after low energy (1.5-2 keV) rare gas (rg) ion implantation. From time lapse scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that these donuts originate from the rg bubbles that migrate out from the sub-surface region. The circular shape of the donuts is observed for both Ar and Ne bubbles. The donuts and the related nano-structures represent different stages of large time scale co-operative relaxation of Au atoms by long range elastic interaction after the rg bubbles leave the metal.

  12. Stabilizing the surface of lithium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughey, J. T.; Liu, Gao; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2014-05-01

    Lithium metal is an ideal anode for the next generation of high capacity rechargeable batteries, including Li-air, Li-S, and other Li-based batteries using intercalation compounds. To enable the broad applications for lithium anodes, more fundamental studies need to be conducted to simultaneously address the two barriers discussed above. One of the key breakthroughs in this field may come from the development of new electrolytes (and additives) which can form a stable SEI layer with enough mechanical strength and flexibility. The ideal electrolyte may consist of only two components; one component inhibits dendrite growth, while another component forms a stable SEI layer to improve Coulombic efficiency. In this review, the status of three approaches at manipulating and controlling the lithium metal – electrolyte interface were discussed. While previous studies concentrated on coatings with minimal surface connectivity, the approaches discussed, namely a coating that forms and dissipates into the electrolyte based on charge density, a coating bonded to the termination layer of lithium, and a conformal carbonate coating formed at the interface, all highlight new research directions. Although there are still many obstacles to be overcome, we are optimistic that Li metal can be used as an anode in rechargeable batteries in the foreseeable future. This will enable wide

  13. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  14. Surface Stabilization Mechanisms in Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra Toledo, Andres Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Metal oxide surfaces play a central role in modern applications, ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to electronic devices, yet little is known about the processes determining their structural stabilization. Several such stabilization mechanisms are explored via a combination of theoretical and experimental methods. The processes of periodic reconstruction, adsorption and segregation are studied through case studies of model material systems. The evaluation of structural models of periodic SrTiO3(001) reconstructions via bonding analysis and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images supports the family of "DL" models terminating in two consecutive layers of TiO2 composition, and discards alternative proposals such as the models based on periodic Sr adatoms. Experimental and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and complementary spectroscopic data are used to determine the structure of linear Ti-rich SrTiO 3(001) nanostructures. The structural solution exemplifies the recurrence of locally stable motifs across numerous surfaces. In particular, the arrangement of edge-sharing TiO5 surface polyhedra is a trait is shared by (001) nanostructures and DL reconstructions. This is a flexible framework which allows for optimal bonding in surface atoms. Modeling of water adsorption on reconstructed SrTiO3(001) surfaces reveals that water plays two major roles in the stabilization of oxide surfaces: it may mediate the formation of certain ordered structures, or it may be part of the ultimately stable structures themselves. This can be understood in terms of the inevitable presence of chemisorbed water on defective surfaces. Since the surface mobility of cationic species is relatively low, the kinetics associated to water diffusion and desorption dominate the surface ordering process. High-temperature annealing of SrLaAlO4 single crystals leads to the segregation of SrO to the surfaces, in the form of islands. This process is in fact a bulk stabilization

  15. Stereochemical Recognition of Helicenes on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2016-06-21

    The chiral recognition among biomolecules is fundamentally important for many processes of life, including the stereochemistry of evolution. Of special interest is chiral recognition during crystallization of racemates, when either homochiral recognition leads to a conglomerate of homochiral crystals or heterochiral recognition dominates resulting in a racemic compound. The complex nature of molecular recognition at the level of nucleation and crystal growth renders it difficult to understand and calls for manageable model systems. Notably, the approach of studying aggregation of molecules at surfaces under well-defined conditions includes the benefit of the availability of a multitude of highly sensitive investigation methods, of which scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with its submolecular resolution is tremendously valuable. Heterogeneous nucleation at surfaces is strongly favored over homogeneous nucleation in solution; hence, surfaces are significantly involved in stereochemical recognition during crystallization. Helicenes are a fascinating class of chiral compounds with outstanding optical activity. These π-conjugated, ortho-fused, aromatic hydrocarbons are promising candidates for organic electronic devices such as sensors, circular dichroic photonics, liquid crystal displays or spin filters. But in particular the defined footprint of their terminal benzo rings on a surface makes them interesting for studying stereochemical recognition with different single crystalline surfaces and the impact this has, in turn, on intermolecular recognition. In this Account, we describe the self-assembly of helicenes on metal surfaces with the focus on stereochemical recognition in two-dimensional structures. Using the isomeric all-carbon helicenes, heptahelicene and dibenzohelicene as examples, different aggregation phenomena on different surfaces of single crystalline copper, silver, and gold are investigated. By means of STM different modes of transmission of

  16. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Allred, Ronald E.; Wilson, Jr., Kennard V.

    1992-01-01

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  17. Method for providing adhesion to a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Allred, R.E.; Wilson, K.V. Jr.

    1992-02-18

    A process for treating metal surfaces to obtain improved susceptibility to bonding with adhesive compositions is disclosed. A metal surface is oxidized with a halogen to form a monolayer of halide ions on the surface. The halide ions are then exchanged with azide ions to form an azide monolayer on the metal surface. Upon contact of the treated surface with an adhesive composition, the azide layer may be thermally or photochemically decomposed to form active nitrene species, which react to bond the adhesive composition to the metal surface.

  18. Metal-oxide-semiconductor photocapacitor for sensing surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzade-Rezaie, Farnood; Peale, Robert E.; Panjwani, Deep; Smith, Christian W.; Nath, Janardan; Lodge, Michael; Ishigami, Masa; Nader, Nima; Vangala, Shiva; Yannuzzi, Mark; Cleary, Justin W.

    2015-09-01

    An electronic detector of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) is reported. SPPs optically excited on a metal surface using a prism coupler are detected by using a close-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor. Semitransparent metal and graphene gates function similarly. We report the dependence of the photoresponse on substrate carrier type, carrier concentration, and back-contact biasing.

  19. The Surface Structure of Ground Metal Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, W.; Schmid, E.

    1944-01-01

    The changes produced on metallic surfaces as a result of grinding and polishing are not as yet fully understood. Undoubtedly there is some more or less marked change in the crystal structure, at least, in the top layer. Hereby a diffusion of separated crystal particles may be involved, or, on plastic material, the formation of a layer in greatly deformed state, with possible recrystallization in certain conditions. Czochralski verified the existence of such a layer on tin micro-sections by successive observations of the texture after repeated etching; while Thomassen established, roentgenographically by means of the Debye-Scherrer method, the existence of diffused crystal fractions on the surface of ground and polished tin bars, which he had already observed after turning (on the lathe). (Thickness of this layer - 0.07 mm). Whether this layer borders direct on the undamaged base material or whether deformed intermediate layers form the transition, nothing is known. One observation ty Sachs and Shoji simply states that after the turning of an alpha-brass crystal the disturbance starting from the surface, penetrates fairly deep (approx. 1 mm) into the crystal (proof by recrystallization at 750 C).

  20. Method for cleaning and passivating a metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, George B. (Inventor); Carpenter, Norman F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A cleaning solvent useful in the cleaning of metal surfaces, e.g. nickle-iron alloys, contains sulfamic acid, citric acid, a solvent for hydrocarbon residues, and a surfactant. Metal surfaces are cleaned by contacting the surface with the cleaning solvent and then passivated by contact with aqueous solutions of citric acid or sodium nitrite or a combination of the two.

  1. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences. For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.

  2. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.more » For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.« less

  3. Ultrasound-driven design of metal surface nanofoams.

    PubMed

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth; Andreeva, Daria V

    2010-05-01

    Ultrasound processes are particularly interesting for a great variety of applications like formation of developed surfaces, finishing, catalyst formation, polymerization and surface polymer attachment, etc. Here, we report on the ultrasound-driven formation of metal surface nanofoams in aqueous media. Systematic investigation of ultrasound effects on various types of aluminium, iron and magnesium alloys shows that the character of the metal determines the roughness of the metal surface. A trick with attachment of layered double hydroxide laurate to a nanostructured aluminium-based foam surface results in the formation of a corrosion-resistant superhydrophobic surface. PMID:20644741

  4. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Gary L.

    1988-08-16

    A method for preparing highly hydrogen-reactive surfaces on metals which normally require substantial heating, high pressures, or an extended induction period, which involves pretreatment of said surfaces with either a non-oxidizing acid or hydrogen gas to form a hydrogen-bearing coating on said surfaces, and subsequently heating said coated metal in the absence of moisture and oxygen for a period sufficient to decompose said coating and cooling said metal to room temperature. Surfaces so treated will react almost instantaneously with hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The method is particularly applicable to uranium, thorium, and lanthanide metals.

  5. Photoelectric scanner makes detailed work function maps of metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    Photoelectric scanning device maps the work function of a metal surface by scanning it with a light spot and measuring the resulting photocurrent. The device is capable of use over a range of surface temperatures.

  6. Dependence of metal-enhanced fluorescence on surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Alexandre; Sciacca, Beniamino; Zuber, Agnieszka; Klantsataya, Elizaveta; Monro, Tanya M.

    2014-03-01

    Metal Enhanced Fluorescence (MEF) takes advantage of the coupling between surface plasmons, in either a metallic thin film or metallic nanoparticles, and fluorophores located in proximity of the metal, yielding an increase of the fluorophore emission. While MEF has been widely studied on metallic nanoparticles with the emphasis on creating brighter fluorescent labels, planar surfaces have not benefitted from the same attention. Here we investigate the influence of the surface roughness of a thin metallic film on the fluorescence enhancement. 50nm thick silver films were deposited on glass slides using either thermal evaporation with different evaporation currents or an electroless plating method based on the Tollens reaction to vary the surface roughness. Multiple layers of positively and negatively charged polyelectrolytes were deposited on top of the metallic coating to map out the enhancement factor as function of the gap between the metallic coating and fluorophore molecules covalently bound to the last polyelectrolyte layer. We show that fluorescence is enhanced by the presence of the metallic film, and in particular that the enhancement increases by a factor 3 to 40 for roughness ranging from 3 nm to 8 nm. Although these enhancement factors are modest compared to the enhancement produced by complex metallic nanoparticles or nano-patterned metallic thin films, the thin films used here are capable of supporting a plasmonic wave and offer the possibility of combining different techniques, such as surface plasmon resonance (with its higher refractive index sensitivity compared to localized plasmons) and MEF within a single device.

  7. X-ray Fluorescence analytical criteria to assess the fineness of ancient silver coins: Application on Ptolemaic coinage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarelou, Vasiliki; Ager, Francisco José; Eugenidou, Despoina; Chaves, Francisca; Andreou, Alexandros; Kontou, Elena; Katsikosta, Niki; Respaldiza, Miguel Angel; Serafin, Patrizia; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zarkadas, Charalambos; Polikreti, Kyriaki; Karydas, Andreas Germanos

    2011-09-01

    The application of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis in a non-invasive manner on ancient silver coins may not provide reliable bulk compositional data due to possible presence of a surface, silver enriched layer. The present work proposes a set of three complementary analytical methodologies to assess and improve the reliability of XRF data in such cases: a) comparison of XRF data on original and cleaned micro-spots on coin surface, b) Ag K/L ratio test and c) comparison of experimental and theoretically simulated intensities of the Rayleigh characteristic radiation emitted from the anode. The proposed methodology was applied on 82 silver coins from the collection of Ioannes Demetriou, donated to the Numismatic Museum of Athens in the 1890s. The coins originate from different mints and are attributed to the first five Ptolemaic kings' reign (321-180 B.C.). They were analyzed in-situ by using a milli-probe XRF spectrometer. The presence of an Ag-enriched layer was excluded for the majority of them. The silver fineness was found to be high, with very low concentrations of copper and lead. The composition data provide important information about possible sources of silver during the Ptolemaic period and indications of a gradual coinage debasement after 270 B.C. due to economic or technical reasons.

  8. Process to restore obliterated serial numbers on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.; Parker, B.; Chisum, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Metal smeared into grooves of serial numbers by grinding or filing can be cleaned out by process called cavitation. Ultrasonic vibrator generates very high frequency vibrations in water which create millions of microscopic bubbles. Cavitation bubbles impact metal surface at thousands of pounds per square inch pressure. Metal particles filling grooves are broken away.

  9. Selective Metal-vapor Deposition on Organic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Selective metal-vapor deposition signifies that metal-vapor atoms are deposited on a hard organic surface, but not on a soft (low glass transition temperature, low Tg ) surface. In this paper, we introduce the origin, extension, and applications of selective metal-vapor deposition. An amorphous photochromic diarylethene film shows light-controlled selective metal-vapor deposition, which is caused by a large Tg change based on photoisomerization, but various organic surfaces, including organic crystal and polymers, can be utilized for achieving selective metal-vapor deposition. Various applications of selective metal-vapor deposition, including cathode patterning of organic light-emitting devices, micro-thin-film fuses, multifunctional diffraction gratings, in-plane electrical bistability for memory devices, and metal-vapor integration, have been demonstrated. PMID:26663735

  10. Metals at the surface of last scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-04-15

    Standard big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) predicts only a trace abundance of lithium and no heavier elements, but some alternatives predict a nonzero primordial metallicity. Here we explore whether CMB measurements may set useful constraints to the primordial metallicity and/or whether the standard CMB calculations are robust, within the tolerance of forthcoming CMB maps, to the possibility of primordial metals. Metals would affect the recombination history (and thus CMB power spectra) in three ways: (1) Ly{alpha} photons can be removed (and recombination thus accelerated) by photoionizing metals; (2) The Bowen resonance-fluorescence mechanism may degrade Ly{beta} photons and thus enhance the Ly{beta} escape probability and speed up recombination; (3) Metals could affect the low-redshift tail of the CMB visibility function by providing additional free electrons. The last two of these provide the strongest CMB signal. However, the effects are detectable in the Planck satellite only if the primordial metal abundance is at least a few hundredths of solar for (2) and a few tenths of solar for (3). We thus conclude that Planck will not be able to improve upon current constraints to primordial metallicity, at the level of a thousandth of solar, from the Lyman-{alpha} forest and ultra-metal-poor halo stars, and that the CMB power-spectrum predictions for Planck suffer no uncertainty arising from the possibility that there may be primordial metals.

  11. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  12. An Atomistic View on Fundamental Transport Processes on Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Giesen, Margret

    2007-06-14

    In this lecture I present an introduction to the time-resolved observation of atomic transport processes on metal surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy video sequences. The experimental data is analyzed using scaling law concepts known from statistical thermodynamics. I will present studies from metal surfaces in vacuum as well as in electrolyte.

  13. Pendant-Drop Surface-Tension Measurement On Molten Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man, Kin Fung; Thiessen, David

    1996-01-01

    Method of measuring surface tension of molten metal based on pendant-drop method implemented in quasi-containerless manner and augmented with digital processing of image data. Electrons bombard lower end of sample rod in vacuum, generating hanging drop of molten metal. Surface tension of drop computed from its shape. Technique minimizes effects of contamination.

  14. He atom surface spectroscopy: Surface lattice dynamics of insulators, metals and metal overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the first three years of this grant (1985--1988) the effort was devoted to the construction of a state-of-the-art He atom scattering (HAS) instrument which would be capable of determining the structure and dynamics of metallic, semiconductor or insulator crystal surfaces. The second three year grant period (1988--1991) has been dedicated to measurements. The construction of the instrument went better than proposed; it was within budget, finished in the proposed time and of better sensitivity and resolution than originally planned. The same success has been carried over to the measurement phase where the concentration has been on studies of insulator surfaces, as discussed in this paper. The experiments of the past three years have focused primarily on the alkali halides with a more recent shift to metal oxide crystal surfaces. Both elastic and inelastic scattering experiments were carried out on LiF, NaI, NaCl, RbCl, KBr, RbBr, RbI, CsF, CsI and with some preliminary work on NiO and MgO.

  15. ELECTROCATALYSIS ON SURFACES MODIFIED BY METAL MONOLAYERS DEPOSITED AT UNDERPOTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    ADZIC,R.

    2000-12-01

    The remarkable catalytic properties of electrode surfaces modified by monolayer amounts of metal adatoms obtained by underpotential deposition (UPD) have been the subject of a large number of studies during the last couple of decades. This interest stems from the possibility of implementing strictly surface modifications of electrocatalysts in an elegant, well-controlled way, and these bi-metallic surfaces can serve as models for the design of new catalysts. In addition, some of these systems may have potential for practical applications. The UPD of metals, which in general involves the deposition of up to a monolayer of metal on a foreign substrate at potentials positive to the reversible thermodynamic potential, facilitates this type of surface modification, which can be performed repeatedly by potential control. Recent studies of these surfaces and their catalytic properties by new in situ surface structure sensitive techniques have greatly improved the understanding of these systems.

  16. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1995-02-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of different polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitrile (SAN), polybutadieneterephthalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylene (POM) were treated by excimer-laser radiation at 248 nm in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification and ablation to increase surface roughness. Therefore, the laser-processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the ablation depth, optical penetration depth, absorption coefficient and ablation threshold are determined. The metallization of pretreated (laser, wet chemical and plasma etching) polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes were electroplating and physical vapour deposition (PVD). The adhesion of the deposited films is measured with scratch and tape test methods in order to determine the regimes of suitable surface modification for metallization.

  17. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed. PMID:23915280

  18. Detecting Cracks in Rough Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuver, N. T.; Sugg, F. E.; Stuckenberg, F. H.; Morrissey, E. T.

    1985-01-01

    Test based on eddy-current probe technique identifies cracks in swaged metals. Hinged collar with spring-loaded latch holds probe in place on part tested. For repeated measurements on same or similar parts, collar loosened and moved to various measuring positions. Method suitable for many kinds of metal parts, including swaged fittings, tubing, and pipes. Used for rapid crack/no-crack determinations in suspect parts already installed.

  19. Metal-organic framework materials with ultrahigh surface areas

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Wilmer, Christopher E.; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Snurr, Randall Q.; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Borah, Bhaskarjyoti

    2015-12-22

    A metal organic framework (MOF) material including a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area greater than 7,010 m.sup.2/g. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bond. Also a metal organic framework (MOF) material including three types of cuboctahedron cages fused to provide continuous channels. Also a method of making a metal organic framework (MOF) material including saponifying hexaester precursors having alkyne bonds to form a plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers including alkyne bonds and performing a solvothermal reaction with the plurality of hexa-carboxylated linkers and one or more metal containing compounds to form the MOF material.

  20. Staphylococcal surface display of metal-binding polyhistidyl peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, P.; Wernerus, H.; Svedberg, M.; Staahl, S.

    2000-03-01

    Recombinant Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus strains were generated with surface-exposed chimeric proteins containing polyhistidyl peptides designed for binding to divalent metal ions. Surface accessibility of the chimeric surface proteins was demonstrated and the chimeric surface proteins were found to be functional in terms of metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococcal cells were shown to have gained Ni{sup 2+}- and Cd{sup 2+}-binding capacity, suggesting that such bacteria could find use in bioremediation of heavy metals. This is, to their knowledge, the first time that recombinant, surface-exposed metal-binding peptides have been expressed on gram-positive bacteria. Potential environmental or biosensor applications for such recombinant staphylococci as biosorbents are discussed.

  1. The interaction of surfaces across rough, metal-containing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knarr, Randolph Frederick

    1999-10-01

    This thesis probes the interfacial and contact mechanical behavior between an optically smooth (nanometer-scale roughness) metal surface and an opposing surface of either a similar metal or a molecularly smooth mica surface (sub-Angstrom-scale roughness). This was carried out in a surface forces apparatus (SFA) equipped with extended spectral analysis of multiple beam interferometry (ESA-MBI) allowing Angstrom-scale deformations at the interface to be probed. During this work the SFA was enhanced to include an electrical resistance probe. The contact mechanics theory of Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR), 1971, originally developed for smooth, elastic bodies, is applied in broad new ways to describe the contact mechanical behavior of rough-metal contacts. The effects of depositing a self assembled monolayer (SAM) on one or both metal surfaces were also investigated. Finally, three new metals were introduced successfully into the SFA with the aid of optical theory to define the geometry of the metal films. In the JKR theory, the fundamental work of adhesion, W, is replaced with an effective work of adhesion that is shown to correlate with asperity deformations at the interface both in the loading and unloading cycles. For the case of metal-metal contact cold welding is observed and characterized. In the case of silver-silver contact, JKR theory is used to postulate that cold welding occurs in only a fraction of the whole contact zone. SAMs deposited on metals, gold in this case, are shown to inhibit cold welding in most cases and result in adequate description by JKR theory during unloading. Adhesion between SAM-coated metal surfaces correlates with terminal chemistry, with polar groups interacting more strongly. Optical theory was used to design experiments to successfully introduce three alternative metals into the SFA.

  2. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Hartmut; Wesner, David A.; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang

    1995-04-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of various polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitril (SAN), polybutadieneterphtalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylen (POM) were treated by excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm) in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification. Therefore the laser processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the absorption coefficient, optical penetration depth, ablation depth and ablation threshold are determined. The surface morphology and surface roughness are studied by optical surface profilometry and secondary electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of laser treatment on chemical composition of modified and ablated surfaces is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Depending on the processing parameters and materials properties different microstructures and values of surface roughness are generated on the micrometer length scale. Pretreatment for the subsequent metallization is performed with laser radiation, wet chemical and plasma etching. The metallization of polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes are electroplating and physical vapor deposition (PVD). Adhesion of the deposited films, measured with scratch and tape test methods, is used as a criterion for determining regimes of suitable surface modification for subsequent metallization.

  3. Formation of carbyne and graphyne on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qinghong; Ding, Feng

    2014-10-01

    The electronic and geometric structures of carbyne on various transition metal surfaces were investigated by theoretical calculations. It was found that carbyne on non-active metal surfaces has a polyynic structure, while a polycumulenic structure is more stable on active catalyst surfaces. The self-assembly of carbyne on a metal substrate could lead to the synthesis of graphyne.The electronic and geometric structures of carbyne on various transition metal surfaces were investigated by theoretical calculations. It was found that carbyne on non-active metal surfaces has a polyynic structure, while a polycumulenic structure is more stable on active catalyst surfaces. The self-assembly of carbyne on a metal substrate could lead to the synthesis of graphyne. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational details and structural information of carbon chains on Ni(111) and Rh(111) surfaces, carbon island on Cu(111), Ni(111), Rh(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03757j

  4. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  5. Antimicrobial metallic copper surfaces kill Staphylococcus haemolyticus via membrane damage

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Quaranta, Davide; Grass, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Recently, copper (Cu) in its metallic form has regained interest for its antimicrobial properties. Use of metallic Cu surfaces in worldwide hospital trials resulted in remarkable reductions in surface contaminations. Yet, our understanding of why microbes are killed upon contact to the metal is still limited and different modes of action have been proposed. This knowledge, however, is crucial for sustained use of such surfaces in hospitals and other hygiene-sensitive areas. Here, we report on the molecular mechanisms by which the Gram-positive Staphylococcus haemolyticus is inactivated by metallic Cu. Staphylococcus haemolyticus was killed within minutes on Cu but not on stainless steel demonstrating the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic Cu. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and in vivo staining with Coppersensor-1 indicated that cells accumulated large amounts of Cu ions from metallic Cu surfaces contributing to lethal damage. Mutation rates of Cu- or steel-exposed cells were similarly low. Instead, live/dead staining indicated cell membrane damage in Cu- but not steel-exposed cells. These findings support a model of the cellular targets of metallic Cu toxicity in bacteria, which suggests that metallic Cu is not genotoxic and does not kill via DNA damage. In contrast, membranes constitute the likely Achilles’ heel of Cu surface-exposed cells. PMID:22950011

  6. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates. PMID:26679353

  7. Polarity-driven surface metallicity in SmB6.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z-H; Nicolaou, A; Levy, G; Butch, N P; Syers, P; Wang, X F; Paglione, J; Sawatzky, G A; Elfimov, I S; Damascelli, A

    2013-11-22

    By a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory study, we discover that the surface metallicity is polarity driven in SmB6. Two surface states, not accounted for by the bulk band structure, are reproduced by slab calculations for coexisting B6 and Sm surface terminations. Our analysis reveals that a metallic surface state stems from an unusual property, generic to the (001) termination of all hexaborides: the presence of boron 2p dangling bonds, on a polar surface. The discovery of polarity-driven surface metallicity sheds new light on the 40-year old conundrum of the low-temperature residual conductivity of SmB6, and raises a fundamental question in the field of topological Kondo insulators regarding the interplay between polarity and nontrivial topological properties. PMID:24313508

  8. Multilayer Relaxation and Surface Energies of Metallic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Agustin M.; Ferrante, John

    1994-01-01

    The perpendicular and parallel multilayer relaxations of fcc (210) surfaces are studied using equivalent crystal theory (ECT). A comparison with experimental and theoretical results is made for AI(210). The effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the magnitudes and ordering of surface relaxations for this semiempirical method is estimated. A new measure of surface roughness is proposed. Predictions for the multilayer relaxations and surface energies of the (210) face of Cu and Ni are also included.

  9. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: cast metal occlusal surface.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Arora, Aman; Yadav, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, however, these methods are time-consuming, expensive and requires many cumbersome steps. These methods also requires the patient to be without the prosthesis for the time during which the laboratory procedures are performed. This article presents a quick, simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on complete dentures. PMID:22945724

  10. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, J.B.; Steger, P.J.; Wright, R.R.

    1982-03-04

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes depositing, by electrolysis, an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be-re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  11. Bonding at the Metal-Organic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Eva

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of density functional theory calculations that account for dispersion, which systematically study the perturbations of the electronic structure of various organic molecules physisorbed or weakly chemisorbed to the (111) surfaces of the coinage metal surfaces copper, silver and gold. The molecules considered include: benzene, substituted benzenes, 4-fluorostyrene, tetraphenyl porphyrin, a quinonoid zwitterion, croconic acid and rhodizonic acid. We have employed a frontier orbital perspective to analyze the bonding between the substrate and the adsorbate, studied the charge redistribution at the organic-metal interface, and analyzed how this affects the self-assembly. Our theoretical studies have helped to explain the experimental observations of STM (scanning tunneling microscopy) groups by showing that: tetraphenyl-porphyrin forms attractive networks on the Ag(111) surface and repulsive ones on Cu(111) because of the larger amount of charge transfer on Cu(111); the 10 D dipole of a quinonoid zwitterion changes substantially upon adsorption to the coinage metal surfaces Cu(111), Ag(111) and Au(111) as a result of donation of charge from the molecular HOMO to the surface and back donation to the LUMO; the charge transfer which occurs between the quinonoid zwitterion and Au(111) has been studied as a function of surface coverage; 4-fluorostyrene molecules form clusters of ``magic'' sizes that depend on the metal surface and can be understood in terms of a balance between attractive H-bonding and van der Waals interactions as well as Coulomb repulsion between the molecules; the topological organic ferroelectric molecule croconic acid forms chiral honeycomb networks on the Ag(111) surface. Moreover, our calculations have illustrated that classic activating groups generally increase and prototypical deactivating groups decrease the amount and direction of charge transferred from a substituted benzene derivative to the Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces

  12. Precision metal occlusal surfaces for removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Barco, M T; Synnott, S A

    1989-01-01

    The prosthodontist is often limited in developing the desired occlusal pattern when integrating removable partial dentures with natural dentitions or fixed partial dentures. A technique that allows the development of an esthetic, accurate metal occlusal surface for a removable partial denture is described. The occlusion developed allows an occlusal harmony with the removable partial denture that is not possible with stock denture teeth or metal occlusal surfaces developed with stock denture teeth. PMID:2700630

  13. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films with (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.

  14. How do energetic ions damage metallic surfaces?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Calder, Andrew F.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-02-20

    Surface modification under bombardment by energetic ions observed under different conditions in structural and functional materials and can be either unavoidable effect of the conditions or targeted modification to enhance materials properties. Understanding basic mechanisms is necessary for predicting properties changes. The mechanisms activated during ion irradiation are of atomic scale and atomic scale modeling is the most suitable tool to study these processes. In this paper we present results of an extensive simulation program aimed at developing an understanding of primary surface damage in iron by energetic particles. We simulated 25 keV self-ion bombardment of Fe thin films withmore » (100) and (110) surfaces at room temperature. A large number of simulations, ~400, were carried out allow a statistically significant treatment of the results. The particular mechanism of surface damage depends on how the destructive supersonic shock wave generated by the displacement cascade interacts with the free surface. Three basic scenarios were observed, with the limiting cases being damage created far below the surface with little or no impact on the surface itself, and extensive direct surface damage on the timescale of a few picoseconds. In some instances, formation of large <100> vacancy loops beneath the free surface was observed, which may explain some earlier experimental observations.« less

  15. Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh

    2006-07-01

    PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

  16. Heavy metal adsorption by sulphide mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Gilles E.; Bancroft, G. Michael

    1986-07-01

    The adsorption of aqueous Hg 2+, Pb 2+, Zn 2+ and Cd 2+ complexes on a variety of sulphide minerals has been studied as a function of the solution pH and also as a function of the nature of the ligands in solution. Sulphide minerals are excellent scavengers for these heavy metals. The adsorption is strongly pH dependent, i.e. there is a critical pH at which the adsorption increases dramatically. The pH dependence is related to the hydrolysis of the metal ions. Indirect evidence suggests that the hydrolyzed species are adsorbed directly on the sulphide groups, probably as a monolayer. The results also suggest the presence of MCI n2- n species physisorbed on the adsorbed monolayer. A positive identification of the adsorbed species was not possible using ESCA/XPS.

  17. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  18. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  19. Characterisation of the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stewart F; Adroja, Devashibhai; Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica; Tischer, Markus; Möbus, Konrad; Wieland, Stefan D; Albers, Peter

    2016-07-14

    A combination of electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron spectroscopies and computational methods has provided new insights into the species present on the surface of freshly prepared precious metal catalysts. The results show that in all cases, at least half of the surface is metallic or nearly so, with the remainder covered by oxygen, largely as hydroxide. Water is also present and is strongly held; weeks of pumping under high vacuum is insufficient to remove it. The hydroxyls are reactive as shown by their reaction with or displacement by CO and can be removed by hydrogenation. This clearly has implications for how precious metal catalysts are activated after preparation. PMID:26986759

  20. Lipophilic super-absorbent polymer gels as surface cleaners for oil and grease from metal and non-metal surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to develop a new cleaning technology based on lipophilic super-absorbent swelling gels for the removal of oil, grease and particulate matters from metal and non-metal surfaces. It is desired that the cleaner is in solid form and is VOC-exempt, HAP-free, non-toxic, n...

  1. Method for producing highly reflective metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jones B.; Steger, Philip J.; Wright, Ralph R.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a novel method for producing mirror surfaces which are extremely smooth and which have high optical reflectivity. The method includes electrolessly depositing an amorphous layer of nickel on an article and then diamond-machining the resulting nickel surface to increase its smoothness and reflectivity. The machined nickel surface then is passivated with respect to the formation of bonds with electrodeposited nickel. Nickel then is electrodeposited on the passivated surface to form a layer of electroplated nickel whose inside surface is a replica of the passivated surface. The electroplated nickel layer then is separated from the passivated surface. The mandrel then may be re-passivated and provided with a layer of electrodeposited nickel, which is then recovered from the mandrel providing a second replica. The mandrel can be so re-used to provide many such replicas. As compared with producing each mirror-finished article by plating and diamond-machining, the new method is faster and less expensive.

  2. Sulfur-induced structural motifs on copper and gold surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walen, Holly

    The interaction of sulfur with copper and gold surfaces plays a fundamental role in important phenomena that include coarsening of surface nanostructures, and self-assembly of alkanethiols. Here, we identify and analyze unique sulfur-induced structural motifs observed on the low-index surfaces of these two metals. We seek out these structures in an effort to better understand the fundamental interactions between these metals and sulfur that lends to the stability and favorability of metal-sulfur complexes vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur. We choose very specific conditions: very low temperature (5 K), and very low sulfur coverage (≤ 0.1 monolayer). In this region of temperature-coverage space, which has not been examined previously for these adsorbate-metal systems, the effects of individual interactions between metals and sulfur are most apparent and can be assessed extensively with the aid of theory and modeling. Furthermore, at this temperature diffusion is minimal and relatively-mobile species can be isolated, and at low coverage the structures observed are not consumed by an extended reconstruction. The primary experimental technique is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The experimental observations presented here---made under identical conditions---together with extensive DFT analyses, allow comparisons and insights into factors that favor the existence of metal-sulfur complexes, vs. chemisorbed atomic sulfur, on metal terraces. We believe this data will be instrumental in better understanding the complex phenomena occurring between the surfaces of coinage metals and sulfur.

  3. Investigating Free-surface, MHD Instabilities in Liquid Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfiel, Geoff; Ji, Hantao; Zweben, Stewart

    1999-11-01

    The addition of the Lorentz force (j × B) to MHD fluids, such as liquid metals, could introduce new instabilities to free-surface motions. An experiment is under development at PPPL that will contribute to the understanding of these instabilities. This experiment is designed to explore how instabilities form and propagate on the surface of liquid metals. Metals with low melting points and reasonable conductive properties (such as Ga) are melted in an eight inch, square Pyrex container. The container is placed in a large magnetic field (up to 5 kG) and a perpendicular current is set up in the metal. Waves are generated using a simple wave driving apparatus. A one dimensional, diode camera is used to monitor wave propagation perpendicular to the B-field. Initial results will be presented and discussed. This experiment will provide information that could eventually be used to better control free-surface motions in liquid Li walls in fusion reactors.

  4. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires’ overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire’s metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue. PMID:23652344

  5. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  6. Carbon monoxide-induced dynamic metal-surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Carenco, Sophie

    2014-08-18

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule in surface science, materials chemistry, catalysis and nanotechnology. Its interaction with a number of metal surfaces is at the heart of major processes, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or fuel-cell optimization. Recent works, coupling structural and nanoscale in situ analytic tools have highlighted the ability of metal surfaces and nanoparticles to undergo restructuring after exposure to CO under fairly mild conditions, generating nanostructures. This Minireview proposes a brief overview of recent examples of such nanostructuring, which leads to a discussion about the driving force in reversible and non-reversible situations. PMID:25044189

  7. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  8. Sapphire (0001) Surface, Clean and with d -Metal Overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Verdozzi, C.; Jennison, D.R.; Schultz, P.A.; Sears, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    We present local density-functional results for structural and electronic properties of Al{sub 2}O {sub 3}(0001) , clean and with Pt and Ag adsorption. Significant surface relaxations penetrate to the third oxygen layer, 5.2 {Angstrom} below the surface. The dominant mechanism of metal adhesion is polarization and is relatively weak ({approx_equal} 0.4 and 0.6 eV/atom for Ag and Pt, respectively); however, isolated metal atoms bind up to 5{times} as strongly with an ionic bond induced by the surface Madelung potential. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. The role of van der Waals interactions in surface-supported supramolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Treier, Matthias; Fasel, Roman; Passerone, Daniele

    2010-01-28

    The development of a detailed theoretical understanding of surface-supported supramolecular networks is important for designing novel organic nanodevices. By comparing with STM experiments, we show that van der Waals corrections to density functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) are mandatory to correctly reproduce the electronic and geometric structure of a prototypical system of this kind, the self-assembled hydrogen bonded network formed by 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) and 4,4''-diamino-p-terphenyl (DATP) deposited on Au(111). Our results reproduce both the network structure and its higher stability with respect to homomolecular networks. By successful comparison with the experiments, we demonstrate that dispersive interactions must be taken into account when rationally designing organic semiconductor nanostructures on a metallic substrate. DFT-GGA alone would fail in predicting geometric and electronic properties for weakly bounded large organic adsorbates on coinage metal surfaces. PMID:20066384

  10. Interaction of nanostructured metal overlayers with oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Wagner, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    Interactions between metals and oxides are key factors to determine the performance of metal/oxide heterojunctions, particularly in nanotechnology, where the miniaturization of devices down to the nanoregime leads to an enormous increase in the density of interfaces. One central issue of concern in engineering metal/oxide interfaces is to understand and control the interactions which consist of two fundamental aspects: (i) interfacial charge redistribution — electronic interaction, and (ii) interfacial atom transport — chemical interaction. The present paper focuses on recent advances in both electronic and atomic level understanding of the metal-oxide interactions at temperatures below 1000 ∘C, with special emphasis on model systems like ultrathin metal overlayers or metal nanoclusters supported on well-defined oxide surfaces. The important factors determining the metal-oxide interactions are provided. Guidelines are given in order to predict the interactions in such systems, and methods to desirably tune them are suggested. The review starts with a brief summary of the physics and chemistry of heterophase interface contacts. Basic concepts for quantifying the electronic interaction at metal/oxide interfaces are compared to well-developed contact theories and calculation methods. The chemical interaction between metals and oxides, i.e., the interface chemical reaction, is described in terms of its thermodynamics and kinetics. We review the different chemical driving forces and the influence of kinetics on interface reactions, proposing a strong interplay between the chemical interaction and electronic interaction, which is decisive for the final interfacial reactivity. In addition, a brief review of solid-gas interface reactions (oxidation of metal surfaces and etching of semiconductor surfaces) is given, in addition to a comparison of a similar mechanism dominating in solid-solid and solid-gas interface reactions. The main body of the paper reviews

  11. Monolayer detection on flat metal surface via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Chen, Jiao; He, Haibing; Zhang, Rongping; Chen, Wei; Lu, Xiaolin; Wang, Xinping; Xue, Gi

    2012-01-01

    Monolayer detection on metal surface requires ultra high sensitivity. Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy (SFG) and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) are regarded as two powerful techniques with submolecular sensitivity to detect adsorbents on metal surface. However, in some cases it's still challenge to characterize molecules or groups with relatively high intramolecular symmetry, such as 4-Nitrothiophenol (4NTP), on flat metal surface even combining these two techniques. Basically, this is due to that 4NTP with para-substituted phenol groups is SFG insensitive while flat metal surface is unfavorable to yield strong SERS enhancement. In this concern, a simple and efficient method, silver mirror method, was employed to facilitate the detection of 4NTP SAM on flat gold surface. Silver nanopheres with diameters around 300 nm was fabricated through silver mirror reaction and in situ formed milky overlayer on top of 4NTP SAM adsorbed on gold surface. Significant enhancement on SERS signal can be achieved with such special assembly structure of the "metal-molecule-metal" system. Generally, the silver mirror method provided a complementary approach to facilitate the spectroscopic applications of molecule level detection on various metal surfaces in situ. PMID:22523987

  12. MHD Effects on Surface Stability and Turbulence in Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Lauren; Ji, Hantau; Zweben, Stewart

    2000-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is a significant element in understanding many phenomena observed in space and laboratory plasmas. MHD models also appropriately describe behaviors of liquid metals. Currently, there are many interests in the utilization of liquid metal in fusion devices; therefore an understanding of MHD physics in liquid metals is imperative. A small experiment has been built to study the MHD effects on turbulence and surface waves in liquid metal. To fully examine the MHD properties, a reference case in hydrodynamics is established using water or Gallium without the presence of the magnetic field or electrical current. An external wave driver with varying frequency and amplitude excites surface waves on the liquid metal. The experimental case using Gallium is run with the presence of the magnetic field and/ or electric pulses. The magnetic field is induced using two magnetic field coils on either side of the liquid metal and the electrical current is induced using electrodes. The measured dispersion relations of the two cases are then compared to the theoretical predictions. Several diagnostics are used in concert to accurately measure the wave characteristics. The surface waves will be recorded visually through a camera and the amplitude and frequency of the waves will be measured using a laser and fiber-optic system. This successful experiment will significantly enhance knowledge of liquid metal wave behavior and therefore aid in the applications of MHD in fusion plasmas. This worked was conducted as part of the DOE-sponsored National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics

  13. Solvated Electrons on Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jin; Li, Bin; Onda, Ken; Feng, Min; Petek, Hrvoje

    2006-09-13

    An electron added to a solvent polarizes its surrounding medium to minimize the free energy. Such an electron with its polarization cloud, which we refer to as the solvated electron, is one of the most fundamental chemical reagents of significant experimental and theoretical interest. The structure and dynamics of solvated electrons in protic solvents have been explored ever since the discovery of intense blue coloration in solutions of alkali metals in ammonia.1-3 Because solvated electrons are the most fundamental chemical reagents as well as carriers of negative charge, substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have focused on elucidating their equilibrium structure and solvation dynamics in a variety of neat liquids.4,5 One of the most important but least explored environments for solvated electrons, namely, the two-dimensional liquid/solid and liquid/vacuum interfaces, is the subject of this review.

  14. Isolation and characterization of bacteria resistant to metallic copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Morais, Paula Vasconcelos; Grass, Gregor

    2010-03-01

    Metallic copper alloys have recently attracted attention as a new antimicrobial weapon for areas where surface hygiene is paramount. Currently it is not understood on a molecular level how metallic copper kills microbes, but previous studies have demonstrated that a wide variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Clostridium difficile, are inactivated within minutes or a few hours of exposure. In this study, we show that bacteria isolated from copper alloy coins comprise strains that are especially resistant against the toxic properties exerted by dry metallic copper surfaces. The most resistant of 294 isolates were Gram-positive staphylococci and micrococci, Kocuria palustris, and Brachybacterium conglomeratum but also included the proteobacterial species Sphingomonas panni and Pseudomonas oleovorans. Cells of some of these bacterial strains survived on copper surfaces for 48 h or more. Remarkably, when these dry-surface-resistant strains were exposed to moist copper surfaces, resistance levels were close to those of control strains and MICs for copper ions were at or below control strain levels. This suggests that mechanisms conferring resistance against dry metallic copper surfaces in these newly isolated bacterial strains are different from well-characterized copper ion detoxification systems. Furthermore, staphylococci on coins did not exhibit increased levels of resistance to antibiotics, arguing against coselection with copper surface resistance traits. PMID:20048058

  15. Surface plasmon dispersion analysis in the metal-oxide-metal tunnel diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, J. F.; Wang, E. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed model of surface plasmon dispersion in the metal-oxide-metal tunnel diode is presented in order to clarify the spectral emission from this diode. The model predicts the location of the spectral peaks and the emission between the peaks by considering the effects of retardation on the surface plasmon. A nonradiative mode is found to play a major role in the transition from the visible to UV peaks in the diode spectra.

  16. Method for producing functionally graded nanocrystalline layer on metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Hershberger, Jeffrey G.

    2010-03-23

    An improved process for the creation or formation of nanocrystalline layers on substrates' surfaces is provided. The process involves "prescuffing" the surface of a substrate such as a metal by allowing friction to occur on the surface by a load-bearing entity making rubbing contact and moving along and on the substrate's surface. The "prescuffing" action is terminated when the coefficient of friction between the surface and the noise is rising significantly. Often, the significant rise in the coefficient of friction is signaled by a change in pitch of the scuffing action sound emanating from the buffeted surface. The "prescuffing" gives rise to a harder and smoother surface which withstands better any inadequate lubrication that may take place when the "prescuffed" surface is contacted by other surfaces.

  17. Method for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Purohit, Ankur; Kaminski, Michael D.; Nunez, Luis

    2003-01-01

    A method of decontaminating a radioactively contaminated oxide on a surface. The radioactively contaminated oxide is contacted with a diphosphonic acid solution for a time sufficient to dissolve the oxide and subsequently produce a precipitate containing most of the radioactive values. Thereafter, the diphosphonic solution is separated from the precipitate. HEDPA is the preferred diphosphonic acid and oxidizing and reducing agents are used to initiate precipitation. SFS is the preferred reducing agent.

  18. Emerging Applications of Liquid Metals Featuring Surface Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide “skin” enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects. PMID:25283244

  19. Electronic decoupling of a cyclophane from a metal surface

    PubMed Central

    Matino, Francesca; Schull, Guillaume; Köhler, Felix; Gabutti, Sandro; Mayor, Marcel; Berndt, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Electronic self-decoupling of an organic chromophore from a metal substrate is achieved using a naphtalenediimide cyclophane to spatially separate one chromophore unit of the cyclophane from the substrate. Observations of vibronic excitations in scanning tunneling spectra demonstrate the success of this approach. These excitations contribute a significant part of the tunneling current and give rise to clear structure in scanning tunneling microscope images. We suggest that this approach may be extended to implement molecular functions at metal surfaces. PMID:21059947

  20. Rough Fresnel zone plates over metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Rios, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the focusing properties of Fresnel zone plates fabricated over steel tapes using laser ablation. Our intention is to implement the use of micro-optical elements when the use of conventional chrome-glass elements is not indicated. Because of the manufacture process, the surface presents a certain anisotropic roughness, which reduces the focusing properties. First, we develop numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld approach, showing how roughness in both levels of the Fresnel zone plate affects the focalization of the lens. We also manufacture Fresnel zone plates over steel tape, and perform experimental verification that corroborates the numerical results. PMID:20357856

  1. Surface plasmons leaky radiation of the flat metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Dejiao; Pang, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Surface plasmons have been widely investigated in many fields due to the unique property. ATR (attenuated totalreflection) is the common method to excite surface plasmons. We derive the Fano-type analysis to present the reflection spectrum of ATR configuration derived from the three-layer Fresnel reflection equation, which are asymmetric curves resulted from interference between direct reflectance and surface plasmons leaky radiation. In the fitting progress, we obtain the relationship between surface plasmons leaky radiation and metal thickness. When the metal thickness is greater than 25nm, surface plasmons leaky radiation rate is less than 0.07. We also compare the ATR and grating coupler excitement mechanism, which provide a reference to evaluate their application.

  2. Interaction of hydrogen with transition metal fcc(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löautber, R.; Hennig, D.

    1997-02-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the fcc(111) surfaces of Pd and Rh was investigated theoretically with an ab initio method, to find out the differences and similiarities between these neighboring metals. At the Rh surface the hcp site of the threefold-coordinated adsorption sites is preferred, while at Pd almost no difference between the hcp and fcc sites was found. For Pd, the occupation of subsurface positions was calculated to be more stable than bulklike positions. The energy gain caused by hydrogen absorption in subsurface positions is only about 100 meV lower than for hydrogen adsorption at the surface. In contrast, for Rh, significant differences between adsorption and absorption were calculated. The diffusion barrier for hydrogen diffusion from surface to subsurface positions was calculated and compared to the diffusion barrier in bulk. The hydrogen-induced work-function changes for the considered 4d transition-metal surfaces were positive for coverage θ=1.

  3. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  4. RFID Label Tag Design for Metallic Surface Environments

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chong Ryol; Eom, Ki Hwan

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a metal mount RFID tag that works reliably on metallic surfaces. The method proposes the use of commercial label type RFID tags with 2.5 mm thick Styrofoam103.7 with a relative permittivity of 1.03 attached on the back of the tag. In order to verify the performance of the proposed method, we performed experiments on an electric transformer supply chain system. The experimental results showed that the proposed tags can communicate with readers from a distance of 2 m. The recognition rates are comparable to those of commercial metallic mountable tags. PMID:22346612

  5. Enrichment of metals in the surface sediments of Sapanca Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Bakan, G.; Balkas, T.I.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive lake sediment study was performed on the Sapanca Lake of Turkey in which certain metal analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The purpose of the study was to find the enrichment of metals in the surface sediments of Sapanca Lake. A method, namely, the index of geoaccumulation, was used to define the degree of anthropogenic pollution in the Sapanca Lake basin. Results of the geoaccumulation index indicate that only enrichments of trace metals, cadmium, and lead are found.

  6. Facile preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces based on metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xue-Mei; Cui, Jin-Feng; Sun, Han-Xue; Liang, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Zhao-Qi; An, Jin; Yang, Bao-Ping; La, Pei-Qing; Li, An

    2014-06-01

    A novel method for fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces was developed by facile coating various metal oxide nanoparticles, including ZnO, Al2O3 and Fe3O4, on various substrates followed by treatment with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using ZnO nanoparticles as a model, the changes in the surface chemical composition and crystalline structures of the metal oxide nanoparticles by PDMS treatment were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. The results show that the combination of the improved surface roughness generated from of the nanoparticles aggregation with the low surface-energy of silicon-coating originated from the thermal pyrolysis of PDMS would be responsible for the surface superhydrophobicity. By a simple dip-coating method, we show that the metal oxide nanoparticles can be easily coated onto the surfaces of various textural and dimensional substrates, including glass slide, paper, fabric or sponge, for preparation of superhydrophobic surfaces for different purpose. The present strategy may provide an inexpensive and new route to surperhydrophobic surfaces, which would be of technological significance for various practical applications especially for separation of oils or organic contaminates from water.

  7. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  8. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  9. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  10. Evaluation of Metal-Fueled Surface Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David I.; Marcille, Thomas F.; Kapernick, Richard J.; Hiatt, Matthew T.; Amiri, Benjamin W.

    2007-01-30

    Surface fission power systems for use on the Moon and Mars may provide the first use of near-term reactor technology in space. Most near-term surface reactor concepts specify reactor temperatures <1000 K to allow the use of established material and power conversion technology and minimize the impact of the in-situ environment. Metal alloy fuels (e.g. U-10Zr and U-10Mo) have not traditionally been considered for space reactors because of high-temperature requirements, but they might be an attractive option for these lower temperature surface power missions. In addition to temperature limitations, metal fuels are also known to swell significantly at rather low fuel burnups ({approx}1 a/o), but near-term surface missions can mitigate this concern as well, because power and lifetime requirements generally keep fuel burnups <1 a/o. If temperature and swelling issues are not a concern, then a surface reactor concept may be able to benefit from the high uranium density and relative ease of manufacture of metal fuels. This paper investigates two reactor concepts that utilize metal fuels. It is found that these concepts compare very well to concepts that utilize other fuels (UN, UO2, UZrH) on a mass basis, while also providing the potential to simplify material safeguards issues.

  11. Modulation of human osteoblasts by metal surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Sehr, Harald; de Wild, Michael; Portenier, Jeannette; Gobrecht, Jens; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2013-08-01

    The use of metal implants in dental and orthopedic surgery is continuously expanding and highly successful. While today longevity and load-bearing capacity of the implants fulfill the expectations of the patients, acceleration of osseointegration would be of particular benefit to shorten the period of convalescence. To further clarify the options to accelerate the kinetics of osseointegration, within this study, the osteogenic properties of structurally identical surfaces with different metal coatings were investigated. To assess the development and function of primary human osteoblasts on metal surfaces, cell viability, differentiation, and gene expression were determined. Titanium surfaces were used as positive, and surfaces coated with gold were used as negative controls. Little differences in the cellular parameters tested for were found when the cells were grown on titanium discs sputter coated with titanium, zirconium, niobium, tantalum, gold, and chromium. Cell number, activity of cell layer-associated alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and levels of transcripts encoding COL1A1 and BGLAP did not vary significantly in dependence of the surface chemistry. Treatment of the cell cultures with 1,25(OH)2 D3 /Dex, however, significantly increased ALP activity and BGLAP messenger RNA levels. The data demonstrate that the metal layer coated onto the titanium discs exerted little modulatory effects on cell behavior. It is suggested that the microenvironment regulated by the peri-implant tissues is more effective in regulating the tissue response than is the material of the implant itself. PMID:23359530

  12. Theoretical Studies of the Surface Tension of Liquid Metal System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, D. G.; Shih, W. H.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to understand the surface tension and other thermophysical properties of liquid metals and alloys from a fundamental viewpoint. The approach is to calculate these quantities by a first principles technique which combines the statistical-mechanical theory of the liquid state with an electronic pseudopotential theory of electrons in metals. The inhomogeneity of the surface is treated using an ionic-density-functional formalism developed with the support of NASA. Of particular interest are the variation of surface tension with temperature and impurity concentration: such variations strongly influence the types of convection which make take place in a low-gravity environment. Some progress has already been achieved in computing the reduction of surface tension due to the presence of low-surface-tension impurities, and the corresponding surface segregation of such impurities. In the coming year, it is planned to concentrate on the surface properties of materials of particular interest to the MSA program: Si, Ga and GaSn alloys. An additional goal is to gain some theoretical understanding of the high temperature thermophysical properties of liquid metals, particularly high melting point materials which have not been studied extensively from a theoretical viewpoint.

  13. Surface free energy of alkali and transition metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqra, Fathi; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses an interesting issue on the surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles as compared to the bulk material. Starting from a previously reported equation, a theoretical model, that involves a specific term for calculating the cohesive energy of nanoparticle, is established in a view to describe the behavior of surface free energy of metallic nanoparticles (using different shapes of particle: sphere, cube and disc). The results indicate that the behavior of surface energy is very appropriate for spherical nanoparticle, and thus, it is the most realistic shape of a nanoparticle. The surface energy of copper, silver, gold, platinum, tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, paladium and alkali metallic nanoparticles is only prominent in the nanoscale size, and it decreases with the decrease of nanoparticle size. Thus, the surface free energy plays a more important role in determining the properties of nanoparticles than in bulk materials. It differs from shape to another, and falls down as the number of atoms (nanoparticle size) decreases. In the case of spherical nanoparticles, the onset of the sharp decrease in surface energy is observed at about 110 atom. A decrease of 16% and 45% in surface energy is found by moving from bulk to 110 atom and from bulk to 5 atom, respectively. The predictions are consistent with the reported data.

  14. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O2 = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  15. Observation of Fermi arc surface states in a topological metal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Su-Yang; Liu, Chang; Kushwaha, Satya K; Sankar, Raman; Krizan, Jason W; Belopolski, Ilya; Neupane, Madhab; Bian, Guang; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Lin, Hsin; Shibayev, Pavel P; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Cava, Robert J; Hasan, M Zahid

    2015-01-16

    The topology of the electronic structure of a crystal is manifested in its surface states. Recently, a distinct topological state has been proposed in metals or semimetals whose spin-orbit band structure features three-dimensional Dirac quasiparticles. We used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to experimentally observe a pair of spin-polarized Fermi arc surface states on the surface of the Dirac semimetal Na3Bi at its native chemical potential. Our systematic results collectively identify a topological phase in a gapless material. The observed Fermi arc surface states open research frontiers in fundamental physics and possibly in spintronics. PMID:25593189

  16. Surface structures of polar and non-polar metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Sara E.

    Metal oxides have long been a challenge to surface science since many traditional surface techniques are often affected by their insulating nature. In particular, high current electron beams can cause charging effects in addition to potentially desorbing surface species and damaging the surface. The development of a low current, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) system has allowed us to investigate metal oxide surfaces while significantly limiting the above mentioned complications. This low current LEED system has been used to perform a structural LEED-IV study of the reconstructed TiO2(011)-(2x1) surface. This surface is known to experience significant oxygen desorption when exposed to high current electron beams. The low current LEED system was crucial to maintain confidence in the structure found, which generally agreed with recently published models, but did not confirm one key feature. The oxygen atoms at the surface were not found to be asymmetrically bonded, which has been thought to be the cause of this surface's enhanced photocatalytic activity. We have also used the low current LEED system to investigate the polar oxide surfaces of ZnO(000 1¯) and MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30°. For Zn0(000 1¯) LEED-IV structural study was combined with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the impact of hydrogen on the surface. Our results support a disordered, fractional coverage of hydrogen terminating the surface. MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30° has proven to be a challenging reconstructed surface. Both LEED-IV and surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) find that previously proposed models for the surface are not a good fit to the data, so other models have been explored. The SXRD data in particular suggest that the reconstruction is more than one atomic layer deep.

  17. Effective mineral coatings for hardening the surface of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, S. V.; Kislov, V. G.; Skazochkin, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. G.; Tikhonov, A. N.

    2015-07-01

    The structural changes that occur in the surface and surface layers of steel 20Kh13 and titanium alloy PT-3V (Russian designation) samples after each stage of hardening due to a formed mineral surface layer are studied by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Electric spark alloying, pressing, and ultrasonic processing are used to reach the effect of volume compression of the base metal and the mineral in the plastic deformation zone. As a result, applied mineral particles concentrate in preliminarily created microvoids in a thin surface layer. The surface layer thus modified acquires a high hardness and wear resistance. Durometry shows that the hardness of the processed sample surfaces increases more than twofold. Therefore, the developed technology of creating a mineral coating can be used to increase the tribological properties of the surfaces of the parts, units, and mechanisms of turbine, pump, and mining equipment, which undergo intense wear during operation.

  18. Phisicochemistry of alkaline-earth metals oxides surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimova, Irina; Minakova, Tamara; Ogneva, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The surface state of alkaline-earth metals and magnesium oxides obtained by means of commercial and laboratory ways has been studied in this paper. A complex of methods has been used for identification, determination of a phase composition and morphology of the samples. The high basic character of surface centres has been shown with the help of pH-metry and adsorption of indicators methods. Acid-basic parameters (pHt, pHiis, etc.) can be used for the estimation of a general acid-basic state of metal oxides samples surface and for the supposition about different nature and strength of acid-basic centres as well as for the initial control in the process of acid basic properties of solid oxides surface properties evaluation.

  19. Ambient non-thermal plasma for metal surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuamatha, Prasad; Pashaie, Bijan; Dhali, Shirshak; Dave, Bakul

    2002-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharge in Argon/Hydrogen and Argon/Oxygen mixture is used to clean metal surfaces prior to applying coating. Dielectric barrier discharges driven by low frequency (4 kHz) and RF (13.45 MHz) are used for the treatment. Plasma treatment removes organic contaminants from the surface of the steel and could provide an alternative to chemical cleaning. Peel tests indicate that Argon/Hydrogen plasma produces the strongest coatings. This would suggest that hydrogen plays a role in etching the surface of the metal. XPS results of surfaces coated with adhesives show that plasma treatment is capable of removing ester like compounds without the need for chemicals. The effect of both oxidizing and reducing atmospher will be discussed.

  20. Modelling of Surfaces. Part 1: Monatomic Metallic Surfaces Using Equivalent Crystal Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Rodriguez, Agustin M.

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed description of equivalent crystal theory focusing on its application to the study of surface structure. While the emphasis is in the structure of the algorithm and its computational aspects, we also present a comprehensive discussion on the calculation of surface energies of metallic systems with equivalent crystal theory and other approaches. Our results are compared to experiment and other semiempirical as well as first-principles calculations for a variety of fcc and bcc metals.

  1. Comparative study of metal adsorption on the metal and the oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Vladimirov, G. G.; Remar, D.; Moutinho, A. M. C.

    2002-05-01

    Adsorption of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu atoms at coverage not exceeding two monolayers on the surface of ultrathin (10-15 Å) alumina and magnesia films (γ-Al 2O 3(111) or α-Al 2O 3(1000) and MgO(111) grown on Mo(110) were studied in ultrahigh vacuum by means of electron spectroscopy techniques (Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), work function measurements and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS)). At very low metal coverage and low substrate temperature (85 K) when the film can be viewed as consisting of separate adatoms and/or very small clusters the electronic properties of adatoms on the oxide films, on one hand, and on Mo(110) surface, on the other hand, are quite different. With increasing metal coverage, the properties on both the oxide and the metallic substrates change becoming similar at the coverage close to monolayer. On the Mo(110) surface the electronic properties change gradually with the metal coverage, whereas on the oxide there is a critical coverage of about 0.15 ML separating ionic and metallic adsorption of the metal species. It is shown that the lateral interaction of adatoms on the oxide surface plays a dominant role in the formation of the band-like structure of the adsorbed 2D film.

  2. Quantum Chemistry for Surface Segregation in Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David

    2006-08-31

    Metal alloys are vital materials for the fabrication of high-flux, high-selectivity hydrogen separation membranes. A phenomenon that occurs in alloys that does not arise in pure metals is surface segregation, where the composition of the surface differs from the bulk composition. Little is known about the strength of surface segregation in the alloys usually considered for hydrogen membranes. Despite this lack of knowledge, surface segregation may play a decisive role in the ability of appropriately chosen alloys to be resistant to chemical poisoning, since membrane poisoning is controlled by surface chemistry. The aim of this Phase I project is to develop quantum chemistry approaches to assess surface segregation in a prototypical hydrogen membrane alloy, fcc Pd{sub 75}Cu{sub 25}. This alloy is known experimentally to have favorable surface properties as a poison resistant H{sub 2} purification membrane (Kamakoti et al., Science 307 (2005) 569-573), but previous efforts at modeling surfaces of this alloy have ignored the possible role of surface segregation (Alfonso et al., Surf. Sci. 546 (2003) 12-26).

  3. Surface-polaritonlike waves guided by thin, lossy metal films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.; Hall, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Surface-plasmon polaritons guided by thin, lossy metallic films bounded by dissimilar dielectric media are investigated. New solutions to the dispersion relation are found, representing waves that are leaky (radiative) in one of the dielectrics. The new waves are interpreted in terms of the coupling of a damped surface plasmon at one interface with continuum modes at the other. Their excitation by end-fire coupling techniques is suggested.

  4. Interaction potential between a helium atom and metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Y.; Kohn, W.

    1985-01-01

    By employing an S-matrix theory for evanescent waves, the repulsive potential between a helium atom and corrugated metal surfaces has been calculated. P-wave interactions and intra-atomic correlation effects were found to be very important. The corrugation part of the interaction potential is much weaker than predicted by the effective-medium theory. Application to Cu, Ni, and Ag (110) surfaces gives good agreement with experiment without any adjustable parameters.

  5. A reliable method of manufacturing metallic hierarchical superhydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pogreb, Roman; Whyman, Gene; Barayev, Reuven; Bormashenko, Edward; Aurbach, Doron

    2009-06-01

    A method of manufacturing hierarchical metallic surfaces demonstrating superhydrophobic properties is presented. The surfaces showed apparent contact angles as high as 153 deg. and sliding angles of 10 deg. for 50-100 {mu}l droplets. The Cassie-like model [A. B. D. Cassie and S. Baxter, Trans. Faraday Soc. 40, 546 (1944)], considering the hierarchical topography of the relief, predicts apparent contact angles in a satisfactory agreement with the measured values.

  6. Excimer laser ceramic and metal surface alloying applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hontzopoulos, E.; Zervaki, A.; Zergioti, Y.; Hourdakis, G.; Raptakis, E.; Giannacopoulos, A.; Fotakis, C.

    1991-02-01

    Recent excimer laser based deposition and surface modification techniques for ceramic and metallurgical engineering applications are reported. These include the improvement of the anti-corrosion and erosion properties and wear resistance of metal alloys and the formation of surface conducting patterns on ceramic materials. Excimer laser chemical vapour deposition (LCVD) applications B, AI and Hf or multielement combinations are discussed together with studies which aim at a better understanding of the fundamental processes governing the deposition process.

  7. Inspection of metal surface containing cracks by small antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, K.; Tamakawa, K.; Minkov, D.; Sato, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2001-04-01

    In order to realize advanced nondestructive inspection technique characterized by high sensitivity and high accuracy, a new technique has been developed for detection and characterization of surface cracks in metals, using small loop antenna or dipole antenna. The principle of the new technique is presented. Experiments are performed on detection and characterization of artificial surface cracks on the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic materials, and a fatigue crack is detected in a 316 stainless steel specimen.

  8. Temporal pulse shaping for smoothing of printed metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Yuval; Zenou, Michael; Dolev, Omer; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) printed metal structures show typical roughness characteristic of the metal droplet size (3 to 10 μm). Submicron voids are often observed in the bulk of such printed metal structures with consequences on the mechanical strength, chemical resistivity, and electrical conductivity. We present the results of our efforts to reduce surface roughness and bulk voids by controlled laser melting. We have used temporally shaped pulses from a fiber laser tunable in the range from 1 to 600 ns in order to improve the quality of LIFT printed copper and aluminum structures. For the best case shown, roughness was improved from RRMS=0.8 μm to RRMS=0.2 μm and the relative percentage of the voids was reduced from 7.3% to 0.9%.

  9. Are the Surfaces of CrO2 Metallic?

    SciTech Connect

    Ventrice, Jr.,C.; Borst, D.; Geisler, H.; van Ek, J.; Losovyj, Y.; Robbert, P.; Diebold, U.; Rodriguez, J.; Miao, G.; Gupta, A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous photoelectron spectroscopy studies of CrO2 have found either no density of states or a very low density of states at the Fermi level, suggesting that CrO2 is a semiconductor or a semi-metal. This is in contradiction to calculations that predict that CrO2 should be a half-metallic ferromagnet. Recently, techniques have been developed to grow high-quality epitaxial films of CrO2 on TiO2 substrates by chemical vapour deposition. We present photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of epitaxial CrO2(110)/TiO2(110) and CrO2(100)/TiO2(100) grown using a CrO3 precursor. In addition, measurements of epitaxial Cr2O3(0001)/Pt(111) films grown by thermal evaporation of Cr in an oxygen atmosphere are presented as a reference for reduced CrO2 films. The measurements of the CrO2 surfaces show no emission at the Fermi level after sputtering and annealing the surfaces in oxygen, even though our soft core photoemission data and low-energy electron diffraction measurements provide evidence that stoichiometric CrO2 is present. The consequence of this is that neither surface of CrO2 is metallic. This behaviour could result from a metal to semiconductor transition at the (110) and (100) surfaces.

  10. Gravity- and strain-induced electric fields outside metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, F.; Opat, G. I.

    1992-05-01

    The gravity-induced electric field outside a metal object supported against gravity is predominantly due to its differential compression which arises in supporting its own weight. This Dessler-Michel-Rorschach-Trammell (DMRT) field, as it has come to be known, is expected to be proportional to the strain derivative of the work function of the surface. We report the results of an experiment designed to produce this effect with mechanically applied strain rather than with gravity. In essence, we have measured the strain-induced contact-potential variation between a metal surface of known strain gradient and an unstrained capacitive probe. We describe useful solutions to the problems faced in such an experiment, which were not adequately addressed by earlier workers. A knowledge of the DMRT field is of considerable importance to experiments designed to compare the gravitational acceleration of charged particles and antiparticles inside a metallic shield. Past experiments with electrons yielded results contrary to the then-expected DMRT field. We review and partially extend the theoretical background by drawing on later results based on the jellium model of metal surfaces. Our results for Cu and Au surfaces are consistent with jellium-based calculations which imply a DMRT field that is about an order of magnitude smaller and of opposite sign to the early estimates.

  11. Insight into water molecules bonding on 4d metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Javier; Michaelides, Angelos; Scheffler, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Water-metal interactions are of capital importance to a wide variety of phenomena in materials science, catalysis, corrosion, electrochemistry, etc. Here we address the nature of the bond between water molecules and metal surfaces through a careful systematic study. Specifically, the bonding of isolated water molecules to a series of close-packed transition metal surfaces - Ru(0001), Rh(111), Pd(111) and Ag(111) - has been examined in detail with density functional theory (DFT). Aiming to understand the origin behind energetic and structural trends along the 4d series we employ a range of analysis tools, such as decomposition of the density of states, electron density differences, electronic reactivity function and inspection of individual Kohn-Sham orbitals. The results obtained allow us to rationalize the bonding between water and transition metal surfaces as a balance of covalent and electrostatic interactions. A frontier orbital scheme based on so-called two-center four-electron interactions between molecular orbitals of water and d band states of the surface proves incisive in understanding these systems.

  12. Properties of corona discharge plasma near metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrinenko, M.; Biktashev, E.; Kirko, D.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of corona discharge near metallic surface were researched. Electrical oscillations in discharge plasma of 1 kHz - 100 MHz rate were registered. Spectrum of electrical oscillations in this range was obtained. Possible plasma waves for observed electronic oscillations explanation are discussed.

  13. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    DOEpatents

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  14. Formation and properties of metallic nanoparticles on compound semiconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Myungkoo

    When electromagnetic radiation is incident upon metallic nanoparticles (NPs), a collective oscillation, termed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR), is generated. Recently, metallic NPs on semiconductor surfaces have enabled the generation of SPR, promising for enhanced light emission, efficient solar energy harvesting, biosensing, and metamaterials. Metallic NPs have been fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) which has an advantage of cost-effectiveness over conventional lithography process requiring multi-step processes. Here, we report formation and properties of FIB-induced metallic NPs on compound semiconductor surfaces. Results presented in this thesis study suggest that FIB-induced Ga NPs can be a promising alternative plasmonic material. In particular, using a combined experimental-computational approach, we discovered a universal mechanism for ion-induced NP formation, which is governed by the sputtering yield of semiconductor surfaces. We also discovered a governing mechanism for ion-induced NP motion, which is driven by thermal fluctuation and anisotropic mass transport. Furthermore, we demonstrated Ga NP arrays with plasmon resonances with performance comparable to those of traditionally-used silver and gold NPs. We then finally demonstrated the Ga NP plasmoninduced enhancement of light emission from GaAs, which is the first ever combination of a new plasmonic material (Ga) and a new fabrication method (FIB) for the plasmon-enhanced light emission.

  15. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  16. Metal surface effects on deposit formation in a flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Eser, S.

    1996-10-01

    The formation of carbonaceous deposits on metallic surfaces of the fuel system due to thermal degradation/pyrolysis of jet fuels is a major concern in the development of advanced jet aircraft in which the fuel is to be used to dissipate the heat loads. The effects of these surfaces on deposit formation at relatively high temperatures (> 400{degrees}C) are studied using a bench scale flow reactor by passing JP-8 fuel and a mixture of n-paraffins (NORPAR 13) on metal coupons (Ni, Cu, Ti, Stainless Steel) inserted inside the reactor. Gas phase reaction products are analyzed by an on-line GC attached to the reactor. Global kinetics for deposit formation is studied by the amount of deposit on the coupons. Carbonaceous deposits on the metal coupons are characterized with SEM, optical microscopy and FTIR. Nickel and copper surfaces are found active in incipient deposit formation. Deposit formed from gas phase with isotropic textures is also observed. The combined data help the understanding of the metal surface effects on deposit formation in comparison to those from tubing bomb reactor and those from actual engine fuel system.

  17. Spatial characters of metallic surface states of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinhee; Lee, Hyungjun; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2011-03-01

    We study the electronic structure of metallic surface states in Bi 2 Se 3 , Bi 2 Te 3 , and Sb 2 Te 3 using an ab-initio pseudopotential density-functional method. We implemented the spin-orbit interaction into the SIESTA in a form of additional fully non-local projectors. For surface states on (001) surface, we used a supercell containing 10 quintuple layers. We obtained bulk and surface electronic structures of topological insulators Bi 2 Se 3 , Bi 2 Te 3 , and Sb 2 Te 3 , which are close to previous theoretical results and consistent with Dirac-cone band dispersions measured by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Then, we analyzed the wavefunctions of the metallic surface states near the Fermi level to find out spatial distributions of the surface-state wavefunctions, which turn out to be localized in the surface region with a typical spread of about 2 quintuple layers, and the shapes of the wavefunctions around Bi (or Sb) atoms close to the surface. This work was supported by the NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2009-0081204) and KISTI Supercomputing Center (Project No. KSC-2008-S02-0004).

  18. Microbial specificity of metallic surfaces exposed to ambient seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, B.R.; Bard, R.F.; Tosteson, T.R.

    1984-09-01

    High-molecular-weight materials associated with the extracellular matrix and film found on titanium and aluminum surfaces after exposure to flowing coastal seawater were isolated. This material was purified by hydroxylapatite chromatography and subsequently employed to produce antibodies in the toad, Bufo marinus. The antibodies were immobilized on a solid support and employed to isolate adhesion-enhancing, high-molecular-weight materials from the laboratory culture media of bacterial strains recovered from the respective metallic surfaces during the course of their exposure to seawater. The adhesion-enhancing materials produced by the surface-associated bacterial strains were immunologically related to the extracellular biofouling matrix material found on the surfaces from which these bacteria were isolated. The surface selectivity of these bacterial strains appeared to be based on the specificity of the interaction between adhesion-enhancing macromolecules produced by these bacteria and the surfaces in question. 30 references, 6 tables.

  19. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

  20. Microbial Specificity of Metallic Surfaces Exposed to Ambient Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, B. R.; Bard, R. F.; Tosteson, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    High-molecular-weight materials associated with the extracellular matrix and film found on titanium and aluminum surfaces after exposure to flowing coastal seawater were isolated. This material was purified by hydroxylapatite chromatography and subsequently employed to produce antibodies in the toad, Bufo marinus. The antibodies were immobilized on a solid support and employed to isolate adhesion-enhancing, high-molecular-weight materials from the laboratory culture media of bacterial strains recovered from the respective metallic surfaces during the course of their exposure to seawater. The adhesion-enhancing materials produced by the surface-associated bacterial strains were immunologically related to the extracellular biofouling matrix material found on the surfaces from which these bacteria were isolated. The surface selectivity of these bacterial strains appeared to be based on the specificity of the interaction between adhesion-enhancing macromolecules produced by these bacteria and the surfaces in question. PMID:16346622

  1. Enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of rotational isomers on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, B. H.; Lee, Y. G.; Frazier, D. O.

    1986-01-01

    Surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study rotational isomers of succinonitrile and N-methyl-thioacetamide on Cu and Ag surfaces. Both the gauche and trans conformers of succinonitrile are found to chemisorb on the metal surface. The doubly degenerate nu(C-triple bond-N) in the free molecules is removed when succinonitrile adsorbs on copper, which indicates that the two (C-triple bond-N) groups are no longer chemically equivalent. Both conformers are found to coordinate to the copper surface through the pi system of one of the two (C-triple bond-N) groups. In the case of N-methyl-thioacetamide, the population of the cis isomer is greatly increased on Cu and Ag surfaces. This is probably due to surface-induced cis-trans isomerization, in which the predominant trans isomer is converted to the cis isomer.

  2. Graphene nucleation on transition metal surface: structure transformation and role of the metal step edge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junfeng; Yip, Joanne; Zhao, Jijun; Yakobson, Boris I; Ding, Feng

    2011-04-01

    The nucleation of graphene on a transition metal surface, either on a terrace or near a step edge, is systematically explored using density functional theory calculations and applying the two-dimensional (2D) crystal nucleation theory. Careful optimization of the supported carbon clusters, C(N) (with size N ranging from 1 to 24), on the Ni(111) surface indicates a ground state structure transformation from a one-dimensional C chain to a 2D sp(2) C network at N ≈ 10-12. Furthermore, the crucial parameters controlling graphene growth on the metal surface, nucleation barrier, nucleus size, and nucleation rate on a terrace or near a step edge are calculated. In agreement with numerous experimental observations, our analysis shows that graphene nucleation near a metal step edge is superior to that on a terrace. On the basis of our analysis, we propose the use of graphene seeds to synthesize high-quality graphene in large area. PMID:21384854

  3. Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, V. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Burchinov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    Generation of singlet oxygen on the surface of metal oxides is studied. It is shown that, under conditions of heterogeneous photo-catalysis, along with the conventional mechanism of singlet oxygen formation due to the formation of electron-hole pairs in the oxide structure, there is an additional and more efficient mechanism involving direct optical excitation of molecular oxygen adsorbed on the oxide surface. The excited adsorbate molecule then interacts with the surface or with other adsorbate molecules. It is shown that, with respect to singlet oxygen generation, yttrium oxide is more than an order of magnitude more efficient than other oxides, including titanium dioxide.

  4. Self-affine surface morphology of plastically deformed metals.

    PubMed

    Zaiser, Michael; Grasset, Frederic Madani; Koutsos, Vasileios; Aifantis, Elias C

    2004-11-01

    We analyze the surface morphology of metals after plastic deformation over a range of scales from 10 nm to 2 mm using atomic force microscopy and scanning white-light interferometry. We demonstrate that an initially smooth surface during deformation develops self-affine roughness over almost 4 orders of magnitude in scale. The Hurst exponent H of one-dimensional surface profiles initially decreases with increasing strain and then stabilizes at H approximately 0.75. We show that the profiles can be mathematically modeled as graphs of a fractional Brownian motion. Our findings can be understood in terms of a fractal distribution of plastic strain within the deformed samples. PMID:15600851

  5. The surface chemistry of metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Christina V; Forgan, Ross S

    2015-03-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received particular attention over the last 20 years as a result of their attractive properties offering potential applications in a number of areas. Typically, these characteristics are tuned by functionalisation of the bulk of the MOF material itself. This Feature Article focuses instead on modification of MOF particles at their surfaces only, which can also offer control over the bulk properties of the material. The differing surface modification techniques available to the synthetic chemist will be discussed, with a focus on the effect of surface modification of MOFs on their fundamental properties and application in adsorption, catalysis, drug delivery and other areas. PMID:25116412

  6. Surface plasmon polaritons on thin-slab metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, I. R.; Sambles, J. R.

    2003-06-01

    In a recently published paper [U. Schröter and D. Heitmann, Phys. Rev. B 60, 4992 (1999)] an unexpected result occurred when light was incident upon a periodically corrugated thin metal film when the corrugations on the two interfaces were identical and in phase with each other. It was observed that it was not possible to excite the surface plasmon polariton on the metal surface facing away from the incoming light, and they ascribed this to the lack of a thickness variation within the metal. In this paper a somewhat different interpretation of their results is presented, which shows that the surface plasmon polariton (SSP) is in fact very weakly excited on the transmission side of such structures. It is explained why this coupling is so weak in terms of the cancellation of the evanescent diffracted orders from the two diffractive surfaces and how, by changing the phase between the grating on either surface, this coupling becomes much stronger. An explanation for the observation that SPP excitation on such structures may lead to either transmission maxima or minima is also presented.

  7. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  8. Recommended values of clean metal surface work functions

    SciTech Connect

    Derry, Gregory N. Kern, Megan E.; Worth, Eli H.

    2015-11-15

    A critical review of the experimental literature for measurements of the work functions of clean metal surfaces of single-crystals is presented. The tables presented include all results found for low-index crystal faces except cases that were known to be contaminated surfaces. These results are used to construct a recommended value of the work function for each surface examined, along with an uncertainty estimate for that value. The uncertainties are based in part on the error distribution for all measured work functions in the literature, which is included here. The metals included in this review are silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), gold (Au), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iridium (Ir), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W)

  9. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying

    PubMed Central

    Alfè, D.; Pozzo, M.; Miniussi, E.; Günther, S.; Lacovig, P.; Lizzit, S.; Larciprete, R.; Burgos, B. Santos; Menteş, T. O.; Locatelli, A.; Baraldi, A.

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction. PMID:23938361

  10. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A Alec; Davids, Paul S; Decca, Ricardo S; Aksyuk, Vladimir A; Dalvit, Diego A R; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  11. Fine tuning of graphene-metal adhesion by surface alloying.

    PubMed

    Alfè, D; Pozzo, M; Miniussi, E; Günther, S; Lacovig, P; Lizzit, S; Larciprete, R; Santos Burgos, B; Menteş, T O; Locatelli, A; Baraldi, A

    2013-01-01

    We show that bimetallic surface alloying provides a viable route for governing the interaction between graphene and metal through the selective choice of the elemental composition of the surface alloy. This concept is illustrated by an experimental and theoretical characterization of the properties of graphene on a model PtRu surface alloy on Ru(0001), with a concentration of Pt atoms in the first layer between 0 and 50%. The progressive increase of the Pt content determines the gradual detachment of graphene from the substrate, which results from the modification of the carbon orbital hybridization promoted by Pt. Alloying is also found to affect the morphology of graphene, which is strongly corrugated on bare Ru, but becomes flat at a Pt coverage of 50%. The method here proposed can be readily extended to several supports, thus opening the way to the conformal growth of graphene on metals and to a full tunability of the graphene-substrate interaction. PMID:23938361

  12. Selective metallization on insulator surfaces with femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Liao, Yang; Zeng, Huidan; Zhou, Zenghui; Sun, Haiyi; Song, Juan; Wang, Xinshun; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2007-10-01

    We report selective metallization on surfaces of insulators (glass slides and lithium niobate crystal) based on femtosecond laser modification combined with electroless plating. The process is mainly composed of four steps: (1) formation of silver nitrate thin films on the surfaces of glass or crystal substrates; (2) generation of silver particles in the irradiated area by femtosecond laser direct writing; (3) removal of unirradiated silver nitrate films; and (4) selective electroless plating in the modified area. We discuss the mechanism of selective metallization on the insulators. Moreover, we investigate the electrical and adhesive properties of the copper microstructures patterned on the insulator surfaces, showing great potential of integrating electrical functions into lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:19550542

  13. Laser Nanostructurization of the Metal and Alloy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavin, Andrei; Kozlovskaya, Natalia; Krokhin, Oleg; Zavestovskaya, Irina

    2010-10-01

    The results from experimental and theoretical investigation of material pulsed laser treatment aimed at obtaining nano- and microstructured surface are presented. An experiment has been performed on the modification of indium surface using a solid-state diode-pumped laser. It has been shown that nano- and micro-size structures are formed under laser melting and fast crystallization of the metal surface. The kinetics of the crystallization of metals under superfast cooling. The distribution function for crystalline nuclei dimensions is analytically found within the framework of the classical kinetic equation in case of superfast temperature changing. The average number of particles in the crystalline nuclei and relative volume of the crystalline phase are determined as functions of thermodynamic and laser treatment regime parameters. Good agreement is observed with experimental results for ultrashort laser pulses induced micro- and nanostructures production.

  14. Understanding the biological responses of nanostructured metals and surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Reiss, Rebecca A.

    2014-08-01

    Metals produced by Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) offer distinct advantages for medical applications such as orthopedic devices, in part because of their nanostructured surfaces. We examine the current theoretical foundations and state of knowledge for nanostructured biomaterials surface optimization within the contexts that apply to bulk nanostructured metals, differentiating how their microstructures impact osteogenesis, in particular, for Ultrafine Grained (UFG) titanium. Then we identify key gaps in the research to date, pointing out areas which merit additional focus within the scientific community. For example, we highlight the potential of next-generation DNA sequencing techniques (NGS) to reveal gene and non-coding RNA (ncRNA) expression changes induced by nanostructured metals. While our understanding of bio-nano interactions is in its infancy, nanostructured metals are already being marketed or developed for medical devices such as dental implants, spinal devices, and coronary stents. Our ability to characterize and optimize the biological response of cells to SPD metals will have synergistic effects on advances in materials, biological, and medical science.

  15. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  16. Single-molecule insight into Wurtz reactions on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Cai, Liangliang; Ding, Yuanqi; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-28

    Wurtz reactions feature the dehalogenated coupling of alkyl halides. In comparison to their widely investigated counterparts, Ullmann reactions, Wurtz reactions have however been scarcely explored on surfaces. Herein, by combining high-resolution STM imaging and DFT calculations, we have systematically investigated Wurtz reactions on three chemically different metal surfaces including Cu(110), Ag(110) and Au(111). We find that the Wurtz reactions could be achieved on all three surfaces, and the temperatures for triggering the reactions are in the order of Cu(110) > Ag(110) > Au(111). Moreover, DFT calculations have been performed to unravel the pathways of on-surface Wurtz reactions and identify three basic steps of the reactions including debromination, diffusion and coupling processes. Interestingly, we found that the mechanism of the on-surface Wurtz reaction is intrinsically different from the Ullmann reaction and it is revealed that the coupling process is the rate-limiting step of Wurtz reactions on three different substrates. These findings have given a comprehensive picture of Wurtz reactions on metal surfaces and demonstrated that such a reaction could be an alternative reaction scheme for advanced on-surface synthesis. PMID:26725836

  17. Nanotubular surface modification of metallic implants via electrochemical anodization technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Jin, Ming; Zheng, Yudong; Guan, Yueping; Lu, Xin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased awareness and interest in the biomedical implant field as a result of an aging population, research in the field of implantable devices has grown rapidly in the last few decades. Among the biomedical implants, metallic implant materials have been widely used to replace disordered bony tissues in orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. The clinical success of implants is closely related to their early osseointegration (ie, the direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant), which relies heavily on the surface condition of the implant. Electrochemical techniques for modifying biomedical implants are relatively simple, cost-effective, and appropriate for implants with complex shapes. Recently, metal oxide nanotubular arrays via electrochemical anodization have become an attractive technique to build up on metallic implants to enhance the biocompatibility and bioactivity. This article will thoroughly review the relevance of electrochemical anodization techniques for the modification of metallic implant surfaces in nanoscale, and cover the electrochemical anodization techniques used in the development of the types of nanotubular/nanoporous modification achievable via electrochemical approaches, which hold tremendous potential for bio-implant applications. In vitro and in vivo studies using metallic oxide nanotubes are also presented, revealing the potential of nanotubes in biomedical applications. Finally, an outlook of future growth of research in metallic oxide nanotubular arrays is provided. This article will therefore provide researchers with an in-depth understanding of electrochemical anodization modification and provide guidance regarding the design and tuning of new materials to achieve a desired performance and reliable biocompatibility. PMID:25258532

  18. Film boiling of R-11 on liquid metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting problem is the effect of an immiscible liquid heating surface on the process of film boiling. Such surfaces raise questions concerning interface stability to disturbances, effects of gas bubbling, and vapor explosions in layered systems. The specific motivation for this study was to investigate film boiling from a liquid surface with application to cooling of molten reactor core debris by an overlying pool of reactor coolant. To investigate this phenomenon, and apparatus consisting of a nominal six-inch diameter steel vessel to hold the liquid metal and boiling fluid was constructed; coolant reservoirs, heaters, controllers, and allied instrumentation were attached. A transient energy balance was performed on the liquid metal pool by a submerged assembly of microthermocouples in the liquid metal and an array of thermocouples on the wall of the test vessel. The thermocouple data were used to determine the boiling heat flux as well as the boiling superheat. On an average basis, the deviation between the prediction of the Berenson model and the experimental data was less than one percent when Berenson was corrected for thermal radiation effects. Evidence from visualization tests of R-11 in film boiling over molten metal pools to superheats in excess of 600 K supports this conclusion. 13 refs.

  19. High surface area graphene-supported metal chalcogenide assembly

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kuntz, Joshua; Orme, Christine A.

    2016-04-19

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported assembly, which comprises a three-dimensional network of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, and at least one metal chalcogenide compound disposed on said graphene sheets, wherein the chalcogen of said metal chalcogenide compound is selected from S, Se and Te. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the graphene-supported assembly, including graphene-supported MoS.sub.2. Monoliths with high surface area and conductivity can be achieved. Lower operating temperatures in some applications can be achieved. Pore size and volume can be tuned.

  20. Surface treatment of metals with excimer and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidemenopoulos, G. N.; Zervaki, A.; Papadimitriou, K.; Tsipas, D. N.; McIntosh, J.; Zergioti, G.; Manousaki, G.; Hontzopoulos, Elias I.

    1993-05-01

    The availability of a variety of lasers including the high-power cw CO2 lasers, the pulsed- mode infrared Nd-YAG, and the pulsed-mode ultraviolet excimer laser has led to the development of many interesting applications of laser technology to materials processing. Among them the surface modification of metallic alloys appears to be one of the most important and very close to implementation in various industries. Specifically the applications of excimer lasers have been discussed in a recent workshop in the framework of the Eureka EU 205 program. The major topics concerned with surface modifications that were discussed in this workshop were surface smoothing and roughening, surface cleaning of Ti and Cu, mixing and interdiffusion of predeposited layers, surface irradiation of Cu-alloys to improve the corrosion resistance, surface remelting of Al-alloys for grain refinement through rapid solidification, and surface remelting of Ni-P electroless coatings on Al alloys for the improvement of corrosion resistance. Laser alloying of Ni-base superalloys has also been discussed. Applications discussed here include the surface treatment of Ni-base superalloys with high-power CO2 laser, the surface treatment of aluminum alloys with excimer lasers, the laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of wear and corrosion resistant layers of Ti, TiC, and TiN on tool steels, and the fracture surface sulphur printing with excimer lasers.

  1. Surface imaging of metallic material fractures using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Hutiu, Gheorghe; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Demian, Dorin; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-09-10

    We demonstrate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform topography of metallic surfaces after being subjected to ductile or brittle fracturing. Two steel samples, OL 37 and OL 52, and an antifriction Sn-Sb-Cu alloy were analyzed. Using an in-house-built swept source OCT system, height profiles were generated for the surfaces of the two samples. Based on such profiles, it can be concluded that the first two samples were subjected to ductile fracture, while the third one was subjected to brittle fracture. The OCT potential for assessing the surface state of materials after fracture was evaluated by comparing OCT images with images generated using an established method for such investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis of cause of fracture is essential in response to damage of machinery parts during various accidents. Currently the analysis is performed using SEM, on samples removed from the metallic parts, while OCT would allow in situ imaging using mobile units. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the OCT capability to replace SEM has been demonstrated. SEM is a more costly and time-consuming method to use in the investigation of surfaces of microstructures of metallic materials. PMID:25321671

  2. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  3. Wireless Metal Detection and Surface Coverage Sensing for All-Surface Induction Heating

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-01-01

    All-surface induction heating systems, typically comprising small-area coils, face a major challenge in detecting the presence of a metallic vessel and identifying its partial surface coverage over the coils to determine which of the coils to power up. The difficulty arises due to the fact that the user can heat vessels made of a wide variety of metals (and their alloys). To address this problem, we propose and demonstrate a new wireless detection methodology that allows for detecting the presence of metallic vessels together with uniquely sensing their surface coverages while also identifying their effective material type in all-surface induction heating systems. The proposed method is based on telemetrically measuring simultaneously inductance and resistance of the induction coil coupled with the vessel in the heating system. Here, variations in the inductance and resistance values for an all-surface heating coil loaded by vessels (made of stainless steel and aluminum) at different positions were systematically investigated at different frequencies. Results show that, independent of the metal material type, unique identification of the surface coverage is possible at all freqeuncies. Additionally, using the magnitude and phase information extracted from the coupled coil impedance, unique identification of the vessel effective material is also achievable, this time independent of its surface coverage. PMID:26978367

  4. Helium atmospheric pressure plasma jets touching dielectric and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg, Seth A. Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-07-07

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are being investigated in the context plasma medicine and biotechnology applications, and surface functionalization. The composition of the surface being treated ranges from plastics, liquids, and biological tissue, to metals. The dielectric constant of these materials ranges from as low as 1.5 for plastics to near 80 for liquids, and essentially infinite for metals. The electrical properties of the surface are not independent variables as the permittivity of the material being treated has an effect on the dynamics of the incident APPJ. In this paper, results are discussed from a computational investigation of the interaction of an APPJ incident onto materials of varying permittivity, and their impact on the discharge dynamics of the plasma jet. The computer model used in this investigation solves Poisson's equation, transport equations for charged and neutral species, the electron energy equation, and the Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. The APPJ is sustained in He/O{sub 2} = 99.8/0.2 flowing into humid air, and is directed onto dielectric surfaces in contact with ground with dielectric constants ranging from 2 to 80, and a grounded metal surface. Low values of relative permittivity encourage propagation of the electric field into the treated material and formation and propagation of a surface ionization wave. High values of relative permittivity promote the restrike of the ionization wave and the formation of a conduction channel between the plasma discharge and the treated surface. The distribution of space charge surrounding the APPJ is discussed.

  5. Origins of Folding Instabilities on Polycrystalline Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, N.; Romero, P. A.; Linsler, D.; Dienwiebel, M.; Stolz, U.; Moseler, M.; Gumbsch, P.

    2014-12-01

    Wear and removal of material from polycrystalline metal surfaces is inherently connected to plastic flow. Here, plowing-induced unconstrained surface plastic flow on a nanocrystalline copper surface has been studied by massive molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy scratch experiments. In agreement with experimental findings, bulges in front of a model asperity develop into vortexlike fold patterns that mark the disruption of laminar flow. We identify dislocation-mediated plastic flow in grains with suitably oriented slip systems as the basic mechanism of bulging and fold formation. The observed folding can be fundamentally explained by the inhomogeneity of plasticity on polycrystalline surfaces which favors bulge formation on grains with suitably oriented slip system. This process is clearly distinct from Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in fluids, which have been previously suggested to resemble the formed surface fold patterns. The generated prow grows into a rough chip with stratified lamellae that are identified as the precursors of wear debris. Our findings demonstrate the importance of surface texture and grain structure engineering to achieve ultralow wear in metals.

  6. Interaction of fast charges with a rough metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Keenan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Mišković, Z. L.; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We use the Green function formulation of a dielectric response formalism to study the dynamic polarization of a rough metal surface by a single charged particle and by a pair of charged particles that move parallel to the surface. While the surface roughness is treated nonperturbatively, the plasmon excitation of the metal electron gas is described locally. We find that the magnitudes of both the image potential and the stopping power of a single particle are increased by the increasing roughness and decreasing correlation length of the surface. On the other hand, both the long-range wake potential of a single charged particle and the interaction potential between two particles are weakly affected by the surface roughness. However, the strongest effects of the surface roughness are seen in the correlated stopping power of two charged particles, giving rise to oscillations in the dependence of the stopping ratio on their distance, both when the interparticle axis is perpendicular to their direction of motion and when the wake-related oscillations are damped by adiabatic suppression of plasmon excitations at low particle speeds.

  7. Porous metals and alternate bearing surfaces in shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon R; Urits, Ivan; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) provides an effective solution for the treatment of glenohumeral arthritis. However, long-term outcomes have been limited by glenoid component aseptic loosening and polyethylene (PE) wear. Previous attempts to improve glenoid fixation with metal-backed glenoids resulted in inferior results. Newer component designs that contain porous metal allow for biological ingrowth of the prosthesis, potentially improving longevity and overall outcomes. Porous metal can also improve humeral component fixation, obviating the need for cement and simplifying revision surgery. Advances such as highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE), vitamin E-doped HXLPE, and alternate bearing surfaces like ceramics and pyrolytic carbon have proven to provide superior wear characteristics in other joint replacements and may prove beneficial in the shoulder as well. PMID:26797775

  8. Ultrasonic characterization of shot-peened metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Anton I.; Veronesi, William A.

    2001-08-01

    Shot peening is a well-known method for extending the fatigue life of metal components by introducing near-surface compressive residual stresses. The capability to nondestructively evaluate near-surface residual stress would greatly aid the assurance of proper fatigue life in shot-peened components. This paper describes our work on near-surface residual stress measurement by an ultrasonic surface wave method. In this method, a variation of ultrasonic surface wave speed with shot peening intensity is measured. Since the effective wave penetration depth is inversely related to the excitation frequency, the method has the potential to provide the stress-depth profile. The paper presents results from an ultrasonic characterization study of shot peened Al-7075 and Waspaloy surfaces. Rayleigh wave velocity measurements by a V(z)-curve method were made on smooth and shot peened samples using line-focus ultrasonic transducers. Several factors were found to contribute to the surface wave velocity measurements: surface roughness, near-surface grain reorientation (texture), dislocation density increase, and residual stress. In this paper we estimate quantitatively the effects of each factor and discuss how these effects can be separated and accounted for during residual stress measurement.

  9. Review of 2H-tetraphenylporphyrins metalation in ultra-high vacuum on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panighel, M.; Di Santo, G.; Caputo, M.; Lal, C.; Taleatu, B.; Goldoni, A.

    2013-12-01

    The formation and conformational adaptation of self-assembled monolayer of 2H-tetraphenylporphyrins (2H-TPPs) on metal surfaces, as well as their metalation processes in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), are reviewed. By means of XPS, NEXAFS and STM measurements we demonstrate that, after the annealing at 550 K, a temperature-induced chemical modification of 2H-TPP monolayer on Ag(111) occurs, resulting in the rotation of the phenyl rings parallel to the substrate plane. Moreover, independently of the conformation, we report three different methods to metalate 2H-TPP monolayers in UHV. Experimental evidence indicates that the presence of a metal atom in the TPP macrocycle influences both the conformation of the molecule and its adsorption distance.

  10. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at