Science.gov

Sample records for cold fission

  1. Cold fission description with constant and varying mass asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, S. B.; Rodríguez, O.; Tavares, O. A. P.; Gonçalves, M.; García, F.; Guzmán, F.

    1998-05-01

    Different descriptions for varying the mass asymmetry in the fragmentation process are used to calculate the cold fission barrier penetrability. The relevance of the appropriate choice for both the description of the prescission phase and inertia coefficient to unify alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and spontaneous cold fission processes in the same theoretical framework is explicitly shown. We calculate the half-life of all possible partition modes of nuclei of A>200 following the most recent Mass Table by Audi and Wapstra. It is shown that if one uses the description in which the mass asymmetry is maintained constant during the fragmentation process, the experimental half-life values and mass yield of 234U cold fission are satisfactorily reproduced.

  2. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-01

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a nonevaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  3. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E. Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-15

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a non-evaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  4. Development and Analysis of Cold Trap for Use in Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. M.; Dervan, C. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    The design and analysis of a cold trap proposed for use in the purification of circulated eutectic sodium potassium (NaK-78) loops is presented. The cold trap is designed to be incorporated into the Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC), which incorporates a pumped NaK loop to simulate in-space nuclear reactor-based technology using non-nuclear test methodology as developed by the Early Flight Fission-Test Facility. The FSP-PTC provides a test circuit for the development of fission surface power technology. This system operates at temperatures that would be similar to those found in a reactor (500-800 K). By dropping the operating temperature of a specified percentage of NaK flow through a bypass containing a forced circulation cold trap, the NaK purity level can be increased by precipitating oxides from the NaK and capturing them within the cold trap. This would prevent recirculation of these oxides back through the system, which may help prevent corrosion.

  5. Isotopic yield in cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Cyriac, Annu; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-05-01

    The cold binary fission of even-even 244-258Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. The favorable fragment combinations are obtained from the cold valley plot (plot of driving potential vs. mass number of fragments) and by calculating the yield for charge minimized fragments. It is found that for 244,246,248Cf isotopes highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Pb (Z = 82) as one fragment, whereas for 250Cf and 252Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with isotope of Hg (Z = 80) as one fragment. In the case of 254,256,258Cf isotopes the highest yield is for the fragments with Sn (Z = 50) as one fragment. Thus, the fragment combinations with maximum yield reveal the role of doubly magic and near doubly magic nuclei in binary fission. It is found that asymmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with mass number A ≤ 250 and symmetric splitting is favored for Cf isotopes with A > 252. In the case of Cf isotope with A = 252, there is an equal probability for asymmetric and symmetric splitting. The individual yields obtained for the cold fission of 252Cf isotope are compared with the experimental data taken from the γ- γ- γ coincidences technique using Gammasphere.

  6. Fission Product Separation from Pyrochemical Electrolyte by Cold Finger Melt Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Versey, Joshua R.

    2013-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of pyroprocessing technology as an economically viable means of separating used nuclear fuel from fission products and cladding materials. Electrolytic oxide reduction is used as a head-end step before electrorefining to reduce oxide fuel to metallic form. The electrolytic medium used in this technique is molten LiCl-Li2O. Groups I and II fission products, such as cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), have been shown to partition from the fuel into the molten LiCl-Li2O. Various approaches of separating these fission products from the salt have been investigated by different research groups. One promising approach is based on a layer crystallization method studied at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Despite successful demonstration of this basic approach, there are questions that remain, especially concerning the development of economical and scalable operating parameters based on a comprehensive understanding of heat and mass transfer. This research explores these parameters through a series of experiments in which LiCl is purified, by concentrating CsCl in a liquid phase as purified LiCl is crystallized and removed via an argon-cooled cold finger.

  7. Cold-end Subsystem Testing for the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell; Gibson, Marc; Ellis, David; Sanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) consists of a pumped sodium-potassium (NaK) loop that provides heat to a Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which converts some of that heat into electricity and rejects the waste heat to a pumped water loop. Each of the TDU subsystems is being tested independently prior to full system testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The pumped NaK loop is being tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; the Stirling PCU and electrical controller are being tested by Sunpower Inc.; and the pumped water loop is being tested at Glenn. This paper describes cold-end subsystem setup and testing at Glenn. The TDU cold end has been assembled in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6) at Glenn, the same chamber that will be used for TDU testing. Cold-end testing in VF 6 will demonstrate functionality; validated cold-end fill, drain, and emergency backup systems; and generated pump performance and system pressure drop data used to validate models. In addition, a low-cost proof-of concept radiator has been built and tested at Glenn, validating the design and demonstrating the feasibility of using low-cost metal radiators as an alternative to high-cost composite radiators in an end-to-end TDU test.

  8. Cold-End Subsystem Testing for the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Mazwell; Gibson, Marc; Ellis, David; Sanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Fission Power System (FPS) Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) consists of a pumped sodiumpotassium (NaK) loop that provides heat to a Stirling Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which converts some of that heat into electricity and rejects the waste heat to a pumped water loop. Each of the TDU subsystems is being tested independently prior to full system testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The pumped NaK loop is being tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; the Stirling PCU and electrical controller are being tested by Sunpower Inc.; and the pumped water loop is being tested at Glenn. This paper describes cold-end subsystem setup and testing at Glenn. The TDU cold end has been assembled in Vacuum Facility 6 (VF 6) at Glenn, the same chamber that will be used for TDU testing. Cold-end testing in VF 6 will demonstrate functionality; validated coldend fill, drain, and emergency backup systems; and generated pump performance and system pressure drop data used to validate models. In addition, a low-cost proof-of concept radiator has been built and tested at Glenn, validating the design and demonstrating the feasibility of using low-cost metal radiators as an alternative to highcost composite radiators in an end-to-end TDU test.

  9. Inversion of the Odd-Even Effect in Cold Fission from the Time-Dependent Pairing Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-06-01

    A peculiar phenomenon was observed experimentally in cold fission: the odd partition yields are favored over the even ones for excitations energies of the fragments smaller than 4 MeV. In this contribution, a microscopic model is proposed for the explanation of this odd-even effect in cold fission. This explanation is based on a mixing configuration mechanism that is produced during the fission process. This configuration mixing mechanism is obtained dynamically by solving a the generalized system of time-dependent pairing equations, which include a pair-breaking effect. The time dependent equations of motion for the pair breaking effect were corroborated with a condition that fixes dynamically the number of particles on the two fission fragment. The single particle level scheme was calculated with the Woods-Saxon superasymmetric two center shell model, providing a continuous variation of the single particle energies and of the wave functions from one nucleus up to two separated fragments. A first rule can be extracted from this model. The even-even fission products cannot be obtained at zero excitation energies because of the existence of dynamical excitations produced in the avoided- level-crossing regions when the nuclear system deforms slowly.

  10. T invariance and T-odd asymmetries for the cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Titova, L. V.

    2014-12-15

    It is shown that the coefficients D{sup exp} for all T-odd asymmetries observed experimentally in the cross sections for the reactions of cold-polarized-neutron-induced fission of nonoriented target nuclei (which involves the emission of prescission and evaporated particles) comply in shape and scale with the coefficients D{sup theor} calculated for the analogous asymmetries on the basis of quantum-mechanical nuclear-fission theory for T-invariant Hamiltonians of fissile systems. It is also shown that the asymmetries in question arise upon taking into account the effect of (i) the interference between the fission amplitudes of s- and p-wave resonances of a polarized fissile compound nucleus formed in the aforementioned reactions; (ii) the collective rotation of the compound nucleus in question (this rotation entails a change in the angular distributions of fission fragments and third particles); and (iii) the wriggling vibrations of this compound nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point, which lead to the appearance of high aligned spins of fission fragments, with the result that the emission of neutrons and photons evaporated from these fragments becomes anisotropic. The possible contribution of T-noninvariant interactions to the formation of the T-odd asymmetries under analysis is estimated by using the results obtained in experimentally testing the detailed-balance principle, (P-A) theorem, and T invariance of cross sections for elastic proton-proton and proton-neutron scattering.

  11. Cold-sensitive mutants of p34cdc2 that suppress a mitotic catastrophe phenotype in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ayscough, K; Hayles, J; MacNeill, S A; Nurse, P

    1992-04-01

    The p34cdc2 protein kinase plays a central role in the regulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle, being required both in late G1 for the commitment to S-phase and in late G2 for the initiation of mitosis. p34cdc2 also determines the precise timing of entry into mitosis in fission yeast, where a number of gene products that regulate p34cdc2 activity have been identified and characterised. To investigate further the mitotic role of p34cdc2 in this organism we have isolated new cold-sensitive p34cdc2 mutants. These are defective only in their G2 function and are extragenic suppressors of the lethal premature entry into mitosis brought about by mutating the mitotic inhibitor p107wee1 and overproducing the mitotic activator p80cdc25. One of the mutant proteins p34cdc2-E8 is only functional in the absence of p107wee1, and all the mutant strains have reduced histone H1 kinase activity in vitro. Each mutant allele has been cloned and sequenced, and the lesions responsible for the cold-sensitive phenotypes identified. All the mutations were found to map to regions that are conserved between the fission yeast p34cdc2 and functional homologues from higher eukaryotes. PMID:1316996

  12. Development of the quantum theory of T-odd asymmetries for prescission and evaporated third particles in ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Titova, L. V.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2011-10-15

    A comparative analysis of the results obtained by experimentally and theoretically studying T-odd asymmetries for various third particles in the true and delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons was performed. It was confirmed that the appearance of these asymmetries was associated with the effect of rotation of a polarized system undergoing fission on the angular distributions of prescission and evaporated third particles with respect to the direction along which the emerging fission fragments flew apart, this effect being determined by the Coriolis interaction of the rotational and the internalmotion of the fissioning system. A quantum-mechanical description of particle motion in a rotating coordinate system was generalized to the case where gamma-ray emission was present. It was shown that the separation of the motions of an axially symmetric fissile system into a rotational and an internal motion was valid in the external region as well, where ternary-fission products had already been formed, if it was considered that the motion of fission fragments was tightly connected with the system symmetry axis, which rotated in the laboratory frame. It was found that the dependence of the fissile-system moment of inertia appearing in the Coriolis interaction Hamiltonian on the distance between the fission fragments flying apart generated an additional phase in the amplitude of the radial distribution of fission fragments. It was shown that this phase might change sizably the contribution of the interference between fission amplitudes of neutron resonances excited in a fissile compound nucleus to the absolute values of T -odd asymmetries, especially for third particles such as neutrons and photons, which interacted only slightly with fission fragments.

  13. Semiclassical description of TRI asymmetry in ternary fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.

    2011-11-15

    The possibility of semiclassically describing T-even TRI-type asymmetry in ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons is considered on the basis of employing Coriolis interaction that takes into account the coupling of a light charged particle to the collective rotation of a polarized fissile nucleus. It is shown that allowance for this interaction makes it possible to explain qualitatively the magnitudes of two asymmetry effects observed in light-charge-particle emission both within the semiclassical and within the quantum-mechanical approach. The difference in the relative magnitudes and signs of the effects between different target nuclei is associated with the interference contributions to the cross section from neighboring neutron resonances and therefore cannot be explained within the semiclassical approach.

  14. The rotation of scissioning nucleus considered trajectory calculations for ternary fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, I.; Gusev, Yu.

    2009-10-01

    On the base of modified trajectory calculations the shift of angular distribution of α-particles accompanied the reaction 235U(n,f) induced by cold polarized neutrons is evaluated. It was supposed that angular distribution shift is caused by the rotation of nuclear system before scission. The orientation of a rotation motion is determined by the neutron spin polarization along and opposite to the beam direction. For the first time the estimation was done in the frame of trajectory calculations assuming the rotation motion of scissioning nucleus [1]. The result of the calculation is in a good agreement with experimental data of paper [2], where this new phenomenon was named as ROT-effect.

  15. Rotation of the compound nucleus 236U ∗ in the fission reaction 235U( n,f) induced by cold polarised neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Petrov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Zavarukhina, T.; Gusev, Yu.; von Kalben, J.; Nesvizhevski, V.; Soldner, T.

    2007-08-01

    Surprisingly, for one of the best investigated nuclear reactions a new phenomenon was discovered. In an experiment performed at the High Flux Reactor of the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble, France, the reaction 235U(n , f) was studied. Fission was induced by cold polarised neutrons. Besides the two main fragments also ternary light charged particles were measured. The centres or the detector assemblies for fragments and light particles were positioned at right angles relative to each other in a plane perpendicular to the neutron beam. It is well known that the majority of ternary particles are emitted closely perpendicular to the fission axis. With the neutron spin pointing parallel or anti-parallel to the neutron beam it was observed that, upon flipping periodically the neutron spin, the distributions of angles between fragments and light particles are wobbling back and forth. The phenomenon is traced to the rotation of the scissioning nucleus while the light particles are ejected. This interpretation is corroborated by trajectory calculations for ternary α-particles being accelerated in a rotating Coulomb field provided by the two main fragments. The angle through which the fission axis and the trajectories of α-particles rotate is very small and barely exceeds 0.2°. This so far unreported feature of nuclear fission has been called the “ROT-effect”.

  16. Fission with cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    As NASA continues the exploration of deep space, there is a need for safe, reliable, and long-lasting source of energy. Solar cells, which are useful at the inner solar system, cannot provide adequate power for a spacecraft once it has passed beyond Jupiter's orbit. For missions to the outer planets, NASA has relied on radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) using 238Pua s a heat source. RTGs are an excellent power conversion technology but, unfortunately, 238Pu is a potential environmental hazard. In the past, the use of 238Pu has generated much controversy and turmoil. Its use in future missions is doubtful because of environmental concerns. This paper presents calculations performed with MCNP for a power source that will take advantage of the low temperatures found in deep space.

  17. Deformation effects in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even 244-260Cf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Krishnan, Sreejith

    2016-04-01

    Within the unified ternary fission model (UTFM), the alpha accompanied ternary fission of even-even 244-260Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 244Cf isotope, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination 108Ru + 4He + 132Te, which contains the near doubly magic nucleus 132Te ( N = 80, Z = 52). In the case of 246Cf and 248Cf isotopes, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combinations with the near doubly magic nucleus 134Te ( N = 82, Z = 52) as the heaviest fragment. The highest yield obtained for 250Cf, 252Cf, 254Cf, 256Cf, 258Cf and 260Cf isotopes is for the fragment combination with the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn ( N = 82), Z = 50 as the heaviest fragment. We have included the effect of deformation and orientation of fragments and this has revealed that in addition to the closed shell effect, ground-state deformation also plays an important role in the calculation of the relative yield of favorable fragment combinations. The computed isotopic yields for the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the 252Cf isotope are found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The emission probability and kinetic energy of the long-range alpha particle is calculated for the various isotopes of Cf and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Swi6, a Gene Required for Mating-Type Switching, Prohibits Meiotic Recombination in the Mat2-Mat3 ``cold Spot'' of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klar, AJS.; Bonaduce, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    Mitotic interconversion of the mating-type locus (mat1) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is initiated by a double-strand break at mat1. The mat2 and mat3 loci act as nonrandom donors of genetic information for mat1 switching such that switches occur primarily (or only) to the opposite mat1 allele. Location of the mat1 ``hot spot'' for transposition should be contrasted with the ``cold spot'' of meiotic recombination located within the adjoining mat2-mat3 interval. That is, meiotic interchromosomal recombination in mat2, mat3 and the intervening 15-kilobase region does not occur at all. swi2 and swi6 switching-deficient mutants possess the normal level of double-strand break at mat1, yet they fail to switch efficiently. By testing for meiotic recombination in the cold spot, we found the usual lack of recombination in a swi2 mutant but a significant level of recombination in a swi6 mutant. Therefore, the swi6 gene function is required to keep the donor loci inert for interchromosomal recombination. This finding, combined with the additional result that switching primarily occurs intrachromosomally, suggests that the donor loci are made accessible for switching by folding them onto mat1, thus causing the cold spot of recombination. PMID:1783290

  19. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  20. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  1. Development and Utilization of Space Fission Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Mason, Lee S.; Palac, Donald T.; Harlow, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Space fission power systems could enable advanced civilian space missions. Terrestrially, thousands of fission systems have been operated since 1942. In addition, the US flew a space fission system in 1965, and the former Soviet Union flew 33 such systems prior to the end of the Cold War. Modern design and development practices, coupled with 65 years of experience with terrestrial reactors, could enable the affordable development of space fission power systems for near-term planetary surface applications.

  2. Benchmarking nuclear fission theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G. F.; Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-05-14

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. Thus, the purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  3. Fission Spectrum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  4. Fission meter

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  5. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  6. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

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  7. Ternary fission induced by polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönnenwein, Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Ternary fission of (e,e) U- and Pu- isotopes induced by cold polarized neutrons discloses some new facets of the process. In the so-called ROT effect shifts in the angular distributions of ternary particles relative to the fission fragments show up. In the so-called TRI effect an asymmetry in the emission of ternary particles relative to a plane formed by the fragment momentum and the spin of the neutron appear. The two effects are shown to be linked to the components of angular momentum perpendicular and parallel to the fission axis at the saddle point of fission. Based on theoretical models the spectroscopic properties of the collective transitional states at the saddle point are inferred from experiment.

  8. The quantum and thermodynamical characteristics of fission taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.

    2007-09-15

    In the framework of the quantum theory of spontaneous and low-energy induced fission, the nature of quantum and thermodynamical properties of a fissioning system is analyzed taking into account adiabatic and nonadiabatic modes of motion for different fission stages. It is shown that, owing to the influence of the Coriolis interaction, the states of the fissile nucleus and of primary fission products are cold and strongly nonequilibrium. The important role of superfluid and pairing nucleon-nucleon correlations for binary and ternary fission is demonstrated. The mechanism of pumping of high values of relative orbital momenta and spins of fission fragments for binary and ternary fission and the nonevaporation mechanism of formation of third particles for ternary fission are investigated. The anisotropies and P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries for angular distributions of fission products are analyzed.

  9. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

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  10. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

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  11. Common cold

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  12. Common Cold

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  13. Fission barriers of compound superheavy nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pei, J C; Nazarewicz, W; Sheikh, J A; Kerman, A K

    2009-05-15

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for 264Fm, 272Ds, ;{278}112, ;{292}114, and ;{312}124. For nuclei around ;{278}112 produced in "cold-fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy as compared to the nuclei around ;{292}114 synthesized in "hot-fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and saddle-point temperatures. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. PMID:19518948

  14. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  15. Ternary Fission Studies by Correlation Measurements with Ternary Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutterer, Manfred

    2011-10-01

    The rare ternary fission process has been studied mainly by inclusive measurements of the energy distributions and fractional yields of the light charged particles (LCPs) from fission, or by experiments on the angular and energy correlation between LCPs and fission fragments (FFs). The present contribution presents a brief overview of more elaborate correlation measurements that comprise the emission of neutrons and γ rays with LCPs and FFs, or the coincident registration of two LCPs. These measurements have permitted identification of new modes of particle-accompanied fission, such as the population of excited states in LCPs, the formation of neutron-unstable nuclei as short-lived intermediate LCPs, as well as the sequential decay of particle-unstable LCPs and quaternary fission. Furthermore, the neutron multiplicity numbers bar ν (A) and distributions of fragment masses A, measured for the ternary fission modes with various LCP isotopes, give a valuable hint of the role played by nuclear shell structure in the fission process near scission. Finally, two different hitherto unknown asymmetries in ternary α-particle emission with respect to the fission axis, called the TRI and ROT effect, were studied in fission reactions induced by polarised cold neutrons.

  16. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  17. Fission Xenon on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Fission gas detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  19. Fission Spectrum Related Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    G. Aliberti; I. Kodeli; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2007-10-01

    The paper presents a preliminary uncertainty analysis related to potential uncertainties on the fission spectrum data. Consistent results are shown for a reference fast reactor design configuration and for experimental thermal configurations. However the results obtained indicate the need for further analysis, in particular in terms of fission spectrum uncertainty data assessment.

  20. The Fission Barrier Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Phair, L.; Moretto, L. G.

    2008-04-17

    Fission excitation functions have been measured for a chain of neighboring compound nuclei from {sup 207}Po to {sup 212}Po. We present a new analysis which provides a determination of the fission barriers and ground state shell effects with nearly spectroscopic accuracy. The accuracy achieved in this analysis may lead to a future detailed exploration of the saddle mass surface and its spectroscopy.

  1. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Junchen; Nazarewicz, Witold; Sheikh, J. A.; Kerman, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. We study the temperature-dependent fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The equivalence of isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. Calculations have been carried out for ^{264}Fm, ^{272}Ds, ^{278}112, ^{292}114, and ^{312}124. For nuclei around ^{278}112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with temperature as compared to the nuclei around ^{292}114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and fission-barrier temperatures. Our calculations are consistent with the long survival probabilities of the superheavy elements produced in Dubna with the ^{48}Ca beam.

  3. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  4. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  5. Singlet exciton fission photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Jadhav, Priya; Reusswig, Philip D; Yost, Shane R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Hontz, Eric; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc A

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission, a process that generates two excitons from a single photon, is perhaps the most efficient of the various multiexciton-generation processes studied to date, offering the potential to increase the efficiency of solar devices. But its unique characteristic, splitting a photogenerated singlet exciton into two dark triplet states, means that the empty absorption region between the singlet and triplet excitons must be filled by adding another material that captures low-energy photons. This has required the development of specialized device architectures. In this Account, we review work to develop devices that harness the theoretical benefits of singlet exciton fission. First, we discuss singlet fission in the archetypal material, pentacene. Pentacene-based photovoltaic devices typically show high external and internal quantum efficiencies. They have enabled researchers to characterize fission, including yield and the impact of competing loss processes, within functional devices. We review in situ probes of singlet fission that modulate the photocurrent using a magnetic field. We also summarize studies of the dissociation of triplet excitons into charge at the pentacene-buckyball (C60) donor-acceptor interface. Multiple independent measurements confirm that pentacene triplet excitons can dissociate at the C60 interface despite their relatively low energy. Because triplet excitons produced by singlet fission each have no more than half the energy of the original photoexcitation, they limit the potential open circuit voltage within a solar cell. Thus, if singlet fission is to increase the overall efficiency of a solar cell and not just double the photocurrent at the cost of halving the voltage, it is necessary to also harvest photons in the absorption gap between the singlet and triplet energies of the singlet fission material. We review two device architectures that attempt this using long-wavelength materials: a three-layer structure that uses

  6. Rapid separation of fresh fission products (draft)

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, D. E.; Bauer, E.; Petersen, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The fission of highly eruiched uranium by thermal neutrons creates dozens of isotopic products. The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Group participates in programs that involve analysis of 'fiesh' fission products by beta counting following radiochemical separations. This is a laborious and time-consuming process that can take several days to generate results. Gamma spectroscopy can provide a more immediate path to isolopic activities, however short-lived, high-yield isotopes can swamp a gamma spectrum, making difficult the identification and quantification of isotopes on the wings and valley of the fission yield curve. The gamma spectrum of a sample of newly produced fission products is dominated by the many emissions of a very few high-yield isotopes. Specilkally, {sup 132}Te (3.2 d), its daughter, {sup 132}I(2 .28 h), {sup 140}Ba (12.75 d), and its daughter {sup 140}La (1.68 d) emit at least 18 gamma rays above 100 keV that are greater than 5% abundance. Additionally, the 1596 keV emission fiom I4'La imposes a Compton background that hinders the detection of isotopes that are neither subject to matrix dependent fractionation nor gaseous or volatile recursors. Some of these isotopes of interest are {sup 111}Ag, {sup 115}Cd, and the rare earths, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 156}Eu, and {sup 160}Tb. C-INC has performed an HEU irradiation and also 'cold' carrier analyses by ICP-AES to determine methods for rapid and reliable separations that may be used to detect and quantify low-yield fission products by gamma spectroscopy. Results and progress will be presented.

  7. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. You may also have a sore throat, cough, ... symptoms are: Nasal congestion Runny nose Scratchy throat Sneezing Adults and older children with colds generally have ...

  8. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Cold Intolerance Many polio ... index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Back to top Contact ...

  9. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in a gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into nonequilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in near thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme nonequilibrium. During 20 years of research under NASA support major elements of the fissioning plasma reactor were demonstrated in theory and experiment, culminating in a proof-of-principle reactor test conducted at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It is concluded that the construction of a gaseous fuel reactor power plant is within the reach of present technology.

  10. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  12. Process for treating fission waste

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Wick, Oswald J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  13. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  14. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  15. Radiation Detection from Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.

    2004-11-17

    This report briefly describes the neutrons and gamma rays emitted in fission, briefly discusses measurement methods, briefly discusses sources and detectors relevant to detection of shielded HEU in sealand containers, and lists the measurement possibilities for the various sources. The brief descriptions are supplemented by reference.

  16. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  17. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  18. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  19. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  20. Clusterization in Ternary Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanin, D. V.; Pyatkov, Y. V.

    This lecture notes are devoted to the new kind of ternary decay of low excited heavy nuclei called by us "collinear cluster tri-partition" (CCT) due to the features of the effect observed, namely, decay partners fly away almost collinearly and at least one of them has magic nucleon composition. At the early stage of our work the process of "true ternary fission" (fission of the nucleus into three fragments of comparable masses) was considered to be undiscovered for low excited heavy nuclei. Another possible prototype—three body cluster radioactivity—was also unknown. The most close to the CCT phenomenon, at least cinematically, stands so called "polar emission", but only very light ions (up to isotopes of Be) were observed so far.

  1. SHAPED FISSIONABLE METAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Williamson, R.R.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A technique is presented for grooving the surface of fissionable fuel elements so that expansion can take place without damage to the interior structure of the fuel element. The fissionable body tends to develop internal stressing when it is heated internally by the operation of the nuclear reactor and at the same time is subjected to surface cooling by the circulating coolant. By producing a grooved or waffle-like surface texture, the annular lines of tension stress are disrupted at equally spaced intervals by the grooves, thereby relieving the tension stresses in the outer portions of the body while also facilitating the removal of accumulated heat from the interior portion of the fuel element.

  2. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  3. Extended optical model for fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  4. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  6. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  7. ''Subthreshold'' reactions involving nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, M.; Shrock, R.

    2001-02-01

    We analyze reactions of several types that are naively below threshold but can proceed because of the release of binding energy from nuclear fission and occasionally the formation of Coulombic bound states. These reactions include (i) photofission with pion production and (ii) charged current neutrino-nucleus reactions that lead to fission and/or formation of a Coulomb bound state of a {mu}{sup -} with the nucleus of a fission fragment. We comment on the possible experimental observation of these reactions.

  8. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  9. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  10. Fast fission phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  11. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; et al

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally,more » individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  12. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O`Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-07-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E-2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E-v measurement.

  13. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O׳Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-04-01

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Finally, individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). These mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  14. Fission Particle Emission Multiplicity Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-09-27

    Simulates discrete neutron and gamma-ray emission from the fission of heavy nuclei that is either spontaneous or neutron induced. This is a function library that encapsulates the fission physics and is intended to be called Monte Carlo transport code.

  15. TREATMENT OF FISSION PRODUCT WASTE

    DOEpatents

    Huff, J.B.

    1959-07-28

    A pyrogenic method of separating nuclear reactor waste solutions containing aluminum and fission products as buring petroleum coke in an underground retort, collecting the easily volatile gases resulting as the first fraction, he uminum chloride as the second fraction, permitting the coke bed to cool and ll contain all the longest lived radioactive fission products in greatly reduced volume.

  16. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  17. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  18. Nuclear Fission Research at IRMM

    SciTech Connect

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2005-05-24

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) will celebrate its 45th anniversary in 2005. With its 150-MeV Geel Electron Linear Accelerator (GELINA) and 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator as multi-purpose neutron sources, it served the nuclear physics community for this period.The research in the field of nuclear fission was focused in recent years on both the measurement and calculation of fission cross sections, and the measurement of fission fragment properties.Fission cross sections were determined for 233Pa and 234U; the fission process was studied in the resolved resonance region of 239Pu(n,f) and for 251Cf(nth,f). These measurements derive their interest from accelerator driven systems, the thorium fuel cycle, high temperature reactors, safety issues of current reactors, and basic physics. The measurements are supported by several modeling efforts that aim at improving model codes and nuclear data evaluation.

  19. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  20. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  1. Prompt Fission Neutron Emission in Resonance Fission of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Varapai, Natallia; Zeinalov, Shakir; Oberstedt, Stephan; Serot, Olivier

    2005-05-01

    The prompt neutron emission probability from neutron-induced fission in the resonance region is being investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is used as a fission-fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both the fission-fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection, large-volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration are used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data. Neutron multiplicity investigations for actinides, especially in resonance neutron-induced fission, are rather scarce. They are, however, important for reactor control and safety issues as well as for understanding the basic physics of the fission process. Fission yield measurements on both 235U and 239Pu without prompt neutron emission coincidence have shown that fluctuation of the fission-fragment mass distribution exists from resonance to resonance, larger in the case of 235U. To possibly explain these observations, the question now is whether the prompt neutron multiplicity shows similar fluctuations with resonance energy.

  2. Fission yeast septation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Juan C. G.; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  3. Fission yeast septation.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Juan C G; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  4. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  5. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  6. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics - colds and flu ... treat infections that are caused by a virus. Colds and flu are caused by viruses. If you ... Hamilton A. Treatments for symptoms of the common cold. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(12):Online. PMID: ...

  7. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... belief that vitamin C can cure the common cold , research about this claim is conflicting. Large doses ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts, but they do not appear to protect ...

  8. Dynamical Aspects of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliman, J.; Itkis, M. G.; Gmuca, Š.

    2008-11-01

    Fission dynamics. Dependence of scission-neutron yield on light-fragment mass for [symbol]=1/2 [et al.]. Dynamics of capture quasifission and fusion-fission competition / L. Stuttgé ... [et al.] -- Fission-fission. The processes of fusion-fission and quasi-fission of superheavy nuclei / M. G. Itkis ... [et al.]. Fission and quasifission in the reactions [symbol]Ca+[symbol]Pb and [symbol]Ni+[symbol]W / G. N. Knyazheva ... [et al.]. Mass-energy characteristics of reactions [symbol]Fe+[symbol][symbol][symbol]266Hs and [symbol]Mg+[symbol]Cm[symbol][symbol]Hs at Coulomb barrier / L. Krupa ... [et al.]. Fusion of heavy ions at extreme sub-barrier energies / Ş. Mişicu and H. Esbensen. Fusion and fission dynamics of heavy nuclear system / V. Zagrebaev and W. Greiner. Time-dependent potential energy for fusion and fission processes / A. V. Karpov ... [et al.] -- Superheavy elements. Advances in the understanding of structure and production mechanisms for superheavy elements / W. Greiner and V. Zagrebaev. Fission barriers of heaviest nuclei / A. Sobiczewski ... [et al.]. Possibility of synthesizing doubly magic superheavy nuclei / Y Aritomo ... [et al.]. Synthesis of superheavy nuclei in [symbol]Ca-induced reactions / V. K. Utyonkov ... [et al.] -- Fragmentation. Production of neutron-rich nuclei in the nucleus-nucleus collisions around the Fermi energy / M. Veselský. Signals of enlarged core in [symbol]Al / Y. G. Ma ... [et al.] -- Exotic modes. New insight into the fission process from experiments with relativistic heavy-ion beams / K.-H. Schmidt ... [et al.]. New results for the intensity of bimodal fission in binary and ternary spontaneous fission of [symbol]Cf / C. Goodin ... [et al.]. Rare fission modes: study of multi-cluster decays of actinide nuclei / D. V. Kamanin ... [et al.]. Energy distribution of ternary [symbol]-particles in [symbol]Cf(sf) / M. Mutterer ... [et al.]. Preliminary results of experiment aimed at searching for collinear cluster tripartition of

  9. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D. )

    1989-01-01

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  10. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  11. Fusion, fission, and quasi-fission using TDHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, Sait; Oberacker, Volker

    2014-03-01

    We study fusion, fission, and quasi-fission reactions using the time-dependent Hartee-Fock (TDHF) approach together with the density-constrained TDHF method for fusion. The only input is the Skyrme NN interaction, there are no adjustable parameters. We discuss the identification of quasi-fission in 40Ca+238U, the scission dynamics in symmetric fission of 264Fm, as well as calculating heavy-ion interaction potentials V (R) , mass parameters M (R) , and total fusion cross sections from light to heavy systems. Some of the effects naturally included in these calculations are: neck formation, mass exchange, internal excitations, deformation effects, as well as nuclear alignment for deformed systems. Supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER40975.

  12. Cluster aspects of binary fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-04-01

    With the improved scission-point model the mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of different Hg isotopes with even mass numbers A =180, 184, 188, 192, 196, 198. The calculated mass distribution and mean total kinetic energy of fission fragments are in a good agreement with the existing experimental data. The change in the shape of the mass distribution from asymmetric to more symmetric is revealed with increasing A of the fissioning AHg nucleus, and the reactions are proposed to verify this prediction experimentally.

  13. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  14. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  15. Quantum Relaxation in Singlet Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichen, Paul; Eaves, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Singlet fission is a multielectron process in organic chromophores, where an initially excited singlet state decays into two independent triplets. First observed in organic semiconductors almost 40 years ago, the phenomenon may be a promising route for increasing yields in next-generation photovoltaics. Early theories that ignored quantum coherence between excited states were capable of explaining the fission process on nanosecond timescales, but recent observations of fission on sub picosecond timescales call several tenants of those theories into question. We present a theory of optical dephasing and decoherence in singlet fission, drawing on ideas from quantum information theory to establish conditions for decoherence and disentanglement between the relevant quantum states on the picosecond timescale.

  16. Background radiation from fission pulses

    SciTech Connect

    England, T.R.; Arthur, E.D.; Brady, M.C.; LaBauve, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Extensive source terms for beta, gamma, and neutrons following fission pulses are presented in various tabular and graphical forms. Neutron results from a wide range of fissioning nuclides (42) are examined and detailed information is provided for four fuels: /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu; these bracket the range of the delayed spectra. Results at several cooling (decay) times are presented. For ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. spectra, only /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu results are given; fission-product data are currently inadequate for other fuels. The data base consists of all known measured data for individual fission products extensively supplemented with nuclear model results. The process is evolutionary, and therefore, the current base is summarized in sufficient detail for users to judge its quality. Comparisons with recent delayed neutron experiments and total ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. decay energies are included. 27 refs., 47 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Rotation of Nuclei as Observed in Ternary Fission of the Reaction 235U(nth,f) Induced by Polarized Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönnenwein, F.; Gagarski, A.; Guseva, I.; Petrov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Zavarukhkina, T.; Mutterer, M.; Nesvizhevski, V.; Bunakov, V.; Kadmensky, S.

    2007-05-01

    Ternary fission of the standard reaction 235U(nth,f) induced by cold polarized neutrons has been investigated. Fission fragments and light charged particles were recorded in coincidence. Following cold neutron capture the compound nucleus 236U* has spin 3- or 4-. At the saddle point of the fissioning 236U* nucleus these states are collective. They are expected to retain a sizable collectivity down to the scission point. In fact, a collective rotation has been sensed by the shift in the angular distribution of the light charged particles which depends on the orientation of neutron polarization. Direct observation of the rotation of 236U* excited in a cold neutron reaction is reported here for the first time. It is proposed to call the new phenomenon the "ROT-effect".

  18. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  19. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  20. Energy dependence of fission observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paşca, Horia

    2016-01-01

    The mass, charge and isotopic distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reaction 235U+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments. The calculated mass distribution of 238U+n is also compared with experimental data.

  1. Testing in Support of Fission Surface Power System Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, Jim; Pearson, Boise; VanDyke, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    The strategy for qualifying a FSP system could have a significant programmatic impact. The US has not qualified a space fission power system since launch of the SNAP-10A in 1965. This paper explores cost-effective options for obtaining data that would be needed for flight qualification of a fission system. Qualification data could be obtained from both nuclear and non-nuclear testing. The ability to perform highly realistic nonnuclear testing has advanced significantly throughout the past four decades. Instrumented thermal simulators were developed during the 1970s and 1980s to assist in the development, operation, and assessment of terrestrial fission systems. Instrumented thermal simulators optimized for assisting in the development, operation, and assessment of modern FSP systems have been under development (and utilized) since 1998. These thermal simulators enable heat from fission to be closely mimicked (axial power profile, radial power profile, temperature, heat flux, etc.) and extensive data to be taken from the core region. For transient testing, pin power during a transient is calculated based on the reactivity feedback that would occur given measured values of test article temperature and/or dimensional changes. The reactivity feedback coefficients needed for the test are either calculated or measured using cold/warm zero-power criticals. In this way non-nuclear testing can be used to provide very realistic information related to nuclear operation. Non-nuclear testing can be used at all levels, including component, subsystem, and integrated system testing. FSP fuels and materials are typically chosen to ensure very high confidence in operation at design burnups, fluences, and temperatures. However, facilities exist (e.g. ATR, HFIR) for affordably performing in-pile fuel and materials irradiations, if such testing is desired. Ex-core materials and components (such as alternator materials, control drum drives, etc.) could be irradiated in university or DOE

  2. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  3. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed counter

  4. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  5. Singlet exciton fission in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brian J.; Musser, Andrew J.; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H.

    2013-12-01

    Singlet exciton fission, the spin-conserving process that produces two triplet excited states from one photoexcited singlet state, is a means to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells. Although the process through which singlet fission occurs is not well characterized, some local order is thought to be necessary for intermolecular coupling. Here, we report a triplet yield of 200% and triplet formation rates approaching the diffusion limit in solutions of bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)) pentacene. We observe a transient bound excimer intermediate, formed by the collision of one photoexcited and one ground-state TIPS-pentacene molecule. The intermediate breaks up when the two triplets separate to each TIPS-pentacene molecule. This efficient system is a model for future singlet-fission materials and for disordered device components that produce cascades of excited states from sunlight.

  6. Singlet exciton fission in solution.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brian J; Musser, Andrew J; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H

    2013-12-01

    Singlet exciton fission, the spin-conserving process that produces two triplet excited states from one photoexcited singlet state, is a means to circumvent the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells. Although the process through which singlet fission occurs is not well characterized, some local order is thought to be necessary for intermolecular coupling. Here, we report a triplet yield of 200% and triplet formation rates approaching the diffusion limit in solutions of bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl (TIPS)) pentacene. We observe a transient bound excimer intermediate, formed by the collision of one photoexcited and one ground-state TIPS-pentacene molecule. The intermediate breaks up when the two triplets separate to each TIPS-pentacene molecule. This efficient system is a model for future singlet-fission materials and for disordered device components that produce cascades of excited states from sunlight. PMID:24256865

  7. Ternary fission of superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, M.; Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Manimaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ternary fission of superheavy nuclei is studied within the three-cluster model potential energy surfaces (PESs). Due to shell effects, the stability of superheavy nuclei has been predicted to be associated with Z =114 , 120, and 126 for protons and N =184 for neutrons. Taking some representative nuclei we have extended the ternary fission studies to superheavy nuclei. We adopted two minimization procedures to minimize the potential and considered different arrangements of the fragments. The PES from one-dimensional minimization reveals a strong cluster region favoring various ternary breakups for an arrangement in which the lightest fragment is kept at the center. The PES obtained from two-dimensional minimization reveals strong preference of ternary fragmentation in the true ternary fission region. Though the dominant decay mode of superheavy nuclei is α decay, the α -accompanied ternary breakup is found to be a nonfavorable one. Further, the prominent ternary combinations are found to be associated with the neutron magic number.

  8. Interplay between compound and fragments aspects of nuclear fission and heavy-ion reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, Peter; Iwamoto, A; Ichikawa, I

    2010-09-10

    The scission point in nuclear fission plays a special role where one-body system changes to two-body system. Inverse of this situation is realized in heavy-ion fusion reaction where two-body system changes to one body system. Among several peculiar phenomena expected to occur during this change, we focus our attention to the behavior of compound and fragments shell effects. Some aspects of the interplay between compound and fragments shell effect are discussed related to the topics of the fission valleys in the potential energy surface of actinide nuclei and the fusion-like trajectory found in the cold fusion reaction leading to superheavy nuclei.

  9. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  10. Heavy-element fission barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Bengtsson, Ragnar; Uhrenholt, Henrik; Angstromberg, Sven

    2009-06-15

    We present calculations of fission properties for heavy elements. The calculations are based on the macroscopic-microscopic finite-range liquid-drop model with a 2002 parameter set. For each nucleus we have calculated the potential energy in three different shape parametrizations: (1) for 5 009 325 different shapes in a five-dimensional deformation space given by the three-quadratic-surface parametrization, (2) for 10 850 different shapes in a three-dimensional deformation space spanned by {epsilon}{sub 2}, {epsilon}{sub 4}, and {gamma} in the Nilsson perturbed-spheroid parametrization, supplemented by a densely spaced grid in {epsilon}{sub 2}, {epsilon}{sub 3}, {epsilon}{sub 4}, and {epsilon}{sub 6} for axially symmetric deformations in the neighborhood of the ground state, and (3) an axially symmetric multipole expansion of the shape of the nuclear surface using {beta}{sub 2}, {beta}{sub 3}, {beta}{sub 4}, and {beta}{sub 6} for intermediate deformations. For a fissioning system, it is always possible to define uniquely one saddle or fission threshold on the optimum trajectory between the ground state and separated fission fragments. We present such calculated barrier heights for 1585 nuclei from Z=78 to Z=125. Traditionally, actinide barriers have been characterized in terms of a ''double-humped'' structure. Following this custom we present calculated energies of the first peak, second minimum, and second peak in the barrier for 135 actinide nuclei from Th to Es. However, for some of these nuclei which exhibit a more complex barrier structure, there is no unique way to extract a double-humped structure from the calculations. We give examples of such more complex structures, in particular the structure of the outer barrier region near {sup 232}Th and the occurrence of multiple fission modes. Because our complete results are too extensive to present in a paper of this type, our aim here is limited: (1) to fully present our model and the methods for determining the

  11. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  12. Ballistic piston fissioning plasma experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. E.; Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Lalos, G. T.

    1971-01-01

    The production of fissioning uranium plasma samples such that the fission fragment stopping distance is less than the dimensions of the plasma is approached by using a ballistic piston device for the compression of uranium hexafluoride. The experimental apparatus is described. At room temperature the gun can be loaded up to 100 torr UF6 partial pressure, but at compression a thousand fold increase of pressure can be obtained at a particle density on the order of 10 to the 19th power per cu cm. Limited spectral studies of UF6 were performed while obtaining the pressure-volume data. The results obtained and their implications are discussed.

  13. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Carmona, Belén Martínez; Martínez, Jose L. Muñoz

    2016-02-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  14. PRODUCING ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Segre, E.; Kennedy, J.W.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-10-13

    This patent broadly discloses the production of plutonium by the neutron bombardment of uranium to produce neptunium which decays to plutonium, and the fissionability of plutonium by neutrons, both fast and thermal, to produce energy and fission products.

  15. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2012-06-19

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  16. Neutronics for critical fission reactors and subcritical fission in hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    The requirements of future innovative nuclear fuel cycles will focus on safety, sustainability and radioactive waste minimization. Critical fast neutron reactors and sub-critical, external source driven systems (accelerator driven and fusion-fission hybrids) have a potential role to meet these requirements in view of their physics characteristics. This paper provides a short introduction to these features.

  17. Computer program FPIP-REV calculates fission product inventory for U-235 fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. S.; Call, D. W.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates fission product inventories and source strengths associated with the operation of U-235 fueled nuclear power reactor. It utilizes a fission-product nuclide library of 254 nuclides, and calculates the time dependent behavior of the fission product nuclides formed by fissioning of U-235.

  18. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  19. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  20. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  1. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  2. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  3. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking plenty of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  4. Process for treating fission waste. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, C.A.; Wick, O.J.

    1981-11-17

    A method is described for the treatment of fission waste. A glass forming agent, a metal oxide, and a reducing agent are mixed with the fission waste and the mixture is heated. After melting, the mixture separates into a glass phase and a metal phase. The glass phase may be used to safely store the fission waste, while the metal phase contains noble metals recovered from the fission waste.

  5. Superfluid fission dynamics with microscopic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simenel, C.; Scamps, G.; Lacroix, D.; Umar, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progresses in the description of the latter stage of nuclear fission are reported. Dynamical effects during the descent of the potential towards scission and in the formation of the fission fragments are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with dynamical pairing correlations at the BCS level. In particular, this approach is used to compute the final kinetic energy of the fission fragments. Comparison with experimental data on the fission of 258Fm are made.

  6. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  7. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  8. Etching fission tracks in zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.

    1969-01-01

    A new technique has been developed whereby fission tracks can be etched in zircon with a solution of sodium hydroxide at 220??C. Etching time varied between 15 minutes and 5 hours. Colored zircon required less etching time than the colorless varieties.

  9. Space Fission System Test Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, Mike; Schmidt, Glen L.; Van Dyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Martin, James; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Harper, Roger

    2004-02-04

    Space fission technology has the potential to enable rapid access to any point in the solar system. If fission propulsion systems are to be developed to their full potential, however, near-term customers need to be identified and initial fission systems successfully developed, launched, and utilized. One key to successful utilization is to develop reactor designs that are highly testable. Testable reactor designs have a much higher probability of being successfully converted from paper concepts to working space hardware than do designs which are difficult or impossible to realistically test. ''Test Effectiveness'' is one measure of the ability to realistically test a space reactor system. The objective of this paper is to discuss test effectiveness as applied to the design, development, flight qualification, and acceptance testing of space fission systems. The ability to perform highly effective testing would be particularly important to the success of any near-term mission, such as NASA's Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, the first mission under study within NASA's Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program.

  10. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  11. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... These cells produce essential immune system proteins called interferons that respond to a cold virus. The cells ... several degrees below core body temperature, virus-fighting interferons were less able to do their job. The ...

  12. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Williams, Eric; Harper, Roger; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep spare or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start - addressing this issue through proper system design is straightforward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission system. While space fission system were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if Ae are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems.

  13. Tri And Rot Effects In Ternary Fission: What Can Be Learned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gönnenwein, F.; Gagarski, A.; Petrov, G.; Guseva, I.; Zavarukhina, T.; Mutterer, M.; von Kalben, J.; Kopatch, Yu.; Tiourine, G.; Trzaska, W.; Sillanpäa, M.; Soldner, T.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2010-04-01

    Inducing fission by polarized neutrons allows studying subtle effects of the dynamics of the process. In the present experiments ternary fission of 235U and 239Pu was investigated with cold neutrons in the (n,f) reaction at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble. Asymmetries in the emission of ternary particles were discovered by making use of the neutron spin flipping. It was found that two effects are interfering. There is first an asymmetry in the total yields of ternary particles having been called the TRI-effect. Second, it was observed that the angular distributions of ternary particles are shifted back and forth when flipping the neutron spin. This shift was named ROT effect. Guided by trajectory calculations of the three-body decay, the signs and sizes of the ROT effect are interpreted in terms of the K-numbers of the transition states at the saddle point of fission.

  14. Formation of Heavy Compound Nuclei, Their Survival and Correlation with Longtime-Scale Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Yakushev, A.-B.

    2007-05-22

    Fusion of two massive nuclei with formation of super-heavy compound nucleus (CN) is driven by the potential energy gradient, as follows from the analysis of nuclear reaction cross-sections. The conservative energy of the system is deduced in simple approximation using regularized nuclear mass and interaction barrier values. Different reaction for the synthesis of Zc (110-118) nuclei are compared and the favourable conditions are found for fusion of the stable (W-Pt) isotopes with radioactive fission fragment projectiles, like 94Kr or 100Sr. Thus, the cold fusion method can be extended for a synthesis of elements with Z > 113. Survival of the evaporation residue is defined by the neutron-to-fission probability ratio and by the successful emission of gammas at final step of the reaction. Numerical estimates are presented. Fixation of evaporation residue products must correlate with longtime-scale fission and available experimental results are discussed.

  15. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  16. Space Fission Propulsion System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, M.; Van Dyke, M. K.; Godfroy, T. J.; Pedersen, K. W.; Martin, J. J.; Dickens, R.; Williams, E.; Harper, R.; Salvail, P.; Hrbud, I.

    2001-01-01

    The world's first man-made self-sustaining fission reaction was achieved in 1942. Since then fission has been used to propel submarines, generate tremendous amounts of electricity, produce medical isotopes, and provide numerous other benefits to society. Fission systems operate independently of solar proximity or orientation, and are thus well suited for deep space or planetary surface missions. In addition, the fuel for fission systems (enriched uranium) is virtually non-radioactive. The primary safety issue with fission systems is avoiding inadvertent system start. Addressing this issue through proper system design is straight-forward. Despite the relative simplicity and tremendous potential of space fission systems, the development and utilization of these systems has proven elusive. The first use of fission technology in space occurred 3 April 1965 with the US launch of the SNAP-10A reactor. There have been no additional US uses of space fission systems. While space fission systems were used extensively by the former Soviet Union, their application was limited to earth-orbital missions. Early space fission systems must be safely and affordably utilized if we are to reap the benefits of advanced space fission systems. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, working with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, and others, has conducted preliminary research related to a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE). An unfueled core has been fabricated by LANL, and resistance heaters used to verify predicted core thermal performance by closely mimicking heat from fission. The core is designed to use only established nuclear technology and be highly testable. In FY01 an energy conversion system and thruster will be coupled to the core, resulting in an 'end-to-end' nuclear electric propulsion demonstrator being tested using resistance heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. Results of the SAFE test program will be presented. The applicability

  17. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Tovesson, F.; Couture, A.; Duke, D. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Meharchand, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Perdue, B.; Richman, D.; Shields, D.

    2014-09-01

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup.

  18. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the 252Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the 252Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  19. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-29

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the {sup 252}Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the {sup 252}Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  20. Bright fission: singlet fission into a pair of emitting states.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David

    2015-06-01

    This paper reintroduces and explores the generation of two bright states from a single photon via a singlet fission mechanism in organic materials. This particular photophysical process is labeled here as bright fission (BF). The central part of the study is devoted to set the theoretical foundations of BF by discussing possible electronic mechanisms, the role of different excited states with various physical nature, the presence of competing deactivation channels, and the possible requirements for the BF viability. In a second part, some of the properties related to BF are computationally explored in anthracene. The analysis of computed high-lying excited states identifies several optical transitions as good candidates to trigger BF in anthracene. The approximation of excitonic couplings of these high energy levels to other electronic states within the same energy range suggests possible paths to populate electronic configurations potentially able to split in two independent spin singlets, i.e. singlet-singlet states. The study also explores the electronic structure of the energetically lowest singlet-singlet states in anthracene dimers and discusses the presence of charge transfer configurations and their relation to the singlet-singlet manifold. The computational results suggest fast relaxation to the lowest singlet-singlet state, from which the excitonic fission may occur. All in all, the present work aims at motivating to pursue further efforts in the study of the BF process in organic materials. PMID:26575561

  1. Human responses to cold.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    The thermoneutral ambient temperature for naked and resting humans is ca. 27 degrees C. Exposure to cold stimulates cold receptors of the skin which causes cold thermal sensations and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction in skin, arms and legs. Diminished skin and extremity blood flow increases the thermal insulation of superficial tissues more than 300% corresponding to 0.9 clo (0.13 degrees C x m(-2) x W(-1)). With thermoregulatory vasoconstriction/ vasodilatation the body heat balance can be maintained within a range of ca. 4 degrees C, the middle of the range being at ca. 21 degrees C when light clothing is used. Below the thermoneutral zone metabolic heat production (shivering) is stimulated and above the zone starts heat loss by evaporation (sweating). Cold induced vasoconstriction increases blood pressure and viscosity and decreases plasma volume consequently increasing cardiac work. Cold induced hypertensive response can be counteracted by light exercise, while starting heavy work in cold markedly increases blood pressure. Under very cold conditions the sympathetic stimulation opens the anastomoses between arterioles and venules which increases skin temperatures markedly but temporarily, especially in finger tips. Adaptation to cold takes ca. 2 weeks, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful. PMID:17929604

  2. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  3. Quantum nature of ROT and TRI asymmetries in the ternary fission of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2010-08-01

    Effects of T-odd asymmetry in ternary-nuclear-fission reactions induced by polarized cold neutrons are considered within quantum theory. It is shown that the asymmetry coefficient can be expressed in terms of experimental angular distributions of third particles in reactions induced by unpolarized neutrons. The explicit form of this coefficient makes it possible to explain the difference in the magnitudes and signs of the TRI and ROT effects observed experimentally for different targets.

  4. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from 235U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 × 10-5. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to | D n | < 6 × 10-5 at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D α = (170±20) × 10-5. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5° to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 ± 0.20) × 10-4, while at the angle of 67.5° it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt γ-rays.

  5. Fission Properties for R-Process Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Erler, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematics of fission barriers and fission lifetimes for the whole landscape of superheavy elements (SHE), i.e., nuclei with Z 100. The fission lifetimes are also compared with the -decay half-lives. The survey is based on a self-consistent description in terms of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach. Results for various different SHF parametrizations are compared to explore the robustness of the predictions. The fission path is computed by quadrupole constrained SHF. The computation of fission lifetimes takes care of the crucial ingredients of the large-amplitude collective dynamics along the fission path, as self-consistent collective mass and proper quantum corrections. We discuss the different topologies of fission landscapes which occur in the realm of SHE (symmetric versus asymmetric fission, regions of triaxial fission, bimodal fission, and the impact of asymmetric ground states). The explored region is extended deep into the regime of very neutron-rich isotopes as they are expected to be produced in the astrophysical r process.

  6. Fission fusion hybrids- recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2012-03-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power, and can do this at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant- so it could be a nearer term application. For waste incineration, hybrids can burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs) with far fewer hybrid reactors than a comparable system within the realm of fission alone. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for ˜4 times as many LWRs with NO fuel reprocessing. For both waste incineration or fuel production, the most severe kind of nuclear accident- runaway criticality- can be excluded, unlike either fast reactors or typical accelerator based reactors. The proliferation risks for hybrid fuel production are, we strongly believe, far less than any other fuel production method, including today's gas centrifuges. US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ˜ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  7. Technical Application of Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    The chapter is devoted to the practical application of the fission process, mainly in nuclear reactors. After a historical discussion covering the natural reactors at Oklo and the first attempts to build artificial reactors, the fundamental principles of chain reactions are discussed. In this context chain reactions with fast and thermal neutrons are covered as well as the process of neutron moderation. Criticality concepts (fission factor η, criticality factor k) are discussed as well as reactor kinetics and the role of delayed neutrons. Examples of specific nuclear reactor types are presented briefly: research reactors (TRIGA and ILL High Flux Reactor), and some reactor types used to drive nuclear power stations (pressurized water reactor [PWR], boiling water reactor [BWR], Reaktor Bolshoi Moshchnosti Kanalny [RBMK], fast breeder reactor [FBR]). The new concept of the accelerator-driven systems (ADS) is presented. The principle of fission weapons is outlined. Finally, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly covered from mining, chemical isolation of the fuel and preparation of the fuel elements to reprocessing the spent fuel and conditioning for deposit in a final repository.

  8. Cold pool dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  9. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  10. Role of dynamical effects in the formation of T-Odd asymmetries for products of polarized-neutron-induced ternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Titova, L. V.

    2015-07-15

    Basic dynamical effects that accompany the cold-polarized-neutron-induced binary and ternary fission of actinide nuclei and which determine the properties of T -odd asymmetries in angular distributions of various prescission and evaporated light third particles emitted in true and delayed ternary fission are analyzed on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. It is emphasized that effects associated with the conservation of axial symmetry of the fissioning system under study at all stages of its evolution from the formation of neutron resonance states of the fissile compound nucleus to the separation of its fission fragments, including the appearance of zero wriggling vibrations of the cold compound nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point, are of particular importance, the influence of quantum collective rotation of the polarized fissile system on the asymmetry of the angular distribution of both fission fragments and third particles being taken into account. It is shown that the difference in the behavior of the coefficients characterizing the T -odd asymmetries under analysis for the target nuclei being studied can be explained, upon taking into account the interference between the fission amplitudes for the neutron resonance states of fissile compound nuclei, by the difference in the contributions of even and odd components of the amplitudes of angular distributions of third particles to the coefficients in question.

  11. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  12. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis. PMID:23471256

  13. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  14. RECOVERY OF ALUMINUM FROM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Blanco, R.E.; Higgins, I.R.

    1962-11-20

    A method is given for recovertng aluminum values from aqueous solutions containing said values together with fission products. A mixture of Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ and MnO/sub 2/ is added to a solution containing aluminum and fission products. The resulting aluminum-containing supernatant is then separated from the fission product-bearing metal oxide precipitate and is contacted with a cation exchange resin. The aluminum sorbed on the resin is then eluted and recovered. (AEC)

  15. Monte carlo sampling of fission multiplicity.

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Two new methods have been developed for fission multiplicity modeling in Monte Carlo calculations. The traditional method of sampling neutron multiplicity from fission is to sample the number of neutrons above or below the average. For example, if there are 2.7 neutrons per fission, three would be chosen 70% of the time and two would be chosen 30% of the time. For many applications, particularly {sup 3}He coincidence counting, a better estimate of the true number of neutrons per fission is required. Generally, this number is estimated by sampling a Gaussian distribution about the average. However, because the tail of the Gaussian distribution is negative and negative neutrons cannot be produced, a slight positive bias can be found in the average value. For criticality calculations, the result of rejecting the negative neutrons is an increase in k{sub eff} of 0.1% in some cases. For spontaneous fission, where the average number of neutrons emitted from fission is low, the error also can be unacceptably large. If the Gaussian width approaches the average number of fissions, 10% too many fission neutrons are produced by not treating the negative Gaussian tail adequately. The first method to treat the Gaussian tail is to determine a correction offset, which then is subtracted from all sampled values of the number of neutrons produced. This offset depends on the average value for any given fission at any energy and must be computed efficiently at each fission from the non-integrable error function. The second method is to determine a corrected zero point so that all neutrons sampled between zero and the corrected zero point are killed to compensate for the negative Gaussian tail bias. Again, the zero point must be computed efficiently at each fission. Both methods give excellent results with a negligible computing time penalty. It is now possible to include the full effects of fission multiplicity without the negative Gaussian tail bias.

  16. Fission-product retention in HTGR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, F.J.; Kania, M.J.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed.

  17. Interference of fission amplitudes of neutron resonances and T-odd asymmetry for various prescission third particles in the ternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2011-12-15

    Differential cross sections for reactions of the true ternary fission of nuclei that was induced by cold polarized neutrons were constructed with allowance of the effect that Coriolis interaction and the interference between fission amplitudes of neutron resonances excited in fissile nuclei upon incidentneutron capture by target nuclei exerted on angular distributions of prescission third particles (alpha particles, neutrons, or photons). It is shown that T -odd TRI- and ROT-type asymmetries for prescission alpha particles are associated with, respectively, the odd and even components of the Coriolis interaction-perturbed amplitude of angular distributions of particles belonging to the types indicated above. These asymmetries have angular distributions differing from each other and stemming from a nontrivial dependence of these components on the neutron-resonance spins J{sub s} and their projections K{sub s} onto the symmetry axis of the nucleus involved. It is shown that angular distributions of prescission photons and neutrons from reactions of the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by cold polarized neutrons are determined by the effect of Coriolis forces exclusively. Therefore, the emerging T-odd asymmetries have a character of a ROT-type asymmetry and are universal for all target nuclei.

  18. Fission Product Decay Heat Calculations for Neutron Fission of 232Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, P. N.; Hai, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    Precise information on the decay heat from fission products following times after a fission reaction is necessary for safety designs and operations of nuclear-power reactors, fuel storage, transport flasks, and for spent fuel management and processing. In this study, the timing distributions of fission products' concentrations and their integrated decay heat as function of time following a fast neutron fission reaction of 232Th were exactly calculated by the numerical method with using the DHP code.

  19. FISSION PRODUCT REMOVAL FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.H.

    1960-05-10

    The decontamination of organic solvents from fission products and in particular the treatment of solvents that were used for the extraction of uranium and/or plutonium from aqueous acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium are treated. The process broadly comprises heating manganese carbonate in air to a temperature of between 300 and 500 deg C whereby manganese dioxide is formed; mixing the manganese dioxide with the fission product-containing organic solvent to be treated whereby the fission products are precipitated on the manganese dioxide; and separating the fission product-containing manganese dioxide from the solvent.

  20. Primary cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prabodh Chandra; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bera, Mitali

    2011-07-01

    A 4-year-old girl presented with severe pallor and intermittent passage of cola-coloured urine. Routine investigations were suggestive of auto-immune haemolytic anaemia. Red cell agglutination was observed in peripheral smear and patient's serum was positive for cold agglutinins. Thorough work-up ruled out secondary cold agglutinin disease. Patient was treated successfully with corticosteroids. PMID:22315851

  1. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold Sores (HSV-1) KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold Sores (HSV-1) Print A A A Text Size What's in ... person's lips, are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) . But they don't just show ...

  2. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  3. Cold fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  4. A hemi-fission intermediate links two mechanistically distinct stages of membrane fission

    PubMed Central

    Sundborger, Anna C.; Hortelano, Eva Rodriguez; Fuhrmans, Marc; Neumann, Sylvia; Müller, Marcus; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Schmid, Sandra L.; Frolov, Vadim A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion and fission drive all vesicular transport. Although topologically opposite, these reactions pass through the same hemi-fusion/fission intermediate1,2, characterized by a ‘stalk’ in which only the inner monolayers of the two compartments have merged to form a localized non-bilayer connection1-3. Formation of the hemi-fission intermediate requires energy input from proteins catalyzing membrane remodeling; however the relationship between protein conformational rearrangements and hemi-fusion/fission remains obscure. Here we analyzed how the GTPase cycle of dynamin, the prototypical membrane fission catalyst4-6, is directly coupled to membrane remodeling. We used intra-molecular chemical cross-linking to stabilize dynamin in its GDP•AlF4--bound transition-state. In the absence of GTP this conformer produced stable hemi-fission, but failed to progress to complete fission, even in the presence of GTP. Further analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain (PHD) locked in its membrane-inserted state facilitated hemi-fission. A second mode of dynamin activity, fueled by GTP hydrolysis, couples dynamin disassembly with cooperative diminishing of the PHD wedging, thus destabilizing the hemi-fission intermediate to complete fission. Molecular simulations corroborate the bimodal character of dynamin action and indicate radial and axial forces as dominant, although not independent drivers of hemi-fission and fission transformations, respectively. Mirrored in the fusion reaction7-8, the force bimodality might constitute a general paradigm for leakage-free membrane remodeling. PMID:26123023

  5. METHOD FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS EMPLOYING AN OXIDE AS A CARRIER FOR FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Davies, T.H.

    1961-07-18

    Carrier precipitation processes for separating plutonium values from uranium fission products are described. Silicon dioxide or titanium dioxide in a finely divided state is added to an acidic aqueous solution containing hexavalent plutonium ions together with ions of uranium fission products. The supernatant solution containing plutonium ions is then separated from the oxide and the fission products associated therewith.

  6. 242Amm fission cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, J. C.; White, R. M.; Howe, R. E.; Landrum, J. H.; Dougan, R. J.; Dupzyk, R. J.

    1984-06-01

    The neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Amm has been measured over the energy region from 10-3 eV to ~20 MeV in a series of experiments utilizing a linac-produced "white" neutron source and a monoenergetic source of 14.1 MeV neutrons. The cross section was measured relative to that of 235U in the thermal (0.001 to ~3 eV) and high energy (1 keV to ~20 MeV) regions and normalized to the ENDF/B-V 235U(n,f) evaluated cross section. In the resonance energy region (0.5 eV to 10 keV) the neutron flux was measured using thin lithium glass scintillators and the relative cross section thus obtained was normalized to the thermal energy measurement. This procedure allowed a consistency check between the thermal and high energy data. The cross section data have a statistical accuracy of ~0.5% at thermal energies and in the 1-MeV energy region, and a systematic uncertainty of ~5%. We confirmed that 242Amm has the largest thermal fission cross section known with a 2200 m/sec value of 6328 b. Results of a Breit-Wigner sum-of-single-levels analysis of 48 fission resonances up to 20 eV are presented and the connection of these resonance properties to the large thermal cross section is discussed. Our measurements are compared with previously reported results.

  7. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  8. Neutron emission prior to fission

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Gayer, A.; Boissevain, J.; Britt, H.C.; Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.; Grange, P.; Hassani, S.; Weidenmueller, H.A.; Beene, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron emission in the /sup 158/Er composite system is studied in order to investigate particle emission with energy spectrum and angular distribution in excess of statistical model predictions. Data are analyzed using a modified statistical model which incorporates effects due to nuclear dissipation, and also calculates neutron emission during the descent from the saddle to the scission point. Calculations consider the Kramers effect and the Transient effect. It is concluded that a detailed interpretation of enhanced neutron emission preceding fission in compound nucleus reactions is possible, and that an upper limit may be set on the reduced nuclear dissipation coefficient. 5 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  9. Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weather Hazard Heath and Aging Hypothermia: A Cold Weather Hazard What Are The Signs Of Hypothermia? Taking ... cold air. But, not everyone knows that cold weather can also lower the temperature inside your body. ...

  10. Heat transfer in a fissioning uranium plasma reactor cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two schemes are investigated by which a fission-heated uranium plasma located in the central cavity of a test reactor could be insulated to keep its temperature above condensation in a neutron flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/(sq cm)(sec) or less. The first scheme was to use a mirrored cavity wall to reflect the thermal radiation back into the plasma. The second scheme was to seed the transpirational cavity wall coolant so as to make it opaque to thermal radiation, thus insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall. The analysis showed that a mirrored cavity wall must have a reflectivity of over 95 percent or that seeded argon must be used as the wall coolant to give an acceptable operating margin above fuel condensation conditions.

  11. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  12. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: Deformation-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2015-11-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide Pu240 as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate nonadiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behavior. Those beginning just beyond the barrier explore large-amplitude motion but do not fission, whereas those beginning beyond the two-fragment pathway crossing fission to final states which differ according to the exact initial deformation. Conclusions: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock is able to give a good qualitative and quantitative description of fast fission, provided one begins from a sufficiently deformed state.

  13. Spectrum of carbonaceous-chondrite fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Estimations of the fission spectrum in xenon isotopes from the progenitor of the strange carbonaceous-chondrite xenon must take account of p-process nucleosynthesis if the latter is the source of anomalous Xe-124, 126. Sample calculations of the p-process yields illustrate the magnitude of the effect, which can greatly increase the estimated Xe-132 fission yield.

  14. Options for Affordable Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Gaddis, Steve; Porter, Ron; VanDyke, Melissa; Martin Jim; Godfroy, Tom; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Pearson, Boise

    2006-01-01

    Fission surface power systems could provide abundant power anywhere on free surface of the moon or Mars. Locations could include permanently shaded regions on the moon and high latitudes on Mars. To be fully utilized; however, fission surface power systems must be safe, have adequate performance, and be affordable. This paper discusses options for the design and development of such systems.

  15. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  16. Spontaneous fission properties and lifetime systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    Half-lives for spontaneous fission of nuclides with even and odd numbers of particles are compared with recent theoretical calculations. A summary of odd particle hindrance factors is given. The most recent measurements of kinetic-energy and mass distributions and neutron emission for spontaneous fission of the heaviest nuclides are summarized and discussed. 51 refs., 9 figs.

  17. SOURCE OF PRODUCTS OF NUCLEAR FISSION

    DOEpatents

    Harteck, P.; Dondes, S.

    1960-03-15

    A source of fission product recoil energy suitable for use in radiation chemistry is reported. The source consists of thermal neutron irradiated glass wool having a diameter of 1 to 5 microns and containing an isotope fissionable by thermal neutrons, such as U/sup 235/.

  18. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  19. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; Kornilov, N. V.; Lestone, J. P.; Litaize, O.; Morillon, B.; Neudecker, D.; Oberstedt, S.; Ohsawa, T.; et al

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  20. Theoretical Description of the Fission Process

    SciTech Connect

    Witold Nazarewicz

    2009-10-25

    Advanced theoretical methods and high-performance computers may finally unlock the secrets of nuclear fission, a fundamental nuclear decay that is of great relevance to society. In this work, we studied the phenomenon of spontaneous fission using the symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory (DFT). Our results show that many observed properties of fissioning nuclei can be explained in terms of pathways in multidimensional collective space corresponding to different geometries of fission products. From the calculated collective potential and collective mass, we estimated spontaneous fission half-lives, and good agreement with experimental data was found. We also predicted a new phenomenon of trimodal spontaneous fission for some transfermium isotopes. Our calculations demonstrate that fission barriers of excited superheavy nuclei vary rapidly with particle number, pointing to the importance of shell effects even at large excitation energies. The results are consistent with recent experiments where superheavy elements were created by bombarding an actinide target with 48-calcium; yet even at high excitation energies, sizable fission barriers remained. Not only does this reveal clues about the conditions for creating new elements, it also provides a wider context for understanding other types of fission. Understanding of the fission process is crucial for many areas of science and technology. Fission governs existence of many transuranium elements, including the predicted long-lived superheavy species. In nuclear astrophysics, fission influences the formation of heavy elements on the final stages of the r-process in a very high neutron density environment. Fission applications are numerous. Improved understanding of the fission process will enable scientists to enhance the safety and reliability of the nation’s nuclear stockpile and nuclear reactors. The deployment of a fleet of safe and efficient advanced reactors, which will also minimize radiotoxic

  1. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited in availability or intensity. NASA is maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for an affordable fission surface power system. Because affordability drove the determination of the system concept that this technology will make possible, low development and recurring costs result, while required safety standards are maintained. However, an affordable approach to fission surface power also provides the benefits of simplicity, robustness, and conservatism in design. This paper will illuminate the multiplicity of benefits to an affordable approach to fission surface power, and will describe how the foundation for these benefits is being developed and demonstrated in the Exploration Technology Development Program s Fission Surface Power Project.

  2. Systematics of Fission-Product Yields

    SciTech Connect

    A.C. Wahl

    2002-05-01

    Empirical equations representing systematics of fission-product yields have been derived from experimental data. The systematics give some insight into nuclear-structure effects on yields, and the equations allow estimation of yields from fission of any nuclide with atomic number Z{sub F} = 90 thru 98, mass number A{sub F} = 230 thru 252, and precursor excitation energy (projectile kinetic plus binding energies) PE = 0 thru {approx}200 MeV--the ranges of these quantities for the fissioning nuclei investigated. Calculations can be made with the computer program CYFP. Estimates of uncertainties in the yield estimates are given by equations, also in CYFP, and range from {approx} 15% for the highest yield values to several orders of magnitude for very small yield values. A summation method is used to calculate weighted average parameter values for fast-neutron ({approx} fission spectrum) induced fission reactions.

  3. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.; Ivanyuk, F.

    2014-11-01

    The mass asymmetry in the fission of 236U at low excitation energy is clarified by the analysis of the trajectories obtained by solving the Langevin equations for the shape degrees of freedom. It is demonstrated that the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments is determined mainly by the saddle point configuration originating from the shell correction energy. The width of the peaks, on the other hand, results from the shape fluctuations close to the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We have found out that the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes are essential for the fission process. According to our results the fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup, but is accompanied by the fluctuations between elongated and compact shapes. This picture presents a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  4. Event-by-Event Fission with FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J; Vogt, R

    2010-11-09

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. The presentation first discusses the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended up to energies where pre-equilibrium emission becomes significant and one or more neutrons may be emitted prior to fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n,f), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also briefly suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  5. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van der Bliek, Alexander M.; Shen, Qinfang; Kawajiri, Sumihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria continually change shape through the combined actions of fission, fusion, and movement along cytoskeletal tracks. The lengths of mitochondria and the degree to which they form closed networks are determined by the balance between fission and fusion rates. These rates are influenced by metabolic and pathogenic conditions inside mitochondria and by their cellular environment. Fission and fusion are important for growth, for mitochondrial redistribution, and for maintenance of a healthy mitochondrial network. In addition, mitochondrial fission and fusion play prominent roles in disease-related processes such as apoptosis and mitophagy. Three members of the Dynamin family are key components of the fission and fusion machineries. Their functions are controlled by different sets of adaptor proteins on the surface of mitochondria and by a range of regulatory processes. Here, we review what is known about these proteins and the processes that regulate their actions. PMID:23732471

  6. Investigations of fission characteristics and correlation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zeinalov, Sh. S.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Popov, A. B.; Furman, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    We review the experimental results on the P-even and P-odd angular correlations of fission fragments in the fission of the 235U and 239Pu nuclei induced by unpolarized and polarized resonance neutrons, and on the TRI and ROT effects in the ternary and binary fission of actinides induced by polarized thermal neutrons. Also reported are the measured yields of prompt and delayed neutrons per fission event. The experimental data are analyzed within a novel theoretical framework developed by the JINR—RNC KI Collaboration, whereby the reduction of the multidimensional phase space of fission fragments to the JπK-channel space is consistently validated and the role of resonance interference in the observed correlation effects is revealed.

  7. Fifty years with nuclear fission. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-12-31

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ``Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,`` in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  8. Febrile/cold agglutinins

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose certain infections and find the cause of hemolytic anemia (a type of anemia that occurs when red ... or cold agglutinins can help explain why the hemolytic anemia is occurring and direct treatment.

  9. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n+235U above the (n,nf) fission threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Neng-Chuan; Jia, Min; Chen, Yong-Jing; Liu, Ting-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n,xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n,xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n,nf) or (n,2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n,xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n,f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205246, 91126010, U1230127, 91226102), IAEA CRP (15905), and Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (B0120110034)

  10. Overview of fission yeast septation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pilar; Cortés, Juan C G; Martín-García, Rebeca; Ribas, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    Cytokinesis is the final process of the vegetative cycle, which divides a cell into two independent daughter cells once mitosis is completed. In fungi, as in animal cells, cytokinesis requires the formation of a cleavage furrow originated by constriction of an actomyosin ring which is connected to the plasma membrane and causes its invagination. Additionally, because fungal cells have a polysaccharide cell wall outside the plasma membrane, cytokinesis requires the formation of a septum coincident with the membrane ingression. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a unicellular, rod-shaped fungus that has become a popular model organism for the study of actomyosin ring formation and constriction during cell division. Here we review the current knowledge of the septation and separation processes in this fungus, as well as recent advances in understanding the functional interaction between the transmembrane enzymes that build the septum and the actomyosin ring proteins. PMID:27155541

  11. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers.

    PubMed

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B; Chernick, Erin T; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R; Guldi, Dirk M

    2015-04-28

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley-Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  12. Recent Advances in Singlet Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Millicent B.; Michl, Josef

    2013-04-01

    A survey is provided of recent progress in the understanding of singlet fission, a spin-allowed process in which a singlet excited molecule shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor to produce two triplet excited molecules. It has been observed to occur in single-crystal, polycrystalline, and amorphous solids, on timescales from 80 fs to 25 ps, producing triplet yields as high as 200%. Photovoltaic devices using the effect have shown external quantum efficiencies in excess of 100%. Almost all the efficient materials are alternant hydrocarbons of the acene series or their simple derivatives, and it is argued that a wider structural variety would be desirable. The current state of the development of molecular structure design rules, based on first-principles theoretical considerations, is described along with initial examples of implementation.

  13. Singlet fission in pentacene dimers

    PubMed Central

    Zirzlmeier, Johannes; Lehnherr, Dan; Coto, Pedro B.; Chernick, Erin T.; Casillas, Rubén; Basel, Bettina S.; Thoss, Michael; Tykwinski, Rik R.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to supersede the traditional solar energy conversion scheme by means of boosting the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies beyond the 30% Shockley–Queisser limit. Here, we show unambiguous and compelling evidence for unprecedented intramolecular SF within regioisomeric pentacene dimers in room-temperature solutions, with observed triplet quantum yields reaching as high as 156 ± 5%. Whereas previous studies have shown that the collision of a photoexcited chromophore with a ground-state chromophore can give rise to SF, here we demonstrate that the proximity and sufficient coupling through bond or space in pentacene dimers is enough to induce intramolecular SF where two triplets are generated on one molecule. PMID:25858954

  14. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    1979-01-01

    Designed to help teachers deal with students in a cold environment, this article explains cold physiology and fundamental laws of heat; describes 14 common cold injuries and their current treatment; and lists a number of useful teaching techniques for cold environments. (SB)

  15. Teaching in a Cold Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Instructors who teach outdoors in an environment so cold as to cause injury must satisfy program objectives while avoiding cold injury to themselves and students, help students focus on learning instead of discomfort, and alleviate some students' intense fear of the cold. Dealing with the cold successfully requires a thorough knowledge of:…

  16. Membrane Fission: Model for Intermediate Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Membrane budding-fission is a fundamental process generating intracellular carriers of proteins. Earlier works were focused only on formation of coated buds connected to the initial membrane by narrow membrane necks. We present the theoretical analysis of the whole pathway of budding-fission, including the crucial stage where the membrane neck undergoes fission and the carrier separates from the donor membrane. We consider two successive intermediates of the reaction: 1), a constricted membrane neck coming out of aperture of the assembling protein coat, and 2), hemifission intermediate resulting from self-fusion of the inner monolayer of the neck, while its outer monolayer remains continuous. Transformation of the constricted neck into the hemifission intermediate is driven by the membrane stress produced in the neck by the protein coat. Although apparently similar to hemifusion, the fission is predicted to have an opposite dependence on the monolayer spontaneous curvature. Analysis of the further stages of the process demonstrates that in all practically important cases the hemifission intermediate decays spontaneously into two separate membranes, thereby completing the fission process. We formulate the “job description” for fission proteins by calculating the energy they have to deliver and the radii of the protein coat aperture which have to be reached to drive the fission process. PMID:12829467

  17. Fifty years with nuclear fission. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, J.W.; Carlson, A.D.

    1989-12-31

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ``Fifty years with nuclear fission,`` in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  18. Cold moderators at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, up–grading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  19. Singlet fission in reduced dimensions of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichen, Paul; Eaves, Joel

    2014-03-01

    In some molecular systems the decay of an initially excited singlet into two independent triplets, a process called singlet fission, is highly efficient. Organic crystals are among the most promising candidates for increasing yields in next-generation photovoltaics. Although excitons are known to exist in reduced dimensions of crystals the role of dimensionality in the entanglement of two triplets born out of singlet fission remains unclear. We develop a quantum lattice model for singlet fission to examine the role of quantum entanglement and exciton delocalization.

  20. Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B

    2010-01-01

    I describe some high priority research areas in nuclear fission, where applications in nuclear reactor technologies and in modeling criticality in general are demanding higher accuracies in our databases. We focus on fission cross sections, fission neutron spectra, and fission product data.

  1. Recovery and use of fission product noble metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.; Rohmann, C.A.; Perrigo, L.D.

    1980-06-01

    Noble metals in fission products are of strategic value. Market prices for noble metals are rising more rapidly than recovery costs. A promising concept has been developed for recovery of noble metals from fission product waste. Although the assessment was made only for the three noble metal fission products (Rh, Pd, Ru), there are other fission products and actinides which have potential value. (DLC)

  2. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Sean E.; Brown, Forrest B.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  3. The Processes of Fusion-Fission and Quasi-Fission of Superheavy Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; Bogachev, A. A.; Itkis, I. M.; Kliman, J.; Knyazheva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Szilner, S.; Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Trotta, M.; Bouchat, V.; Hanappe, F.; Materna, T.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, C.; Stuttge, L.

    2008-11-01

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions 48Ca + 144,154Sm, 168Er, 208Pb, 238U, 244Pu, 248Cm; 50Ti + 208Pb, 244Pu; 58Fe + 208Pb, 244Pu, 248Cm, and 64Ni + 186W, 242Pu leading to the formation of heavy and super-heavy systems with Z = 82-122 are presented. Cross sections, mass-energy and angular distributions for fission and quasi-fission fragments have been studied at energies close and below the Coulomb barrier. The influence of the reaction entrance channel properties such as mass asymmetry, deformations, neutron excess, shell effects in the interacting nuclei and producing compound nucleus, the mechanism of the fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  4. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock. II. Boost-induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Philip; Stevenson, Paul; Rios, Arnau

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus and the daughter products. Purpose: We explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe induced fission processes, using quadrupole boosts in the nuclide 240Pu as an example. Methods: Following upon the work presented in Goddard et al. [Phys. Rev. C 92, 054610 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.92.054610, quadrupole-constrained Hartree-Fock calculations are used to create a potential energy surface. An isomeric state and a state beyond the second barrier peak are excited by means of instantaneous as well as temporally extended gauge boosts with quadrupole shapes. The subsequent deexcitation is studied in a time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulation, with emphasis on fissioned final states. The corresponding fission fragment mass numbers are studied. Results: In general, the energy deposited by the quadrupole boost is quickly absorbed by the nucleus. In instantaneous boosts, this leads to fast shape rearrangements and violent dynamics that can ultimately lead to fission. This is a qualitatively different process than the deformation-induced fission. Boosts induced within a finite time window excite the system in a relatively gentler way and do induce fission but with a smaller energy deposition. Conclusions: The fission products obtained using boost-induced fission in time-dependent Hartree-Fock are more asymmetric than the fragments obtained in deformation-induced fission or the corresponding adiabatic approaches.

  5. "Cold training" affects rat liver responses to continuous cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Paola; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Di Meo, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Continuous exposure of homeothermic animals to low environmental temperatures elicits physiological adaptations necessary for animal survival, which are associated to higher generation of pro-oxidants in thermogenic tissues. It is not known whether intermittent cold exposure (cold training) is able to affect tissue responses to continuous cold exposure. Therefore, we investigated whether rat liver responses to continuous cold exposure of 2 days are modified by cold training (1h daily for 5 days per week for 3 consecutive weeks). Continuous cold increased liver oxidative metabolism by increasing tissue content of mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial aerobic capacity. Cold training did not affect such parameters, but attenuated or prevented the changes elicited by continuous cold exposure. Two-day cold exposure increased lipid hydroperoxide and protein-bound carbonyl levels in homogenates and mitochondria, whereas cold training decreased such effects although it decreased only homogenate protein damage in control rats. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes GPX and GR and H2O2 production were increased by continuous cold exposure. Despite the increase in GPX and GR activities, livers from cold-exposed rats showed increased susceptibility to in vitro oxidative challenge. Such cold effects were decreased by cold training, which in control rats reduced only H2O2 production and susceptibility to stress. The changes of PGC-1, NRF-1, and NRF-2 expression levels were consistent with those induced by cold exposure and cold training in mitochondrial protein content and antioxidant enzyme activities. However, the mechanisms by which cold training attenuates the effects of the continuous cold exposure remain to be elucidated. PMID:26808664

  6. Massive cold cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015) allows an almost unbiased study of the early phases of star-formation in our Galaxy. Several thousand of the clumps have also distance estimates allowing a mass, and density determination. The nature of Planck clumps varies from IRDCs to tiny nearby cold clouds with masses ranging from one to several tens of thousands solar masses. Some of the clumps are embedded in GMCs, others are isolated. Some are close or even very close to OB associations, while others lay far from any UV luminous objects.The small scale clustering of these objects was studied with the improved Minimum Spanning Tree method of Cartwright & Whitworth identifying groups in 3D space. As a result also massive cold cloud clusters were identified. We analyse the MST structures, and discuss their relation to ongoing and future massive star formation.

  7. Prompt Fission Gamma-ray Spectra and Multiplicities for Various Fissioning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Regnier, David; Serot, Olivier

    The prompt fission gamma spectra (PFGS) and multiplicities (PFGM) are investigated from a Monte Carlo simulation of the fission fragment deexcitation. The fission fragment characteristics are sampled from mass, charge, kinetic energy, spin and parity distributions from experimental data or theoretical models. Initial excitation energy is shared between the two complementary fragments using a mass dependent temperature ratio law and a level density parameter law based on Ignatyuk's prescription. Details can be found elsewhere in the literature. The deexcitation process can be performed with different calculation schemes. The first one is based on a Weisskopf model for neutron evaporation and nuclear transition sampling (from level density and strength function models) for gamma evaporation. In this case, the competition between neutrons and gammas is taken into account by using a spin dependent excitation energy limit under which gamma emission takes place. The second one is based on an Hauser-Feshbach model for neutron/gamma evaporation based on neutron transmission coefficients (from optical model calculations) and the same model as above for gammas. The n/γ competition is then automatically taken into account at the very beginning of the primary fission fragments evaporation process. Fission observables, especially related to prompt fission gammas are presented and discussed for spontaneous fission (252Cf, 240Pu), thermal fission (235U+nth) and fast fission (238U+n1.8MeV). Comparisons with experimental data are shown when available.

  8. Cold-responsive gene regulation during cold acclimation in plants.

    PubMed

    Lissarre, Mickael; Ohta, Masaru; Sato, Aiko; Miura, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    Regulation of the transcriptome is necessary for plants to acquire cold tolerance, and cold induces several genes via a cold signaling pathway. The transcription factors CBF/DREB1 (C-repeat binding factor/dehydration responsive element binding1) and ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression1) have important roles in the regulation of cold-responsive gene expression. ICE1 is post-translationally regulated by ubiquitylation-mediated proteolysis and sumoylation. This mini-review highlights some recent studies on plant cold signaling. The relationships among cold signaling, salicylic acid accumulation and stomatal development are also discussed. PMID:20699657

  9. Porous fission fragment tracks in fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Li Weixing; Ewing, Rodney C.; Wang Lumin; Sun Kai; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Fission tracks caused by the spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U in minerals, as revealed by chemical etching, are extensively used to determine the age and thermal history of Earth's crust. Details of the structure and annealing of tracks at the atomic scale have remained elusive, as the original track is destroyed during chemical etching. By combining transmission electron microscopy with in situ heating, we demonstrate that fission tracks in fluorapatite are actually porous tubes, instead of having an amorphous core, as generally assumed. Direct observation shows thermally induced track fragmentation in fluoapatite, in clear contrast to the amorphous tracks in zircon, which gradually ''fade'' without fragmentation. Rayleigh instability and the thermal emission of vacancies control the annealing of porous fission tracks in fluorapatite.

  10. Charge transfer-mediated singlet fission.

    PubMed

    Monahan, N; Zhu, X-Y

    2015-04-01

    Singlet fission, the splitting of a singlet exciton into two triplet excitons in molecular materials, is interesting not only as a model many-electron problem, but also as a process with potential applications in solar energy conversion. Here we discuss limitations of the conventional four-electron and molecular dimer model in describing singlet fission in crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene. We emphasize the need to consider electronic delocalization, which is responsible for the decisive role played by the Mott-Wannier exciton, also called the charge transfer (CT) exciton, in mediating singlet fission. At the strong electronic coupling limit, the initial excitation creates a quantum superposition of singlet, CT, and triplet-pair states, and we present experimental evidence for this interpretation. We also discuss the most recent attempts at translating this mechanistic understanding into design principles for CT state-mediated intramolecular singlet fission in oligomers and polymers. PMID:25648486

  11. Singlet Fission: From Coherences to Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Piland, Geoffrey B; Burdett, Jonathan J; Dillon, Robert J; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2014-07-01

    Singlet fission, in which an initially excited singlet state spontaneously splits into a pair of triplet excitons, is a process that can potentially boost the efficiency of solar energy conversion. The separate electronic bands in organic semiconductors make them especially useful for dividing a high-energy singlet exciton into a pair of lower-energy triplet excitons. Recent experiments illustrate the role of spin coherence in fission, while kinetic models are used to describe how triplet and singlet states interact on longer time scales. Despite insights gained from recent experiments, the detailed structure and dynamics of the electronic states involved in the initial step of singlet fission remain active areas of investigation. On longer time scales, finding ways to efficiently harvest the triplet excitons will be an important challenge for making devices based on this phenomenon. A full understanding of singlet fission requires consideration of a sequence of photophysical events (decoherence, relaxation, and diffusion) occurring on different time scales. PMID:26279552

  12. Charge Transfer-Mediated Singlet Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, N.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2015-04-01

    Singlet fission, the splitting of a singlet exciton into two triplet excitons in molecular materials, is interesting not only as a model many-electron problem, but also as a process with potential applications in solar energy conversion. Here we discuss limitations of the conventional four-electron and molecular dimer model in describing singlet fission in crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene and tetracene. We emphasize the need to consider electronic delocalization, which is responsible for the decisive role played by the Mott-Wannier exciton, also called the charge transfer (CT) exciton, in mediating singlet fission. At the strong electronic coupling limit, the initial excitation creates a quantum superposition of singlet, CT, and triplet-pair states, and we present experimental evidence for this interpretation. We also discuss the most recent attempts at translating this mechanistic understanding into design principles for CT state-mediated intramolecular singlet fission in oligomers and polymers.

  13. Mechanics of Dynamin-Mediated Membrane Fission

    PubMed Central

    Morlot, Sandrine; Roux, Aurélien

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, membrane compartments are split into two by membrane fission. This ensures discontinuity of membrane containers and thus proper compartmentalization. The first proteic machinery implicated in catalyzing membrane fission was dynamin. Dynamin forms helical collars at the neck of endocytic buds. This structural feature suggested that the helix of dynamin could constrict in order to promote fission of the enclosed membrane. However, verifying this hypothesis revealed itself to be a challenge, which inspired many in vitro and in vivo studies. The primary goal of this review is to discuss recent structural and physical data from biophysical studies that have refined our understanding of the dynamin mechanism. In addition to the constriction hypothesis, other models have been proposed to explain how dynamin induces membrane fission. We present experimental data supporting these various models and assess which model is the most probable. PMID:23541160

  14. The scission point configuration of fissioning nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, Fedir

    2016-06-01

    We define the optimal shape which fissioning nuclei attain just before the scission and calculate the deformation energy as function of the mass asymmetry at the scission point. The calculated deformation energy is used in quasi-static approximation for the estimation of mass distribution, total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments, and the total number of prompt neutrons. The calculated results reproduce rather well the experimental data on the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments, the total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments. The calculated value of neutron multiplicity is somewhat larger than experimental results. The saw-tooth structure of neutron multiplicity is qualitatively reproduced.

  15. Aqueous cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, Walter K.; Googin, John M.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  16. Microscopic description of complex nuclear decay: Multimodal fission

    SciTech Connect

    Staszczak, A.; Baran, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2009-07-15

    Our understanding of nuclear fission, a fundamental nuclear decay, is still incomplete due to the complexity of the process. In this paper, we describe a study of spontaneous fission using the symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory. Our results show that the observed bimodal fission can be explained in terms of pathways in multidimensional collective space corresponding to different geometries of fission products. We also predict a new phenomenon of trimodal spontaneous fission for some rutherfordium, seaborgium, and hassium isotopes.

  17. Microscopic description of complex nuclear decay: Multimodal fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszczak, A.; Baran, A.; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2009-07-01

    Our understanding of nuclear fission, a fundamental nuclear decay, is still incomplete due to the complexity of the process. In this paper, we describe a study of spontaneous fission using the symmetry-unrestricted nuclear density functional theory. Our results show that the observed bimodal fission can be explained in terms of pathways in multidimensional collective space corresponding to different geometries of fission products. We also predict a new phenomenon of trimodal spontaneous fission for some rutherfordium, seaborgium, and hassium isotopes.

  18. Fission rate and transient time with a quantum master equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-12-15

    The induced nuclear fission is considered a transport process over the fission barrier underlying dissipative forces. Using a quantum master equation for the reduced density matrix, the influence of microscopical diffusion coefficients on the total fission time and transient time is studied. The influence of transient effects on the probability of the first-chance fission is estimated. For different temperatures and friction coefficients, the quasistationary fission rate is compared with the analytical Kramers formula.

  19. Hollow fission fragment tracks in fluorapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weixing

    Spontaneous fission of uranium in minerals creates a damaged "track" along the trajectory of the fission fragments. Fission tracks in fluorapatite, enlarged by chemical etching, are widely used in geologic age-dating and the reconstruction of the thermal history of Earth's crust. However, despite this wide spread application, there have been no systematic studies of the internal structure of unetched fission tracks or the atomic-scale process of track annealing. In this research, fission tracks in fluorapatite are demonstrated to be nano-channels instead of amorphous cores as had been assumed. The formation of hollow tracks is ascribed to the highly ionizing energy deposition of fission fragments inducing radiolytic decomposition of fluorapatite accompanied by the loss of volatile elements. The mechanism for thermal annealing of hollow tracks in fluorapatite is shown to be entirely different from that of amorphous tracks in zircon. The discontinuity of fission tracks, in addition to the shrinkage, prevents chemicals from entering into the hollow tracks for further etching, and then significantly reduces the etched length. The shrinkage of hollow fission tracks results from thermo-emission of vacancies or gaseous species from the cavities to surrounding solids instead of atomic-scale recovery of the amorphous core. The high diffusivity of atoms on the surface of hollow tracks causes the discontinuity of tracks either by Rayleigh instability, by Brownian motion, or by preferential motion of track segments. The preferential motion of atoms along c-axis causes more rapid annealing of fission tracks perpendicular to the c-axis. Under the electron beam, the hollow tracks segment into droplets and the track segments randomly move at room temperature or preferentially move along c-axis at high temperatures. The radiolytic annealing results from beam-enhanced diffusion, which is similar to thermally enhanced diffusion. The similarity in the morphology of fission tracks and

  20. Effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles and photons during fission of heavy nuclei by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gagarskii, A. M.; Guseva, I. S.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Mutterer, M.; Kuz'mina, T. E.; Petrov, G. A.; Tyurin, G.; Nesvizhevsky, V.

    2011-12-15

    The new physical effects of T-odd asymmetry of the emission of light charged particles (LCPs) during the ternary fission of some heavy nuclei by cold polarized neutrons have been experimentally studied. The coefficients of triple scalar and vector correlation of the pulses of light particles and fission fragments (TRI effect) and the fivefold correlation of the same vectors (ROT effect) have been measured. These effects are believed to be caused by the rotation of polarized fissioning system around its polarization direction. The treatment of the experimental data for LCPs in the framework of this hypothesis leads to a good agreement between the calculation results and experimental data. The calculated value of the angle of rotation of the fission axis in the ternary fission of the polarized fissioning {sup 236}U* compound nucleus was used to process the results of measuring the ROT effect for {gamma} photons from binary-fission fragments of the same nucleus. A satisfactory description of these experimental data is obtained which serves a convincing confirmation of the rotation hypothesis.

  1. Transport properties of fission product vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1983-07-01

    Kinetic theory of gases is used to calculate the transport properties of fission product vapors in a steam and hydrogen environment. Provided in tabular form is diffusivity of steam and hydrogen, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gaseous mixture, and diffusivity of cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide, diatomic tellurium and tellurium dioxide. These transport properties are required in determining the thermal-hydraulics of and fission product transport in light water reactors.

  2. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane; Allen, Todd

    2013-04-08

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission

  3. MCNP6 Fission Multiplicity with FMULT Card

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Trevor; Fensin, Michael Lorne; Hendricks, John S.; James, Michael R.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2012-06-18

    With the merger of MCNPX and MCNP5 into MCNP6, MCNP6 now provides all the capabilities of both codes allowing the user to access all the fission multiplicity data sets. Detailed in this paper is: (1) the new FMULT card capabilities for accessing these different data sets; (2) benchmark calculations, as compared to experiment, detailing the results of selecting these separate data sets for thermal neutron induced fission on U-235.

  4. Spontaneous fission of 256Rf, new data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V.; Izosimov, I. N.; Isaev, A. V.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Malyshev, O. N.; Popeko, A. G.; Popov, Yu. A.; Sokol, E. A.; Chelnokov, M. L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Andel, B.; Asfari, M. Z.; Gall, B.; Yoshihiro, N.; Kalaninova, Z.; Mullins, S.; Piot, J.; Stefanova, E.; Tonev, D.

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous fission properties of the short-lived neutron-deficient 256Rf nucleus produced in the complete fusion reaction with a beam of multiply charged heavy 50Ti ions from the U-400 cyclotron (FLNR, JINR) are experimentally investigated. Its half-life and decay branching ratio are measured. The average number of neutrons per spontaneous fission of 256Rf (bar v = 4.47 ± 0.09) is determined for the first time.

  5. Accurate Fission Data for Nuclear Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solders, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Accurate fission data for nuclear safety (AlFONS) project aims at high precision measurements of fission yields, using the renewed IGISOL mass separator facility in combination with a new high current light ion cyclotron at the University of Jyväskylä. The 30 MeV proton beam will be used to create fast and thermal neutron spectra for the study of neutron induced fission yields. Thanks to a series of mass separating elements, culminating with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, it is possible to achieve a mass resolving power in the order of a few hundred thousands. In this paper we present the experimental setup and the design of a neutron converter target for IGISOL. The goal is to have a flexible design. For studies of exotic nuclei far from stability a high neutron flux (1012 neutrons/s) at energies 1 - 30 MeV is desired while for reactor applications neutron spectra that resembles those of thermal and fast nuclear reactors are preferred. It is also desirable to be able to produce (semi-)monoenergetic neutrons for benchmarking and to study the energy dependence of fission yields. The scientific program is extensive and is planed to start in 2013 with a measurement of isomeric yield ratios of proton induced fission in uranium. This will be followed by studies of independent yields of thermal and fast neutron induced fission of various actinides.

  6. Spontaneous fission of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-04-01

    Although spontaneous fission was discovered in /sup 238/U in 1940, detailed studies of the process were first made possible in the 1960's with the availability of milligram quantities of /sup 252/Cf. The advent of solid-state detectors made it possible to perform measurements of coincident fission fragments from even very short-lived spontaneous fission activities or those available in only very small quantities. Until 1971 it was believed that the main features of the mass and kinetic-energy distributions were essentially the same as those for thermal neutron-induced fission and that all low-energy fission proceeded via asymmetric mass division with total kinetic energies which could be derived by linear extrapolation from those of lighter elements. In 1971, measurements of /sup 257/Fm showed an increase in symmetric mass division with anomalously high TKE's. Subsequent experiments showed that in /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, the most probable mass split was symmetric with very high total kinetic energy. Measurements for the heavier elements have shown symmetric mass distributions with both high and low total kinetic energies. Recent results for spontaneous fission properties of the heaviest elements are reviewed and compared with theory. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Complete event simulations of nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona

    2015-10-01

    For many years, the state of the art for treating fission in radiation transport codes has involved sampling from average distributions. In these average fission models energy is not explicitly conserved and everything is uncorrelated because all particles are emitted independently. However, in a true fission event, the energies, momenta and multiplicities of the emitted particles are correlated. Such correlations are interesting for many modern applications. Event-by-event generation of complete fission events makes it possible to retain the kinematic information for all particles emitted: the fission products as well as prompt neutrons and photons. It is therefore possible to extract any desired correlation observables. Complete event simulations can be included in general Monte Carlo transport codes. We describe the general functionality of currently available fission event generators and compare results for several important observables. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We acknowledge support of the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development in DOE/NNSA.

  8. The Munich Accelerator for Fission Fragments MAFF

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Gross, M.; Assmann, W.; Beck, L.; Grossmann, R.; Maier, H.-J.; Schumann, M.; Sewtz, M.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Kruecken, R.; Faestermann, T.; Maier-Komor, P.; Nebel, F.; Zech, E.; Hartung, P.; Stoepler, R.; Juettner, Ph.; Tralmer, F.L.

    2005-11-21

    The layout and status of MAFF at the Munich high flux reactor FRM-II is described. At MAFF 1014 fissions/s will be induced by thermal neutrons in a target with approx. 1 g of 235U. The situation is compared to the SPIRAL2 facility where 1014 fissions/s are expected by fast neutron fission in a target containing 5100 g of 238U. A comparison of the yields of SPIRAL2 and MAFF is performed to show the complementarity of the two ISOL-facilities for fission fragments. MAFF has approximately five times the beam intensities of SPIRAL2 for short-lived fission isotopes with lifetimes shorter than 5 s and thus will focus on the most neutron-rich nuclei, while SPIRAL2 has better perspectives for the more intense, less neutron-rich post-accelerated beams.A problem that also deserves attention is the production of {alpha} emitters, in particular plutonium. Here MAFF has the advantage to contain the Pu-producing 238U only as impurity not as the main fissile system. If SPIRAL2 would use 235U instead of 238U this problematic issue could be avoided at the cost of a further reduction in intensity of very neutron-rich fission fragments by a factor of 10. Finally new physics close to the classically doubly-magic nuclei 78Ni and 132Sn is described.

  9. Investigation of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O, f) fission reaction: Mass-energy distributions of fission fragments and their correlation with the gamma-ray multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Rusanov, A. Ya.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Chubarian, G. G.

    2008-06-15

    The mass-energy distributions of fragments originating from the fission of the compound nucleus {sup 226}Th and their correlations with the multiplicity of gamma rays emitted from these fragments are measured and analyzed in {sup 18}O + {sup 208}Pb interaction induced by projectile oxygen ions of energy in the range E{sub lab} = 78-198.5 MeV. Manifestations of an asymmetric fission mode, which is damped exponentially with increasing E{sub lab}, are demonstrated. Theoretical calculations of fission valleys reveal that only two independent valleys, symmetric and asymmetric, exist in the vicinity of the scission point. The dependence of the multiplicity of gamma rays emitted from both fission fragments on their mass, M{sub {gamma}}(M), has a complicated structure and is highly sensitive to shell effects in both primary and final fragments. A two-component analysis of the dependence M{sub {gamma}}(M) shows that the asymmetric mode survives in fission only at low partial-wave orbital angular momenta of compound nuclei. It is found that, for all E{sub lab}, the gamma-ray multiplicity M{sub {gamma}}as a function of the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fragments, M{sub {gamma}}(TKE), decreases linearly with increasing TKE. An analysis of the energy balance in the fission process at the laboratory energy of E{sub lab} = 78 MeV revealed the region of cold fission of fragments whose total kinetic energy is TKE {approx}Q{sub max}.

  10. Heating up cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Stone, Marvin J

    2010-10-28

    In this issue of Blood, Berentsen and coworkers describe a high response rate which is durable in some patients who receive combination fludarabine and rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD). If confirmed, this is a significant advance in therapy for a frequently difficult clinical problem. PMID:21030565

  11. Cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Paul L; Hegerova, Livia T; Gertz, Morie A

    2013-08-15

    Cold agglutinin disease is a rare and poorly understood disorder affecting 15% of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We reviewed the clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, and management in the literature and describe our institutional experience to improve strategies for accurate diagnosis and treatment. Retrospective analysis identified 89 patients from our institution with cold agglutinin disease from 1970 through 2012. Median age at symptom onset was 65 years (range, 41 to 83 years), whereas the median age at diagnosis was 72 years (range, 43 to 91 years). Median survival of all patients was 10.6 years, and 68 patients (76%) were alive 5 years after the diagnosis. The most common symptom was acrocyanosis (n = 39 [44%]), and many had symptoms triggered by cold (n = 35 [39%]) or other factors (n = 20 [22%]). An underlying hematologic disorder was detected in 69 patients (78%). Thirty-six patients (40%) received transfusions during their disease course, and 82% received drug therapy. Rituximab was associated with the longest response duration (median, 24 months) and the lowest proportion of patients needing further treatment (55%). Our institution's experience and review of the literature confirms that early diagnostic evaluation and treatment improves outcomes in cold agglutinin disease. PMID:23757733

  12. Out in the cold.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-01

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet. PMID:27154099

  13. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  14. Cold Facts about Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pea, Celeste; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of scientific concepts and skills. Describes a mini-unit around the cold in which students can relate humans to viruses. Includes activities and a modified simulation that provides questions to guide students. Discusses ways that allows students to apply prior knowledge, take ownership…

  15. Breeding Cold Hardy Begonias

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hardy begonia cultivars have potential as a new crop for Southern nurseries. Current begonia breeding efforts are focused on sections Begonia and Pritzelia. Diverse begonia germplasm has been collected to study fertility and hardiness.To date cold hardy germplasm which has produced viable seeds inc...

  16. Recent Cold War Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  17. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one man for another, and the place…

  18. Titanium Cold Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaja, Jihane; Goldbaum, Dina; Chromik, Richard; Yue, Stephen; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Wong, Wilson; Irissou, Eric; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    Titanium Cold Spray Coatings Cold Spray is an emerging technology used for the deposition of coatings for many industries including aerospace. This technique allows the deposition of metallic materials at low temper-atures below their melting point. The aim of this research was to develop a test technique that can measure the degree to which a cold spray coating achieves mechanical properties similar to a traditional bulk material. Vickers hardness testing and nanoindentation were used as micro-and nano-scale measurement techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of titanium coatings, deposited at different deposition conditions, and bulk Ti. The mechanical properties of bulk titanium and titanium coatings were measured over a range of length scales, with the indentation size effect examined with Meyer's law. Hardness measurements are shown to be affected by material porosity, microstructure and coating particle bonding mechanism. Hard-ness measurements showed that Ti coatings deposited at higher gas pressures and temperatures demonstrate an indentation load response similar to bulk Ti. Key words: titanium, cold spray, Vickers hardness, nanoindentation, indentation size effect, microstructure, mechanical properties

  19. Diffraction by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, F.; Gomer, V.; Schadwinkel, H.; Ueberholz, B.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed diffraction of a laser probe beam by a trapped sample of cold atoms. The effect is only visible in the vicinity of a resonance line. The observed diffraction pattern arises from interference of the incident and scattered light wave, allowing reconstruction of geometric properties of the trapped sample from the holographic record.

  20. Expert Cold Structure Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  1. Cold War Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly discusses the development of Cold War propaganda in the United States, Canada, and the USSR after 1947. Presents two movie reviews and a Canadian magazine advertisement of the period which illustrate the harshness of propaganda used by both sides in the immediate postwar years. (GEA)

  2. Event-by-event fission simulation code, generates complete fission events

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-01

    FREYA is a computer code that generates complete fission events. The output includes the energy and momentum of these final state particles: fission products, prompt neutrons and prompt photons. The version of FREYA that is to be released is a module for MCNP6.

  3. Thermoregulatory modeling for cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojiang; Tikuisis, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Modeling for cold stress has generated a rich history of innovation, has exerted a catalytic influence on cold physiology research, and continues to impact human activity in cold environments. This overview begins with a brief summation of cold thermoregulatory model development followed by key principles that will continue to guide current and future model development. Different representations of the human body are discussed relative to the level of detail and prediction accuracy required. In addition to predictions of shivering and vasomotor responses to cold exposure, algorithms are presented for thermoregulatory mechanisms. Various avenues of heat exchange between the human body and a cold environment are reviewed. Applications of cold thermoregulatory modeling range from investigative interpretation of physiological observations to forecasting skin freezing times and hypothermia survival times. While these advances have been remarkable, the future of cold stress modeling is still faced with significant challenges that are summarized at the end of this overview. PMID:24944030

  4. Prescription Drugs and Cold Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Email Facebook Twitter What is Prescription Drug Abuse: ... treatment of addiction. Read more Safe Disposal of Medicines Disposal of Unused Medicines: What You Should Know ( ...

  5. Imaging with cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-09-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 Å). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects—choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  6. Health problems in cold work.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Tiina M; Hassi, Juhani

    2009-07-01

    Cold in- and outdoor work can result in different adverse effects on human health. Health problems decrease performance and work productivity and increase the occurrence of accidents and injuries. Serious health problems can also result in absence from work due to sick leave or hospitalization. At its worst, work in cold conditions could be associated with deaths due to cold-related accidents or a sudden health event. Musculoskeletal complaints, like pain, aches etc. are common in indoor cold work. Breathing cold air while working may lead to respiratory symptoms, which can decrease performance in cold. The symptoms are usually worsened by exercise and ageing, being more common in persons having a respiratory disease. Cardiovascular complaints and related performance decrements could be especially pronounced during work in cold weather and involving physical exercise, especially among those with an underlying cardiovascular disease. The article also reviews the current information related to diabetes, skin disorders and diseases, as well as cold injuries and accidents occurring in cold work. Increasing awareness and identifying workplace- and individual-related cold risks is the first step in proper cold risk management. Following this, the susceptible population groups need customized advice on proper prevention and protection in cold work. PMID:19531906

  7. Human whole body cold adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  8. Remedies for Common Cold Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Penny F.

    1991-01-01

    Individuals suffering from intolerable symptoms of the common cold can now be advised of safe and effective products for symptomatic relief. This article describes and discusses four categories of drugs used to treat the common cold. To simplify the product selection process for family physicians, suggestions are included for possible ingredients for treatments of specific cold symptoms. PMID:21234087

  9. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  10. Testing in Support of Space Fission System Development and Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Garber, Anne; Godfrey, Tom; Martin, Jim; Pearson, Boise; Webster, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    Extensive data would be required for the qualification of a fission surface power (FSP) system. The strategy for qualifying a FSP system could have a significant programmatic impact. This paper explores potential options that could be used for qualifying FSP systems, including cost-effective means for obtaining required data. three methods for obtaining qualification data are analysis, non-nuclear testing, and nuclear testing. It has been over 40 years since the US qualified a space reactor for launch. During that time, advances have been made related to all three methods. Perhaps the greatest advancement has occurred in the area of computational tools for design and analysis. Tools that have been developed, coupled with modem computers, would have a significant impact on a FSP qualification. This would be especially true for systems with materials and fuels operating well within temperature, irradiation damage, and burnup limits. The ability to perform highly realistic non-nuclear testing has also advanced throughout the past four decades. Instrumented thermal simulators were developed during the 1970s and 1980s to assist in the development, operation, and assessment of terrestrial fission systems. Instrumented thermal simulators optimized for assisting in the development, operation, and assessment of modem FSP systems have been under development (and utilized) since 1998. These thermal simulators enable heat from fission to be closely mimicked (axial power profile, radial power profile, temperature, heat flux, etc.} and extensive data to be taken from the core region. Both steady-state and transient operation can be tested. For transient testing, reactivity feedback is calculated (or measured in cold/warm criticals) based on reactor temperature and/or dimensional changes. Pin power during a transient is then calculated based on the reactivity feedback that would occur given measured values of temperature and/or dimensional change. In this way nonnuclear testing

  11. T-odd angular correlations in the emission of prompt gamma rays and neutrons in nuclear fission induced by polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    Study of the T-odd three-vector correlation in the emission of prompt neutrons from {sup 235}U fission by polarized cold neutrons has been continued at the facility MEPHISTO of the FRM II reactor (Technical University of Munich). The sought correlation was not found within experimental error of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. The upper limit for the asymmetry coefficient has been set to vertical bar D{sub n} vertical bar < 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} at 99% confidence level, whereas for ternary fission correlation coefficient D{sub {alpha}} = (170{+-}20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. This limit casts doubt on a model that explains the three-vector correlation in ternary fission by the Coriolis mechanism. At the same time, five-vector correlation in the emission of prompt fission neutrons has been measured, which describes the rotation of the fissioning nucleus at the moment it breaks (ROT effect). At the angle 22.5 Degree-Sign to the fission axis, the correlation coefficient was found to be (1.57 {+-} 0.20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, while at the angle of 67.5 Degree-Sign it is zero within the experimental uncertainty. The existence of ROT effect in the emission of prompt fission neutrons can be explained by the anisotropy of neutron emission in the rest frame of the fragment (fission fragments are aligned with respect to the axis of deformation of the fissioning nucleus), similar to the mechanism of ROT effect in the emission of prompt {gamma}-rays.

  12. Options For Development of Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houta, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include high specific power continuous impulse propulsion systems and bimodal nuclear thermal rockets. Despite their tremendous potential for enhancing or enabling deep space and planetary missions, to date space fission system have only been used in Earth orbit. The first step towards utilizing advanced fission propulsion systems is development of a safe, near-term, affordable fission system that can enhance or enable near-term missions of interest. An evolutionary approach for developing space fission propulsion systems is proposed.

  13. When blood runs cold: cold agglutinins and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Findlater, Rhonda R; Schnell-Hoehn, Karen N

    2011-01-01

    Cold agglutinins are particular cold-reactive antibodies that react with red blood cells when the blood temperature drops below normal body temperature causing increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping. Most individuals with cold agglutinins are not aware of their presence, as these antibodies have little effect on daily living, often necessitating no treatment. However, when those with cold agglutinins are exposed to hypothermic situations or undergo procedures such as cardiopulmonary bypass with hypothermia during cardiac surgery, lethal complications of hemolysis, microvascular occlusion and organ failure can occur. By identifying those suspected of possessing cold agglutinins through a comprehensive nursing assessment and patient history, cold agglutinin screening can be performed prior to surgery to determine a diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease. With a confirmed diagnosis of cold agglutinin disease, the plan of care can be focused on measures to maintain the patient's blood temperature above the thermal amplitude throughout their hospitalization including the use of normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with warm myocardial preservation techniques to prevent these fatal complications. Using a case report approach, the authors review the mechanism, clinical manifestations, detection and nursing management of a patient with cold agglutinins undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery. Cold agglutinin disease is rare. However, the risk to patients warrants an increased awareness of cold agglutinins and screening for those who are suspected of carrying these antibodies. PMID:21630629

  14. Correlation of recent fission product release data

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, T.S.; Lorenz, R.A.; Nakamura, T.; Osborne, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    For the calculation of source terms associated with severe accidents, it is necessary to model the release of fission products from fuel as it heats and melts. Perhaps the most definitive model for fission product release is that of the FASTGRASS computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory. There is persuasive evidence that these processes, as well as additional chemical and gas phase mass transport processes, are important in the release of fission products from fuel. Nevertheless, it has been found convenient to have simplified fission product release correlations that may not be as definitive as models like FASTGRASS but which attempt in some simple way to capture the essence of the mechanisms. One of the most widely used such correlation is called CORSOR-M which is the present fission product/aerosol release model used in the NRC Source Term Code Package. CORSOR has been criticized as having too much uncertainty in the calculated releases and as not accurately reproducing some experimental data. It is currently believed that these discrepancies between CORSOR and the more recent data have resulted because of the better time resolution of the more recent data compared to the data base that went into the CORSOR correlation. This document discusses a simple correlational model for use in connection with NUREG risk uncertainty exercises. 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Singlet fission in linear chains of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, Francesco; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    We develop a model configuration interaction Hamiltonian to study the electronic structure of a chain of molecules undergoing singlet fission. We first consider models for dimer and trimer and then we use a matrix partitioning technique to build models of arbitrary size able to describe the relevant electronic structure for singlet fission in linear aggregates. We find that the multi-excitonic state (ME) is stabilized at short inter-monomer distance and the extent of this stabilization depends upon the size of orbital coupling between neighboring monomers. We also find that the coupling between ME states located on different molecules is extremely small leading to bandwidths in the order of ˜10 meV. This observation suggests that multi-exciton states are extremely localized by electron-phonon coupling and that singlet fission involves the transition between a relatively delocalized Frenkel exciton and a strongly localized multi-exciton state. We adopt the methodology commonly used to study non-radiative transitions to describe the singlet fission dynamics in these aggregates and we discuss the limit of validity of the approach. The results indicate that the phenomenology of singlet fission in molecular crystals is different in many important ways from what is observed in isolated dimers.

  16. Singlet fission in linear chains of molecules.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Francesco; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-11-28

    We develop a model configuration interaction Hamiltonian to study the electronic structure of a chain of molecules undergoing singlet fission. We first consider models for dimer and trimer and then we use a matrix partitioning technique to build models of arbitrary size able to describe the relevant electronic structure for singlet fission in linear aggregates. We find that the multi-excitonic state (ME) is stabilized at short inter-monomer distance and the extent of this stabilization depends upon the size of orbital coupling between neighboring monomers. We also find that the coupling between ME states located on different molecules is extremely small leading to bandwidths in the order of ∼10 meV. This observation suggests that multi-exciton states are extremely localized by electron-phonon coupling and that singlet fission involves the transition between a relatively delocalized Frenkel exciton and a strongly localized multi-exciton state. We adopt the methodology commonly used to study non-radiative transitions to describe the singlet fission dynamics in these aggregates and we discuss the limit of validity of the approach. The results indicate that the phenomenology of singlet fission in molecular crystals is different in many important ways from what is observed in isolated dimers. PMID:25429953

  17. Singlet fission in linear chains of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Francesco E-mail: A.Troisi@warwick.ac.uk; Troisi, Alessandro E-mail: A.Troisi@warwick.ac.uk

    2014-11-28

    We develop a model configuration interaction Hamiltonian to study the electronic structure of a chain of molecules undergoing singlet fission. We first consider models for dimer and trimer and then we use a matrix partitioning technique to build models of arbitrary size able to describe the relevant electronic structure for singlet fission in linear aggregates. We find that the multi-excitonic state (ME) is stabilized at short inter-monomer distance and the extent of this stabilization depends upon the size of orbital coupling between neighboring monomers. We also find that the coupling between ME states located on different molecules is extremely small leading to bandwidths in the order of ∼10 meV. This observation suggests that multi-exciton states are extremely localized by electron-phonon coupling and that singlet fission involves the transition between a relatively delocalized Frenkel exciton and a strongly localized multi-exciton state. We adopt the methodology commonly used to study non-radiative transitions to describe the singlet fission dynamics in these aggregates and we discuss the limit of validity of the approach. The results indicate that the phenomenology of singlet fission in molecular crystals is different in many important ways from what is observed in isolated dimers.

  18. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  19. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  20. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  1. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  2. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aide researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials. Details of these current technologies will be provided along with operational experience gained to date. With shuttle retirement looming, NASA has protected the capability to provide a temperature controlled environment during transportation to and from the ISS with the use of Glacier and Coldbags, which are compatible with future commercial vehicles including SpaceX's Dragon Capsule, and Orbital s Cygnus vehicle. This paper will discuss the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  3. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  4. Event-by-Event Fission Modeling of Prompt Neutrons and Photons from Neutron-Induced and Spontaneous Fission with FREYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Jorgen

    2013-04-01

    The event-by-event fission Monte Carlo code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events. Using FREYA, it is possible to obtain the fission products as well as the prompt neutrons and photons emitted during the fission process, all with complete kinematic information. We can therefore extract any desired correlation observables. Concentrating on ^239Pu(n,f), ^240Pu(sf) and ^252Cf(sf), we compare our FREYA results with available data on prompt neutron and photon emission and present predictions for novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  5. Quantitative Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Bipentacenes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Samuel N; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B; Trinh, M Tuan; Choi, Bonnie; Xia, Jianlong; Taffet, Elliot J; Low, Jonathan Z; Miller, John R; Roy, Xavier; Zhu, X-Y; Steigerwald, Michael L; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Campos, Luis M

    2015-07-22

    Singlet fission (SF) has the potential to significantly enhance the photocurrent in single-junction solar cells and thus raise the power conversion efficiency from the Shockley-Queisser limit of 33% to 44%. Until now, quantitative SF yield at room temperature has been observed only in crystalline solids or aggregates of oligoacenes. Here, we employ transient absorption spectroscopy, ultrafast photoluminescence spectroscopy, and triplet photosensitization to demonstrate intramolecular singlet fission (iSF) with triplet yields approaching 200% per absorbed photon in a series of bipentacenes. Crucially, in dilute solution of these systems, SF does not depend on intermolecular interactions. Instead, SF is an intrinsic property of the molecules, with both the fission rate and resulting triplet lifetime determined by the degree of electronic coupling between covalently linked pentacene molecules. We found that the triplet pair lifetime can be as short as 0.5 ns but can be extended up to 270 ns. PMID:26102432

  6. Solution-processable singlet fission photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Bayliss, Sam L; Böhm, Marcus L; Broch, Katharina; Greenham, Neil C; Friend, Richard H; Ehrler, Bruno

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful incorporation of a solution-processable singlet fission material, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), into photovoltaic devices. TIPS-pentacene rapidly converts high-energy singlet excitons into pairs of triplet excitons via singlet fission, potentially doubling the photocurrent from high-energy photons. Low-energy photons are captured by small-bandgap electron-accepting lead chalcogenide nanocrystals. This is the first solution-processable singlet fission system that performs with substantial efficiency with maximum power conversion efficiencies exceeding 4.8%, and external quantum efficiencies of up to 60% in the TIPS-pentacene absorption range. With PbSe nanocrystal of suitable bandgap, its internal quantum efficiency reaches 170 ± 30%. PMID:25517654

  7. Lunar surface fission power supplies: Radiation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Lee, S.K.

    1994-07-01

    A lunar space fission power supply shield that uses a combination of lunar regolith and materials brought from earth may be optimal for early lunar outposts and bases. This type of shield can be designed such that the fission power supply does not have to be moved from its landing configuration, minimizing handling and required equipment on the lunar surface. Mechanisms for removing heat from the lunar regolith are built into the shield, and can be tested on earth. Regolith activation is greatly reduced compared with a shield that uses only regolith, and it is possible to keep the thermal conditions of the fission power supply close to these seen in free space. For a well designed shield, the additional mass required to be brought fro earth should be less than 1000 kg. Detailed radiation transport calculations confirm the feasibility of such a shield.

  8. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  9. METHOD OF MAKING JACKETED FISSIONABLE SLUG

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1959-02-10

    BS>A method is described for fabricating a jacketed fissionable body or slug to provide an effective leak-proof seal between the jacket and the end closure. A housing for the fissionable slug is first formed and then tinned on the interior. The fissionable slug is coated on its exterior surface with the same material used to tin the interior of the housing. The coated slug is then inserted into the housing. A disc shaped end closure for the housing, coated with the tinning material, is inserted into the open end of the housing while the tinning material is still liquid. The end of the housing is then swaged into good contact with the periphery of the closure.

  10. Molecular control of fission yeast cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sergio A; Paoletti, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Cytokinesis gives rise to two independent daughter cells at the end of the cell division cycle. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as one of the most powerful systems to understand how cytokinesis is controlled molecularly. Like in most eukaryotes, fission yeast cytokinesis depends on an acto-myosin based contractile ring that assembles at the division site under the control of spatial cues that integrate information on cell geometry and the position of the mitotic apparatus. Cytokinetic events are also tightly coordinated with nuclear division by the cell cycle machinery. These spatial and temporal regulations ensure an equal cleavage of the cytoplasm and an accurate segregation of the genetic material in daughter cells. Although this model system has specificities, the basic mechanisms of contractile ring assembly and function deciphered in fission yeast are highly valuable to understand how cytokinesis is controlled in other organisms that rely on a contractile ring for cell division. PMID:26806637

  11. Landau-Zener effect in fission

    SciTech Connect

    Mirea, M.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.; Bacri, C. O.; Bobulescu, R. C.

    2007-12-15

    A model that takes into account the Landau-Zener promotion mechanism during fission was developed recently. The structures observed in the subthreshold neutron-induced fission of {sup 232}Th are investigated employing this model. Theoretical single-particle excitations of a phenomenological two-humped barrier are determined by solving a system of coupled differential equations for the motion along the optimal fission path. A rather good agreement with experimental data is obtained using a small number of independent parameters. It is predicted that the structure at 1.4 and 1.6 MeV is mainly dominated by a spin 3/2 partial cross section with a small admixture of spin 1/2, while the structure at 1.7 MeV is given by a large partial cross section of spin 5/2.

  12. Coincident measurements of prompt fission γ rays and fission fragments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, C. L.; Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J.; Kawano, T.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.

    2015-10-01

    Modern statistical approaches to modeling fission involve the calculation of not only average quantities but also fully correlated distributions of all fission products. Applications such as those involving the detection of special nuclear materials also rely on fully correlated data of fission products. Experimental measurements of correlated data are thus critical to the validation of theory and the development of important applications. The goal of this experiment was to measure properties of prompt fission gamma-ray emission as a function of fission fragments' total kinetic energy in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The measurement was carried out at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE), a 4 π γ-ray calorimeter. A prototype design consisting of two silicon detectors was installed in the center of DANCE, allowing simultaneous measurement of fission fragments and γ rays. Effort has been taken to simulate fragment kinetic energy losses as well as γ-ray attenuation in DANCE using such tools as GEANT4 and SRIM. Theoretical predictions generated by the code CGMF were also incorporated as input for these simulations. Results from the experiment and simulations will be presented, along with plans for future measurements.

  13. Low-mass fission detector for the fission neutron spectrum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Haight, R C; Lee, H Y

    2010-10-20

    For the fission neutron spectrum measurement, the neutron energy is determined in a time-of-flight experiment by the time difference between the fission event and detection of the neutron. Therefore, the neutron energy resolution is directly determined by the time resolution of both neutron and fission detectors. For the fission detection, the detector needs not only a good timing response but also the tolerance of radiation damage and high {alpha}-decay rate. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to particles, which is important for experiments with - emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. In the following sections, the description will be given for the design and performance of a new low-mass PPAC for the fission-neutron spectrum measurements at LANL.

  14. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  15. Dynamic fission instability of dissipative protoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Mizuno, H.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and numerical approaches are taken to consider if a rapidly rotating, viscous protoearth would have lost mass by a fission process and thereby given birth to the moon. The fast rotation is assumed as the source of the instability in the dissipative liquid protoearth. Governing hydrodynamic equations are defined for the evolution of the protoearth. Account is taken of viscous dissipation, the pressure equation of state for the atmospheric material sent on a ballistic trajectory, and the effective viscosity. The results indicate that dynamic fission was probably not the process by which the protomoon came into existence.

  16. Italian hybrid and fission reactors scenario analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ciotti, M.; Manzano, J.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-06-19

    Italy is a country where a long tradition of studies both in the fission and fusion field is consolidated; nevertheless a strong public opinion concerned with the destination of the Spent Nuclear Fuel hinders the development of nuclear power. The possibility to a severe reduction of the NSF mass generated from a fleet of nuclear reactors employing an hypothetical fusionfission hybrid reactor has been investigated in the Italian framework. The possibility to produce nuclear fuel for the fission nuclear reactors with the hybrid reactor was analyzed too.

  17. Fission Yeast Cell Cycle Synchronization Methods.

    PubMed

    Tormos-Pérez, Marta; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells can be synchronized by cell cycle arrest and release or by size selection. Cell cycle arrest synchronization is based on the block and release of temperature-sensitive cell cycle mutants or treatment with drugs. The most widely used approaches are cdc10-129 for G1; hydroxyurea (HU) for early S-phase; cdc25-22 for G2, and nda3-KM311 for mitosis. Cells can also be synchronized by size selection using centrifugal elutriation or a lactose gradient. Here we describe the methods most commonly used to synchronize fission yeast cells. PMID:26519320

  18. In-beam Fission Study at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa

    2013-12-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions were measured in heavy-ion induced fissions using 238U target nucleus. The measured mass distributions changed drastically with incident energy. The results are explained by a change of the ratio between fusion and quasifission with nuclear orientation. A calculation based on a fluctuation dissipation model reproduced the mass distributions and their incident energy dependence. Fusion probability was determined in the analysis. Evaporation residue cross sections were calculated with a statistical model in the reactions of 30Si + 238U and 34S + 238U using the obtained fusion probability in the entrance channel. The results agree with the measured cross sections for seaborgium and hassium isotopes.

  19. Italian hybrid and fission reactors scenario analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, M.; Manzano, J.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-06-01

    Italy is a country where a long tradition of studies both in the fission and fusion field is consolidated; nevertheless a strong public opinion concerned with the destination of the Spent Nuclear Fuel hinders the development of nuclear power. The possibility to a severe reduction of the NSF mass generated from a fleet of nuclear reactors employing an hypothetical fusionfission hybrid reactor has been investigated in the Italian framework. The possibility to produce nuclear fuel for the fission nuclear reactors with the hybrid reactor was analyzed too.

  20. Fission-gas release from uranium nitride at high fission rate density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    A sweep gas facility has been used to measure the release rates of radioactive fission gases from small UN specimens irradiated to 8-percent burnup at high fission-rate densities. The measured release rates have been correlated with an equation whose terms correspond to direct recoil release, fission-enhanced diffusion, and atomic diffusion (a function of temperature). Release rates were found to increase linearly with burnups between 1.5 and 8 percent. Pore migration was observed after operation at 1550 K to over 6 percent burnup.

  1. Fission barriers in a macroscopic-microscopic model

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolski, A.; Pomorski, K.; Bartel, J.

    2007-02-15

    In the framework of the macroscopic-microscopic model, this study investigates fission barriers in the region of actinide nuclei. A very effective four-dimensional shape parametrization for fissioning nuclei is proposed. Taking, in particular, the left-right mass asymmetric and nonaxial shapes into account is demonstrated to have a substantial effect on fission barrier heights. The influence of proton versus neutron deformation differences on the potential energy landscape of fissioning nuclei is also discussed.

  2. Structure of matter, radioactivity, and nuclear fission. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes structure of matter (what is matter, forces holding atoms together, visualizing the atom, the chemical elements, atomic symbols, isotopes, radiation from the atom), radioactivity (what holds the nucleus together, can one element change into another element, radiation from the nucleus, half-life, chart of the nuclides), and nuclear fission (nuclear energy release, the fission process, where does fission energy go, radiation and radioactivity resulting from fission).

  3. Simulated Atomic Fission Engine (S.A.F.E)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of S.A.F.E. (Simulated Atomic Fission Engine). The topics include: 1) Why Space Fission Propulsion? 2) History of Fission System Development; 3) New Approach to Space Fission Propulsion System Development; 4) Propulsion Flight Demonstrator Schematic Flight Configuration; 5) Ongoing Propellant Energy Source Tests; 6) First Generation Propulsion System Status; 7) Tungsten Fuel Pin Simulator Tests; 8) Full Module Test (High Efficiency Mode); and 9) First Generation Propulsion Flight Demonstrator Status.

  4. Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2008-07-22

    An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

  5. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Both adsorption and absorption (sorption) of fission product (FP) gases on/into graphite are issues of interest in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). In the original proposal, we proposed to use packed beds of graphite particles to measure sorption at a variety of temperatures and to use an electrodynamic balance (EDB) to measure sorption onto single graphite particles (a few μm in diameter) at room temperature. The use of packed beds at elevated temperature is not an issue. However, the TPOC requested revision of this initial proposal to included single particle measurements at elevated temperatures up to 1100 °C. To accommodate the desire of NEUP to extend the single particle EDB measurements to elevated temperatures it was necessary to significantly revise the plan and the budget. These revisions were approved. In the EDB method, we levitate a single graphite particle (the size, surface characteristics, morphology, purity, and composition of the particle can be varied) or agglomerate in the balance and measure the sorption of species by observing the changes in mass. This process involves the use of an electron stepping technique to measure the total charge on a particle which, in conjunction with the measured suspension voltages for the particle, allows for determinations of mass and, hence, of mass changes which then correspond to measurements of sorption. Accommodating elevated temperatures with this type of system required a significant system redesign and required additional time that ultimately was not available. These constraints also meant that the grant had to focus on fewer species as a result. Overall, the extension of the original proposed single particle work to elevated temperatures added greatly to the complexity of the proposed project and added greatly to the time that would eventually be required as well. This means that the bulk of the experimental progress was made using the packed bed sorption systems. Only being able to recruit one

  6. Fission measurements with PPAC detectors using a coincidence technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paradela, C.; Duran, I.; Tarrio, D.; Audouin, L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Stephan, C.

    2011-07-01

    A fission detection setup based on Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) has been constructed and used at the CERN n-TOF facility. The setup takes advantage of the coincidence detection of both fission fragments to discriminate the background reactions produced by high energy neutrons and it allows obtaining neutron-induced fission cross section up to 1 GeV. (authors)

  7. The Isis cold moderators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G. M.; Broome, T. A.; Burridge, R. A.; Cragg, D.; Hall, R.; Haynes, D.; Hirst, J.; Hogston, J. R.; Jones, H. H.; Sexton, J.; Wright, P.

    1997-09-01

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  8. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    PubMed

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases. PMID:26043386

  9. Development Status of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Geng, Steven M.; Pearson, Jon Boise; Godfoy, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress that has been made in the development of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The reactor simulator core and Annular Linear Induction Pump have been fabricated and assembled into a test loop at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. A 12 kWe Power Conversion Unit (PCU) is being developed consisting of two 6 kWe free-piston Stirling engines. The two 6 kWe engines have been fabricated by Sunpower Inc. and are currently being tested separately prior to integration into the PCU. The Facility Cooling System (FCS) used to reject convertor waste heat has been assembled and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The structural elements, including a Buildup Assembly Platform (BAP) and Upper Truss Structure (UTS) have been fabricated, and will be used to test cold-end components in thermal vacuum prior to TDU testing. Once all components have been fully tested at the subsystem level, they will be assembled into an end-to-end system and tested in thermal vacuum at GRC.

  10. Development Status of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Geng, Steven M; Pearson, Jon Boise; Godfroy, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the progress that has been made in the development of the Fission Power System Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). The reactor simulator core and Annular Linear Induction Pump have been fabricated and assembled into a test loop at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. A 12 kWe Power Conversion Unit (PCU) is being developed consisting of two 6 kWe free-piston Stirling engines. The two 6 kWe engines have been fabricated by Sunpower Inc. and are currently being tested separately prior to integration into the PCU. The Facility Cooling System (FCS) used to reject convertor waste heat has been assembled and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The structural elements, including a Buildup Assembly Platform (BAP) and Upper Truss Structure (UTS) have been fabricated, and will be used to test cold-end components in thermal vacuum prior to TDU testing. Once all components have been fully tested at the subsystem level, they will be assembled into an end-to-end system and tested in thermal vacuum at NASA GRC.

  11. Fission barriers and probabilities of spontaneous fission for elements with Z ≥ 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Kowal, M.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Robledo, L. M.; Staszczak, A.; Warda, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper briefly reviews recent progress in theoretical studies on fission barriers and fission half-lives of even-even superheavy nuclei. We compare and discuss results obtained in the semi-classical macroscopic-microscopic approach, the self-consistent mean-field models with the Skyrme and Gogny energy density functionals and in the relativistic mean-field theory. A short part of the paper is devoted to the calculation of the mass parameters and nuclear fission dynamics. We also discuss the predictive power of Skyrme energy density functionals applied to key properties of the fission path of 266Hs. Standard techniques of error estimates in the framework of a χ2 analysis are applied.

  12. After Apollo: Fission Origin of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, John A.

    1973-01-01

    Presents current ideas about the fission process of the Moon, including loss of mass. Saturnian rings, center of the Moon, binary stars, and uniformitarianism. Indicates that planetary formation may be best explained as a destructive, rather than a constructive process. (CC)

  13. Energy Correlation of Prompt Fission Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elter, Zs.; Pázsit, I.

    2016-03-01

    In all cases where neutron fluctuations in a branching process (such as in multiplicity measurements) are treated in an energy dependent description, the energy correlations of the branching itself (energy correlations of the fission neutrons) need to be known. To date, these are not known from experiments. Such correlations can be theoretically and numerically derived by modelling the details of the fission process. It was suggested earlier that the fact that the prompt neutrons are emitted from the moving fission targets, will influence their energy and angular distributions in the lab system, which possibly induces correlations. In this paper the influence of the neutron emission process from the moving targets on the energy correlations is investigated analytically and via numerical simulations. It is shown that the correlations are generated by the random energy and direction distributions of the fission fragments. Analytical formulas are derived for the two-point energy distributions, and quantitative results are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations. The results lend insight into the character of the two-point distributions, and give quantitative estimates of the energy correlations, which are generally small.

  14. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, Vladimir

    1986-01-01

    This invention teaches a nuclear fission reactor having a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200.degree.-1800.degree. C. range, and even higher to 2500.degree. C., limited only by the thermal effectiveness of the structural materials, increasing the efficiency of power generation from the normal 30-35% with 300.degree.-500.degree. C. upper limit temperature to 50-65%. Irradiation of the circulating liquid fuel, as contrasted to only localized irradiation of a solid fuel, provides improved fuel utilization.

  15. Liquid uranium alloy-helium fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Minkov, V.

    1984-06-13

    This invention describes a nuclear fission reactor which has a core vessel and at least one tandem heat exchanger vessel coupled therewith across upper and lower passages to define a closed flow loop. Nuclear fuel such as a uranium alloy in its liquid phase fills these vessels and flow passages. Solid control elements in the reactor core vessel are adapted to be adjusted relative to one another to control fission reaction of the liquid fuel therein. Moderator elements in the other vessel and flow passages preclude fission reaction therein. An inert gas such as helium is bubbled upwardly through the heat exchanger vessel operable to move the liquid fuel upwardly therein and unidirectionally around the closed loop and downwardly through the core vessel. This helium gas is further directed to heat conversion means outside of the reactor vessels to utilize the heat from the fission reaction to generate useful output. The nuclear fuel operates in the 1200 to 1800/sup 0/C range, and even higher to 2500/sup 0/C.

  16. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  17. Critical Temperature from the Fission Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov, E. A.; Karnaukhov, V. A.

    2007-05-22

    Experimental and calculated data on the fission probability are compared for highly excited 188Os. The calculations have been made within the statistical model using the more reliable parameterizations for the temperature dependence or surface tension. It is concluded that the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is higher than 16 MeV.

  18. Fission Detection Using the Associated Particle Technique

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Keegan, J.P. Hurley, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham, S.C. Wilde

    2008-09-18

    A beam of tagged 14 MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction is used to induce fission in a target composed of depleted uranium. The generator yield is 107 neutrons/second radiated into a 4π solid angle. Two 4 in.×4 in. NaI detectors are used for gamma-ray detection. The fission process is known to produce multiple gamma-rays and neutrons. Triple coincidences (α-γ-γ) are measured as a function of neutron flight time up to 90 ns after fission, where the α-particle arises from the DT reaction. A sudden increase in the triple coincidence rate at the location of the material is used to localize and detect fission in the interrogated target. Comparisons are made with experiment runs where lead, tungsten, and iron were used as target materials. The triple coincidence response profile from depleted uranium is noted to be different to those observed from the other target materials. The response from interrogation targets composed of fissile material is anticipated to be even more unique than that observed from depleted uranium.

  19. Tandem mirror fusion-fission hybrid studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.

    1980-04-01

    The concept of combining nuclear fusion and nuclear fission techniques is discussed. Initial tandem mirror hybrid studies predict the ability to produce large amounts of fissile fuel (2 to 7 tons U233 per year from a 4000 MW plant) at a cost that adds less than 25% to the cost of power from a light water reactor.

  20. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components--intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Fission Energy and Other Sources of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfven, Hannes

    1974-01-01

    Discusses different forms of energy sources and basic reasons for the opposition to the use of atomic energy. Suggests that research efforts should also be aimed toward the fission technology to make it acceptable besides major research studies conducted in the development of alternative energy sources. (CC)

  2. Cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Googin, J.M.; Napier, B. Jr.

    1982-01-28

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and a boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  3. Delayed neutrons in fission of polonium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, R.; Urikbaev, Z.S.; Maksyutenko, B.P.; Ignat'ev, S.V.

    1988-06-01

    A strong difference is found in the relative yields of delayed neutrons in the production of compound nuclei of polonium isotopes in reactions in which bismuth and lead are bombarded by various charged particles. The effect can be partially explained by the different lengths of the ..beta..-decay chains of the light and heavy fission products.

  4. Fission Fragment Distributions and Delayed Neutron Yields from Photon-Induced-Fission

    SciTech Connect

    David, J.-C.; Dore, D.; Giacri-Mauborgne, M.-L.; Ridikas, D.; Lauwe, A. van

    2005-05-24

    Fission fragment distributions and delayed neutron yields for 235U and 238U are provided by a complete modelization of the photofission process below 25 MeV. The absorption cross-section parameterization and the fission fragment distributions are given and compared to experimental data. The delayed neutron yields and the half-lives in terms of six groups are presented and compared to data obtained with a bremsstrahlung spectrum of 15 MeV.

  5. Fission barrier properties, resonance fluctuations and isomer fission cross-sections.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J. E.; Hayes, A. C.

    2002-11-27

    Although the main picture of fission bamer physics was established some time ago many of the details still have to be settled. Consequently, the application to evaluation of crosssections of unmeasurable or exotic nuclides and their excited states is still in its early stages. In this paper I consider some of these details and explore the possibility of quantitative estimation of fission cross-sections

  6. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambsch, F.-J.; Al-Adili, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-02-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission of 235U. Experimental data on fission fragment properties like fission fragment mass and total kinetic energy (TKE) as a function of incident neutron energy are rather scarce for this reaction. For the theoretical modelling of the reaction cross sections for Uranium isotopes this information is a crucial input parameter. In addition, 234U is also an important isotope in the Thorium-based fuel cycle. The strong anisotropy of the angular distribution around the vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV could be confirmed using the full angular range. Fluctuations in the fragment TKE have been observed in the threshold region around the strong vibrational resonance at En = 0.77 MeV. The present results are in contradiction with corresponding literature values. Changes in the mass yield around the vibrational resonance and at En = 5 MeV relative to En = 2 MeV show a different signature. The drop in mean TKE around 2.5 to 3 MeV points to pair breaking as also observed in 235,238U(n,f). The measured two-dimensional mass yield and TKE distribution have been described in terms of fission modes. The yield of the standard 1 (S1) mode shows fluctuations in the threshold of the fission cross section due to the influence of the resonance and levels off at about 20% yield for higher incident neutron energies. The S2 mode shows the respective opposite behaviour. The mean TKE of both modes decreases with En. The decrease in mean TKE overrules the increase in S1 yield, so the mean TKE is dropping

  7. SOFIA, a Next-Generation Facility for Fission Yields Measurements and Fission Study. First Results and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouin, L.; Pellereau, E.; Taieb, J.; Boutoux, G.; Béliera, G.; Chatillon, A.; Ebran, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Jurado, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamano, M.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Vargas, J.; Casarejos, E.; Heinz, A.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    Fission fragments play an important role in nuclear reactors evolution and safety. However, fragments yields are poorly known : data are essentially limited to mass yields from thermal neutron-induced fissions on a very few nuclei. SOFIA (Study On FIssion with Aladin) is an innovative experimental program on nuclear fission carried out at the GSI facility, which aims at providing isotopic yields on a broad range of fissioning systems. Relativistic secondary beams of actinides and pre-actinides are selected by the Fragment Separator (FRS) and their fission is triggered by electromagnetic interaction. The resulting excitation energy is comparable to the result of an interaction with a low-energy neutron, thus leading to useful data for reactor simulations. For the first time ever, both fission fragments are completely identified in charge and mass in a new recoil spectrometer, allowing for precise yields measurements. The yield of prompt neutrons can then be deduced, and the fission mechanism can be ascribed, providing new constraints for fission models. During the first experiment, all the technical challenges were matched : we have thus set new experimental standards in the measurements of relativistic heavy ions (time of flight, position, energy loss).This communication presents a first series of results obtained on the fission of 238U; many other fissioning systems have also been measured and are being analyzed presently. A second SOFIA experiment is planned in September 2014, and will be focused on the measurement of the fission of 236U, the analog of 235U+n.

  8. Prompt fission neutron spectra in fast-neutron-induced fission of 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, V. V.; Nayak, B. K.; Saxena, A.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Capote, R.

    2015-07-01

    Prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) measurements for the neutron-induced fission of 238U are carried out at incident neutron energies of 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MeV, respectively. The time-of-flight technique is employed to determine the energy of fission neutrons. The prompt fission neutron energy spectra so obtained are analyzed using Watt parametrization to derive the neutron multiplicity and average prompt fission neutron energy. The present experimental PFNS data are compared with the evaluated spectra taken from the ENDF/B-VII.1 library and the predictive calculations carried out using the empire-3.2 (Malta) code with built-in Los Alamos (LA) and Kornilov PFNS models. The sensitivity of the empire-3.2 LA model-calculated PFNS to the nuclear level density parameter of the average fission fragment and to the total kinetic energy is investigated. empire-3.2 LA model PFNS calculations that use Madland 2006-recommended values [D. G. Madland, Nucl. Phys. A 772, 113 (2006), 10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2006.03.013] of the total kinetic energy and the level density parameter a =A /(10 ±0.5 ) compare very well to measured data at all incident neutron incident energies.

  9. Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm, FREYA - For event-by-event simulation of fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Randrup, J.; Vogt, R.

    2015-06-01

    From nuclear materials accountability to detection of special nuclear material, SNM, the need for better modeling of fission has grown over the past decades. Current radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance, but performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. For fission applications, these codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, prompt fission neutron and photon multiplicities are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g. the neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. The new computational model, FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm), aims to meet this need by modeling complete fission events. Thus it automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum. FREYA has been integrated into the LLNL Fission Library, and will soon be part of MCNPX2.7.0, MCNP6, TRIPOLI-4.9, and Geant4.10.

  10. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  11. Application of the dinuclear system model to fission process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Shneidman, T. M.; Ventura, A.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical evaluation of the collective excitation spectra of nucleus at large deformations is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two-cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of nucleons between clusters. In this work the method of calculation of the potential energy and the collective spectrum of fissioning nucleus at scission point is presented. Combining the DNS model calculations and the statistical model of fission we calculate the mass, total kinetic energy, and angular distribution of fission fragments for the neutron-induced fission of 239Pu.

  12. Innovative Fission Measurements with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M D; Barnes, P D; Klay, J L

    2005-11-16

    This study explores a pioneering idea to utilize a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure fission cross sections and other fission quantities. The TPC is inherently capable of measuring fragments from fission events, decay alphas, and beam-material scatters. This document explores whether the TPC can improve the precision of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section and measure other new and significant fission quantities simultaneously. This work shows that the TPC can in fact deliver sub-1% cross section measurements and should provide breakthroughs in both the quality and quantity of information available from neutron-induced fission experiments.

  13. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  14. Fission Technology for Exploring and Utilizing the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Mike; VanDyke, Melissa; Godfroy, Tom; Pedersen, Kevin; Martin, James; Dickens, Ricky; Salvail, Pat; Hrbub, Ivana; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Fission technology can enable rapid, affordable access to any point in the solar system. Potential fission-based transportation options include bimodal nuclear thermal rockets, high specific energy propulsion systems, and pulsed fission propulsion systems. In-space propellant re-supply enhances the effective performance of all systems, but requires significant infrastructure development. Safe, timely, affordable utilization of first-generation space fission propulsion systems will enable the development of more advanced systems. First generation space systems will build on over 45 years of US and international space fission system technology development to minimize cost,

  15. Cluster expression in fission and fusion in high-dimensional macroscopic-microscopic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, A.; Ichikawa, T.; Moller, P.; Sierk, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the relation between the fission-fusion potential-energy surfaces of very heavy nuclei and the formation process of these nuclei in cold-fusion reactions. In the potential-energy surfaces, we find a pronounced valley structure, with one valley corresponding to the cold-fusion reaction, the other to fission. As the touching point is approached in the cold-fusion entrance channel, an instability towards dynamical deformation of the projectile occurs, which enhances the fusion cross section. These two 'cluster effects' enhance the production of superheavy nuclei in cold-fusion reactions, in addition to the effect of the low compound-system excitation energy in these reactions. Heavy-ion fusion reactions have been used extensively to synthesize heavy elements beyond actinide nuclei. In order to proceed further in this direction, we need to understand the formation process more precisely, not just the decay process. The dynamics of the formation process are considerably more complex than the dynamics necessary to interpret the spontaneous-fission decay of heavy elements. However, before implementing a full dynamical description it is useful to understand the basic properties of the potential-energy landscape encountered in the initial stages of the collision. The collision process and entrance-channel landscape can conveniently be separated into two parts, namely the early-stage separated system before touching and the late-stage composite system after touching. The transition between these two stages is particularly important, but not very well understood until now. To understand better the transition between the two stages we analyze here in detail the potential energy landscape or 'collision surface' of the system both outside and inside the touching configuration of the target and projectile. In Sec. 2, we discuss calculated five-dimensional potential-energy landscapes inside touching and identify major features. In Sec. 3, we present calculated

  16. Diabetes regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and fission in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J.L.; Quattrini, A.; Lentz, S.I.; Figueroa-Romero, C.; Cerri, F.; Backus, C.; Hong, Y.; Feldman, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Normal mitochondrial (Mt) activity is a critical component of neuronal metabolism and function. Disruption of Mt activity by altered Mt fission and fusion is the root cause of both neurodegenerative disorders and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2A inherited neuropathy. The current study addressed the role of Mt fission in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy (DN). Methods Mt biogenesis and fission were assayed in both in vivo and in vitro models of DN. Gene, protein, mitochondrial DNA and ultrastructural analyses were used to assess Mt biogenesis and fission. Results Our data reveal increased Mt biogenesis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from diabetic compared to non-diabetic mice. An essential step in Mt biogenesis is Mt fission, regulated by the Mt fission protein Drp1. Evaluation of in vivo diabetic neurons indicated small, fragmented Mt, suggesting increased fission. In vitro studies reveal short-term hyperglycemic exposure increased expression of Drp1. The influence of hyperglycemia-mediated Mt fission on cellular viability was evaluated by knockdown of Drp1. Knockdown of Drp1 resulted in decreased susceptibility to hyperglycemic damage. Conclusions We propose that: 1) Mt undergo biogenesis in response to hyperglycemia, but the increased biogenesis is insufficient to accommodate the metabolic load; 2) hyperglycemia causes an excess of Mt fission, creating small, damaged mitochondria; and 3) reduction of aberrant Mt fission increases neuronal survival and indicates an important role for the fission-fusion equilibrium in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:19847394

  17. A transferable model for singlet-fission kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Shane R.; Lee, Jiye; Wilson, Mark W. B.; Wu, Tony; McMahon, David P.; Parkhurst, Rebecca R.; Thompson, Nicholas J.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Rao, Akshay; Johnson, Kerr; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Swager, Timothy M.; Friend, Richard H.; Baldo, Marc A.; van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-06-01

    Exciton fission is a process that occurs in certain organic materials whereby one singlet exciton splits into two independent triplets. In photovoltaic devices these two triplet excitons can each generate an electron, producing quantum yields per photon of >100% and potentially enabling single-junction power efficiencies above 40%. Here, we measure fission dynamics using ultrafast photoinduced absorption and present a first-principles expression that successfully reproduces the fission rate in materials with vastly different structures. Fission is non-adiabatic and Marcus-like in weakly interacting systems, becoming adiabatic and coupling-independent at larger interaction strengths. In neat films, we demonstrate fission yields near unity even when monomers are separated by >5 Å. For efficient solar cells, however, we show that fission must outcompete charge generation from the singlet exciton. This work lays the foundation for tailoring molecular properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications.

  18. Fifty years of nuclear fission: Nuclear data and measurements series

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    This report is the written version of a colloquium first presented at Argonne National Laboratory in January 1989. The paper begins with an historical preamble about the events leading to the discovery of nuclear fission. This leads naturally to an account of early results and understanding of the fission phenomena. Some of the key concepts in the development of fission theory are then discussed. The main theme of this discussion is the topography of the fission barrier, in which the interplay of the liquid-drop model and nucleon shell effects lead to a wide range of fascinating phenomena encompassing metastable isomers, intermediate-structure effects in fission cross-sections, and large changes in fission product properties. It is shown how study of these changing effects and theoretical calculations of the potential energy of the deformed nucleus have led to broad qualitative understanding of the nature of the fission process. 54 refs., 35 figs.

  19. Multimodal Fission in Heavy-Ion Induced Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskiy, I. V.; Bogachev, A. A.; Iitkis, M. G.; Iitkis, J. M.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Dorvaux, O.; Rowley, N.; Schmitt, Ch.; Stuttge, L.

    2006-08-14

    Mass, energy and folding angle distributions of the fission fragments as well as multiplicities of neutron and gamma-quanta emissions accompanying the fission process were measured for fission of 226Th, 227Pa and 234Pu compound nuclei produced in reactions with 18O and 26Mg projectiles over a wide energy range. Data were analyzed with respect to the presence of fission modes. Asymmetric fission was observed even at very high initial excitation for all the measured systems. The so-called fission mode S1 (caused by the proton shell Z{approx}50 and neutron shell N{approx}82 in heavy fragment) was found to be dominant in asymmetric fission of 234Pu. Reactions with not full linear momentum transfer were observed in the folding spectra for all the measured systems.

  20. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Choudhury, D.; Maheshwari, B.

    2014-06-15

    On the occasion of the 75{sup th} anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,f) and {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction {sup 245}Cm(n{sup th},f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  1. A transferable model for singlet-fission kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yost, Shane R; Lee, Jiye; Wilson, Mark W B; Wu, Tony; McMahon, David P; Parkhurst, Rebecca R; Thompson, Nicholas J; Congreve, Daniel N; Rao, Akshay; Johnson, Kerr; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Bawendi, Moungi G; Swager, Timothy M; Friend, Richard H; Baldo, Marc A; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2014-06-01

    Exciton fission is a process that occurs in certain organic materials whereby one singlet exciton splits into two independent triplets. In photovoltaic devices these two triplet excitons can each generate an electron, producing quantum yields per photon of >100% and potentially enabling single-junction power efficiencies above 40%. Here, we measure fission dynamics using ultrafast photoinduced absorption and present a first-principles expression that successfully reproduces the fission rate in materials with vastly different structures. Fission is non-adiabatic and Marcus-like in weakly interacting systems, becoming adiabatic and coupling-independent at larger interaction strengths. In neat films, we demonstrate fission yields near unity even when monomers are separated by >5 Å. For efficient solar cells, however, we show that fission must outcompete charge generation from the singlet exciton. This work lays the foundation for tailoring molecular properties like solubility and energy level alignment while maintaining the high fission yield required for photovoltaic applications. PMID:24848234

  2. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Choudhury, D.; Maheshwari, B.

    2014-06-01

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions 238U(18O,f) and 208Pb(18O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction 245Cm(nth,f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  3. Searches for T-odd correlations in the emission of prompt neutrons in the polarized-neutron-induced fission of 235U nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyan, G. V.; Klenke, J.; Krakhotin, V. A.; Novitsky, V. V.; Pavlov, V. S.; Shatalov, P. B.

    2010-07-01

    The results of an experiment aimed at searches for formally T-odd correlations in the angular distribution of prompt neutrons from the fission of 235U nuclei are presented. The experiment was performed in the MEPHISTO polarized cold-neutron beam from the Munich FRMII reactor. The correlation coefficient proved to be (-3.5 ± 3.4) × 10-5 for a three-vector correlation (TRI effect) and (-5.0 ± 3.4) × 10-5 for a five-vector correlation (ROT effect). This means that no significant effects were discovered within the measurement errors. A comparison with the analogous effects in the ternary fission of 235U nuclei was performed. The values of the corresponding correlations in the angular distribution of prompt fission gamma rays were refined.

  4. Distribution of Prompt Neutron Emission Probability for Fission Fragments in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf and 244,248Cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Dushin, V. N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jakovlev, V. A.; Kalinin, V. A.; Laptev, A. B.; Petrov, B. F.; Shcherbakov, O. A.

    2005-05-01

    Neutrons emitted in fission events were measured separately for each complementary fragment in correlation with fission fragment energies. Two high-efficiency Gd-loaded liquid scintillator tanks were used for neutron registration. Fission fragment energies were measured using a twin Frisch gridded ionization chamber with a pinhole collimator. The neutron multiplicity distributions were obtained for each value of the fission fragment mass and energy and corrected for neutron registration efficiency, background, and pile-up. The dependency of these distributions on fragment mass and energy for different energy and mass bins as well as mass and energy distribution of fission fragments are presented and discussed.

  5. Cold Atom Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Yujiro; Sadrove, Mark; Hirano, Takuya

    Detection of weak magnetic fields with high spatial resolution is an important technology for various applications such as biological imaging, detection of MRI signals and fundamental physics. Cold atom magnetometry enables 10-11 T/ Hz sqrt{text{Hz}} sensitivities at the micron scale, that is, at the scale of a typical biological cell size. This magnetometry takes advantage of unique properties of atomic gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates with internal spin degrees of freedom. In this chapter, we first overview various state-of-the-art magnetometers, addressing their sensitivities and spatial resolutions. Then we describe properties of spinor condensates, ultracold atom magnetometers, and the latest research developments achieved in the FIRST project, especially for the detection of alternate current magnetic fields using a spin-echo-based magnetometer. We also discuss future prospects of the magnetometers.

  6. Cold isopressing method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Stawisuck, Valerie M.; Prasad, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    A cold isopressing method in which two or more layers of material are formed within an isopressing mold. One of the layers consists of a tape-cast film. The layers are isopressed within the isopressing mold, thereby to laminate the layers and to compact the tape-cast film. The isopressing mold can be of cylindrical configuration with the layers being coaxial cylindrical layers. The materials used in forming the layers can contain green ceramic materials and the resultant structure can be fired and sintered as necessary and in accordance with known methods to produce a finished composite, ceramic structure. Further, such green ceramic materials can be of the type that are capable of conducting hydrogen or oxygen ions at high temperature with the object of utilizing the finished composite ceramic structure as a ceramic membrane element.

  7. A correlated electron view of singlet fission.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Paul M; Musgrave, Charles B; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2013-06-18

    Singlet fission occurs when a single exciton splits into multiple electron-hole pairs, and could dramatically increase the efficiency of organic solar cells by converting high energy photons into multiple charge carriers. Scientists might exploit singlet fission to its full potential by first understanding the underlying mechanism of this quantum mechanical process. The pursuit of this fundamental mechanism has recently benefited from the development and application of new correlated wave function methods. These methods-called restricted active space spin flip-can capture the most important electron interactions in molecular materials, such as acene crystals, at low computational cost. It is unrealistic to use previous wave function methods due to the excessive computational cost involved in simulating realistic molecular structures at a meaningful level of electron correlation. In this Account, we describe how we use these techniques to compute single exciton and multiple exciton excited states in tetracene and pentacene crystals in order to understand how a single exciton generated from photon absorption undergoes fission to generate two triplets. Our studies indicate that an adiabatic charge transfer intermediate is unlikely to contribute significantly to the fission process because it lies too high in energy. Instead, we propose a new mechanism that involves the direct coupling of an optically allowed single exciton to an optically dark multiexciton. This coupling is facilitated by intermolecular motion of two acene monomers that drives nonadiabatic population transfer between the two states. This transfer occurs in the limit of near degeneracies between adiabatic states where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation of fixed nuclei is no longer valid. Existing theories for singlet fission have not considered this type of coupling between states and, therefore, cannot describe this mechanism. The direct mechanism through intermolecular motion describes many

  8. Fission studies of secondary beams from relativistic uranium projectiles: The proton even-odd effect in fission fragment charge yields

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, A. R.; Benlliure, J.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Voss, B.; Boeckstiegel, C.; Clerc, H.-G.; Grewe, A.; Heinz, A.; Jong, M. de; Mueller, J.; Steinhaeuser, S.; Pfuetzner, M.

    1999-09-02

    Nuclear-charge yields of fragments produced by fission of neutron-deficient isotopes of uranium, protactinium, actinium, and radium have been measured. These radioactive isotopes were produced as secondary beams, and electromagnetic fission was induced in a lead target with an average excitation energy around 11 MeV. The local even-odd effect in symmetric and in asymmetric fission of thorium isotopes is found to be independent of Z{sup 2}/A. The charge yields of the fission fragments of the odd-Z fissioning protactinium and actinium show a pronounced even-odd effect. In asymmetric fission the unpaired proton predominantly sticks to the heavy fragment. A statistical model based on the single-particle level density at the Fermi energy is able to reproduce the overall trend of the local even-odd effects both in even-Z and odd-Z fissioning systems.

  9. The status of cold fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  10. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  11. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Harlow, Scott

    2009-01-01

    With the potential future deployment of a lunar outpost there is expected to be a clear need for a high-power, lunar surface power source to support lunar surface operations independent of the day-night cycle, and Fission Surface Power (FSP) is a very effective solution for power levels above a couple 10 s of kWe. FSP is similarly enabling for the poorly illuminated surface of Mars. The power levels/requirements for a lunar outpost option are currently being studied, but it is known that cost is clearly a predominant concern to decision makers. This paper describes the plans of NASA and the DOE to execute an affordable fission surface power system technology development project to demonstrate sufficient technology readiness of an affordable FSP system so viable and cost-effective FSP system options will be available when high power lunar surface system choices are expected to be made in the early 2010s.

  12. Fission Fragment characterization with FALSTAFF at NFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, D.; Farget, F.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Ledoux, X.; Lehaut, G.; Materna, T.; Pancin, J.; Panebianco, S.

    2013-03-01

    The Neutrons for Science (NFS) facility will be one of the first installations of the SPIRAL2 facility. NFS will be composed of a time-of-flight baseline and irradiation stations and will allow studying neutron-induced reactions for energies going from some hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Continuous and quasi-monoenergetic energy neutron beams will be available. Taking advantage of this new installation, the development of an experimental setup for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments in this energy domain has been undertaken. To achieve this goal a new detection system called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the STudy of Actinide Fission Fragments) in under development. In this paper, the characteristics of the NFS facility will be exposed and the motivations for the FALSTAFF experiment will be presented. The experimental setup will be described and the expected resolutions based on realistic GEANT4 simulations will be discussed.

  13. Nuclear Fission Investigation with Twin Ionization Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-11-29

    The purpose of the present paper was to report the recent results, obtained in development of digital pulse processing mathematics for prompt fission neutron (PFN) investigation using twin ionization chamber (TIC) along with fast neutron time-of-flight detector (ND). Due to well known ambiguities in literature (see refs. [4, 6, 9 and 11]), concerning a pulse induction on TIC electrodes by FF ionization, we first presented detailed mathematical analysis of fission fragment (FF) signal formation on TIC anode. The analysis was done using Ramo-Shockley theorem, which gives relation between charged particle motion between TIC electrodes and so called weighting potential. Weighting potential was calculated by direct numerical solution of Laplace equation (neglecting space charge) for the TIC geometry and ionization, caused by FF. Formulae for grid inefficiency (GI) correction and digital pulse processing algorithms for PFN time-of-flight measurements and pulse shape analysis are presented and discussed.

  14. System Concepts for Affordable Fission Surface Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee; Poston, David; Qualls, Louis

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an affordable Fission Surface Power (FSP) system that could be used for NASA applications on the Moon and Mars. The proposed FSP system uses a low temperature, uranium dioxide-fueled, liquid metal-cooled fission reactor coupled to free-piston Stirling converters. The concept was determined by a 12 month NASA/DOE study that examined design options and development strategies based on affordability and risk. The system is considered a low development risk based on the use of terrestrial-derived reactor technology, high efficiency power conversion, and conventional materials. The low-risk approach was selected over other options that could offer higher performance and/or lower mass.

  15. Fusion-fission energy systems evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Teofilo, V.L.; Aase, D.T.; Bickford, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report serves as the basis for comparing the fusion-fission (hybrid) energy system concept with other advanced technology fissile fuel breeding concepts evaluated in the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). As such, much of the information and data provided herein is in a form that meets the NASAP data requirements. Since the hybrid concept has not been studied as extensively as many of the other fission concepts being examined in NASAP, the provided data and information are sparse relative to these more developed concepts. Nevertheless, this report is intended to provide a perspective on hybrids and to summarize the findings of the rather limited analyses made to date on this concept.

  16. Anisotropic Neutron Evaporation from Spinning Fission Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Gönnenwein, F.; Mutterer, M.; Kopatch, Yu.; Chernysheva, E.; Hanappe, F.; Hambsch, F.-J.

    2011-10-01

    Neutron evaporation anisotropy in the centre of mass of the rotating fission fragments in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated within the CORA experiments. If it is well accepted that the bulk of emitted neutrons originate from an isotropic evaporation in the centre of mass of the moving fragments, discrepancies in experimental as well as in theoretical energy and angular distributions appear throughout many attempts performed by various authors. Scission neutrons most probably contribute but don't allow to explain totally the observed anisotropy. Due to its weak contribution to the total anisotropy, the centre of mass anisotropy is very difficult to be highlighted. A novel experimental approach has been developed to extract this effect and will be presented as well as some first results.

  17. True ternary fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Greiner, Walter

    2010-04-15

    True ternary fission with formation of a heavy third fragment is quite possible for superheavy nuclei because of the strong shell effects leading to a three-body clusterization with the two doubly magic tinlike cores. The simplest way to discover this phenomenon in the decay of excited superheavy nuclei is a detection of two tinlike clusters with appropriate kinematics in low-energy collisions of medium-mass nuclei with actinide targets. The three-body quasi-fission process could be even more pronounced for giant nuclear systems formed in collisions of heavy actinide nuclei. In this case a three-body clusterization might be proved experimentally by the detection of two coincident leadlike fragments in low-energy U + U collisions.

  18. Investigation of n+238U Fission Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litaize, O.; Serot, O.; Regnier, D.; Manailescu, C.

    2014-04-01

    The prompt fission observables related to the 238U(n,f) reaction were investigated through a Monte Carlo simulation. Two models were tested in the FIFRELIN Monte Carlo code to simulate the de-excitation of the primary fission fragments. In the first one, prompt neutrons are emitted before prompt gammas and a Weisskopf model is used for neutrons while a level-density plus gamma-strength function statistical model is used for gammas. In the second one, an Hauser-Feshbach statistical model is used for the n/γ coupled emission using neutron-transmission coefficients provided by TALYS-1.4 and gamma-transmission coefficients calculated as in the previous model.

  19. Singlet fission: Towards efficient solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Wen, Jin; Michl, Josef

    2015-12-01

    Singlet fission (SF) offers an opportunity to improve solar cell efficiency, but its practical use is hindered by the limited number of known efficient materials, limited knowledge of SF mechanism, mainly the relation between the dimer structure and SF efficiency and diffusion of the triplet states allowing injection of electrons into the solar cell semiconductor band. Here we report on our attempt to design new classes of chromophores and to study the relation between the structure and SF efficiency.

  20. REMOVAL OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM WATER

    DOEpatents

    Rosinski, J.

    1961-12-19

    A process is given for precipitating fission products from a body of water having a pH of above 6.5. Calcium permanganate and ferrous sulfate are added in a molar ratio of l: 3, whereby a mixed precipitate of manganese dioxide, ferric hydroxide and calcium sulfate is formed; the precipitate carries the fisston products and settles to the bottom of the body of water. (AEC)

  1. Singlet fission: Towards efficient solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Wen, Jin; Michl, Josef

    2015-12-31

    Singlet fission (SF) offers an opportunity to improve solar cell efficiency, but its practical use is hindered by the limited number of known efficient materials, limited knowledge of SF mechanism, mainly the relation between the dimer structure and SF efficiency and diffusion of the triplet states allowing injection of electrons into the solar cell semiconductor band. Here we report on our attempt to design new classes of chromophores and to study the relation between the structure and SF efficiency.

  2. Shell effects in fission and quasi-fission of heavy and superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkis, M. G.; A¨ysto¨, J.; Beghini, S.; Bogachev, A. A.; Corradi, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Gadea, A.; Giardina, G.; Hanappe, F.; Itkis, I. M.; Jandel, M.; Kliman, J.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Kniajeva, G. N.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Krupa, L.; Latina, A.; Materna, T.; Montagnoli, G.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Prokhorova, E. V.; Rowley, N.; Rubchenya, V. A.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Scarlassara, F.; Stefanini, A. M.; Stuttge, L.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vakhtin, D. N.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Voskressenski, V. M.; Zagrebaev, V. I.

    2004-04-01

    Results of the experiments aimed at the study of fission and quasi-fission processes in the reactions 12C+ 204Pb, 48Ca+ 144,154Sm, 168Er, 208Pb, 244Pu, 248Cm; 58Fe+ 208Pb, 244Pu, 248Cm, and 64Ni+ 186W, 242Pu are presented in the work. The choice of the above-mentioned reactions was inspired by recent experiments on the production of the isotopes 283112, 289114 and 283116 at Dubna [1],[2] using the same reactions. The 58Fe and 64Ni projectiles were chosen since the corresponding projectile-target combinations lead to the synthesis of even heavier elements. The experiments were carried out at the U-400 accelerator of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Russia), the XTU Tandem accelerator of the National Laboratory of Legnaro (LNL, Italy) and the Accelerator of the Laboratory of University of Jyvaskyla (JYFL, Finland) using the time-of-flight spectrometer of fission fragments CORSET[3] and the neutron multi-detector DEMON[4],[5]. The role of shell effects and the influence of the entrance channel on the mechanism of the compound nucleus fusion-fission and the competitive process of quasi-fission are discussed.

  3. A new approach to prompt fission neutron TOF data treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O. V.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach, applicable to single events, was developed for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-offlight distribution unfolding. The main goal was to understand the reasons of the long existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fission fragments (FF). Since the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data the understanding of the PFN emission mechanism is very important both for nuclear fission theory and nuclear data. The experimental data were taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to the well known work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter. About 2.5 × 105 coincidences between fission fragment (FF) and neutron detector response to prompt fission neutron detection have been registered (∼ 1.6 × 107 of total recorded fission events). Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12-bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The main goal of this work was a detailed description of the prompt fission neutron treatment.

  4. Spontaneous fission half-lives and their systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1998-03-01

    Spontaneous fission is a phenomenon exhibited by heavy nuclei, which can be a major mode of decay of nuclei of elements heavier than thorium and can be a determining factor in their stability. For purposes of this paper, spontaneous fission will be considered a process in which a nucleus breaks up into two approximately equal parts. The emission of light nuclei or heavy ions such as {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, or {sup 32}S will not be considered. This radioactive decay mode is often much smaller than the spontaneous fission decay mode, although this is not true in all cases. Barwick noted that this might indicate that the assumed half-life for spontaneous fission of some older experiments might be partially due to heavy fragment radioactivity. Other than taking note of this potential correction to spontaneous fission half-lives, this decay mode of heavy fragment radioactivity will be ignored. Excited states of some heavy nuclei may decay via spontaneous fission. These so-called fission isomers will not be discussed here. Electron capture (EC) or beta-delayed fission is a process in which prompt fission of a sufficiently excited daughter state occurs following population by EC or beta decay. The fission activity will appear to decay with the half-life of the parent and was earlier confused in some cases with SF. This process has been discussed in detail in a review and will not be considered in this paper.

  5. Undergraduate Measurements For Fission Reactor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Kersting, L. J.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P.; Crider, B. P.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    Undergraduate students at the University of Dallas (UD) have investigated elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections on structural materials important for criticality considerations in nuclear fission processes. Neutrons scattered off of 23Na and NatFe were detected using neutron time-of-flight techniques at the University of Kentucky Low-Energy Nuclear Accelerator Facility. These measurements are part of an effort to increase the efficiency of power generation from existing fission reactors in the US and in the design of new fission systems. Students have learned the basics of how to operate the Model CN Van de Graaff generator at the laboratory, setup detectors and electronics, use data acquisition systems, and they are currently analyzing the angular dependence of the scattered neutrons for incident neutron energies of 3.57 and 3.80 MeV. Most students participating in the project will use the research experience as the material for their undergraduate research thesis required for all Bachelor of Science students at the University of Dallas. The first student projects on this topic were completed during the summer of 2010; an overview of student participation in this investigation and their preliminary results will be presented.

  6. Simulating an Exploding Fission-Bomb Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent desktop-computer simulation of the core of an exploding fission bomb (nuclear weapon) has been developed. The simulation models a core comprising a mixture of two isotopes: a fissile one (such as U-235) and an inert one (such as U-238) that captures neutrons and removes them from circulation. The user sets the enrichment percentage and scattering and fission cross-sections of the fissile isotope, the capture cross-section of the inert isotope, the number of neutrons liberated per fission, the number of ``initiator'' neutrons, the radius of the core, and the neutron-reflection efficiency of a surrounding tamper. The simulation, which is predicated on ordinary kinematics, follows the three-dimensional motions and fates of neutrons as they travel through the core. Limitations of time and computer memory render it impossible to model a real-life core, but results of numerous runs clearly demonstrate the existence of a critical mass for a given set of parameters and the dramatic effects of enrichment and tamper efficiency on the growth (or decay) of the neutron population. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  7. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; et al

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomericmore » states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.« less

  8. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  9. Interstellar rendezvous missions employing fission propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    There has been a conventionally held nostrum that fission system specific power and energy content is insufficient to provide the requisite high accelerations and velocities to enable interstellar rendezvous missions within a reasonable fraction of a human lifetime. As a consequence, all forms of alternative mechanisms that are not yet, and may never be technologically feasible, have been proposed, including laser light sails, fusion and antimatter propulsion systems. In previous efforts, [Lenard and Lipinski, 1999] the authors developed an architecture that employs fission power to propel two different concepts: one, an unmanned probe, the other a crewed vehicle to Alpha Centauri within mission times of 47 to 60 years. The first portion of this paper discusses employing a variant of the ``Forward Resupply Runway'' utilizing fission systems to enable both high accelerations and high final velocities necessary for this type of travel. The authors argue that such an architecture, while expensive, is considerably less expensive and technologically risky than other technologically advanced concepts, and, further, provides the ability to explore near-Earth stellar systems out to distances of 8 light years or so. This enables the ability to establish independent human societies which can later expand the domain of human exploration in roughly eight light-year increments even presuming that no further physics or technology breakthroughs or advances occur. In the second portion of the paper, a technology requirement assessment is performed. The authors argue that reasonable to extensive extensions to known technology could enable this revolutionary capability. .

  10. Calculated fission properties of the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.J.

    1986-09-01

    A quantitative calculation is presented that shows where high-kinetic-energy symmetric fission occurs and why it is associated with a sudden and large decrease in fission half-lives. The study is based on calculations of potential-energy surfaces in the macroscopic-microscopic model and a semi-empirical model for the nuclear inertia. For the macroscopic part a Yukawa-plus-exponential model is used and for the microscopic part a folded-Yukawa single-particle potential is used. The three-quadratic-surface parameterization generates shapes for which the potential-energy surfaces are calculated. The use of this parameterization and the use of the finite-range macroscopic model allows for the study of two touching spheres and similar shapes. The results of the calculations in terms of potential-energy surfaces and fission half-lives are presented for heavy even nuclei. The surfaces are displayed in the form of contour diagrams as functions of two moments of the shape. 53 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Capture and fission with DANCE and NEUANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E.; Rusev, G.; Walker, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M. M.; Hayes, A.; Kawano, T.; Mosby, S.; Stetcu, I.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-12-23

    A summary of the current and future experimental program at DANCE is presented. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections are planned for many actinide isotopes with the goal to reduce the present uncertainties in nuclear data libraries. Detailed studies of capture gamma rays in the neutron resonance region will be performed in order to derive correlated data on the de-excitation of the compound nucleus. New approaches on how to remove the DANCE detector response from experimental data and retain the correlations between the cascade gamma rays are presented. Studies on 235U are focused on quantifying the population of short-lived isomeric states in 236U after neutron capture. For this purpose, a new neutron detector array NEUANCE is under construction. It will be installed in the central cavity of the DANCE array and enable the highly efficient tagging of fission and capture events. In addition, developments of fission fragment detectors are also underway to expand DANCE capabilities to measurements of fully correlated data on fission observables.

  12. Common cold - how to treat at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000466.htm Common cold - how to treat at home To use the ... green snot, and sneezing Sore throat Treating your Cold Treating your symptoms will not make your cold ...

  13. Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family KidsHealth > For Parents > Cold- ... once the weather turns frosty. Beating the Cold-Weather Blahs Once a chill is in the air, ...

  14. Cold dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinski, John Joseph

    The dark halos arising in the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmology are simulated to investigate the relationship between the structure and kinematics of dark halos and galaxies. Realistic cosmological initial conditions and tidal field boundary conditions are used in N-body simulations of the collapse of density peaks to form dark halos. The core radii of dark halos are no greater than the softening radius, rs = 1.4 kpc. The density profiles can be fit with an analytical Hernquist (1990) profile with an effective power law which varies between -1 in the center to -4 at large radii. The rotation curves of dark halos resemble the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies in the observed range, 1.5 approximately less than r approximately less than 30 kpc. The halos are strongly triaxial and very flat with (c/a) = 0.50 and (b/a) = 0.71. The distribution of ellipticities for dark halos reaches a maximum at epsilon = 0.5 in contrast to the distribution for elliptical galaxies which peaks at epsilon = 0.2 suggesting that ellipticals are much rounder than dark halos. Dark halos are generally flatter than their progenitor density peaks. The final shape and orientation of a dark halo are largely determined by tidal torquing and are sensitive to changes in the strength and orientation of a tidal field. Dark halos are pressure supported objects with negligible rotational support as indicated by the mean dimensionless spin, lamda = 0.042 +/- 0.024. The angular momentum vector tends to align with the true minor axis of dark halos. Elliptical galaxies have a similar behavior implied by the observation of the tendency for alignment of the rotation vector and the apparent minor axis. The origin of this behavior may be traced to the tendency for tidal torques to misalign with the major axis of a density peak. Tidal torques are found to isotropize the velocity ellipsoids of dark halos at large radii, contrary to the expectation of radially anisotropic velocity ellipsoids in cold collapse

  15. Cold plasma decontamination of foods.

    PubMed

    Niemira, Brendan A

    2012-01-01

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology that uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas, such as air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium; antimicrobial chemical agents are not required. The primary modes of action are due to UV light and reactive chemical products of the cold plasma ionization process. A wide array of cold plasma systems that operate at atmospheric pressures or in low pressure treatment chambers are under development. Reductions of greater than 5 logs can be obtained for pathogens such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Effective treatment times can range from 120 s to as little as 3 s, depending on the food treated and the processing conditions. Key limitations for cold plasma are the relatively early state of technology development, the variety and complexity of the necessary equipment, and the largely unexplored impacts of cold plasma treatment on the sensory and nutritional qualities of treated foods. Also, the antimicrobial modes of action for various cold plasma systems vary depending on the type of cold plasma generated. Optimization and scale up to commercial treatment levels require a more complete understanding of these chemical processes. Nevertheless, this area of technology shows promise and is the subject of active research to enhance efficacy. PMID:22149075

  16. Fission Cross Sections and Fission-Fragment Mass Yields via the Surrogate Reaction Method

    SciTech Connect

    Jurado, B.; Kessedjian, G.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Bidaud, A.; Czajkowski, S.; Dassie, D.; Haas, B.; Mathieu, L.; Osmanov, B.; Ahmad, I.

    2008-04-17

    The surrogate reaction method is a powerful tool to infer neutron-induced data of short-lived nuclei. After a short overview of the experimental techniques employed in the present surrogate experiments, we will concentrate on a recent measurement to determine neutron-induced fission cross sections for the actinides {sup 242,243}Cm and {sup 241}Am. The latest direct neutron-induced measurement for the {sup 243}Cm fission cross section is questioned by our results, since there are differences of more than 60% in the 0.7 to 7 MeV neutron energy range. Our experimental set-up has also enabled us to measure for the first time the fission fragment ''pseudo-mass'' distributions of {sup 243,244,245}Cm and {sup 242}Am compound nuclei in the excitation energy range from a few MeV to about 25 MeV.

  17. Single site suppressors of a fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutant in cdc48 identified by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Irina N; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Ewald, Adrian; Langholm, Lasse L; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Gordon, Colin; Nielsen, Olaf; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors. PMID:25658828

  18. Single Site Suppressors of a Fission Yeast Temperature-Sensitive Mutant in cdc48 Identified by Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Marinova, Irina N.; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Ewald, Adrian; Langholm, Lasse L.; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B.; Gordon, Colin; Nielsen, Olaf; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors. PMID:25658828

  19. Cold fusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembree, D. M.; Burchfield, L. A.; Fuller, E. L., Jr.; Perey, F. G.; Mamantov, G.

    1990-06-01

    A series of experiments designed to detect the by-products expected from deuterium fusion occurring in the palladium and titanium cathodes of heavy water, D2O, electrolysis cells is reported. The primary purpose of this account is to outline the integrated experimental design developed to test the cold fusion hypothesis and to report preliminary results that support continuing the investigation. Apparent positive indicators of deuterium fusion were observed, but could not be repeated or proved to originate from the electrochemical cells. In one instance, two large increases in the neutron count rate, the largest of which exceeded the background by 27 standard deviations, were observed. In a separate experiment, one of the calorimetry cells appeared to be producing approximately 18 percent more power that the input value, but thermistor failure prevented an accurate recording of the event as a function of time. In general, the tritium levels in most cells followed the slow enrichment expected from the electrolysis of D2O containing a small amount of tritium. However, after 576 hours of electrolysis, one cell developed a tritium concentration approximately seven times greater than expected level.

  20. Cold quark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2010-05-15

    We perform an O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}) perturbative calculation of the equation of state of cold but dense QCD matter with two massless and one massive quark flavor, finding that perturbation theory converges reasonably well for quark chemical potentials above 1 GeV. Using a running coupling constant and strange quark mass, and allowing for further nonperturbative effects, our results point to a narrow range where absolutely stable strange quark matter may exist. Absent stable strange quark matter, our findings suggest that quark matter in (slowly rotating) compact star cores becomes confined to hadrons only slightly above the density of atomic nuclei. Finally, we show that equations of state including quark matter lead to hybrid star masses up to M{approx}2M{sub {center_dot},} in agreement with current observations. For strange stars, we find maximal masses of M{approx}2.75M{sub {center_dot}}and conclude that confirmed observations of compact stars with M>2M{sub {center_dot}}would strongly favor the existence of stable strange quark matter.

  1. Early results utilizing high-energy fission product (gamma) rays to detect fissionable material in cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Accatino, M R; Bernstein, A; Church, J A; Descalle, M A; Gosnell, T B; Hall, J M; Loshak, A; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; McDowell, M; Moore, T M; Norman, E B; Pohl, B A; Pruet, J A; Petersen, D C; Walling, R S; Weirup, D L; Prussin, S G

    2004-09-30

    A concept for detecting the presence of special nuclear material ({sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu) concealed in intermodal cargo containers is described. It is based on interrogation with a pulsed beam of 7 MeV neutrons that produce fission events and their {beta}-delayed neutron emission or {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma}-radiation between beam pulses provide the detection signature. Fission product {beta}-delayed {gamma}-rays above 3 MeV are nearly ten times more abundant than {beta}-delayed neutrons and are distinct from natural radioactivity and from nearly all of the induced activity in a normal cargo. Detector backgrounds and potential interferences with the fission signature radiation have been identified and quantified. An important goal in the US is the detection of nuclear weapons or special nuclear material (SNM) concealed in intermodal cargo containers. This must be done with high detection probability, low false alarm rates, and without impeding commerce, i.e. about one minute for an inspection. The concept for inspection has been described before and its components are now being evaluated. While normal radiations emitted from plutonium may allow its detection, the majority of {sup 235}U {gamma} ray emission is at 186 keV, is readily attenuated by cargo, and thus not a reliable detection signature for passive detection. Delayed neutron detection following a neutron or photon beam pulse has been used successfully to detect lightly or unshielded SNM targets. While delayed neutrons can be easily distinguished from beam neutrons they have relatively low yield in fission, approximately 0.008 per fission in {sup 239}Pu and 0.017 per fission in {sup 235}U, and are rapidly attenuated in hydrogenous materials making that technique unreliable when challenged by thick hydrogenous cargo overburden. They propose detection of {beta}-delayed high-energy {gamma} radiation as a more robust signature characteristic of SNM.

  2. Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R; Chen, Y J; Hambsch, F J; Kornilov, N V; Lestone, J P; Litaize, O; Morillon, B; Neudecker, D; Oberstedt, S; Ohsawa, T; Smith, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides”was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei. The following technical areas were addressed: (i) experiments and uncertainty quantification (UQ): New data for neutron-induced fission of 233U, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu have been measured, and older data have been compiled and reassessed. There is evidence from the experimental work of this CRP that a very small percentage of neutrons emitted in fission are actually scission neutrons; (ii) modeling: The Los Alamos model (LAM) continues to be the workhorse for PFNS evaluations. Monte Carlo models have been developed that describe the fission phenomena microscopically, but further development is needed to produce PFNS evaluations meeting the uncertainty targets; (iii) evaluation methodologies: PFNS evaluations rely on the use of the least-squares techniques for merging experimental and model data. Considerable insight was achieved on how to deal with the problem of too small uncertainties in PFNS evaluations. The importance of considering that all experimental PFNS data are “shape” data was stressed; (iv) PFNS evaluations: New evaluations, including covariance data, were generated for major actinides including 1) non-model GMA evaluations of the 235U(nth,f), 239Pu(nth,f), and 233U(nth,f) PFNS based exclusively on experimental data (0.02 ≤ E ≤ 10 MeV), which resulted in PFNS average energies E of 2.00±0.01, 2.073±0.010, and 2.030±0.013 MeV, respectively; 2) LAM evaluations of neutron-induced fission spectra on uranium and plutonium targets with improved UQ for incident energies from thermal up to 30 MeV; and 3) Point-by-Point calculations for 232Th, 234U and 237Np targets; and (v) data

  3. Plants in a cold climate.

    PubMed Central

    Smallwood, Maggie; Bowles, Dianna J

    2002-01-01

    Plants are able to survive prolonged exposure to sub-zero temperatures; this ability is enhanced by pre-exposure to low, but above-zero temperatures. This process, known as cold acclimation, is briefly reviewed from the perception of cold, through transduction of the low-temperature signal to functional analysis of cold-induced gene products. The stresses that freezing of apoplastic water imposes on plant cells is considered and what is understood about the mechanisms that plants use to combat those stresses discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the extracellular matrix. PMID:12171647

  4. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  5. Nonfreezing cold-induced injuries.

    PubMed

    Imray, C H E; Richards, P; Greeves, J; Castellani, J W

    2011-03-01

    Non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) is the Cinderella of thermal injuries and is a clinical syndrome that occurs when tissues are exposed to cold temperatures close to freezing point for sustained periods. NFCI is insidious in onset, often difficult to recognize and problematic to treat, and yet the condition accounts for significant morbidity in both military and civilians who work in cold conditions. Consequently recognition of those at risk, limiting their exposure and the appropriate and timely use of suitable protective equipment are essential steps in trying to reduce the impact of the condition. This review addresses the issues surrounding NFCI. PMID:21465916

  6. New experimental approaches to investigate the fission dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benlliure, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2016-07-01

    The first ever achieved full identification of both fission fragments, in atomic and mass number, made it possible to define new observables sensitive to the fission dynamics along the fission path up to the scission point. Moreover, proton-induced fission of 208Pb at high energies offers optimal conditions for the investigation of dissipative, and transient effects, because of the high-excitation energy of the fissioning nuclei, its low angular momentum, and limited shape distortion by the reaction. In this work we show that the charge distribution of the final fission fragments can constrain the ground-to-saddle dynamics while the mass distribution is sensitive to the dynamics until the scission point.

  7. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of 244Es

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Adams, Jeb L.; Lane, Michael R.; Laue, Carola A.; Lee, Diana M.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Ninov, Victor; Patin, Joshua B.; Strellis, Dan A.; Sylwester, Eric R.; Wilk, Philip A.; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2001-03-16

    Electron-capture delayed fission was observed in {sup 244}Es produced via the {sup 237}Np({sup 12}C,5n){sup 244}Es reaction at 81 MeV (on target) with a production cross section of 0.31{+-}0.12 {micro}b. The mass-yield distribution of the fission fragments is highly asymmetric. The average preneutron-emission total kinetic energy of the fragments was measured to be 186{+-}19 MeV. Based on the ratio of the number of fission events to the measured number of {alpha} decays from the electron-capture daughter {sup 244}Cf (100% {alpha} branch), the probability of delayed fission was determined to be (1.2{+-}0.4) x 10{sup -4}. This value for the delayed fission probability fits the experimentally observed trend of increasing delayed fission probability with increasing Q value for electron-capture.

  8. Fission xenon from extinct Pu-244 in 14,301.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Ragan, D.

    1972-01-01

    Xenon extracted in step-wise heating of lunar breccia 14,301 contains a fission-like component in excess of that attributable to uranium decay during the age of the solar system. There seems to be no adequate source for this component other than Pu-244. Verification that this component is in fact due to the spontaneous fission of extinct Pu-244 comes from the derived spectrum which is similar to that observed from artificially produced Pu-244. It thus appears that Pu-244 was extant at the time lunar crustal material cooled sufficiently to arrest the thermal diffusion of xenon. Subsequent history has apparently maintained the isotopic integrity of plutonium fission xenon. Of major importance are details of the storage itself. Either the fission component is the result of in situ fission of Pu-244 and subsequent storage in 14,301 material, or the fission xenon was stored in an intermediate reservoir before incorporation into 14,301.

  9. Microscopic theory of singlet exciton fission. I. General formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; Reichman, David R.

    2013-03-01

    Singlet fission, a spin-allowed energy transfer process generating two triplet excitons from one singlet exciton, has the potential to dramatically increase the efficiency of organic solar cells. However, the dynamical mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood and a complete, microscopic theory of singlet fission is lacking. In this work, we assemble the components of a comprehensive microscopic theory of singlet fission that connects excited state quantum chemistry calculations with finite-temperature quantum relaxation theory. We elaborate on the distinction between localized diabatic and delocalized exciton bases for the interpretation of singlet fission experiments in both the time and frequency domains. We discuss various approximations to the exact density matrix dynamics and propose Redfield theory as an ideal compromise between speed and accuracy for the detailed investigation of singlet fission in dimers, clusters, and crystals. Investigations of small model systems based on parameters typical of singlet fission demonstrate the numerical accuracy and practical utility of this approach.

  10. Prompt fission gamma-ray studies at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Rusev, G.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; Fowler, M.. M; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Keksis, A. L.; Mosby, S. M.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Stoyer, M. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-11-26

    Measurements of correlated data on prompt-fission γ-rays (PFG) have been carried out for various actinide isotopes in recent years using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have developed a model that conveniently parametrizes the correlated data of γ-ray multiplicity and energy. New results on two- dimensional prompt-fission γ-ray multiplicity versus energy distributions from spontaneous fission on ²⁵²Cf and neutron-induced fission on 242mAm are presented together with previously obtained results on 233,235U and ²³⁹Pu. Correlated PFG data from ²⁵²Cf are also compared to results of the detailed theoretical model developed at LANL, for different thresholds of PFG energies. Future plans to measure correlated data on fission fragments, prompt fission neutrons and γ-rays at DANCE are presented.

  11. Experiments on nuclear fission induced by radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Skobelev, N.K.

    1994-07-01

    The cross sections of {sup 209}Bi nuclear fission induced by secondary beams of {sup 6}He and {sup 4}He are measured under identical conditions. The experimental data are in good agreement with earlier results on the fission cross section of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. The measured values of the cross section of {sup 209}Bi fission induced by {sup 6}He ions are much higher than the cross sections of fission induced by {alpha}-particles. It is found that the fission threshold for the {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction is shifted as compared to that of the {sup 4}He + {sup 209}Bi reaction. Various factors that can be responsible for the observed peculiarities in the {sup 209}Bi fission induced by the {sup 6}He ions are analyzed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Mass resolved angular distribution of fission fragments for near-barrier fusion-fission reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vorkapic, D.

    1997-05-01

    It is shown that K-equilibration fission can explain the decrease of mass resolved fission fragment anisotropy at larger mass asymmetries. Two competing mechanisms contribute to the anisotropy. The effective moment of inertia and K{sub 0}{sup 2} decreases with the increase of mass asymmetry and contribute to the increase of anisotropy. On the other hand, for larger asymmetries, the barriers are higher and lifetimes are longer. Such systems are more K equilibrated and will have smaller anisotropy. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Microscopic description of 258Fm fission dynamic with pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Fission dynamic remains a challenge for nuclear microscopic theories. In order to understand the dynamic of the last stage of the fission process, the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with BCS pairing is applied to the describe the fission of the 258Fm. A good agreement is found for the one-body observables: the total kinetic energy and the average mass asymmetry. The non-physical dependence of two-body observables with the initial shape is discussed.

  14. New Fission Cross Section Measurements using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2008-03-01

    A group of six universities (ACU, California Polytechnic, Colorado School of Mines, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ohio, and Oregon State) and three national laboratories (Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Idaho) have undertaken the task of building a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure the fission cross sections needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. The fission TPC concept will be presented, and why we think we can improve on 50 years of fission study.

  15. Fission Barriers and Neutron Gas in Compound Superheavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Junchen; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Kerman, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission and neutron emission are the principal cooling mechanisms of the compound superheavy nuclei. In the framework of the Finite-Temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov method, the fission barriers and neutron gas have been studied in the excited superheavy systems. Very different energy dependence of fission barriers has been found for ^{278}112 and ^{292}114. On the other hand, the energy dependence of thermal neutron gas has been found to be almost identical for both systems.

  16. Neutron emission from fission fragments during acceleration p

    SciTech Connect

    Hinde, D.J.; Charity, R.J.; Foote, G.S.; Leigh, J.R.; Newton, J.O.; Ogaza, S.; Chatterjee, A.

    1984-03-19

    Fission-neutron angular correlations following fusion of /sup 19/F and /sup 232/Th have been measured. Conventional analysis, based on the approximation that post-fission neutrons originate only from fully accelerated fission fragments, gives unexpectedly large numbers of ''prefission'' neutrons. Comparison with the considerably less fissile system /sup 200/Pb gives the first convincing evidence that this approach is inadequate. Consideration of neutron emission from the accelerating fragments gives results consistent with expectations.

  17. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  18. Elutriation for Cell Cycle Synchronization in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Cell synchronization is a powerful technique for studying the eukaryotic cell cycle events precisely. The fission yeast is a rod-shaped cell whose growth is coordinated with the cell cycle. Monitoring the cellular growth of fission yeast is a relatively simple way to measure the cell cycle stage of a cell. Here, we describe a detailed method of unperturbed cell synchronization, named centrifugal elutriation, for fission yeast. PMID:26254921

  19. Fission of actinide nuclei using multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léguillon, Romain; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Hirose, Kentaro; Orlandi, Riccardo; Makii, Hiroyuki; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Ishii, Tetsuro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Chiba, Satoshi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Araki, Shohei; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Tatsuzawa, Ryotaro; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2014-09-01

    We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. We are promoting a campaign to measure fission-fragment mass distributions for neutron-rich actinide nuclei populated by transfer reactions from their ground state up to an excitation energy of several tens MeV. We thus obtain the excitation energy dependence of the mass distribution. The experiment was carried out at the 20 MV JAEA tandem facility at Tokai. We report on the data obtained in the direct reaction 18 O + 232 Th . Transfer-channels and excitation energies of the fissioning nuclei were identified using silicon dE-E detectors located at forward angle. Two fission fragments were detected in coincidence using multi-wire proportional counters. Fission fragment masses were determined by kinematic consideration. We obtained the fission fragment mass distributions for 13 nuclei from actinium to uranium and some fission barrier heights. Present study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  20. Search for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 228}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanbing; Ding Huajie; Yuan Shuanggui; Yang Weifan; Niu Yanning; Li Yingjun; Xiao Yonghou; Zhang Shengdong; Lu Xiting

    2006-10-15

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin {sup 228}Ra{yields}{beta}{sup -228}Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe {gamma}-ray detector. The {beta}-delayed fission events of {sup 228}Ac were observed and its {beta}-delayed fission probability was found to be (5{+-}2)x10{sup -12}.

  1. Revision of the JENDL FP Fission Yield Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi; Minato, Futoshi; Ohgama, Kazuya

    2016-03-01

    Some fission yields data of JENDL FP Fission Yields Data File 2011 (JENDL/FPY-2011) revealed inadequacies when applied to delayed neutron related subjects. The sensitivity analyses of decay heat summation calculations also showed some problems. From these results the fission yields of JENDL/FPY-2011 have been revised. The present report describes the revision of the yield data by emphasizing the sensitivity analyses.

  2. Fission of 232Th in a spallation neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distributions of thorium fission reaction rate in a spallation neutron field of thick lead target bombarded by protons or deuterons with energy between 1.0 and 3.7 GeV were measured. Approximately a linear dependence of the thorium fission rate on the beam energy is observed. The mean fission cross section of 232Th <σ f > ≈ 123 mb and it does not depend on energy and type of the beam particles.

  3. Trapping cold molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ch; Hogan, S D; Merkt, F

    2011-11-14

    Translationally cold H(2) molecules excited to non-penetrating |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states of principal quantum number in the range 21-37 have been decelerated and trapped using time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields. The |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states were prepared from the X (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 0, J = 0) ground state using a resonant three-photon excitation sequence via the B (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 3, J = 1) and I (1)Π(g) (v = 0, J = 2) intermediate states and circularly polarized laser radiation. The circular polarization of the vacuum ultraviolet radiation used for the B ← X transition was generated by resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing in xenon and the degree of circular polarization was determined to be 96%. To analyse the deceleration and trapping experiments, the Stark effect in Rydberg states of molecular hydrogen was calculated using a matrix diagonalization procedure similar to that presented by Yamakita et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 1419. Particular attention was given to the prediction of zero-field positions of low-l states and of avoided crossings between Rydberg-Stark states with different values of |M(J)|. The calculated Stark maps and probabilities for diabatic traversal of the avoided crossings were used as input to Monte-Carlo particle-trajectory simulations. These simulations provide a quantitatively satisfactory description of the experimental data and demonstrate that particle loss caused by adiabatic traversals of avoided crossings between adjacent |M(J)| = 3 Stark states of H(2) is small at principal quantum numbers beyond n = 25. The main source of trap losses was found to be from collisional processes. Predissociation following the absorption of blackbody radiation is estimated to be the second most important trap-loss mechanism at room temperature, and trap loss by spontaneous emission is negligible under our experimental conditions. PMID:21818497

  4. Cold nuclear fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, E. N.; Bavizhev, M. D.; Buryakov, M. G.; Dabagov, S. B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Lobastov, S. P.

    2015-07-01

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction's theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300-700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of 4He∗.

  5. Magnetic Materials Suitable for Fission Power Conversion in Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial fission reactors use combinations of shielding and distance to protect power conversion components from elevated temperature and radiation. Space mission systems are necessarily compact and must minimize shielding and distance to enhance system level efficiencies. Technology development efforts to support fission power generation scenarios for future space missions include studying the radiation tolerance of component materials. The fundamental principles of material magnetism are reviewed and used to interpret existing material radiation effects data for expected fission power conversion components for target space missions. Suitable materials for the Fission Power System (FPS) Project are available and guidelines are presented for bounding the elevated temperature/radiation tolerance envelope for candidate magnetic materials.

  6. New Measurements of Fission Neutron Spectra at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethvignot, Thierry; Granier, Thierry; Haight, Robert C.; O'Donnell, John M.; Devlin, Matthew; Nelson, Ronald O.; Drosg, Roswitha

    2002-04-01

    Interest in obtaining a more detailed understanding of prompt neutron emission in fission is now high. Information on neutron-induced fission of actinides for incident-neutron energies from a few MeV to higher energies, except for data at 14 MeV is sparse. Such measurements are now possible, and the data are needed for design studies of accelerator-driven systems. Moreover, these data provide valuable information to improve our understanding of fission at high excitation energy. As a matter of fact, a theoretical effort has been pursued recently to predict the properties of prompt neutron emission in fission. They are characterized by two basic quantities, the average number of prompt neutrons emitted per fission, which is well known up to 20 MeV, and the neutron energy spectrum, which is not nearly so well known. However, it was shown for a few cases that not only the average energy but also the shape of the Fission Neutron Spectra (FNS) depend on the incident neutron energy. It is particularly interesting to investigate the change in shape of the FNS around the first, second and third chance fission where the properties of the fissioning nucleus drastically change. At the WNR white source, the FNS were measured with the FIGARO set-up, with a ^238U fission chamber as the target. Both incoming and emitted neutron energies were determined with their time of flight. Preliminary results of recorded spectra will be presented at the meeting.

  7. Possible origin of transition from symmetric to asymmetric fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paşca, H.; Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The charged distributions of fragments produced in the electromagnetic-induced fission of the even-even isotopes of Rn, Ra, Th, and U are described within an improved scission-point model and compared with the available experimental data. The three-equal-peaked charge distributions are predicted for several fissioning nuclei with neutron number N = 136. The possible explanation of the transition from a symmetric fission mode to an asymmetric one around N ∼ 136 is presented. The excitation energy dependencies of the asymmetric and symmetric fission modes are anticipated.

  8. Time dependence of delayed neutron emission for fissionable isotope identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlaw, M.T.; Hunt, A.W.

    2005-06-20

    The time dependence of delayed neutron emission was examined as a method of fissionable isotope identification. A pulsed bremsstrahlung photon beam was used to induce photofission reactions in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu targets. The resulting delayed neutron emission was recorded between irradiating pulses and is a well-known technique for fissionable material detection. Monitoring the decay of delayed neutron emission between irradiating pulses demonstrates the ability to not only detect the presence of fissionable materials, but also to identify which fissionable isotope is present.

  9. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM FROM URANIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.E.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Russell, E.R.

    1958-10-01

    A chromatographic adsorption process is presented for the separation of plutonium from other fission products formed by the irradiation of uranium. The plutonium and the lighter element fission products are adsorbed on a sulfonated phenol-formaldehyde resin bed from a nitric acid solution containing the dissolved uranium. Successive washes of sulfuric, phosphoric, and nitric acids remove the bulk of the fission products, then an eluate of dilute phosphoric and nitric acids removes the remaining plutonium and fission products. The plutonium is selectively removed by passing this solution through zirconium phosphate, from which the plutonium is dissolved with nitric acid. This process provides a convenient and efficient means for isolating plutonium.

  10. Fission Study Using Multi-Nucleon Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, K.; Hirose, K.; Lėguillon, R.; Makii, H.; Nishinaka, I.; Orlandi, R.; Smallcombe, J.; Ishii, T.; Tsukada, K.; Asai, M.; Chiba, S.; Ohtsuki, T.; Tatsuzawa, R.; Takaki, N.

    2015-06-01

    Fission study using multi-nucleon transfer reaction will be discussed. This approach has an advantage that we can study fission of neutron-rich nuclei which cannot be accessed by particle or charged-particle capture reactions. Unique feature in our setup is that we can produce fission data for many nuclei using many transfer-channels. Also wide excitation energy range can be covered in this set up, allowing us to measure the excitation energy dependence of the fission properties. Preliminary data obtained in the 18O + 238U reaction will be presented..

  11. The Nature of Singlet Exciton Fission in Carotenoid Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Singlet exciton fission allows the fast and efficient generation of two spin triplet states from one photoexcited singlet. It has the potential to improve organic photovoltaics, enabling efficient coupling to the blue to ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum to capture the energy generally lost as waste heat. However, many questions remain about the underlying fission mechanism. The relation between intermolecular geometry and singlet fission rate and yield is poorly understood and remains one of the most significant barriers to the design of new singlet fission sensitizers. Here we explore the structure–property relationship and examine the mechanism of singlet fission in aggregates of astaxanthin, a small polyene. We isolate five distinct supramolecular structures of astaxanthin generated through self-assembly in solution. Each is capable of undergoing intermolecular singlet fission, with rates of triplet generation and annihilation that can be correlated with intermolecular coupling strength. In contrast with the conventional model of singlet fission in linear molecules, we demonstrate that no intermediate states are involved in the triplet formation: instead, singlet fission occurs directly from the initial 1Bu photoexcited state on ultrafast time scales. This result demands a re-evaluation of current theories of polyene photophysics and highlights the robustness of carotenoid singlet fission. PMID:25825939

  12. New fission-fragment detector for experiments at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-10-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a veto/trigger detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation events caused by the fission fragment interactions in the films are registered with silicon photomultipliers. Design of the detector and test measurements are described. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Nuclear Physics under the Early Career Award No. LANL20135009.

  13. The nature of singlet exciton fission in carotenoid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Musser, Andrew J; Maiuri, Margherita; Brida, Daniele; Cerullo, Giulio; Friend, Richard H; Clark, Jenny

    2015-04-22

    Singlet exciton fission allows the fast and efficient generation of two spin triplet states from one photoexcited singlet. It has the potential to improve organic photovoltaics, enabling efficient coupling to the blue to ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum to capture the energy generally lost as waste heat. However, many questions remain about the underlying fission mechanism. The relation between intermolecular geometry and singlet fission rate and yield is poorly understood and remains one of the most significant barriers to the design of new singlet fission sensitizers. Here we explore the structure-property relationship and examine the mechanism of singlet fission in aggregates of astaxanthin, a small polyene. We isolate five distinct supramolecular structures of astaxanthin generated through self-assembly in solution. Each is capable of undergoing intermolecular singlet fission, with rates of triplet generation and annihilation that can be correlated with intermolecular coupling strength. In contrast with the conventional model of singlet fission in linear molecules, we demonstrate that no intermediate states are involved in the triplet formation: instead, singlet fission occurs directly from the initial 1B(u) photoexcited state on ultrafast time scales. This result demands a re-evaluation of current theories of polyene photophysics and highlights the robustness of carotenoid singlet fission. PMID:25825939

  14. Mass distributions for induced fission of different Hg isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2012-10-01

    With the improved scission-point model mass distributions are calculated for induced fission of different Hg isotopes with even mass numbers A=180, 184, 188, 192, 196, and 198. The calculated mass distribution and mean total kinetic energy of fission fragments are in good agreement with the existing experimental data. The asymmetric mass distribution of fission fragments of 180Hg observed in the recent experiment is explained. The change in the shape of the mass distribution from asymmetric to more symmetric is revealed with increasing A of the fissioning AHg nucleus, and reactions are proposed to verify this prediction experimentally.

  15. Generalized Energy-Dependent Q Values for Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2010-03-31

    We extend Madland's parameterization of the energy release in fission to obtain the dependence of the fission Q value for major and minor actinides on the incident neutron energies in the range 0 {le} E{sub n} {le} 20 MeV. Our parameterization is based on the actinide evaluations recommended for the ENDF/B-VII.1 release. This paper describes the calculation of energydependent fission Q values based on the calculation of the prompt energy release in fission by Madland. This calculation was adopted for use in the LLNL ENDL database and then generalized to obtain the prompt fission energy release for all actinides. Here the calculation is further generalized to the total energy release in fission. There are several stages in a fission event, depending on the time scale. Neutrons and gammas may be emitted at any time during the fission event.While our discussion here is focussed on compound nucleus creation by an incident neutron, similar parameterizations could be obtained for incident gammas or spontaneous fission.

  16. Dynamical fission following peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzeri, A.; Italiano, A.

    2016-02-01

    A closed-form theoretical approach describing in a single picture both the evaporation component and the fast nonequilibrium component of the sequential fission of projectile-like fragments in a peripheral heavy-ion collision is derived and then applied to the dynamical fission observed in the 124Sn+64Ni semiperipheral collision at 35AMeV. Information on the reaction mechanism is obtained such as the opposite polarization effects and the estimate of the “formation-to-fast fission lifetimes” of the fissioning fragment.

  17. Fission cross sections in the intermediate energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Gavron, A.; Parker, W.E.; Ullmann, J.L.; Balestrini, S.J. ); Carlson, A.D.; Wasson, O.A. ); Hill, N.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Until recently there has been very little cross section data for neutron-induced fission in the intermediate energy region, primarily because no suitable neutron source has existed. At Los Alamos, the WNR target-4 facility provides a high-intensity source of neutrons nearly ideal for fission measurements extending from a fraction of a MeV to several hundred MeV. This paper summarizes the status of fission cross section data in the intermediate energy range (En > 30 MeV) and presents our fission cross section data for {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U compared to intranuclear cascade and statistical model predictions.

  18. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergy and Infectious Diseases Web site . What the Science Says About Complementary Health Approaches for the Flu ... tea Oscillococcinum Vitamin C Vitamin D What the Science Says About Complementary Health Approaches for Colds The ...

  19. Toward singlet fission for excitonic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michl, Josef; Nozik, Arthur J.; Chen, Xudong; Johnson, Justin C.; Rana, Geeta; Akdag, Akin; Schwerin, Andrew F.

    2007-09-01

    Sensitizer dyes capable of producing two triplet excited states from a singlet excited state produced by the absorption of a single photon would allow an increase of the efficiency of photovoltaic cells by up to a factor of 1.5, provided that each triplet injects an electron into a semiconductor such as TiO II. Although singlet fission in certain crystals and polymers was reported long ago, little is known about its efficiency in dyes suitable for use as sensitizers of photoinduced charge separation on semiconductors surfaces. Biradicaloids and large alternant hydrocarbons are desirable parent structures likely to meet the requirement E(T II), E(S I) > 2E(T I) for the excitation energies of the lowest excited singlet (S I) and the two triplet (T I, T II) states. We report results for 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, a model compound of the biradicaloid type. Its energy levels satisfy the desired relation, and in solution it shows no triplet formation by intersystem crossing. In the neat solid state, it forms triplets efficiently, and indirect evidence suggests that this is due to singlet fission. This appears to be the first compound displaying SF by design. When two such chromophores were combined into dimers, triplet formation yields of up to 9% were observed in polar solvents, possibly due to singlet fission, but possibly due to intersystem crossing. The triplet formation occurs in two steps, via an intermediate assigned as an intramolecular charge-transfer state and responsible for most of the observed excitation loss.

  20. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, T.

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that “at rest” annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  1. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-02-01

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that "at rest" annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas — inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton — to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  2. ORNL fission product release tests VI-6

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.F.; Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Lee, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The ORNL fission product release tests investigate release and transport of the major fission products from high-burnup fuel under LWR accident conditions. The two most recent tests (VI-4 and VI-5) were conducted in hydrogen. In three previous tests in this series (VI-1, VI-2, and VI-3), which had been conducted in steam, the oxidized Zircaloy cladding remained largely intact and acted as a barrier to steam reaction with the UO{sub 2}. Test VI-6 was designed to insure significant oxidation of the UO{sub 2} fuel, which has been shown to enhance release of certain fission products, especially molybdenum and ruthenium. The BR3 fuel specimen used in test VI-6 will be heated in hydrogen to 2300 K; the Zircaloy cladding is expected to melt and runoff at {approximately}2150 K. Upon reaching the 2300 K test temperature, the test atmosphere will be changed to steam, and that temperature will be maintained for 60 min, with the three collection trains being operated for 2-, 18-, and 40-min periods. The releases of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 137}Cs will be monitored continuously throughout the test. Posttest analyses of the material collected on the three trains will provide results on the release and transport of Mo, Ru, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, and Eu as a function of time at 2300 K. Continuous monitoring of the hydrogen produced during the steam atmosphere period at high temperature will provide a measure of the oxidation rate of the cladding and fuel. Following delays in approval of the safety documentation and in decontamination of the hot cell and test apparatus, test VI-6 will be conducted in late May.

  3. Antiproton Powered Gas Core Fission Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, Terry

    2005-02-06

    Extensive research in recent years has demonstrated that 'at rest' annihilation of antiprotons in the uranium isotope U238 leads to fission at nearly 100% efficiency. The resulting highly-ionizing, energetic fission fragments can heat a suitable medium to very high temperatures, making such a process particularly suitable for space propulsion applications. Such an ionized medium, which would serve as a propellant, can be confined by a magnetic field during the heating process, and subsequently ejected through a magnetic nozzle to generate thrust. The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) magnetic configuration is especially suited for this application since the underlying confinement principle is that the plasma be of such density and temperature as to make the ion-ion collision mean free path shorter than the plasma length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid, and its escape from the system is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. For the system we propose we envisage radially injecting atomic or U238 plasma beam at a pre-determined position and axially pulsing an antiproton beam which upon interaction with the uranium target gives rise to near isotropic ejection of fission fragments with a total mass of 212 amu and total energy of about 160 MeV. These particles, along with the annihilation products (i.e. pions and muons) will heat the background U238 gas - inserted into the chamber just prior to the release of the antiproton - to one keV temperature. Preliminary analysis reveals that such a propulsion system can produce a specific impulse of about 3000 seconds at a thrust of about 50 kN. When applied to a round trip Mars mission, we find that such a journey can be accomplished in about 142 days with 2 days of thrusting and requiring only one gram of antiprotons to achieve it.

  4. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selby, H. D.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Barr, D. W.; Keksis, A. L.; Meade, R. A.; Burns, C. J.; Chadwick, M. B.; Wallstrom, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99Mo, 95Zr, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141,143Ce, and 147Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ˜5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for 99Mo

  5. Analysis of prompt fission neutrons in 235U(nth,f) and fission fragment distributions for the thermal neutron induced fission of 234U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Tarrío, D.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Jansson, K.; Solders, A.; Rakopoulos, V.; Gustafsson, C.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Vidali, M.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the ongoing analysis of two fission experiments. Both projects are part of the collaboration between the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala and the JRC-IRMM. The first experiment deals with the prompt fission neutron multiplicity in the thermal neutron induced fission of 235U(n,f). The second, on the fission fragment properties in the thermal fission of 234U(n,f). The prompt fission neutron multiplicity has been measured at the JRC-IRMM using two liquid scintillators in coincidence with an ionization chamber. The first experimental campaign focused on 235U(nth,f) whereas a second experimental campaign is foreseen later for the same reaction at 5.5 MeV. The goal is to investigate how the so-called sawtooth shape changes as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Some harsh experimental conditions were experienced due to the large radiation background. The solution to this will be discussed along with preliminary results. In addition, the analysis of thermal neutron induced fission of 234U(n,f) will be discussed. Currently analysis of data is ongoing, originally taken at the ILL reactor. The experiment is of particular interest since no measurement exist of the mass and energy distributions for this system at thermal energies. One main problem encountered during analysis was the huge background of 235U(nth,f). Despite the negligible isotopic traces in the sample, the cross section difference is enormous. Solution to this parasitic background will be highlighted.

  6. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Nicholls, C.M.; Wells, I.; Spence, R.

    1959-10-13

    The separation of uranium and plutonium from neutronirradiated uranium is described. The neutron-irradiated uranium is dissolved in nitric acid to provide an aqueous solution 3N in nitric acid. The fission products of the solution are extruded by treating the solution with dibutyl carbitol substantially 1.8N in nitric acid. The organic solvent phase is separated and neutralized with ammonium hydroxide and the plutonium reduced with hydroxylamine base to the trivalent state. Treatment of the mixture with saturated ammonium nitrate extracts the reduced plutonium and leaves the uranium in the organic solvent.

  7. Recent fission cross section standards measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 235/U(n,f) reaction is the standard by which most neutron induced fission cross sections are determined. Most of these cross sections are derived from relatively easy ratio measurements to /sup 235/U. However, the more difficult /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section measurements require the use of advanced neutron detectors for the determination of the incident neutron fluence. Examples of recent standard cross section measurements are discussed, various neutron detectors are described, and the status of the /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section standard is assessed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Decay Chain Deduction of Uranium Fission Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiping; Tian, Chenyang; Wang, Xiaotian; Lv, Ning; Ma, Meng; Wei, Yingguang

    2016-07-01

    Delayed gamma spectrum is the fingerprint of uranium materials in arms control verification technology. The decay chain is simplified into basic state linear chain and excitation state linear chain to calculate and analyze the delayed gamma spectra of fission products. Formulas of the changing rule for nuclide number before and after zero-time are deduced. The C program for calculating the delayed gamma ray spectra data is constructed, and related experiments are conducted to verify this theory. Through analysis of the delayed gamma counts of several nuclides, the calculated results are found to be consistent with experimental values. PMID:27218290

  9. Finite Element Solver for Fission Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-01-30

    FELIX is a physics computer code used to model fission fragment mass distributions in a fully quantum-mechanical, misroscopic framework that only relies on our current knowledge of nuclear forces. It is an implementation of the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM), which simulates the dynamics of a collective quantum wave-packet assuming the motion is adiabatic. In typical applications of the TDGCM, the nuclear collective wavepacket is obtained as a superposition of wavefunctions obtained by solving themore » Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of nuclear density functional theory (DFT). The program calculates at each time step the coefficients of that superposition.« less

  10. Finite Element Solver for Fission Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    FELIX is a physics computer code used to model fission fragment mass distributions in a fully quantum-mechanical, misroscopic framework that only relies on our current knowledge of nuclear forces. It is an implementation of the time-dependent generator coordinate method (TDGCM), which simulates the dynamics of a collective quantum wave-packet assuming the motion is adiabatic. In typical applications of the TDGCM, the nuclear collective wavepacket is obtained as a superposition of wavefunctions obtained by solving the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of nuclear density functional theory (DFT). The program calculates at each time step the coefficients of that superposition.

  11. Garlic for the common cold.

    PubMed

    Lissiman, Elizabeth; Bhasale, Alice L; Cohen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Garlic is alleged to have antimicrobial and antiviral properties that relieve the common cold, among other beneficial effects. There is widespread usage of garlic supplements. The common cold is associated with significant morbidity and economic consequences. On average, children have six to eight colds per year and adults have two to four.Objectives To determine whether garlic (Allium sativum) is effective for the prevention or treatment of the common cold, when compared to placebo, no treatment or other treatments.Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 7),OLDMEDLINE (1950 to 1965),MEDLINE (January 1966 to July week 5, 2014), EMBASE(1974 to August 2014) and AMED (1985 to August 2014).Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of common cold prevention and treatment comparing garlic with placebo, no treatment or standard treatment.Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed and selected trials from searches, assessed and rated study quality and extracted relevant data.Main results In this updated review, we identified eight trials as potentially relevant from our searches. Again, only one trial met the inclusion criteria.This trial randomly assigned 146 participants to either a garlic supplement (with 180 mg of allicin content) or a placebo (once daily)for 12 weeks. The trial reported 24 occurrences of the common cold in the garlic intervention group compared with 65 in the placebo group (P value < 0.001), resulting in fewer days of illness in the garlic group compared with the placebo group (111 versus 366). The number of days to recovery from an occurrence of the common cold was similar in both groups (4.63 versus 5.63). Only one trial met the inclusion criteria, therefore limited conclusions can be drawn. The trial relied on self reported episodes of the common cold but was of reasonable quality in terms of randomisation and allocation concealment. Adverse effects included rash and odour. Authors' conclusions

  12. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  13. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  14. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A; Wu, Ching - Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  15. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Background: Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. Purpose: To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. Methods: We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Results: Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. Conclusions: The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. Consequently, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  16. Exciton Correlations in Intramolecular Singlet Fission.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Samuel N; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Steigerwald, Michael L; Campos, Luis M; Sfeir, Matthew Y

    2016-06-15

    We have synthesized a series of asymmetric pentacene-tetracene heterodimers with a variable-length conjugated bridge that undergo fast and efficient intramolecular singlet fission (iSF). These compounds have distinct singlet and triplet energies, which allow us to study the spatial dynamics of excitons during the iSF process, including the significant role of exciton correlations in promoting triplet pair generation and recombination. We demonstrate that the primary photoexcitations in conjugated dimers are delocalized singlets that enable fast and efficient iSF. However, in these asymmetric dimers, the singlet becomes more localized on the lower energy unit as the length of the bridge is increased, slowing down iSF relative to analogous symmetric dimers. We resolve the recombination kinetics of the inequivalent triplets produced via iSF, and find that they primarily decay via concerted processes. By identifying different decay channels, including delayed fluorescence via triplet-triplet annihilation, we can separate transient species corresponding to both correlated triplet pairs and uncorrelated triplets. Recombination of the triplet pair proceeds rapidly despite our experimental and theoretical demonstration that individual triplets are highly localized and unable to be transported across the conjugated linker. In this class of compounds, the rate of formation and yield of uncorrelated triplets increases with bridge length. Overall, these constrained, asymmetric systems provide a unique platform to isolate and study transient species essential for singlet fission, which are otherwise difficult to observe in symmetric dimers or condensed phases. PMID:27183040

  17. Microscopy of Fission Yeast Sexual Lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Vjestica, Aleksandar; Merlini, Laura; Dudin, Omaya; Bendezu, Felipe O; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been an invaluable model system in studying the regulation of the mitotic cell cycle progression, the mechanics of cell division and cell polarity. Furthermore, classical experiments on its sexual reproduction have yielded results pivotal to current understanding of DNA recombination and meiosis. More recent analysis of fission yeast mating has raised interesting questions on extrinsic stimuli response mechanisms, polarized cell growth and cell-cell fusion. To study these topics in detail we have developed a simple protocol for microscopy of the entire sexual lifecycle. The method described here is easily adjusted to study specific mating stages. Briefly, after being grown to exponential phase in a nitrogen-rich medium, cell cultures are shifted to a nitrogen-deprived medium for periods of time suited to the stage of the sexual lifecycle that will be explored. Cells are then mounted on custom, easily built agarose pad chambers for imaging. This approach allows cells to be monitored from the onset of mating to the final formation of spores. PMID:27022830

  18. Fission fragment rockets: A potential breakthrough

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.; Dickson, P.W.; Schnitzler, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    A new reactor concept which has the potential of enabling extremely energetic and ambitious space propulsion missions is described. Fission fragments are directly utilized as the propellant by guiding them out of a very low density core using magnetic fields. The very high fission fragment exhaust velocities yield specific impulses of approximately a million seconds while maintaining respectable thrust levels. Specific impulses of this magnitude allow acceleration of significant payload masses to several percent of the velocity of light and enable a variety of interesting missions, e.g., payloads to the nearest star, Alpha Centauri, in about a hundred years for very rapid solar system transport. The parameters reported in this paper are based on a very preliminary analysis. Considerable trade-off studies will be required to find the optimum system. We hope the optimum system proves to be as attractive as our preliminary analysis indicates, although we must admit that our limited effort is insufficient to guarantee any specific level of performance.

  19. A Fission-Powered Interstellar Precursor Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Lenard, R.X.; Lipinski, R.J.; West, J.L.; Wright, S.A.

    1998-10-28

    An 'interstellar precursor mission' lays the groundwork for eventual interstellar exploration by studying the interstellar medium and by stretching technologies that have potential application for eventual interstellar exploration. The numerous scientific goals for such a mission include generating a 3-D stellar map of our galaxy, studying Kuiper-belt and Oort cloud objects, and observing distant objects using the sun's gravitational lens as the primary of an enormous telescope. System equations are developed for a space tug which propels a 2500-kg scientific payload to 550 astronomical units in about 20 years. The tug to transport this payload uses electric propulsion with an Isp of 15,000 seconds and a fission reactor with a closed Brayton cycle to genemte the electricity. The optimal configuration may be to thrust for only about 6 years and then coast for the remaining 14 pars. This spacecraft does not require any physics breakthroughs or major advances in technology. The fission power syslem can be engineered and built by drawing upon known technologies developed for relatgd systems over the past 40 years. The tug system would eventually reach 1000 a.u in 33 years, and would have adequate power to relay large amounts of data throughout its journey.

  20. FYPO: the fission yeast phenotype ontology

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Midori A.; Lock, Antonia; Bähler, Jürg; Oliver, Stephen G.; Wood, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To provide consistent computable descriptions of phenotype data, PomBase is developing a formal ontology of phenotypes observed in fission yeast. Results: The fission yeast phenotype ontology (FYPO) is a modular ontology that uses several existing ontologies from the open biological and biomedical ontologies (OBO) collection as building blocks, including the phenotypic quality ontology PATO, the Gene Ontology and Chemical Entities of Biological Interest. Modular ontology development facilitates partially automated effective organization of detailed phenotype descriptions with complex relationships to each other and to underlying biological phenomena. As a result, FYPO supports sophisticated querying, computational analysis and comparison between different experiments and even between species. Availability: FYPO releases are available from the Subversion repository at the PomBase SourceForge project page (https://sourceforge.net/p/pombase/code/HEAD/tree/phenotype_ontology/). The current version of FYPO is also available on the OBO Foundry Web site (http://obofoundry.org/). Contact: mah79@cam.ac.uk or vw253@cam.ac.uk PMID:23658422

  1. A fission-powered interstellar precursor mission

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Lenard, Roger X.; Wright, Steven A. West, John L.

    1999-01-01

    An {open_quotes}interstellar precursor mission{close_quotes} lays the groundwork for eventual interstellar exploration by studying the interstellar medium and by stretching technologies that have potential application for eventual interstellar exploration. The numerous scientific goals for such a mission include generating a 3-D stellar map of our galaxy, studying Kuiper-belt and Oort cloud objects, and observing distant objects using the sun{close_quote}s gravitational lens as the primary of an enormous telescope. System equations are developed for a space tug which propels a 2500-kg scientific payload to 550 astronomical units in about 20 years. The tug to transport this payload uses electric propulsion with an lsp of 15,000 seconds and a fission reactor with a closed Brayton cycle to generate the electricity. The optimal configuration may be to thrust for only about 6 years and then coast for the remaining 14 years. This spacecraft does not require any physics breakthroughs or major advances in technology. The fission power system can be engineered and built by drawing upon known technologies developed for related systems over the past 40 years. The tug system would eventually reach 1000 a.u in 33 years, and would have adequate power to relay large amounts of data throughout its journey. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Monte Carlo simulation based toy model for fission process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear fission has been modeled notoriously using two approaches method, macroscopic and microscopic. This work will propose another approach, where the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The aim is to see the usefulness of particle distribution in fission yield calculation. Inasmuch nucleus is a toy, then the Fission Toy Model (FTM) does not represent real process in nature completely. The fission event in FTM is represented by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. By adopting the nucleon density approximation, the Gaussian distribution is chosen as particle distribution. This distribution function generates random number that randomizes distance between particles and a central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. The yield is determined from portion of nuclei distribution which is proportional with portion of mass numbers. By using modified FTM, characteristic of particle distribution in each fission event could be formed before fission process. These characteristics could be used to make prediction about real nucleons interaction in fission process. The results of FTM calculation give information that the γ value seems as energy.

  3. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  4. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  5. Singlet fission in pentacene through multiple exciton quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zimmerman, Paul; Musgrave, Charles

    2010-03-01

    Multi-exciton generation (MEG) has been reported for several materials and may dramatically increase solar cell efficiency. Singlet fission is the molecular analogue of MEG and has been observed in various systems, including tetracene and pentacene, however, no fundamental mechanism for singlet fission has yet been described, although it may govern MEG processes in a variety of materials. Because photoexcited states have single-exciton character, singlet fission to produce a pair of triplet excitons must involve an intermediate state that: (1) exhibits multi-exciton (ME) character, (2) is accessible from S1 and satisfies the fission energy requirement, and (3) efficiently dissociates into multiple electron-hole pairs. Here, we use sophisticated ab initio calculations to show that singlet fission in pentacene proceeds through a dark state (D) of ME character that lies just below S1, satisfies the fission energy requirement (ED>2ET0), and splits into two triplets (2xT0). In tetracene, D lies just above S1, consistent with the observation that singlet fission is thermally activated in tetracene. Rational design of photovoltaic systems that exploit singlet fission will require ab initio analysis of ME states such as D.

  6. Whole-rock uranium analysis by fission track activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Haines, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    We report a whole-rock uranium method in which the polished sample and track detector are separated in a vacuum chamber. Irradiation with thermal neutrons induces uranium fission in the sample, and the detector records the integrated fission track density. Detection efficiency and geometric factors are calculated and compared with calibration experiments.

  7. SEPARATION OF FISSION PRODUCTS FROM PLUTONIUM BY PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.; Davidson, N.R.

    1959-09-01

    Fission product separation from hexavalent plutonium by bismuth phosphate precipitation of the fission products is described. The precipitation, according to this invention, is improved by coprecipitating ceric and zirconium phosphates (0.05 to 2.5 grams/liter) with the bismuth phosphate.

  8. Immobilization of fission products in phosphate ceramic waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.

    1996-10-01

    The goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel low-temperature solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology for immobilizing waste streams containing fission products such as cesium, strontium, and technetium in a chemically bonded phosphate ceramic. This technology can immobilize partitioned tank wastes and decontaminate waste streams containing volatile fission products.

  9. Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits

    DOEpatents

    Ruddy, Francis H.

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

  10. Fission-track ages from the Precambrian of Shropshire.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; Toghill, P.; Ross, R.J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of Longmyndian and Uriconian strata from S of Shrewsbury, England have been processed for apatite and/or zircon fission-track ages. The resultant ages illustrate how depth of burial may affect fission-track ages. The analytical procedures followed were as described in Naeser (1979).-from Authors

  11. Low scatter lightweight fission spectrometer constructed for biological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.

    1968-01-01

    Low scatter, lightweight fission spectrometer provides a simple, reliable method for determining absolute neutron fluxes in a fixed neutron. It minimizes neutron scatter and energy degradation effects, and has a counting volume large enough to intercept the most energetic fission fragments, yet small enough to be discriminating.

  12. Fission energy program of the US Department of Energy, FY 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Robert L.

    1980-03-01

    Information is presented concerning the National Energy Plan and fission energy policy; fission energy program management; converter reactor systems; breeder reactor systems; and special nuclear evaluations and systems.

  13. Ceramic Hosts for Fission Products Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C Kong

    2010-07-01

    Natural spinel, perovskite and zirconolite rank among the most leach resistant of mineral forms. They also have a strong affinity for a large number of other elements and including actinides. Specimens of natural perovskite and zirconolite were radioisotope dated and found to have survived at least 2 billion years of natural process while still remain their loading of uranium and thorium . Developers of the Synroc waste form recognized and exploited the capability of these minerals to securely immobilize TRU elements in high-level waste . However, the Synroc process requires a relatively uniform input and hot pressing equipment to produce the waste form. It is desirable to develop alternative approaches to fabricate these durable waste forms to immobilize the radioactive elements. One approach is using a high temperature process to synthesize these mineral host phases to incorporate the fission products in their crystalline structures. These mineral assemblages with immobilized fission products are then isolated in a durable high temperature glass for periods measured on a geologic time scale. This is a long term research concept and will begin with the laboratory synthesis of the pure spinel (MgAl2O4), perovskite (CaTiO3) and zirconolite (CaZrTi2O7) from their constituent oxides. High temperature furnace and/or thermal plasma will be used for the synthesis of these ceramic host phases. Nonradioactive strontium oxide will be doped into these ceramic phases to investigate the development of substitutional phases such as Mg1-xSrxAl2O4, Ca1-xSrxTiO3 and Ca1-xSrxZrTi2O7. X-ray diffraction will be used to establish the crystalline structures of the pure ceramic hosts and the substitution phases. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) will be performed for product morphology and fission product surrogates distribution in the crystalline hosts. The range of strontium doping is planned to reach the full substitution of the divalent

  14. Photodissociation of dichlorocarbene CCl 2 at 248 nm in a cold beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, G. P.; Felder, P.; Huber, J. Robert

    1994-03-01

    The photodissociation of the dichlorocarbene radical CCl 2 at 248 nm has been studied by photofragment translational spectroscopy. An intense beam of cold CCl 2 was generated from CHCl 3 by a pulsed molecular beam source equipped with a flash pyrolysis nozzle. The photolysis proceeds exclusively via CCl bond fission yielding CCl+Cl. The photofragment recoil distributions imply that more than 60% of the available energy is channeled into the internal degree of freedom of CCl and that the angular distribution is almost isotropic.

  15. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  16. Caffeine and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Thomas, M; Perry, K; Whitney, H

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine whether caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee removed the malaise (reduced alertness, slower psychomotor performance) associated with having a common cold. One hundred volunteers were tested when healthy and 46 returned to the laboratory when they developed colds. Those subjects who remained healthy were then recalled as a control group. On the second visit subjects carried out two sessions, one pre-drink and another an hour after the drink. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions, caffeinated coffee (1.5 mg/kg caffeine/body weight), decaffeinated coffee or fruit juice. Subjects with colds reported decreased alertness and were slower at performing psychomotor tasks. Caffeine increased the alertness and performance of the colds subjects to the same level as the healthy group and decaffeinated coffee also led to an improvement. These results suggest that drugs which increase alertness can remove the malaise associated with the common cold, and that increased stimulation of the sensory afferent nerves may also be beneficial. PMID:9443519

  17. Mathematical modeling of cold cap

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-10-13

    The ultimate goal of studies of cold cap behavior in glass melters is to increase the rate of glass processing in an energy-efficient manner. Regrettably, mathematical models, which are ideal tools for assessing the responses of melters to process parameters, have not paid adequate attention to the cold cap. In this study, we consider a cold cap resting on a pool of molten glass from which it receives a steady heat flux while temperature, velocity, and extent of conversion are functions of the position along the vertical coordinate. A one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model simulates this process by solving the differential equations for mass and energy balances with appropriate boundary conditions and constitutive relationships for material properties. The sensitivity analyses on the effects of incoming heat fluxes to the cold cap through its lower and upper boundaries show that the cold cap thickness increases as the heat flux from above increases, and decreases as the total heat flux increases. We also discuss the effects of foam, originating from batch reactions and from redox reactions in molten glass and argue that models must represent the foam layer to achieve a reliable prediction of the melting rate as a function of feed properties and melter conditions.

  18. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  19. Cross correlation method application to prompt fission neutron investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M. A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2012-10-01

    Do The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying cross correlation method and digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach for neutron/gamma pulse shape separation was developed and implemented for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-of-flight measurement. The main goal was development of automated data analysis algorithms and procedures for data analysis with minimum human intervention. Experimental data was taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to well work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter [1]. About 2*107 fission events were registered with 2*105 neutron/gamma detection in coincidence with fission fragments. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer.

  20. First fission mass yield measurements using SPIDER at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, Krista; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Devlin, Matt; Bredeweg, Todd; Jandel, Marian; Jorgenson, Justin; Nelson, Ron; White, Morgan; Shields, Dan; Blakeley, Rick; Hecht, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Robust measurements of fission product properties, including mass yields, are important for advancing our understanding of the complex fission process and as improved inputs to calculation and simulation efforts in nuclear applications. The SPIDER detector, located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), is a recently developed mass spectrometer aimed at measuring fission product mass yields with high resolution as a function of incident neutron energy and product mass, charge, and kinetic energy. The prototype SPIDER detector has been assembled, tested, installed at the Lujan Center at LANSCE, and taken initial thermal neutron induced measurements. The first results of mass yields for spontaneous fission of 252Cf and thermal neutron-induced fission of 235U measured with SPIDER will be presented. Ongoing upgrades and future plans for SPIDER will also be discussed. This work is in part supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Projects 20110037DR and 20120077DR. LA-UR-14-24830.

  1. Mitochondrial fission - a drug target for cytoprotection or cytodestruction?

    PubMed

    Rosdah, Ayeshah A; K Holien, Jessica; Delbridge, Lea M D; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are morphologically dynamic organelles constantly undergoing processes of fission and fusion that maintain integrity and bioenergetics of the organelle: these processes are vital for cell survival. Disruption in the balance of mitochondrial fusion and fission is thought to play a role in several pathological conditions including ischemic heart disease. Proteins involved in regulating the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission are therefore potential targets for pharmacological therapies. Mdivi-1 is a small molecule inhibitor of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Inhibiting mitochondrial fission with Mdivi-1 has proven cytoprotective benefits in several cell types involved in a wide array of cardiovascular injury models. On the other hand, Mdivi-1 can also exert antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects, particularly in hyperproliferative cells. In this review, we discuss these divergent effects of Mdivi-1 on cell survival, as well as the potential and limitations of Mdivi-1 as a therapeutic agent. PMID:27433345

  2. Quantum Aspects of Low-Energy Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, W.

    2011-10-01

    A helicity representation for fission product channels with correctly defined parity is used to describe neutron induced fission with arbitrary spin density matrix in ingoing channel. Recently obtained data for ROT effect in binary fission give evidence for high accuracy of the helicity representation just at scission. A general expression for differential cross-section of (n,f)-reaction is obtained. In the framework of multilevel, many channel R-matrix theory the reduced S-matrix for JΠK effective channels rigorously derived. These channels include fission modes in natural way. Theoretical analysis of experimentally observed P-even and P-odd interference effects in low energy nuclear fission allows one to make some essential conclusions on basic mechanism of the process.

  3. Angular momentum effects in multimodal fission of {sup 226}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarian, G. G.; Hurst, B. J.; O'Kelly, D.; Schmitt, R. P.; Itkis, M. G.; Kondratiev, N. A.; Kozulin, E. M.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pashkevich, V. V.; Pokrovsky, I. V.; Salamatin, V. S.; Rusanov, A. Ya.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.

    1998-12-21

    The {gamma}-rays from the multimodal fission of the {sup 226}Th formed in {sup 18}O+{sup 208}Pb was investigated at the near- and sub-barrier energies. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}*, ranged from 23 to 26 MeV. The average {gamma}-ray multiplicities and relative {gamma}-ray energies as a function of the mass of the fission fragments exhibits a complex structure and strong variations. Such strong variations have never been previously observed in heavy ion-induced fusion-fission reactions. Obtained results may be explained with the influence of shell effects on the properties of the fission fragments. Present work is the one in series of investigation of the multimodal fission phenomena in At-Th region.

  4. Applications of Event-by-Event Fission Modeling with FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2011-09-16

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. We first discuss the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended to include spontaneous fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f), {sup 240}Pu(sf) and {sup 252}Cf(sf), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  5. Angular momentum effects in multimodal fission of {sup 226}Th

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarian, G.G.; Hurst, B.J.; OKelly, D.; Schmitt, R.P.; Itkis, M.G.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Oganessian, Y.T.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Pokrovsky, I.V.; Salamatin, V.S.; Rusanov, A.Y.; Calabretta, L.; Maiolino, C.; Lukashin, K.; Agodi, C.; Bellia, G.; Hanappe, F.; Liatard, E.; Huck, A.; Stuttge, L.

    1998-12-01

    The {gamma}-rays from the multimodal fission of the {sup 226}Th formed in {sup 18}O+{sup 208}Pb was investigated at the near- and sub-barrier energies. The corresponding excitation energies at the saddle point, E{sub sp}{sup {asterisk}}, ranged from 23 to 26 MeV. The average {gamma}-ray multiplicities and relative {gamma}-ray energies as a function of the mass of the fission fragments exhibits a complex structure and strong variations. Such strong variations have never been previously observed in heavy ion-induced fusion-fission reactions. Obtained results may be explained with the influence of shell effects on the properties of the fission fragments. Present work is the one in series of investigation of the multimodal fission phenomena in At-Th region. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Neutron capture and fission in /sup 254g/ Es

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, J.; Bigelow, J.E.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Oliver, J.H.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1985-07-01

    Integral neutron capture and neutron fission cross sections have been measured for the 276-day /sup 254g/ Es. Thermal cross sections and resonance integrals were evaluated using a cadmium filter technique. Capture cross sections were determined from alpha-particle spectrum measurements following neutron irradiations with cobalt flux monitors. Fission cross sections were measured using fission track detection techniques with STTU monitors. The fission cross-section values compared favorably with an absorption cross-section determination from a burnout experiment of SVTEs-SVUEs. The integral neutron capture and fission cross sections determined for /sup 254g/ Es are: sigma /sub c/ /sup th/ = 28.3 + or - 2.5 and I /sub c/ = 18.2 + or - 1.5 b, and sigma /sub F/ /sup th/ = 1970 + or - 200 and I /sub F/ = 1200 + or - 250 b.

  7. Characterization of the scission point from fission-fragment velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Delaune, O.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Bacri, C.-O.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Derkx, X.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Gaudefroy, L.; Golabek, C.; Jurado, B.; Lemasson, A.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Roger, T.; Shrivastava, A.

    2015-09-01

    The isotopic yield distributions and kinematic properties of fragments produced in the transfer-induced fission of 240Pu and fusion-induced fission of 250Cf, with 9 MeV and 45 MeV excitation energy, respectively, were measured in inverse kinematics with the spectrometer VAMOS. The kinematics of identified fission fragments allow to derive properties of the scission configuration such as the distance between fragments, the total kinetic energy, the neutron multiplicity, the total excitation energy, and, for the first time, the proton- and neutron-number sharing during the emergence of the fragments. These properties of the scission point are studied as functions of the fragment atomic number. The correlation between these observables, gathered in one single experiment and for two different fissioning systems at different excitation energies, give valuable information for the understanding and modeling of the fission process.

  8. Fission product studies in the symmetric mass region

    SciTech Connect

    De Laeter, J.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Loss, R.D.

    1993-05-01

    Fission yields can be determined by radiochemical or mass spectrometric techniques. Mass spectrometry can provide more accurate data, particularly in the symmetric mass region where the probability of fission is low and uncertainties in isometric ratios occur. Fine structure in the mass distribution can usually only be determined by mass spectrometry. Many of the elements in the valley of symmetry have high ionization potentials and are therefore difficult to measure by solid source mass spectrometry. Analytical techniques have been developed to provide the sensitivity required to measure the small sample sizes available in fission product studies. Cumulative fission yields for ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tin, and tellurium have been measured by mass spectrometry for the thermal and epicadmium fission of {sup 233}U and for thermal and epicadmium fission of {sup 239}Pu. These fission yields, which span the mass range 101 {le} A {le} 130, can be combined to give a mass yield curve for {sup 235}U in the valley region, which is symmetrical about A = 116.8 and exhibits fine structure in the mass 113 to 114 region. Fine structure in {sup 233}U is also present at mass 111. Mass spectrometric determinations of the fission yields of uranium ore at the Oklo mine site in Gabon enable the nuclear parameters of this natural reactor to be evaluated. This in turn enables the amounts of fission products produced in the reactor zone and the surrounding rocks enables an assessment to be made of the efficiency of this geological repository for containing radioactive waste. The elemental abundances can be determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the paucity of good fission yield data available for {sup 238}U by fast neutrons is a severe constraint in this evaluation.

  9. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  10. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-12-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  11. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  12. A method to measure prompt fission neutron spectrum using gamma multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Barry, D.; Danon, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve on current prompt fission neutron spectrum measurements, a gamma multiplicity tagging method was developed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gearttner Linear Accelerator Center. This method involves using a coincidence requirement on an array of BaF2 gamma detectors to determine the timing of a fission event. This allows for much larger fission samples to be used due to the higher penetrability of gammas compared to fission fragments. Additionally, since the method relies on gammas as opposed to fission fragments, the effects of the low level discriminator, used in fission chambers to eliminate alpha events, are not seen. A 252Cf fission chamber was constructed in order to determine the viability of this method as well as the efficiency when compared to a fission chamber. The implemented multiple gamma tagging method was found to accurately reproduce the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and to detect 30% of fission events.

  13. Towards high accurate neutron-induced fission cross sections of 240,242Pu: Spontaneous fission half-lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Pretel, C.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross sections of transuranic isotopes are being of special demand in order to provide accurate data for the new GEN-IV nuclear power plants. To minimize the uncertainties on these measurements accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives and detector efficiencies are a key point. High α-active actinides need special attention since the misinterpretation of detector signals can lead to low efficiency values or underestimation in fission fragment detection. In that context, 240,242Pu isotopes have been studied by means of a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) for measurements of their neutron-induced fission cross section. Gases with different drift velocities have been used, namely P10 and CH4. The detector efficiencies for both samples have been determined and improved spontaneous fission half-life values were obtained.

  14. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  15. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission track ages for 1992 fission track workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Crowley, K.D.; Dokka, R.K.; Galbraith, R.F.; Kowallis, B.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Two apatites and one sphene were made available to the fission track research community for analysis prior to the 1992 Fission Track Workshop held in Philadelphia, U.S.A., 13-17 July. Eighteen laboratories throughout the world received aliquots of apatite and sphene. To date, analyses by 33 different scientists have been representing 15 different laboratories. With respect to the previous two interlaboratory comparisons, there is a noticeable improvement in the accuracy of the age results (Naeser and Cebula, 1978; Naeser et al., 1981; Miller et al., 1985;Miller et al.1990). Ninety-four percent of the analysis used the external detector method (EDM) combined with the zeta technique while the remaining individuals used the population method (POP). Track length measurements (requested for the first time in the interlaboratory comparison studies) were in relatively good agreement. ?? 1993.

  16. Fission Product Yields from Fission Spectrum n+ 239Pu for ENDF/B-VII.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, M. B.; Kawano, T.; Barr, D. W.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Kahler, A. C.; Graves, T.; Selby, H.; Burns, C. J.; Inkret, W. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Lestone, J. P.; Sierk, A. J.; Talou, P.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new cumulated fission product yield (FPY) evaluation for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium that updates the ENDF/B-VI evaluation by England and Rider, for the forthcoming ENDF/B-VII.1 database release. We focus on FPs that are needed for high accuracy burnup assessments; that is, for inferring the number of fissions in a neutron environment. Los Alamos conducted an experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten fast critical assembly to determine fission product yields as part of the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration, and this has defined the Laboratory's fission standard to this day. Our evaluation includes use of the LANL-ILRR measurements (not previously available to evaluators) as well as other Laboratory FPY measurements published in the literature, especially the high-accuracy mass spectrometry data from Maeck and others. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small — especially for 99Mo — we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data, using R-value ratio measurements. The meta-analysis supports the FP measurements from the LANL-ILRR experiment. Differences between our new evaluations and ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1-2%-relative for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (4%-relative) and 147Nd (5%-relative, at 1.5 MeV) respectively. We present evidence for an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average neutron energies in Los Alamos' fast critical assemblies. Accounting for such FPY neutron energy dependencies is important if one wants to reach a goal of determining the number of fissions to accuracies of 1-2%. An evaluation of the energy-dependence of fission product yields is given for all A values based on systematical trends in the measured data, with a focus on

  17. Intramolecular Singlet Fission in Oligoacene Heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Samuel N; Kumarasamy, Elango; Pun, Andrew B; Steigerwald, Michael L; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Campos, Luis M

    2016-03-01

    We investigate singlet fission (SF) in heterodimers comprising a pentacene unit covalently bonded to another acene as we systematically vary the singlet and triplet pair energies. We find that these energies control the SF process, where dimers undergo SF provided that the resulting triplet pair energy is similar or lower in energy than the singlet state. In these systems the singlet energy is determined by the lower-energy chromophore, and the rate of SF is found to be relatively independent of the driving force. However, triplet pair recombination in these heterodimers follows the energy gap law. The ability to tune the energies of these materials provides a key strategy to study and design new SF materials-an important process for third-generation photovoltaics. PMID:26836223

  18. Lasers from fission. [nuclear pumping feasibility experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Helmick, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of the nuclear pumping of lasers was demonstrated in three experiments conducted independently at three different laboratories. In this context nuclear pumping of lasers is understood to be the excitation of a laser by the kinetic energy of the fission fragments only. A description is given of research concerned with the use of nuclear energy for the excitation of gas lasers. Experimental work was supplemented by theoretical research. Attention is given to a nuclear pumped He-Xe laser, a nuclear pumped CO laser, and a neon-nitrogen laser pumped by alpha particles. Studies involving uranium hexafluoride admixture to laser media are discussed along with research on uranium hexafluoride-fueled reactors.

  19. Control system for a small fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Saiveau, J.G.

    1985-02-08

    A system for controlling the reactivity of a small fission reactor includes an elongated, flexible hollow tube in the general form of a helical coiled spring axially positioned around and outside of the reactor vessel in an annular space between the reactor vessel and a surrounding cylindrical-shaped neutron reflector. A neutron absorbing material is provided within the hollow tube with the rate of the reaction controlled by the extension and compression of the hollow tube, e.g., extension of the tube increases reactivity while its compression reduces reactivity, in varying the amount of neutron absorbing material disposed between the reactor vessel and the neutron reflector. Conventional mechanical displacement means may be employed to control the coil density of the hollow tube as desired.

  20. A Fission-Fusion Origin for Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, V.; Raine, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    To develop a comprehensive `cells-first' approach to the origin of life, we propose that protocells form spontaneously and that the fission and fusion of these protocells drives the dynamics of their evolution. The fitness criterion for this evolution is taken to be the the stability (conservation) of domains in the protocellular membrane as determined by non-covalent molecular associations between the amphiphiles of the membrane and a subset of the macromolecules in the protocell. In the presence of a source of free energy the macromolecular content of the protocell (co-)evolves as the result of (domain-dependent) membrane-catalysed polymerisation of the prebiotic constituents delivered to the protocell by fusion. The metabolism of the cell therefore (co-)evolves on a rugged fitness landscape. We indicate how domain evolution with the same fitness criterion can potentially give rise to coding. Membrane domains may therefore provide the link between protocells and the RNA/DNA-world.

  1. (Fuel, fission product, and graphite technology)

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.

    1990-07-25

    Travel to the Forschungszentrum (KFA) -- Juelich described in this report was for the purpose of participating in the annual meeting of subprogram managers for the US/DOE Umbrella Agreement for Fuel, Fission Product, and Graphite Technology. At this meeting the highlights of the cooperative exchange were reviewed for the time period June 1989 through June 1990. The program continues to contribute technology in an effective way for both countries. Revision 15 of the Subprogram Plan will be issued as a result of the meeting. There was interest expressed by KFA management in the level of support received from the NPR program and in potential participation in the COMEDIE loop experiment being conducted at the CEA.

  2. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in continuous culture

    SciTech Connect

    Vrana, D.

    1983-08-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was cultivated in a chemostat at dilution rates of D = 0.03, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20/h. After steady state has been reached, the amount of dry matter, number of cells, concentration of residual sugar, yield coefficient (Y), and some morphological properties of the cells were estimated. Curves reflecting the dry mass, number of cells, and cell mean volume show a changing coordination between the growth rate and the rate of cell division, with respect of D. In addition, it could be concluded that in dividing cells the cell septum is localized asymmetrically; two nonidentical cells differing both in length and volume result. The degree of asymmetry is a function of the dilution rate. (25 Refs.)

  3. Fission products stability in uranium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillant, G.; Gupta, F.; Pasturel, A.

    2011-05-01

    Fission product stability in nuclear fuels is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, incorporation and solution energies of He, Kr, Xe, I, Te, Ru, Sr and Ce in pre-existing trap sites of UO 2 (vacancies, interstitials, U-O divacancy, and Schottky trio defects) are calculated using the projector-augmented-wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package. Correlation effects are taken into account within the DFT+U approach. The stability of many binary and ternary compounds in comparison to soluted atoms is also explored. Finally the involvement of FP in the formation of metallic and oxide precipitates in oxide fuels is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  4. Fission and dipole resonances in metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T. P.; Billas, I. M. L.; Branz, W.; Heinebrodt, M.; Tast, F.; Malinowski, N.

    1997-06-20

    It is not obvious that metal clusters should behave like atomic nuclei--but they do. Of course the energy and distance scales are quite different. But aside from this, the properties of these two forms of condensed matter are amazingly similar. The shell model developed by nuclear physicists describes very nicely the electronic properties of alkali metal clusters. The giant dipole resonances in the excitation spectra of nuclei have their analogue in the plasmon resonances of metal clusters. Finally, the droplet model describing the fission of unstable nuclei can be successively applied to the fragmentation of highly charged metal clusters. The similarity between clusters and nuclei is not accidental. Both systems consist of fermions moving, nearly freely, in a confined space.

  5. Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-06-05

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

  6. Nuclear fission and the transuranium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1989-02-01

    Many of the transuranium elements are produced and isolated in large quantities through the use of neutrons furnished by nuclear fission reactions: plutonium (atomic number 94) in ton quantities; neptunium (93), americium (95), and curium (96) in kilogram quantities; berkelium (97) in 100 milligram quantities; californium (98) in gram quantities; and einsteinium (99) in milligram quantities. Transuranium isotopes have found many practical applications---as nuclear fuel for the large-scale generation of electricity, as compact, long-lived power sources for use in space exploration, as means for diagnosis and treatment in the medical area, and as tools in numerous industrial processes. Of particular interest is the unusual chemistry and impact of these heaviest elements on the periodic table. This account will feature these aspects. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Results of interlaboratory comparison of fission-track age standards: Fission-track workshop-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, D.S.; Duddy, I.R.; Green, P.F.; Hurford, A.J.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Five samples were made available as standards for the 1984 Fission Track Workshop held in the summer of 1984 (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York). Two zircons, two apatites and a sphene were distributed prior to the meeting to 40 different laboratories. To date, 24 different analysts have reported results. The isotopic ages of the standards ranged from 16.8 to 98.7 Myr. Only the statement that the age of each sample was less than 200 Myr was provided with the set of standards distributed. Consequently, each laboratory was required to use their laboratory's accepted treatment (irradiation level, etching conditions, counting conditions, etc.) for these samples. The results show that some workers have serious problems in achieving accurate age determinations. This emphasizes the need to calibrate experimental techniques and counting procedures against age standards before unknown ages are determined. Any fission-track age determination published or submitted for publication can only be considered reliable if it is supported by evidence of consistent determinations on age standards. Only this can provide the scientific community with the background to build up confidence concerning the validity of the fission-track method. ?? 1985.

  8. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Larchar, Steven W.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Problem Introduction: 1. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Space Shuttle. 1a. The number of cold plate problems had increased from an average of 16.5 per/year between 1990 through 2000, to an average of 39.6 per year between 2001through 2005. 1b. Each complete set of 80 cold plates cost approximately $29 million, an average of $362,500 per cold plate. 1c It takes four months to produce a single cold plate. 2. Prevent Cold Plate Damage in Future Space Vehicles.

  9. Fission Surface Power System Initial Concept Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) and in partnership with the Department of Energy (DOE), NASA has embarked on a project to develop Fission Surface Power (FSP) technology. The primary goals of the project are to 1) develop FSP concepts that meet expected surface power requirements at reasonable cost with added benefits over other options, 2) establish a hardwarebased technical foundation for FSP design concepts and reduce overall development risk, 3) reduce the cost uncertainties for FSP and establish greater credibility for flight system cost estimates, and 4) generate the key products to allow NASA decision-makers to consider FSP as a preferred option for flight development. The FSP project was initiated in 2006 as the Prometheus Program and the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission were phased-out. As a first step, NASA Headquarters commissioned the Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study to evaluate the potential for an affordable FSP development approach. With a cost-effective FSP strategy identified, the FSP team evaluated design options and selected a Preliminary Reference Concept to guide technology development. Since then, the FSP Preliminary Reference Concept has served as a point-of-departure for several NASA mission architecture studies examining the use of nuclear power and has provided the foundation for a series of "Pathfinder" hardware tests. The long-term technology goal is a Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) integrated system test using full-scale components and a non-nuclear reactor simulator. The FSP team consists of Glenn Research Center (GRC), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the DOE National Laboratories at Los Alamos (LANL), Idaho (INL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), and Sandia (SNL). The project is organized into two main elements: Concept Definition and Risk Reduction. Under Concept Definition, the team performs trade studies, develops analytical tools, and formulates system concepts. Under Risk

  10. Fusion and fission of fluid amphiphilic bilayers.

    PubMed

    Gotter, Martin; Strey, Reinhard; Olsson, Ulf; Wennerström, Håkan

    2005-01-01

    The system water-oil (n-decane)-nonionic surfactant (C12E5) forms bilayer phases in a large concentration region, but, for a given oil-to-surfactant ratio, only in a narrow temperature range. In addition to the anisotropic lamellar phase (Lalpha) there is also, at slightly higher temperature, a sponge or L3-phase where the bilayers build up an isotropic structure extending macroscopically in three dimensions. In this phase the bilayer mid-surface has a mean curvature close to zero and a negative Euler characteristic. In this paper we study how the bilayers in the lamellar and the sponge phase respond dynamically to sudden temperature changes. The monolayer spontaneous curvature depends sensitively on temperature and a change of temperature thus provides a driving force for a change in bilayer topology. The equilibration therefore involves kinetic steps of fusion/fission of bilayers. Such dynamic processes have previously been monitored by temperature jump experiments using light scattering in the sponge phase. These experiments revealed an extraordinarily strong dependence of the relaxation time on the bilayer volume fraction phi. At phi < 0.1 the relaxation times are so slow that experiments using deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (2H-NMR) appear feasible. We here report on the first experiments concerned with the dynamics of the macroscopic phase transition sponge-lamellae by 2H-NMR. We find that the sponge-to-lamellae transition occurs through a nucleation process followed by domain growth involving bilayer fission at domain boundaries. In contrast, the lamellae-to-sponge transformation apparently occurs through a succession of uncorrelated bilayer fusion events. PMID:15715316

  11. General Description of Fission Observables: GEF Model Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K.-H.; Jurado, B.; Amouroux, C.; Schmitt, C.

    2016-01-01

    The GEF ("GEneral description of Fission observables") model code is documented. It describes the observables for spontaneous fission, neutron-induced fission and, more generally, for fission of a compound nucleus from any other entrance channel, with given excitation energy and angular momentum. The GEF model is applicable for a wide range of isotopes from Z = 80 to Z = 112 and beyond, up to excitation energies of about 100 MeV. The results of the GEF model are compared with fission barriers, fission probabilities, fission-fragment mass- and nuclide distributions, isomeric ratios, total kinetic energies, and prompt-neutron and prompt-gamma yields and energy spectra from neutron-induced and spontaneous fission. Derived properties of delayed neutrons and decay heat are also considered. The GEF model is based on a general approach to nuclear fission that explains a great part of the complex appearance of fission observables on the basis of fundamental laws of physics and general properties of microscopic systems and mathematical objects. The topographic theorem is used to estimate the fission-barrier heights from theoretical macroscopic saddle-point and ground-state masses and experimental ground-state masses. Motivated by the theoretically predicted early localisation of nucleonic wave functions in a necked-in shape, the properties of the relevant fragment shells are extracted. These are used to determine the depths and the widths of the fission valleys corresponding to the different fission channels and to describe the fission-fragment distributions and deformations at scission by a statistical approach. A modified composite nuclear-level-density formula is proposed. It respects some features in the superfluid regime that are in accordance with new experimental findings and with theoretical expectations. These are a constant-temperature behaviour that is consistent with a considerably increased heat capacity and an increased pairing condensation energy that is

  12. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-01

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 107 fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  13. Fission-Fusion Neutron Source Progress Report July 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G; Daffin, F; Clarke, R

    2010-02-19

    In this report the authors describe progress in evaluating the feasibility of a novel concept for producing intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons using the DT fusion reaction. In this new scheme the heating of the DT is accomplished using fission fragments rather than ion beams as in conventional magnet fusion schemes or lasers in ICF schemes. This has the great advantage that there is no need for any large auxiliary power source. The scheme does require large magnetic fields, but generating these fields, e.g. with superconducting magnets, requires only a modest power source. As a source of fission fragments they propose using a dusty reactor concept introduced some time ago by one of us (RC). The version of the dusty reactor that they propose using for our neutron source would operate as a thermal neutron reactor and use highly enriched uranium in the form of micron sized pellets of UC. Our scheme for using the fission fragments to produce intense pulses of 14 MeV neutrons is based on the fission fragment rocket idea. In the fission fragment rocket scheme it was contemplated that the fission fragments produced in a low density reactor core would then be guided out of the reactor by large magnetic fields. A simple version of this idea would be to use the fission fragments escaping from one side of a tandem magnet mirror to heat DT gas confined in the adjacent magnetic trap.

  14. Constraining the level density using fission of lead projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Taïeb, J.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear level density is one of the main ingredients for the statistical description of the fission process. In this work, we propose to constrain the description of this parameter by using fission reactions induced by protons and light ions on 208Pb at high kinetic energies. The experiment was performed at GSI (Darmstadt), where the combined use of the inverse kinematics technique with an efficient detection setup allowed us to measure the atomic number of the two fission fragments in coincidence. This measurement permitted us to obtain with high precision the partial fission cross sections and the width of the charge distribution as a function of the atomic number of the fissioning system. These data and others previously measured, covering a large range in fissility, are compared to state-of-the-art calculations. The results reveal that total and partial fission cross sections cannot unambiguously constrain the level density at ground-state and saddle-point deformations and additional observables, such as the width of the charge distribution of the final fission fragments, are required.

  15. Quantifying singlet fission in novel organic materials using nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Erik; Xia, Jianlong; Yaffe, Omer; Kumar, Bharat; Berkelbach, Timothy; Wu, Qin; Miller, John; Nuckolls, Colin; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Reichman, David; Campos, Luis; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2014-10-01

    Singlet fission is a form of multiple exciton generation in which two triplet excitons are produced from the decay of a photoexcited singlet exciton. In a small number of organic materials, most notably pentacene, this conversion process has been shown to occur with unity quantum yield on sub-ps timescales. However, a poorly understood mechanism for fission along with strict energy and geometry requirements have so far limited the observation of this process to a few classes of organic materials, with only a subset of these (most notably the polyacenes) showing both efficient fission and long-lived triplets. Here, we utilize novel organic materials to investigate how the efficiency of the fission process depends on the coupling and the energetic driving force between chromophores in both intra- and intermolecular singlet fission materials. We demonstrate how the triplet yield can be accurately quantified using a combination of traditional transient spectroscopies and recently developed excited state saturable absorption techniques. These results allow us to gain mechanistic insight into the fission process and suggest general strategies for generating new materials that can undergo efficient fission.

  16. Nuclear fission of neutron-deficient protactinium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Ikezoe, H.; Sueki, K.; Nakahara, H.; Tanikawa, M.; Ohtsuki, T.

    1997-08-01

    Fragment velocity, kinetic energy, mass yield, and element yield distributions in the fission of neutron-deficient Pa isotopes produced in the reactions of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O on {sup 209}Bi have been measured at incident beam energies near and above the Coulomb barriers by the time-of-flight and radiochemical methods. An asymmetric mass-division component has been observed. Measured fission cross sections were compared with the results of statistical model calculations which take into account two fission barrier heights for symmetric and asymmetric yields. The fission barrier height deduced for the asymmetric fission is found slightly lower than that for the symmetric one. The difference between the two barrier heights in the fission of the present protactinium nuclides (N{approximately}135) is considerably smaller than that in the neutron-rich nuclide of {sup 233}Pa (N{approximately}142), indicating that the difference sensitively depends on the neutron number of the fissioning nuclide. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Modelling Animal Group Fission Using Social Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sueur, Cédric; Maire, Anaïs

    2014-01-01

    Group life involves both advantages and disadvantages, meaning that individuals have to compromise between their nutritional needs and their social links. When a compromise is impossible, the group splits in order to reduce conflict of interests and favour positive social interactions between its members. In this study we built a dynamic model of social networks to represent a succession of temporary fissions involving a change in social relations that could potentially lead to irreversible group fission (i.e. no more group fusion). This is the first study that assesses how a social network changes according to group fission-fusion dynamics. We built a model that was based on different parameters: the group size, the influence of nutritional needs compared to social needs, and the changes in the social network after a temporary fission. The results obtained from this theoretical data indicate how the percentage of social relation transfer, the number of individuals and the relative importance of nutritional requirements and social links influence the average number of days before irreversible fission occurs. The greater the nutritional needs and the higher the transfer of social relations during temporary fission, the fewer days will be observed before an irreversible fission. It is crucial to bridge the gap between the individual and the population level if we hope to understand how simple, local interactions may drive ecological systems. PMID:24831471

  18. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Hdinger, D.S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fissile fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the requirement to maintain a critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in {sup 238}U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fission. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results seen, the engine design presented is inadequate. Limitations introduced by the reaction fluid far outweigh the simplicity-of-design gained. Despite this, the basic idea of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of spacecraft propulsion warrants further study.

  19. A New Method of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectrum Unfolding

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O. V.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-11-25

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. The goal was to find out the reasons of a long time existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of fission fragments (FF). On the one hand the {sup 252}Cf(sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data, on the other hand the understanding of PFN emission mechanism is very important for nuclear fission theory. Using a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber for fission fragment (FF) detection and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in total about 10{sup 7} fission fragment-neutron coincidences have been registered. Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12 bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. For the first time the dependence of the number of emitted neutrons as a function of total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fragments is in very good agreement with theoretical calculations in the range of TKE from 140-220 MeV.

  20. Compilation of fission product yields Vallecitos Nuclear Center

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    This document is the ninth in a series of compilations of fission yield data made at Vallecitos Nuclear Center in which fission yield measurements reported in the open literature and calculated charge distributions have been utilized to produce a recommended set of yields for the known fission products. The original data with reference sources, as well as the recommended yields are presented in tabular form for the fissionable nuclides U-235, Pu-239, Pu-241, and U-233 at thermal neutron energies; for U-235, U-238, Pu-239, and Th-232 at fission spectrum energies; and U-235 and U-238 at 14 MeV. In addition, U-233, U-236, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Np-237 at fission spectrum energies; U-233, Pu-239, Th-232 at 14 MeV and Cf-252 spontaneous fission are similarly treated. For 1979 U234F, U237F, Pu249H, U234He, U236He, Pu238F, Am241F, Am243F, Np238F, and Cm242F yields were evaluated. In 1980, Th227T, Th229T, Pa231F, Am241T, Am241H, Am242Mt, Cm245T, Cf249T, Cf251T, and Es254T are also evaluated.

  1. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsley, J.R., Hurley, J.P., Trainham, R., Keegan, R.P.

    2008-11-14

    In an extension of the Associated Particle Imaging technique that is used for the detection and imaging of hidden explosives, the present measurements use a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons in coincidence with two or more gammas to probe for the presence of fissionable materials. We have measured neutron-gamma-gamma coincidences with targets of depleted uranium, tungsten, lead, iron, and carbon and will present results that show the multiple-coincidence counting rate for the depleted uranium is substantially higher than any of the non-fissionable materials. In addition, the presence of coincidences involving delayed particle spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from that for non-fissionable ones. Information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence event is used to compute the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is compact and portable, and produces relatively low levels of background radiation. Simultaneous measurements on packages of interest for both explosives and fissionable materials are now feasible.

  2. Fission-product SiC reaction in HTGR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, F.

    1981-07-13

    The primary barrier to release of fission product from any of the fuel types into the primary circuit of the HTGR are the coatings on the fuel particles. Both pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings are very effective in retaining fission gases under normal operating conditions. One of the possible performance limitations which has been observed in irradiation tests of TRISO fuel is chemical interaction of the SiC layer with fission products. This reaction reduces the thickness of the SiC layer in TRISO particles and can lead to release of fission products from the particles if the SiC layer is completely penetrated. The experimental section of this report describes the results of work at General Atomic concerning the reaction of fission products with silicon carbide. The discussion section describes data obtained by various laboratories and includes (1) a description of the fission products which have been found to react with SiC; (2) a description of the kinetics of silicon carbide thinning caused by fission product reaction during out-of-pile thermal gradient heating and the application of these kinetics to in-pile irradiation; and (3) a comparison of silicon carbide thinning in LEU and HEU fuels.

  3. Feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidinger, David S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of an antiproton catalyzed fission fragment rocket (FFR). The FFR is characterized by the extraction of fission fragments from the fuel, and the utilization of their kinetic energy for thrust generation. A significant drawback to previous FFR designs was the required critical nuclear pile as the fission fragment source. The author examined the possibility of replacing the critical pile with a sub-critical pile driven by antiprotons. Recent experiments have revealed that antiprotons stimulate highly energetic fissions in 238U, with a neutron multiplicity of 13.7 neutrons per fissions. This interaction was used as a throttled neutron source. The pile consisted of layers of fissile coated fibers which are designed to allow fission fragments to escape them, where the fragments collide with a fluid. The heated fluid is then ejected from the rocket to provide thrust. The calculations performed indicate that each antiproton injected into the pile can stimulate 8 or more fissions while maintaining a neutron multiplication of less than 0.4. Based on the results, the specific design presented was inadequate. Despite this, the concept of using the antiproton-U interaction as a source of thrust warrants further study.

  4. Cold plasma decontamination of foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold plasma is a novel nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. This flexible sanitizing method uses electricity and a carrier gas such as air, oxygen, nitrogen or helium; antimicrobi...

  5. Images of the Cold War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    1989-01-01

    The conventional U.S. picture traces the Cold War to Soviet violation of wartime agreements, while the U.S.S.R. defends its actions as responses to American violations and foreign adventurism. An understanding of how ideology is shaped by national self-interest will help students see beyond propaganda and myth in interpreting past and current…

  6. Cold War Geopolitics: Embassy Locations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogeler, Ingolf

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that the geopolitics of the Cold War can be illustrated by the diplomatic ties among countries, particularly the superpowers and their respective allies. Describes a classroom project in which global patterns of embassy locations are examined and compared. Includes five maps and a chart indicating types of embassy locations. (CFR)

  7. "Stone Cold": Worthy of Study?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthwaite, Alison

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on my experiences of teaching "Stone Cold" to respond to a blog post suggesting that the novel holds little educational value. I argue that the novel's narrative style helps to foster criticality while its subject matter can help students see the relevance of literature to the world around them. Relating this to…

  8. Advances in cold plasma technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens continue to be an issue on a variety of commodities, prompting research into novel interventions. Cold plasma is a nonthermal food processing technology which uses energetic, reactive gases to inactivate contaminating microbes on meats, poultry and fruits and vegetables. The prim...

  9. The Cold Blooded Killer: Hypothermia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Rosanne

    Part of a series of home literacy readers with conversational text and sketches, this booklet depicts the subarctic Alaskan environment where cold makes extreme demands on body metabolism. Body temperature must be maintained above 80F (26.7C). A condition of too little body-heat is termed hypo- ('deficit') thermia ('heat'). Hypothermia is the…

  10. Lupus - the cold, hard facts.

    PubMed

    Wong, N W K; Ng, Vt-Y; Ibrahim, S; Slessarev, M; Chandran, V

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem chronic disease with a multitude of clinical presentations. We review and synthesize how an environmental insult (exposure to extreme cold for a short duration) and endogenous (antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, SLE vasculitis) insults in a susceptible young female with lupus (peripheral arterial disease, smoking, SLE) led to a perfect storm resulting in catastrophic injuries (frostbite). PMID:24699313

  11. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  12. Causes, consequences, and kin bias of human group fissions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim R

    2014-12-01

    Fissions of human communities are monumental occasions with consequences for cultural and genetic variation and divergence through time by means of serial founder effects. An ethnographic review shows that most human group fissions are fueled primarily by internal political conflict and secondarily by resource scarcity. As found for other social animals, human fissions lead to subgroups that have higher levels of relatedness as compared with the original community because of kin-biased assortment known as the lineal effect. Fission processes that increase the average relatedness of subgroups are important because relatedness governs how strongly kin/group selection favors social behaviors such as warfare, peacekeeping, and other forms of collection action. However, random individual assortment is not an appropriate null model for evaluating lineage assortment because nuclear families and extended households are expected to remain together, which in and of itself forces higher relatedness in smaller subgroups. We develop a lineage assortment index where low values represent subgroups with coefficients of relatedness near those expected if nuclear and extended households had chosen to associate into random groupings. Two fissions of Ache villages (Paraguay) are examples of this type of fission with a low lineage assortment index not significantly different from zero as evaluated with controlled simulations. On the other extreme, a lineage assortment index near unity represents a lineal fission that maximizes the relatedness of subgroups such as the perfect split of a lineage into sublineages. A fission of Piaroa (Venezuela) fits this scenario. While previous discussions of fission have emphasized similarities among human studies and even other social mammals, we highlight the full range of potential kin bias in the formation of new communities. PMID:25056829

  13. Simulated fissioning of uranium and testing of the fission-track dating method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, V.E.; Johnson, N.M.; Naeser, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program (FTD-SIM) faithfully simulates the fissioning of 238U with time and 235U with neutron dose. The simulation is based on first principles of physics where the fissioning of 238U with the flux of time is described by Ns = ??f 238Ut and the fissioning of 235U with the fluence of neutrons is described by Ni = ??235U??. The Poisson law is used to set the stochastic variation of fissioning within the uranium population. The life history of a given crystal can thus be traced under an infinite variety of age and irradiation conditions. A single dating attempt or up to 500 dating attempts on a given crystal population can be simulated by specifying the age of the crystal population, the size and variation in the areas to be counted, the amount and distribution of uranium, the neutron dose to be used and its variation, and the desired ratio of 238U to 235U. A variety of probability distributions can be applied to uranium and counting-area. The Price and Walker age equation is used to estimate age. The output of FTD-SIM includes the tabulated results of each individual dating attempt (sample) on demand and/or the summary statistics and histograms for multiple dating attempts (samples) including the sampling age. An analysis of the results from FTD-SIM shows that: (1) The external detector method is intrinsically more precise than the population method. (2) For the external detector method a correlation between spontaneous track count, Ns, and induced track count, Ni, results when the population of grains has a stochastic uranium content and/or when the counting areas between grains are stochastic. For the population method no correlation can exist. (3) In the external detector method the sampling distribution of age is independent of the number of grains counted. In the population method the sampling distribution of age is highly dependent on the number of grains counted. (4) Grains with zero-track counts, either in Ns or Ni, are in integral part of

  14. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  15. Combustion heated cold sealed TEC

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, V.I.; Klepikov, V.V.; Meleta, Y.A.; Mikheyev, A.S.; Yarygin, D.V.; Wolff, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a thermionic domestic boiler system using natural gas, which as performed under an ECS-project in 1992 to 1994 by a Russian-Dutch team of researchers, will be continued again. Thanks to financial support on the part of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), the major effort in 1997 to 1999 will be focused on the development, manufacture and testing of an improved, easier to fabricate, more repairable and less expensive combustion heated TEC with a longer life-time. The achievement of the aim of this project will make it possible to expand the field of the terrestrial thermionics application and to embark on the commercialization stage. This report discusses the concept of the combustion heated Cold Seal TEC. A Cold Seal TEC will be developed and tested, in which the rubber O-ring seal will electrically insulate the hot shell from the collector heat pipe. The Cold Seal TEC will use a noble gas + cesium as the working medium (the idea of such a TEC was first proposed in 1973 by Professor Musa from Romania). In its cold state, the cesium will short circuit the emitter and the collector. During operation, the interelectrode space will be filled with cesium vapor. The upper part of a Cold Seal TEC will be filled with a noble gas. This noble gas will prevent the O-ring seal from being attacked by the cesium. The TEC output characteristics will be considerably improved by using electrode materials that were developed earlier in the course of an ECS-project for the development of low temperature TEC electrodes.

  16. Singlet exciton fission in polycrystalline pentacene: from photophysics toward devices.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark W B; Rao, Akshay; Ehrler, Bruno; Friend, Richard H

    2013-06-18

    Singlet exciton fission is the process in conjugated organic molecules bywhich a photogenerated singlet exciton couples to a nearby chromophore in the ground state, creating a pair of triplet excitons. Researchers first reported this phenomenon in the 1960s, an event that sparked further studies in the following decade. These investigations used fluorescence spectroscopy to establish that exciton fission occurred in single crystals of several acenes. However, research interest has been recently rekindled by the possibility that singlet fission could be used as a carrier multiplication technique to enhance the efficiency of photovoltaic cells. The most successful architecture to-date involves sensitizing a red-absorbing photoactive layer with a blue-absorbing material that undergoes fission, thereby generating additional photocurrent from higher-energy photons. The quest for improved solar cells has spurred a drive to better understand the fission process, which has received timely aid from modern techniques for time-resolved spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and small-molecule device fabrication. However, the consensus interpretation of the initial studies using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy was that exciton fission was suppressed in polycrystalline thin films of pentacene, a material that would be otherwise expected to be an ideal model system, as well as a viable candidate for fission-sensitized photovoltaic devices. In this Account, we review the results of our recent transient absorption and device-based studies of polycrystalline pentacene. We address the controversy surrounding the assignment of spectroscopic features in transient absorption data, and illustrate how a consistent interpretation is possible. This work underpins our conclusion that singlet fission in pentacene is extraordinarily rapid (∼80 fs) and is thus the dominant decay channel for the photoexcited singlet exciton. Further, we discuss our demonstration that triplet excitons

  17. Experimental Studies of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardet, A.; Granier, T.; Laurent, B.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt fission neutron spectra were measured in the reactions 238U(n,f), 235U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f) at different incident neutron energies. The neutrons were detected using a coaxial doped p-terphenyl scintillation detector in coincidence with fission fragments and their time-of-flight was recorded. The properties of the neutron detector were determined and the results are presented in this work. A preliminary neutron detection efficiency was applied to data from the neutron-induced fission of 238U at En = 5.2 MeV, leading to encouraging results.

  18. Fission of Actinides Induced by Neutrons at nTOF

    SciTech Connect

    Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Berthier, B.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Le Naour, C.; Stephan, C.; Trubert, D.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Moreau, C.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron-induced fission cross sections of 233U, 234U, 232Th, 237Np, 209Bi, natPb have been measured on the nTOF facility at CERN, which allows an accurate energy measurement owing to the long path. Parallel plate avalanche counters were used to detect the 2 fission fragments in coincidence. This method allows an efficient discrimination of fission reactions among other types of reactions especially at high energies, and it is well suited for the very large energy range available at nTOF. The case of 234U will be used as an example of the quality of the data obtained in these measurements.

  19. Fission dynamics study in 243Am and 254Fm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, K.; Ghosh, T. K.; Roy, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chaudhuri, A.; Bhattacharya, C.; Pandey, R.; Kundu, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rana, T. K.; Meena, J. K.; Mohanto, G.; Dubey, R.; Saneesh, N.; Sugathan, P.; Guin, R.; Das, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2016-06-01

    Fission fragment mass distributions in the reactions 11B + 232Th and 11B + 243Am were measured in an energy range around the barrier. No sudden change in the width of the mass distribution as a function of center-of-mass energy was observed at near-barrier energies, indicating no quasifission transition in the near-barrier energies. Interestingly, the previous measurements of fission fragment angular anisotropies for the same systems showed significant departure from the statistical saddle-point model predictions at near-barrier energies, indicating the presence of nonequilibrium fission processes.

  20. Nanoscopic mechanisms of singlet fission in amorphous molecular solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Weiwei; Hattori, Shinnosuke; Rajak, Pankaj; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro

    2013-04-01

    Fission of a spin-singlet exciton into two triplet excitons, if realized in disordered organic solid, could revolutionize low-cost fabrication of efficient solar cells. Here, a divide-conquer-recombine approach involving nonadiabatic quantum molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations identifies the key molecular geometry and exciton-flow-network topology for singlet-fission "hot spots" in amorphous diphenyl tetracene, where fission occurs preferentially. The simulation reveals the molecular origin of experimentally observed two time scales in exciton population dynamics and may pave a way to nanostructural design of efficient solar cells from first principles.