Science.gov

Sample records for cold cluster reactions

  1. Reaction paths leading from O2/+/ to water clusters under cold mesospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrumb, J. L.

    1982-06-01

    Reference is made to reported D-region positive ion measurements (Arnold and Krankowsky, 1974) in which a number of new cluster ions of minor abundance were apparent. It is noted that these ions, which were attributed to clusters with N2, O2, and CO2 ligands, were observable owing to enhanced O2(+) production and the low temperatures during the flight. Consideration is given here to these in situ ion data in view of recent laboratory ion-molecule reaction experiments that shed light on the mechanism leading from O2(+) to water clusters in air mixtures. Possible intermediates are discussed in terms of ion stability and the existence of effective reaction paths under the given atmospheric conditions. The intermediates proposed here are then fitted into a coherent reaction mechanism resulting in significant new pathways for the formation of protonated water clusters. A semiquantitative measure of the importance of each of the pathways is then calculated using signal flow graph theory.

  2. Massive cold cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015) allows an almost unbiased study of the early phases of star-formation in our Galaxy. Several thousand of the clumps have also distance estimates allowing a mass, and density determination. The nature of Planck clumps varies from IRDCs to tiny nearby cold clouds with masses ranging from one to several tens of thousands solar masses. Some of the clumps are embedded in GMCs, others are isolated. Some are close or even very close to OB associations, while others lay far from any UV luminous objects.The small scale clustering of these objects was studied with the improved Minimum Spanning Tree method of Cartwright & Whitworth identifying groups in 3D space. As a result also massive cold cloud clusters were identified. We analyse the MST structures, and discuss their relation to ongoing and future massive star formation.

  3. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  4. Reactions and properties of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1992-09-01

    The elucidation from a molecular point of view of the differences and similarities in the properties and reactivity of matter in the gaseous compared to the condensed state is a subject of considerable current interest. One of the promising approaches to this problem is to utilize mass spectrometry in conjunction with laser spectroscopy and fast-flow reaction devices to investigate the changing properties, structure and reactivity of clusters as a function of the degree of solvation under well-controlled conditions. In this regard, an investigation of molecular cluster ions has provided considerable new insight into the basic mechanisms of ion reactions within a cluster, and this paper reviews some of the recent advances in cluster production, the origin of magic numbers and relationship to cluster ion stabilities, and solvation effects on reactions. There have been some notable advances in the production of large cluster ions under thermal reaction conditions, enabling a systematic study of the influence of solvation on reactions to be carried out. These and other new studies of magic numbers have traced their origin to the thermochemical stability of cluster ions. There are several classes of reaction where solvation has a notable influence on reactivity. A particularly interesting example comes from recent studies of the reactions of the hydroxyl anion with CO2 and SO2, studied as a function of the degree of hydration of OH-. Both reactions are highly exothermic, yet the differences in reactivity are dramatic. In the case of SO2, the reaction occurs at near the collision rate. By contrast, CO2 reactivity plummets dramatically for clusters having more than four water molecules. The slow rate is in accord with observations in the liquid phase.

  5. Shocks and cold fronts in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevitch, Maxim; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2007-05-01

    The currently operating X-ray imaging observatories provide us with an exquisitely detailed view of the Megaparsec-scale plasma atmospheres in nearby galaxy clusters. At z<0.05, the Chandra's 1 angular resolution corresponds to linear resolution of less than a kiloparsec, which is smaller than some interesting linear scales in the intracluster plasma. This enables us to study the previously unseen hydrodynamic phenomena in clusters: classic bow shocks driven by the infalling subclusters, and the unanticipated “cold fronts,” or sharp contact discontinuities between regions of gas with different entropies. The ubiquitous cold fronts are found in mergers as well as around the central density peaks in “relaxed” clusters. They are caused by motion of cool, dense gas clouds in the ambient higher-entropy gas. These clouds are either remnants of the infalling subclusters, or the displaced gas from the cluster's own cool cores. Both shock fronts and cold fronts provide novel tools to study the intracluster plasma on microscopic and cluster-wide scales, where the dark matter gravity, thermal pressure, magnetic fields, and ultrarelativistic particles are at play. In particular, these discontinuities provide the only way to measure the gas bulk velocities in the plane of the sky. The observed temperature jumps at cold fronts require that thermal conduction across the fronts is strongly suppressed. Furthermore, the width of the density jump in the best-studied cold front is smaller than the Coulomb mean free path for the plasma particles. These findings show that transport processes in the intracluster plasma can easily be suppressed. Cold fronts also appear less prone to hydrodynamic instabilities than expected, hinting at the formation of a parallel magnetic field layer via magnetic draping. This may make it difficult to mix different gas phases during a merger. A sharp electron temperature jump across the best-studied shock front has shown that the electron proton

  6. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  7. Nuclear waste vitrification efficiency: cold cap reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.; Pokorny, Richard

    2012-12-15

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe2O3 and Al2O3), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions

  8. NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

    2011-07-29

    The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup

  9. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. Transfer-type products accompanying cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.

    2005-12-15

    Production of nuclei heavier than the target is treated for projectile-target combinations used in cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy nuclei. These products are related to transfer-type or to asymmetry-exit-channel quasifission reactions. The production of isotopes in the transfer-type reactions emitting of {alpha} particles with large energies is discussed.

  11. Cold fronts: probes of plasma astrophysics in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhone, John A.; Roediger, E.

    2016-06-01

    > The most massive baryonic component of galaxy clusters is the `intracluster medium' (ICM), a diffuse, hot, weakly magnetized plasma that is most easily observed in the X-ray band. Despite being observed for decades, the macroscopic transport properties of the ICM are still not well constrained. A path to determine macroscopic ICM properties opened up with the discovery of `cold fronts'. These were observed as sharp discontinuities in surface brightness and temperature in the ICM, with the property that the denser side of the discontinuity is the colder one. The high spatial resolution of the Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed two puzzles about cold fronts. First, they should be subject to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, yet in many cases they appear relatively smooth and undisturbed. Second, the width of the interface between the two gas phases is typically narrower than the mean free path of the particles in the plasma, indicating negligible thermal conduction. It was thus realized that these special characteristics of cold fronts may be used to probe the properties of the cluster plasma. In this review, we will discuss the recent simulations of cold fronts in galaxy clusters, focusing on those which have attempted to use these features to constrain ICM physics. In particular, we will examine the effects of magnetic fields, viscosity, and thermal conductivity on the stability properties and long-term evolution of cold fronts. We conclude with a discussion on what important questions remain unanswered, and the future role of simulations and the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  12. Study of Cold Potassium Atom - Calcium Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egodapitiya, Kisra; Gang, Shu; Clark, Robert; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    We report on our progress towards constructing a hybrid system for studying reactions between cold Potassium (K) atoms and cold Calcium (Ca+) ions. Ca+ ions will be trapped and Doppler-cooled inside a linear quadrupole ion trap. Cold K atoms will be created inside a magneto optical trap, such that the ion and the atoms are in an overlapping volume. Trapping and re-pumping beams for the Potassium MOT are derived from the same laser with wavelength 766 nm using two acousto optic modulators. The reaction products will be detected using a time-of- flight mass spectrometer that is designed to detect radially ejected ions. The main objective of this experiment is to study the rate coefficients, and identification of reaction channels between cold K atoms and Ca+ ions. Subsequently this setup will be used to study reactions between cold K atoms and sympathetically cooled molecular ions such as CaO+, and to study internal state quenching of molecular ions.

  13. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  14. Formation of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Zhaoqing; Jin Genming; Li Junqing; Scheid, Werner

    2007-10-15

    Within the concept of the dinuclear system (DNS), a dynamical model is proposed for describing the formation of superheavy nuclei in complete fusion reactions by incorporating the coupling of the relative motion to the nucleon transfer process. The capture of two heavy colliding nuclei, the formation of the compound nucleus, and the de-excitation process are calculated by using an empirical coupled channel model, solving a master equation numerically and applying statistical theory, respectively. Evaporation residue excitation functions in cold fusion reactions are investigated systematically and compared with available experimental data. Maximal production cross sections of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions with stable neutron-rich projectiles are obtained. Isotopic trends in the production of the superheavy elements Z=110, 112, 114, 116, 118, and 120 are analyzed systematically. Optimal combinations and the corresponding excitation energies are proposed.

  15. Constraints on cold dark matter accelerating cosmologies and cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Basilakos, S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2010-07-15

    We discuss the properties of homogeneous and isotropic flat cosmologies in which the present accelerating stage is powered only by the gravitationally induced creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) particles ({Omega}{sub m}=1). For some matter creation rates proposed in the literature, we show that the main cosmological functions such as the scale factor of the universe, the Hubble expansion rate, the growth factor, and the cluster formation rate are analytically defined. The best CCDM scenario has only one free parameter and our joint analysis involving baryonic acoustic oscillations + cosmic microwave background (CMB) + SNe Ia data yields {Omega}-tilde{sub m}=0.28{+-}0.01 (1{sigma}), where {Omega}-tilde{sub m} is the observed matter density parameter. In particular, this implies that the model has no dark energy but the part of the matter that is effectively clustering is in good agreement with the latest determinations from the large-scale structure. The growth of perturbation and the formation of galaxy clusters in such scenarios are also investigated. Despite the fact that both scenarios may share the same Hubble expansion, we find that matter creation cosmologies predict stronger small scale dynamics which implies a faster growth rate of perturbations with respect to the usual {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Such results point to the possibility of a crucial observational test confronting CCDM with {Lambda}CDM scenarios through a more detailed analysis involving CMB, weak lensing, as well as the large-scale structure.

  16. Effects of the cosmological constant on cold dark matter clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Membrado, M.; Pacheco, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Cold dark matter inhomogeneities are considered in a homogeneous background of matter, radiation, and the cosmological constant in a flat universe. Aims: We investigate the influence of the cosmological constant on the non-linear collapse of cold dark matter clusters. Methods: For simplicity, a spherical infall model has been used to describe the collapse of non-relativistic mass shells; besides, an average distribution of density around a cluster of galaxies has been taken. Boundary conditions are imposed by the solution of the linearized equation for the growth of matter perturbations and by the cold dark matter power spectrum. Results: For an average cluster, the radii of shells and masses enclosed by them have been obtained at their zero proper acceleration (ZA) redshifts, at their turn-around (TA) redshifts and at their virialization (VIR) redshifts. According to our results at present, the shell that reaches its turn-around point shows [rTA] 0 = 6.85 Mpc and [ℳTA] 0 = 6.76 × 1014 ℳ⊙. The virializing shell fulfills [rTA] 0 = 4.57 [rVIR] 0 and [ℳTA] 0 = 1.95 [ℳVIR] 0. These results differ appreciably from those derived from a model with cosmological constant equal to zero in a flat universe: [rTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 6.62 [rVIR(Λ = 0)] 0 and [ℳTA(Λ = 0)] 0 = 5.26 [ℳVIR(Λ = 0)] 0; this discrepancy could be considered as a new independent proof of the existence of dark energy. The shell with zero proper acceleration presents [rZA] 0 = 1.59 [rTA] 0 and [ℳZA] 0 = 1.63 [ℳTA] 0. We have found that there is a limit to the mass of the average cluster, which is able to virialize; its value is { ℳVIR } MAX = 8.1 × 1014 M⊙. As expected, we found that shells present null proper acceleration at redshift values that are smaller than 0.755. Conclusions: We have noticed that the cosmological constant imposes an upper limit for the mass enclosed by shells, which are able to reach zero proper velocity. Hence, this mass is the maximum mass of the

  17. Synthesis of the heaviest nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münzenberg, G.; Morita, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cold fusion of heavy ions paved the way to superheavy elements. It was proposed by Yu.Ts. Oganessian more than forty years ago in 1974 [1,2]. First experiments were carried out at JINR Dubna, starting with the reaction 40Ar + 208Pb → 248Fm* where several hundreds to thousand atoms were produced on one day. The large production rate indicating an enhancement of the fusion cross section, especially for the evaporation of two or three neutrons, proved the concept of cold-fusion with the use of the doubly magic nucleus 208Pb as a target. The Dubna experiments were extended to the transactinide region beyond rutherfordium. The breakthrough came with the separation in-flight. Two different approaches were used: kinematic separation with the velocity filter SHIP [3] at GSI Darmstadt, and with the gasfilled separator GARIS [4,5] at RIKEN. With SHIP the concept of cold fusion of massive nuclear systems was convincingly confirmed by the observation of the one-neutron evaporation channel in the production of 247Rf in an irradiation of 208Pb with 50Ti [6] in 1981 which opened the way to the transactinide region. At SHIP the elements bohrium (107) to copernicium (112) were discovered [7]. A new closed shell region around hassium was found. The RIKEN experiments started in 2002. They confirmed the GSI results and in addition improved the data on structure and production of elements hassium to copernicium significantly. The heaviest element ever created in a cold fusion reaction, Z = 113, was observed at GARIS [8,9].

  18. THE PROPERTIES OF X-RAY COLD FRONTS IN A STATISTICAL SAMPLE OF SIMULATED GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Eric J.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Smith, Britton D.; Burns, Jack O.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Norman, Michael L.

    2010-12-10

    We examine the incidence of cold fronts in a large sample of galaxy clusters extracted from a (512 h {sup -1} Mpc) hydrodynamic/N-body cosmological simulation with adiabatic gas physics computed with the Enzo adaptive mesh refinement code. This simulation contains a sample of roughly 4000 galaxy clusters with M {>=}10{sup 14} M{sub sun} at z = 0. For each simulated galaxy cluster, we have created mock 0.3-8.0 keV X-ray observations and spectroscopic-like temperature maps. We have searched these maps with a new automated algorithm to identify the presence of cold fronts in projection. Using a threshold of a minimum of 10 cold front pixels in our images, corresponding to a total comoving length L{sub cf}>156 h {sup -1} kpc, we find that roughly 10%-12% of all projections in a mass-limited sample would be classified as cold front clusters. Interestingly, the fraction of clusters with extended cold front features in our synthetic maps of a mass-limited sample trends only weakly with redshift out to z = 1.0. However, when using different selection functions, including a simulated flux limit, the trending with redshift changes significantly. The likelihood of finding cold fronts in the simulated clusters in our sample is a strong function of cluster mass. In clusters with M>7.5 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun} the cold front fraction is 40%-50%. We also show that the presence of cold fronts is strongly correlated with disturbed morphology as measured by quantitative structure measures. Finally, we find that the incidence of cold fronts in the simulated cluster images is strongly dependent on baryonic physics.

  19. Enantiomer-Selective Photolysis of Cold Gas-Phase Tryptophan in L-Serine Clusters with Linearly Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Maeda, Naoto; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2014-04-01

    Photostability of cold gas-phase tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers in L-serine (L-Ser) clusters at 8 K as a model for interstellar molecular clouds was examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing a cold ion trap to investigate the hypothesis that homochirality in gas-phase Ser clusters promotes the enantiomeric enrichment of other amino acids via enantiomer-selective photolysis with linearly polarized light. In the UV excitation of heterochiral H+ (L-Ser) 3(D-Trp), the CO2-eliminated product in the cluster was observed. In contrast, the photodissociation mass spectrum of homochiral H+(L-Ser)3(L-Trp) showed that photolysis of amino acids in the cluster did not occur due to the evaporation of L-Ser molecules. In the spectra of the homochiral H+(L-Ser) (L-Trp) and heterochiral H+(L-Ser) (D-Trp), the evaporation of L-Ser was the primary reaction pathway, and no difference between the L- and D-enantiomers was observed. The findings confirm that when 3 L-Ser units are present in the cluster, the photolytic decomposition of Trp is enantiomerically selective.

  20. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-05-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  1. The fate of cold gas in intermediate redshift galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonka, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    Clusters are the densest and interaction-richest environments of galaxies, in which one can witness their morphological transformations and the quenching of their star formation. These features are the results of complex physical processes affecting the galaxy gas component, such as ram-pressure stripping, harassment, or strangulation, whose frequency, intensity, and long-term effect on galaxy evolution are still to be unveiled. I shall report on a recent and unique program of detection of CO in intermediate redshift cluster galaxies (0.2clusters, and ii) to assess whether the star formation correlations, which were established in field star forming galaxies, still hold in dense environments.

  2. Clustering recognition model for intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Mignerey, A.C.

    1996-07-01

    A clustering model which allows the recognition of mass fragments from dynamical simulations has been developed. Studying the evolution of a microscopic computation based on the nuclear Boltzman equation, a suitable time is chosen to define bound clusters. At this stopping time the cluster cores for each member of the distribution are defined as a function of the overall density. Then an iterative routine is applied to estimate the coalescence of the surrounding nucleons. Once the fragment formation has been established, a statistical decay code is used to generate the final fragment distributions. Applications are shown to the reactions {sup 129}Xe + {sup nat}Cu at 50 MeV/nucleon and {sup 139}La on {sup 27}Al and {sup nat}Cu at 45 MeV/nucleon. A general improvement in cluster identification is found over approaches where a standard cluster separation algorithm has been used. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. van der Waals explosion of cold Rydberg clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, R.; Simonelli, C.; Archimi, M.; Masella, G.; Valado, M. M.; Arimondo, E.; Mannella, R.; Ciampini, D.; Morsch, O.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the direct measurement in real space of the effect of the van der Waals forces between individual Rydberg atoms on their external degrees of freedom. Clusters of Rydberg atoms with interparticle distances of around 5 μ m are created by first generating a small number of seed excitations in a magneto-optical trap, followed by off-resonant excitation that leads to a chain of facilitated excitation events. After a variable expansion time the Rydberg atoms are field ionized, and from the arrival time distributions the size of the Rydberg cluster after expansion is calculated. Our experimental results agree well with a numerical simulation of the van der Waals explosion.

  4. STREAMING COLD COSMIC-RAY BACK-REACTION AND THERMAL INSTABILITIES ALONG THE BACKGROUND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K.; Shadmehri, Mohsen E-mail: nekrasov.anatoly@gmail.com

    2012-09-01

    Using a multi-fluid approach, we investigate the streaming and thermal instabilities of electron-ion-cosmic-ray astrophysical objects in which homogeneous cold cosmic rays have a drift velocity perpendicular to the background magnetic field. One-dimensional perturbations along the magnetic field are considered. The induced return current of the background plasma and back-reaction of cosmic rays are taken into account. It is shown that the cosmic-ray back-reaction results in a streaming instability with considerably higher growth rates than that due to the return current of the background plasma. This increase is by a factor of the square root of the ratio of the background plasma mass density to the cosmic-ray mass density. The maximal growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber are then found. Thermal instability is shown to be not subject to the action of cosmic rays in the model under consideration. The dispersion relation for thermal instability includes ion inertia. In the limit of a fast thermal energy exchange between electrons and ions, the isobaric and isochoric growth rates are obtained. The results can be useful for the investigation of electron-ion astrophysical objects such as galaxy clusters, including the dynamics of streaming cosmic rays.

  5. Redshift space clustering of galaxies and cold dark matter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue; Gramann, Mirt

    1993-01-01

    The distorting effect of peculiar velocities on the power speturm and correlation function of IRAS and optical galaxies is studied. The observed redshift space power spectra and correlation functions of IRAS and optical the galaxies over the entire range of scales are directly compared with the corresponding redshift space distributions using large-scale computer simulations of cold dark matter (CDM) models in order to study the distortion effect of peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and correlation function of the galaxies. It is found that the observed power spectrum of IRAS and optical galaxies is consistent with the spectrum of an Omega = 1 CDM model. The problems that such a model currently faces may be related more to the high value of Omega in the model than to the shape of the spectrum. A low-density CDM model is also investigated and found to be consistent with the data.

  6. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  7. COLD FRONTS AND GAS SLOSHING IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Lee, D.

    2013-01-10

    Cold fronts in cluster cool cores should be erased on short timescales by thermal conduction, unless protected by magnetic fields that are 'draped' parallel to the front surfaces, suppressing conduction perpendicular to the sloshing fronts. We present a series of MHD simulations of cold front formation in the core of a galaxy cluster with anisotropic thermal conduction, exploring a parameter space of conduction strengths parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. Including conduction has a strong effect on the temperature distribution of the core and the appearance of the cold fronts. Though magnetic field lines are draping parallel to the front surfaces, preventing conduction directly across them, the temperature jumps across the fronts are nevertheless reduced. The geometry of the field is such that the cold gas below the front surfaces can be connected to hotter regions outside via field lines along directions perpendicular to the plane of the sloshing motions and along sections of the front that are not perfectly draped. This results in the heating of this gas below the front on a timescale of a Gyr, but the sharpness of the density and temperature jumps may nevertheless be preserved. By modifying the gas density distribution below the front, conduction may indirectly aid in suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. If conduction along the field lines is unsuppressed, we find that the characteristic sharp jumps seen in Chandra observations of cold front clusters do not form. Therefore, the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters is in contradiction with our simulations with full Spitzer conduction. This suggests that the presence of cold fronts in hot clusters could be used to place upper limits on conduction in the bulk of the intracluster medium. Finally, the combination of sloshing and anisotropic thermal conduction can result in a larger flux of heat to the core than either process in isolation. While still not sufficient to prevent a cooling

  8. Knockout driven reactions in complex molecules and their clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Energetic ions lose some of their kinetic energy when interacting with electrons or nuclei in matter. Here, we discuss combined experimental and theoretical studies on such impulse driven reactions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes, and pure or mixed clusters of these molecules. These studies show that the nature of excitation is important for how complex molecular systems respond to ion/atom impact. Rutherford-like nuclear scattering processes may lead to prompt atom knockout and formation of highly reactive fragments, while heating of the molecular electron clouds in general lead to formation of more stable and less reactive fragments. In this topical review, we focus on recent studies of knockout driven reactions, and present new calculations of the angular dependent threshold (displacement) energies for such processes in PAHs. The so-formed fragments may efficiently form covalent bonds with neighboring molecules in clusters. These unique molecular growth processes may be important in astrophysical environments such as low velocity shock waves.

  9. Clustering under the line graph transformation: application to reaction network

    PubMed Central

    Nacher, Jose C; Ueda, Nobuhisa; Yamada, Takuji; Kanehisa, Minoru; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Background Many real networks can be understood as two complementary networks with two kind of nodes. This is the case of metabolic networks where the first network has chemical compounds as nodes and the second one has nodes as reactions. In general, the second network may be related to the first one by a technique called line graph transformation (i.e., edges in an initial network are transformed into nodes). Recently, the main topological properties of the metabolic networks have been properly described by means of a hierarchical model. While the chemical compound network has been classified as hierarchical network, a detailed study of the chemical reaction network had not been carried out. Results We have applied the line graph transformation to a hierarchical network and the degree-dependent clustering coefficient C(k) is calculated for the transformed network. C(k) indicates the probability that two nearest neighbours of a vertex of degree k are connected to each other. While C(k) follows the scaling law C(k) ~ k-1.1 for the initial hierarchical network, C(k) scales weakly as k0.08 for the transformed network. This theoretical prediction was compared with the experimental data of chemical reactions from the KEGG database finding a good agreement. Conclusions The weak scaling found for the transformed network indicates that the reaction network can be identified as a degree-independent clustering network. By using this result, the hierarchical classification of the reaction network is discussed. PMID:15617578

  10. Galaxy clusters and cold dark matter - A low-density unbiased universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, Neta A.; Cen, Renyue

    1992-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of a universe dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) are tested against two fundamental properties of clusters of galaxies: the cluster mass function and the cluster correlation function. We find that standard biased CDM models are inconsistent with these observations for any bias parameter b. A low-density, low-bias CDM-type model, with or without a cosmological constant, appears to be consistent with both the cluster mass function and the cluster correlations. The low-density model agrees well with the observed correlation function of the Abell, Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM), and Edinburgh-Durham cluster catalogs. The model is in excellent agreement with the observed dependence of the correlation strength on cluster mean separation, reproducing the measured universal dimensionless cluster correlation. The low-density model is also consistent with other large-scale structure observations, including the APM angular galaxy-correlations, and for lambda = 1-Omega with the COBE results of the microwave background radiation fluctuations.

  11. Condensed Matter Deuterium Cluster Target for Study of Pycnonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; George, Miley

    2009-11-01

    Fusion reactions have two main classes: thermonuclear and the pycnonuclear. Thermonuclear fusion occurs in low density high temperature plasmas, and is very sensitive to the ion temperature due to Columbic repulsion effects. As the density increases, the Columbic potential barrier is depressed by increased electron screening, allowing fusion at lower temperatures. This type of nuclear reaction is termed a pycnonuclear fusion and is the basis for astrophysical fusion. Ichimarua [1] proposed a laboratory study of this process using explosive mechanical compression of H/D to metallic densities, which would be extremely difficult to implement. Instead, our recent research suggests that metallic-like H/D ``clusters'' can be formed in dislocation loops of thin Palladium foils through electrochemical processes. [2] If this technique is used as a laser compression target, the compressed cluster density would allow study of pycnonuclear reactions. This provides a means of studying astrophysical fusion process, and could also lead to an important non-cryogenic ICF target. [2] [4pt] [1] S. Ichimaru, H. Kitamura. Phys. Plasmas, 6, 2649 (1999) [0pt] [2] G. Miley and X. Yang, Deuterium Cluster Target for Ultra-High Density, 18TH TOFE, San Francisco, CA Sep. 28 -- Oct. 2, 2008

  12. The peculiar velocities of rich clusters in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, George F.; West, Michael J.; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies. The peculiar motion of rich clusters in various cosmological scenarios is of interest for a number of reasons. Observationally, one can measure the peculiar motion of clusters to greater distances than galaxies because cluster peculiar motions can be determined to greater accuracy. One can also test the slope of distance indicator relations using clusters to see if galaxy properties vary with environment. We have used N-body simulations to measure the amplitude and rms cluster peculiar velocity as a function of bias parameter in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios. In addition to measuring the mean and rms peculiar velocity of clusters in the two models, we determined whether the peculiar velocity vector of a given cluster is well aligned with the gravity vector due to all the particles in the simulation and the gravity vector due to the particles present only in the clusters. We have investigated the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies in the cold dark matter and hot dark matter galaxy formation scenarios. We have derived peculiar velocities and associated errors for the scenarios using four values of the bias parameter ranging from b = 1 to b = 2.5. The growth of the mean peculiar velocity with scale factor has been determined and compared to that predicted by linear theory. In addition, we have compared the orientation of force and velocity in these simulations to see if a program such as that proposed by Bertschinger and Dekel (1989) for elliptical galaxy peculiar motions can be applied to clusters. The method they describe enables one to recover the density field from large scale redshift distance samples. The method makes it possible to do this when only radial velocities are known by assuming that the velocity field is curl free. Our analysis suggests that this program if applied to clusters is only realizable for models with a low value of the bias

  13. Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, B.; Offenberg, D.; Zhang, C. B.; Schiller, S.

    2008-10-01

    Using a laser-cooled ion trapping apparatus, we have investigated laser-induced chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and several neutral molecular gases at room temperature, O2 , CO2 , and N2O , leading to the production of cold trapped (≈20mK) BaO+ ions. The BaO+ ions were converted back to Ba+ ions via reaction with room-temperature CO. Reaction rates were determined by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The cold mixed-species ion ensembles produced were used for studying the efficiency of sympathetic cooling, by variation of the ratio of laser-cooled to sympathetically cooled ion numbers. In one extreme case, 20 laser-cooled Ba+138 ions were capable of maintaining the translational temperature of 120 sympathetically cooled barium isotopes (Ba+135-137) and 430 Ba16138O+ molecules at approximately 25mK .

  14. Formation of superheavy elements in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolańczuk, Robert

    2001-04-01

    We calculate the formation cross sections of transactinides (superheavy elements), as well as heavy actinides (No and Lr), which have been or might be obtained in fusion reactions with the evaporation of only one neutron. We use both more realistic fusion barrier and survival probability of the compound nucleus in comparison with the original phenomenological model [Phys. Rev. C 59, 2634 (1999)] that prompted the Berkeley experiment on the synthesis of a new superheavy element 118 [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1104 (1999)]. Calculations are performed for asymmetric and symmetric target-projectile combinations and for reactions with stable and radioactive-ion beams. The formation cross sections measured at GSI-Darmstadt for transactinides and heavy actinides, as well as that for superheavy element 118 reported by the LBNL-Berkeley group, are reproduced within a factor of 2.4, on average. Based on the obtained relatively large cross sections, we predict that optimal reactions with stable beams for the synthesis of so far unobserved superheavy elements 119, 120, and 121 are 209Bi(86Kr, 1n)294119, 208Pb(88Sr, 1n)295120, and 209Bi(88Sr, 1n)296121, respectively. This is because of the magic of both the target and the projectile that leads to larger Q value and, consequently, lower effective fusion barrier with larger transmission probability. The same effect is responsible for relatively large cross sections predicted for the symmetric reactions 136Xe(124Sn, 1n)259Rf, 136Xe(136Xe, 1n)271Hs,138Ba(136Xe, 1n)273110, and 140Ce(136Xe, 1n)275112. Although shell effects in the magic nuclei 124Sn, 136Xe, 138Ba, and 140Ce are not as strong as in 208Pb and 209Bi, they act on both the target and the projectile and lead to the prediction of measurable cross sections.

  15. Environmental Effects on Evolution of Cluster Galaxies in a Λ-dominated Cold Dark Matter Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2003-04-01

    We investigate environmental effects on evolution of bright cluster galaxies (L>L*) in a Λ-dominated cold dark matter universe using a combination of dissipationless N-body simulations and a semianalytic galaxy formation model. The N-body simulations enable us to calculate orbits of galaxies in simulated clusters. Therefore, we can incorporate stripping of cold gas from galactic disks by ram pressure (RP) from the intracluster medium into our model. In this paper we study how ram pressure stripping (RPS) and small starburst induced by a minor merger affect colors, star formation rates (SFRs), and morphologies of cluster galaxies. These processes are new ingredients in our model and have not been studied sufficiently. We find that the RPS is not important for colors and SFRs of galaxies in the cluster core if the star formation timescale is properly chosen, because the star formation is sufficiently suppressed by consumption of the cold gas in the disks. Then observed color and SFR gradients can be reproduced without the RPS. The small starburst triggered by a minor merger hardly affects the SFRs and colors of the galaxies as well. We also examine whether these two processes can resolve the known problem that the hierarchical clustering models based on the major merger-driven bulge formation scenario predict too few galaxies of intermediate bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T) in clusters. When the minor burst is taken into account, the intermediate B/T population is increased, and the observed morphology gradients in clusters are successfully reproduced. Without the minor burst, the RPS cannot increase the intermediate B/T population. On the other hand, when the minor burst is considered, the RPS also plays an important role in formation of the intermediate B/T galaxies. We present redshift evolution of morphological fractions predicted by our models. The predicted number ratios of the intermediate B/T galaxies to the bulge-dominated galaxies show nearly flat or

  16. Deuterium cluster model for low energy nuclear reactions (LENR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Hora, Heinrich

    2007-11-01

    For studying the possible reactions of high density deuterons on the background of a degenerate electron gas, a summary of experimental observations resulted in the possibility of reactions in pm distance and more than ksec duration similar to the K-shell electron capture [1]. The essential reason was the screening of the deuterons by a factor of 14 based on the observations. Using the bosonic properties for a cluster formation of the deuterons and a model of compound nuclear reactions [2], the measured distribution of the resulting nuclei may be explained as known from the Maruhn-Greiner theory for fission. The local maximum of the distribution at the main minimum indicates the excited states of the compound nuclei during their intermediary state. This measured local maximum may be an independent proof for the deuteron clusters at LENR. [1] H. Hora, G.H. Miley et al. Physics Letters A175, 138 (1993) [2] H. Hora and G.H. Miley, APS March Meeting 2007, Program p. 116

  17. THE EFFECT OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY ON COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M.; Biffi, V.

    2015-01-10

    Cold fronts—contact discontinuities in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters—should be disrupted by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities due to the associated shear velocity. However, many observed cold fronts appear stable. This opens the possibility of placing constraints on microphysical mechanisms that stabilize them, such as the ICM viscosity and/or magnetic fields. We performed exploratory high-resolution simulations of cold fronts arising from subsonic gas sloshing in cluster cores using the grid-based Athena MHD code, comparing the effects of isotropic Spitzer and anisotropic Braginskii viscosity (expected in a magnetized plasma). Magnetized simulations with full Braginskii viscosity or isotropic Spitzer viscosity reduced by a factor f ∼ 0.1 are both in qualitative agreement with observations in terms of suppressing K-H instabilities. The rms velocity of turbulence within the sloshing region is only modestly reduced by Braginskii viscosity. We also performed unmagnetized simulations with and without viscosity and find that magnetic fields have a substantial effect on the appearance of the cold fronts, even if the initial field is weak and the viscosity is the same. This suggests that determining the dominant suppression mechanism of a given cold front from X-ray observations (e.g., viscosity or magnetic fields) by comparison with simulations is not straightforward. Finally, we performed simulations including anisotropic thermal conduction, and find that including Braginskii viscosity in these simulations does not significantly affect the evolution of cold fronts; they are rapidly smeared out by thermal conduction, as in the inviscid case.

  18. Possibilities for synthesis of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X. J.; Gao, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-04-01

    In order to find a way to produce superheavy nuclei (SHN), which appear in the gap between the SHN synthesized by cold fusion and those by hot fusion, or those so far not yet been produced in the laboratory, we tried to make use of a set of projectile isotopic chains, to use a radioactive beam projectile, and to test symmetric fusion reactions for gaining more neutrons to synthesize neutron-richer SHN based on the dinuclear system (DNS) model via cold fusion reactions. It is found that the nuclei 265Mt,Ds,272268,273Rg, and 274,275,276Cn may be produced with the detectable evaporation residual cross sections. The intensities of radioactive beams are significantly less than those of the stable beams, therefore using a stable beam is predicted to be the most favorable method for producing SHN. From the symmetric reaction system 136Xe+136Xe , no fusion event was found.

  19. Cross sections calculated for cold fusion reactions for producing superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Smolanczuk, Robert

    2008-08-15

    We propose a handy formula for calculating the formation cross sections for optimal bombarding energies for transactinides (superheavy elements). By means of the proposed formula the cross sections for asymmetric and symmetric cold fusion reactions (one-neutron-out reactions) are calculated. The fusion barrier and its position are calculated by using the folding heavy-ion potential that for spherical reaction partners has the form of a seventh-order polynomial of the radial coordinate with built-in dependence on the thickness of the nuclear surface, as well as on the separation energy of the least bound nucleon. Possibilities of further experimental exploitation of cold fusion in producing the superheavy nuclei are briefly discussed.

  20. The evolution of X-ray clusters in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Klypin, Anatoly; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Burns, Jack O.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first self-consistently computed results on the evolution of X-ray properties of galaxy clusters in a cold + hot dark matter (CHDM) model. We have performed a hydrodynamic plus N-body simulation for the COBE-compatible CHDM model with standard mass components: Omega(sub hot) = 0.3, Omega (sub cold) = 0.6 and Omega(sub baryon) = 0.1 (h = 0.5). In contrast with the CDM model, which fails to reproduce the observed temperature distribution function dN/dT (Bryan et al. 1994b), the CHDM model fits the observational dN/dT quite well. Our results on X-ray luminosity are less firm but even more intriguing. We find that the resulting X-ray luminosity functions at redshifts z = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.7 are well fit by observations, where they overlap. The fact that both temperatures and luminosities provide a reasonable fit to the available observational data indicates that, unless we are missing some essential physics, there is neither room nor need for a large fraction of gas in rich clusters: 10% (or less) in baryons is sufficient to explain their X-ray properties. We also see a tight correlation between X-ray luminosity and gas temperature.

  1. Entropy Limit and the Cold Feedback Mechanism in Cooling Flow Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-09-01

    I propose an explanation for the finding that star formation and visible filaments strong in Hα emission in cooling flow clusters occur only if the minimum specific entropy and the radiative cooling time of the intracluster medium (ICM) are below a specific threshold. The explanation is based on the cold feedback mechanism. In this mechanism, the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in nonlinear overdense blobs of gas residing in an extended region of the cooling flow region. I use the criterion that the feedback cycle period must be longer than the radiative cooling time of dense blobs, for large quantities of gas to cool to low temperatures. The falling time of the dense blobs is parameterized by the ratio of the infall velocity to the sound speed. Another parameter is the ratio of the blobs' density to that of the surrounding ICM. By taking the values of the parameters as in previous papers on the cold feedback model, I derive an expression that gives the right value of the entropy threshold. Future studies will have to examine in more detail the role these parameters play, and will have to show that the observed sharp change in the behavior of clusters across the entropy, or radiative cooling time, threshold can be reproduced by the model.

  2. Role of the neck degree of freedom in cold fusion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Lenske, H.

    2015-05-01

    Mass parameters for collective variables of dinuclear systems formed in cold fusion reactions are microscopically calculated with the linear response theory making use of the width of single-particle states and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The single-particle spectrum and potential energy surface of the adiabatic two-center shell model are used. The microscopical mass parameter in the neck is found to be much larger than one obtained with the hydrodynamical model. Therefore, the dinuclear system lives a rather long time, comparable to the characteristic time of fusion and, correspondingly, the fusion can be considered at fixed neck parameter. With an adiabatic melting of the dinuclear system along the internuclear distance into a compound system one cannot explain the experimental trends in cold fusion reactions.

  3. COLD ELECTRON REACTIONS PRODUCING THE ENERGETIC ISOMER OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Mario B.; Buhr, Henrik; Berg, Max H.; Froese, Michael; Grieser, Manfred; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Novotny, Oldrich; Novotny, Steffen; Orlov, Dmitry A.; Petrignani, Annemieke; Repnow, Roland; Schwalm, Dirk; Shornikov, Andrey; Stuetzel, Julia; Wolf, Andreas; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael L.; Zajfman, Daniel

    2012-02-10

    Using event-by-event fragment momentum spectroscopy in a storage-ring merged-beams experiment, we find laboratory evidence that in the dissociative recombination (DR) of HCNH{sup +} with cold electrons the energetic isomer HNC is produced with a high yield, similar to that of HCN. With a newly implemented mass-sensitive fragment imaging detector, we analyze the kinetic energy release of the triatomic fragments DCN/DNC from the DR reaction of the isotopologue DCND{sup +} with cold (near 10 K) electrons. The results show that the internal energy of these fragments is extremely high, far exceeding the isomerization barrier between DNC and DCN. From this laboratory characterization of the DR reaction we conclude that also the triatomic fragment HCN/HNC from the DR of HCNH{sup +} will carry a large amount of ro-vibrational excitation and show that this implies an isomeric production ratio in a narrow range near unity.

  4. Can Thermal Instability Explain the Cold Gas in Galaxy Cluster Centers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappiello, Christopher; Nulsen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Massive galaxies in the cores of some galaxy clusters take part in a feedback cycle in which cooling gas powers their active galactic nuclei (AGN), while jets from the AGN heat the gas and reduce the rates of cooling and star formation. Thermal instabilities are believed to play a crucial role in feeding these AGN. The Field length is the distance scale above which thermal conduction is unable to smooth out inhomogeneities; if the radius of a cloud of gas is greater than the Field length, the cloud may become thermally unstable. Additionally, angular momentum can promote thermal instability by preventing a dense cloud from falling to its equilibrium position, where heating balances cooling. This requires a low viscosity, which can be tested by a similar criterion to the Field condition for thermal instability. For this reason, the Field parameter, given by the Field length squared over the radius squared, is calculated in order to determine whether a gas cloud at a given radius can become thermally unstable. In this study, we calculate the Field parameter as a function of the radius for a sample of five galaxy clusters known to produce Halpha emission, a marker of cold gas and star formation, and one cluster known not to contain cool gas. We find that all of the clusters with Halpha emission appear to be thermally unstable by the Field criterion, while the cluster without cool gas is not. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution. This research has made use of data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive and the Chandra Source Catalog, and software provided by the Chandra X-ray Center (CXC) in the application packages CIAO and ChIPS.

  5. The rise and fall of a challenger: the Bullet Cluster in Λ cold darkmatter simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Dave, Romeel; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The Bullet Cluster has provided some of the best evidence for the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model via direct empirical proof of the existence of collisionless dark matter, while posing a serious challenge owing to the unusually high inferred pairwise velocities of its progenitor clusters. Here we investigate the probability of finding such a high-velocity pair in large-volume N-body simulations, particularly focusing on differences between halo finding algorithms. We find that algorithms that do not account for the kinematics of infalling groups yield vastly different statistics and probabilities. When employing the Rockstar (RS) halo finder that considers particle velocities, we find numerous Bullet-like pair candidates that closely match not only the high pairwise velocity, but also the mass, mass ratio, separation distance, and collision angle of the initial conditions that have been shown to produce the Bullet Cluster in non-cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The probability of finding a high pairwise velocity pair among haloes with Mhalo≥1014 M⊙ is 4.6×10-4 using RS, while it is ≈34× lower using a friends-of-friends (FOF) based approach as in previous studies. This is because the typical spatial extent of Bullet progenitors is such that FOF tends to group them into a single halo despite clearly distinct kinematics. Further requiring an appropriately high average mass among the two progenitors, we find the comoving number density of potential Bullet-like candidates to be on the order of ≈10-10 Mpc-3. Our findings suggest that ΛCDM straightforwardly produces massive, high relative velocity halo pairs analogous to Bullet Cluster progenitors, and hence the Bullet Cluster does not present a challenge to the ΛCDM model.

  6. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  7. Formation Of Cometary Hydrocarbons By Hydrogen Addition Reactions On Cold Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Watanabe, N.; Kawakita, H.; Fukushima, T.

    2012-10-01

    Hydrogen addition reactions on cold grains are considered to play an important role to form many kinds of volatiles in low temperature conditions like molecular clouds or early solar nebula. We can investigate the physical conditions (e.g., temperature, gas density, and etc.) of the early solar nebula via chemical properties of the pristine bodies like comets. The hydrocarbons like C2H2 and C2H6 have been studied so far and C2H6 might be a product of successive hydrogen addition of C2H2 on the cold grain. To evaluate the efficiency of hydrogen addition reactions from C2H2 to C2H6 quantitatively, we conducted laboratory measurements of those reactions under multiple conditions of the samples (on H2O ice) at different temperatures (10, 20, 30 K) with the LASSIE apparatus at Hokkaido University. Our results provide more detailed information about those reactions than previous quantitative studies. We discuss about the reaction rates with different samples and conditions.

  8. Investigating the mechanism of the selective hydrogenation reaction of cinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters.

    PubMed

    Li, Laicai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CAL) belongs to the group of aromatic α,β-unsaturated aldehydes; the selective hydrogenation of CAL plays an important role in the fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Using Ptn clusters as catalytic models, we studied the selective hydrogenation reaction mechanism for CAL catalyzed by Ptn (n = 6, 10, 14, 18) clusters by means of B3LYP in density functional theory at the 6-31+ G(d) level (the LanL2DZ extra basis set was used for the Pt atom). The rationality of the transition state was proved by vibration frequency analysis and intrinsic reaction coordinate computation. Moreover, atoms in molecules theory and nature bond orbital theory were applied to discuss the interaction among orbitals and the bonding characteristics. The results indicate that three kinds of products, namely 3-phenylpropyl aldehyde, 3-phenyl allyl alcohol and cinnamyl alcohol, are produced in the selective hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Ptn clusters; each pathway possesses two reaction channels. Ptn clusters are more likely to catalyze the activation and hydrogenation of the C = O bond in CAL molecules, eventually producing cinnamic alcohol, which proves that Ptn clusters have a strong reaction selectivity to catalyze CAL. The reaction selectivity of the catalyzer cluster is closely related to the size of the Ptn cluster, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. Graphical Abstract The reaction mechanism for the selective hydrogenation reaction ofcinnamaldehyde catalyzed by Ptn clusters was studied by densityfunctional theory. The reactionselectivity of cluster catalyzer was concluded to be closely related to the size of Ptn clusters, with Pt14 clusters having the greatest reaction selectivity. PMID:27444877

  9. Generation of intense and cold beam of Pt-Ag bi-element cluster ions having single-composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumatsu, H.

    2011-07-01

    An intense beam of bi-element Pt-Ag cluster ions with a single atomic-composition has been gained toward development of new-functional materials of the clusters fixed on a solid surface. Mass production of the bi-element cluster ions has been achieved by operating dual magnetron-sputtering devices independently in a gas aggregation cell, and the ions having a single composition are filtered out by passing through a quadrupole mass filter. The kinetic energies of the cluster ions have been reduced by collision with cold helium in order for low-energy cluster-impact deposition of the clusters on the surface. The cooling process was examined further by means of molecular-dynamics simulation.

  10. Nucleus-nucleus cold fusion reactions analyzed with the l-dependent 'fusion by diffusion' model

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, T.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Wilczynski, J.

    2011-05-15

    We present a modified version of the Fusion by Diffusion (FBD) model aimed at describing the synthesis of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, in which a low excited compound nucleus emits only one neutron. The modified FBD model accounts for the angular momentum dependence of three basic factors determining the evaporation residue cross section: the capture cross section {sigma}{sub cap}(l), the fusion probability P{sub fus}(l), and the survival probability P{sub surv}(l). The fusion hindrance factor, the inverse of P{sub fus}(l), is treated in terms of thermal fluctuations in the shape degrees of freedom and is expressed as a solution of the Smoluchowski diffusion equation. The l dependence of P{sub fus}(l) results from the l-dependent potential energy surface of the colliding system. A new parametrization of the distance of starting point of the diffusion process is introduced. An analysis of a complete set of 27 excitation functions for production of superheavy nuclei in cold fusion reactions, studied in experiments at GSI Darmstadt, RIKEN Tokyo, and LBNL Berkeley, is presented. The FBD model satisfactorily reproduces shapes and absolute cross sections of all the cold fusion excitation functions. It is shown that the peak position of the excitation function for a given 1n reaction is determined by the Q value of the reaction and the height of the fission barrier of the final nucleus. This fact could possibly be used in future experiments (with well-defined beam energy) for experimental determination of the fission barrier heights.

  11. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T CIVD, min, where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T CIVD,min was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T CIVD,min at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T CIVD,min.

  12. High-resolution electron microscopy observation and dislocation reaction mechanism of fivefold twinning in a Cu-rich precipitate in a cold rolled ferritic steel containing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Wei; Chen, Bolin; Zhou, Xiying; Li, Zhongwen; Zhou, Bangxin; Wang, Lumin

    2014-09-15

    Ferritic steels containing copper have been studied as model systems for clusters/precipitate formation in reactor pressure vessel steels. The samples were aged at 400 °C for 4000 h and subsequently cold rolled to 30% reduction at room temperature. The microstructural characteristics of the samples were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Direct evidence was found that the fivefold twinning occurs via simultaneous emission of two Shockley partial dislocations from two particular α-Fe/Cu interfaces, and then the pileup tips of the twofold twin. - Highlights: • Fivefold twin is observed in a Cu-rich precipitate in cold rolled ferritic steels. • A dislocation reaction mechanism for the fivefold twin formation is proposed. • Two particular mismatching α-Fe/Cu-rich precipitate interfaces play a critical role.

  13. Chemisorption and reactions on clusters of nickel atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waber, J. T.; Adachi, H.; Yu, T.

    1982-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of metallic clusters on a substantially amorphous substrate are discussed with emphasis on the geometrical and electronic structure of the clusters. Several clusters of different symmetry containing five to nine nickel atoms were studied. It was found that the energy range of primary d-like states is not significantly different from the width of the d-band states in nickel metal, as long as the interatomic distance is comparable to that in the bulk metal. The approach of one or more molecules to the cluster is examined using at the hydrogenation of acetylene and the dehydrogenation of ethylene as examples.

  14. Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Cobalt--(6)Pyrrole Cluster: Density Functional Theory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputro, Adhitya G.; Rusydi, Febdian; Kasai, Hideaki; Dipojono, Hermawan K.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the potential energy surface profile for various water formation reaction schemes on an unsupported cobalt--(6)pyrrole [Co--(6)Ppy] cluster in the vacuum state by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that in the Co--(6)Ppy cluster, the formation of H2O2 is energetically not favorable. Instead of forming H2O2ad, the \\text{HO\\text{2ad} + H reaction forms 2OHad or \\text{O\\text{ad} + H2O immediately. The adsorption of H2O2 on the Co--(6)Ppy cluster is possible only if the H2O2 molecule comes from or forms outside of the cluster. The formation of two OH molecules instead of H2O2 on the Co--(6)Ppy cluster suggests that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism on the unsupported Co--(6)Ppy cluster in the vacuum state prefers the direct four-electron reduction to water.

  15. The molecular quantum rotor in cold reactions at the Langevin universal limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagam, Yuval; Klein, Ayelet; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Yun, Renjie; Averbukh, Vitali; Koch, Christiane; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2015-05-01

    Fast chemical reactions have been predicted to be solely governed by long-range interactions as was established by Langevin in 1905. The theory has become central to astrochemistry, where fast chemical processes dominate, giving rise to collision energy scaling laws of reaction rates, such as E1/6 for the van der Waals interaction. Importantly, for molecular reactants, the presence of additional anisotropic long-range interactions, such as quadrupole-quadrupole, is predicted to surface only when the molecule is rotationally excited, changing the scaling law to E1/10. Although molecular reactions with near unit probability have been observed at ultra-cold temperatures, these scaling laws and the role of the rotational state remain unconfirmed experimentally. We report the direct observation of universal scaling laws in chemi-ionization reactions of H2 and HD by He(23P2) extending over three orders of magnitude in collision energies. For rotationally ground-state HD molecules the rate follows the E1/6 scaling, while for H2, where the majority of the molecules are rotationally excited, the scaling changes to E1/10 at low collision energies only. At the lowest collision energies the Wigner threshold laws start governing the reactions as the classical Langevin theory breaks down.

  16. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-10-28

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (He{sub n}, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He{sub 4} and He{sub 5} clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  17. Molecular-dynamics analysis of mobile helium cluster reactions near surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-01

    We report the results of a systematic atomic-scale analysis of the reactions of small mobile helium clusters (Hen, 4 ≤ n ≤ 7) near low-Miller-index tungsten (W) surfaces, aiming at a fundamental understanding of the near-surface dynamics of helium-carrying species in plasma-exposed tungsten. These small mobile helium clusters are attracted to the surface and migrate to the surface by Fickian diffusion and drift due to the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. As the clusters migrate toward the surface, trap mutation (TM) and cluster dissociation reactions are activated at rates higher than in the bulk. TM produces W adatoms and immobile complexes of helium clusters surrounding W vacancies located within the lattice planes at a short distance from the surface. These reactions are identified and characterized in detail based on the analysis of a large number of molecular-dynamics trajectories for each such mobile cluster near W(100), W(110), and W(111) surfaces. TM is found to be the dominant cluster reaction for all cluster and surface combinations, except for the He4 and He5 clusters near W(100) where cluster partial dissociation following TM dominates. We find that there exists a critical cluster size, n = 4 near W(100) and W(111) and n = 5 near W(110), beyond which the formation of multiple W adatoms and vacancies in the TM reactions is observed. The identified cluster reactions are responsible for important structural, morphological, and compositional features in the plasma-exposed tungsten, including surface adatom populations, near-surface immobile helium-vacancy complexes, and retained helium content, which are expected to influence the amount of hydrogen re-cycling and tritium retention in fusion tokamaks.

  18. Cold reaction valleys in the radioactive decay of superheavy {sup 286}112, {sup 292}114, and {sup 296}116 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sabina, S.

    2012-08-15

    Cold reaction valleys in the radioactive decay of superheavy nuclei {sup 286}112, {sup 292}114, and {sup 296}116 are studied taking Coulomb and Proximity Potential as the interacting barrier. It is found that in addition to alpha particle, {sup 8}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 28}Mg, {sup 34}Si, {sup 50}Ca, etc. are optimal cases of cluster radioactivity since they lie in the cold valleys. Two other regions of deep minima centered on {sup 208}Pb and {sup 132}Sn are also found. Within our Coulomb and Proximity Potential Model half-life times and other characteristics such as barrier penetrability, decay constant for clusters ranging from alpha particle to {sup 68}Ni are calculated. The computed alpha half-lives match with the values calculated using Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski systematics. The clusters {sup 8}Be and {sup 14}C are found to be most probable for emission with T{sub 1/2} < 10{sup 30} s. The alpha-decay chains of the three superheavy nuclei are also studied. The computed alpha-decay half-lives are compared with the values predicted by Generalized Liquid Drop Model and they are found to match reasonably well.

  19. Statistical Description of Cluster Emission Including Direct Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, Emil

    2006-04-26

    The coalescence idea of the Iwamoto-Harada-Bisplinghoff model within the pre-equilibrium (exciton model) approach to nuclear reactions has been generalized and the links to direct reactions have been outlined.

  20. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  1. THE NATURE OF FILAMENTARY COLD GAS IN THE CORE OF THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, N.; Canning, R. E. A.; Allen, S. W.; Simionescu, A.; Von der Linden, A.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Kos, J.; Van Weeren, R. J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Ruszkowski, M.

    2013-04-20

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the emission-line nebulae located {approx}38'' (3 kpc in projection) southeast of the nucleus of M87, the central dominant galaxy of the Virgo Cluster. We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) [C II] line emission at 158 {mu}m from the nebulae using observations made with the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). The infrared line emission is extended and co-spatial with optical H{alpha}+ [N II], far-ultraviolet C IV lines, and soft X-ray emission. The filamentary nebulae evidently contain multi-phase material spanning a temperature range of at least five orders of magnitude, from {approx}100 K to {approx}10{sup 7} K. This material has most likely been uplifted by the active galactic nucleus from the center of M87. The thermal pressure of the 10{sup 4} K phase appears to be significantly lower than that of the surrounding hot intracluster medium (ICM), indicating the presence of additional turbulent and magnetic pressure in the filaments. If the turbulence in the filaments is subsonic then the magnetic field strength required to balance the pressure of the surrounding ICM is B {approx} 30-70 {mu}G. The spectral properties of the soft X-ray emission from the filaments indicate that it is due to thermal plasma with kT {approx} 0.5-1 keV, which is cooling by mixing with the cold gas and/or radiatively. Charge exchange can be ruled out as a significant source of soft X-rays. Both cooling and mixing scenarios predict gas with a range of temperatures. This is at first glance inconsistent with the apparent lack of X-ray emitting gas with kT < 0.5 keV. However, we show that the missing very soft X-ray emission could be absorbed by the cold gas in the filaments with an integrated hydrogen column density of N{sub H} {approx} 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, providing a natural explanation for the apparent temperature floor to the X-ray emission at kT {approx} 0.5 keV. The FIR through ultraviolet

  2. Photonuclear reaction to test cluster structure of Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Iskender

    2008-11-11

    The lithium can be pictured as an {alpha} particle with 2 extra nucleon surrounding it. A photonuclear reaction experiment has been performed to test this structure at Maxlab in Lund-Sweden. The cross-section of the {sup 6}Li({gamma},n) reaction have been measured using TOF methods and the results were compared with results of {sup 6}Li({gamma},p) and also {sup 4}He({gamma},n) reaction.

  3. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: A spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoni, S.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Raabe, R.; Rusek, K.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Morales, A. I.; Bednarczyk, P.; Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Królas, W.; Maj, A.; Szpak, B.; Callens, M.; Bouma, J.; Elseviers, J.; De Witte, H.; Flavigny, F.; Orlandi, R.; Reiter, P.; Seidlitz, M.; Warr, N.; Siebeck, B.; Hellgartner, S.; Mücher, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Bauer, C.; Georgiev, G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Balabanski, D.; Sferrazza, M.; Kowalska, M.; Rapisarda, E.; Voulot, D.; Lozano Benito, M.; Wenander, F.

    2015-08-01

    An exploratory experiment performed at REX-ISOLDE to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier as a mechanism to explore the structure of exotic neutron-rich nuclei. The reactions 7Li(98Rb,α xn ) and 7Li(98Rb,t xn ) were studied through particle-γ coincidence measurements, and the results are presented in terms of the observed excitation energies and spins. Moreover, the reaction mechanism is qualitatively discussed as a transfer of a clusterlike particle within a distorted-wave Born approximation framework. The results indicate that cluster-transfer reactions can be described well as a direct process and that they can be an efficient method to investigate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high excitation energies and spins.

  4. Constraints on cold dark matter theories from observations of massive x-ray-luminous clusters of galaxies at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, G. A.; Gioia, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    During the course of a gravitational lensing survey of distant, X-ray selected Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) clusters of galaxies, we have studied six X-ray-luminous (L(sub x) greater than 5 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) clusters at redshifts exceeding z = 0.5. All of these clusters are apparently massive. In addition to their high X-ray luminosity, two of the clusters at z approximately 0.6 exhibit gravitationally lensed arcs. Furthermore, the highest redshift cluster in our sample, MS 1054-0321 at z = 0.826, is both extremely X-ray luminous (L(sub 0.3-3.5keV)=9.3 x 10(exp 44)(h(sub 50)(exp -2))ergs/sec) and exceedingly rich with an optical richness comparable to an Abell Richness Class 4 cluster. In this Letter, we discuss the cosmological implications of the very existence of these clusters for hierarchical structure formation theories such as standard Omega = 1 CDM (cold dark matter), hybrid Omega = 1 C + HDM (hot dark matter), and flat, low-density Lambda + CDM models.

  5. Will water act as a photocatalyst for cluster phase chemical reactions? Vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Zeb C.; Takahashi, Kaito; Skodje, Rex T.; Vaida, Veronica

    2012-04-28

    The possibility of water catalysis in the vibrational overtone-induced dehydration reaction of methanediol is investigated using ab initio dynamical simulations of small methanediol-water clusters. Quantum chemistry calculations employing clusters with one or two water molecules reveal that the barrier to dehydration is lowered by over 20 kcal/mol because of hydrogen-bonding at the transition state. Nevertheless, the simulations of the reaction dynamics following OH-stretch excitation show little catalytic effect of water and, in some cases, even show an anticatalytic effect. The quantum yield for the dehydration reaction exhibits a delayed threshold effect where reaction does not occur until the photon energy is far above the barrier energy. Unlike thermally induced reactions, it is argued that competition between reaction and the irreversible dissipation of photon energy may be expected to raise the dynamical threshold for the reaction above the transition state energy. It is concluded that quantum chemistry calculations showing barrier lowering are not sufficient to infer water catalysis in photochemical reactions, which instead require dynamical modeling.

  6. Probing surface distributions of α clusters in 20Ne via α -transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tokuro; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Suhara, Tadahiro; Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Background: Direct evidence of the α -cluster manifestation in bound states has not been obtained yet, although a number of experimental studies were carried out to extract the information of the clustering. In particular in conventional analyses of α -transfer reactions, there exist a few significant problems on reaction models, which are insufficient to qualitatively discuss the cluster structure. Purpose: We aim to verify the manifestation of the α -cluster structure from observables. As the first application, we plan to extract the spatial information of the cluster structure of the 20Ne nucleus in its ground state through the cross section of the α -transfer reaction 16O(6Li,d )20Ne. Methods: For the analysis of the transfer reaction, we work with the coupled-channel Born approximation (CCBA) approach, in which the breakup effect of 6Li is explicitly taken into account by means of the continuum-discretized coupled-channel method based on the three-body α +d +16O model. The two methods are adopted to calculate the overlap function between 20Ne and α +16O ; one is the microscopic cluster model (MCM) with the generator coordinate method, and the other is the phenomenological two-body potential model (PM). Results: We show that the CCBA calculation with the MCM wave function gives a significant improvement of the theoretical result on the angular distribution of the transfer cross section, which is consistent with the experimental data. Employing the PM, it is discussed which region of the cluster wave function is probed on the transfer cross section. Conclusions: It is found that the surface region of the cluster wave function is sensitive to the cross section. The present work is situated as the first step in obtaining important information to systematically investigate the cluster structure.

  7. Controlled shock shells and intracluster fusion reactions in the explosion of large clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Peano, F.

    2006-05-15

    The ion phase-space dynamics in the Coulomb explosion of very large ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} atoms) deuterium clusters can be tailored using two consecutive laser pulses with different intensities and an appropriate time delay. For suitable sets of laser parameters (intensities and delay), large-scale shock shells form during the explosion, thus highly increasing the probability of fusion reactions within the single exploding clusters. In order to analyze the ion dynamics and evaluate the intracluster reaction rate, a one-dimensional theory is used, which approximately accounts for the electron expulsion from the clusters. It is found that, for very large clusters (initial radius {approx}100 nm), and optimal laser parameters, the intracluster fusion yield becomes comparable to the intercluster fusion yield. The validity of the results is confirmed with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Clustering and Optimal Arrangement of Enzymes in Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Alexander; Tostevin, Filipe; Gerland, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Enzymes within biochemical pathways are often colocalized, yet the consequences of specific spatial enzyme arrangements remain poorly understood. We study the impact of enzyme arrangement on reaction efficiency within a reaction-diffusion model. The optimal arrangement transitions from a cluster to a distributed profile as a single parameter, which controls the probability of reaction versus diffusive loss of pathway intermediates, is varied. We introduce the concept of enzyme exposure to explain how this transition arises from the stochastic nature of molecular reactions and diffusion.

  9. Energetics, dynamics, and reactions of rydberg state molecules in van der Waals clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Q.Y.; Bernstein, E.R.

    1994-12-31

    In the past 10 years the study of van der Waals clusters has grown enormously; perhaps one of the best indications of this growth, in both activity and sophistication, is the advent of this review issue devoted to such research. Van der Waals clusters, synthesized one molecule or atom at a time and accessed according to size and structure, provide a molecule by molecule view of the solvation process, its energetics, solute/solvent dynamics, and eventually even unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reactions. The clusters treated most frequently and discussed in this review are of the form solute or chromophore (solvent)n, with n varying from 1 to more than 100. These clusters are most typically generated in a supersonic beam; both large and small clusters can be synthesized by controlling the expansion conditions.

  10. On the Bonding Mechanism in Cold Spray of Deformable hex-BN-Ni Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.; Eden, T. J.

    2016-06-01

    Bond strength and the lubrication potential of coatings made of 7 µm Hexagonal Boron Nitride particles encapsulated with nickel (hBN-Ni), and deposited onto aluminum 6061 substrates via cold spray were examined; for all tests, N2 was used as the carrier gas at a temperature of 480 °C and pressure of 2.4 MPa. Results showed significant improvement in both wear resistance and reduced surface friction. Coated samples also demonstrated unexpected high bond strength, which was much greater than pure nickel cold sprayed onto aluminum. However, while the results were truly promising, the primary reason for the observed high bond strength could not be explained using existing cold spray theories which were primarily developed for pure metal particles. Based on the present findings compared to cold-sprayed layers of composite nickel-nickel (nickel particles encapsulated with nickel), a mechanism for bonding of hBN-Ni particles to aluminum based on the level of plastic deformation and hardenability is proposed. Indeed, the high bond strength between the coating and substrate is related to the relatively high initial ductility of the nickel encapsulation, compliance of the hBN, as well as the ensuing significant plastic deformation of the composite particles during cold spray deposition.

  11. On the Bonding Mechanism in Cold Spray of Deformable hex-BN-Ni Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshastehriz, M.; Smid, I.; Segall, A. E.; Eden, T. J.

    2016-05-01

    Bond strength and the lubrication potential of coatings made of 7 µm Hexagonal Boron Nitride particles encapsulated with nickel (hBN-Ni), and deposited onto aluminum 6061 substrates via cold spray were examined; for all tests, N2 was used as the carrier gas at a temperature of 480 °C and pressure of 2.4 MPa. Results showed significant improvement in both wear resistance and reduced surface friction. Coated samples also demonstrated unexpected high bond strength, which was much greater than pure nickel cold sprayed onto aluminum. However, while the results were truly promising, the primary reason for the observed high bond strength could not be explained using existing cold spray theories which were primarily developed for pure metal particles. Based on the present findings compared to cold-sprayed layers of composite nickel-nickel (nickel particles encapsulated with nickel), a mechanism for bonding of hBN-Ni particles to aluminum based on the level of plastic deformation and hardenability is proposed. Indeed, the high bond strength between the coating and substrate is related to the relatively high initial ductility of the nickel encapsulation, compliance of the hBN, as well as the ensuing significant plastic deformation of the composite particles during cold spray deposition.

  12. X-ray clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamic PPM simulation of the cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Cen, Renyue; Norman, Michael L.; Ostriker, Jermemiah P.; Stone, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) is utilized to compute the distribution of hot gas in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) universe. Utilizing periodic boundary conditions, a box with size 85 h(exp-1) Mpc, having cell size 0.31 h(exp-1) Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3)=10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, Sigma(sub 8)=1.05, Omega(sub b)=0.06, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters, compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. The results, which are compared with those obtained in the preceding paper (Kang et al. 1994a), may be used in conjuction with ROSAT and other observational data sets. Overall, the results of the two computations are qualitatively very similar with regard to the trends of cluster properties, i.e., how the number density, radius, and temeprature depend on luminosity and redshift. The total luminosity from clusters is approximately a factor of 2 higher using the PPM code (as compared to the 'total variation diminishing' (TVD) code used in the previous paper) with the number of bright clusters higher by a similar factor. The primary conclusions of the prior paper, with regard to the power spectrum of the primeval density perturbations, are strengthened: the standard CDM model, normalized to the COBE microwave detection, predicts too many bright X-ray emitting clusters, by a factor probably in excess of 5. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions for the evolution of cluster properties, luminosity functions, and size and temperature distributions should provide an important discriminator among competing scenarios for the development of structure in the universe.

  13. Stable stoichiometry of gas-phase cerium oxide cluster ions and their reactions with CO.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Toshiaki; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-03-12

    Cerium oxide cluster ions, Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (n = 2-9, x = -1 to +2), were prepared in the gas phase by laser ablation of a cerium oxide rod in the presence of oxygen diluted in He as the carrier gas. The stable stoichiometry of the cluster ions was investigated using a mass spectrometer in combination with a newly developed post heating device. The oxygen-rich clusters, Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (x = 1, 2), were found to release oxygen molecules, and Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) (x = -1, 0) were exclusively formed by post heating treatment at 573 K. The Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and Ce(n)O(2n)(+) clusters were found to be thermally stable, and the oxygen-rich clusters consisted of robust Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and Ce(n)O(2n)(+) and weakly bound oxygen atoms. Evaluation of the reactivity of Ce(n)O(2n+x)(+) with CO molecules demonstrated that Ce(n)O(2n)(+) oxidized CO to form Ce(n)O(2n-1)(+) and CO2, and the rate constants of the reaction were in the range of 10(-12)-10(-16) cm(3) s(-1). The CO oxidation reaction was distinct for n = 5, which occurred in parallel with the CO attachment reaction. PMID:25651032

  14. Emission of heavy clusters in nuclear reactions at low collision energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2012-11-01

    A survey of theoretical and experimental investigations of the process involving the emission of heavy clusters from excited nuclear systems produced in heavy-ion reactions at low collision energies is given. The dinuclear system (DNS) model for calculating cross sections for the formation of heavy clusters in complete-fusion and quasifission reactions is described in detail. The results of respective calculations are compared with relevant experimental data and with the results obtained on the basis of different models. The role of the angular momentum, the asymmetry of the entrance channel, the N/Z ratio, and the excitation energy in the formation of final reaction products is studied within the proposed approach. A method is developed for calculating cross sections for evaporation-residue formation. This method takes into account both channels of light-particle emission and channels of heavy-cluster emission. The possibility for the formation of Rn, Fr, and Ra isotopes in channels of heavy-cluster emission from the excited compound nucleus of Pu is demonstrated for the first time. The calculated cross sections and isotopic distributions for residual nuclei arising upon the emission of heavy clusters from an excited compound nucleus of Pu are in good agreement with experimental data. The model developed in the present study permits finding optimum experimental conditions (projectile-target combination and bombarding energy) for studying processes involving the emission of specific complex fragments.

  15. Cold gas in cluster cores: global stability analysis and non-linear simulations of thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Prakriti Pal; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-04-01

    We perform global linear stability analysis and idealized numerical simulations in global thermal balance to understand the condensation of cold gas from hot/virial atmospheres (coronae), in particular the intracluster medium (ICM). We pay particular attention to geometry (e.g. spherical versus plane-parallel) and the nature of the gravitational potential. Global linear analysis gives a similar value for the fastest growing thermal instability modes in spherical and Cartesian geometries. Simulations and observations suggest that cooling in haloes critically depends on the ratio of the cooling time to the free-fall time (tcool/tff). Extended cold gas condenses out of the ICM only if this ratio is smaller than a threshold value close to 10. Previous works highlighted the difference between the nature of cold gas condensation in spherical and plane-parallel atmospheres; namely, cold gas condensation appeared easier in spherical atmospheres. This apparent difference due to geometry arises because the previous plane-parallel simulations focused on in situ condensation of multiphase gas but spherical simulations studied condensation anywhere in the box. Unlike previous claims, our non-linear simulations show that there are only minor differences in cold gas condensation, either in situ or anywhere, for different geometries. The amount of cold gas depends on the shape of tcool/tff; gas has more time to condense if gravitational acceleration decreases towards the centre. In our idealized plane-parallel simulations with heating balancing cooling in each layer, there can be significant mass/energy/momentum transfer across layers that can trigger condensation and drive tcool/tff far beyond the critical value close to 10.

  16. Reactions of metal cluster anions with inorganic and organic molecules in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-07-28

    The study of gas phase ion-molecule reactions by state-of-the-art mass spectrometric experiments in conjunction with quantum chemistry calculations offers an opportunity to clarify the elementary steps and mechanistic details of bond activation and conversion processes. In the past few decades, a considerable number of publications have been devoted to the ion-molecule reactions of metal clusters, the experimentally and theoretically tractable models for the active phase of condensed phase systems. The focus of this perspective concerns progress on activation and transformation of important inorganic and organic molecules by negatively charged metal clusters. The metal cluster anions cover bare metal clusters as well as ligated systems with oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen, among others. The following important issues have been summarized and discussed: (i) dependence of chemical reactivity and selectivity on cluster structures and sizes, metals and metal oxidation states, odd-even electron numbers, etc. and (ii) effects of doping, ligation, and pre-adsorption on the reactivity of metal clusters toward rather inert molecules. PMID:27346242

  17. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-08-15

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed.

  18. Cluster geometry and survival probability in systems driven by reaction diffusion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windus, Alastair; Jensen, Henrik J.

    2008-11-01

    We consider a reaction-diffusion model incorporating the reactions A→phi, A→2A and 2A→3A. Depending on the relative rates for sexual and asexual reproduction of the quantity A, the model exhibits either a continuous or first-order absorbing phase transition to an extinct state. A tricritical point separates the two phase lines. While we comment on this critical behaviour, the main focus of the paper is on the geometry of the population clusters that form. We observe the different cluster structures that arise at criticality for the three different types of critical behaviour and show that there exists a linear relationship for the survival probability against initial cluster size at the tricritical point only.

  19. Chemical reactions studied at ultra-low temperature in liquid helium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Krasnokutski, Serge A.

    2012-11-01

    Low-temperature reaction rates are important ingredients for astrophysical reaction networks modeling the formation of interstellar matter in molecular clouds. Unfortunately, such data is difficult to obtain by experimental means. In an attempt to study low-temperature reactions of astrophysical interest, we have investigated relevant reactions at ultralow temperature in liquid helium droplets. Being prepared by supersonic expansion of helium gas at high pressure through a nozzle into a vacuum, large helium clusters in the form of liquid droplets constitute nano-sized reaction vessels for the study of chemical reactions at ultra-low temperature. If the normal isotope 4He is used, the helium droplets are superfluid and characterized by a constant temperature of 0.37 K. Here we present results obtained for Mg, Al, and Si reacting with O2. Mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the reaction products. As it may be difficult to distinguish between reactions occurring in the helium droplets before they are ionized and ion-molecule reactions taking place after the ionization, additional techniques were applied to ensure that the reactions actually occurred in the helium droplets. This information was provided by measuring the chemiluminescence light emitted by the products, the evaporation of helium atoms by the release of the reaction heat, or by laser-spectroscopic identification of the reactants and products.

  20. Chemical reactions studied at ultra-low temperature in liquid helium clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Huisken, Friedrich; Krasnokutski, Serge A.

    2012-11-27

    Low-temperature reaction rates are important ingredients for astrophysical reaction networks modeling the formation of interstellar matter in molecular clouds. Unfortunately, such data is difficult to obtain by experimental means. In an attempt to study low-temperature reactions of astrophysical interest, we have investigated relevant reactions at ultralow temperature in liquid helium droplets. Being prepared by supersonic expansion of helium gas at high pressure through a nozzle into a vacuum, large helium clusters in the form of liquid droplets constitute nano-sized reaction vessels for the study of chemical reactions at ultra-low temperature. If the normal isotope {sup 4}He is used, the helium droplets are superfluid and characterized by a constant temperature of 0.37 K. Here we present results obtained for Mg, Al, and Si reacting with O{sub 2}. Mass spectrometry was employed to characterize the reaction products. As it may be difficult to distinguish between reactions occurring in the helium droplets before they are ionized and ion-molecule reactions taking place after the ionization, additional techniques were applied to ensure that the reactions actually occurred in the helium droplets. This information was provided by measuring the chemiluminescence light emitted by the products, the evaporation of helium atoms by the release of the reaction heat, or by laser-spectroscopic identification of the reactants and products.

  1. Intracluster Ion Molecule Reactions Following the Generation of Mg+ Within Polar Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Alsharaeh, Edreese H.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigated the intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg+ within the polar clusters (water, methanol, ether and acetonitrile), using time of flight mass spectrometry. In the case of Mg+/water and Mg+/methanol, dehydrogenation reactions are observed after the addition of five molecules. However, no dehydrogenation reactions are observed in the case of Mg+/ether or Mg+/acetonitrile clusters. This confirms the role of the H atom in (O–H) in the dehydrogenation reaction, and rules out any contribution from the H atom in the CH3 group. In addition, the magic numbers in the time of flight (TOF) mass spectra of the Mg+Xn clusters (X = H2O, CH3OH, CH3OCH3 and CH3CN) have been investigated. Finally, the role of ground electronic magnesium ion Mg+(2S1/2), and excited electronic magnesium ion Mg+(2P1/2) in the dehydrogenation reaction were investigated using Ion Mobility Mass spectrometry. The results offer direct evidence confirming the absence of the electronically excited, Mg+(2P1/2). PMID:22272121

  2. Intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg+ within polar clusters.

    PubMed

    Alsharaeh, Edreese H

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigated the intracluster ion molecule reactions following the generation of Mg(+) within the polar clusters (water, methanol, ether and acetonitrile), using time of flight mass spectrometry. In the case of Mg(+)/water and Mg(+)/methanol, dehydrogenation reactions are observed after the addition of five molecules. However, no dehydrogenation reactions are observed in the case of Mg(+)/ether or Mg(+)/acetonitrile clusters. This confirms the role of the H atom in (O-H) in the dehydrogenation reaction, and rules out any contribution from the H atom in the CH(3) group. In addition, the magic numbers in the time of flight (TOF) mass spectra of the Mg(+)X(n) clusters (X = H(2)O, CH(3)OH, CH(3)OCH(3) and CH(3)CN) have been investigated. Finally, the role of ground electronic magnesium ion Mg(+)((2)S(1/2)), and excited electronic magnesium ion Mg(+)((2)P(1/2)) in the dehydrogenation reaction were investigated using Ion Mobility Mass spectrometry. The results offer direct evidence confirming the absence of the electronically excited, Mg(+)((2)P(1/2)). PMID:22272121

  3. Gas phase vibrational spectroscopy of cold (TiO 2 ) n - (n = 3-8) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Marissa L.; Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Debnath, Sreekanta; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Neumark, Daniel M.; Asmis, Knut R.

    2016-03-01

    We report infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra for the D2-tagged titanium oxide cluster anions (TiO 2 ) n - with n = 3-8 in the spectral region from 450 to 1200 cm-1. The IRPD spectra are interpreted with the aid of harmonic spectra from BP86/6-311+G* density functional theory calculations of energetically low-lying isomers. We conclusively assign the IRPD spectra of the n = 3 and n = 6 clusters to global minimum energy structures with Cs and C2 symmetry, respectively. The vibrational spectra of the n = 4 and n = 7 clusters can be attributed to contributions of at most two low-lying structures. While our calculations indicate that the n = 5 and n = 8 clusters have many more low-lying isomers than the other clusters, the dominant contributions to their spectra can be assigned to the lowest energy structures. Through comparison between the calculated and experimental spectra, we can draw conclusions about the size-dependent evolution of the properties of (TiO 2 ) n - clusters, and on their potential utility as model systems for catalysis on a bulk TiO2 surface.

  4. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  5. Cluster reaction of [Ag8]-/[Cu8]- with chlorine: Evidence for the harpoon mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhixun; Berkdemir, Cüneyt; Smith, Jordan C.; Castleman, A. W.

    2013-09-01

    To examine the question whether the harpoon mechanism can account for the reactive behavior of microscopic charged systems, we have investigated the reactivity of coinage metal clusters in gas phase. Our studies reveal that the reactivity between [Cu8]-/[Ag8]- and chlorine gas is consistent with the harpoon mechanism. An increased reactive cross section is noted through our theoretical estimation based on two methods, ascribed to a long-range transfer of valence electrons from the [Cu8]-/[Ag8]- cluster to chlorine. Insights into this reactivity will be of interest to other researchers working on obtaining a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms of such superatomic species.

  6. 8He cluster structure studied by recoil proton tagged knockout reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y.; Cao, Z.; Xiao, J.; Jiang, D.; Zheng, T.; Hua, H.; Ge, Y.; Li, X.; Lou, J.; Li, Q.; Lv, L.; Qiao, R.; You, H.; Chen, R.; Sakurai, H.; Otsu, H.; Li, Z.; Nishimura, M.; Sakaguchi, S.; Baba, H.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Li, C.; Wang, S.; Wang, H.; Li, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Deguchi, S.; Sato, Y.; Tshoo, K.

    2013-04-01

    Knockout reaction experiment for 8He at 82.3 MeV/u on Hydrogen target was carried out at the RIPS beam line in RIKEN. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the forward moving core fragments and neutrons. The quasi-free knockout mechanism is identified through the polar angle correlation and checked by various kinematics conditions. The absolute differential cross sections for 6He core cluster are obtained and compared with the simple Glauber model calculations. The extracted spectroscopic factor is close to unity and a shrinking of the cluster size is evidenced.

  7. Receptor clustering affects signal transduction at the membrane level in the reaction-limited regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2013-01-01

    Many types of membrane receptors are found to be organized as clusters on the cell surface. We investigate the potential effect of such receptor clustering on the intracellular signal transduction stage. We consider a canonical pathway with a membrane receptor (R) activating a membrane-bound intracellular relay protein (G). We use Monte Carlo simulations to recreate biochemical reactions using different receptor spatial distributions and explore the dynamics of the signal transduction. Results show that activation of G by R is severely impaired by R clustering, leading to an apparent blunted biological effect compared to control. Paradoxically, this clustering decreases the half maximal effective dose (ED50) of the transduction stage, increasing the apparent affinity. We study an example of inter-receptor interaction in order to account for possible compensatory effects of clustering and observe the parameter range in which such interactions slightly counterbalance the loss of activation of G. The membrane receptors’ spatial distribution affects the internal stages of signal amplification, suggesting a functional role for membrane domains and receptor clustering independently of proximity-induced receptor-receptor interactions.

  8. Fluorescent probes for tracking the transfer of iron-sulfur cluster and other metal cofactors in biosynthetic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Vranish, James N; Russell, William K; Yu, Lusa E; Cox, Rachael M; Russell, David H; Barondeau, David P

    2015-01-14

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are protein cofactors that are constructed and delivered to target proteins by elaborate biosynthetic machinery. Mechanistic insights into these processes have been limited by the lack of sensitive probes for tracking Fe-S cluster synthesis and transfer reactions. Here we present fusion protein- and intein-based fluorescent labeling strategies that can probe Fe-S cluster binding. The fluorescence is sensitive to different cluster types ([2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters), ligand environments ([2Fe-2S] clusters on Rieske, ferredoxin (Fdx), and glutaredoxin), and cluster oxidation states. The power of this approach is highlighted with an extreme example in which the kinetics of Fe-S cluster transfer reactions are monitored between two Fdx molecules that have identical Fe-S spectroscopic properties. This exchange reaction between labeled and unlabeled Fdx is catalyzed by dithiothreitol (DTT), a result that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. DTT likely functions in a ligand substitution reaction that generates a [2Fe-2S]-DTT species, which can transfer the cluster to either labeled or unlabeled Fdx. The ability to monitor this challenging cluster exchange reaction indicates that real-time Fe-S cluster incorporation can be tracked for a specific labeled protein in multicomponent assays that include several unlabeled Fe-S binding proteins or other chromophores. Such advanced kinetic experiments are required to untangle the intricate networks of transfer pathways and the factors affecting flux through branch points. High sensitivity and suitability with high-throughput methodology are additional benefits of this approach. We anticipate that this cluster detection methodology will transform the study of Fe-S cluster pathways and potentially other metal cofactor biosynthetic pathways. PMID:25478817

  9. The environmental history of group and cluster galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Weinmann, Simone; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We use publicly available galaxy merger trees, obtained applying semi-analytic techniques to a large high-resolution cosmological simulation, to study the environmental history of group and cluster galaxies. Our results highlight the existence of an intrinsic history bias which makes the nature versus nurture (as well as the mass versus environment) debate inherently ill posed. In particular, we show that (i) surviving massive satellites were accreted later than their less massive counterparts, from more massive haloes and (ii) the mixing of galaxy populations is incomplete during halo assembly, which creates a correlation between the time a galaxy becomes satellite and its present distance from the parent halo centre. The weakest trends are found for the most massive satellites, as a result of efficient dynamical friction and late formation times of massive haloes. A large fraction of the most massive group/cluster members are accreted on to the main progenitor of the final halo as central galaxies, while about half of the galaxies with low and intermediate stellar masses are accreted as satellites. Large fractions of group and cluster galaxies (in particular those of low stellar mass) have therefore been ‘pre-processed’ as satellites of groups with mass ˜1013 M⊙. To quantify the relevance of hierarchical structure growth on the observed environmental trends, we have considered observational estimates of the passive galaxy fractions and their variation as a function of halo mass and clustercentric distance. Comparisons with our theoretical predictions require relatively long times (˜5-7 Gyr) for the suppression of star formation in group and cluster satellites. It is unclear how such a gentle mode of strangulation can be achieved by simply relaxing the assumption of instantaneous stripping of the hot gas reservoir associated with accreting galaxies, or if the difficulties encountered by recent galaxy formation models in reproducing the observed trends

  10. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  11. Muscle Reaction Time During a Simulated Lateral Ankle Sprain After Wet-Ice Application or Cold-Water Immersion

    PubMed Central

    Thain, Peter K.; Bleakley, Christopher M.; Mitchell, Andrew C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Cryotherapy is used widely in sport and exercise medicine to manage acute injuries and facilitate rehabilitation. The analgesic effects of cryotherapy are well established; however, a potential caveat is that cooling tissue negatively affects neuromuscular control through delayed muscle reaction time. This topic is important to investigate because athletes often return to exercise, rehabilitation, or competitive activity immediately or shortly after cryotherapy. Objective To compare the effects of wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, and an untreated control condition on peroneus longus and tibialis anterior muscle reaction time during a simulated lateral ankle sprain. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University of Hertfordshire human performance laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 54 physically active individuals (age = 20.1 ± 1.5 years, height = 1.7 ± 0.07 m, mass = 66.7 ± 5.4 kg) who had no injury or history of ankle sprain. Intervention(s) Wet-ice application, cold-water immersion, or an untreated control condition applied to the ankle for 10 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s) Muscle reaction time and muscle amplitude of the peroneus longus and tibialis anterior in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain were calculated. The ankle-sprain simulation incorporated a combined inversion and plantar-flexion movement. Results We observed no change in muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude after cryotherapy for either the peroneus longus or tibialis anterior (P > .05). Conclusions Ten minutes of joint cooling did not adversely affect muscle reaction time or muscle amplitude in response to a simulated lateral ankle sprain. These findings suggested that athletes can safely return to sporting activity immediately after icing. Further evidence showed that ice can be applied before ankle rehabilitation without adversely affecting dynamic neuromuscular control. Investigation in patients with acute ankle sprains is

  12. Adsorption and reactions of O2 and D2 on small free palladium clusters in a cluster-molecule scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Mats; Rosén, Arne

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and hydrogen (deuterium) on small neutral palladium clusters was investigated in a cluster beam experiment. The beam passes through two low-pressure reaction cells, and the clusters, with and without adsorbed molecules, are detected using laser ionization and mass spectrometry. Both H2 and O2 adsorb efficiently on the palladium clusters with only moderate variations with cluster size in the investigated range, i.e. between 8 and 28 atoms. The co-adsorption of H2 and O2 results in the formation of H2O, detected as a decrease in the number of adsorbed oxygen atoms with an increasing number of collisions with H2 molecules. A comparison is done with an earlier similar study of clusters of Pt. Furthermore a comparison is done with what is known for sticking and reactivity of surfaces.

  13. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. II. Effects of reaction dimensionality

    SciTech Connect

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-04-21

    The black dot damage features which develop in iron at low temperatures exhibit significant mobility during in situ irradiation experiments via a series of discrete, intermittent, long range hops. By incorporating this mobility into cluster dynamics models, the temperature dependence of such damage structures can be explained with a surprising degree of accuracy. Such motion, however, is one dimensional in nature. This aspect of the physics has not been fully considered in prior models. This article describes one dimensional reaction kinetics in the context of cluster dynamics and applies them to the black dot problem. This allows both a more detailed description of the mechanisms by which defects execute irradiation-induced hops while allowing a full examination of the importance of kinetic assumptions in accurately assessing the development of this irradiation microstructure. Results are presented to demonstrate whether one dimensional diffusion alters the dependence of the defect population on factors such as temperature and defect hop length. Finally, the size of interstitial loops that develop is shown to depend on the extent of the reaction volumes between interstitial clusters, as well as the dimensionality of these interactions.

  14. Studies of Neutron-Deficient Nuclei Near the Z = 82 Shell Closure via Cold Fusion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, M. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Seweryniak, D.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Zhu, S.; Camera, F.; Bracco, A.; Million, B.; Leoni, S.; Jenkins, D. G.; Wadsworth, R.

    2009-03-01

    Over the last decade, we have performed in-beam experiments using Gammasphere+FMA to measure excited states in proton-rich Au, Hg, Tl and Pb isotopes. In these studies, the use of the FMA is essential in order to differentiate evaporation residues from the large fission background which dominates the reaction cross-section. In addition, we have found that using near-symmetric reactions at bombarding energies near the Coloumb barrier is beneficial in performing these studies. By keeping the bombarding energy low, fission is minimized and the reaction products are concentrated in only a few channels. New results have recently been obtained using the 90Zr+92Mo reaction to study shape co-existence in 181Tl via the lp evaporation channel. In addition, we have measured the total γ-ray energy and multiplicity associated with the surviving compund system, 179Au, following the fusion reaction, 90Zr+89Y.

  15. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of the reactions between vanadium oxide cluster cations and water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui; Ding, Xun-Lei

    2012-03-01

    Vanadium oxide cluster cations V(x)O(y)(+) (x = 2-6) are prepared by laser ablation and are reacted with D(2)O in a fast flow reactor under room temperature conditions. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to detect the cluster distribution before and after the reactions. Observation of the products (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(+) indicates the deuterium atom abstraction reaction (V(2)O(5))(1-3)(+) + D(2)O → (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(+) + OD. In addition, significant association products (V(2)O(5))(1-3)D(2)O(+) are also observed in the experiments. Density functional theory calculations are performed to study the reaction mechanisms of V(4)O(10)(+) with H(2)O. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental observations and indicate that H(2)O is dissociatively rather than molecularly adsorbed in V(4)O(10)H(2)O(+) complex. PMID:22315964

  17. Magnetophoretic potential at the movement of cluster products of electrochemical reactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Gorobets, O. Yu. Gorobets, Yu. I.; Rospotniuk, V. P.

    2015-08-21

    An electric field arises from the influence of a nonuniform static magnetic field on charged colloid particles with magnetic susceptibility different from that of the surrounding liquid. It arises, for example, under the influence of a nonuniform static magnetic field in clusters of electrochemical reaction products created during metal etching, deposition, and corrosion processes without an external electric current passing through an electrolyte near a magnetized electrode surface. The corresponding potential consists of a Nernst potential of inhomogeneous distribution of concentration of colloid particles and a magnetophoretic potential (MPP). This potential has been calculated using a thermodynamic approach based on the equations of thermodynamics of nonequilibrium systems and the Onsager relations for a mass flow of correlated magnetic clusters under a gradient magnetic force in the electrolyte. The conditions under which the MPP contribution to the total electric potential may be significant are discussed with a reference to the example of a corroding spherical ferromagnetic steel electrode.

  18. Heterogeneous reaction probabilities, solubilities, and the physical state of cold volcanic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O.; Browell, E.; Gary, B.; Lait, L.; Livingston, J.; Newman, P.; Pueschel, R.; Russell, P.; Schoeberl, M.; Toon, G.

    1993-01-01

    On 19 January 1992, heterogeneous loss of HNO3, ClNO3, and HCl was observed in part of the Mount Pinatubo volcanic cloud that had cooled as a result of forced ascent. Portions of the volcanic cloud froze near 191 kelvin. The reaction probability of ClNO3 and the solubility of HNO3 were close to laboratory measurements on liquid sulfuric acid. The magnitude of the observed loss of HCl suggests that it underwent a heterogeneous reaction. Such reactions could lead to substantial loss of HCl on background sulfuric acid particles and so be important for polar ozone loss.

  19. Pharmacoepidemiological characterization of drug-induced adverse reaction clusters towards understanding of their mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Noro, Yousuke; Kotera, Masaaki; Goto, Susumu

    2014-06-01

    A big challenge in pharmacology is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms that cause drug-induced adverse reactions (ADRs), which are in some cases similar to each other regardless of different drug indications, and are in other cases different regardless of same drug indications. The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) provides a valuable resource for pharmacoepidemiology, the study of the uses and the effects of drugs in large human population. However, FAERS is a spontaneous reporting system that inevitably contains noise that deviates the application of conventional clustering approaches. By performing a biclustering analysis on the FAERS data we identified 163 biclusters of drug-induced adverse reactions, counting for 691 ADRs and 240 drugs in total, where the number of ADR occurrences are consistently high across the associated drugs. Medically similar ADRs are derived from several distinct indications for use in the majority (145/163=88%) of the biclusters, which enabled us to interpret the underlying mechanisms that lead to similar ADRs. Furthermore, we compared the biclusters that contain same drugs but different ADRs, finding the cases where the populations of the patients were different in terms of age, sex, and body weight. We applied a biclustering approach to catalogue the relationship between drugs and adverse reactions from a large FAERS data set, and demonstrated a systematic way to uncover the cases different drug administrations resulted in similar adverse reactions, and the same drug can cause different reactions dependent on the patients' conditions. PMID:24534381

  20. How much can we learn from a merging cold front cluster? Insights from X-ray temperature and radio maps of A3667

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Abhirup; Schenck, David E.; Burns, Jack O.; Skillman, Samuel W.; Hallman, Eric J.

    2014-10-01

    The galaxy cluster A3667 is an ideal laboratory to study the plasma processes in the intracluster medium. High-resolution Chandra X-ray observations show a cold front in A3667. At radio wavelengths, A3667 reveals a double radio-relic feature in the outskirts of the cluster. These suggest multiple merger events in this cluster. In this paper, we analyze the substantial archival X-ray observations of A3667 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and compare these with existing radio observations as well as state-of-the-art adaptive mesh refinement MHD cosmological simulations using Enzo. We have used two temperature map making techniques, weighted Voronoi tessellation and adaptive circular binning, to produce the high-resolution and largest field-of-view temperature maps of A3667. These high-fidelity temperature maps allow us to study the X-ray shocks in the cluster using a new two-dimensional shock-finding algorithm. We have also estimated the Mach numbers from the shocks inferred from previous ATCA radio observations. The combined shock statistics from the X-ray and radio data are in agreement with the shock statistics in a simulated MHD cluster. We have also studied the profiles of the thermodynamic properties across the cold front using ∼447 ks from the combined Chandra observations on A3667. Our results show that the stability of the cold front in A3667 can be attributed to the suppression of the thermal conduction across the cold front by a factor of ∼100-700 compared to the classical Spitzer value.

  1. Nucleation-conversion-polymerization reactions of biological macromolecules with prenucleation clusters.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonzalo A; Cohen, Samuel I A; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2014-03-01

    The self-assembly of biomolecules, such as peptides and proteins, into filaments is conventionally understood as a nucleated polymerization reaction. However, detailed analysis of experimental observation has revealed recently that nucleation pathways generate growth-competent nuclei via a cascade of metastable intermediate species, which are omitted in conventional models of filamentous growth based on classical nucleation theory. Here we take an analytical approach to generalizing the classical theory of nucleated polymerization to include the formation of these prenucleation clusters, providing a quantitative general classification of the behavior exhibited by these nucleation-conversion-polymerization reactions. A phase diagram is constructed, and analytical predictions are derived for key experimental observables. Using this approach, we delineate the characteristic time scales that determine the nature of biopolymer growth phenomena. PMID:24730879

  2. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Isomerization Reactions of Bidentate Phosphine Ligands in Triosmium Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Zhang; Kandala, Srikanth; Yang, Li; Watson, William H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hrovat, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The diphosphine ligand 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene (dppbz) reacts with the activated cluster 1,2-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(MeCN){sub 2} (1) at room temperature to furnish a mixture of the triosmium clusters 1,2-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppbz) (2) and 1,1-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppbz) (3), along with a trace amount of the hydride cluster HOs{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}[{mu}-1,2-PhP(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-{eta}{sup 1})C{sub 6}H{sub 4}PPh{sub 2}] (4). The dppbz-bridged cluster 2 forms as the kinetically controlled product and irreversibly transforms to the corresponding chelated isomer 3 at ambient temperature. The disposition of the dppbz ligand in 2 and 3 has been established by X-ray crystallography and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, and the kinetics for the conversion 2 {yields} 3 have been followed by UV-vis spectroscopy in toluene over the temperature range 318-343 K. The calculated activation parameters ({Delta}H{sub {+-}} = 21.6(3) kcal/mol; {Delta}S{sub {+-}} = -11(1) eu) and lack of CO inhibition support an intramolecular isomerization mechanism that involves the simultaneous migration of phosphine and CO groups about the cluster polyhedron. The reaction between 1 and the fluorinated diphosphine ligand 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)tetrafluorobenzene (dppbzF{sub 4}) was examined under similar reaction conditions and was found to afford the chelated cluster 1,1-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppbzF{sub 4}) (6) as the sole observable product. The absence of the expected bridged isomer 1,2-Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 10}(dppbzF{sub 4}) (5) suggests that the dppbzF{sub 4} ligand destabilizes 5, thus accounting for the rapid isomerization of 5 to 6. Near-UV irradiation of clusters 3 and 6 leads to CO loss and ortho metalation of an ancillary aryl group. The resulting hydride clusters 4 and HOs{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}[{mu}-1,2-PhP(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-{eta}{sup 1})C{sub 6}F{sub 4}PPh{sub 2}] (7) have been isolated and fully characterized by spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction analyses. Both 4 and 7 react with added

  3. Reactions between cold methyl halide molecules and alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-07

    We investigate the potential energy surfaces and activation energies for reactions between methyl halide molecules CH{sub 3}X (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and alkali-metal atoms A (A = Li, Na, K, Rb) using high-level ab initio calculations. We examine the anisotropy of each intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) and the mechanism and energetics of the only available exothermic reaction pathway, CH{sub 3}X + A → CH{sub 3} + AX. The region of the transition state is explored using two-dimensional PES cuts and estimates of the activation energies are inferred. Nearly all combinations of methyl halide and alkali-metal atom have positive barrier heights, indicating that reactions at low temperatures will be slow.

  4. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Hydride Cluster Anions and Their Roles in Hydrogenation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Bowen, Kit

    The interaction between transition metals and hydrogen has been an intriguing research topic for such applications as hydrogen storage and catalysis of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation. Special bonding features between TM and hydrogen are interesting not only because they are scarcely reported but also because they could help to discover and understand the nature of chemical bonding. Very recently, we discovered a PtZnH5- cluster which possessed an unprecedented planar pentagonal coordination between the H5- moiety and Pt, and exhibited special σ-aromaticity. The H5-kernel as a whole can be viewed as a η5-H5 ligand for Pt. As the second example, an H2 molecule was found to act as a ligand in the PdH3-cluster, in which two H atoms form a η2-H2 type of ligation to Pd. These transition metal hydride clusters were considered to be good hydrogen sources for hydrogenation. The reactions between PtHn- and CO2 were investigated. We observed formate in the final product H2Pt(HCO2)- .

  5. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Liuhanzi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kim, Hyunook; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO2 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO2 flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO2 fixation capacity of 102g perkg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO2 reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO2 fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion. PMID:26025583

  6. [Effect of training on treadmill performance, aerobic capacity and body reactions to acute cold exposure].

    PubMed

    Iakushkin, A V; Akimov, E B; Andreev, R S; Kalenov, Iu N; Kozlov, A V; Kuznetsova, O V; Son'kin, V D

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to test the hypothesis that regular physical activity at the anaerobic threshold is able to stimulate an increase in the amount of body fat brown or beige, which can manifest itself in increasing lactate utilization during exercise and increase the reactivity in response to acute regional cooling. The methods used are: ramp test, regional acute cold exposure, measurement of gas exchange, lactate and glucose in the blood, heart rate, and heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during standard functional tests; infrared thermal imaging, statistical methods of results analysis. Workout 10 physically active volunteers (7 males and 3 females) on a treadmill at a speed corresponding to 75-80% of the persona VO2max for 30 minutes 3 times per week at a fixed ambient temperature 21-22°C for 6 weeks resulted in a significant (from 19 to 39%) increase in test work duration but VO2max on average changed little. The increase in power of anaerobic threshold was associated with a sharp slowdown in the accumulation of lactate in progress of ramp test. Lactate utilization rate during the recovery period, on the contrary, increased. In general, significantly increased work efficiency at a test load. Not revealed noticeable changes in the condition and response to a standard functional tests of autonomic systems, as judged by heart rate variability, blood pressure and respiration variability at rest and during orthostatic tests and imposed breathing rhythm. The functional response of the body to acute cold exposure (1 minute cooling of the feet in ice water) is not changed after a cycle of training--either in terms of metabolism (oxygen consumption, etc.), or the dynamics of the skin temperature in areas of most probable location of brown adipose tissue (BAT). These data do not confirm the previously expressed (2010) hypothesis about the function of BAT as a universal homeostatic instrument in the body. Probably, if under

  7. Waterhammer modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System cold flow development test article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides in-flight three-axis attitude control for the Ares I Upper Stage. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center in 2009 were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined the waterhammer pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  8. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Con+ (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CHx (x=0-3) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citir, Murat; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Con+ (n =2-16) with CD4 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, ConD+, dehydrogenation to form ConCD2+, and double dehydrogenation yielding ConC+. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, ConCD+, Con-1D+, Con-1C+, Con-1CD+, and Con-1CD2+ at higher energies. Adduct formation of ConCD4+ is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n ≥10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD2, and CD3 are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD2, and CD3 molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  9. Approaching complete low-spin spectroscopy of 210Bi with a cold-neutron capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Fornal, B.; Leoni, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Szpak, B.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-05-01

    The low-spin structure of the 210Bi nucleus was investigated in the neutron capture experiment 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi performed at ILL Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. By using the EXILL multidetector array, consisting of 46 high-purity germanium crystals, and γ γ -coincidence technique, 64 primary γ rays were observed (40 new) and a total number of 70 discrete states (33 new) were located below the neutron binding energy in 210Bi. The analysis of the angular correlations of γ rays provided information about transitions multipolarities, which made it possible to confirm most of the previously known spin-parity assignments and helped establish new ones. The obtained experimental results were compared to shell-model calculations involving one-valence-proton, one-valence-neutron excitations outside the 208Pb core. It has been found that while up to the energy of ˜2 MeV each state observed in 210Bi has its calculated counterpart; at higher excitation energies some levels cannot be described by the valence particle couplings. These states may arise from couplings of valence particles to the 3- octupole phonon of the doubly magic 208Pb core and may serve as a testing ground for models which describe single particle-phonon excitations.

  10. Photoemission and reaction study of mass-selected Pt clusters on TiO2(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Watanabe, Yoshihide

    2008-03-01

    Metal cluster has been speculated to have strong size dependence in catalytic activity. The clusters on surfaces would give further specificity because of the interaction between the clusters and the surface. Catalytic properties of mass-selected metal clusters on well-defined oxide surfaces have been investigated using the new ultra high vacuum cluster deposition apparatus. In this study, we have examined catalytic and electronic properties of platinum clusters used as a composition of automotive exhaust catalysts, and used titanium dioxide as the support. Pt cluster ions were produced by a DC magnetron-sputter cluster ion source [1] with an ion funnel [2], mass-selected by a quadrupole mass filter, and then deposited on TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces. The catalytic oxidation of CO on Ptn/TiO2 (n<10) was investigated using the high-pressure reaction cell with quartz linings, which was connected to the external recirculation loop with a stainless steel bellows pump. The catalytic activity was suggested to be dependent on the size (n) of Ptn clusters. It was expected to be due to the electronic properties of the clusters. The size specificity will be discussed with the results of photoemission spectroscopy. [1] H. Haberland et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 10, 3266 (1992). [2] S.A. Shaffer el al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 11, 1813 (1997).

  11. Masses of high-z galaxy hosting haloes from angular clustering and their evolution in the cold dark matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamana, Takashi; Yamada, Toru; Ouchi, Masami; Iwata, Ikuru; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2006-07-01

    We examine masses of hosting haloes of two photometrically selected high-z galaxy samples: the old passively evolving galaxies (OPEGs) at z ~ 1 and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 4 both taken from the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). The large survey area of the SXDS (1 deg2) allows us to measure the angular two-point correlation functions to a wide separation of >10 arcmin with a good statistical quality. We utilize the halo model prescription for estimating characteristic masses of hosting haloes from the measured large-scale clustering amplitudes. It is found that the hosting halo mass positively correlates with the luminosity of galaxies. Then, adopting the extended Press-Schechter (EPS) model, we compute the predictions for the mass evolution of the hosting haloes in the framework of the cold dark matter (CDM) cosmology in order to make an evolutionary link between the two galaxy samples at different redshifts and to identify their present-day descendants by letting their haloes evolve forward in time. It is found that, in the view of the mass evolution of hosting haloes in the CDM model, bright (i' <~ i'* + 1) LBGs are consistent with being the progenitor of the OPEGs, whereas it is less likely that the LBG population, as a whole, has evolved into the OPEG population. It is also found that the present-day descendants of both the bright LBGs and OPEGs are likely to be located in massive systems such as groups of galaxies or clusters of galaxies. Finally, we estimate the hosting halo mass of local early-type galaxy samples from the 2dF and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based on the halo model, and it turns out that their expected characteristic mass of hosting haloes is in good agreement with the EPS predictions for the descendant's mass of both the bright LBGs and OPEGs. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. E-mail: hamanatk@cc.nao.ac.jp ‡ Hubble fellow.

  12. Entrance channel dynamics of hot and cold fusion reactions leading to superheavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the entrance channel dynamics for the reactions {sup 70}Zn+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U by using the fully microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory coupled with a density constraint. We calculate excitation energies and capture cross sections relevant for the study of superheavy formations. We discuss the deformation dependence of the ion-ion potential for the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U system and perform an alignment angle averaging for the calculation of the capture cross section. The results show that this approach can generate results in good agreement with experiments and other theories.

  13. Waterhammer Modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System Cold Flow Development Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides three-axis attitude control for the Ares I launch vehicle during active Upper Stage flight. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain the proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted in the fall of 2009 at Marshall Space Flight Center were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid performance characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined waterhammer along with the subsequent pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  14. Kinetic study of the reaction of vanadium and vanadium-titanium oxide cluster anions with SO2.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Ewald; Lang, Sandra M; Brümmer, Mathias; Niedziela, Andrzej; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Asmis, Knut R; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The reactivity of mass-selected V(4)O(10)(-) cluster anions towards sulphur dioxide is investigated in an ion trap under multi-collision conditions. Gas phase reaction kinetics are studied as a function of temperature (T(R) = 150-275 K). The binding energy of SO(2) to V(4)O(10)(-) is obtained by analyzing the experimental low pressure rate constants, employing the Lindemann energy transfer model for association reactions in conjunction with statistical RRKM theory. In addition, infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy is used in conjunction with density functional theory for the structural assignment of the [V(4)O(10)(-), SO(2)] complex, revealing a square pyramidal structure with the SO(2) molecule incorporated in the vanadium oxide framework. Energy profiles are calculated for the reaction between V(4)O(10)(-) and V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2). Whereas the transition structures along the reaction pathway of V(4)O(10)(-) with SO(2) have energies below those of the separated partners, the reaction of V(6)O(15)(-) with SO(2) proceeds via a transition structure with energy higher than the educts. The role of cluster size and composition is investigated by studying the reaction kinetics of larger (V(6)O(15)(-) and V(8)O(20)(-)) and titanium doped (V(3)TiO(10)(-) and V(2)Ti(2)O(10)(-)) vanadium oxide clusters with SO(2). The observed cluster size and composition dependencies are discussed. PMID:23008835

  15. Al13@Pt42 Core-Shell Cluster for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, B. B.; Zhu, Y. F.; Lang, X. Y.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2014-06-01

    To increase Pt utilization for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells, reducing particle sizes of Pt is a valid way. However, poisoning or surface oxidation limits the smallest size of Pt particles at 2.6 nm with a low utility of 20%. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we develop a core-shell Al13@Pt42 cluster as a catalyst for ORR. Benefit from alloying with Al in this cluster, the covalent Pt-Al bonding effectively activates the Pt atoms at the edge sites, enabling its high utility up to 70%. Valuably, the adsorption energy of O is located at the optimal range with 0.0-0.4 eV weaker than Pt(111), while OH-poisoning does not observed. Moreover, ORR comes from O2 dissociation mechanism where the rate-limiting step is located at OH formation from O and H with a barrier of 0.59 eV, comparable with 0.50 eV of OH formation from O and H2O on Pt(111).

  16. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal "corrals" and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles. PMID:26656912

  17. Sensing Size through Clustering in Non-Equilibrium Membranes and the Control of Membrane-Bound Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vagne, Quentin; Turner, Matthew S.; Sens, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The formation of dynamical clusters of proteins is ubiquitous in cellular membranes and is in part regulated by the recycling of membrane components. We show, using stochastic simulations and analytic modeling, that the out-of-equilibrium cluster size distribution of membrane components undergoing continuous recycling is strongly influenced by lateral confinement. This result has significant implications for the clustering of plasma membrane proteins whose mobility is hindered by cytoskeletal “corrals” and for protein clustering in cellular organelles of limited size that generically support material fluxes. We show how the confinement size can be sensed through its effect on the size distribution of clusters of membrane heterogeneities and propose that this could be regulated to control the efficiency of membrane-bound reactions. To illustrate this, we study a chain of enzymatic reactions sensitive to membrane protein clustering. The reaction efficiency is found to be a non-monotonic function of the system size, and can be optimal for sizes comparable to those of cellular organelles. PMID:26656912

  18. Accelerated carbonation using municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater: Performance evaluation and reaction kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, E-E; Pan, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Liuhanzi; Chen, Yi-Hung; Kim, Hyunook; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Carbonation was performed using CO{sub 2}, wastewater and bottom ash in a slurry reactor. • A maximum capture capacity of 102 g CO{sub 2} per kg BA was achieved at mild conditions. • A maximum carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was predicted to be 95% by RSM. • The CO{sub 2} emission from Bali incinerator could be expected to reduce by 6480 ton/y. • The process energy consumption per ton CO{sub 2} captured was estimated to be 180 kW h. - Abstract: Accelerated carbonation of alkaline wastes including municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWI-BA) and the cold-rolling wastewater (CRW) was investigated for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) fixation under different operating conditions, i.e., reaction time, CO{sub 2} concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, particle size, and CO{sub 2} flow rate. The MSWI-BA before and after carbonation process were analyzed by the thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The MSWI-BA exhibits a high carbonation conversion of 90.7%, corresponding to a CO{sub 2} fixation capacity of 102 g per kg of ash. Meanwhile, the carbonation kinetics was evaluated by the shrinking core model. In addition, the effect of different operating parameters on carbonation conversion of MSWI-BA was statistically evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using experimental data to predict the maximum carbonation conversion. Furthermore, the amount of CO{sub 2} reduction and energy consumption for operating the proposed process in refuse incinerator were estimated. Capsule abstract: CO{sub 2} fixation process by alkaline wastes including bottom ash and cold-rolling wastewater was developed, which should be a viable method due to high conversion.

  19. Geometries, thermodynamic properties and reactions of methylzinc alkoxide clusters studied by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Steudel, Ralf; Steudel, Yana

    2006-07-20

    Methylzinc alkoxide complexes are precursors for the preparation of nanosized zinc oxide particles, which in turn are catalysts or reagents in important industrial processes such as methanol synthesis and rubber vulcanization. We report for the first time the structures, energies, atomic charges, dipole moments, and vibrational spectra of more than 20 species of the type [(MeZnOR')n] with R' = H, Me, tBu and n = 1-6, calculated by density functional theory methods, mostly at the B3LYP/6-31+G* level of theory. For R' = Me, the global minimum structure of the tetramer (n = 4) is a highly symmetrical heterocubane but a ladder-type isomer is by only 70.9 kJ mol(-1) less stable. The corresponding trimer is most stable as a rooflike structure; a planar six-membered ring of relative energy 13.5 kJ mol(-1) corresponds to a saddle point connecting two equivalent rooflike trimer structures. All dimers form planar four-membered Zn2O2 rings whereas the monomer has a planar CZnOC backbone. A hexameric drumlike structure represents the global minimum on the potential energy hypersurface of [(MeZnOMe)6]. The enthalpies and Gibbs energies of the related dissociation reactions hexamer --> tetramer --> trimer --> dimer --> monomer as well as of a number of isomerization reactions have been calculated. The complexes [(MeZnOMe)n] (n = 1-3) form adducts with Lewis bases such as tetrahydrofuran (thf) and pyridine (py). The binding energy of py to the zinc atoms is about 65% larger than that of thf but is not large enough to break up the larger clusters. The bimolecular disproportionation of [(MeZnOMe)4] with formation of the dicubane [Zn{(MeZn)3(OMe)4}2] and Me2Zn is less endothermic than any isomerization or dissociation reaction of the heterocubane, but for steric reasons this reaction is not possible if R' = tBu. A novel reaction mechanism for the reported interconversion, disproportionation and ligand exchange reactions of zinc alkoxide complexes is proposed. PMID:16836455

  20. Gas-phase reaction of CeVO5(+) cluster ions with C2H4: the reactivity of cluster bonded peroxides.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-02-21

    Cerium-vanadium oxide cluster cations CeVO5(+) were generated by laser ablation, mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter, thermalized through collisions with helium atoms, and then reacted with ethene molecules in a linear ion trap reactor. The cluster reactions have been characterized by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The CeVO5(+) cluster has a closed-shell electronic structure and contains a peroxide (O2(2-)) unit. The cluster bonded O2(2-) species is reactive enough to oxidize a C2H4 molecule to generate C2H4O2 that can be an acetic acid molecule. Atomic oxygen radicals (O(-)˙), superoxide radicals (O2(-)˙), and peroxides are the three common reactive oxygen species. The reactivity of cluster bonded O(-)˙ and O2(-)˙ radicals has been widely studied while the O2(2-) species were generally thought to be much less reactive or inert toward small molecules under thermal collision conditions. This work is among the first to report the reactivity of the peroxide unit on transition metal oxide clusters with hydrocarbon molecules, to the best of our knowledge. PMID:25573178

  1. The Effects of One-Dimensional Glide On the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.

    2000-09-01

    Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that glide in thermally activated, one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These gliding defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore ?mixed 1D/3D migration? along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from both pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale Kinetic Monte Carlo defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the theory. The dependence of sink strength on the size and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration lies between those for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with the average distance between direction changes, L. The sink strength for sinks of size R under mixed 1D/3D migration can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2 for values of L greater than the sink size. The transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations.

  2. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Reaction Control System (ReCS) Cold Flow Development Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Melanie; Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Sivak, Amy; Morris, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Ares I launch vehicle, consisting of a five segment solid rocket booster first stage and a liquid bi-propellant J2-X engine Upper Stage, is the vehicle that s been chosen to launch the Orion Crew Module, which will return humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. After First Stage booster separation, the Reaction Control System (ReCS), a monopropellant hydrazine system, will provide the Upper Stage element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. This paper provides an overview of the system level development testing that has taken place on the Ares I launch vehicle Upper Stage ReCS. The ReCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) was built as a flight representative water flow test article whose primary test objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate the integrate system performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Water is the industry standard for cold flow testing of hydrazine systems, because the densities are very close and the speeds of sound are well characterized. The completion of this development level test program was considered necessary to support the ReCS Critical Design Review. This paper will address the design approach taken in building the test article, the objectives of the test program, types of testing completed, general results, the ability of the program to meet the test objectives, and lessons learned

  3. Clustering effects in 48Cr composite nuclei produced via the 24Mg+24Mg reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nitto, A.; Vardaci, E.; Brondi, A.; La Rana, G.; Cinausero, M.; Gelli, N.; Moro, R.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Prete, G.; Vanzanella, A.

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear properties of 48Cr composite α -like nuclei produced at 60 MeV of excitation energy via the 24Mg+24Mg reaction were investigated. This excitation energy corresponds to a resonance with a narrow width (170 keV) observed in the elastic and inelastic channels, which was interpreted as a highly deformed state. To gain insight on the deformation of this state exclusive measurements of light charged particles were carried out with 8 π LP apparatus at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro and compared to statistical model predictions. The measured of α -particle energy spectra, α -evaporation residues, α -α , and α -α -α correlations indicate the limitation of the rotating liquid drop model in describing the nuclear shape of the compound nucleus along the decay cascade. To reproduce the full set of experimental data very elongated nuclear shapes had to be considered, with an axis ratio 3 :1 at the resonance angular momentum. This large deformation is consistent with previous findings for α -like nuclei and with the predictions of the cranked cluster model.

  4. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  5. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  6. Oxygen reduction reaction on Cu-doped Ag cluster for fuel-cell cathode.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Xiaoqiang

    2014-10-01

    The development of fuel cells as clean-energy technologies is largely limited by the prohibitive cost of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of catalyst design principle that links material structures to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant bimetallic catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we present a first-principles study of ORR on Ag12Cu cluster in alkaline environment. The adsorptions of O2, OOH, and OH on Cu-doped Ag13 are stronger than on Ag13. The d-band centers of adsorption sites show the Cu-doping makes d-electrons transferred to higher energy state, and improves O2 dissociation. ORR processes on Ag12Cu and Ag13 indicate Cu-doping can strongly promote ORR, and ORR process can be better preformed on Ag12Cu than on Ag13. For four-electron transfer, the effective reversible potential is 0.401 V/RHE on Ag12Cu in alkaline medium. PMID:25227449

  7. Large odd-numbered carbon clusters from fullerene-ozone reactions. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McElvany, S.W.; Callahan, J.H.; Ross, M.M.; Lamb, L.D.; Huffman, D.R.

    1993-06-11

    The odd-numbered carbon clusters C119, C129 and C139 have been observed in the mass spectra of toluene extracts of fullerene soots and of the products of ozone-fullerene reactions. Specifically, ozone-C60 reactions yield C119, and ozone-C70 reactions yield C139, and ozone-(C60/C70) reactions produce C119, C129, and C139. These unexpected species correspond to dimers of C60, C60/C70, and C70, respectively, less one carbon atom, and are stable gas-phase ions with behavior similar to that of fullerenes. The results suggest a new route to functionalization and derivatization of fullerenes through controlled ozone-catalyzed cage-opening reactions.

  8. Mechanism for the stabilization of protein clusters above the solubility curve: the role of non-ideal chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Lutsko, J F

    2016-06-22

    Dense protein clusters are known to play an important role in nucleation of protein crystals from dilute solutions. While these have generally been thought to be formed from a metastable phase, the observation of similar, if not identical, clusters above the critical point for the dilute-solution/strong-solution phase transition has thrown this into doubt. Furthermore, the observed clusters are stable for relatively long times. Because protein aggregation plays a central role in some pathologies, understanding the nature of such clusters is an important problem. One mechanism for the stabilization of such structures was proposed by Pan, Vekilov and Lubchenko and was investigated using a dynamical density functional theory model which confirmed the viability of the model. Here, we revisit that model and incorporate additional physics in the form of state-dependent reaction rates. We show by a combination of numerical results and general arguments that the state-dependent rates disrupt the stability mechanism. Finally, we argue that the state-dependent reactions correct unphysical aspects of the model with ideal (state-independent) reactions and that this necessarily leads to the failure of the proposed mechanism. PMID:27115119

  9. Mechanism for the stabilization of protein clusters above the solubility curve: the role of non-ideal chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Dense protein clusters are known to play an important role in nucleation of protein crystals from dilute solutions. While these have generally been thought to be formed from a metastable phase, the observation of similar, if not identical, clusters above the critical point for the dilute-solution/strong-solution phase transition has thrown this into doubt. Furthermore, the observed clusters are stable for relatively long times. Because protein aggregation plays a central role in some pathologies, understanding the nature of such clusters is an important problem. One mechanism for the stabilization of such structures was proposed by Pan, Vekilov and Lubchenko and was investigated using a dynamical density functional theory model which confirmed the viability of the model. Here, we revisit that model and incorporate additional physics in the form of state-dependent reaction rates. We show by a combination of numerical results and general arguments that the state-dependent rates disrupt the stability mechanism. Finally, we argue that the state-dependent reactions correct unphysical aspects of the model with ideal (state-independent) reactions and that this necessarily leads to the failure of the proposed mechanism.

  10. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  11. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  12. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  13. Hot versus Cold: the Dichotomy in Spherical Accretion of Cooling Flows onto Supermassive Black Holes in Elliptical Galaxies, Galaxy Groups, and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ~100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z ⊙, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R e ~ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  14. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  15. Iron-sulfur clusters as biological sensors: the chemistry of reactions with molecular oxygen and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Crack, Jason C; Green, Jeffrey; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2014-10-21

    recognized. This remarkable feature suggested that the original [4Fe-4S] cluster can be restored using persulfide as the source of sulfide ion. We have demonstrated that only iron and a source of electrons are required to promote efficient conversion back from the [2Fe-2S] to the [4Fe-4S] form. We propose this as a novel in vivo repair mechanism that does not require the intervention of an iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis pathway. A number of iron-sulfur regulators have evolved to function as sensors of NO. Although it has long been known that the iron-sulfur clusters of many phylogenetically unrelated proteins are vulnerable to attack by NO, our recent studies of Wbl proteins and FNR have provided new insights into the mechanism of cluster nitrosylation, which overturn the commonly accepted view that the product is solely a mononuclear iron dinitrosyl complex (known as a DNIC). The major reaction is a rapid, multiphase process involving stepwise addition of up to eight NO molecules per [4Fe-4S] cluster. The major iron nitrosyl product is EPR silent and has optical characteristics similar to Roussin's red ester, [Fe2(NO)4(RS)2] (RRE), although a species similar to Roussin's black salt, [Fe4(NO)7(S)3](-) (RBS) cannot be ruled out. A major future challenge will be to clarify the nature of these species. PMID:25262769

  16. The State of the Warm and Cold Gas in the Extreme Starburst at the Core of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Michael; Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Wilner, David J.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Bradford A.; Hogan, Michael T.; Marrone, Daniel P.; McNamara, Brian R.; Wei, Lisa H.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Bautz, Marshall W.

    2014-03-01

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (~800 M ⊙ yr-1) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L Hα = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×1043 erg s-1, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM gsim 500 km s-1), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M_{H_2} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 1010 M ⊙, which implies that the starburst will consume its fuel in ~30 Myr if it is not

  17. The state of the warm and cold gas in the extreme starburst at the core of the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Hogan, Michael T.; Wilner, David J.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Bradford A.; Marrone, Daniel P.; McNamara, Brian R.; Wei, Lisa H.

    2014-03-20

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (∼800 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L {sub Hα} = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×10{sup 43} erg s{sup –1}, making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM ≳ 500 km s{sup –1}), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}} = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, which implies that

  18. Atomistic and continuums modeling of cluster migration and coagulation in precipitation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Warczok, Piotr; Ženíšek, Jaroslav; Kozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The influence of vacancy preference towards one of the constituents in a binary system on the formation of precipitates was investigated by atomistic and continuums modeling techniques. In case of vacancy preference towards the solute atoms, we find that the mobility of individual clusters as well as entire atom clusters is significantly altered compared to the case of vacancy preference towards the solvent atoms. The increased cluster mobility leads to pronounced cluster collisions, providing a precipitate growth and coarsening mechanism competitive to that of pure solute evaporation and adsorption considered in conventional diffusional growth and Ostwald ripening. A modification of a numerical Kampmann–Wagner type continuum model for precipitate growth is proposed, which incorporates the influence of both mechanisms. The prognoses of the modified model are validated against the growth laws obtained with lattice Monte Carlo simulations and a growth simulation considering solely the coalescence mechanism.

  19. Two reaction regimes in the oxidation of larger cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) under multi-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, D; Eckhard, J F; Visser, B R; Tschurl, M; Heiz, U

    2016-03-21

    The reaction of cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) with molecular oxygen is studied under multi-collision conditions and at different temperatures. Consecutive reaction proceeds in several steps upon subsequent attachment of O2. All cluster sizes exhibit fast reaction with oxygen and form a characteristic final reaction product. The time-dependent product analysis enables the fitting to a kinetic model with the extraction of all the rate constants. Determined rate constants reveal the existence of two different regimes, which are interpreted as a change in the reaction mechanism. Based on the temperature-dependent reaction behavior, it is proposed that the reaction changes from a dissociative to a molecular adsorption of oxygen on the clusters. It is found that both regimes appear for all cluster sizes, but the transition takes place at different intermediate oxides TanOx(+). In general it is observed that transition occurs later for larger clusters, which is attributed to an increased cluster surface. PMID:26924176

  20. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2016-07-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  1. Assessment of climate change impacts on watershed in cold-arid region: an integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, X. W.; Li, Y. P.; Huang, G. H.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    An integrated multi-GCM-based stochastic weather generator and stepwise cluster analysis (MGCM-SWG-SCA) method is developed, through incorporating multiple global climate models (MGCM), stochastic weather generator (SWG), and stepwise-clustered hydrological model (SCHM) within a general framework. MGCM-SWG-SCA can investigate uncertainties of projected climate changes as well as create watershed-scale climate projections from large-scale variables. It can also assess climate change impacts on hydrological processes and capture nonlinear relationship between input variables and outputs in watershed systems. MGCM-SWG-SCA is then applied to the Kaidu watershed with cold-arid characteristics in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of northwest China, for demonstrating its efficiency. Results reveal that the variability of streamflow is mainly affected by (1) temperature change during spring, (2) precipitation change during winter, and (3) both temperature and precipitation changes in summer and autumn. Results also disclose that: (1) the projected minimum and maximum temperatures and precipitation from MGCM change with seasons in different ways; (2) various climate change projections can reproduce the seasonal variability of watershed-scale climate series; (3) SCHM can simulate daily streamflow with a satisfactory degree, and a significant increasing trend of streamflow is indicated from future (2015-2035) to validation (2006-2011) periods; (4) the streamflow can vary under different climate change projections. The findings can be explained that, for the Kaidu watershed located in the cold-arid region, glacier melt is mainly related to temperature changes and precipitation changes can directly cause the variability of streamflow.

  2. Computational studies of atmospherically-relevant chemical reactions in water clusters and on liquid water and ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gerber, R Benny; Varner, Mychel E; Hammerich, Audrey D; Riikonen, Sampsa; Murdachaew, Garold; Shemesh, Dorit; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Reactions on water and ice surfaces and in other aqueous media are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, but the microscopic mechanisms of most of these processes are as yet unknown. This Account examines recent progress in atomistic simulations of such reactions and the insights provided into mechanisms and interpretation of experiments. Illustrative examples are discussed. The main computational approaches employed are classical trajectory simulations using interaction potentials derived from quantum chemical methods. This comprises both ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and semiempirical molecular dynamics (SEMD), the latter referring to semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Presented examples are as follows: (i) Reaction of the (NO(+))(NO3(-)) ion pair with a water cluster to produce the atmospherically important HONO and HNO3. The simulations show that a cluster with four water molecules describes the reaction. This provides a hydrogen-bonding network supporting the transition state. The reaction is triggered by thermal structural fluctuations, and ultrafast changes in atomic partial charges play a key role. This is an example where a reaction in a small cluster can provide a model for a corresponding bulk process. The results support the proposed mechanism for production of HONO by hydrolysis of NO2 (N2O4). (ii) The reactions of gaseous HCl with N2O4 and N2O5 on liquid water surfaces. Ionization of HCl at the water/air interface is followed by nucleophilic attack of Cl(-) on N2O4 or N2O5. Both reactions proceed by an SN2 mechanism. The products are ClNO and ClNO2, precursors of atmospheric atomic chlorine. Because this mechanism cannot result from a cluster too small for HCl ionization, an extended water film model was simulated. The results explain ClNO formation experiments. Predicted ClNO2 formation is less efficient. (iii) Ionization of acids at ice surfaces. No ionization is found on ideal crystalline surfaces, but the process is efficient on

  3. Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters studied by time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Kenji

    2013-07-28

    Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters were studied by a time-sliced velocity imaging technique. The N{sub 2}O clusters, (N{sub 2}O){sub n}, generated by supersonic expansion were irradiated by an ultraviolet laser around 204 nm to convert reactant pairs, O({sup 1}D{sub 2})-(N{sub 2}O){sub n−1}. The NO molecules formed from these reactant pairs were ionized by the same laser pulse and their velocity distribution was determined by the time-sliced velocity imaging technique. At low nozzle pressure, lower than 1.5 atm, the speed distribution in the frame moving with the clusters consists of two components. These components were ascribed to the products appeared in the backward and forward directions in the center-of-mass frame, respectively. The former consists of the vibrational ground state and the latter consists of highly vibrational excited states. At higher nozzle pressure, a single broad speed distribution became dominant for the product NO. The pressure and laser power dependences suggested that this component is attributed to the product formed in the clusters larger than dimer, (N{sub 2}O){sub n} (n ≥ 3)

  4. Opening of Carborane Cages by Metal Cluster Complexes: The Reaction of a Thiolate-Substituted Carborane with Triosmium Carbonyl Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-08-15

    The reaction of Os3(CO)10(NCMe)2 with closo-o-(1-SCH3)C2B10H11 has yielded the complex Os3(CO)9[μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9(SCH3)](μ-H)2, 1, by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster and the coordination of the sulfur atom and the activation of two B-H bonds with transfer of the hydrogen atoms to the cluster. Reaction of 1 with a second equivalent of Os3(CO)10(NCMe)2 yielded the complex Os3(CO)9(μ-H)[(μ3-η(3)-1,4,5-μ3-η(3)-6,10,11-C2B10H8S(CH3)]Os3(CO)9(μ-H)2, 2, that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. The carborane cage was opened by cleavage of two B-C bonds and one B-B bond. The B-H group that was pulled out of the cage became a triply bridging group on one of the Os3 triangles but remains bonded to the cage by two B-B bonds. When heated to 150 °C, 2 was transformed into the complex Os3(CO)9(μ-H)[(μ3-η(3)-μ3-η(3)-C2B10H7S(CH3)]Os3(CO)9(μ-H), 3, by the loss of two hydrogen atoms and a rearrangement that led to further opening of the carborane cage. Reaction of 1 with a second equivalent of closo-o-(1-SCH3)C2B10H11 has yielded the complex Os3(CO)6)(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9-R-SCH3) (μ3-η(3)-C2B10H10-S-SCH3)(μ-H)3, 4a, containing two carborane cages coordinated to one Os3 cluster. Compound 4a was isomerized to the compound Os3(CO)6(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H9-R-SCH3)(μ3-η(3)-C2B10H10-R-SCH3)(μ-H)3, 4b, by an inversion of stereochemistry at one of the sulfur atoms by heating to 174 °C. PMID:27487332

  5. Embedded-cluster approach to the study of catalytic reactions in zeolite cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pisani, C.; Birkenheuer, U.

    1995-12-31

    This communication compares three different approaches to the study of ammonia protonation in acidic chabazite: the cluster model, the supercell model, and the embedded cluster model. In all cases, the Hartree-Fock approximation has been adopted, and a minimal Slater-type orbital basis set has been used. To calculate the interaction energies of ammonia by means of the periodic model, the CRYSTAL92 program has been used. The same program has been employed to generate the Madelung field in which a molecular cluster may be embedded. It also provides the reference solution necessary for the embedded cluster model calculations, which in turn have been performed with the EMBED93 program. All three techniques lead to similar interaction energies, however, the embedded cluster approach allows for the most natural way of performing the present adsorption study. Only those atoms which are chemically involved in the interaction have to be treated explicitly, while the rest of the system, though chemically inert, is treated as a consistently described background acting on the adsorption complex. The present investigation suggests that cooperative interaction between molecules trapped in the cavities of zeolites is of crucial importance for the protonation of ammonia to occur. 25 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Mechanisms of the S/CO/Se interchange reactions at FeMo-co, the active site cluster of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2016-09-28

    The active site of the N2 fixing enzyme nitrogenase is a C-centred Fe7MoS cluster (FeMo-co) containing a trigonal prism of six Fe atoms connected by a central belt of three doubly-bridging S atoms. The trigonal faces of the prism are capped via triply-bridging S atoms to Fe1 at one end and Mo at the other end. One of the central belt atoms, S2B, considered to be important in the chemical mechanism of the enzyme, has been shown by Spatzal, Rees et al. to undergo substitution by CO, and also substitution by Se in the presence of SeCN(-), under turnover conditions. Further, when turning over under C2H2 or N2/CO there is migration of Se to the other two belt bridging positions. These reactions are extraordinary, and unprecedented in metal chalcogenide cluster chemistry. Using density functional simulations, mechanisms for all of these reactions have been developed, involving the small molecules SCO, SeCO, C2H2S, C2H2Se, SeCN(-), SCN(-) functioning as carriers of S and Se atoms. The possibility that the S2B bridge position is vacant is discounted, because the barrier to formation of a bridge-void intermediate with two contiguous three-coordinate Fe atoms is too large. A bridging ligand is retained throughout the proposed mechanisms. Intermediates with Fe-C(O)-S/Se-Fe cycles and with SCO/SeCO C-bound to Fe are predicted. The energetics of the reaction trajectories show them to be feasible and easily reversible, consistent with experiment. Alternative mechanisms involving intramolecular differential rotatory rearrangements of the cluster to scramble the Se bridges are also examined, and shown to be very unlikely. The implications of these new facets of the reactivity of the FeMo-co cluster are discussed: it is considered that they are unlikely to be part of the mechanism of the physiological reactions of nitrogenase. PMID:27534727

  7. Au25 Clusters as Electron-Transfer Catalysts Induced the Intramolecular Cascade Reaction of 2-nitrobenzonitrile

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hanbao; Li, Peng; Wang, Shuxin; Fu, Fangyu; Xiang, Ji; Zhu, Manzhou; Li, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Design of atomically precise metal nanocluster catalysts is of great importance in understanding the essence of the catalytic reactions at the atomic level. Here, for the first time, Au25z nanoslusters were employed as electron transfer catalysts to induce an intramolecular cascade reaction at ambient conditions and gave rise to high conversion (87%) and selectivity (96%). Electron spin-resonance spectra indeed confirmed the consecutive electron transfer process and the formation of N radical. UV-vis absorption spectra also verified Au25z was intact after the catalytic circle. Our research may open up wide opportunities for extensive organic reactions catalyzed by Au25z. PMID:24225495

  8. Near Fermi Energy reaction dynamics and clustering in alpha-conjugate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiguang; Schmidt, Katarzyna; Kim, E.-J.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Wuenschel, S.; Natowitz, J. B.; Zheng, H.; Blando, N.; Bonasera, A.; Giuliani, G.

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical study predicted that the self-organizing of alpha cluster is favored over deuteron below a critical density with moderate temperature, where the possible Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is expected to occur. However the experimental information about the alpha states at low density is scarce. It is natural to pursue experiments with α conjugate beams and advanced detection apparatus to explore the collective dynamics of alpha clustered systems at low density. Systematical experiments were carried out with 40Ca and 28Si beams at 10, 25, 35 MeV/u incident on 28Si, 12C, 40Ca and 180Ta targets, detected with the NIMROD-ISiS 4 Pi detector array. It is found that there is a strong neck-like emission, which consists mainly of alpha-like fragments. The characteristic of the α emission source is explored by shape analysis, multi-particle correlation and quantum fluctuation approaches. How these observables reveal the possible alpha BEC in low density and possible exotic toroidal and linear chain configurations made out of alpha clusters is discussed.

  9. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  10. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Chun, Jaehun; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. Foams from the residual gases can significantly alter the melting rate through mass and heat transfers. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform quantitative evolved gas analysis (EGA) and developed a simple calibration model which correlates the overall mass loss rate with the evolution rates for individual gases. The model parameters are obtained from the least squares analysis, assuming that the gas-evolving reactions are independent. Thus, the EGAmore » adds the ‘chemical identity’ to the reactions indicated by the ‘phenomenological’ kinetic model.« less

  11. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Chun, Jaehun; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. Foams from the residual gases can significantly alter the melting rate through mass and heat transfers. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform quantitative evolved gas analysis (EGA) and developed a simple calibration model which correlates the overall mass loss rate with the evolution rates for individual gases. The model parameters are obtained from the least squares analysis, assuming that the gas-evolving reactions are independent. Thus, the EGA adds the ‘chemical identity’ to the reactions indicated by the ‘phenomenological’ kinetic model.

  12. Size and structure effects of Pt{sub N} (N = 12 − 13) clusters for the oxygen reduction reaction: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Kessler, P. L.; Rodríguez-Domínguez, A. R.

    2015-11-14

    Size and structure effects on the oxygen reduction reaction on Pt{sub N} clusters with N = 12–13 atoms have been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations with the generalized gradient approximation. To describe the catalytic activity, we calculated the O and OH adsorption energies on the cluster surface. The oxygen binding on the 3-fold hollow sites on stable Pt{sub 12−13} cluster models resulted more favorable for the reaction with O, compared with the Pt{sub 13}(I{sub h}) and Pt{sub 55}(I{sub h}) icosahedral particles, in which O binds strongly. However, the rate-limiting step resulted in the removal of the OH species due to strong adsorptions on the vertex sites, reducing the utility of the catalyst surface. On the other hand, the active sites of Pt{sub 12−13} clusters have been localized on the edge sites. In particular, the OH adsorption on a bilayer Pt{sub 12} cluster is the closest to the optimal target; with 0.0-0.2 eV weaker than the Pt(111) surface. However, more progress is necessary to activate the vertex sites of the clusters. The d-band center of Pt{sub N} clusters shows that the structural dependence plays a decisive factor in the cluster reactivity.

  13. O2 Reactions at the Six-iron Active Site (H-cluster) in [FeFe]-Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Lambertz, Camilla; Leidel, Nils; Havelius, Kajsa G. V.; Noth, Jens; Chernev, Petko; Winkler, Martin; Happe, Thomas; Haumann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible inhibition by molecular oxygen (O2) complicates the use of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HydA) for biotechnological hydrogen (H2) production. Modification by O2 of the active site six-iron complex denoted as the H-cluster ([4Fe4S]-2FeH) of HydA1 from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was characterized by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the iron K-edge. In a time-resolved approach, HydA1 protein samples were prepared after increasing O2 exposure periods at 0 °C. A kinetic analysis of changes in their x-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra revealed three phases of O2 reactions. The first phase (τ1 ≤ 4 s) is characterized by the formation of an increased number of Fe–O,C bonds, elongation of the Fe–Fe distance in the binuclear unit (2FeH), and oxidation of one iron ion. The second phase (τ2 ≈ 15 s) causes a ∼50% decrease of the number of ∼2.7-Å Fe–Fe distances in the [4Fe4S] subcluster and the oxidation of one more iron ion. The final phase (τ3 ≤ 1000 s) leads to the disappearance of most Fe–Fe and Fe–S interactions and further iron oxidation. These results favor a reaction sequence, which involves 1) oxygenation at 2FeH+ leading to the formation of a reactive oxygen species-like superoxide (O2−), followed by 2) H-cluster inactivation and destabilization due to ROS attack on the [4Fe4S] cluster to convert it into an apparent [3Fe4S]+ unit, leading to 3) complete O2-induced degradation of the remainders of the H-cluster. This mechanism suggests that blocking of ROS diffusion paths and/or altering the redox potential of the [4Fe4S] cubane by genetic engineering may yield improved O2 tolerance in [FeFe]-hydrogenase. PMID:21930709

  14. Cold gas in hot star clusters: the wind from the red supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Castro, Norberto; Fossati, Luca; Langer, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The massive red supergiant W26 in Westerlund 1 is one of a growing number of red supergiants shown to have winds that are ionized from the outside in. The fate of this dense wind material is important for models of second generation star formation in massive star clusters. Mackey et al. (2014, Nature, 512, 282) showed that external photoionization can stall the wind of red supergiants and accumulate mass in a dense static shell. We use spherically symmetric radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of an externally photoionized wind to predict the brightness distribution of Hα and [N II] emission arising from photoionized winds both with and without a dense shell. We analyse spectra of the Hα and [N II] emission lines in the circumstellar environment around W26 and compare them with simulations to investigate whether W26 has a wind that is confined by external photoionization. Simulations of slow winds that are decelerated into a dense shell show strongly limb-brightened line emission, with line radial velocities that are independent of the wind speed. Faster winds (≳22 km s-1) do not form a dense shell, have less limb-brightening, and the line radial velocity is a good tracer of the wind speed. The brightness of the [N II] and Hα lines as a function of distance from W26 agrees reasonably well with observations when only the line flux is considered. The radial velocity of the simulated winds disagrees with observations, however: the brightest observed emission is blueshifted by ≈25 km s-1 relative to the radial velocity of the star, whereas a spherically symmetric wind has the brightest emission at zero radial velocity because of limb brightening. Our results show that the bright nebula surrounding W26 must be asymmetric, and we suggest that it is confined by external ram pressure from the extreme wind of the nearby supergiant W9. We obtain a lower limit on the nitrogen abundance within the nebula of 2.35 times solar. The line ratio strongly favours photoionization

  15. Measurement of the parity-violating triton emission asymmetry in the reaction {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H with polarized cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V. A.; Shulgina, E. V.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petoukhov, A. K.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-03-15

    We describe measurements of the parity-violating (P-odd) triton emission asymmetry coefficient a{sub P-odd} in the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H reaction with polarized cold neutrons. Experiments were carried out at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Gatchina, Russia) and at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We employed an ionisation chamber in a configuration allowing us to suppress the left-right asymmetry well below 10{sup -8}. An additional test for a false asymmetry due to eventual target impurities (''zero test'') resulted in a{sub 0-test}=(0.0{+-}0.5)x10{sup -8}. As final result of this series of experiments we obtained a{sub P-odd}=(-8.8{+-}2.1)x10{sup -8}.

  16. Discovery of a rich proto-cluster at z = 2.9 and associated diffuse cold gas in the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Zamorani, G.; Lemaux, B. C.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Cassata, P.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Pentericci, L.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Thomas, R.; Vanzella, E.; Zucca, E.; Amorin, R.; Capak, P.; Cassarà, L. P.; Castellano, M.; Cuby, J. G.; de la Torre, S.; Durkalec, A.; Fontana, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Grazian, A.; Hathi, N. P.; Ilbert, O.; Moreau, C.; Paltani, S.; Ribeiro, B.; Salvato, M.; Schaerer, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Sommariva, V.; Talia, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Wang, P. W.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Fotopoulou, S.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Mellier, Y.; Scoville, N.

    2014-10-01

    a rest frame EW of 10.8 ± 3.7 Å, with a detection S/N of ~4. We verify that this measurement is not likely to be due to noise fluctuations. These EW values imply a high column density (N(HI) ~ 3-20 × 1019 cm-2), consistent with a scenario where such absorption is due to intervening cold streams of gas that are falling into the halo potential wells of the proto-cluster galaxies. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the hypothesis that this absorption line is related to the diffuse gas within the overdensity. Based on data obtained with the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under Large Program 185.A-0791.

  17. On-surface reaction of tetraphenylporphyrins with Os3(CO)12 precursors and Os clusters: A scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sağlam, Özge; Yetik, Görsel; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of porphyrin molecules to incorporate metal atoms into the cavity of the macrocycle is the primary factor that enables the plethora of their applications. The fabrication and characterisation of surface confined metal-organic architectures by employing porphyrins promise unique technical applications in the field of nanotechnology. Here we report on the efforts to use triosmium dodecacarbonyl as a metal precursor for the on-surface Os functionalisation of porphyrins under ultra-high vacuum conditions. We address the effects of the temperature treatment of mixtures of tetraphenylporphyrins and the Os precursor molecules, which can decompose to yield Os clusters, on Ag(111) via scanning tunnelling microscopy, a technique that provides real-space visualisation of the reaction products formed. It is shown that free base porphyrins can be metallated to osmium porphyrins. Furthermore the presence of Os on the Ag(111) surface catalyses intramolecular cyclodehydrogenations in tetraphenylporphyrins, as well as intermolecular tetraphenylporphyrin polymerisation.

  18. The FX iron-sulfur cluster serves as the terminal bound electron acceptor in heliobacterial reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Steven P; Golbeck, John H

    2012-03-01

    Phototrophs of the family Heliobacteriaceae contain the simplest known Type I reaction center (RC), consisting of a homodimeric (PshA)(2) core devoid of bound cytochromes and antenna proteins. Unlike plant and cyanobacterial Photosystem I in which the F(A)/F(B) protein, PsaC, is tightly bound to P(700)-F(X) cores, the RCs of Heliobacterium modesticaldum contain two F(A)/F(B) proteins, PshBI and PshBII, which are loosely bound to P(800)-F(X) cores. These two 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins have been proposed to function as mobile redox proteins, reducing downstream metabolic partners much in the same manner as does [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin or flavodoxin (Fld) in PS I. Using P(800)-F(X) cores devoid of PshBI and PshBII, we show that iron-sulfur cluster F(X) directly reduces Fld without the involvement of F(A) or F(B) (Fld is used as a proxy for soluble redox proteins even though a gene encoding Fld is not identified in the H. modesticaldum genome). The reduction of Fld is suppressed by the addition of PshBI or PshBII, an effect explained by competition for the electron on F(X). In contrast, P(700)-F(X) cores require the presence of the PsaC, and hence, the F(A)/F(B) clusters for Fld (or ferredoxin) reduction. Thus, in H. modesticaldum, the interpolypeptide F(X) cluster serves as the terminal bound electron acceptor. This finding implies that the homodimeric (PshA)(2) cores should be capable of donating electrons to a wide variety of yet-to-be characterized soluble redox partners. PMID:22297911

  19. Pharmacovigilance from social media: mining adverse drug reaction mentions using sequence labeling with word embedding cluster features

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Abeed; O’Connor, Karen; Ginn, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social media is becoming increasingly popular as a platform for sharing personal health-related information. This information can be utilized for public health monitoring tasks, particularly for pharmacovigilance, via the use of natural language processing (NLP) techniques. However, the language in social media is highly informal, and user-expressed medical concepts are often nontechnical, descriptive, and challenging to extract. There has been limited progress in addressing these challenges, and thus far, advanced machine learning-based NLP techniques have been underutilized. Our objective is to design a machine learning-based approach to extract mentions of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) from highly informal text in social media. Methods We introduce ADRMine, a machine learning-based concept extraction system that uses conditional random fields (CRFs). ADRMine utilizes a variety of features, including a novel feature for modeling words’ semantic similarities. The similarities are modeled by clustering words based on unsupervised, pretrained word representation vectors (embeddings) generated from unlabeled user posts in social media using a deep learning technique. Results ADRMine outperforms several strong baseline systems in the ADR extraction task by achieving an F-measure of 0.82. Feature analysis demonstrates that the proposed word cluster features significantly improve extraction performance. Conclusion It is possible to extract complex medical concepts, with relatively high performance, from informal, user-generated content. Our approach is particularly scalable, suitable for social media mining, as it relies on large volumes of unlabeled data, thus diminishing the need for large, annotated training data sets. PMID:25755127

  20. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2014-04-30

    In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

  1. Production of cold target-like fragments in the reaction of /sup 48/Ca+/sup 248/Cm

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeggeler, H.; Bruechle, W.; Bruegger, M.; Schaedel, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Wirth, G.; Kratz, J.V.; Lerch, M.; Blaich, T.; Herrmann, G.

    1986-06-01

    Yields for isotopes of Rn through Pu have been measured in the reaction /sup 48/Ca+/sup 248/Cm at an energy of 248--263 MeV (1.04--1.10 times the Coulomb barrier). Despite the low bombarding energy, high and essentially constant integral yields of about 1 to 2 mb for the elements Rn through U were observed. There is evidence that these nuclides are produced with little excitation energy.

  2. O-atom transport catalysis by neutral manganese oxide clusters in the gas phase: Reactions with CO, C2H4, NO2, and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2013-08-01

    Reactions of CO, C2H4, NO2, and O2 with neutral MnmOn clusters in a fast flow reactor are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Single photon ionization at 118 nm is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. MnmOn clusters are generated through laser ablation of a manganese target in the presence of 5% O2/He carrier gas. A strong size dependent reactivity of MnmOn clusters is characterized. Reactions Mn2O5/Mn3O7 + CO → Mn2O4/Mn3O6 + CO2 are found for CO oxidation by MnmOn clusters, while only association products Mn2O3-5C2H4 and Mn3O5-7C2H4 are observed for reactions of C2H4 with small MnmOn clusters. Reactions of MnmOn clusters with NO2 and O2 are also investigated, and the small Mn2On clusters are easily oxidized by NO2. This activation suggests that a catalytic cycle can be generated for the Mn2O5 cluster: Mn2O5 + CO + NO2 → Mn2O4 + CO2 + NO2 → Mn2O5 + CO2 + NO. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the reactions Mn2O4,5/Mn3O7 + CO → Mn2O3,4/Mn3O6 + CO2, Mn2O5 + C2H4 → Mn2O4 + CH3CHO, and Mn2O4 + NO2 → Mn2O5 + NO. Barrierless and thermodynamically favorable pathways are obtained for Mn2O5/Mn3O7 + CO and Mn2O4 + NO2 reactions. A catalytic cycle for CO oxidation by NO2 over a manganese oxide surface is proposed based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The various atom related reaction mechanisms explored by DFT are in good agreement with the experimental results. Condensed phase manganese oxide is suggested to be a good catalyst for low temperature CO oxidation by NO2, especially for an oxygen rich sample.

  3. Fission and cluster decay of the {sup 76}Sr nucleus in the ground state and formed in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Raj K.; Sharma, Manoj K.; Singh, Sarbjit; Nouicer, Rachid; Beck, Christian

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for fission and cluster decay of {sup 76}Sr are presented for this nucleus to be in its ground state or formed as an excited compound system in heavy-ion reactions. The predicted mass distribution, for the dynamical collective mass transfer process assumed for fission of {sup 76}Sr, is clearly asymmetric, favoring {alpha} nuclei. Cluster decay is studied within a preformed cluster model, both for ground-state to ground-state decays and from excited compound system to the ground state(s) or excited states(s) of the fragments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Competing computational approaches to reaction-diffusion equations in clusters of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Sabrina; Chignola, Roberto; Milotti, Edoardo

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a numerical model that simulates the growth of small avascular solid tumors. At its core lies a set of partial differential equations that describe diffusion processes as well as transport and reaction mechanisms of a selected number of nutrients. Although the model relies on a restricted subset of molecular pathways, it compares well with experiments, and its emergent properties have recently led us to uncover a metabolic scaling law that stresses the common mechanisms that drive tumor growth. Now we plan to expand the biochemical model at the basis of the simulator to extend its reach. However, the introduction of additional molecular pathways requires an extensive revision of the reaction-diffusion part of the C++ code to make it more modular and to boost performance. To this end, we developed a novel computational abstract model where the individual molecular species represent the basic computational building blocks. Using a simple two-dimensional toy model to benchmark the new code, we find that the new implementation produces a more modular code without affecting performance. Preliminary results also show that a factor 2 speedup can be achieved with OpenMP multithreading, and other very preliminary results indicate that at least an order-of-magnitude speedup can be obtained using an NVidia Fermi GPU with CUDA code.

  5. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Kido, Y.; Takizawa, M.

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O{sub ad}) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) react with CO to form CO{sub 2} at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of {approx}1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to {approx}50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O{sub 2} adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O{sub ad} atoms to form CO{sub 2} owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  6. Cryogenic Trapping and Isotope Editing Identify a Protonated Water Cluster as an Intermediate in the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanjun; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-09-01

    Internal water is known to play a catalytic role in several enzymes. In photosystem II (PSII), water is the substrate. To oxidize water, the PSII Mn4CaO5 cluster or oxygen evolving center (OEC) cycles through five oxidation states, termed Sn states. As reaction products, molecular oxygen is released, and protons are transferred through a ∼25 Å hydrogen-bonded network from the OEC to the thylakoid lumen. Previously, it was reported that a broad infrared band at 2880 cm(-1) is produced during the S1-to-S2 transition and accompanies flash-induced, S state cycling at pH 7.5. Here, we report that when the S2 state is trapped by continuous illumination under cryogenic conditions (190 K), an analogous 2740/2900 cm(-1) band is observed. The frequency depended on the sodium chloride concentration. This band is unambiguously assigned to a normal mode of water by D2(16)O and H2(18)O solvent exchange. Its large, apparent H2(18)O isotope shift, ammonia sensitivity, frequency, and intensity support assignment to a stretching vibration of a hydronium cation, H3O(+), in a small, protonated internal water cluster, nH2O(H3O(+)). Water OH stretching bands, which may be derived from the hydration shell of the hydronium ion, are also identified. Using the 2740 cm(-1) infrared marker, the results of calcium depletion and strontium reconstitution on the protonated water cluster are found to be pH dependent. This change is attributed to protonation of an amino acid side chain and a possible change in nH2O(H3O)(+) localization in the hydrogen-bonding network. These results are consistent with an internal water cluster functioning as a proton acceptor and an intermediate during the S1-to-S2 transition. Our experiments demonstrate the utility of this infrared signal as a novel functional probe in PSII. PMID:27491625

  7. Incorporating a completely renormalized coupled cluster approach into a composite method for thermodynamic properties and reaction paths

    SciTech Connect

    Nedd, Sean; DeYonker, Nathan; Wilson, Angela; Piecuch, Piotr; Gordon, Mark

    2012-04-12

    The correlation consistent composite approach (ccCA), using the S4 complete basis set two-point extrapolation scheme (ccCA-S4), has been modified to incorporate the left-eigenstate completely renormalized coupled cluster method, including singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples (CR-CC(2,3)) as the highest level component. The new ccCA-CC(2,3) method predicts thermodynamic properties with an accuracy that is similar to that of the original ccCA-S4 method. At the same time, the inclusion of the single-reference CR-CC(2,3) approach provides a ccCA scheme that can correctly treat reaction pathways that contain certain classes of multi-reference species such as diradicals, which would normally need to be treated by more computationally demanding multi-reference methods. The new ccCA-CC(2,3) method produces a mean absolute deviation of 1.7 kcal/mol for predicted heats of formation at 298 K, based on calibration with the G2/97 set of 148 molecules, which is comparable to that of 1.0 kcal/mol obtained using the ccCA-S4 method, while significantly improving the performance of the ccCA-S4 approach in calculations involving more demanding radical and diradical species. Both the ccCA-CC(2,3) and ccCA-S4 composite methods are used to characterize the conrotatory and disrotatory isomerization pathways of bicyclo[1.1.0]butane to trans-1,3-butadiene, for which conventional coupled cluster methods, such as the CCSD(T) approach used in the ccCA-S4 model and, in consequence, the ccCA-S4 method itself might fail by incorrectly placing the disrotatory pathway below the conrotatory one. The ccCA-CC(2,3) scheme provides correct pathway ordering while providing an accurate description of the activation and reaction energies characterizing the lowest-energy conrotatory pathway. The ccCA-CC(2,3) method is thus a viable method for the analyses of reaction mechanisms that have significant multi-reference character, and presents a generally less computationally intensive alternative to

  8. Rotation of the compound nucleus 236U ∗ in the fission reaction 235U( n,f) induced by cold polarised neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Petrov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Zavarukhina, T.; Gusev, Yu.; von Kalben, J.; Nesvizhevski, V.; Soldner, T.

    2007-08-01

    Surprisingly, for one of the best investigated nuclear reactions a new phenomenon was discovered. In an experiment performed at the High Flux Reactor of the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble, France, the reaction 235U(n , f) was studied. Fission was induced by cold polarised neutrons. Besides the two main fragments also ternary light charged particles were measured. The centres or the detector assemblies for fragments and light particles were positioned at right angles relative to each other in a plane perpendicular to the neutron beam. It is well known that the majority of ternary particles are emitted closely perpendicular to the fission axis. With the neutron spin pointing parallel or anti-parallel to the neutron beam it was observed that, upon flipping periodically the neutron spin, the distributions of angles between fragments and light particles are wobbling back and forth. The phenomenon is traced to the rotation of the scissioning nucleus while the light particles are ejected. This interpretation is corroborated by trajectory calculations for ternary α-particles being accelerated in a rotating Coulomb field provided by the two main fragments. The angle through which the fission axis and the trajectories of α-particles rotate is very small and barely exceeds 0.2°. This so far unreported feature of nuclear fission has been called the “ROT-effect”.

  9. Tuning the selectivity of Gd3N cluster endohedral metallofullerene reactions with Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Steven; Rottinger, Khristina A; Fahim, Muska; Field, Jessica S; Martin, Benjamin R; Arvola, Kristine D

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the manipulation of the Lewis acid strength to selectively fractionate different types of Gd3N metallofullerenes that are present in complex mixtures. Carbon disulfide is used for all Lewis acid studies. CaCl2 exhibits the lowest reactivity but the highest selectivity by precipitating only those gadolinium metallofullerenes with the lowest first oxidation potentials. ZnCl2 selectively complexes Gd3N@C88 during the first 4 h of reaction. Reaction with ZnCl2 for an additional 7 days permits a selective precipitation of Gd3N@C84 as the dominant endohedral isolated. A third fraction is the filtrate, which possesses Gd3N@C86 and Gd3N@C80 as the two dominant metallofullerenes. The order of increasing reactivity and decreasing selectivity (left to right) is as follows: CaCl2 < ZnCl2 < NiCl2 < MgCl2 < MnCl2 < CuCl2 < WCl4 ≪ WCl6 < ZrCl4 < AlCl3 < FeCl3. As a group, CaCl2, ZnCl2, and NiCl2 are the weakest Lewis acids and have the highest selectivity because of their very low precipitation onsets, which are below +0.19 V (i.e., endohedrals with first oxidation potentials below +0.19 V are precipitated). For CaCl2, the precipitation threshold is estimated at a remarkably low value of +0.06 V. Because most endohedrals possess first oxidation potentials significantly higher than +0.06 V, CaCl2 is especially useful in its ability to precipitate only a select group of gadolinium metallofullerenes. The Lewis acids of intermediate reactivity (i.e., precipitation onsets estimated between +0.19 and +0.4 V) are MgCl2, MnCl2, CuCl2, and WCl4. The strongest Lewis acids (WCl6, ZrCl4, AlCl3, and FeCl3) are the least selective and tend to precipitate the entire family of gadolinium metallofullerenes. Tuning the Lewis acid for a specific type of endohedral should be useful in a nonchromatographic purification method. The ability to control which metallofullerenes are permitted to precipitate and which endohedrals would remain in solution is a key outcome of this work. PMID

  10. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  11. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  12. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  13. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance is an abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and ...

  14. Stereochemical course of hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by alpha-galactosidase from cold adaptable marine bacterium of genus Pseudoalteromonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, Irina; Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasiliy; Slepchenko, Lyubov; Isakov, Vladimir; Rasskazov, Valeriy

    2014-10-01

    The recombinant α-galactosidase of the marine bacterium (α-PsGal) was synthesized with the use of the plasmid 40Gal, consisting of plasmid pET-40b (+) (Novagen) and the gene corresponding to the open reading frame of the mature α-galactosidase of marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, transformed into the E. coli Rosetta(DE3) cells. In order to understand the mechanism of action, the stereochemistry of hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4-NPGP) by α-PsGal was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics of formation of α- and β-anomer of galactose showed that α-anomer initially formed and accumulated, and then an appreciable amount of β-anomer appeared as a result of mutarotation. The data clearly show that the enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-NPGP proceeds with the retention of anomeric configuration, probably, due to a double displacement mechanism of reaction.

  15. Gas-Phase Reactions of Cationic Vanadium-Phosphorus Oxide Clusters with C2Hx (x=4, 6): A DFT-Based Analysis of Reactivity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dietl, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinhao; van der Linde, Christian; Beyer, Martin K; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The reactivities of the adamantane-like heteronuclear vanadium-phosphorus oxygen cluster ions [VxP4−xO10].+ (x=0, 2–4) towards hydrocarbons strongly depend on the V/P ratio of the clusters. Possible mechanisms for the gas-phase reactions of these heteronuclear cations with ethene and ethane have been elucidated by means of DFT-based calculations; homolytic C–H bond activation constitutes the initial step, and for all systems the P–O. unit of the clusters serves as the reactive site. More complex oxidation processes, such as oxygen-atom transfer to, or oxidative dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbons require the presence of a vanadium atom to provide the electronic prerequisites which are necessary to bring about the 2e− reduction of the cationic clusters. PMID:23322620

  16. On the dynamics of the reaction of positive hydrogen cluster ions (H5+ to H23+) with para and normal hydrogen at 10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, W.; Lücke, B.; Schlemmer, S.; Gerlich, D.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of clustering and fragmentation reactions Hi+ + 2H2 [right harpoon over left] Hi+2+ + H2, for odd i, was studied at a nominal temperature of 10 K in a 22-pole radio-frequency ion trap in normal hydrogen and para-enriched hydrogen. Ternary association rate coefficients, k3, and binary fragmentation rate coefficients, kf, were extracted from the measured temporal evolution of the hydrogen cluster ion intensity, I(Hi+), for i = 3,...,23. Pure para hydrogen enhances the rate coefficients for association and fragmentation. For i > 9 this general trend is explained by a difference in the capture cross-sections, kc, for the two hydrogen nuclear spin modifications. Significant differences in k3 which remain for small clusters (i < 9) are due to the availability of the J = 1 rotational energy of the ortho modification when merging into the cluster. This surprising result is discussed in the framework of simple dynamical and energetic considerations. Possible structures of the cluster can be classified and estimates for the bond energy of the outermost H2 in the cluster as a function of cluster size are derived.

  17. Decay studies of 59Cu* formed in the 35Cl + 24Mg reaction using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikraj, C.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2013-02-01

    The reformulated dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) is applied to study the decay of odd-A and non-α structured 59Cu* formed in the 35Cl+24Mg reaction at Elab=275 MeV. Here, the temperature (T)-dependent binding energies due to Krappe are used. The roles of Wigner and pairing energies in the fragmentation potential are explicitly shown in this work. For the temperature T=4.1898 MeV corresponding to Elab=275 MeV, the contribution of pairing vanishes and the resulting structure of the fragmentation potential due to Wigner term is shown. In addition to this, we have studied the role of factor α appearing in the inertia part of the equation of motion dictating the mass-transfer process. It is shown that this factor has significant effect in the structure of preformation probability values and hence in turn we see significant changes in the cross sections. We compare the cross sections of the measured charge distributions of the fission fragments for two limiting values of the parameter α with the experimental data. In order to fit the total cross-section values, a linear relation is obtained between the free parameter of the model ▵R and the factor α appearing in the hydrodynamical mass.

  18. The Aftermath of a Suicide Cluster in the Age of Online Social Networking: A Qualitative Analysis of Adolescent Grief Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffel, Carly J.; Riggs, Shelley A.; Ruiz, John M.; Ruggles, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Although suicide clusters have been identified in many populations, research exploring the role of online communication in the aftermath of a suicide cluster is extremely limited. This study used the Consensual Qualitative Research method to analyze interviews with ten high school students 1 year after a suicide cluster in a small suburban school…

  19. Structure Determination and Excited State Proton Transfer Reaction of 1-NAPHTHOL-AMMONIA Clusters in the S_{1} State Studied by Uv-Ir Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shunpei; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Martin, Weiler; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    1-naphthol ammonia clusters have been studied long time as a benchmark system of the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Understanding the ESPT reaction in this system has still not been fully established. To detect the cluster size dependence of the S_{1} state properties, many researcher extensively investigated such as emission spectra, lifetime, solvents (ammonia) evaporation pattern. Curiously, cluster structure that is fundamental to discuss the reaction has not been determined for the system. Thus we applied an IR spectroscopy to the S_{1} states of the system to determine the cluster structure and to discuss the minimum size inducing the ionic dissociation of the O-H bond in the S_{1} state. IR spectra were recorded not only the O-H and N-H stretching region (3 {μ}m) but also the skeletal vibrational region (5.5-10 {μ}m). Though O-H and N-H stretching vibrations do not provide useful structural information due to the broadness, the skeletal vibrations hold the sharpness even in the S_{1} states. Changes in the skeletal vibrations due to the ammonia solvation, e.g. C-O stretching and C-O-H bending, will be discussed based on a comparison with theoretical calculations. O. Cheshnovsky and S. Leutwylar, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 4127 (1988). S. K. Kim et al., Chem. Phys. lett. 228, 369 (1994). C. Dedonder-Lardeux et al., Phys. Chem, Chem, Phys. 3, 4316 (2001).

  20. Manipulating the charge state of Au clusters on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces through molecular reactions probed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunjun; Hu, Shujun; Yu, Min; Wang, Tingting; Huang, Shiming; Yan, Shishen; Xu, Mingchun

    2016-07-14

    The charge state of Au clusters deposited on rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surfaces was studied by UHV-FTIRS using CO as a probe. The as-deposited Au clusters on oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces are electrically neutral and are identified by the 2105-2112 cm(-1) vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO depending on Au coverage. Annealing Au/TiO2(110) in a moderate O2 atmosphere at 400 K blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by only 2-3 cm(-1) both on bare TiO2(110) surfaces and on Au clusters. However, NO exposure blue shifts the CO vibrational frequency by 16-26 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on Au atoms near the interface and by 3-4 cm(-1) for CO adsorbed on top of Au clusters. As the acceptors of the intense charge transfer from Au, the Oa atoms generated through (NO)2→ N2O + Oa reactions on the small fraction of the bare TiO2(110) surface reside around the Au/TiO2(110) interface perimeter, causing the neutral Au(0) to be cationic Au(δ+) states. This is a new approach to manipulate the charge state of Au clusters on oxide surfaces, which may be helpful in regulating the catalytic redox reactions on oxide supported metal systems. PMID:27306113

  1. Decay of the compound nucleus *297118 formed in the reaction 249Cf+48Ca using the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Gudveen; Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-12-01

    The decay of the Z =118 , *297118 compound system, formed in the 249Cf+48Ca reaction, is studied for 2 n , 3 n , and 4 n emissions, by using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) at compound-nucleus (CN) excitation energies ECN*=29.2 and 34.4 MeV. A parallel attempt is made to analyze the 294118 residue nucleus synthesized in the 250Cf+48Ca reaction, subsequent to the 4 n emission from the *298118 nucleus, to check the possibility of isotopic mixing in the 249Cf target used in the 249Cf+48Ca reaction. The possible role of deformations and orientations, together with different nuclear proximity potentials, is also investigated. In addition, an exclusive analysis of the mass distributions of Z =113 to 118 superheavy nuclei, formed in 48Ca -induced reactions, is explored within the DCM. A comparative importance of Prox-1977 and Prox-2000 potentials on the α -decay chains is also investigated, first by using the preformed cluster model (PCM) for spontaneous decays (T =0 ), the PCM (T =0 ), and then analyzing the possible role of excitation energy in PCM, i.e., PCM (T ≠0 ) , via the measured recoil energy of the residual 294118 nucleus left after 3 n emission from *297118 CN. The branching of α decay to the most-probable clusters is also examined for *294118 and its subsequent *290116 and *286114 parents occurring in the α -decay chain. Interestingly, the calculated decay half-lives for some clusters such as 86Kr , 84Se , and 80Ge , referring to doubly magic 208Pb or its neighboring daughter nucleus, present themselves as exciting new possibilities, though to date difficult to observe, of heavy cluster emissions in superheavy mass region.

  2. Methane activation by cobalt cluster cations, Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-16): Reaction mechanisms and thermochemistry of cluster-CH{sub x} (x=0-3) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Citir, Murat; Liu Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-02-07

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-16) with CD{sub 4} are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-10 eV. The main products are hydride formation, Co{sub n}D{sup +}, dehydrogenation to form Co{sub n}CD{sub 2}{sup +}, and double dehydrogenation yielding Co{sub n}C{sup +}. These primary products decompose to form secondary and higher order products, Co{sub n}CD{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}D{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}C{sup +}, Co{sub n-1}CD{sup +}, and Co{sub n-1}CD{sub 2}{sup +} at higher energies. Adduct formation of Co{sub n}CD{sub 4}{sup +} is also observed for the largest cluster cations, n{>=}10. In general, the efficiencies of the single and double dehydrogenation processes increase with cluster size, although the hexamer cation shows a reduced reactivity compared to its neighbors. All reactions exhibit thresholds, and cross sections for the various primary and secondary reactions are analyzed to yield reaction thresholds from which bond energies for cobalt cluster cations to D, C, CD, CD{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} are determined. The relative magnitudes of these bond energies are consistent with simple bond order considerations. Bond energies for larger clusters rapidly reach relatively constant values, which are used to estimate the chemisorption energies of the C, CD, CD{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} molecular fragments to cobalt surfaces.

  3. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  4. Mechanism for the Direct Synthesis of H2O2 on Pd Clusters: Heterolytic Reaction Pathways at the Liquid-Solid Interface.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Neil M; Flaherty, David W

    2016-01-20

    Direct synthesis (H2 + O2 → H2O2) is a promising reaction for producing H2O2, which can replace chlorinated oxidants in industrial processes. The mechanism of this reaction and the reasons for the importance of seemingly unrelated factors (e.g., Pd cluster size and solvent pH) remain unclear despite significant research. We propose a mechanism for H2O2 formation on Pd clusters consistent with steady-state H2O2 and H2O formation rates measured as functions of reactant pressures and temperature and the interpretations of proton concentration effects. H2O2 forms by sequential proton-electron transfer to O2 and OOH surface intermediates, whereas H2O forms by O-O bond rupture within OOH surface species. Direct synthesis, therefore, does not proceed by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism often invoked. Rather, H2O2 forms by heterolytic reaction pathways resembling the two-electron oxygen reduction reaction (ORR); however, the chemical potential of H2 replaces an external electrical potential as the thermodynamic driving force. Activation enthalpies (ΔH(⧧)) for H2O formation increase by 14 kJ mol(-1) when Pd cluster diameters increase from 0.7 to 7 nm because changes in the electronic structure of Pd surface atoms decrease their propensity to cleave O-O bonds. ΔH(⧧) values for H2O2 remain nearly constant because barriers for proton-electron transfer depend weakly on the coordinative saturation of Pd surface atoms. Collectively, these results provide a self-consistent mechanism, which clarifies many studies in which H2O2 rates and selectivities were shown to depend on the concentration of acid/halide additives and Pd cluster size. These findings will guide the rational design of selective catalysts for direct synthesis. PMID:26597848

  5. Helium Find Thaws the Cold Fusion Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, E.

    1991-01-01

    Reported is a study of cold fusion in which trace amounts of helium, possible evidence of an actual fusion reaction, were found. Research methodology is detailed. The controversy over the validity of experimental results with cold fusion are reviewed. (CW)

  6. Synthesis and Ligand-Exchange Reactions of a Tri-Tungsten Cluster with Applications in Biomedical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noey, Elizabeth; Curtis, Jeff C.; Tam, Sylvia; Pham, David M.; Jones, Ella F.

    2011-01-01

    In this experiment students are exposed to concepts in inorganic synthesis and various spectroscopies as applied to a tri-tungsten cluster with applications in biomedical imaging. The tungsten-acetate cluster, Na[W[superscript 3](mu-O)[subscript 2](CH[superscript 3]COO)[superscript 9

  7. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  8. Structures and rearrangement reactions of 4-aminophenol(H2O)1+ and 3-aminophenol(H2O)1+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhards, M.; Jansen, A.; Unterberg, C.; Gerlach, A.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper the structures of 4-aminophenol(H2O)1+ and 3-aminophenol(H2O)1+ clusters are investigated in molecular beam experiments by different IR/UV-double resonance techniques as well as the mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy yielding both inter- and intramolecular vibrations of the ionic and neutral species. Possible structures are extensively calculated at the level of density functional theory (DFT) or at the ab initio level of theory. From the experimental and theoretical investigations it can be concluded that in the case of 4-aminophenol(H2O)1 one O H⋯O hydrogen-bonded structure exists in the neutral cluster but two structures containing either an O H⋯O or a N H⋯O hydrogen-bonded arrangement are observed in the spectra of the ionic species. This observation is a result of an intramolecular rearrangement reaction within the ion which can only take place if high excess energies are used. A reaction path via the CH bonds is calculated and explains the experimental observations. In the case of 3-aminophenol(H2O)1+ only one O H⋯O bound structure is observed both in the neutral and ionic species. Ab initio and DFT calculations show that due to geometrical and energetical reasons a rearrangement cannot be observed in the 3-aminophenol(H2O)1+ cluster ion.

  9. Si-rich W silicide films composed of W-atom-encapsulated Si clusters deposited using gas-phase reactions of WF6 with SiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Naoya; Uchida, Noriyuki; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2016-02-01

    We formed Si-rich W silicide films composed of Sin clusters, each of which encapsulates a W atom (WSin clusters with 8 < n ≤ ˜ 12), by using a gas-phase reaction between WF6 and SiH4 in a hot-wall reactor. The hydrogenated WSinHx clusters with reduced F concentration were synthesized in a heated gas phase and subsequently deposited on a substrate heated to 350-420 °C, where they dehydrogenated and coalesced into the film. Under a gas pressure of SiH4 high enough for the WSinHx reactant to collide a sufficient number of times with SiH4 molecules before reaching the substrate, the resulting film was composed of WSin clusters with a uniform n, which was determined by the gas temperature. The formed films were amorphous semiconductors with an optical gap of ˜0.8-1.5 eV and an electrical mobility gap of ˜0.05-0.12 eV, both of which increased as n increased from 8 to 12. We attribute this dependence to the reduction of randomness in the Si network as n increased, which decreased the densities of band tail states and localized states.

  10. Gold atomic clusters extracting the valence electrons to shield the carbon monoxide passivation on near-monolayer core-shell nanocatalysts in methanol oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Yao; Li, Hong Dao; Lee, Guo-Wei; Huang, Po-Chun; Yang, Po-Wei; Liu, Yu-Ting; Liao, Yen-Fa; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung; Lin, Tsang-Lang

    2015-06-21

    Atomic-scale gold clusters were intercalated at the inter-facet corner sites of Pt-shell Ru-core nanocatalysts with near-monolayer shell thickness. We demonstrated that these unique clusters could serve as a drain of valence electrons in the kink region of the core-shell heterojunction. As jointly revealed by density functional theory calculations and valence band spectra, these Au clusters extract core-level electrons to the valence band. They prevent corrosion due to protonation and enhance the tolerance of CO by increasing the electronegativity at the outermost surface of the NCs during the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). In these circumstances, the retained current density of Pt-shell Ru-core NCs is doubled in a long-term (2 hours) MOR at a fixed voltage (0.5 V vs. SCE) by intercalating these sub-nanometer gold clusters. Such novel structural confinement provides a possible strategy for developing direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) modules with high power and stability. PMID:25991582

  11. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  12. Guided ion-beam studies of the reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-20) with O{sub 2}: Cobalt cluster-oxide and -dioxide bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fuyi; Li Fengxia; Armentrout, P.B.

    2005-08-08

    The kinetic-energy dependence for the reactions of Co{sub n}{sup +} (n=2-20) with O{sub 2} is measured as a function of kinetic energy over a range of 0 to 10 eV in a guided ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. A variety of Co{sub m}{sup +}, Co{sub m}O{sup +}, and Co{sub m}O{sub 2}{sup +} (m{<=}n) product ions is observed, with the dioxide cluster ions dominating the products for all larger clusters. Reaction efficiencies of Co{sub n}{sup +} cations with O{sub 2} are near unity for all but the dimer. Bond dissociation energies for both cobalt cluster oxides and dioxides are derived from threshold analysis of the energy dependence of the endothermic reactions using several different methods. These values show little dependence on cluster size for clusters larger than three atoms. The trends in this thermochemistry and the stabilities of oxygenated cobalt clusters are discussed. The bond energies of Co{sub n}{sup +}-O for larger clusters are found to be very close to the value for desorption of atomic oxygen from bulk-phase cobalt. Rate constants for O{sub 2} chemisorption on the cationic clusters are compared with results from previous work on cationic, anionic, and neutral cobalt clusters.

  13. The evidence of the mode selectivity of the infrared predissociation reaction of the hydrogen bonds in the aniline water pyrrole cluster cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanaga, Taisuke; Piracha, Naveed K.; Ito, Fumiyuki

    2001-10-01

    The infrared spectrum of aniline-water-pyrrole cluster cation has been measured in the 3 μm region. Four strong vibrational bands were observed at 3313, 3515, 3637, and 3721 cm-1, and the cluster dissociated into fragments in two reaction paths, AWP +→AW ++P and AWP +→AP ++W (A: aniline, W: water, P: pyrrole) when it absorbed an infrared photon. The branching ratio (AW +/AP +) has been determined to be 0.20±0.02 for the NH stretching vibration of aniline ( 3313 cm-1, hydrogen-bonded to pyrrole) and 0.14±0.03 for the other three bands. This vibrational mode dependence should be due to the fast energy transfer from the NH to the intermolecular vibration through the hydrogen bond.

  14. The H + HeH(+) → He + H2(+) reaction from the ultra-cold regime to the three-body breakup: exact quantum mechanical integral cross sections and rate constants.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Dario

    2014-06-21

    In this work, we present a quantum mechanical scattering study of the title reaction from 1 mK to 2000 K. Total integral cross sections and thermal rate constants are compared with previous theoretical and experimental data and with simpler theoretical models to understand the range of validity of the approximations used in the previous studies. The obtained quantum reactive observables have been found to be nearly insensitive to the roto-vibrational energy of the reactants at high temperatures. More sensitive to the reactant's roto-vibrational energy are the data in the cold and ultra-cold regimes. The implications of the new data presented here in the early universe scenario are also discussed and analyzed. PMID:24810283

  15. Theoretical Investigation of the Reaction Paths of the Aluminum Cluster Cation with Water Molecule in the Gas Phase: A Facile Route for Dihydrogen Release.

    PubMed

    Moc, Jerzy

    2015-08-13

    The gas-phase reaction of the Al6(+) cation with a water molecule is investigated computationally by coupled cluster and density functional theories. Several low-energy paths of the mechanism for dihydrogen production from H2O by the positively charged aluminum cluster are identified. This reaction involves the initial formation of the association complex, exothermic by 25 kcal/mol, followed by the water dissociation and H2 elimination major steps, yielding the Al6O(+) product oxide with either the nonplanar or planar structure. The H2O dissociation on Al6(+) is the rate-determining step. Of the paths probed, the one kinetically most preferred leads from the O-H bond dissociation transition state lying below the separated reactants to the immediate HAl6OH(+) intermediate of the "open" type and involves further the more compact intermediate from which H2 is eliminated. The other reaction paths explored involve the activation enthalpy (at 0 K) for the rate-determining step of less than 2 kcal/mol relative to the Al6(+) + H2O. Natural population analysis based charges indicate that forming of H2 along the elimination coordinate is facilitated by the interaction of the hydridic and protic hydrogens. For the kinetically most favorable route detected, the coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) relative energies calculated with the unrestricted and restricted HF references are in a good agreement. This investigation is relevant specifically to the recent mass spectrometric study of the reactivity of Aln(+) with water by Arakawa et al., and it provides a mechanistic insight into the formation of the observed AlnO(+) product oxide with n = 6. PMID:26200102

  16. Clustering effects in fusion evaporation reactions with light even-even N = Z nuclei. The {sup 24}Mg and {sup 28}Si cases

    SciTech Connect

    Morelli, L. D’Agostino, M.; Bruno, M.; Baiocco, G.; Gulminelli, F.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Gelli, N.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.

    2015-10-15

    In the recent years, cluster structures have been evidenced in many ground and excited states of light nuclei [1, 2]. Within the currently ongoing experimental campaign by the NUCL-EX collaboration we have measured the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and {sup 14}N+{sup 10}B reactions at 95 MeV and 80 MeV respectively, and compared experimental data corresponding to complete fusion of target and projectile into an excited {sup 24}Mg nucleus to the results of a pure statistical model[3, 4]. We found clear deviations from the statstical model in the decay pattern: emission channels involving multiple α particles are more probable than expected from a purely statistical behavior. To continue the investigation on light systems, we have recentely measured the {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C reaction at three different beam energies, namely E{sub beam} = 90, 110 and 130 MeV.

  17. FA-SIFT study of reactions of protonated water and ethanol clusters with [alpha]-pinene and linalool in view of their selective detection by CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhooghe, F.; Amelynck, C.; Rimetz-Planchon, J.; Schoon, N.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2010-02-01

    The use of protonated water clusters and protonated ethanol clusters as reagent ions has been evaluated for the resolution of an interference encountered in CIMS when measuring monoterpenes (C10H16) and linalool (C10H18O) simultaneously. To this end, the reactions of H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 1-3), (C2H5OH)mH+ (m = 1-3) and (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ with [alpha]-pinene and linalool have been characterized in a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube (FA-SIFT) instrument at a SIFT He buffer gas pressure of 1.43 hPa and a temperature of 298 K. All reactions with linalool were found to occur at the collision limit. The reaction of (C2H5OH)2H+ with [alpha]-pinene proceeds at half the collision rate and both the reactions of (C2H5OH)3H+ and H3O+.(H2O)3 with [alpha]-pinene have a very low rate constant. All other reactions involving [alpha]-pinene proceed at the collision rate. The reactions of H3O+.H2O, H3O+.(H2O)2, C2H5OH2+, (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ and (C2H5OH)2H+ with [alpha]-pinene mainly proceed by proton transfer. Additionally, ligand switching channels have been observed for the reactions of (C2H5OH)2H+ and H3O+.(H2O)2 with [alpha]-pinene. Protonated linalool was observed as a minor product for the reactions of (C2H5OH.H2O)H+ and H3O+.(H2O)n (n = 1-3) with linalool. For all linalool reactions, a contribution of the dissociative proton transfer product at m/z 137 was found and this ion was the main product ion for the reactions with H3O+.H2O, C2H5OH2+ and (C2H5OH.H2O)H+. For the (C2H5OH.H2O)H+/linalool reaction, ligand switching with both water and ethanol has been observed. Major ligand switching channels were observed for the reactions of (C2H5OH)2H+, (C2H5OH)3H+ and H3O+.(H2O)2 with linalool. Also, for the H3O+.(H2O)3/linalool reaction, several ligand switching channels have been observed. These results are discussed in view of their applicability for the selective detection of monoterpenes and linalool with CIMS instrumentation such as SIFT-MS, PTR-MS and APCI-MS.

  18. Water Nanodroplets as a Reaction Medium: FT-ICR Studies of the Stability, Structure and Reactivity of Hydrated Ions and Ionic Water Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondybey, Vladimir E.

    2001-03-01

    With the help of a versatile ion source coupling laser vaporization with supersonic expansion, ionic clusters of the type X^±(H_2O)n are easily generated, and if desired, they can be mass selected in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The central ion, X^± can be for instance H^+ or OH^-, a free electron, or an ionized metal such as Na^+, Ag^+, Mg^+, or Al^+. Such "nanodroplets" solvated with up to 200 molecules of water or other ligands slowly fragment in the collision-free environment of the FT-ICR trap. They lose in a controlled way the solvent molecules, one by one on a millisecond timescale. The products of reactions which occur in the nanodroplet as a result of the loss of the stabilizing ligand can in the high-resolution mass spectrometer be unambiguously identified. In this way, a variety of solution processes such as ionic dissolution, fragmentation, neutralization, precipitation, reduction-oxidation reactions, or acid-base catalyzed reactions can be investigated in molecular, microscopic detail. Small droplets and particles are important for a variety of atmospheric processes and reactions occurring both in the troposphere and the stratosphere. This suggests the possibility of preparing such nano-droplets of suitable composition, and using them as a model system for investigating a large variety of reactions important for atmospheric chemistry. In the present talk, we will describe our apparatus and external source, and discuss a variety of results obtained recently with it in our laboratory. The aldol condensation of acetaldehyde as an example of an acid-base catalyzed reaction and the precipitation of AgCl show that a number of well-known reactions in solution have their counterpart on a single molecule level in the cluster. The competition between electron detachment and water loss of hydrated electrons e^-(H_2O)_n, n=13-36, provides interesting and unexpected insights into the coupling dynamics of the electron to its water

  19. A multi purpose source chamber at the PLEIADES beamline at SOLEIL for spectroscopic studies of isolated species: Cold molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblad, Andreas; Söderström, Johan; Nicolas, Christophe; Robert, Emmanuel; Miron, Catalin

    2013-11-15

    This paper describes the philosophy and design goals regarding the construction of a versatile sample environment: a source capable of producing beams of atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoparticles in view of studying their interaction with short wavelength (vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray) synchrotron radiation. In the design, specific care has been taken of (a) the use standard components, (b) ensuring modularity, i.e., that swiftly switching between different experimental configurations was possible. To demonstrate the efficiency of the design, proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted by recording x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectra from isolated nanoparticles (SiO{sub 2}) and free mixed clusters (Ar/Xe). The results from those experiments are showcased and briefly discussed.

  20. Clusters: Elucidating the dynamics of ionization events and ensuing reactions in the condensed phase. Final technical report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Chemical reactions that proceed following either a photophysical or ionizing event, are directly influenced by the mechanisms of energy transfer and dissipation away from the site of absorption. Neighboring solvent or solute molecules can affect this by collisional deactivation (removal of energy), through effects in which dissociating molecules are kept in relatively close proximity for comparatively long periods of time due to the presence of the solvent, and in other ways where the solvent influences the energetics of the reaction coordinate. Research on clusters offers promise of elucidating the molecular details of these processes. The studies have focused on providing critical information on problems in radiation biology through investigations of reactions of molecules which simulate functional groups in biological systems, as they proceed following the absorption of ionizing radiation. The overall objective of the program has been to undertake basic underpinning research that contributes to a quantification of the behavior of radionuclides and pollutants associated with advanced energy activities after these materials emanate from their source and are transferred through the environment to the biota and human receptor. Some of the studies have dealt with the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter yielding new data that finds value in assessing photoinduced transformation of pollutants including reactions which take place on aerosol particles, as well as those of species which become transformed into aerosols as a result of their chemical and physical interactions.

  1. Elementary steps of the catalytic NO{sub x} reduction with NH{sub 3}: Cluster studies on reaction paths and energetics at vanadium oxide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, M.; Hermann, K.

    2013-12-28

    We consider different reaction scenarios of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO in the presence of ammonia at perfect as well as reduced vanadium oxide surfaces modeled by V{sub 2}O{sub 5}(010) without and with oxygen vacancies. Geometric and energetic details as well as reaction paths are evaluated using extended cluster models together with density-functional theory. Based on earlier work of adsorption, diffusion, and reaction of the different surface species participating in the SCR we confirm that at Brønsted acid sites (i.e., OH groups) of the perfect oxide surface nitrosamide, NH{sub 2}NO, forms a stable intermediate. Here adsorption of NH{sub 3} results in NH{sub 4} surface species which reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. Nitrosamide is also found as intermediate of the SCR near Lewis acid sites of the reduced oxide surface (i.e., near oxygen vacancies). However, here the adsorbed NH{sub 3} species is dehydrogenated to surface NH{sub 2} before it reacts with gas phase NO to produce the intermediate. The calculations suggest that reaction barriers for the SCR are overall higher near Brønsted acid sites of the perfect surface compared with Lewis acid sites of the reduced surface, examined for the first time in this work. The theoretical results are consistent with experimental findings and confirm the importance of surface reduction for the SCR process.

  2. A new measurement of the fusion reaction nitrogen- 14(proton,photon)oxygen-15 and its impact on hydrogen burning, globular clusters, and the age of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkle, Robert Charles

    2003-10-01

    Stars create the light we observe from energy liberated by nuclear fusion reactions. For most of their lives, stars exist as main-sequence objects quiescently burning hydrogen. At temperatures present in stars slightly larger than the Sun, the CN cycle dominates hydrogen burning and thus a star's macroscopic properties such as luminosity and main sequence turnoff. Because it is the slowest step in the CN cycle, the 14N(p,γ)15O reaction dictates the rate of hydrogen burning. This fact mandates a good understanding of the 14N(p,γ)15O reaction rate. Although this reaction is well understood at high energies, there are large uncertainties at astrophysically relevant energies. We conducted a new measurement of the 14N(p,γ)15O low energy cross section that extends very close to temperatures present in massive stars. The previous uncertainty in the reaction rate resulted from the possible contribution of a subthreshold resonance in the ground state transition. Our measurement suggests that this resonance does not contribute significantly. We conclude that the 6793 keV state in 15O dominates the low energy cross section. Indirect measurements support our extrapolation of this state to very low energies, which results in a factor of two reduction in the reaction rate for temperature below 108 K. This new result has a significant impact on the theory of the evolution of massive stars. It significantly increases the predicted age of the oldest globular clusters and helps provide a better constraint on cosmological parameters that determine the present age of the Universe.

  3. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. You may also have a sore throat, cough, ... symptoms are: Nasal congestion Runny nose Scratchy throat Sneezing Adults and older children with colds generally have ...

  4. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Cold Intolerance Many polio ... index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Back to top Contact ...

  5. Addition of water, methanol, and ammonia to Al3O3- clusters: Reaction products, transition states, and electron detachment energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-García, Alfredo; Martínez, Ana; Ortiz, J. V.

    2005-06-01

    Products of reactions between the book and kite isomers of Al3O3- and three important molecules are studied with electronic structure calculations. Dissociative adsorption of H2O or CH3OH is highly exothermic and proton-transfer barriers between anion-molecule complexes and the products of these reactions are low. For NH3, the reaction energies are less exothermic and the corresponding barriers are higher. Depending on experimental conditions, Al3O3- (NH3) coordination complexes or products of dissociative adsorption may be prepared. Vertical electron detachment energies of stable anions are predicted with ab initio electron propagator calculations and are in close agreement with experiments on Al3O3- and its products with H2O and CH3OH. Changes in the localization properties of two Al-centered Dyson orbitals account for the differences between the photoelectron spectra of Al3O3- and those of the product anions.

  6. The "missing link": the gas-phase generation of platinum-methylidyne clusters Pt(n)CH+ (n=1, 2) and their reactions with hydrocarbons and ammonia.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Schwarz, Helmut

    2011-10-10

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) of tetrameric platinum(II) acetate, [Pt(4)(CH(3)COO)(8)], in methanol generates the formal platinum(III) dimeric cation [Pt(2)(CH(3)COO)(3)(CH(2)COO)(MeOH)(2)](+), which, upon harsher ionization conditions, sequentially loses the two methanol ligands, CO(2), and CH(2)COO to form the platinum(II) dimer [Pt(2)(CH(3)COO)(2)(CH(3))](+). Next, intramolecular sequential double hydrogen-atom transfer from the methyl group concomitant with the elimination of two acetic acid molecules produces Pt(2)CH(+) from which, upon even harsher conditions, PtCH(+) is eventually generated. This degradation sequence is supported by collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments, extensive isotope-labeling studies, and DFT calculations. Both PtCH(+) and Pt(2)CH(+) react under thermal conditions with the hydrocarbons C(2)H(n) (n=2, 4, 6) and C(3)H(n) (n=6, 8). While, in ion-molecule reactions of PtCH(+) with C(2) hydrocarbons, the relative rates decrease with increasing n, the opposite trend holds true for Pt(2)CH(+). The Pt(2)CH(+) cluster only sluggishly reacts with C(2)H(2), but with C(2)H(4) and C(2)H(6) dihydrogen loss dominates. The reactions with the latter two substrates were preceded by a complete exchange of all of the hydrogen atoms present in the adduct complex. The PtCH(+) ion is much less selective. In the reactions with C(2)H(2) and C(2)H(4), elimination of H(2) occurs; however, CH(4) formation prevails in the decomposition of the adduct complex that is formed with C(2)H(6). In the reaction with C(2)H(2), in addition to H(2) loss, C(3)H(3)(+) is produced, and this process formally corresponds to the transfer of the cationic methylidyne unit CH(+) to C(2)H(2), accompanied by the release of neutral Pt. In the ion-molecule reactions with the C(3) hydrocarbons C(3)H(6) and C(3)H(8), dihydrogen loss occurs with high selectivity for Pt(2)CH(+), but in the reactions of these substrates with PtCH(+) several reaction routes compete. Finally, in the

  7. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  8. Clustering effects in fusion evaporation reactions with light even-even N=Z nuclei. The 24Mg and 28Si cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, L.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Baiocco, G.; Gulminelli, F.; Cinausero, M.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Gramegna, F.; Marchi, T.; Barlini, S.; Bini, M.; Casini, G.; Gelli, N.; Pasquali, G.; Piantelli, S.; Valdrè, S.

    2016-06-01

    In the recent years, cluster structures have been evidenced in many ground and excited states of light nuclei [1, 2]. The decay of highly excited states of 24Mg is studied in fusion evaporation events completely detected in charge in the reactions 12C+12C and 14N+10B at 95 and 80 MeV incident energy, respectively, and compared to the results of a pure statistical model [3, 4]. Inclusive variables are in general well reproduced by the model. We found clear deviations from the statistical model if we select emission channels involving multiple α particles which are more probable than expected from a purely statistical behavior. Data from 12C+12C reaction have been analyzed in order to study the decay of the Hoyle state of 12C* with two different selections: peripheral binary collisions and 6α decay channel in central events. To continue the investigation on light systems, we have recently measured the 16O+12C reaction at three different beam energies, namely Ebeam = 90, 110 and 130 MeV. Preliminary results are presented.

  9. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Dong H. E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H{sub 2} → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2){sub Q}] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H{sub 2} reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  10. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  12. Production of the doubly magic nucleus Sn100 in fusion and quasifission reactions via light particle and cluster emission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    The possibilities of production of the doubly magic nucleus Sn100 in complete fusion and quasifission reactions with stable and radioactive ion beams are investigated within a dinuclear system model. The excitation functions for production of the exotic nuclei 100-103Sn and 112,114Ba via xn, pxn, αxn, and 12,14Cxn emission channels are predicted for future experiments.

  13. Reactive accelerated cluster erosion (RACE) by ionized cluster beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gspann, Jürgen

    1996-05-01

    Beams of ionized clusters accelerated up to about 120 keV kinetic energy per cluster are used for cluster impact lithography. Chemical reactions of clusters of CO 2, or of SF 6, respectively, are found to assist the physical erosion by hypervelocity cluster impacts in yielding volatile products. Natural diamond, silicon and Pyrex glass have been microstructured showing very smooth eroded surfaces.

  14. Toward an understanding of the hydrogenation reaction of MO2 gas-phase clusters (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf).

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, P; Calatayud, M; Andrés, J; Ruipérez, F; Roca-Sanjuán, D

    2013-06-27

    A theoretical investigation using density functional theory (DFT) has been carried out in order to understand the molecular mechanism of dihydrogen activation by means of transition metal dioxides MO2 (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf) according to the following reaction: MO2 + H2 → MO + H2O. B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2pd)/SDD methodology was employed considering two possible reaction pathways. As the first step hydrogen activation by M═O bonds yields to metal-oxo hydride intermediates O═MH(OH). This process is spontaneous for all metal dioxides, and the stability of the O═MH(OH) species depends on the transition metal center. Subsequently, the reaction mechanism splits into two paths: the first one takes place passing through the M(OH)2 intermediates yielding to products, whereas the second one corresponds to direct formation of the product complex OM(H2O). A two-state reactivity mechanism was found for the TiO2 system, whereas for ZrO2 and HfO2 no spin-crossing processes were observed. This is confirmed by CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations for ZrO2 that lead to the correct ordering of electronic states not found by DFT. The results obtained in the present paper for MO2 molecules are consistent with the observed reactivity on surfaces. PMID:23706045

  15. Nucleophilic activation of coordinated carbon monoxide. Part 3. Hydroxide and methoxide reactions with the trinuclear clusters M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ (M = Fe, Ru, or Os): implications with regard to catalysis of the water gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, D.C.; Ford, P.C.

    1985-02-06

    Reported are quantitative investigations of the reactions of the triangular clusters M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ (M = Fe, Ru, or Os) with methoxide ion in solution. In methanol under a CO atmosphere, both the osmium and ruthenium species form stable 1:1 methoxycarbonyl adducts (M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ + NaOCH/sub 3/ in equilibrium (M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(CO/sub 2/CH/sub 3/))Na); however, for the triiron analogue this adduct undergoes fragmentation to give Fe(CO)/sub 4/(CO/sub 2/CH/sub 3/)/sup -/. Initial adduct formation in each case occurs with an equilibrium constant of about 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/. In mixed tetrahydrofuran/methanol solutions, K/sub eq/ for Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(CO/sub 2/CH/sub 3/)/sup -/ is much larger, an indication of the greater activity of NaOCH/sub 3/ in the less protic solvent. Notably, in such solvent mixtures, the presence of excess methoxide also led to the formation of 2:1 adducts. Rates of adduct formation were examined by using stopped-flow kinetics techniques, and it was shown that in methanol the second-order rate constants (25/sup 0/C) are 11.3 x 10/sup 3/, 2.1 x 10/sup 3/, and 0.6 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ for Fe/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/, Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/, and Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/, respectively. Rates were much higher in the mixed THF(tetrahydro-furan)/CH/sub 3/OH solutions; for example, k/sub 1/ (25/sup 0/C) for Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ is 2.0 x 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ in 90/10 THF/CH/sub 3/OH (v/v). Monosubstitution of the ruthenium cluster with (CH/sub 3/O)/sub 3/P markedly reduced the reactivity toward the anionic nucleophile. The reaction of the triruthenium species with hydroxide (Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 12/ + OH/sup -/ in equilibrium Ru/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/(CO/sub 2/H)/sup -/ ..-->.. HRu/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11//sup -/ + CO/sub 2/) was also investigated. Analysis of the reaction kinetics leads to the conclusion that formation of the initial hydroxycarbonyl adduct is somewhat less favorable and is slower than the analogous reaction of

  16. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  17. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  18. Low energy (0-4 eV) electron impact to N{sub 2}O clusters: Dissociative electron attachment, ion-molecule reactions, and vibrational Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Vizcaino, Violaine; Denifl, Stephan; Maerk, Tilmann D.; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen

    2010-10-21

    Electron attachment to clusters of N{sub 2}O in the energy range of 0-4 eV yields the ionic complexes [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -}, [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -}, and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} . The shape of the ion yields of the three homologous series differs substantially reflecting the different formation mechanisms. While the generation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} can be assigned to dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of an individual N{sub 2}O molecule in the target cluster, the formation of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}NO]{sup -} is interpreted via a sequence of ion molecule reactions involving the formation of O{sup -} via DEA in the first step. The nondecomposed complexes (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} are preferentially formed at very low energies (below 0.5 eV) as a result of intramolecular stabilization of a diffuse molecular anion at low energy. The ion yields of [(N{sub 2}O){sub n}O]{sup -} and (N{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup -} versus electron energy show sharp peaks at the threshold region, which can be assigned to vibrational Feshbach resonances mediated by the diffuse anion state as already observed in an ultrahigh resolution electron attachment study of N{sub 2}O clusters [E. Leber, S. Barsotti, J. Boemmels, J. M. Weber, I. I. Fabrikant, M.-W. Ruf, and H. Hotop, Chem. Phys. Lett. 325, 345 (2000)].

  19. [Survival in cold water. Physiological consequences of accidental immersion in cold water].

    PubMed

    Mantoni, Teit; Belhage, Bo; Pott, Frank Christian

    2006-09-18

    This survey addresses the immediate physiological reactions to immersion in cold water: cold shock response, diving reflex, cardiac arrhythmias and hypothermia. Cold shock response is the initial sympathetic reaction to immersion in cold water. The diving reflex is elicited by submersion of the face. Afferent and efferent nerves are the trigeminal and vagal nerves. Cardiac arrhythmias occur immediately after immersion. If the immersion persists, hypothermia becomes an issue. Hypothermia is delayed by habituation to immersion in cold water as well as insulating garments, subcutaneous fat and a large lean body mass. PMID:17026891

  20. Some Like It Hot, Some like It Cold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to find the right combination to construct a cold pack for athletic injuries, students mix liquids and solids in a calorimeter, and use a thermometer to ascertain whether the chemical reaction is hot or cold. Many formulae for chemical reactions are given, the first of which is used for commercial cold packs.

  1. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréchignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Falvo, Cyril; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Mulas, Giacomo; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  2. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: Autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation

    SciTech Connect

    Bréchignac, Philippe Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Mulas, Giacomo

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory.

  3. Photoionization of cold gas phase coronene and its clusters: autoionization resonances in monomer, dimer, and trimer and electronic structure of monomer cation.

    PubMed

    Bréchignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A; Falvo, Cyril; Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian; Bonnamy, Anthony; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Mulas, Giacomo; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-10-28

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are key species encountered in a large variety of environments such as the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in combustion media. Their UV spectroscopy and photodynamics in neutral and cationic forms are important to investigate in order to learn about their structure, formation mechanisms, and reactivity. Here, we report an experimental photoelectron-photoion coincidence study of a prototypical PAH molecule, coronene, and its small clusters, in a molecular beam using the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons provided by the SOLEIL synchrotron facility. Mass-selected high resolution threshold photoelectron (TPES) and total ion yield spectra were obtained and analyzed in detail. Intense series of autoionizing resonances have been characterized as originating from the monomer, dimer, and trimer neutral species, which may be used as spectral fingerprints for their detection in the ISM by VUV absorption spectroscopy. Finally, a full description of the electronic structure of the monomer cation was made and discussed in detail in relation to previous spectroscopic optical absorption data. Tentative vibrational assignments in the near-threshold TPES spectrum of the monomer have been made with the support of a theoretical approach based on density functional theory. PMID:25362317

  4. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  5. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  6. Transient negative species in supercritical carbon dioxide : electronic spectra and reactions of CO{sub 2}-anion clusters.

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Sawamura, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Bartels, D. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Chemistry; Hokkaido Univ.

    2002-01-10

    Transient absorption spectra following ionization of supercritical CO{sub 2} have been investigated using the pulse radiolysis technique. Absorption spectra measured from 400 to 800 nm suggest that at least two transient species absorb. We have previously reported that one species is (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup +}. In the near UV region, we observed a transient species of which the lifetime and reactivity are different from the dimer cation. We assign this species to a dimer anion, (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup -}, or an anion-molecule complex, (CO{sub 2}{sup -})(CO{sub 2}){sub x}. Comparison with the photobleaching of CO{sub 2} anion clusters in solid rare gas matrixes and their reactivity with H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} confirm the assignment. Theoretical calculations, in which solvation is taken into account, are consistent with these assignments. It is well-established that the adiabatic electron affinity of CO{sub 2} is negative, but the adiabatic electron affinity of CO{sub 2} dimer has been calculated to be 0.89 eV for D2d symmetry (CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{sup -} in the gas phase. The calculations predict that CO{sub 2}{sup -} in a model continuum solvent is stable to autodetachment.

  7. Study of cluster structures in 10Be and 16C neutron-rich nuclei via break-up reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, D.; Acosta, L.; Amorini, F.; Andolina, R.; Auditore, L.; Berceanu, I.; Cardella, G.; Chatterjiee, M. B.; De Filippo, E.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N.; Minniti, T.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Pop, A.; Porto, F.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2016-05-01

    Projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH2) target are used in order to study the spectroscopy of 10Be and 16C nuclei. For the present experiment we used 10Be and 16C beams delivered by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS, and the CHIMERA 4π multi-detector. 10Be and 16C structures are studied via a relative energy analysis of break-up fragments. The 4He+6He break-up channel allowed us to study the spectroscopy of 10Be; in particular we find evidence of a new state in 10Be at 13.5 MeV excitation energy. The 16C nucleus is studied via 6He-10Be correlation; we find the fingerprint of a possible state at about 20.6 MeV

  8. Thermochemistry of the activation of N2 on iron cluster cations: Guided ion beam studies of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lin; Liu, Fuyi; Armentrout, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    The kinetic energy dependences of the reactions of Fen+ (n=1-19) with N2 are studied in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer over the energy range of 0-15eV. In addition to collision-induced dissociation forming Fem+ ions, which dominate the product spectra, a variety of FemN2+ and FemN+ product ions, where m ⩽n, is observed. All processes are observed to exhibit thresholds. Fem+-N and Fem+-2N bond energies as a function of cluster size are derived from the threshold analysis of the kinetic energy dependences of the endothermic reactions. The trends in this thermochemistry are compared to the isoelectronic D0(Fen+-CH), and to bulk phase values. A fairly uniform barrier of 0.48±0.03eV at 0K is observed for formation of the FenN2+ product ions (n =12, 15-19) and can be related to the rate-limiting step in the Haber process for catalytic ammonia production.

  9. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  10. N-O versus N-N bond activation in reaction of N2O with carbon cluster ions: Experimental and ab initio studies of the effects of geometric and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resat, Marianne Sowa; Smolanoff, Jason N.; Goldman, Ilyse B.; Anderson, Scott L.

    1994-06-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the reaction of small carbon cluster cations with N2O aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism and how it is affected by the electronic and geometric structure of the C+n reactants. Cross sections for reaction of C+n (n=3-12) with N2O were measured over a collision energy range from 0.1-10 eV, using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Ab initio calculations were used to examine the structure and energetics of reactant and product species. Small clusters, which are linear, react with no activation barrier, resulting in either oxide or nitride formation. The branching between oxide and nitride channels shows a strong even-odd alternation, with even clusters preferentially forming nitrides. This appears to be correlated with an even/odd alternation in the ionization potential of the CnN. The larger, monocyclic C+n have activation barriers for reaction, and a completely different product distribution. Secondary reactions of the primary oxide and nitride products were studied at high N2O pressures. Products containing two O or two N atoms are not observed, but it is possible to add one of each. Possible reaction mechanisms are discussed and supported by thermochemistry derived from spin restricted ab initio calculations.

  11. Results of an attempt to measure increased rates of the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n in a nonelectrochemical cold fusion experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Decker, Arthur J.; Blue, James W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to look for evidence of deuterium fusion in palladium. The experiment, which involved introducing deuterium into the palladium filter of a hydrogen purifier, was designed to detect neutrons produced in the reaction D-2 + D-2 yields He-3 + n as well as heat production. The neutron counts for deuterium did not differ significantly from background or from the counts for a hydrogen control. Heat production was detected when deuterium, but not hydrogen, was pumped from the purifier.

  12. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  13. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  14. Evidence for alpha-cluster condensation in the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state at E{sub x} = 7.654 MeV in {sup 12}C via the (p,p') reaction at 300 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, A.; Yamagata, T.; Akimune, H.; Hara, K. Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Utsunomiya, H.; Warashina, N.; Fujiwara, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hayami, R.; Nakayama, S.; Greenfield, M. B.; Hara, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kawase, K.; Nakanishi, N.; Yosoi, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-06-01

    We measured the differential cross sections for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state at E{sub x} = 7.654 MeV in {sup 12}C via the (p,p') reaction at an incident energy of 300 MeV, and in an angular range from 2.7 deg. to 40 deg. We analyzed the data with the distorted-wave Born-approximation (DWBA) employing transition densities obtained in a macroscopic collective model, a microscopic alpha-cluster model, and a microscopic alpha-cluster condensation model. It is concluded that the present results for the {sup 12}C(p,p') reaction at 300 MeV is quite consistent with the assumption that the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state at E{sub x} = 7.654 MeV has the wave function with the alpha-cluster condensation.

  15. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    PubMed

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  16. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    PubMed Central

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1–3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013–2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration. PMID:24982664

  17. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  18. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  19. CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu(I) oxide nanolayers and clusters: an electronic structure insight into the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uzunova, Ellie L; Seriani, Nicola; Mikosch, Hans

    2015-04-28

    The mechanism of carbon dioxide reduction to methanol on Cu(I) oxide nanolayers and clusters using water as the source of hydrogen was traced using density functional theory. The nature of the active sites is revealed, namely the role of surface copper dimers, which are present on the Cu2O(001) surface and in the nanoclusters of size Cu32O16 and Cu14O7. The major difference between metal catalysts and Cu2O is outlined: the CO2 molecule interacts strongly with the oxide and undergoes bending prior to hydrogenation. The first step of CO2 hydrogenation results in the formation of a stable carboxyl intermediate, -CO(OH), which in the following steps is converted to methanol via formic acid and formaldehyde intermediates. The consumption of hydrogen from water leaves surface peroxo- and hydroperoxo-species. The peroxides easily desorb molecular oxygen, while for hydroperoxides the reaction of oxygen evolution requires an activation energy of 130 kJ mol(-1). The maxima in the absorption spectra correspond well with the required activation energies in the elementary steps. PMID:25826462

  20. Orientations of Iron-Sulfur Clusters FA and FB in the Homodimeric Type-I Photosynthetic Reaction Center of Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toru; Matsuoka, Masahiro; Azai, Chihiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2016-05-12

    Orientations of the FA and FB iron-sulfur (FeS) clusters in a structure-unknown type-I homodimeric heriobacterial reaction center (hRC) were studied in oriented membranes of the thermophilic anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and compared with those in heterodimeric photosystem I (PS I). The Rieske-type FeS center in the cytochrome b/c complex showed a well-oriented EPR signal. Illumination at 14 K induced an FB(-) signal with g-axes of gz = 2.066, gy = 1.937, and gx = 1.890, tilted at angles of 60°, 60°, and 45°, respectively, with respect to the membrane normal. Chemical reduction with dithionite produced an additional signal of FA(-), which magnetically interacted with FB(-), with gz = 2.046, gy = 1.942, and gx = 1.911 at 30°, 60°, and 90°, respectively. The angles and redox properties of FA(-) and FB(-) in hRC resemble those of FB(-) and FA(-), respectively, in PS I. Therefore, FA and FB in hRC, named after their g-value similarities, seem to be located like FB and FA, not like FA and FB, respectively, in PS I. The reducing side of hRC could resemble those in PS I, if the names of FA and FB are interchanged with each other. PMID:27101081

  1. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  2. Relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation in the finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate relationships of self-identified cold tolerance and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) in the finger. Nine males and 34 females participated in the following 2 tests: a CIVD test and a self-reported survey. The CIVD test was conducted 30-min cold-water immersion (3.8 ± 0.3 °C) of the middle finger at an air temperature of 27.9 ± 0.1 °C. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of 28 questions about whole and local body cold and heat tolerances. By a cluster analysis on the survey results, the participants were divided into two groups: high self-identified cold tolerance (HSCT, n = 25) and low self-identified cold tolerance (LSCT, n = 18). LSCT had lower self-identified cold tolerance ( P < 0.001), preferred hot thermal stimulation ( P = 0.006), and wore heavier clothing during daily life ( P < 0.001) than HSCT. LSCT had significantly lower maximal finger temperatures ( T max) ( P = 0.040), smaller amplitude ( P = 0.029), and delayed onset time of CIVD ( P = 0.080) when compared to HSCT. Some questions examining the self-identified cold or heat tolerance had relationships with cold tolerance index, T max, and amplitude ( P < 0.1). These results indicate that self-identified cold tolerance classified through a standardized survey could be a good index to predict physiological cold tolerance.

  3. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  4. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics - colds and flu ... treat infections that are caused by a virus. Colds and flu are caused by viruses. If you ... Hamilton A. Treatments for symptoms of the common cold. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(12):Online. PMID: ...

  5. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... belief that vitamin C can cure the common cold , research about this claim is conflicting. Large doses ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts, but they do not appear to protect ...

  6. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  7. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  8. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  9. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  10. Determination of the compound nucleus survival probability Psurv for various "hot" fusion reactions based on the dynamical cluster-decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2015-03-01

    After a successful attempt to define and determine recently the compound nucleus (CN) fusion/ formation probability PCN within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), we introduce and estimate here for the first time the survival probability Psurv of CN against fission, again within the DCM. Calculated as the dynamical fragmentation process, Psurv is defined as the ratio of the evaporation residue (ER) cross section σER and the sum of σER and fusion-fission (ff) cross section σff, the CN formation cross section σCN, where each contributing fragmentation cross section is determined in terms of its formation and barrier penetration probabilities P0 and P . In DCM, the deformations up to hexadecapole and "compact" orientations for both in-plane (coplanar) and out-of-plane (noncoplanar) configurations are allowed. Some 16 "hot" fusion reactions, forming a CN of mass number ACN˜100 to superheavy nuclei, are analyzed for various different nuclear interaction potentials, and the variation of Psurv on CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 is investigated. Interesting results are that three groups, namely, weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, are identified with Psurv, respectively, ˜1 ,˜10-6 , and ˜10-10 . For the weakly fissioning group (100