Science.gov

Sample records for cold flow improvers

  1. Improving the cold flow properties of biodiesel with synthetic branched diester additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A technical disadvantage of biodiesel relative to petroleum diesel fuel is inferior cold flow properties. One of many methodologies to address this deficiency is employment of cold flow improver (CFI) additives. Generally composed of low-molecular weight copolymers, CFIs originally developed for pet...

  2. Improving the cold flow properties of biodiesel by skeletal isomerization of fatty acid chains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is defined as the mono-alkyl fatty acid esters made from vegetable oil or animal fat lipids. Despite its many advantages, biodiesel from most lipid feedstocks has generally poor cold flow properties. The present study evaluates the fuel related properties of branched-chain fatty acid methy...

  3. Ethyl levulinate: A potential bio-based diluent for biodiesel which improves cold flow properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physical properties of biodiesel from soybean, canola, cottonseed and poultry fat methyl esters were improved with addition of ethyl levulinate with increasing concentration. The effect of adding ethyl levulinate was determined by studying its influence on the acid value, cloud point, pour point...

  4. Cold Flow Verification Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, A.; Shadle, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The cold flow verification test facility consists of a 15-foot high, 3-foot diameter, domed vessel made of clear acrylic in two flanged sections. The unit can operate up to pressures of 14 psig. The internals include a 10-foot high jetting fluidized bed, a cylindrical baffle that hangs from the dome, and a rotating grate for control of continuous solids removal. The fluid bed is continuously fed solids (20 to 150 lb/hr) through a central nozzle made up of concentric pipes. It can either be configured as a half or full cylinder of various dimensions. The fluid bed has flow loops for separate air flow control for conveying solids (inner jet, 500 to 100000 scfh) , make-up into the jet (outer jet, 500 to 8000 scfh), spargers in the solids removal annulus (100 to 2000 scfh), and 6 air jets (20 to 200 scfh) on the sloping conical grid. Additional air (500 to 10000 scfh) can be added to the top of the dome and under the rotating grate. The outer vessel, the hanging cylindrical baffles or skirt, and the rotating grate can be used to study issues concerning moving bed reactors. There is ample allowance for access and instrumentation in the outer shell. Furthermore, this facility is available for future Cooperative Research and Development Program Manager Agreements (CRADA) to study issues and problems associated with fluid- and fixed-bed reactors. The design allows testing of different dimensions and geometries.

  5. Resource Prospector Propulsion Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Pederson, Kevin; Dervan, Melanie; Holt, Kimberly; Jernigan, Frankie; Trinh, Huu; Flores, Sam

    2014-01-01

    For the past year, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center have been working on a government version of a lunar lander design for the Resource Prospector Mission. A propulsion cold flow test system, representing an early flight design of the propulsion system, has been fabricated. The primary objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the Resource Prospector propulsion system operation through water flow testing and obtain data for anchoring analytical models. This effort will also provide an opportunity to develop a propulsion system mockup to examine hardware integration to a flight structure. This paper will report the work progress of the propulsion cold flow test system development and test preparation. At the time this paper is written, the initial waterhammer testing is underway. The initial assessment of the test data suggests that the results are as expected and have a similar trend with the pretest prediction. The test results will be reported in a future conference.

  6. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  7. Cold Flow Properties and Performance of Biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is defined as a fatty acid alkyl ester mixture obtained by reacting vegetable oil or fat with a short chain (C1-C4) alcohol. The cold flow properties of biodiesel depend on the fatty acid composition of its feedstock as well as alcohol chain-length. Increasing biodiesel production in the...

  8. Cold-Flow Propulsion Research Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An engineer at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Wind Tunnel Facility uses lasers to measure the velocity and gradient distortion across an eight inch curved pipe with joints and turning valves during a cold-flow propulsion research test; simulating the conditions found in the X-33's hydrogen feedline. Lasers are used because they are non-intrusive and do not disturb the flow like a probe would. The feedline supplies propellants to the turbo pump. The purpose of this project was to design the feedline to provide uniform flow into the turbo pump.

  9. 1. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Cold Flow Laboratory Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 2. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. COLD FLOW LABORATORY, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Cold Flow Laboratory Building B, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. Improvements in Cold-Plate Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaffetti, Mark A.; Taddey, Edmund P.; Laurin, Michael B.; Chabebe, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Five improvements are reported in cold-plate fabrication. This cold plate is part of a thermal control system designed to serve on space missions. The first improvement is the merging of the end sheets of the cold plate with the face sheets of the structural honeycomb panel. The cold plate, which can be a brazed assembly, uses the honeycomb face sheet as its end sheet. Thus, when the honeycomb panel is fabricated, the face sheet that is used is already part of the cold plate. In addition to reducing weight, costs, and steps, the main benefit of this invention is that it creates a more structurally sound assembly. The second improvement involves incorporation of the header into the closure bar to pass the fluid to a lower layer. Conventional designs have used a separate header, which increases the geometry of the system. The improvement reduces the geometry, thus allowing the cold plate to fit into smaller area. The third improvement eliminates the need of hose, tube, or manifold to supply the cooling fluid externally. The external arrangement can be easily damaged and is vulnerable to leakage. The new arrangement incorporates an internal fluid transfer tube. This allows the fluid to pass from one cold plate to the other without any exposed external features. The fourth improvement eliminates separate fabrication of cold plate(s) and structural members followed by a process of attaching them to each other. Here, the structural member is made of material that can be brazed just as that of the cold plate. Now the structural member and the cold plate can be brazed at the same time, creating a monolithic unit, and thus a more structurally sound assembly. Finally, the fifth improvement is the elimination of an additional welding step that can damage the braze joints. A tube section, which is usually welded on after the braze process, is replaced with a more structurally sound configuration that can be brazed at the same time as the rest of the cold plate.

  12. A swirl flow evaporative cold plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niggemann, R. E.; Greenlee, W. J.; Hill, D. G.; Ellis, W.; Marshall, P.

    1985-01-01

    A forced flow evaporative cold plate is under development for future application to the thermal bus concept being pursued by NASA for Space Station Thermal Control. The vaporizer is a swirl-flow device employing a spiral tube coil geometry sandwiched between conductive metal plates upon which electric components could be mounted. This concept is based on the inherent phase separation that occurs in a two phase stream in curvilinear flow. This is a zero 'g' design with one 'g' all-attitude capability and is capable of high heat transfer coefficients, good isothermality, and the ability to function at heat fluxes approaching 5w/sq cm on the cold plates (10w/sq cm on the tube wall) with Freon 114. The advantages of this design over other two phase evaporator approaches are high heat flux capability, simplified control requirements, insensitivity to micro-gravity oscillations, and inexpensive manufacturability. The program included design, fabrication, and test of such a cold plate utilizing an existing test stand developed for two-phase thermal management system (TPTMS) testing. Test results analysis and conclusions are included.

  13. Slurry fired heater cold-flow modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Moujaes, S.F.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical work leading to the scale-up of the SRC-I Demonstration Plant slurry fired heater. The scale-up involved a theoretical model using empirical relations in the derivation, and employed variables such as flow conditions, liquid viscosity, and slug frequency. Such variables have been shown to affect the heat transfer characteristics ofthe system. The model assumes that, if all other variables remain constant, the heat transfer coefficient can be scaled up proportional to D/sup -2/3/ (D = inside diameter of the fired heater tube). All flow conditions, liquid viscosities, and pipe inclinations relevant to the demonstration plant have indicated a slug flow regime in the slurry fired heater. The annular and stratified flow regimes should be avoided to minimize the potential for excessive pipe erosion and to decrease temperature gradients along the pipe cross section leading to coking and thermal stresses, respectively. Cold-flow studies in 3- and 6.75-in.-inside-diameter (ID) pipes were conducted to determine the effect of scale-up on flow regime, slug frequency, and slug dimensions. The developed model assumes that conduction heat transfer occurs through the liquid film surrounding the gas slug and laminar convective heat transfer to the liquid slug. A weighted average of these two heat transfer mechanisms gives a value for the average pipe heat transfer coefficient. The cold-flow work showed a decrease in the observed slug frequency between the 3- and 6.75-ID pipes. Data on the ratio of gas to liquid slug length in the 6.75-in. pipe are not yet complete, but are expected to yield generally lower values than those obtained in the 3-in. pipe; this will probably affect the scale-up to demonstration plant conditions. 5 references, 15 figures, 7 tables.

  14. Dual throat thruster cold flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgreen, R. B.; Nickerson, G. R.; Obrien, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    The concept was evaluated with cold flow (nitrogen gas) testing and through analysis for application as a tripropellant engine for single-stage-to-orbit type missions. Three modes of operation were tested and analyzed: (1) Mode 1 Series Burn, (2) Mode 1 Parallel Burn, and (3) Mode 2. Primary emphasis was placed on the Mode 2 plume attachment aerodynamics and performance. The conclusions from the test data analysis are as follows: (1) the concept is aerodynamically feasible, (2) the performance loss is as low as 0.5 percent, (3) the loss is minimized by an optimum nozzle spacing corresponding to an AF-ATS ratio of about 1.5 or an Le/Rtp ratio of 3.0 for the dual throat hardware tested, requiring only 4% bleed flow, (4) the Mode 1 and Mode 2 geometry requirements are compatible and pose no significant design problems.

  15. Resource Prospector Propulsion System Cold Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Addona, Brad; Trinh, Huu

    2015-01-01

    Resource Prospector (RP) is a NASA mission being led by NASA Ames Research Center with current plans to deliver a scientific payload package aboard a rover to the lunar surface. As part of an early risk reduction activity, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) have jointly developed a government-version concept of a lunar lander for the mission. The spacecraft consists of two parts, the lander and the rover which carries the scientific instruments. The lander holds the rover during launch, cruise, and landing on the surface. Following terminal descent and landing the lander portion of the spacecraft become dormant after the rover embarks on the science mission. The lander will be equipped with a propulsion system for lunar descent and landing, as well as trajectory correction and attitude control maneuvers during transit to the moon. Hypergolic propellants monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide will be used to fuel sixteen 70-lbf descent thrusters and twelve 5-lbf attitude control thrusters. A total of four metal-diaphragm tanks, two per propellant, will be used along with a high-pressure composite-overwrapped pressure vessel for the helium pressurant gas. Many of the major propulsion system components are heritage missile hardware obtained by NASA from the Air Force. In parallel with the flight system design activities, a simulated propulsion system based on flight drawings was built for conducting a series of water flow tests to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. The primary objective of the cold flow testing was to simulate the RP propulsion system fluid flow operation through water flow testing and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. All design and

  16. Metal flowing of involute spline cold roll-beating forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Fengkui; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Fengshou; Xu, Hongyu; Quan, Jianhui; Li, Yan

    2013-09-01

    The present research on involute spline cold roll-beating forming is mainly about the principles and motion relations of cold roll-beating, the theory of roller design, and the stress and strain field analysis of cold roll-beating, etc. However, the research on law of metal flow in the forming process of involute spline cold roll-beating is rare. According to the principle of involute spline cold roll-beating, the contact model between the rollers and the spline shaft blank in the process of cold roll-beating forming is established, and the theoretical analysis of metal flow in the cold roll-beating deforming region is proceeded. A finite element model of the spline cold roll-beating process is established, the formation mechanism of the involute spline tooth profile in cold roll-beating forming process is studied, and the node flow tracks of the deformation area are analyzed. The experimental research on the metal flow of cold roll-beating spline is conducted, and the metallographic structure variation, grain characteristics and metal flow line of the different tooth profile area are analyzed. The experimental results show that the particle flow directions of the deformable bodies in cold roll-beating deformation area are determined by the minimum moving resistance. There are five types of metal flow rules of the deforming region in the process of cold roll-beating forming. The characteristics of involute spline cold roll-beating forming are given, and the forming mechanism of involute spline cold roll-beating is revealed. This paper researches the law of metal flow in the forming process of involute spline cold roll-beating, which provides theoretical supports for solving the tooth profile forming quality problem.

  17. Cold adaptation increases rates of nutrient flow and metabolic plasticity during cold exposure in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; McCue, Marshall D; Sunny, Nishanth E; Szejner-Sigal, Andre; Morgan, Theodore J; Allison, David B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2016-09-14

    Metabolic flexibility is an important component of adaptation to stressful environments, including thermal stress and latitudinal adaptation. A long history of population genetic studies suggest that selection on core metabolic enzymes may shape life histories by altering metabolic flux. However, the direct relationship between selection on thermal stress hardiness and metabolic flux has not previously been tested. We investigated flexibility of nutrient catabolism during cold stress in Drosophila melanogaster artificially selected for fast or slow recovery from chill coma (i.e. cold-hardy or -susceptible), specifically testing the hypothesis that stress adaptation increases metabolic turnover. Using (13)C-labelled glucose, we first showed that cold-hardy flies more rapidly incorporate ingested carbon into amino acids and newly synthesized glucose, permitting rapid synthesis of proline, a compound shown elsewhere to improve survival of cold stress. Second, using glucose and leucine tracers we showed that cold-hardy flies had higher oxidation rates than cold-susceptible flies before cold exposure, similar oxidation rates during cold exposure, and returned to higher oxidation rates during recovery. Additionally, cold-hardy flies transferred compounds among body pools more rapidly during cold exposure and recovery. Increased metabolic turnover may allow cold-adapted flies to better prepare for, resist and repair/tolerate cold damage. This work illustrates for the first time differences in nutrient fluxes associated with cold adaptation, suggesting that metabolic costs associated with cold hardiness could invoke resource-based trade-offs that shape life histories. PMID:27605506

  18. 2. CATCH BASIN, INFLOW PIPES AT CENTER, COLD FLOW LABORATORY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CATCH BASIN, INFLOW PIPES AT CENTER, COLD FLOW LABORATORY AT LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Catch Basin, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  20. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    The infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behavior of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the big flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  1. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results aremore » used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.« less

  2. OVERLAND FLOW TREATMENT OF POULTRY PROCESSING WASTEWATER IN COLD CLIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluates a full-scale wastewater treatment facility emphasizing the overland flow process in northern Indiana, which has a cold climate. The other processes include mechanical pretreatment, a storage lagoon, a lagoon for batch chemical treatment of the overland flow...

  3. Multiple model identification of a cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Panday, Rupen; Famouri, P.; Woerner, B.D.; Turton, R.; •Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.; Boyle, E.J.

    2008-05-13

    Solids circulation rate is an important parameter that is essential to the control and improved performance of a circulating fluidized bed system. The present work focuses on the identification of a cold flow circulating fluidized bed using a multiple model identification technique that considers the given set-up as a nonlinear dynamic system and predicts the solids circulation rate as a function of riser aeration, move air flow rate, and total riser pressure drop. The predictor model obtained from this technique is trained on glass beads data sets in which riser aeration and move air flow are varied randomly one at a time. The global linear state space model obtained from the N4SID algorithm is trained on the same data set and the prediction results of solids circulation rate from both these algorithms are tested against data obtained at operating conditions different from the training data. The comparison between the two methods shows that the prediction results obtained from the multiple model technique are better than those obtained from the global linear model. The number of local models is increased from two to five and two third order state space models are sufficient for the present sets of data.

  4. Numerical Study of Unsteady Flow in Centrifugal Cold Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jihao; Li, Qing

    In helium refrigeration system, high-speed centrifugal cold compressor is utilized to pumped gaseous helium from saturated liquid helium tank at low temperature and low pressure for producing superfluid helium or sub-cooled helium. Stall and surge are common unsteady flow phenomena in centrifugal cold compressors which severely limit operation range and impact efficiency reliability. In order to obtain the installed range of cold compressor, unsteady flow in the case of low mass flow or high pressure ratio is investigated by the CFD. From the results of the numerical analysis, it can be deduced that the pressure ratio increases with the decrease in reduced mass flow. With the decrease of the reduced mass flow, backflow and vortex are intensified near the shroud of impeller. The unsteady flow will not only increase the flow loss, but also damage the compressor. It provided a numerical foundation of analyzing the effect of unsteady flow field and reducing the flow loss, and it is helpful for the further study and able to instruct the designing.

  5. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  6. Mitigating cold flow problems of biodiesel: Strategies with additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanan, Athira

    The present thesis explores the cold flow properties of biodiesel and the effect of vegetable oil derived compounds on the crystallization path as well as the mechanisms at play at different stages and length scales. Model systems including triacylglycerol (TAG) oils and their derivatives, and a polymer were tested with biodiesel. The goal was to acquire the fundamental knowledge that would help design cold flow improver (CFI) additives that would address effectively and simultaneously the flow problems of biodiesel, particularly the cloud point (CP) and pour point (PP). The compounds were revealed to be fundamentally vegetable oil crystallization modifiers (VOCM) and the polymer was confirmed to be a pour point depressant (PPD). The results obtained with the VOCMs indicate that two cis-unsaturated moieties combined with a trans-/saturated fatty acid is a critical structural architecture for depressing the crystallization onset by a mechanism wherein while the straight chain promotes a first packing with the linear saturated FAMEs, the kinked moieties prevent further crystallization. The study of model binary systems made of a VOCM and a saturated FAME with DSC, XRD and PLM provided a complete phase diagram including the thermal transformation lines, crystal structure and microstructure that impact the phase composition along the different crystallization stages, and elicited the competing effects of molecular mass, chain length mismatch and isomerism. The liquid-solid boundary is discussed in light of a simple thermodynamic model based on the Hildebrand equation and pair interactions. In order to test for synergies, the PP and CP of a biodiesel (Soy1500) supplemented with several VOCM and PLMA binary cocktails were measured using a specially designed method inspired by ASTM standards. The results were impressive, the combination of additives depressed CP and PP better than any single additive. The PLM and DSC results suggest that the cocktail additives are most

  7. Improving the cold chain for vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J S

    1977-01-01

    The cold chain may be defined as a system for transporting and storing vaccines at very low temperataures, particularly in tropical countries. In Ghana, efforts are being made, with the assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO) to develop and test a new cold chain technology. Emphasis is on local production in order to meet the needs of the countrywide immunization program, and, if possible, of similar programs in other West African nations. Focus in this discussion is on the losses resulting from mishandling of vaccines during storage and in transit through various stages in the cold chain as well as the problems, requirements, and proposed solutions. In most countries with immunization programs, breakdowns in refrigeration during the transport and storage of vaccines in remote rural areas or at the regional and national central stores have led to great losses of vaccine. The losses are often caused by inappropriate management and technology. The most promising recent development in the area of storage is an enzyme-based time/temperature indicator contained in a paper tab which is attached to the vaccine packet. In order to reduce to a minimum the handling of vaccines at the national central store it is proposed that the ministry of health submit details of regional requirements in their requisition to the manufacturer. Then the manufacturer can make presealed packages which are dispatched by air to the national central store and from there to the regions, while they are still sealed. Insulated boxes for this purpose have been tested in Sweden and been shown to maintain deep-freezing temperatures for 5 days. Road communications to the regional centers are good in Ghana and the 5-day cold boxes give adequate safety margins. The plan for the immunization program in Ghana is to employ a combination of teams from both fixed and mobile centers. 3 contacts, 3 months apart, will be made by the fixed teams; mobile teams will make 2 contacts, 2 months apart. Mobile

  8. Linear system identification of a cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Panday, R; Woerner, B D; Ludlow, J C; Shadle, L J; Boyle, E J

    2009-02-01

    Knowledge of the solids circulation rate (SCR) is essential to the control and improved performance of a circulating fluidized bed system. In the present work, the noise model is derived using the prediction error method considering process and measurement noises acting on the cold flow circulating fluidized bed (CFCFB) with a cork particulate material. The outputs of the initial model are the total pressure drop across the riser, the pressure drop across the crossover, the pressure drop across the primary cyclone, the total pressure drop across the stand-pipe, the pressure drop across the loop seal, and the SCR. The stochastic estimate of SCR is determined from the noise model using the stochastic pressure drop estimates. The deterministic estimate is obtained through the inputs taken as move air flow, riser aeration, and loop seal fluidization air that are all independent variables of the given setup and under the control of the user. The theory has been developed to convert a complete blackbox model to a grey box model through the output-to-state transformation such that both the models of the CFCFB consists of all these output variables as the states of the system, and only pressure drops across the system as the output measurements. Thus, the final models do not include any fictitious terms and they are defined only in terms of physical parameters of the given system. Both components of SCR are separately analysed. The combined SCR response of both the noise model and deterministic model is compared with the validation data set of this state variable in terms of modelfit, and the results are shown.

  9. Fluctuating Pressure Data from 2-D Nozzle Cold Flow Tests (Dual Bell)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocket engines nozzle performance changes as a vehicle climbs through the atmosphere. An altitude compensating nozzle, ACN, is intended to improve on a fixed geometry bell nozzle that performs at optimum at only one trajectory point. In addition to nozzle performance, nozzle transient loads are an important consideration. Any nozzle experiences large transient toads when shocks pass through the nozzle at start and shutdown. Additional transient toads will occur at transitional flow conditions. The objectives of cold flow nozzle testing at MSFC are CFD benchmark / calibration and Unsteady flow / sideloads. Initial testing performed with 2-D inserts to 14" transonic wind tunnel. Recent review of 2-D data in preparation for nozzle test facility 3-D testing. This presentation shows fluctuating pressure data and some observations from 2-D dual-bell nozzle cold flow tests.

  10. A Newly Forming Cold Flow Protogalactic Disk, a Signature of Cold Accretion from the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D. Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D.; Moore, Anna; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    How galaxies form from, and are fueled by, gas from the intergalactic medium (IGM) remains one of the major unsolved problems in galaxy formation. While the classical Cold Dark Matter paradigm posits galaxies forming from cooling virialized gas, recent theory and numerical simulations have highlighted the importance of cold accretion flows—relatively cool (T ˜ few × 104 K) unshocked gas streaming along filaments into dark matter halos, including hot, massive, high-redshift halos. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium resulting in disk- or ring-like structures, eventually coalescing into galaxies forming at filamentary intersections. We earlier reported a bright, Lyα emitting filament near the QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z = 2.843 discovered with the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager. We now report that the bright part of this filament is an enormous (R > 100 kpc) rotating structure of hydrogen gas with a disk-like velocity profile consistent with a 4 × 1012 M ⊙ halo. The orbital time of the outer part of the what we term a “protodisk” is comparable to the virialization time and the age of the universe at this redshift. We propose that this protodisk can only have recently formed from cold gas flowing directly from the cosmic web.

  11. Asthma ski day: cold air sports safe with peak flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Silvers, W; Morrison, M; Wiener, M

    1994-08-01

    The Colorado Asthma Ski Day, an annual cross-country and alpine skiing event, encourages children with asthma to participate fully in outdoor winter sports. Since cold air and exercise can trigger bronchospasm, we examined the peak expiratory flow rates of 80 children who attended Asthma Ski Day 1992 or Asthma Ski Day 1993 to establish a safety profile for this event. Peak expiratory flow rates were measured prior to skiing, at lunchtime, and at the end of the day's activities. We asked the children to pretreat with their regular medications, as prescribed by their physicians, to use their bronchodilator inhalers p.r.n., and to report to our medical station if an episode of acute asthma occurred. The average age of the participants was 9.5 years, and the average baseline daytime peak flow rate was 100.03% of predicted. The average percent change in peak flow rates during the day was an increase of 5.00%. Our results demonstrate that with medical supervision, peak expiratory flow rate monitoring, and properly administered medications, peak flow rates can be stabilized and even improve during cold-weather exercise to an extent that safety concerns need not restrict children with asthma from engaging in exercise or cold-weather sports. The Colorado Asthma Ski Day can serve as a model event for other organizations that want to promote outdoor activities for children with asthma. PMID:8067591

  12. Improving cold tolerance in elderly rats by aminophylline.

    PubMed

    Lee, T F; Wang, L C

    1985-05-27

    During severe cold exposure, old rats (23-26 months) were less capable in maintaining normal body temperature as compared to young rats (6-9 months) due to lower rate of heat production (HP). Single injection of optimal doses of aminophylline (AMPY; 10 and 18.7 mg/kg, i.p.), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor which enhances the intracellular cyclic AMP concentration, significantly increased the rate of HP in old rats to levels beyond the control values observed in young rats. Consequently, cold tolerance of the old rats was significantly improved. This AMPY-improved cold tolerance is apparently not due to increased non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) since AMPY failed to enhance norepinephrine-stimulated NST in the old rats. It is likely that AMPY increased substrate mobilization and/or conversion, thereby circumventing the limiting role of substrate availability for shivering thermogenesis. Thus, the age-dependent decrease in cold tolerance may be due to a reduced capacity for substrate mobilization when challenged by cold. PMID:3999913

  13. Improvement of cold resistance and performance of broilers by acute cold exposure during late embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shinder, D; Ruzal, M; Giloh, M; Druyan, S; Piestun, Y; Yahav, S

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fine-tune previous acute cold exposure treatments of broiler embryos during late embryogenesis to improve lifelong cold resistance and performance. Six hundred Cobb hatching eggs were incubated under standard conditions and then exposed to 3 treatments: control; cold treatment in which embryos were exposed to 15°C for 30 min on d 18 and 19 of incubation (30 × 2); and cold treatment similar to 30 × 2 but with 60-min exposures (60 × 2). Egg shell temperature (T(egg)) and heart rate (HR) were monitored pre- and posttreatment. Upon hatching, hatchability, body weight, and body temperature were recorded. From 14 to 35 d of age, three quarters of the chickens in each treatment were raised under ascites-inducing conditions (AIC) and the remaining birds were raised under standard brooding conditions (SBC). The T(egg) and HR decreased significantly in response to increased exposure time on d 18 of incubation. On d 19 of incubation, before the second cold exposure, the 30 × 2 group showed greater T(egg) and HR than the controls, and during the second exposure they maintained these parameters better than the 60 × 2 embryos. No treatment effect on hatchability was observed. At 35 d of age ascites incidence among 30 × 2 chickens under AIC was significantly less than that among the controls (P < 0.01), and body weight of these chickens under either SBC or AIC was significantly higher than that of the controls. Under SBC relative breast muscle weight was significantly higher in 60 × 2 chickens, whereas the relative heart weight was higher in both cold-treated groups than in the controls. It can be concluded that repeated short acute cold exposures during late embryogenesis significantly reduced ascites incidence and improved growth rate under either SBC or AIC. These results may be related to a prenatal epigenetic adaptation of the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular systems to low ambient temperature. PMID:21325235

  14. Visualization and velocity measurement of unsteady flow in a gas generator using cold-flow technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppa, Subrahmanyam

    1990-08-01

    Modeling of internal flow fields with hot, compressible fluids and sometimes combustion using cold flow techniques is discussed. The flow in a gas generator was modeled using cold air. The experimental set up was designed and fabricated to simulate the unsteady flow with different configurations of inlet tubes. Tests were run for flow visualization and measurement of axial velocity at different frequencies ranging from 5 to 12 Hz. Flow visualization showed that the incoming flow was a complex jet flow confined to a cylindrical enclosure, while the outgoing flow resembled the venting of a pressurized vessel. The pictures show a complex flow pattern due to the angling of the jet towards the wall for the bent tube configurations and straightened flows with straight tube and other configurations with straighteners. Velocity measurements were made at an inlet Re of 8.1 x 10(exp 4) based on maximum velocity and inlet diameter. Phase averaged mean velocities were observed to be well defined during charging and diminished during venting inside the cylinder. For the straight tube inlet comparison with a steady flow measurement of sudden expansion flow showed a qualitative similarity of the mean axial velocity distribution and centerline velocity decay during the charging phases. For the bent tube inlet case the contour plots showed the flow tendency towards the wall. Two cells were seen in the contours for the 8 and 12 Hz cases. The deviation of the point of occurrence of maximum velocity in a radial profile was found to be about 6.5 degrees. Entrance velocity profiles showed symmetry for the straight tube inlet but were skewed for the bent tube inlet. Contour plots of the phase averaged axial turbulence intensity for bent tube cases showed higher values in the core and near the wall in the region of impingement. Axial turbulence intensity measured for the straight tube case showed features as observed in an axisymmetric sudden expansion flow.

  15. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  16. Improving Efficiency of Aluminium Sacrificial Anode Using Cold Work Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmara, Y. P.; Siregar, J. P.; Tezara, C.; Ann, Chang Tai

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium is one of the preferred materials to be used as sacrificial anode for carbon steel protection. The efficiency of these can be low due to the formation of oxide layer which passivate the anodes. Currently, to improve its efficiency, there are efforts using a new technique called surface modifications. The objective of this research is to study corrosion mechanism of aluminium sacrificial anode which has been processed by cold work. The cold works are applied by reducing the thickness of aluminium sacrificial anodes at 20% and 40% of thickness reduction. The cathodic protection experiments were performed by immersion of aluminium connected to carbon steel cylinder in 3% NaCl solutions. Visual inspections using SEM had been conducted during the experiments and corrosion rate data were taken in every week for 8 weeks of immersion time. Corrosion rate data were measured using weight loss and linear polarization technique (LPR). From the results, it is observed that cold worked aluminium sacrificial anode have a better corrosion performance. It shows higher corrosion rate and lower corrosion potential. The anodes also provided a long functional for sacrificial anode before it stop working. From SEM investigation, it is shown that cold works have changed the microstructure of anodes which is suspected in increasing corrosion rate and cause de-passivate of the surface anodes.

  17. Numerical simulation of cold flow patterns and turbulent mixing in a simplified burner

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1994-10-01

    The COYOTE computer program was used to simulate the flow field and turbulent mixing near the fuel and air inlets in a simplified burner. The authors report the results of four cold flow calculations that illustrate several interesting phenomena in addition to demonstrating the capabilities of the basic hydrodynamics model and the turbulence model. They also demonstrate some interesting facets of the hydrodynamics of burners. They summarize their findings as follows: (1) two different grids gave vastly different answers, underscoring the importance of assuring grid-independence in numerical solutions; (2) cold flow patterns are much different than reactive flow fields, making it unwise to apply conclusions from the former to the latter; (3) the problem is elliptic, and it is necessary to include the whole furnace in the calculations; (4) the flow patterns exhibited weakly unstable, almost metastable, modes that make it difficult to ascertain when steady conditions have been obtained. The long range goals of this study are to identify parameters that affect the production of NO{sub x} and to discover methods of reducing emissions while maintaining or improving burner efficiency.

  18. Insights into Cold Water Injection Stimulation Effects through Analytical Solutions to Flow and Heat Transport

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Plummer

    2013-09-01

    Wells in traditional hydrothermal reservoirs are used to extract heat and to dispose of cooled water. In the first case, high productivity (the ratio of production flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) to is preferred in order to maximize power generation, while minimizing the parasitic energy loss of pumping. In the second case, high injectivity (the ratio of injection flow rate to the pressure differential required to produce that rate) is preferred, in order to reduce pumping costs. In order to improve productivity or injectivity, cold water is sometimes injected into the reservoir in an attempt to cool and contract the surrounding rock matrix and thereby induce dilation and/or extension of existing fractures or to generate new fractures. Though the increases in permeability associated with these changes are likely localized, by improving connectivity to more extensive high-permeability fractures they can at least temporarily provide substantially improved productivity or injectivity.

  19. The applications of optical computerized tomography (OCT) in cold and hot complex flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Yun; Chen, Li-zhu; Gu, Fang

    2014-11-01

    Optical computerized tomography (OCT), as a branch of computerized tomography (CT) techniques, has been widely used to display and diagnose a variety of complex flow fields, due to its characteristics of real-time, stable, non-contact and can supply 3-D distributions. In practical applications, we found some different phenomenon when they are adopted in clod and hot complex flow fields. In this paper, the cold and hot flow field's OCT diagnosis is analyzed and compared. The results show that 1) OCT can directly reflect the spatial distribution of the measured flow field's refractive index, for both the cold and the hot complex flow fields; 2) OCT can reflect the boundary or structure of the cold flow fields, but could not well done for the hot flow fields. The involved results will help us to make better use of OCT methods to diagnose various cold or hot complex flow fields.

  20. Improved trapping and transport of cold atoms for magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadge, Amruta; James, T.; Li, X.; Lu, Bo; Garridogonzalez, N.; Finke, A.; Mellor, C.; Fromhold, M.; Koller, C.; Orucevic, F.; Kruger, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Using cold atoms, a very sensitive and high resolution magnetic and electric field sensor can be realised. Ultra-close trapping of atoms would improve the resolution of cold-atom based surface probes. The limitation on the trapping distance arises from strongly distance-dependent effects such as Casimir force, Johnson noise etc. We are constructing an experimental system to trap atoms at surface separations of less than a micron. We will demonstrate the possibility of using special surfaces such as silicon nitride membranes and graphene for sub-micron trapping. We have designed a 10-layer printed circuit board, which can magnetically trap the cold atom cloud and transport it precisely to a desired location. This gives us the ability to study multiple samples within the same vacuum environment. In order to achieve higher atom number in the initial trapping stages, we use a dual-color MOT technique for Rb-87 atoms. Using this technique we achieve a significant increase in atom number and decrease in temperature. In this talk, I will present the results of the dual color MOT. I will also report on results related to magnetic transport and sub-micron trapping of atoms.

  1. Viscous computations of cold air/air flow around scramjet nozzle afterbody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Engelund, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The flow field in and around the nozzle afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle was computationally simulated. The compressible, Reynolds averaged, Navier Stokes equations were solved by an implicit, finite volume, characteristic based method. The computational grids were adapted to the flow as the solutions were developing in order to improve the accuracy. The exhaust gases were assumed to be cold. The computational results were obtained for the two dimensional longitudinal plane located at the half span of the internal portion of the nozzle for over expanded and under expanded conditions. Another set of results were obtained, where the three dimensional simulations were performed for a half span nozzle. The surface pressures were successfully compared with the data obtained from the wind tunnel tests. The results help in understanding this complex flow field and, in turn, should help the design of the nozzle afterbody section.

  2. Effect of gas flow swirling on coating deposition by the cold gas-dynamic spray method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, S. P.; Kiselev, V. P.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of gas flow swirling on the process of coating deposition onto a target by the cold gas-dynamic spray method is studied experimentally and numerically. Flow swirling is found to change the gas flow field and to reduce the gas flow rate under typical conditions of cold gas-dynamic spray. In a non-swirled flow, the shape of the deposited spot is similar to a sharp cone. In contrast, the deposited spot in a swirled flow is shaped as a crater without particles at the center of this crater. It is found that this effect is caused by centrifugal forces acting on particles in a swirled gas flow.

  3. Cold Flow Properties of Biodiesel by Automatic and Manual Analysis Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel from most common feedstocks has inferior cold flow properties compared to conventional diesel fuel. Blends with as little as 10 vol% biodiesel content typically have significantly higher cloud point (CP), pour point (PP) and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) than No. 2 grade diesel fuel (...

  4. Flow visualization during transient cooldown in a model PWR cold leg and downcomer

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Valenzuela, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report documents flow visualization studies performed in a 1/5 scale model of the cold leg and downcomer typical of Westinghouse or Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors which have a horizontal cold leg. Tests were performed with stagnant loop flow and prototypical HPI flow (Froude number F/sub CL/ = 0.04). In addition to photographs and movies illustrating phenomena and mechanistic descriptions of the behavior, the results include transient velocity profiles in the cold leg and downcomer, HPI buoyant jet entrainment rates and flow split ratios, and transient density profiles in the cold leg. This study will help to clarify the detailed mixing phenomena that are relevant to the thermal-hydraulic aspects of the Pressurized Thermal Shock concern.

  5. Cold Acclimation Improves Regrowth of Cryopreserved Apple Shoot Tips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryopreservation is important for preserving the genetic resources of apple germplasm in Kazakhstan, the center of origin for apples. In this study of five apple genotypes [Malus domestica Borkh. and Malus sieversii (Ledeb.) M. Roem] we determined cold hardiness and the effect of cold acclimation o...

  6. Intra-arrest Hypothermia: Both Cold Liquid Ventilation with Perfluorocarbons and Cold Intravenous Saline Rapidly Achieve Hypothermia, but Only Cold Liquid Ventilation Improves Resumption of Spontaneous Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Riter, Henry G.; Brooks, Leonard A.; Pretorius, Andrew M.; Ackermann, Laynez W.; Kerber, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapid intra-arrest induction of hypothermia using total liquid ventilation (TLV) with cold perfluorocarbons improves resuscitation outcome from ventricular fibrillation (VF). Cold saline intravenous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a simpler method of inducing hypothermia. We compared these 2 methods of rapid hypothermia induction for cardiac resuscitation. Methods Three groups of swine were studied: cold preoxygenated TLV (TLV, n=8), cold intravenous saline infusion (S, n=8), and control (C, n=8). VF was electrically induced. Beginning at 8 minutes of VF, TLV and S animals received 3 minutes of cold TLV or rapid cold saline infusion. After 11 minutes of VF, all groups received standard air ventilation and closed chest massage. Defibrillation was attempted after 3 minutes of CPR (14 minutes of VF). The end point was resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Results Pulmonary arterial (PA) temperature decreased after 1 minute of CPR from 37.2°C to 32.2°C in S and from 37.1°C to 34.8°C in TLV (S or TLV vs. C p<0.0001). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was higher in TLV than S animals during the initial 3 minutes of CPR. Arterial pO2 was higher in the preoxygenated TLV animals. ROSC was achieved in 7 of 8 TLV, 2 of 8 S, and 1 of 8 C (TLV vs. C, p=0.03). Conclusions Moderate hypothermia was achieved rapidly during VF and CPR using both cold saline infusion and cold TLV, but ROSC was higher than control only in cold TLV animals, probably due to better CPP and pO2. The method by which hypothermia is achieved influences ROSC. PMID:19249149

  7. Effect of banana on cold stress test & peak expiratory flow rate in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Bairy, K L; Rao, N M; Udupa, E G

    1999-07-01

    The effect of banana on cold stress induced hypertension, peak expiratory flow rate and plasma ACE activity in healthy human volunteers was tested. Systolic blood pressure (P < 0.005), diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.025) and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.005) were significantly decreased during cold stress after banana treatment compared to controls subjected to cold stress. There was no significant changes in heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate but only significant decrease in plasma ACE activity after banana treatment. Banana decreased the rise of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers subjected to cold stress test without much effect on heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate. PMID:10709336

  8. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  9. Rinse trough with improved flow

    DOEpatents

    O`Hern, T.J.; Grasser, T.W.

    1998-08-11

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The troughs are suitable for one or more essentially planar objects having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs provide uniform rinse fluid flow over the objects` surfaces to accomplish a more thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 5 figs.

  10. Rinse trough with improved flow

    DOEpatents

    O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grasser, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The troughs are suitable for one or more essentially planar objects having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs provide uniform rinse fluid flow over the objects' surfaces to accomplish a more thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

  11. Fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer with loop flow

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Ackerson, M.F.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the cold leg and downcomer of typical Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactors. The results include transient data from a grid of thermocouples and exensive flow visualization photographs. Substantial mixing of cold injected water with hot primary coolant occurred during many of the tests.

  12. Recommendations to Improve Employee Thermal Comfort When Working in 40°F Refrigerated Cold Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana; Mead, Kenneth; Ramsey, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Cold rooms are commonly used for food storage and preparation, and are usually kept around 40°F following food safety guidelines. Some food preparation employees may spend 8 or more hours inside cold rooms. These employees may not be aware of the risks associated with mildly cold temperatures, dampness, and limited ventilation. We performed an evaluation of cold rooms at an airline catering facility because of concerns with exposure to cold temperatures. We spoke with and observed employees in two cold rooms, reviewed daily temperature logs, evaluated employee’s physical activity, work/rest schedule, and protective clothing. We measured temperature, percent relative humidity, and air velocities at different work stations inside the cold rooms. We concluded that thermal comfort concerns perceived by cold room employees may have been the result of air drafts at their workstations, insufficient use of personal protective equipment due to dexterity concerns, work practices, and lack of knowledge about good health and safety practices in cold rooms. These moderately cold work conditions with low air velocities are not well covered in current occupational health and safety guidelines, and wind chill calculations do not apply. We provide practical recommendations to improve thermal comfort of cold room employees. Engineering control recommendations include the redesigning of air deflectors and installing of suspended baffles. Administrative controls include the changing out of wet clothing, providing hand warmers outside of cold rooms, and educating employees on cold stress. We also recommended providing more options on personal protective equipment. However, there is a need for guidelines and educational materials tailored to employees in moderately cold environments to improve thermal comfort and minimize health and safety problems. PMID:25961447

  13. Recommendations to Improve Employee Thermal Comfort When Working in 40°F Refrigerated Cold Rooms.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana; Mead, Kenneth; Ramsey, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Cold rooms are commonly used for food storage and preparation, and are usually kept around 40°F following food safety guidelines. Some food preparation employees may spend 8 or more hours inside cold rooms. These employees may not be aware of the risks associated with mildly cold temperatures, dampness, and limited ventilation. We performed an evaluation of cold rooms at an airline catering facility because of concerns with exposure to cold temperatures. We spoke with and observed employees in two cold rooms, reviewed daily temperature logs, evaluated employee's physical activity, work/rest schedule, and protective clothing. We measured temperature, percent relative humidity, and air velocities at different work stations inside the cold rooms. We concluded that thermal comfort concerns perceived by cold room employees may have been the result of air drafts at their workstations, insufficient use of personal protective equipment due to dexterity concerns, work practices, and lack of knowledge about good health and safety practices in cold rooms. These moderately cold work conditions with low air velocities are not well covered in current occupational health and safety guidelines, and wind chill calculations do not apply. We provide practical recommendations to improve thermal comfort of cold room employees. Engineering control recommendations include the redesigning of air deflectors and installing of suspended baffles. Administrative controls include the changing out of wet clothing, providing hand warmers outside of cold rooms, and educating employees on cold stress. We also recommended providing more options on personal protective equipment. However, there is a need for guidelines and educational materials tailored to employees in moderately cold environments to improve thermal comfort and minimize health and safety problems. PMID:25961447

  14. Design and cold flow test of a scramjet nozzle with nonuniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jianwei; Xu, Jinglei; Quan, Zhibin; Yu, Kaikai; Lv, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Dramatic differences in lift and pitching moment of a scramjet nozzle are inevitably produced when its inlet is nonuniform. A rotational method of characteristics computer program which takes into account the non-uniform inflow effects has been developed for designing asymmetric scramjet nozzles. Typical design cases with a given non-uniform Mach number profile and the corresponding mass-weighted average uniform Mach number profile were developed. Then, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analyses and cold flow experimental measurements were conducted to quantify performance improvement of the nozzle with the non-uniform design. Both the computation and experiment results indicate that the nozzle design with the non-uniform Mach number profile always exhibit better performance than the design with the uniform Mach number profile, particularly for lift and pitching moment. Compared with the nozzle design with uniform inflow, the improvement of axial thrust coefficient in the nozzle design with non-uniform inflow is approximately 1.75% at the design point, with a nozzle pressure ratio of 35. Moreover, the benefits on lift and pitching moment coefficients of the nozzle design with non-uniform inflow are approximately 6.51% and 6.35% at the design point, respectively. These results confirm that considering non-uniform distribution of the entrance flow parameters of a scramjet nozzle is necessary.

  15. Constitutive Description of Tensile Flow Behavior of Cold Flow-Formed AFNOR 15CDV6 Steel at Different Deformation Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chandan; Podder, Bikramjit; Ramesh Kumar, K.; Yadav, D. R.

    2014-10-01

    The influences of cold deformation on the room temperature tensile stress-strain behavior of a flow-formed AFNOR 15CDV6 steel have been evaluated in the deformation range of 74-86% at a nominal strain rate of 6.67 × 10-4 s-1. Constitutive description of the tensile plastic flow has been illustrated through a comparative description of widely used empirical relationships proposed by Hollomon, Ludwigson, Pickering and Voce. Both the Voce and Pickering relations adequately describe the tensile flow behavior of all the specimens. Although the standard Ludwigson relation does not fit the experimental data satisfactorily, the fitting ability improves dramatically when a modified relation with the negative deviation compensating parameter has been employed. Physical interpretation of the fitting parameters based on observed microstructural features of the materials is further attempted. The variations in Ludwigson ( n 2) and Voce ( K v) parameters match well with the trend in the development of delamination cracks due to internal stress fields. Such behavior is directly linked to the uniform elongation of the materials. The tensile work hardening behavior has been elucidated by the differential and modified Crussard-Jaoul methods. Such analyses in corroboration with microstructural characterization indicate the development of internal stress field during highly constrained material flow in a banded structure. The consequence of this phenomenon is manifested in the formation of severe delamination cracks that significantly affect the uniform elongation of the specimens. Furthermore, the Estrin-Mecking analysis of microstructural attributes to the work hardening behavior points out the dynamic recovery controlled deformation mechanism in 86% deformed specimen.

  16. SR-71 LASRE during in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This shot, from above and behind the SR-71 in flight, runs 11 seconds and shows the Aerospike engine and its fuel system being charged with gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen during one of two tests. The tests are to check for leaks and check the flow characteristics of cryogenic fuels to be used in the engine. The NASA/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) concluded its flight operations phase at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November 1998. The goal of this experiment was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin, Bethesda, Maryland, validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future potential reusable launch vehicle. Information from the LASRE experiment will help Lockheed Martin maximize its design for a future potential reusable launch vehicle. It gave Lockheed an understanding of the performance of the lifting body and linear aerospike engine combination even before the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator flies. LASRE was a small, half-span model of a lifting body with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine. The experiment, mounted on the back of an SR-71 aircraft, operates like a kind of 'flying wind tunnel.' The experiment focused on determining how the engine plume of a reusable launch vehicle engine plume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting body shape at specific altitudes and speeds reaching approximately 750 miles per hour. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume could create drag; design refinements look to minimize that interaction. During the flight research program, the aircraft completed seven research flights. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus on the back of the aircraft. The first of those two flights occurred October 31, 1997. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a

  17. Cold climate mapping using satellite high resolution thermal imagery. [weather forecasting improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholic, J. F.; Sutherland, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an attempt to improve cold climate mapping and freeze forecasting techniques, thermal imagery from the NOAA-2 and -3 satellites and the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) were obtained and analyzed. Enhanced image transparencies showed detailed temperature patterns over the peninsula of Florida. The analysis was superior to hand-drawn isotherms drawn from the 300 to 500 thermograph stations presently in use. Satellite data on several cold nights with similar synoptic conditions showed that similar cold patterns existed. Thus, cold climate mapping is possible.

  18. Improved Ultrasonic Transducer For Measuring Cryogenic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis

    1991-01-01

    Improved ultrasonic transducer used to measure flow of cryogenic fluid. Includes wedge made nonintrusive by machining it out of bulk material of duct carrying fluid. Skewed surfaces of wedge suppress standing waves, thus reducing ringing and increasing signal-to-noise ratio. Increases accuracy of measurements of times of arrival of ultrasonic pulses, from which times flow inferred.

  19. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-06-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  20. Gas Flow, Particle Acceleration, and Heat Transfer in Cold Spray: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Meyer, Morten; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Lupoi, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    Cold spraying is increasingly attracting attentions from both scientific and industrial communities due to its unique `low-temperature' coating build-up process and its potential applications in the additive manufacturing across a variety of industries. The existing studies mainly focused on the following subjects: particle acceleration and heating, coating build-up, coating formation mechanism, coating properties, and coating applications, among which particle acceleration and heating can be regarded as the premise of the other subjects because it directly determines whether particles have sufficient energy to deposit and form the coating. Investigations on particle acceleration and heating behavior in cold spraying have been widely conducted both numerically and experimentally over decades, where many valuable conclusions were drawn. However, existing literature on this topic is vast; a systematical summery and review work is still lack so far. Besides, some curtail issues involved in modeling and experiments are still not quite clear, which needs to be further clarified. Hence, a comprehensive summary and review of the literature are very necessary. In this paper, the gas flow, particle acceleration, and heat transfer behavior in the cold spray process are systematically reviewed. Firstly, a brief introduction is given to introduce the early analytical models for predicting the gas flow and particle velocity in cold spraying. Subsequently, special attention is directed towards the application of computational fluid dynamics technique for cold spray modeling. Finally, the experimental observations and measurements in cold spraying are summarized.

  1. Cold flow simulation of an internal combustion engine with vertical valves using layering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinas, G.; Cupsa, O. S.; Stan, L. C.; Arsenie, A.

    2015-11-01

    Complying with emission requirements and fuel consumption efficiency are the points which drive any development of internal combustion engine. Refinement of the process of combustion and mixture formation, together with in-cylinder flow refinement, is a requirement, valves and piston bowl and intake exhaust port design optimization is essential. In order to reduce the time for design optimization cycle it is used Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Being time consuming and highly costly caring out of experiment using flow bench testing this methods start to become less utilized. Air motion inside the intake manifold is one of the important factors, which govern the engine performance and emission of multi-cylinder diesel engines. Any cold flow study on IC is targeting the process of identifying and improving the fluid flow inside the ports and the combustion chamber. This is only the base for an optimization process targeting to increase the volume of air accessing the combustion space and to increase the turbulence of the air at the end of the compression stage. One of the first conclusions will be that the valve diameter is a fine tradeoff between the need for a bigger diameter involving a greater mass of air filling the cylinder, and the need of a smaller diameter in order to reduce the blind zone. Here there is room for optimization studies. The relative pressure indicates a suction effect coming from the moving piston. The more the shape of the inlet port is smoother and the diameter of the piston is bigger, the aerodynamic resistance of the geometry will be smaller so that the difference of inlet port pressure and the pressure near to piston face will be smaller. Here again there is enough room for more optimization studies.

  2. Influence of Flow Swirling and Exit Shape of Barrel Nozzle on Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkov, S. V.; Kosarev, V. F.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, in cold spray two-phase supersonic jet formed with the help of converging-diverging nozzle are used. In this study an alternative design of cold spray nozzle is proposed in which a high velocity two-phase flow is created using an intense flow swirling in a constant section barrel (cylinder) with double-edged bevel exit. As a result, a high velocity gas-powder mixture jet is produced presenting a fan-shaped jet spreading at a large angle in one plane and approximately of equal size along the normal to this plane. This results in greater angles of particle deposition and, hence, in larger deposition widths, with the maximum width of deposition spot reaching 25 barrel diameters. The performed experimental study proves the new nozzle design to be appropriate for deposition of cold-sprayed coatings.

  3. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasiblity of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Tatterson, D.F.; Vasalos, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process successfully tested in 1.5 ton/day pilot plant in Amoco Research Center is discussed. Emphasis is given on information showing the application of cold flow unit results in the interpretation of retort product yields.

  4. Effect of Saturated Mono- and Diacylglycerols on Cold Flow Properties of Biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel in the form of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) derived from vegetable oils and animal fats is very attractive as a renewable and domestically available alternative fuel for combustion in direct-injection compression-ignition (diesel) engines. Past research on the cold flow properties of s...

  5. Stereomicroscopic imaging technique for the quantification of cold flow in drug-in-adhesive type of transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Katragadda, Usha; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-05-01

    Cold flow is a phenomenon occurring in drug-in-adhesive type of transdermal drug delivery systems (DIA-TDDS) because of the migration of DIA coat beyond the edge. Excessive cold flow can affect their therapeutic effectiveness, make removal of DIA-TDDS difficult from the pouch, and potentially decrease available dose if any drug remains adhered to pouch. There are no compendial or noncompendial methods available for quantification of this critical quality attribute. The objective was to develop a method for quantification of cold flow using stereomicroscopic imaging technique. Cold flow was induced by applying 1 kg force on punched-out samples of marketed estradiol DIA-TDDS (model product) stored at 25°C, 32°C, and 40°C/60% relative humidity (RH) for 1, 2, or 3 days. At the end of testing period, dimensional change in the area of DIA-TDDS samples was measured using image analysis software, and expressed as percent of cold flow. The percent of cold flow significantly decreased (p < 0.001) with increase in size of punched-out DIA-TDDS samples and increased (p < 0.001) with increase in cold flow induction temperature and time. This first ever report suggests that dimensional change in the area of punched-out samples stored at 32°C/60%RH for 2 days applied with 1 kg force could be used for quantification of cold flow in DIA-TDDS. PMID:24585397

  6. MODELING THE STAR-FORMING UNIVERSE AT z = 2: IMPACT OF COLD ACCRETION FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Khochfar, Sadegh; Silk, Joseph

    2009-07-20

    We present results of a semianalytic model (SAM) that includes cold accretion and a porosity-based prescription for star formation. We can recover the puzzling observational results of low V/{sigma} seen in various massive disk or disk-like galaxies, if we allow 18% of the accretion energy from cold flows to drive turbulence in gaseous disks at z = 2. The increase of gas mass through cold flows is by itself not sufficient to increase the star formation rate sufficiently to recover the number density of M-dot{sub *}>120 M{sub odot} yr{sup -1} galaxies in our model. In addition, it is necessary to increase the star formation efficiency. This can be achieved naturally in the porosity model, where star formation efficiency scales {proportional_to}{sigma}, which scales as cloud velocity dispersion. As cold accretion is the main driver for gas velocity dispersion in our model, star formation efficiency parallels cold accretion rates and allows fast conversion into stars. At z {approx} 2, we find a space density 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} in star-forming galaxies with M-dot{sub *}>120 M{sub odot} yr{sup -1}, in better agreement than earlier estimates from SAMs. However, the fundamental relation between M-dot{sub *} and M {sub *} is still offset from the observed relation, indicating the need for possibly more efficient star formation at high-z perhaps associated with a role for active galactic nucleus (AGN) triggering.

  7. Vent Flowing Cold Gas and T/C Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Vent flowing cryogenic fuel and T/C Rake mounted on a 1/10 scale model Centaur in the l0 x l0 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The fuel being used is liquid hydrogen. The point of the test is to determine how far to expel venting fuel from the rocket body to prevent explosion at the base of the vehicle. This vent is used as a safety valve for the fumes created when loading the fuel tanks during launch preparation. Liquid hydrogen has to be kept at a very low temperature. As it heats, it turns to gas and increases pressure in the tank. It therefore has to be vented overboard while the rocket sits on the pad. The test is being run at the Lewis Research Center, now known as John H. Glenn Research Center, Lewis Field.

  8. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  9. Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Wang, Ting-An; Weglarz, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow forced by various combinations of prescribed heat sinks and sources are studied using a hydrostatic two-dimensional nonlinear numerical model. The formation time for the development of a stagnation point or reversed flow at the surface is not always directly proportional to the Froude number when wave reflections exist from upper levels. A density current is able to form by the wave-otuflow interaction, even though the Froude number is greater than a critical value. This is the result of the wave-outflow interaction shifting the flow response to a different location in the characteristic parameter space. A density current is able to form or be destroyed due to the wave-outflow interaction between a traveling gravity wave and cold air outflow. This is proved by performing experiments with a steady-state heat sink and an additional transient heat source. In a quiescent fluid, a region of cold air, convergence, and upward motion is formed after the collision between two outflows produced by two prescribed heat sinks. After the collision, the individual cold air outflows lose their own identity and merge into a single, stationary, cold air outflow region. Gravity waves tend to suppress this new stationary cold air outflow after the collision. The region of upward motion associated with the collision is confined to a very shallow layer. In a moving airstream, a density current produced by a heat sink may be suppressed or enhanced nonlinearly by an adjacent heat sink due to the wave-outflow interaction.

  10. Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Wang, Ting-An; Weglarz, Ronald P.

    1993-11-01

    Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow forced by various combinations of prescribed heat sinks and sources are studied using a hydrostatic two-dimensional nonlinear numerical model. The formation time for the development of a stagnation point or reversed flow at the surface is not always directly proportional to the Froude number when wave reflections exist from upper levels. A density current is able to form by the wave-otuflow interaction, even though the Froude number is greater than a critical value. This is the result of the wave-outflow interaction shifting the flow response to a different location in the characteristic parameter space. A density current is able to form or be destroyed due to the wave-outflow interaction between a traveling gravity wave and cold air outflow. This is proved by performing experiments with a steady-state heat sink and an additional transient heat source. In a quiescent fluid, a region of cold air, convergence, and upward motion is formed after the collision between two outflows produced by two prescribed heat sinks. After the collision, the individual cold air outflows lose their own identity and merge into a single, stationary, cold air outflow region. Gravity waves tend to suppress this new stationary cold air outflow after the collision. The region of upward motion associated with the collision is confined to a very shallow layer. In a moving airstream, a density current produced by a heat sink may be suppressed or enhanced nonlinearly by an adjacent heat sink due to the wave-outflow interaction.

  11. Thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer at low flow rates. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Fanning, M.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid-mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale, transparent model of a cold leg and downcomer typical of Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The test program simulated steady-state conditions thought to be extreme for small break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs). Analysis of transient and steady-state temperature records indicates that the cold High-Pressure Injection (HPI) coolant water and the hot primary coolant water are well mixed prior to flowing over the reactor vessel wall.

  12. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Kalen; Ruf, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and with four different versions of the TIC nozzle model geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification to the test article geometry.

  13. Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized-Bed Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Parviz Famouri

    2005-07-01

    In a variety of industrial applications, the use of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) provides various advantages, such as reducing environmental pollution and increasing process efficiency. The application of circulating fluidized bed technology contributes to the improvement of gas-solid contact, reduction of the cross-sectional area with the use of higher superficial velocities, the use of the solids circulation rate as an additional control variable, and superior radial mixing, Grace et al. [1]. In order to improve raw material usage and utility consumption, optimization and control of CFB is very important, and an accurate, real time model is required to describe and quantify the process. Currently there is no accepted way to construct a reliable model for such a complex CFB system using traditional methods, especially at the pilot or industrial scale. Three major obstacles in characterizing the system are: 1) chaotic nature of the system; 2) non-linearity of the system, and 3) number of immeasurable unknowns internal to the system,[2]. Advanced control theories and methods have the ability to characterize the system, and can overcome all three of these obstacles. These methods will be discussed in this report.

  14. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  15. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  16. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  17. Improving the cold flow properties of biodiesel by fractionation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of biodiesel is increasing world-wide and contributing to the growing development of renewable alternative fuels. Biodiesel has many fuel properties such as density, viscosity, lubricity, and cetane number that make it compatible for combustion in compression-ignition (diesel) engines. ...

  18. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  19. CEOs say patient deposits improve cash flow.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1991-02-20

    CEOs say it makes good business sense to require patients to make cash deposits toward their bills prior to admission, because improved cash flow is vital to financially strapped hospitals. But hospitals that require cash deposits should also be aware of the sensitive public relations issues involved, experts caution. PMID:1993531

  20. Improved bonding strength of bioactive cermet Cold Gas Spray coatings.

    PubMed

    Gardon, M; Concustell, A; Dosta, S; Cinca, N; Cano, I G; Guilemany, J M

    2014-12-01

    The fabrication of cermet biocompatible coatings by means Cold Gas Spray (CGS) provides prosthesis with outstanding mechanical properties and the required composition for enhancing the bioactivity of prosthetic materials. In this study, hydroxyapatite/Titanium coatings were deposited by means of CGS technology onto titanium alloy substrates with the aim of building-up well-bonded homogeneous coatings. Powders were blended in different percentages and sprayed; as long as the amount of hydroxyapatite in the feedstock increased, the quality of the coating was reduced. Besides, the relation between the particle size distribution of ceramic and metallic particles is of significant consideration. Plastic deformation of titanium particles at the impact eased the anchoring of hard hydroxyapatite particles present at the top surface of the coating, which assures the looked-for interaction with the cells. Coatings were immersed in Hank's solution for 1, 4 and 7 days; bonding strength value was above 60 MPa even after 7 days, which enhances common results of HAp coatings obtained by conventional thermal spray technologies. PMID:25491809

  1. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasibility of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Vasalos, I.A.; Tatterson, D.F.; Furlong, M.W.; Kowalski, T.L.; So, B.Y.C. )

    1992-06-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process was successfully tested in a 1.5 tons/day retort. A pilot plant previously used for catalytic cracking studies was modified for this purpose. The successful conversion of the existing pilot plant to a retort and the remarkably smooth startup and operation were attributed to the concurrent construction and operation of a full-scale cold flow model to test the design of solid feeders and a unique injector/mixer. Operation of the cold flow model over the range of anticipated pilot plant operating conditions provided pressure drop and solids hold data for the mixer. The process was based on rapid heating of small oil shale particles with a hot heat carrier. key to the process was the design of a mixer, of proprietary geometry, which effects rapid interparticle heat transfer, substantial retorting of oil shale, and rapid removal of the hydrocarbon vapors. Several tests were carried out showing that shale oil yields up to 110% of Fisher assay are feasible by using this unique process scheme. In this paper, data are presented showing the application of cold flow results in the interpretation of pilot plant data such as gas and liquid yields.

  2. Development of an Empirical Methods for Predicting Jet Mixing Noise of Cold Flow Rectangular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James W.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents an empirical method for predicting the jet mixing noise levels of cold flow rectangular jets. The report presents a detailed analysis of the methodology used in development of the prediction method. The empirical correlations used are based on narrow band acoustic data for cold flow rectangular model nozzle tests conducted in the NASA Langley Jet Noise Laboratory. There were 20 separate nozzle test operating conditions. For each operating condition 60 Hz bandwidth microphone measurements were made over a frequency range from 0 to 60,000 Hz. Measurements were performed at 16 polar directivity angles ranging from 45 degrees to 157.5 degrees. At each polar directivity angle, measurements were made at 9 azimuth directivity angles. The report shows the methods employed to remove screech tones and shock noise from the data in order to obtain the jet mixing noise component. The jet mixing noise was defined in terms of one third octave band spectral content, polar and azimuth directivity, and overall power level. Empirical correlations were performed over the range of test conditions to define each of these jet mixing noise parameters as a function of aspect ratio, jet velocity, and polar and azimuth directivity angles. The report presents the method for predicting the overall power level, the average polar directivity, the azimuth directivity and the location and shape of the spectra for jet mixing noise of cold flow rectangular jets.

  3. Comparative photosynthetic and metabolic analyses reveal mechanism of improved cold stress tolerance in bermudagrass by exogenous melatonin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengrong; Fan, Jibiao; Xie, Yan; Amombo, Erick; Liu, Ao; Gitau, Margaret Mukami; Khaldun, A B M; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-03-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been reported to participate in plant development and abiotic stress responses. The main objective of this study was to investigate the role of melatonin in the cold-sensitive (S) and the cold-tolerant (T) bermudagrass genotypes' response to cold stress. The genotypes were treated with 100 μM melatonin and exposed to 4 °C temperature for 3 days. In both genotypes, cold stress increased the endogenous melatonin levels, and more prominently in T than S. Physiological responses indicated that exogenous melatonin triggered antioxidant activities in both genotypes, while it alleviated cell damage in the T genotype response to cold stress. Melatonin treatment under cold stress increased fluorescence curve levels for both genotypes, and higher in T than S genotypes. In both genotypes, the alterations in photosynthetic fluorescence parameters after melatonin treatment highlighted the participation of melatonin in improving photosystem response to cold stress, particularly for the cold-tolerant genotype. The metabolic analyses revealed the alterations of 44 cold-responsive metabolites in the two genotypes, mainly including carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids. After exogenous melatonin treatment under cold condition, there was high accumulation of metabolites in the cold-tolerant regimes than their cold-sensitive counterparts. Collectively, the present study revealed differential modulations of melatonin between the cold-sensitive and the cold-tolerant genotypes in response to cold stress. This was mainly by impacting antioxidant system, photosystem II, as well as metabolic homeostasis. PMID:26807934

  4. Extended alternating-temperature cold acclimation and culture duration improve pear shoot cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y; Reed, B M

    2000-06-01

    Meristems of many pear genotypes can be successfully cryopreserved following 1 week of cold acclimation, but an equal number do not survive the process or have very little regrowth. This study compared commonly used cold acclimation protocols to determine whether the cold acclimation technique used affected the cold hardiness of shoots or the regrowth of cryopreserved meristems. In vitro-grown pear (Pyrus L.) shoots were cold acclimated for up to 16 weeks, then either the shoot tips were tested for cold hardiness or the meristems were cryopreserved by controlled freezing. Cold acclimation consisted of alternating temperatures (22 degrees C with light/-1 degrees C darkness with various photo- and thermoperiods) or a constant temperature (4 degrees C with an 8-h photoperiod or darkness). Compared with nonacclimated controls, both alternating- and constant-temperature acclimation significantly improved postcryopreservation regrowth of P. cordata Desv. and P. pashia Buch. -Ham. ex D. Don meristems. Alternating-temperature acclimation combined with either an 8-h photoperiod or darkness was significantly better than constant-temperature acclimation. Alternating-temperature shoot acclimation for 2 to 5 weeks significantly increased postcryopreservation meristem regrowth, and recovery remained high for up to 15 weeks acclimation. Postcryopreservation meristem regrowth increased with 1 to 5 weeks of constant-temperature acclimation and then declined with longer acclimation. Shoot cold hardiness varied with the acclimation procedure. The LT(50) of shoots acclimated for 10 weeks with alternating temperatures was -25 degrees C; that with constant temperature was -14.7 degrees C; and that of the nonacclimated control was -10 degrees C. Less frequent transfer of cultures also improved acclimation of shoots. Shoots grown without transfer to fresh medium for 6-12 weeks had higher postcryopreservation recovery with shorter periods of acclimation than shoots with a 3-week transfer

  5. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  6. Simulation of Cold Flow in a Truncated Ideal Nozzle with Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, K. E.; Ruf, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Flow transients during rocket start-up and shut-down can lead to significant side loads on rocket nozzles. The capability to estimate these side loads computationally can streamline the nozzle design process. Towards this goal, the flow in a truncated ideal contour (TIC) nozzle has been simulated using RANS and URANS for a range of nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) aimed to match a series of cold flow experiments performed at the NASA MSFC Nozzle Test Facility. These simulations were performed with varying turbulence model choices and for four approximations of the supersonic film injection geometry, each of which was created with a different simplification of the test article geometry. The results show that although a reasonable match to experiment can be obtained with varying levels of geometric fidelity, the modeling choices made do not fully represent the physics of flow separation in a TIC nozzle with film cooling.

  7. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  8. Cold Flow Determination of the Internal Flow Environment Around the Submerged TVC Nozzle for the Space Shuttle SRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. H.; Ghosh, A.; Jenkins, S. L.; Bacchus, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    A series of subscale cold flow tests was performed to quantify the gas flow characteristics at the aft end of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. This information was used to support the analyses of the redesigned nozzle/case joint. A portion of the thermal loads at the joint are due to the circumferential velocities and pressure gradients caused primarily by the gimbaling of the submerged nose TVC nozzle. When the nozzle centerline is vectored with respect to the motor centerline, asymmetries are set up in the flow field under the submerged nozzle and immediately adjacent to the nozzle/case joint. Specific program objectives included: determination of the effects of nozzle gimbal angle and propellant geometry on the circumferential flow field; measurement of the static pressure and gas velocities in the vicinity of the nozzle/case joint; use of scaling laws to apply the subscale cold flow data to the full scale SRM; and generation of data for use in validation of 3-D computational fluid dynamic, CFD, models of the SRM flow field. These tests were conducted in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Airflow Facility with a 7.5 percent scale model of the aft segment of the SRM. Static and dynamic pressures were measured in the model to quantify the flow field. Oil flow data was also acquired to obtain qualitative visual descriptions of the flow field. Nozzle gimbal angles of 0, 3.5, and 7 deg were used with propellant grain configurations corresponding to motor burn times of 0, 9, 19, and 114 seconds. This experimental program was successful in generating velocity and pressure gradient data for the flow field around the submerged nose nozzle of the Space Shuttle SRM at various burn times and gimbal angles. The nature of the flow field adjacent to the nozzle/case joint was determined with oil droplet streaks, and the velocity and pressure gradients were quantified with pitot probes and wall static pressure measurements. The data was applied to the full scale SRM thru

  9. Modifying shale oil to improve flow characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzer, W.H.; Lovell, P.F.

    1982-05-01

    Shale oil, which forms a viscous, wax slurry below 25 C, was treated in several different ways to try to improve its flow characteristics as measured in a concentric cylinder viscometer. Removing the wax does not greatly improve the pumpability of the oil. Hydrotreatment of the whole oil to take out nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen can lower the viscosity by a factor of five or more, even though the pour point is not greatly affected. Apparently hydrogenolysis of the nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen lowers the molecular weight of the oil without much modification of the paraffinic wax. The pour point of the shale oil can be decreased with various commercial pour improvers. Sometimes an accompanying drop in viscosity is observed, but most of this decrease is not stable to shear in the viscometer.

  10. Double-diffusive layers adjacent to cold chimney flows during transient mushy-layer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Xue, Qiwei; Wettlaufer, John

    2013-03-01

    We examine the cooling effect of chimney flows in the liquid region during transient upward growth of a mushy layer in solidifying aqueous ammonium chloride. Through drainage channels in a mushy layer, cold, relatively fresh fluid is carried into the warm, salt-stratified liquid region. Double-diffusive cells form due to the cooling effect of the chimney flows and evolve into a series of downwelling horizontal layers. Using shadowgraph methods and dyed fluids we demonstrate the vigorous flow circulations and compositional mixing within each layer. Vertical concentration and temperature profiles reveal the double-diffusive staircase structure across the layers. The downward velocity of the layers decreases as they approach to the mush-liquid interface, which is interpreted by a filling-box model representing the momentum and compositional transport of turbulent continuous plumes in a confined region. The present experiment provides insight to evaluate the solute fluxes from growing mushy layers.

  11. Genetic improvement of rainbow trout at the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major constraint to increasing the efficiency of rainbow trout production is the lack of well-characterized, genetically-improved stocks. Scientists at the USDA, ARS, National Center for Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture have developed two resource populations suitable for long-term sele...

  12. Improved engineering models for turbulent wall flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi; Zou, Hong-Yue; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach, called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), involving new concepts to describe the mean quantities in wall-bounded flows, and its application to improving the existing engineering turbulence models, as well as its physical interpretation. First, a revised k - ω model for pipe flows is obtained, which accurately predicts, for the first time, both mean velocity and (streamwise) kinetic energy for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), validated by Princeton experimental data. In particular, a multiplicative factor is introduced in the dissipation term to model an anomaly in the energy cascade in a meso-layer, predicting the outer peak of agreeing with data. Secondly, a new one-equation model is obtained for compressible turbulent boundary layers (CTBL), building on a multi-layer formula of the stress length function and a generalized temperature-velocity relation. The former refines the multi-layer description - viscous sublayer, buffer layer, logarithmic layer and a newly defined bulk zone - while the latter characterizes a parabolic relation between the mean velocity and temperature. DNS data show our predictions to have a 99% accuracy for several Mach numbers Ma = 2.25, 4.5, improving, up to 10%, a previous similar one-equation model (Baldwin & Lomax, 1978). Our results promise notable improvements in engineering models.

  13. Method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalim, M. Razi (Inventor); Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cold gas reinjection in through-flow and reverse-flow wave rotors having a plurality of channels formed around a periphery thereof. A first port injects a supply of cool air into the channels. A second port allows the supply of cool air to exit the channels and flow to a combustor. A third port injects a supply of hot gas from the combustor into the channels. A fourth port allows the supply of hot gas to exit the channels and flow to a turbine. A diverting port and a reinjection port are connected to the second and third ports, respectively. The diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air exiting through the second port as reinjection air. The diverting port is fluidly connected to the reinjection port which reinjects the reinjection air back into the channels. The reinjection air evacuates the channels of the hot gas resident therein and cools the channel walls, a pair of end walls of the rotor, ducts communicating with the rotor and subsequent downstream components. In a second embodiment, the second port receives all of the cool air exiting the channels and the diverting port diverts a portion of the cool air just prior to the cool air flowing to the combustor.

  14. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  15. Electromagnetic and Thermal-flow Modeling of a Cold-Wall Crucible Induction Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, James A.; Garnich, Mark R.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.

    2005-02-01

    An approach for modeling cold-wall crucible induction melters is described. Materials in the melt and melter are non-ferromagnetic. In contrast to other modeling works reported in the literature, the numerical models utilize commercial codes. The ANSYS finite element code is employed for electromagnetic field simulations and the STAR-CD finite volume code for thermal-flow calculations. Results from the electromagnetic calculations in the form of local Joule heat and Lorentz force distributions are included as loads in the thermal-flow analysis. This loosely-coupled approach is made possible by the small variation in temperature and, consequently, small variation in electrical properties across the melt as well as the quasi-steady state nature of the thermal flow calculations. A three dimensional finite element grid for electromagnetic calculations is adapted to a similar axisymmetric finite volume grid for data transfer to the thermal-flow model. Results from the electromagnetic model compare well with operational data from a 175 mm diameter melter. Results from the thermal-flow simulation provide insight toward molten metal circulation patterns, temperature variations, and velocity magnitudes. Initial results are included for a model that simulates the formation of a solid (skull) layer on the crucible base and wall. Overall, the modeling approach is shown to produce useful results relating operational parameters to the physics of steady state melter operation.

  16. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  17. The effect of local cold application on intramuscular blood flow at rest and after running.

    PubMed

    Thorsson, O; Lilja, B; Ahlgren, L; Hemdal, B; Westlin, N

    1985-12-01

    Local blood flow was measured with 133Xe clearance technique in eight male distance runners, where one leg was cooled for 20 min by applying two "instant cold packs" on the quadriceps muscle. An initial cooling period after resting was followed by a second cooling period 10 min after running. Skin temperature was maximally reduced after 4.5 min of cooling, both at rest and after running, by 15 degrees C and 14.9 degrees C, respectively. During the first 5 min of cooling no reduction of blood flow was seen. After 10 min of cooling blood flow was significantly reduced in the cooled compared to the control leg by 49% (P less than 0.05) after resting and 34% (P less than 0.05) after running. A maximum reduction of blood flow by 66 and 69% (P less than 0.01), respectively, was seen 10 min after the cooling period. In the event of an acute injury, this delayed reaction of cryotherapy on intramuscular blood flow should be carefully considered. PMID:4079745

  18. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  19. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle First Stage Roll Control System Cold Flow Development Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Christopher G.; Holt, Kimberly A.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle is the selected design, chosen to return humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It is configured in two inline stages: the First Stage is a Space Shuttle derived five-segment Solid Rocket Booster and the Upper Stage is powered by a Saturn V derived J-2X engine. During launch, roll control for the First Stage (FS) is handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS) located on the connecting Interstage. That system will provide the Ares I with the ability to counteract induced roll torque while any induced yaw or pitch moments are handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. This paper provides an overview of NASA s Ares I FS RoCS cold flow development test program including detailed test objectives, types of tests run to meet those objectives, an overview of the results, and applicable lessons learned. The test article was built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. The FS RoCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) is a full scale, flight representative water flow test article whose primary objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate integrated system level performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Development testing and model correlation was deemed necessary as there is little historical precedent for similar large flow, pulsing systems such as the FS RoCS. The cold flow development test program consisted of flight-similar tanks, pressure regulators, and thruster valves, as well as plumbing simulating flight geometries, combined with other facility grade components and structure. Orifices downstream of the thruster valves were used to simulate the pressure drop through the thrusters. Additional primary objectives of this test program were to: evaluate system surge pressure (waterhammer) characteristics due to thruster valve operation over a range of mission duty cycles at various feed system pressures, evaluate temperature transients and heat transfer in the

  20. Large eddy simulation of mixing between hot and cold sodium flows - comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneau, J.P.; Noe, H.; Menant, B.

    1995-09-01

    The large eddy simulation is becoming a potential powerful tool for the calculation of turbulent flows. In nuclear liquid metal cooled fast reactors, the knowledge of the turbulence characteristics is of great interest for the prediction and the analysis of thermal stripping phenomena. The objective of this paper is to give a contribution in the evaluation of the large eddy simulation technique is an individual case. The problem chosen is the case of the mixing between hot and cold sodium flows. The computations are compared with available sodium tests. This study shows acceptable qualitative results but the simple model used is not able to predict the turbulence characteristics. More complex models including larger domains around the fluctuating zone and fluctuating boundary conditions could be necessary. Validation works are continuing.

  1. Flow regime study of a light material in an industrial scale cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Monazam, E.R.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-06-15

    A series of experiments was conducted in the 0.3 meter diameter circulating fluidized bed test facility at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U. S. Department of Energy. The particle used in this study was a coarse, light material, cork, which has a particle density of 189 kg/m{sup 3} and a mean diameter of 812 {mu}m. Fluidizing this material in ambient air approximates the same gas-solids density ratio as coal and coal char in a pressurized gasifier. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, this study is to provide a better understanding on the fundamentals of flow regimes and their transitions. The second purpose of this study is to generate reliable data to validate the mathematical models, which are currently under development at NETL. This paper presents and discusses the data, which covered operating flow regime from dilute phase, fast fluidization, and to dense phase transport by varying the solid flux, G{sub s}. at a constant gas velocity, U{sub g}. Data are presented by mapping the flow regime for coarse cork particles in a {Delta}P/{Delta} L-G{sub s}-U{sub g} plot. A stable operation can be obtained at a fixed riser gas velocity higher than the transport velocity e.g., at U{sub g} = 3.2 m/s, even though the riser is operated within the fast fluidization flow regime. Depending upon the solids influx, the riser can also be operated at dilute phase or dense phase flow regimes. Experimental data were compared to empirical correlations in published literature for flow regime boundaries as well as solids, fractions in the upper dilute and the lower dense regions for fast fluidization flow regime. Comparisons of measured data with these empirical correlations show rather poor agreements. These discrepancies, however, are not surprising since the correlations for these transitions were derived from experimental data of comparative heavier materials such as sands, FCC, iron ore etc.

  2. Cold Flow Testing for Liquid Propellant Rocket Injector Scaling and Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Hulka, James; Jones, Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Scaling and throttling of combustion devices are important capabilities to demonstrate in development of liquid rocket engines for NASA's Space Exploration Mission. Scaling provides the ability to design new injectors and injection elements with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with existing injectors and elements, and could be a key aspect of future development programs. Throttling is the reduction of thrust with fixed designs and is a critical requirement in lunar and other planetary landing missions. A task in the Constellation University Institutes Program (CUIP) has been designed to evaluate spray characteristics when liquid propellant rocket engine injectors are scaled and throttled. The specific objectives of the present study are to characterize injection and primary atomization using cold flow simulations of the reacting sprays. These simulations can provide relevant information because the injection and primary atomization are believed to be the spray processes least affected by the propellant reaction. Cold flow studies also provide acceptable test conditions for a university environment. Three geometric scales - 1/4- scale, 1/2-scale, and full-scale - of two different injector element types - swirl coaxial and shear coaxial - will be designed, fabricated, and tested. A literature review is currently being conducted to revisit and compile the previous scaling documentation. Because it is simple to perform, throttling will also be examined in the present work by measuring primary atomization characteristics as the mass flow rate and pressure drop of the six injector element concepts are reduced, with corresponding changes in chamber backpressure. Simulants will include water and gaseous nitrogen, and an optically accessible chamber will be used for visual and laser-based diagnostics. The chamber will include curtain flow capability to repress recirculation, and additional gas injection to provide independent control of the

  3. Entropy Limit and the Cold Feedback Mechanism in Cooling Flow Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2008-09-01

    I propose an explanation for the finding that star formation and visible filaments strong in Hα emission in cooling flow clusters occur only if the minimum specific entropy and the radiative cooling time of the intracluster medium (ICM) are below a specific threshold. The explanation is based on the cold feedback mechanism. In this mechanism, the mass accreted by the central black hole originates in nonlinear overdense blobs of gas residing in an extended region of the cooling flow region. I use the criterion that the feedback cycle period must be longer than the radiative cooling time of dense blobs, for large quantities of gas to cool to low temperatures. The falling time of the dense blobs is parameterized by the ratio of the infall velocity to the sound speed. Another parameter is the ratio of the blobs' density to that of the surrounding ICM. By taking the values of the parameters as in previous papers on the cold feedback model, I derive an expression that gives the right value of the entropy threshold. Future studies will have to examine in more detail the role these parameters play, and will have to show that the observed sharp change in the behavior of clusters across the entropy, or radiative cooling time, threshold can be reproduced by the model.

  4. Effects of gas temperature on nozzle damping experiments on cold-flow rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bing-bing; Li, Shi-peng; Su, Wan-xing; Li, Jun-wei; Wang, Ning-fei

    2016-09-01

    In order to explore the impact of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics of solid rocket motor, numerical simulations were carried out by an experimental motor in Naval Ordnance Test Station of China Lake in California. Using the pulse decay method, different cases were numerically studied via Fluent along with UDF (User Defined Functions). Firstly, mesh sensitivity analysis and monitor position-independent analysis were carried out for the computer code validation. Then, the numerical method was further validated by comparing the calculated results and experimental data. Finally, the effects of gas temperature on the nozzle damping characteristics were studied in this paper. The results indicated that the gas temperature had cooperative effects on the nozzle damping and there had great differences between cold flow and hot fire test. By discussion and analysis, it was found that the changing of mainstream velocity and the natural acoustic frequency resulted from gas temperature were the key factors that affected the nozzle damping, while the alteration of the mean pressure had little effect. Thus, the high pressure condition could be replaced by low pressure to reduce the difficulty of the test. Finally, the relation of the coefficients "alpha" between the cold flow and hot fire was got.

  5. The impact of upstream blocking, drainage flow and the geostrophic pressure gradient on the persistence of cold-air pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zängl, G.

    2003-01-01

    Idealized numerical simulations are performed to investigate dynamical mechanisms affecting the persistence of cold-air pools in basins and valleys. The first orography type considered is a shallow elongated basin located upstream of a mountain ridge. For sensitivity tests, the mountain ridge is removed. The second type is a basin embedded in a plateau-like mountain ridge. In part of the simulations, this basin has an outflow towards the lee-side plain so as to assess the impact of the drainage flow.The large-scale flow is taken to be in geostrophic balance. In the standard setting, it is perpendicular to the basin and the ridge. The main effect of a large-scale pressure gradient is to induce a circulation within a cold-air pool until the upper boundary of the cold pool is inclined such as to compensate for the ambient pressure gradient. The cold air accumulates where the ambient pressure is lowest. For a shallow basin, this means that part of the cold air may be lost due to advection out of the basin. The upstream influence of a mountain ridge in the lee of a shallow basin is found to be twofold. It tends to deflect the low-level flow towards the lower pressure, leading to an additional ridge-parallel force on the cold-air pool. On the other hand, the absolute wind speed is reduced, diminishing the turbulent mixing near the top of the cold pool. The simulations show that the first effect prevails for ridge-normal flow while second effect may dominate for other flow directions. Drainage flow out of a valley is found to be very important as it promotes the penetration of warm air into valleys very effectively. It may cause a cold pool in a deep valley to disappear more quickly than a cold pool in a shallow basin. Sensitivity tests show that the persistence of a cold pool depends on its depth, on its vertically integrated heat deficit, and on the maximum heat deficit at the bottom of the cold pool.

  6. Fluid and thermal mixing in a model cold leg and downcomer with vent-valve flow. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, P.H.; Marscher, W.D.; Block, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes an experimental program of fluid mixing experiments performed at atmospheric pressure in a 1/5-scale transparent model of the cold leg and downcomer of typical Babcock and Wilcox pressurized water reactors with vent valves. The results include transient data from a grid of thermocouples and extensive flow visualization photographs. Substantial mixing of cold injected water with hot primary coolant occurred during many of the tests.

  7. On the influence of cold-water coral mound size on flow hydrodynamics, and vice versa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, Frédéric; Haren, Hans; Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerard; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Using a combination of in situ observations and idealistic 2-D nonhydrostatic numerical simulations, the relation between cold-water coral (CWC) mound size and hydrodynamics is explored for the Rockall Bank area in the North Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that currents generated by topographically trapped tidal waves in this area cause large isopycnal depressions resulting from an internal hydraulic control above CWC mounds. The oxygen concentration distribution is used as a tracer to visualize the flow behavior and the turbulent mixing above the mounds. By comparing two CWC mounds of different sizes and located close to each other, it is shown that the resulting mixing is highly dependent on the size of the mound. The effects of the hydraulic control for mixing, nutrient availability, and ecosystem functioning are also discussed.

  8. Horizon in Random Matrix Theory, the Hawking Radiation, and Flow of Cold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Franchini, Fabio; Kravtsov, Vladimir E.

    2009-10-16

    We propose a Gaussian scalar field theory in a curved 2D metric with an event horizon as the low-energy effective theory for a weakly confined, invariant random matrix ensemble (RME). The presence of an event horizon naturally generates a bath of Hawking radiation, which introduces a finite temperature in the model in a nontrivial way. A similar mapping with a gravitational analogue model has been constructed for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) pushed to flow at a velocity higher than its speed of sound, with Hawking radiation as sound waves propagating over the cold atoms. Our work suggests a threefold connection between a moving BEC system, black-hole physics and unconventional RMEs with possible experimental applications.

  9. Horizon in random matrix theory, the Hawking radiation, and flow of cold atoms.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Fabio; Kravtsov, Vladimir E

    2009-10-16

    We propose a Gaussian scalar field theory in a curved 2D metric with an event horizon as the low-energy effective theory for a weakly confined, invariant random matrix ensemble (RME). The presence of an event horizon naturally generates a bath of Hawking radiation, which introduces a finite temperature in the model in a nontrivial way. A similar mapping with a gravitational analogue model has been constructed for a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) pushed to flow at a velocity higher than its speed of sound, with Hawking radiation as sound waves propagating over the cold atoms. Our work suggests a threefold connection between a moving BEC system, black-hole physics and unconventional RMEs with possible experimental applications. PMID:19905710

  10. Using nocturnal cold air drainage flow to monitor ecosystem processes in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Pypker, Thomas G; Unsworth, Michael H; Mix, Alan C; Rugh, William; Ocheltree, Troy; Alstad, Karrin; Bond, Barbara J

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents initial investigations of a new approach to monitor ecosystem processes in complex terrain on large scales. Metabolic processes in mountainous ecosystems are poorly represented in current ecosystem monitoring campaigns because the methods used for monitoring metabolism at the ecosystem scale (e.g., eddy covariance) require flat study sites. Our goal was to investigate the potential for using nocturnal down-valley winds (cold air drainage) for monitoring ecosystem processes in mountainous terrain from two perspectives: measurements of the isotopic composition of ecosystem-respired CO2 (delta13C(ER)) and estimates of fluxes of CO2 transported in the drainage flow. To test if this approach is plausible, we monitored the wind patterns, CO2 concentrations, and the carbon isotopic composition of the air as it exited the base of a young (approximately 40 yr-old) and an old (>450 yr-old) steeply sided Douglas-fir watershed. Nocturnal cold air drainage within these watersheds was strong, deep, and occurred on more than 80% of summer nights. The depth of cold air drainage rapidly increased to tower height or greater when the net radiation at the top of the tower approached zero. The carbon isotope composition of CO2 in the drainage system holds promise as an indicator of variation in basin-scale physiological processes. Although there was little vertical variation in CO2 concentration at any point in time, we found that the range of CO2 concentration over a single evening was sufficient to estimate delta 13C(ER) from Keeling plot analyses. The seasonal variation in delta 13C(ER) followed expected trends: during the summer dry season delta 13C(ER) became less negative (more enriched in 13C), but once rain returned in the fall, delta 13C(ER) decreased. However, we found no correlation between recent weather (e.g., vapor pressure deficit) and delta 13C(ER) either concurrently or with up to a one-week lag. Preliminary estimates suggest that the nocturnal CO2

  11. Improved management of winter operations to limit subsurface contamination with degradable deicing chemicals in cold regions.

    PubMed

    French, Helen K; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of management considerations required for better control of deicing chemicals in the unsaturated zone at sites with winter maintenance operations in cold regions. Degradable organic deicing chemicals are the main focus. The importance of the heterogeneity of both the infiltration process, due to frozen ground and snow melt including the contact between the melting snow cover and the soil, and unsaturated flow is emphasised. In this paper, the applicability of geophysical methods for characterising soil heterogeneity is considered, aimed at modelling and monitoring changes in contamination. To deal with heterogeneity, a stochastic modelling framework may be appropriate, emphasizing the more robust spatial and temporal moments. Examples of a combination of different field techniques for measuring subsoil properties and monitoring contaminants and integration through transport modelling are provided by the SoilCAM project and previous work. Commonly, the results of flow and contaminant fate modelling are quite detailed and complex and require post-processing before communication and advising stakeholders. The managers' perspectives with respect to monitoring strategies and challenges still unresolved have been analysed with basis in experience with research collaboration with one of the case study sites, Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway. Both scientific challenges of monitoring subsoil contaminants in cold regions and the effective interaction between investigators and management are illustrated. PMID:24281673

  12. Dynamical Simulation of Cloudy Boundary Layer Flow during Cold Air Outbreaks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, Chiu-Wai

    A two-dimensional primitive equation planetary boundary layer model has been constructed and applied to simulate downwind evolution of coupled dynamical, thermodynamical and cloud properties in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) developed during cold air outbreaks over warm ocean. A layered parametric approach is adopted to model the inversion -capped convective boundary layer filled with shallow cumuli, or topped by stratocumulus or cloud free air. Turbulent and convective cloud fluxes are determined from modifications and generalizations of recent published parameterization schemes. A one-dimensional version of the model is first applied to a local simulation of trade wind flow. Vertical distributions of momentum flux and wind in the cumulus -filled baroclinic PBL are realistically simulated compared to observations, confirming the validity of the momentum flux parameterization scheme assembled in this research. A steady-state linear analysis for a cloud-free mixed layer flowing from land over a warm ocean clarifies the basic dynamical and thermodynamical adjustments to differential friction and heating. Downwind warming and deepening of PBL produces counteracting pressure gradient forces, while heating-induced subsidence occurs only in places where boundary layer baroclinity is strong. Comparative numerical experiments for moderate intensity air-sea interaction illustrate the importance of nonprecipitating cumulus convection and large scale environmental conditions. Such factors as baroclinity, static stability, moisture content, upwind inversion strength and height exert strong controls on the downwind evolution of PBL and clouds. Boundary layer flow is influenced by the basic geostrophic wind distribution and the PBL depth is also sensitive to large scale vertical velocity. The response of an advective boundary layer to stronger wind is different from that of a horizontally homogeneous boundary layer. In a simulation of an intense air mass transformation

  13. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  14. Improvement of Cold Tolerance by Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. F.; Li, D. J.; Jacobson, K. A.; Wang, L. C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the improvement of cold tolerance by theophylline is due to antagonism at adenosine receptors rather than inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since theophylline is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist for both A1 and A2 receptors, the present study investigated the adenosine receptor subtype involved in theophylline’s action. Acute systemic injection of selective A1 receptor antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-aryl or 1,3-dialkyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine derivatives) significantly increased both the total and maximal heat production as well as cold tolerance. In contrast, injection of a relatively selective A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (compound No. 19), failed to significantly alter the thermogenic response of the rat under cold exposure. Further, the relative effectiveness of these compounds in increasing total thermogenesis was positively correlated with their potency in blocking the A1 adenosine receptor (r= .52, p<0.01), but not in A2 adenosine receptor (r= .20, p<0.2). It is likely that the thermally beneficial effects of adenosine A1 antagonists are due to their attenuation of the inhibitory effects of endogenously released adenosine on lipolysis and glucose utilization, resulting in increased substrate mobilization and utilization for enhanced thermogenesis. PMID:2263650

  15. Improved Panel-Method/Potential-Flow Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.

    1991-01-01

    Panel code PMARC (Panel Method Ames Research Center) numerically simulates flow field around complex three-dimensional bodies, such as complete aircraft models. Based on potential-flow theory. Written in FORTRAN 77, with exception of namelist extension used for input. Structure facilitates addition of new features to code and tailoring of code to specific problems and computer hardware constraints.

  16. Modeling of a sinusoidal lobed injector: Vorticity and concentration fields for a cold flow

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1995-12-01

    In this report, we present a simple and somewhat preliminary numerical model of a sinusoidal lobed injector. The lobed (corrugated) injector is being considered by several investigators as a potentially efficient device to mix fuel and air for combustion purposes. In this configuration, air flows parallel to the troughs and valleys of corrugations which grow in amplitude in the stream-wise direction. These ramped corrugations produce stream-wise vortices which enhance the downstream mixing. For the lobed injector, the corrugations are actually double walled which allows one to inject fuel through the space between them into the flow downstream of the ramp. The simulation model presented herein is based on a vorticity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and is solved using an unsteady viscous vortex method. In order to demonstrate the utility of this method we have simulated the three-dimensional cold mixing process for injection of methane gas into air. The vorticity and fuel concentration field downstream of the injector are simulated for two different injector geometries. We observe from these two simulations that variation of the amplitude of the corrugations can be used to achieve considerably different mixing patterns downstream of the injector.

  17. Improved visualization of flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    1991-01-01

    A capability is proposed that makes it feasible to apply to measured flow field data the visualization tools developed to display numerical solutions for computational fluid dynamic problems. The measurement monitor surface (MMS) methodology was used for the analysis of flow field measurements within a low-aspect-ratio transonic axial-flow fan rotor acquired with two-dimensional laser anemometry. It is shown that the MMS method may be utilized to generate input for the multidimensional processing and analytical tools developed for numerical flow field simulation data. Thus an experimenter utilizing an interactive graphics program could illustrate scalar quantities such as Mach number by profiles, contour lines, carpet plots, and surfaces employing various color intensities. Also, flow directionality can be shown by the display of vector fields and particle traces.

  18. Improvement of cold-wire response for measurement of temperature dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemay, J.; Benaïssa, A.

    This work aimed at improving fine-scale measurements using cold-wire anemometry. The dissipation ɛθ of the temperature variance was measured on the axis of a heated turbulent round jet. The measurements were performed with a constant current anemometer (CCA) operating fine Pt-10%Rh wires at very low overheat. The CCA developed for this purpose allowed the use of the current injection method in order to estimate the time constant of the wire. In the first part of the paper, it is shown that the time constants obtained for two wire diameters -d=1.2 and d=0.58μm - compare well with those measured at the same time using two other methods (laser excitation and pulsed wire). Moreover, for these two wires, the estimated time constants were in good agreement with those obtained from a semi-empirical relation. In the second part of the paper, a compensation procedure - post-processing filtering - was developed in order to improved the frequency response of the cold-wire probes. The measurements carried out on the axis of the jet (ReD=16500, Reλ = 167) showed that the frequency response of the 1.2μm wire was significantly improved. In fact, the spectral characteristics of the compensated signal obtained with the 1.2μm wire compared fairly well with those from the 0.58μm wire. Moreover, the results indicated that the compensation procedure must be applied when the cut-off frequency of the cold-wire fc is lower than two times the Kolmogorov frequency fK. In the case where fc = 0.6fK, the compensation procedure can reduce the error in the estimate of ɛθ by more than 20%. When fc = 2fK, the effect of the compensation is reduced to about 5%.

  19. Expanding NevCAN capabilities: monitoring cold air drainage flow along a narrow wash within a Montane to PJ ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, B. M.; Devitt, D.

    2012-12-01

    Cold air drainage flows are a naturally occurring physical process of mountain systems. Plant communities that exist in cold air drainage basins respond to these localized cold air trends, and have been shown to be decoupled from larger global climate weather systems. The assumption that air temperature decreases with altitude is violated within these systems and climate model results based on this assumption would ultimately be inaccurate. In arid regions, high radiation loads lead to significant long wave radiation being emitted from the ground later in the day. As incoming radiation ceases, the surface very quickly loses energy through radiative processes, leading to surface inversions and enhanced cold air drainage opportunities. This study is being conducted in the Mojave desert on Sheep Mountain located between sites 3 and 4 of the NSF EPSCoR network. Monitoring of cold air drainage was initiated in September of 2011within a narrow ravine located between the 2164 and 2350 meter elevation. We have installed 25 towers (5 towers per location situated at the central low point in a ravine and at equal distances up the sides of the ravine on both the N and S facing slopes) to assess air temperatures from 0.1 meters to a height of 3 meters at 25m intervals. Our goal is to better understand the connection between cold air movement and plant physiological response. The species monitored in this study include: Pinus ponderosa (common name: Ponderosa Pine), Pinus pinyon (Pinyon Pine), Juniperus osteosperma (Utah juniper), Cercocarpus intricatus (Mountain Mahogany) and Symphoricarpos (snowberry). Hourly air temperature measurements within the wash are being captured from 100 ibuttons placed within PVC solar radiation shields. We are also developing a modeling approach to assess the three dimensional movement of cold air over time by incorporating wind vectors captured from 5 2D sonic anemometers. Wind velocities will be paired with air temperatures to better understand

  20. Restriction to large-scale gene flow vs. regional panmixia among cold seep Escarpia spp. (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae).

    PubMed

    Cowart, Dominique A; Huang, Chunya; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Carney, Susan L; Fisher, Charles R; Schaeffer, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The history of colonization and dispersal in fauna distributed among deep-sea chemosynthetic ecosystems remains enigmatic and poorly understood because of an inability to mark and track individuals. A combination of molecular, morphological and environmental data improves understanding of spatial and temporal scales at which panmixia, disruption of gene flow or even speciation may occur. Vestimentiferan tubeworms of the genus Escarpia are important components of deep -sea cold seep ecosystems, as they provide long-term habitat for many other taxa. Three species of Escarpia, Escarpia spicata [Gulf of California (GoC)], Escarpia laminata [Gulf of Mexico (GoM)] and Escarpia southwardae (West African Cold Seeps), have been described based on morphology, but are not discriminated through the use of mitochondrial markers (cytochrome oxidase subunit 1; large ribosomal subunit rDNA, 16S; cytochrome b). Here, we also sequenced the exon-primed intron-crossing Haemoglobin subunit B2 intron and genotyped 28 microsatellites to (i) determine the level of genetic differentiation, if any, among the three geographically separated entities and (ii) identify possible population structure at the regional scale within the GoM and West Africa. Results at the global scale support the occurrence of three genetically distinct groups. At the regional scale among eight sampling sites of E. laminata (n = 129) and among three sampling sites of E. southwardae (n = 80), no population structure was detected. These findings suggest that despite the patchiness and isolation of seep habitats, connectivity is high on regional scales. PMID:23879204

  1. Improving Snow Measurement Technology to Better Parameterise Cold Regions Hydrometeorology Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeroy, J.; Debeer, C.; Ellis, C.; Essery, R.; Helgason, W.; Kinar, N.; Link, T.; MacDonald, J.

    2008-12-01

    Marmot Creek Research Basin, in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta, Canada constitutes a long term cold regions hydrometeorological observatory with over 45 years of intensive observations in alpine and forested zones. Recently, novel combinations of measurement technology to snow have been deployed in Marmot Creek to advance the understanding of snow processes and to improve hydrometeorological models of streamflow and atmospheric variables. One advance has been the development and application of portable acoustic reflectometry to measure the density and structure of seasonal snowpacks using an audible sound wave. This has permitted the non-invasive measurement of snow water equivalent for both stationary and snow survey applications. Another advance has been the use of oblique time-lapse digital photography which is corrected for elevation and view angle from a LiDAR DEM to produce daily orthogonal snow covered area images of the alpine zone. These images are used to calculate snowcovered area and to develop and test improved snowcover melt and depletion algorithms. Deployment of 3-axis ultrasonic anemometers and fast hygrometers with collection of 10 Hz data and full correction for non-stationarity, axis rotation and other effects has shown that horizontal turbulence is often advected into mountain clearings and causes failure of traditional bulk transfer calculations of latent and sensible heat. For forest snow a hanging, weighed spruce tree and hanging, weighed sub-canopy troughs are used to capture intercepted snow load and unloaded snow fluxes respectively. These quantities provide the information needed to test detailed models of the snow interception and unloading processes. To quantify variations in sub-canopy energy for snowmelt, infrared imaging radiometers and narrow beam radiometers are used to measure thermal radiation exitance from needles, stems and trunks in forests of varying structure. These measurements are being used to develop improved models of

  2. Facility Activation and Characterization for IPD Oxidizer Turbopump Cold-Flow Testing at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; Raines, N. G.; Farner, B. R.; Ryan, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is a 250K lbf (1.1 MN) thrust cryogenic hydrogen/oxygen engine technology demonstrator that utilizes a full flow staged combustion engine cycle. The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, which seeks to provide safe, dependable, cost-cutting technologies for future space launch systems. The project also is part of the Department of Defense's Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program, which seeks to increase the performance and capability of today s state-of-the-art rocket propulsion systems while decreasing costs associated with military and commercial access to space. The primary industry participants include Boeing-Rocketdyne and GenCorp Aerojet. The intended full flow engine cycle is a key component in achieving all of the aforementioned goals. The IPD Program achieved a major milestone with the successful completion of the IPD Oxidizer Turbopump (OTP) cold-flow test project at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) E-1 test facility in November 2001. A total of 11 IPD OTP cold-flow tests were completed. Following an overview of the NASA SSC E-1 test facility, this paper addresses the facility aspects pertaining to the activation and the cold-flow testing of the IPD OTP. In addition, some of the facility challenges encountered during the test project are addressed.

  3. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  4. Improving the assessment of instream flow needs for fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, M.J. ); Otto, R.G. and Associates, Arlington, VA )

    1991-01-01

    Instream flow requirements are one of the most frequent and most costly environmental issues that must be addressed in developing hydroelectric projects. Existing assessment methods for determining instream flow requirements have been criticized for not including all the biological response mechanisms that regulate fishery resources. A new project has been initiated to study the biological responses of fish populations to altered stream flows and to develop improved ways of managing instream flows. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Cold-atmospheric pressure plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour for improved wood plastics composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekobou, William; Pedrow, Patrick; Englund, Karl; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Plastic composites have become a large class of construction material for exterior applications. One of the main disadvantages of wood plastic composites resides in the weak adhesion between the polar and hydrophilic surface of wood and the non-polar and hydrophobic polyolefin matrix, hindering the dispersion of the flour in the polymer matrix. To improve interfacial compatibility wood flour can be pretreated with environmentally friendly methods such as cold-atmospheric pressure plasma. The objective of this work is therefore to evaluate the potential of plasma polymerization of acetylene on wood flour to improve the compatibility with polyolefins. This presentation will describe the reactor design used to modify wood flour using acetylene plasma polymerization. The optimum conditions for plasma polymerization on wood particles will also be presented. Finally preliminary results on the wood flour surface properties and use in wood plastic composites will be discussed.

  6. Improved dual flow aluminum hydrogen peroxide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Catherine; Licht, Stuart L.; Matthews, Donna

    1993-11-01

    A novel dual flow battery configuration is provided comprising an aqueous hydrogen peroxide catholyte, an aqueous anolyte, a porous solid electrocatalyst capable of reducing said hydrogen peroxide and separating said anolyte, and an aluminum anode positioned within said anolyte. Separation of catholyte and anolyte chambers prevents hydrogen peroxide poisoning of the aluminum anode.

  7. Cold Flow as Versatile Approach for Stable and Highly Luminescent Quantum Dot-Salt Composites.

    PubMed

    Benad, Albrecht; Guhrenz, Chris; Bauer, Christoph; Eichler, Franziska; Adam, Marcus; Ziegler, Christoph; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Since the beginning of the 1980s, colloidally synthesized quantum dots (QDs) have been in the focus of interest due to their possible implementation for color conversion, luminescent light concentrators, and lasing. For all these applications, the QDs benefit from being embedded into a host matrix to ensure stability and usability. Many different host materials used for this purpose still have their individual shortcomings. Here, we present a universal, fast, and flexible approach for the direct incorporation of a wide range of QDs into inorganic ionic crystals using cold flow. The QD solution is mixed with a finely milled salt, followed by the removal of the solvent under vacuum. Under high pressure (GPa), the salt powder loaded with QDs transforms into transparent pellets. This effect is well-known for many inorganic salts (e.g., KCl, KBr, KI, NaCl, CsI, AgCl) from, e.g., sample preparation for IR spectroscopy. With this approach, we are able to obtain strongly luminescent QD-salt composites, have precise control over the loading, and provide a chemically robust matrix ensuring long-term stability of the embedded QDs. Furthermore, we show the photo-, chemical, and thermal stability of the composite materials and their use as color conversion layers for a white light-emitting diode (w-LED). The method presented can potentially be used for all kinds of nanoparticles synthesized in organic as well as in aqueous media. PMID:27482755

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of a Swirl Stabilized Premixed Combustor under Cold Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Strakey; M.J. Yip

    2007-07-01

    Planar velocity measurements under cold-flow conditions in a swirl-stabilized dump combustor typical of land-based gas turbine combustors were carried out using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). Axial, radial, and tangential velocity components were measured sequentially using two experimental configurations. Mean and root-mean-squared velocity components are presented along with instantaneous realizations of the flowfield. A numerical study of the flowfield using large-eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) techniques was conducted in an effort to help understand the complex hydrodynamics observed in the experiments. The agreement between the experimental data and LES simulation was good with both showing evidence of a precessing vortex core. The results of the RANS simulation were not as encouraging. The results provide a fundamental understanding of the complex flowfield associated with the relatively simple geometry and also serve as a baseline validation dataset for further numerical simulations of the current geometry. Validation of LES models in a highly swirled, nonreacting flowfield such as the work presented here is an essential step towards more accurate prediction in a reacting environment.

  9. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  10. Multivariate optimization of mercury determination by flow injection-cold vapor generation-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Vanessa Cristina Gonçalves; Grassi, Marco Tadeu; de Campos, Mônica Soares; Peralta-Zamora, Patricio Guillermo; Abate, Gilberto

    2012-10-01

    In this work a procedure for mercury determination by Flow Injection-Cold Vapor Generation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP OES) has been developed. The system uses a small homemade glass separator constructed to drive the Hg vapor to the plasma. An evolutionary operation factorial design was used to evaluate the optimal experimental conditions for mercury vapor generation, aiming at the low consumption of reagents, the improvement of the analytical signal and consequently greater sensitivity. The procedure allowed the determination of mercury and showed excellent linearity for the concentration range from 0.50 μg L(-1) to 100.0 μg L(-1), with Limits of Detection (LOD) and Quantification (LOQ) of 0.11 μg L(-1) and 0.36 μg L(-1), respectively, and a sampling rate of 36 analyses per hour. The optimized procedure showed good accuracy and precision, and the method was validated by the analysis of two certified reference materials: Buffalo River Sediment (NIST 2704) and human hair (IAEA 085). A good agreement with the certified values was achieved, with recovery values of 99% and 98% and relative standard deviation close to 2%. PMID:22870503

  11. Improving chemical synthesis using flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Charlotte; Watts, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Owing to the competitive nature of the pharmaceutical industry, researchers involved in lead compound generation are under continued pressure to identify and develop promising programmes of research in order to secure intellectual property. The potential of a compound for therapeutic development depends not only on structural complexity, but also on the identification of synthetic strategies that will enable the compound to be prepared on the desired scale. One approach that is of present interest to the pharmaceutical industry is the use of continuous flow reactors, with the flexible nature of the technology being particularly attractive as it bridges the changes in scale required between the initial identification of a target compound and its subsequent production. Based on these factors, a significant programme of research is presently underway into the development of flow reactors as tools for the synthetic chemist, with the transfer of many classes of reaction successfully reported to date. This article focuses on the application of continuous flow methodology to drug discovery and the subsequent production of pharmaceuticals. PMID:23484600

  12. Improving cold storage and processing traits in potato through targeted gene knockout.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Benjamin M; Stoddard, Thomas J; Luo, Song; Demorest, Zachary L; Li, Jin; Cedrone, Frederic; Tibebu, Redeat; Davison, Shawn; Ray, Erin E; Daulhac, Aurelie; Coffman, Andrew; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam; Haun, William; Baltes, Nicholas J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage of potato tubers is commonly used to reduce sprouting and extend postharvest shelf life. However, cold temperature stimulates the accumulation of reducing sugars in potato tubers. Upon high-temperature processing, these reducing sugars react with free amino acids, resulting in brown, bitter-tasting products and elevated levels of acrylamide--a potential carcinogen. To minimize the accumulation of reducing sugars, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to silence the vacuolar invertase gene (VInv), which encodes a protein that breaks down sucrose to glucose and fructose. Because RNAi often results in incomplete gene silencing and requires the plant to be transgenic, here we used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knockout VInv within the commercial potato variety, Ranger Russet. We isolated 18 plants containing mutations in at least one VInv allele, and five of these plants had mutations in all VInv alleles. Tubers from full VInv-knockout plants had undetectable levels of reducing sugars, and processed chips contained reduced levels of acrylamide and were lightly coloured. Furthermore, seven of the 18 modified plant lines appeared to contain no TALEN DNA insertions in the potato genome. These results provide a framework for using TALENs to quickly improve traits in commercially relevant autotetraploid potato lines. PMID:25846201

  13. Molecular physiology and breeding at the crossroads of cold hardiness improvement.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Yves; Dubé, Marie-Pier; Cloutier, Jean; Bertrand, Annick; Michaud, Réal; Laberge, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage legume grown extensively worldwide with important agronomic and environmental attributes. Insufficient cold hardiness is a major impediment to its reliable production in northern climates. Improvement of freezing tolerance using conventional breeding approaches is slowed by the quantitative nature of inheritance and strong interactions with the environment. The development of gene-based markers would facilitate the identification of genotypes with superior stress tolerance. Successive cycles of recurrent selection were applied using an indoor screening method to develop populations with significantly higher tolerance to freezing (TF). Bulk segregant analysis of heterogeneous TF populations identified DNA variations that are progressively enriched in frequency in response to selection. Polymorphisms resulting from intragenic variations within a dehydrin gene were identified and could potentially lead to the development of robust selection tools. Our results illustrate the benefits of feedback interactions between germplasm development programs and molecular physiology for a deeper understanding of the molecular and genetic bases of cold hardiness. PMID:22452626

  14. Full-scale cold-flow modelling of the SRC-I slurry fired heater at Creare, Inc. mixing and 1/sup 0/ downslope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    One of the major pieces of equipment in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant is the slurry fired heater. Because of the absence of any plant data at comparable combinations of operating severity, a cold-flow modelling experimental program was initiated at Creare, Inc. The first phase of the test program confirmed the fired heater design and established reliable boundaries of flow rates for proper operation of the fired heater. An experimental setup was designed and built at Creare to duplicate the piping arrangement and flow conditions of the fired heater. The pipe dimensions, flow rates, and fluid properties were selected to minimize areas of scale-up and extrapolation. This follow-up test program was developed to resolve concerns raised from the observations made in the first phase. Tests were conducted to establish the extent of mixing between the liquid carpet and the fast-moving liquid slugs above it. The other segment of the test program was designed to develop the flow regime and pressure drop data in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. The results demonstrated a significant amount of mixing between the liquid carpet and the liquid slugs for water and the 400-cP fluid at the design flow conditions. The extent of mixing improved with increasing liquid and gas velocities and decreasing liquid viscosities. Adequate mixing was observed at liquid flow rates as low as 50% of the design flow conditions. Slug flow was observed at design conditions in the 1/sup 0/ downslope configuration. Although adequate mixing is expected in heater pipes, different techniques should be investigated to improve the extent of mixing, especially near the transition boundary. 4 references, 5 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Cold flow simulation of the alternate turbopump development turbine of the Space Shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Richard J.

    1994-03-01

    Completion of the installation at the Naval Postgraduate School of a cold-flow test facility for the turbine of the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump is reported. The article to be tested is the first stage of the Alternate Turbopump Development model designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney. The purpose of the facility is to enable the development of non-intrusive flow measurements and comparison of those measurements with numerical simulations. Flow field characteristics of the turbine stator were predicted using a three-dimensional viscous flow code. A sensitivity study was conducted to determine the effect of inlet profile to flow field solution. Recommendations are made for future use of the test facility and validation of the numerical simulation scheme.

  16. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Smith, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    The use of flow boiling for thermal energy transport is intended to provide an alternative for accommodating higher heat fluxes in commercial space systems. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls, spiral fins, or both spiral fins and a twisted tape; (2) examine the effects of channel diameter and subcooling; and (3) develop an improved reduction analysis and/or suggest possible heat transfer correlation of the present data. Freon-11 is the working fluid. Two-dimensional (circumferential and axial) wall temperature distributions were measured for coolant channels with the above noted internal geometries. The flow regimes which are being studied are: (1) single phase; (2) subcooled flow boiling; and (3) stratified flow boiling. The inside diameter of all test sections is near 1.0 cm. Cicumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients at several axial locations were obtained for selected coolant channels for a mass velocity of 210 kg/sq m s, an exit pressure of 0.19 MPa (absolute), and an inlet subcooling of 20.8 C. Overall (averaged over the entire channel) heat transfer coefficients were compared for the above channel geometries. This comparison showed that the channel with large pitch spiral fins had higher heat transfer coefficients at all power levels.

  17. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: I. Cold flow features and dc arc characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2014-05-01

    The cold flow and the arc, under direct currents burning in the nozzle of the arcing device used in Benenson (1980 Final Report General Electric Co. (Schenectady, NY) Project 246-2) with fixed stagnation pressure, have been investigated computationally using five flow models; the laminar flow model, the Prandtl mixing length model, the standard k-epsilon model and its two variants, the Chen-Kim model and the renormalization group model. For the cold flow, the computational results are almost the same for the different flow models apart from in the regions close to the two electrodes. There is a bow shock in front of the downstream hollow electrode and a wake near the tip of the upstream electrode. The size of the wake and the strength and the structure of the shock differ greatly amongst the flow models. With a dc arc in the nozzle, derived voltage-current characteristics are negative for currents of less than 600 A but for higher currents the arc voltage is nearly constant.

  18. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit. Task 1, Cold flow burner development: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.

    1989-10-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop a high efficiency advanced coal combustor (HEACC) for coal-based fuels capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas, distillate, and/or residual oil. The HEACC system is to be capable of firing microfine coal water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system are that it be simple to operate and will offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal fired combustor technology. The specific objective of this report is to document the work carried out under Task 1.0 of this contract, ``Cold Flow Burner Development``. As are detailed in the report, key elements of this work included primary air swirler development, burner register geometry design, cold flow burner model testing, and development of burner scale up criteria.

  19. Results of hydrologic testing of the Cold Creek interbed and Umatilla basalt flow top at Borehole DC-15

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.L. . Rockwell Hanford Operations); Prater, L.S.; Raymond, J.R. )

    1983-08-01

    Results and a description of hydrologic testing of the Cold Creek interbed and Umatilla basalt flow top are presented in this report. The isolated test interval is from 713 to 787 ft below land surface. Hydrologic test results are assigned to the Cold Creek interbed (721 to 769 ft) and Umatilla basalt flow top (769 to 787 ft). Hydrologic tests conducted between March 21 and March 26, 1980 included a constant discharge airlift pumping tests and a constant discharge submersible pumping test. An observed hydraulic head for the interval was about 359 ft above mean sea level. Transmissivity values determined from tests performed range from 28 to 29 ft{sup 2}/day, with an assigned best estimate of 29 ft{sup 2}/day. The best estimate of equivalent hydraulic conductivity, based on an effective test thickness of 66 ft, is 0.4 ft/day. 3 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  1. Mechanical pretreatment improving hemicelluloses removal from cellulosic fibers during cold caustic extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianguo; Liu, Yishan; Duan, Chao; Zhang, Hongjie; Ni, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Hemicelluloses removal is a prerequisite for the production of high-quality cellulose (also known as dissolving pulp), and further recovery and utilization of hemicelluloses, which can be considered as a typical Integrated Forest Biorefinery concept. In this paper, a process of combined mechanical refining and cold caustic extraction (CCE), which was applied to a softwood sulfite sample, was investigated. The results showed that the hemicelluloses removal efficiency and selectivity were higher for the combined treatment than that for the CCE alone. The combined treatment can thus decrease the alkali concentration (from 8% to 4%) to achieve a similar hemicelluloses removal. The improved results were due to the fact that the mechanical refining resulted in increases in pore volume and diameter, water retention value (WRV) and specific surface area (SSA), all of which can make positive contributions to the hemicelluloses removal in the subsequent CCE process. PMID:26081626

  2. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for improved performance of a cold-atom electron and ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkes, B. M.; Murphy, D.; Taylor, R. J.; Speirs, R. W.; McCulloch, A. J.; Scholten, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    We implement high-efficiency coherent excitation to a Rydberg state using stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a cold-atom electron and ion source. We achieve an efficiency of 60% averaged over the laser excitation volume with a peak efficiency of 82%, a 1.6 times improvement relative to incoherent pulsed-laser excitation. Using pulsed electric field ionization of the Rydberg atoms we create electron bunches with durations of 250 ps. High-efficiency excitation will increase source brightness, crucial for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and coherent excitation to high-lying Rydberg states could allow for the reduction of internal bunch heating and the creation of a high-speed single-ion source.

  3. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  4. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  5. Relief, nocturnal cold-air flow and air quality in Kigali, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    , this result is not reassuringly, because all measured residential districts in Kigali exceeded the recommendations of the WHO, too. This suggests that the inhabitants of Kigali are exposed to enormous levels of PM10 during most of their time outdoors. So PM10 levels are increasing in areas with high rates of traffic due to the exhaust of the vehicles and the stirring up of dust from the ground, but also in fact of burning wood for cooking etc. within the residential districts. Hazardous measuring trips could be detected for nighttime measurements. Because of high temperatures, high solar radiation and a non-typical missing cloud cover the urban surface could heat up extremely, which produced a cold-air flow from the ridges and the slopes down to the "Marais" at night. This cold-air flow takes away the suspended particulate matters, which tends to accumulate within the "Marais" on the bottom of the hills, the places where most residential neighborhoods could be found and agricultural fields were used. The distinctive relief caused an accumulation within small valleys. Unfortunately, these are the favourite places of living and agriculture and this tends to high indoor-air pollution.

  6. Nature of convection-stabilized dc arcs in dual-flow nozzle geometry. I - The cold flow field and dc arc characteristics. II - Optical diagnostics and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serbetci, Ilter; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1990-01-01

    Steady-state low-current air arcs in a dual-flow nozzle system are studied experimentally. The cold flow field with no arc is investigated using a 12.7-mm diameter dual-flow nozzle in a steady-flow facility. Mach number and mass flux distributions are determined for various nozzle-pressure ratios and nozzle-gap spacing. It is found that the shock waves in the converging-diverging nozzles result in a decrease in overal resistance by about 15 percent. Also, Schlieren and differential interferometry techniques are used to visualize the density gradients within the arc plasma and thermal mantle. Both optical techniques reveal a laminar arc structure for a reservoir pressure of 1 atm at various current levels. Experimentally determined axial static pressure and cold-flow mass flux rate distributions and a channel-flow model with constant arc temperatre are used to solve the energy integral for the arc radius as a function of axial distance. The arc electric field strength, voltage, resistance, and power are determined with Ohm's law and the total heat transfer is related to arc power.

  7. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  8. Cold-flow performance of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle for supersonic-cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, D. E.; Nosek, S. M.; Straight, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental data were obtained with a 21.59 cm (8.5 in.) diameter cold-flow model in a static altitude facility to determine the thrust and pumping characteristics of several variations of a ram-air-cooled plug nozzle. Tests were conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios simulating supersonic cruise and takeoff conditions. Primary throat area was also varied to simulate afterburner on and off. Effect of plug size, outer shroud length, primary nozzle geometry, and varying amounts of secondary flow were investigated. At a supersonic cruise pressure ratio of 27, nozzle efficiencies were 99.7 percent for the best configurations.

  9. Improvement of Flow Quality in NAL Chofu Mach 10 Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, John; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Higashida, Akio; Inoue, Manabu; Ishizaka, Kouichi; Korte, John J.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of CFD analysis and remachining of the nozzle, the flow quality of the Mach 10 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NAL Chofu, Japan was improved. The subsequent test results validated the CFD analytical predictions by NASA and MHL.

  10. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  11. Trading water to improve environmental flow outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Jeffery D.; Franklin, Brad; Loch, Adam; Kirby, Mac; Wheeler, Sarah Ann

    2013-07-01

    As consumptive extractions and water scarcity pressures brought about by climate change increase in many world river basins, so do the risks to water-dependent ecological assets. In response, public or not for profit environmental water holders (EWHs) have been established in many areas and bestowed with endowments of water and mandates to manage water for ecological outcomes. Water scarcity has also increasingly spawned water trade arrangements in many river basins, and in many instances, EWHs are now operating in water markets. A number of EWHs, especially in Australia, begin with an endowment of permanent water entitlements purchased from irrigators. Such water entitlements typically have relatively constant interannual supply profiles that often do not match ecological water demand involving flood pulses and periods of drying. This article develops a hydrologic-economic simulation model of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray-Darling Basin to assess the scope of possibilities to improve environmental outcomes through EWH trading on an annual water lease market. We find that there are some modest opportunities for EWHs to improve environmental outcomes through water trade. The best opportunities occur in periods of drought and for ecological outcomes that benefit from moderately large floods. We also assess the extent to which EWH trading in annual water leases may create pecuniary externalities via bidding up or down the water lease prices faced by irrigators. Environmental water trading is found to have relatively small impacts on water market price outcomes. Overall our results suggest that the benefits of developing EWH trading may well justify the costs.

  12. A mixing model for transient cooldown in a reactor cold leg and downcomer under stagnant loop flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.; Sun, B.K.M.; Sursock, J.P.

    1983-07-01

    The mixing of the high pressure coolant injected into a reactor cold leg pipe and the water in the reactor loop causes the temperature of water in the cold leg and the downcomer annulus to decrease. The transient cooldown of the water in the downcomer adjacent to the vessel wall is an important factor in determining thermal stress in the vessel. An analytical model has been developed to describe the phenomena of mixing between the coolant and the hot water in the cold leg and the downcomer for the condition of stagnant loop flow. The model divides the volume of the cold leg and the downcomer into several segments based on the understanding of the phenomenon and the governing physical mechanisms associated with them. In each segmented volume, a first-order ordinary differential equation is used along with appropriate mixing correlations to characterize the mass and energy balances. By satisfying the boundary conditions at the conjunctions of the volumes, the differential equations are solved simultaneously to yield the transient cooldown history of the water in each volume. The model predictions are in agreement with data obtained from the EPRI/CREARE 1/5 scale model facility and the EPRI/SAI rectangular geometry fullheight facility.

  13. Environmental Data Flow Six Sigma Process Improvement Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Paige, Karen S

    2015-05-20

    An overview of the Environmental Data Flow Six Sigma improvement project covers LANL’s environmental data processing following receipt from the analytical laboratories. The Six Sigma project identified thirty-three process improvements, many of which focused on cutting costs or reducing the time it took to deliver data to clients.

  14. Cool-season annual grasses interseeded into bermudagrass with improved cold-tolerance for grazing in the upper south

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (Pers.) L.] cultivars with improved cold tolerance can be utilized for grazing in the transition zone between the temperate northeast and subtropical southeast, but these bermudagrasses generally do not provide adequate growth for stocking until late May to early June....

  15. Improving Patient Flow Utilizing a Collaborative Learning Model.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Laura C; Schultz, Stacy R; Cravath, Julie L; Rein, Russell R; Krecke, Karl N

    2016-01-01

    This initiative utilized a collaborative learning approach to increase knowledge and experience in process improvement and systems thinking while targeting improved patient flow in seven radiology modalities. Teams showed improvements in their project metrics and collectively streamlined the flow for 530 patients per day by improving patient lead time, wait time, and first case on-time start rates. In a post-project survey of 50 project team members, 82% stated they had more effective solutions as a result of the process improvement methodology, 84% stated they will be able to utilize the process improvement tools again in the future, and 98% would recommend participating in another project to a colleague. PMID:27514106

  16. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Turknett, Jerry C.; Smith, Alvin

    1989-01-01

    The effects of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in circular coolant channels, which are heated over a fraction of their perimeters, are studied. The variations were examined in both the mean and local (axial, and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls. Improvements were initiated in the present data reduction analysis. These efforts should lead to the development of heat transfer correlations which include effects of single side heat flux and enhancement device configuration. It is hoped that a stage will be set for the study of heat transfer and pressure drop in single sided heated systems under zero gravity conditions.

  17. IMPROVED BIOMASS UTILIZATION THROUGH REMOTE FLOW SENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Washington University- St. Louis: Muthanna Al-Dahhan E-mail: muthanna@wustl.edu Rajneesh Varma Khursheed Karim Mehul Vesvikar Rebecca Hoffman Oak Ridge National Laboratory: David Depaoli, Email: depaolidw@ornl.gov Thomas Klasson Alan L. Wintenberg Charles W Alexander Lloyd Clonts Iowa Energy Center Norm Olson Email: nolson@energy.iastate.edu

    2007-03-26

    The growth of the livestock industry provides a valuable source of affordable, sustainable, and renewable bioenergy, while also requiring the safe disposal of the large quantities of animal wastes (manure) generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. If these biomass resources are mishandled and underutilized, major environmental problems will be created, such as surface and ground water contamination, odors, dust, ammonia leaching, and methane emission. Anaerobic digestion of animal wastes, in which microorganisms break down organic materials in the absence of oxygen, is one of the most promising waste treatment technologies. This process produces biogas typically containing {approx}65% methane and {approx}35% carbon dioxide. The production of biogas through anaerobic digestion from animal wastes, landfills, and municipal waste water treatment plants represents a large source of renewable and sustainable bio-fuel. Such bio-fuel can be combusted directly, used in internal combustion engines, converted into methanol, or partially oxidized to produce synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) that can be converted to clean liquid fuels and chemicals via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Different design and mixing configurations of anaerobic digesters for treating cow manure have been utilized commercially and/or tested on a laboratory scale. These digesters include mechanically mixed, gas recirculation mixed, and slurry recirculation mixed designs, as well as covered lagoon digesters. Mixing is an important parameter for successful performance of anaerobic digesters. It enhances substrate contact with the microbial community; improves pH, temperature and substrate/microorganism uniformity; prevents stratification and scum accumulation; facilitates the removal of biogas from the digester; reduces or eliminates the formation of inactive zones (dead zones); prevents settling of biomass and inert solids; and aids in particle size reduction. Unfortunately

  18. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive electrospun cartilage substitute by integrating cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment with sustained growth factor delivery microspheres. Specifically, CAP was applied to a poly(ε-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold with homogeneously distributed bioactive factors (transforming growth factor-β1 and bovine serum albumin) loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres. We have shown that CAP treatment renders electrospun scaffolds more hydrophilic thus facilitating vitronectin adsorption. More importantly, our results demonstrate, for the first time, CAP and microspheres can synergistically enhance stem cell growth as well as improve chondrogenic differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (such as increased glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and total collagen production). Furthermore, CAP can substantially enhance 3D cell infiltration (over two-fold increase in infiltration depth after 1 day of culture) in the scaffolds. By integrating CAP, sustained bioactive factor loaded microspheres, and electrospinning, we have fabricated a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration. PMID:26222527

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive electrospun cartilage substitute by integrating cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment with sustained growth factor delivery microspheres. Specifically, CAP was applied to a poly(ε-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold with homogeneously distributed bioactive factors (transforming growth factor-β1 and bovine serum albumin) loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid microspheres. We have shown that CAP treatment renders electrospun scaffolds more hydrophilic thus facilitating vitronectin adsorption. More importantly, our results demonstrate, for the first time, CAP and microspheres can synergistically enhance stem cell growth as well as improve chondrogenic differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (such as increased glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and total collagen production). Furthermore, CAP can substantially enhance 3D cell infiltration (over two-fold increase in infiltration depth after 1 day of culture) in the scaffolds. By integrating CAP, sustained bioactive factor loaded microspheres, and electrospinning, we have fabricated a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration. PMID:26222527

  20. A cold-flow experimental and numerical study of fuel injector nozzle and combustor chamber dynamics with swirl and non-swirl flows

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, M.J.; Strab, D.L.; Richards, G.A.; Rogers, W.A.

    1998-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) has developed a bench-scale atmospheric cold-flow rig to study the dynamic response of a premix fuel injector to pressure oscillations. A variable speed rotating disk was used to perturb the flow in the rig to simulate instability. fuel injector nozzles of different lengths, and with and without swirling flows were tested. This paper presents the preliminary results on the dynamic pressures and velocities at the nozzle and the chamber interface. Phase-averaged velocity and pressure measurements indicate frequency doubling in the nozzle under harmonic and sub-harmonic excitations. This frequency doubling is also observed in the numerical computation results.

  1. Cold habituation does not improve manual dexterity during rest and exercise in 5 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Matthew D.; Seo, Yongsuk; Kim, Chul-Ho; Ryan, Edward J.; Pollock, Brandon S.; Burns, Keith J.; Glickman, Ellen L.

    2014-04-01

    When exposed to a cold environment, a barehanded person experiences pain, cold sensation, and reduced manual dexterity. Both acute (e.g. exercise) and chronic (e.g. cold acclimatization or habituation) processes might lessen these negative effects. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of cold habituation on physiology, perception, and manual dexterity during rest, exercise, and recovery in 5 °C. Six cold weather athletes (CWA) and eight non habituated men (NON) volunteered to participate in a repeated measures cross-over design. The protocol was conducted in 5 °C and was 90 min of resting cold exposure, 30 min of cycle ergometry exercise (50 % VO2 peak), and 60 min of seated recovery. Core and finger skin temperature, metabolic rate, Purdue Pegboard dexterity performance, hand pain, thermal sensation, and mood were quantified. Exercise-induced finger rewarming (EIFRW) was calculated for each hand. During 90 min of resting exposure to 5 °C, the CWA had a smaller reduction in finger temperature, a lower metabolic rate, less hand pain, and less negative mood. Despite this cold habituation, dexterity performance was not different between groups. In response to cycle ergometry, EIFRW was greater in CWA (~12 versus 7 °C) and occurred at lower core temperatures (37.02 versus 37.31 °C) relative to NON but dexterity was not greater during post-exercise recovery. The current data indicate that cold habituated men (i.e., CWA) do not perform better on the Purdue Pegboard during acute cold exposure. Furthermore, despite augmented EIFRW in CWA, dexterity during post-exercise recovery was similar between groups.

  2. Cold Flow Properties of Soybean Oil Fatty Acid Monoalkyl Ester Admixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel made from transesterification of vegetable oil or animal fat with an alcohol that has many attractive fuel characteristics. However, biodiesel is more prone than petrodiesel to start-up and operability problems during cold weather. The present study investigates ef...

  3. The effects of minor constituents on biodiesel cold flow properties: Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel made from vegetable oils, animal fats and other lipid feedstocks. Fuel properties and performance of biodiesel during cold weather are influenced by factors related to lipid feedstock as well as small concentrations of monoacylglycerols and other minor constit...

  4. Full-scale cold-flow modelling of the SRC-I slurry fired heater at Creare, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.

    1983-09-01

    The slurry fired heater is a crucial piece of equipment in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant. The design of the fired heater has not been tested in any other plant under a similar combination of operating severity and multiphase flow. The cold-flow modelling experiments were conducted to confirm the fired heater design and to develop acceptable boundaries of flow rates for proper operation of the fired heater. The primary objectives were to identify the flow regimes, estimate pressure drops and measure heat transfer coefficients at a variety of fired heater operating conditions. The results definitively confirm the presence of a slug flow regime in the fired heater at the full range of operating conditions. Slug flow is desirable to avoid coking and excessive temperature gradients in the heater pipes and because of its relatively low pressure drop. The gas holdup predictions by the Hughmark correlation were in good agreement with the experimental results. A simplified correlation was developed to calculate gas holdup in the SRC-I fired heater pipes. The pressure drop results also confirmed that the experimental values were less than the design values. The Hughmark correlation was able to predict the pressure drop for the viscous fluids within +-20% of the measured value. The heat transfer coefficients calculated from the experiments were almost twice as high as those used in the design of the fired heater. The tests were successful based on the data developed, and the results confirm the fired heater design and indicate flexibilities in its operation.

  5. Evidence for viscous flow nature in Zr60Al15Ni25 metallic glass subjected to cold rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhijie; Hao, Weixin; Hu, Yong; Song, Kaikai; Stoica, Mihai; Scudino, Sergio; Eckert, Jürgen

    2013-07-01

    The microstructure changes of Zr60Al15Ni25 metallic glass upon cold rolling and their influences on the thermally induced crystallization kinetics are investigated. The results show that atomic redistribution occurs within the localized zones in the glassy matrix, resulting from the softening of the shear modulus, which retards the crystallization behaviors during the subsequent heating. The present work provides direct evidence for the viscous flow nature in a metallic glass subjected to plastic deformation, during which the softened zones act as potential shear transformation zones.

  6. Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turan, A.; Vandoormaal, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of discrete methods for the prediction of fluid flows can be enhanced by improving the convergence rate of solvers and by increasing the accuracy of the discrete representation of the equations of motion. This report evaluates the gains in solver performance that are available when various acceleration methods are applied. Various discretizations are also examined and two are recommended because of their accuracy and robustness. Insertion of the improved discretization and solver accelerator into a TEACH mode, that has been widely applied to combustor flows, illustrates the substantial gains to be achieved.

  7. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-01

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate. PMID:21227436

  8. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in the Cold and Very Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    2005-08-01

    The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates.

  9. Improvement of a 2D numerical model of lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimine, Y.

    2013-12-01

    I propose an improved procedure that reduces an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in two-dimensional simulations based on Ishihara et al. (in Lava Flows and Domes, Fink, JH eds., 1990). The numerical model for lava flow simulations proposed by Ishihara et al. (1990) is based on two-dimensional shallow water model combined with a constitutive equation for a Bingham fluid. It is simple but useful because it properly reproduces distributions of actual lava flows. Thus, it has been regarded as one of pioneer work of numerical simulations of lava flows and it is still now widely used in practical hazard prediction map for civil defense officials in Japan. However, the model include an improper dependence of lava flow directions on the orientation of DEM because the model separately assigns the condition for the lava flow to stop due to yield stress for each of two orthogonal axes of rectangular calculating grid based on DEM. This procedure brings a diamond-shaped distribution as shown in Fig. 1 when calculating a lava flow supplied from a point source on a virtual flat plane although the distribution should be circle-shaped. To improve the drawback, I proposed a modified procedure that uses the absolute value of yield stress derived from both components of two orthogonal directions of the slope steepness to assign the condition for lava flows to stop. This brings a better result as shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 1. (a) Contour plots calculated with the original model of Ishihara et al. (1990). (b) Contour plots calculated with a proposed model.

  10. Temperature-stable lithium niobate electro-optic Q-switch for improved cold performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jundt, Dieter H.

    2014-10-01

    Lithium niobate (LN) is commonly used as an electro optic (EO) Q-switch material in infrared targeting lasers because of its relatively low voltage requirements and low cost compared to other crystals. A common challenge is maintaining good performance at the sub-freezing temperatures often experienced during flight. Dropping to low temperature causes a pyro-electric charge buildup on the optical faces that leads to birefringence non-uniformity and depolarization resulting in poor hold-off and premature lasing. The most common solution has been to use radioactive americium to ionize the air around the crystal and bleed off the charge, but the radioactive material requires handling and disposal procedures that can be problematic. We have developed a superior solution that is now being implemented by multiple defense system suppliers. By applying a low level thermo-chemical reduction to the LN crystal optical faces we induce a small conductivity that allows pyro-charges to dissipate. As the material gets more heavily treated, the capacity to dissipate charges improves, but the corresponding optical absorption also increases, causing insertion loss. Even though typical high gain targeting laser systems can tolerate a few percent of added loss, the thermo-chemical processing needs to be carefully optimized. We describe the results of our process optimization to minimize the insertion loss while still giving effective charge dissipation. Treatment is performed at temperatures below 500°C and a conductivity layer less than 0.5mm in depth is created that is uniform across the optical aperture. Because the conductivity is thermally activated, the charge dissipation is less effective at low temperature, and characterization needs to be performed at cold temperatures. The trade-off between optical insertion loss and potential depolarization due to low temperature operation is discussed and experimental results on the temperature dependence of the dissipation time and the

  11. An improved near-wall treatment for turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gharbi, Najla; Absi, Rafik; Benzaoui, Ahmed; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The success of predictions of wall-bounded turbulent flows requires an accurate description of the flow in the near-wall region. This article presents a comparative study between different near-wall treatments and presents an improved method. The study is applied to fully developed plane channel flow (i.e. the flow between two infinitely large plates). Simulations were performed using Fluent. Near-wall treatments available in Fluent were tested: standard wall functions, non-equilibrium wall function and enhanced wall treatment. A user defined function (UDF), based on an analytical profile for the turbulent kinetic energy (Absi, R., 2008. Analytical solutions for the modeled k-equation. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics, 75 (4), 044501), is developed and implemented. Predicted turbulent kinetic energy profiles are presented and validated by DNS data.

  12. ACHIEVING IRRIGATION RETURN FLOW QUALITY CONTROL THROUGH IMPROVED LEGAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The key to irrigated agricultural return flow quality control is proper utilization and management of the resource itself, and an accepted tool in out society is the law. This project is designed to develop legal alternatives that will facilitate the implementation of improved wa...

  13. Influence of internal cold gas flow and of nozzle contour on spray properties of an atmospheric plasma spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, R.H.; Borck, V.; Mayr, W.; Landes, K.; Reusch, A.

    1995-12-31

    With an automated Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) equipment trajectories, distributions and velocities of spray particles were measured operating a plasma spray torch under atmospheric pressure conditions. For this purpose a standard APS torch (PT F4) was used, applying different gas distribution rings and nozzle modifications to study the influence of internal plasma gas flow and of plasma jet formation. The main results are: (1) An inclined injection of the plasma cold gas results in a considerable spin of the plasma jet and a significant deviation of the particle trajectories around the plasma jet center. (2) With a plasma cold gas injection parallel to the torch axis no spin is observable, but torch voltage and the plasma jet enthalpy show considerably diminished values. (3) The flow of injected powder may be split up, if it is injected too fast. (4) In comparison with cylindrical nozzles, specially developed nozzles with a controlled expanding contour, lead to broader temperature profiles across the plasma jet and hence to better melting conditions for the particles.

  14. Programmed automation of modulator cold jet flow for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatographic analysis of vacuum gas oils.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for automating the regulation of cold jet flow of a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatograph (GCxGC) configured with flame ionization detection. This new capability enables the routine automated separation, identification, and quantitation of hydrocarbon types in petroleum fractions extending into the vacuum gas oil (VGO) range (IBP-540 degrees C). Chromatographic data acquisition software is programmed to precisely change the rate of flow from the cold jet of a nitrogen cooled loop modulator of a GCxGC instrument during sample analysis. This provides for the proper modulation of sample compounds across a wider boiling range. The boiling point distribution of the GCxGC separation is shown to be consistent with high temperature simulated distillation results indicating recovery of higher boiling semi-volatile VGO sample components. GCxGC configured with time-of-flight mass spectrometry is used to determine the molecular identity of individual sample components and boundaries of different molecular types. PMID:18078570

  15. Cold-Flow Study of Low Frequency Pressure Instability in Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.

    1997-01-01

    Past experience with hybrid rockets has shown that certain motor operating conditions are conducive to the formation of low frequency pressure oscillations, or flow instabilities, within the motor. Both past and present work in the hybrid propulsion community acknowledges deficiencies in the understanding of such behavior, though it seems probable that the answer lies in an interaction between the flow dynamics and the combustion heat release. Knowledge of the fundamental flow dynamics is essential to the basic understanding of the overall stability problem. A first step in this direction was a study conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), centered around a laboratory-scale two dimensional water flow model of a hybrid rocket motor. Principal objectives included: (1) visualization of flow and measurement of flow velocity distributions: (2) assessment of the importance of shear layer instabilities in driving motor pressure oscillations; (3) determination of the interactions between flow induced shear layers with the mainstream flow, the secondary (wall) throughflow, and solid boundaries; (4) investigation of the interactions between wall flow oscillations and the mainstream flow pressure distribution.

  16. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey. PMID:22540901

  17. Packet Scheduling Mechanism to Improve Quality of Short Flows and Low-Rate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Kenji; Asaka, Takuya; Takahashi, Tatsuro

    In recent years elephant flows are increasing by expansion of peer-to-peer (P2P) applications on the Internet. As a result, bandwidth is occupied by specific users triggering unfair resource allocation. The main packet-scheduling mechanism currently employed is first-in first-out (FIFO) where the available bandwidth of short flows is limited by elephant flows. Least attained service (LAS), which decides transfer priority of packets by the total amount of transferred data in all flows, was proposed to solve this problem. However, routers with LAS limit flows with large amount of transferred data even if they are low-rate. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the quality of low-rate flows with long holding times such as voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) applications. This paper proposes rate-based priority control (RBPC), which calculates the flow rate and control the priority by using it. Our proposed method can transfer short flows and low-rate flows in advance. Moreover, its fair performance is shown through simulations.

  18. Cold stress improves the ability of Lactobacillus plantarum L67 to survive freezing.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Bae, Dong-Won; Lim, Kwangsei; Griffiths, Mansel W; Oh, Sejong

    2014-11-17

    The stress resistance of bacteria is affected by the physiological status of the bacterial cell and environmental factors such as pH, salts and temperature. In this study, we report on the stress response of Lactobacillus plantarum L67 after four consecutive freeze-thaw cycles. The cold stress response of the cold-shock protein genes (cspC, cspL and cspP) and ATPase activities were then evaluated. The cold stress was adjusted to 5 °C when the bacteria were growing at the mid-exponential phase. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) and a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometer. Only 56% of the L. plantarum L67 cells without prior exposure to cold stress survived after four consecutive freeze-thaw cycles. However, 78% of the L. plantarum L67 cells that were treated with cold stress at 5 °C for 6 h survived after freeze-thaw conditions. After applying cold stress to the culture for 6h, the cells were then stored for 60 days at 5 °C, 25 °C and 35 °C separately. The cold-stressed culture of L. plantarum L67 showed an 8% higher viability than the control culture. After applying cold stress for 6h, the transcript levels of two genes (cspP and cspL) were up-regulated 1.4 (cspP) and 1.2 (cspL) times compared to the control. However, cspC was not up-regulated. A proteomic analysis showed that the proteins increased after a reduction of the incubation temperature to 5 °C. The importance of the expression of 13 other relevant proteins was also determined through the study. The exposure of L. plantarum cells to low temperatures aids their ability to survive through subsequent freeze-thaw processes and lyophilization. PMID:25261832

  19. A One-Dimensional Flow Model with Adiabatic Friction for Rapid Estimation of Cold Spray Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hezhou; Yin, Yanhua; Wang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-01

    While commercially available computational fluid dynamic packages are employed nowadays to analyze the spraying behavior of the cold spray (CS) system and optimize the nozzle geometry design, using these packages is often prohibitive because of complex computational resource requirements and expensive copyright licenses. This paper proposes a quick and economical method for predicting the performance of the CS system, while asking for minimal computational resource. A one-dimensional adiabatic friction model with the consideration of friction was developed to calculate the critical pressure of nozzles under different expansion ratios and the gas/particle velocity at different spraying conditions. The accuracy of the critical pressure calculation was evidenced by polymeric nozzle destructive tests. The particle velocities achieved from the nozzles with different expansion ratios were measured and compared with the velocity values calculated by the model. The suggested adiabatic friction model is validated by the well-matched values between the calculated results and the experimental data.

  20. Numerical simulations of cold flow in a ramjet dump combustor with a choked exit nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Jou, W.-H.

    1986-10-01

    Simulations of the flow field were performed in a ramjet dump combustor equipped with an exit nozzle. The flow through the nozzle is choked numerically to simulate a realistic ramjet configuration. This also removes any ambiguities associated with the imposed outflow boundary conditions. The method of numerical choking is described. Large-scale motions similar to those in unchoked flow simulations are observed. The interaction between these large vortices and the choked throat is studied. Two simulations at Mach numbers 0.32 and 0.44 are discussed. Spectral analysis of the pressure and vorticity fluctuations in the combustor indicate a much richer spectral content when compared to unchoked flow results. Both convective-wave-dominated oscillations and acoustic oscillations appear to be present in the flow. Some preliminary results are presented.

  1. Cold Flow Plume Entrainment Test Final Report NTF Test Number 2456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David; Mishtawy, Jason; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Hammad, Khaled J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight (RTF) program, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to define the velocity flowfields around the Shuttle stack at liftoff. These CFD predicted velocity flowfields were used in debris transport analysis (DTA). High speed flows such as plumes induce or 'entrain' mass from the surrounding environment. Previous work had shown that CFD analysis over-predicts plume induced flows. Therefore, the DTA would tend to 1) predict more debris impacts, and 2) the debris velocity (and kinetic energy) of those impacts would be too high. At a November, 2004 peer-review it was recommended that the Liftoff DTA team quantify the uncertainty in the DTA caused by the CFD's over prediction of plume induced flow. To do so, the Liftoff DTA team needed benchmark quality data for plume induced flow to quantify the CFD accuracy and its effect on the DTA. MSFC's Nozzle Test Facility (NTF) conducted the "Nozzle Induced Flows test, P#2456" to obtain experimental data for plume induced flows for nozzle flow exhausting into q quiescent freestream. Planning for the test began in December, 2004 and the experimental data was obtained in February and March of 2005. The funding for this test was provided by MSFC's Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Integration and Engineering office.

  2. Application of COLD-PCR for improved detection of NF2 mosaic mutations.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Irene; Mancini, Irene; Baroncelli, Marta; Arena, Guido; Gensini, Francesca; Papi, Laura; Sestini, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Somatic mosaicism represents the coexistence of two or more cell populations with different genotypes in one person, and it is involved in >30 monogenic disorders. Somatic mosaicism characterizes approximately 25% to 33% of patients with de novo neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). The identification of mosaicism is crucial to patients and their families because the clinical course of the disease and its transmission risk is influenced by the degree and distribution of mutated cells. Moreover, in NF2, the capability of discriminating patients with mosaicism is especially important to make differential diagnosis with schwannomatosis. However, the identification of mosaic variants is considerably difficult, and the development of specific molecular techniques to detect low levels of unknown molecular alterations is required. Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR has been described as a powerful method to selectively amplify minority alleles from mixtures of wild-type and mutation-containing sequences. Here, we applied COLD-PCR to molecular analysis of patients with NF2 mosaicism. With the use of COLD-PCR, followed by direct sequencing, we were able to detect NF2 mutations in blood DNA of three patients with NF2 mosaicism. Our study has shown the capability of COLD-PCR in enriching low-represented mutated allele in blood DNA sample, making it usable for molecular diagnosis of patients with mosaicism. PMID:24815379

  3. Cold Calling and Web Postings: Do They Improve Students' Preparation and Learning in Statistics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Getting students to prepare well for class is a common challenge faced by instructors all over the world. This study investigates the effects that two frequently used techniques to increase student preparation--web postings and cold calling--have on student outcomes. The study is based on two experiments and a qualitative study conducted in a…

  4. Turbulent transport measurements in a cold model of GT-burner at realistic flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobyzov, Oleg; Chikishev, Leonid; Lobasov, Alexey; Sharaborin, Dmitriy; Dulin, Vladimir; Bilsky, Artur; Tsatiashvili, Vakhtang; Avgustinovich, Valery; Markovich, Dmitriy

    2016-03-01

    In the present work simultaneous velocity field and passive admixture concentration field measurements at realistic flow-rates conditions in a non-reacting flow in a model of combustion chamber with an industrial mixing device are reported. In the experiments for safety reasons the real fuel (natural gas) was replaced with neon gas to simulate stratification in a strongly swirling flow. Measurements were performed by means of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry technique (PIV) at Reynolds number, based on the mean flow rate and nozzle diameter, ≈300 000. Details on experimental technique, features of the experimental setup, images and data preprocessing procedures and results of performed measurements are given in the paper. In addition to the raw velocity and admixture concentration data in-depth evaluation approaches aimed for estimation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) components, assessment of turbulent Schmidt number and analysis of the gradient closure hypothesis from experimental data are presented in the paper.

  5. Study of Cold Heat Energy Release Characteristics of Flowing Ice Water Slurry in a Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Horibe, Akihiko; Ozaki, Koichi; Yokota, Maki

    This paper has dealt with melting heat transfer characteristics of ice water slurry in an inside tube of horizontal double tube heat exchanger in which a hot water circulated in an annular gap between the inside and outside tubes. Two kinds of heat exchangers were used; one is made of acrylic resin tube for flow visualization and the other is made of stainless steel tube for melting heat transfer measurement. The result of flow visualization revealed that ice particles flowed along the top of inside tube in the ranges of small ice packing factor and low ice water slurry velocity, while ice particles diffused into the whole of tube and flowed like a plug built up by ice particles for large ice packing factor and high velocity. Moreover, it was found that the flowing ice plug was separated into numbers of small ice clusters by melting phenomenon. Experiments of melting heat transfer were carried out under some parameters of ice packing factor, ice water slurry flow rate and hot water temperature. Consequently, the correlation equation of melting heat transfer was derived as a function of those experimental parameters.

  6. Improving Diffusing S-duct Performance by Secondary Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study ways to reduce inlet flow distortion (i.e., total pressure nonuniformity) and improve total pressure recovery in a diffusing S-duct. This was accomplished by controlling the development of secondary flows within the duct through the use of tapered-fin type vortex generators. Reported are results for the bare duct and seven different configurations of vortex generators. Data presented for each configuration include surface static pressure, surface flow visualization, and exit plane total pressure and transverse velocity. The performance of each configuration was assessed by calculating total pressure recovery and inlet distortion descriptors from the data and comparing them to the values for the bare duct. The best configuration tested reduced distortion (as measured by the DC(45) and DC(90) descriptors) by more than 50 percent while improving total pressure recovery by 0.5 percent. These results should provide valuable guidance in designing vortex generator installations in ducts and for assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to calculate duct flows with installed vortex generators.

  7. Improved numerical method for subchannel cross-flow calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, S.; Anghaie, S.

    1986-01-01

    COBRA-OSU is a fast running computer code for coupled kinetic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor core subchannels, currently under development at Oregon State University. This code is a modified version of COBRA-IV with two major improved features. First, COBRA-OSU uses the Gaussian elimination method instead of Gauss-Seidel iteration for subchannel cross-flow calculation. Second, COBRA-OSU has an additional model for regionwise point reactor kinetics which includes all major feedback reactivity effects on calculation of the axial power profile during the course of a transient. This paper summarizes the improved numerical features of the COBRA-OSU code.

  8. Improving patient flow: role of the orthopaedic discharge sister.

    PubMed

    Tytler, Beverley

    2016-03-01

    Timely and well-planned discharge improves the patient's experience, contributes to patient safety and reduces the length of hospital stays. The role of orthopaedic discharge sister was developed at James Cook University Hospital in 2007 to provide safe, timely and efficient discharge for patients from the trauma and theatre centre, and to improve patient experience and flow. This article gives an overview of the role and describes how the sister works with colleagues to plan patient discharges from pre-assessment and emergency department admission through their hospital stay until their departure. PMID:26948225

  9. Improvements on Digital Inline Holographic PIV for Turbulent Flow Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Mallery, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Among all the 3D PIV techniques used in wall-bounded turbulent flow measurements, digital inline holographic (DIH) PIV provides the highest spatial resolution for near-wall flow diagnostics with low-cost, simple and compact optical set-ups. Despite these advantages, DIH-PIV suffers from major limitations including poor longitudinal resolution, human intervention (i.e. requirement for manually determined tuning parameters during tracer field reconstruction and extraction), limited tracer concentration, and expensive computations. These limitations prevent this technique from being widely implemented for high resolution 3D flow measurements. In this study, we present our work on improving holographic particle extraction algorithm with the goal of overcoming some of abovementioned limitations. Our new DIH-PIV processing method has been successfully implemented on multiple experimental cases ranging from 3D flow measurement within a micro-channel to imaging near-wall coherent structures in smooth and rough wall turbulent channel flows. This work is supported by the startup package of Jiarong Hong and the MnDrive Fellowship of Mostafa Toloui from University of Minnesota.

  10. Galactic cosmic-ray mediation of a spherical solar wind flow. 1: The steady state cold gas hydrodynamical approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    1995-01-01

    Realistic models of the outer heliosphere should consider that the interstellar cosmic-ray pressure becomes comparable to pressures in the solar wind at distances more than 100 AU from the Sun. The cosmic-ray pressure dynamically affects solar wind flow through deceleration. This effect, which occurs over a scale length of the order of the effective diffusion length at large radial distances, has important implications for cosmic-ray modulation and acceleration. As a first step toward solution of this nonlinear problem, a steady state numerical model was developed for a relatively cold spherical solar wind flow which encounters the confining isotropic pressure of the surrounding Galactic medium. This pressure is assumed to be dominated by energetic particles (Galactic cosmic rays). The system of equations, which are solved self-consistently, includes the relevant hydrodynamical equations for the solar wind flow and the spherical cosmic-ray transport equation. To avoid the closure parameter problem of the two-fluid model, the latter equation is solved for the energy-dependent cosmic-ray distribution function.

  11. Cold-flow acoustic evaluation of a small scale, divergent, lobed nozzle for supersonic jet noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A supersonic jet noise suppressor was tested with cold flow for acoustic and thrust characteristics at nozzle- to atmospheric-pressure ratios of 1.5 to 4.0. Jet noise suppression and spectral characteristics of the divergent, lobed, suppressor (DLS) nozzle with and without an ejector are presented. Suppression was obtained at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.5 to 4.0. The largest, maximum-lobe, sound pressure level suppression with a hard-wall ejector was 14.6 decibels at a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.5. The thrust loss was 2 percent. In general, low-frequency jet noise was suppressed, leaving higher frequencies essentially unchanged. Without the ejector the nozzle showed a thrust loss of 11 percent together with slightly poorer noise suppression.

  12. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  13. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  14. Improving mechanical properties of polyethylene orthopaedic implants by high frequency cold plasma surface activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Vlad, Iulia E.; Dadarlat, Dorin N.; Anghel, Sorin D.

    2013-11-01

    Although a tremendous progress has been made in developing new methods and materials for manufacturing orthopaedic implants, the new technology still faces various problems. Polyethylene implants are relatively easy to manufacture and at lower cost compared to metallic or ceramic implants, but they present a fundamental problem: during usage and in time, due to their manufacturing technology, the material suffers from pitting and delamination which leads to crack propagation and finally to sudden fracture. Our studies and tests performed on polyethylene showed that, using cold plasma surface activation during the manufacturing process of the orthopaedic implants made from polyethylene can significantly increase their mechanical properties. The breaking tests revealed an increase of the tensile strength in the laminated polyethylene samples by a factor of 4 after plasma activation. "Aging" tests have been also performed to investigate how the cold plasma treated samples maintain their properties in time, after the surface activation process.

  15. What controls inter-basin variation in cold-season river flow recession in permafrost basins in sub-Arctic Siberia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, H.; Watson, V.; Bense, V. F.

    2012-04-01

    Cold-season river discharge during the period of ice cover and snow fall in northern high latitudes, provides a unique window on the role of subsurface hydrology in permafrost settings as direct surface runoff contributions are largely inhibited. Several recent studies have brought to light positive temporal trends in cold-season discharge totals for the past several decades to one century, and have interpreted these trends to reflect permafrost degradation and associated increased subsurface water transport in response to climate warming. While these are significant and compelling findings of hydrological change, there is a clear need to better understand the hydrology of cold-season flow and the discharge-generating processes themselves. We present results of an inter-basin comparison of cold-season (October - April) river flow characteristics for 17 catchments in Siberia that are not disturbed by artifical reservoirs/dam influences. Streamflow data for the period 1980 - 1998 were studied. Flow and recession metrics for each basin and mean annual cold season catchment-averaged drainage depth, CSDD (in mm equivalent water depth) were compared/correlated with various basin attributes in order to evaluate the significance of these attributes as potential controls. Preliminary findings include a marked behavioural distinction between (11) basins on continuous permafrost and (6) basins with reduced permafrost coverage (discontinuous/sporadic). The latter are characterized by slow recession, relatively high discharge in April before spring freshet, and high CSDD values up to about 80 mm corresponding to more than 10% of total annual rainfall. Although positive correlations with several attributes (annual precipitation; peat land fraction) are found, higher abundance of through-taliks and greater active layer depth (ALD) appear to be the most prominent controls of the distinctive behaviour. Cold-season flow behaviour of the (11) basins on continuous permafrost also show

  16. Intraperitoneal Resuscitation Improves Intestinal Blood Flow Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal; Spain, David A.; Matheson, Paul J.; Harris, Patrick D.; Richardson, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of peritoneal resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Summary Background Data Methods for conventional resuscitation (CR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) often fail to restore adequate intestinal blood flow, and intestinal ischemia has been implicated in the activation of the inflammatory response. There is clinical evidence that intestinal hypoperfusion is a major factor in progressive organ failure following HS. This study presents a novel technique of peritoneal resuscitation (PR) that improves visceral perfusion. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were bled to 50% of baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) and resuscitated with shed blood plus 2 equal volumes of saline (CR). Groups were 1) sham, 2) HS + CR, and 3) HS + CR + PR with a hyperosmolar dextrose-based solution (Delflex 2.5%). Groups 1 and 2 had normal saline PR. In vivo videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimetry were used to assess terminal ileal microvascular blood flow. Endothelial cell function was assessed by the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. Results Despite restored heart rate and MAP to baseline values, CR animals developed a progressive intestinal vasoconstriction and tissue hypoperfusion compared to baseline flow. PR induced an immediate and sustained vasodilation compared to baseline and a marked increase in average intestinal blood flow during the entire 2-hour post-resuscitation period. Endothelial-dependent dilator function was preserved with PR. Conclusions Despite the restoration of MAP with blood and saline infusions, progressive vasoconstriction and compromised intestinal blood flow occurs following HS/CR. Hyperosmolar PR during CR maintains intestinal blood flow and endothelial function. This is thought to be a direct effect of hyperosmolar solutions on the visceral microvessels. The addition of PR to a CR protocol prevents the splanchnic ischemia that initiates systemic inflammation. PMID:12724637

  17. An improved scheme for classifying susceptibility to preferential flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeys, Julien; Koestel, John; Hollis, John M.; Jarvis, Nicholas J.

    2010-05-01

    The ability to reliably predict the occurrence and strength of preferential flow in different soils and land use systems would be of great benefit in environmental planning and management at multiple spatial scales, from field to catchments and regions. We recently proposed a simple classification scheme for predicting the susceptibility of soil horizons and pedons to macropore flow, designed to support predictive modelling (Jarvis N.J. et al., 2009. A conceptual model of soil susceptibility to macropore flow. Vadose Zone Journal, 8: 902-910). The scheme, which takes the form of a decision tree, was successfully validated against a small dataset of solute transport experiments. However, in its present form, it is strongly biased toward European agricultural soils, since it was developed to support pesticide risk assessment in the EU. In this poster, we propose an improved version of the classification scheme, which is much broader in scope, with relevance for a much wider range of soils worldwide, including those with clay mineralogies that limit the development of soil macro-structure and restrict macropore flow (e.g. Ferralsols and Andosols). The new scheme is tested in a literature meta-analysis exercise, making use of the temporal moments of solute breakthrough curves derived from fits of the mobile / immobile model to steady-state experiments on short laboratory columns.

  18. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K.; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  19. RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage of cold responsive S-nitrosylated targets in Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Abat, Jasmeet K; Deswal, Renu

    2013-01-01

    Although in the last few years good number of S-nitrosylated proteins are identified but information on endogenous targets is still limiting. Therefore, an attempt is made to decipher NO signaling in cold treated Brassica juncea seedlings. Treatment of seedlings with substrate, cofactor and inhibitor of Nitric-oxide synthase and nitrate reductase (NR), indicated NR mediated NO biosynthesis in cold. Analysis of the in vivo thiols showed depletion of low molecular weight thiols and enhancement of available protein thiols, suggesting redox changes. To have a detailed view, S-nitrosylation analysis was done using biotin switch technique (BST) and avidin-affinity chromatography. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is S-nitrosylated and therefore, is identified as target repeatedly due to its abundance. It also competes out low abundant proteins which are important NO signaling components. Therefore, RuBisCO was removed (over 80%) using immunoaffinity purification. Purified S-nitrosylated RuBisCO depleted proteins were resolved on 2-D gel as 110 spots, including 13 new, which were absent in the crude S-nitrosoproteome. These were identified by nLC-MS/MS as thioredoxin, fructose biphosphate aldolase class I, myrosinase, salt responsive proteins, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and malate dehydrogenase. Cold showed differential S-nitrosylation of 15 spots, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity (via S-nitrosylation) and promoted the detoxification of superoxide radicals. Increased S-nitrosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sedoheptulose-biphosphatase, and fructose biphosphate aldolase, indicated regulation of Calvin cycle by S-nitrosylation. The results showed that RuBisCO depletion improved proteome coverage and provided clues for NO signaling in cold. PMID:24032038

  20. 15O PET Measurement of Blood Flow and Oxygen Consumption in Cold-Activated Human Brown Fat

    PubMed Central

    Muzik, Otto; Mangner, Thomas J.; Leonard, William R.; Kumar, Ajay; Janisse, James; Granneman, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots disappear shortly after the perinatal period in humans, PET imaging using the glucose analog 18F-FDG has shown unequivocally the existence of functional BAT in adult humans, suggesting that many humans retain some functional BAT past infancy. The objective of this study was to determine to what extent BAT thermogenesis is activated in adults during cold stress and to establish the relationship between BAT oxidative metabolism and 18F-FDG tracer uptake. Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (15 women and 10 men; mean age ± SD, 30 ± 7 y) underwent triple-oxygen scans (H215O, C15O, and 15O2) as well as measurements of daily energy expenditure (DEE; kcal/d) both at rest and after exposure to mild cold (15.5°C [60°F]) using indirect calorimetry. The subjects were divided into 2 groups (high BAT and low BAT) based on the presence or absence of 18F-FDG tracer uptake (standardized uptake value [SUV] > 2) in cervical–supraclavicular BAT. Blood flow and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were calculated from dynamic PET scans at the location of BAT, muscle, and white adipose tissue. Regional blood oxygen saturation was determined by near-infrared spectroscopy. The total energy expenditure during rest and mild cold stress was measured by indirect calorimetry. Tissue-level metabolic rate of oxygen (MRO2) in BAT was determined and used to calculate the contribution of activated BAT to DEE. Results The mass of activated BAT was 59.1 ± 17.5 g (range, 32–85 g) in the high-BAT group (8 women and 1 man; mean age, 29.6 ± 5.5 y) and 2.2 ± 3.6 g (range, 0–9.3 g) in the low-BAT group (9 men and 7 women; mean age, 31.4 ± 10 y). Corresponding maximal SUVs were significantly higher in the high-BAT group than in the low-BAT group (10.7 ± 3.9 vs. 2.1 ± 0.7, P = 0.01). Blood flow values were significantly higher in the high-BAT group than in the low-BAT group for BAT (12.9 ± 4.1 vs. 5.9 ± 2.2 mL/100 g/min, P = 0

  1. Effective dynamics of cold atoms flowing in two ring-shaped optical potentials with tunable tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamalyan, Davit; Amico, Luigi; Kwek, L. C.

    2013-12-01

    We study the current dynamics of coupled atomic condensates flowing in two ring-shaped optical potentials. We provide a specific setup where the ring-ring coupling can be tuned in an experimentally feasible way. It is demonstrated that the imaginary time effective action of the system in a weak coupling regime provides a two-level-system dynamics for the phase slip across the two rings. Through two-mode Gross- Pitaevskii mean-field equations, the real-time dynamics of the population imbalance and the phase difference between the two condensates is thoroughly analyzed analytically, as a function of the relevant physical parameters of the system. In particular, we find that the macroscopic quantum self-trapping phenomenon is induced in the system if the flowing currents assume a nonvanishing difference.

  2. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 2: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. This volume contains tabulated data for each of the data runs cited in Volume 1. Baseline characteristics, mixing modifications (subsonic and supersonic, heated and unheated) and miscellaneous charts are included.

  3. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 4; Cold Flow Analyses and CFD Analysis Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of model inlet air temperature drift during a test run was performed to aid in the decision on the need for and/or the schedule for including heaters in the SRMAFTE. The Sverdrup acceptance test data was used to determine the drift in air temperature during runs over the entire range of delivered flow rates and pressures. The effect of this temperature drift on the model Reynolds number was also calculated. It was concluded from this study that a 2% change in absolute temperature during a test run could be adequately accounted for by the data analysis program. A handout package of these results was prepared and presented to ED35 management.

  4. Stagnation temperature in a cold hypersonic flow produced by a light free piston compression facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo, Agung; Buttsworth, David

    2013-04-01

    Stagnation temperatures at the nozzle exit of the University of Southern Queensland hypersonic wind tunnel facility have been identified using an aspirating tube device with a 0.075 mm diameter k-type butt-welded thermocouple junction positioned at its inlet. Because of the finite thermal inertia of the thermocouple, a response time correction is introduced, and uncertainties in the response time correction are assessed and minimized by operating the aspirating device over a range of different initial temperatures. Pressure measurements within the barrel of the wind tunnel facility were used to estimate a theoretical upper bound on the flow stagnation temperature by assuming isentropic compression of the test gas. Results demonstrate that for the current operating conditions, the gas which is first delivered into the hypersonic nozzle has a stagnation temperature almost identical to the isentropic compression value of around 560 K, but a cooling effect is registered for the duration of the test flow which is about 200 ms. Thermodynamic simulations based on an unsteady energy balance model with turbulent heat transfer from the test gas within the barrel demonstrate a cooling effect of a similar magnitude to that indicated by the measured temperature variation, suggesting that strong mixing of the test gas occurs within the barrel during flow discharge through the hypersonic nozzle.

  5. Do water-saving technologies improve environmental flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Charles; Reddy, V. Ratna; Linstead, Conor; Dhar, Murli; Roy, Sumit; May, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Water saving and conservation technologies (WCTs) have been promoted widely in India as a practical means of improving the water use efficiency and freeing up water for other uses (e.g. for maintaining environmental flows in river systems). However, there is increasing evidence that, somewhat paradoxically, WCTs often contribute to intensification of water use by irrigated and rainfed farming systems. This occurs when: (1) Increased crop yields are coupled with increased consumptive water use and/or (2) Improved efficiency, productivity and profitability encourages farmers to increase the area cropped and/or to adopt multiple cropping systems. In both cases, the net effect is an increase in annual evapotranspiration that, particularly in areas of increasing water scarcity, can have the trade-off of reduced environmental flows. Recognition is also increasing that the claimed water savings of many WCTs may have been overstated. The root cause of this problem lies in confusion over what constitutes real water saving at the system or basin scales. The simple fact is that some of the water that is claimed to be ‘saved’ by WCTs would have percolated into the groundwater from where it can be and often is accessed and reused. Similarly, some of the “saved” runoff can be used downstream by, for example, farmers or freshwater ecosystems. This paper concludes that, particularly in areas facing increasing water scarcity, environmental flows will only be restored and maintained if they are given explicit (rather than theoretical or notional) attention. With this in mind, a simple methodology is proposed for deciding when and where WCTs may have detrimental impacts on environmental flows.

  6. The Determination of Forces and Moments on a Gimballed SRM Nozzle Using a Cold Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Bacchus, David L.; Hengel, John E.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Air Flow Facility (SAF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to characterize the flow in the critical aft end and nozzle of a solid propellant rocket motor (SRM) as part of the design phase of development. The SAF is a high pressure, blowdown facility which supplies a controlled flow of air to a subscale model of the internal port and nozzle of a SRM to enable measurement and evaluation of the flow field and surface pressure distributions. The ASRM Aft Section/Nozzle Model is an 8 percent scale model of the 19 second burn time aft port geometry and nozzle of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, the now canceled new generation space Shuttle Booster. It has the capability to simulate fixed nozzle gimbal angles of 0, 4, and 8 degrees. The model was tested at full scale motor Reynolds Numbers with extensive surface pressure instrumentation to enable detailed mapping of the surface pressure distributions over the nozzle interior surface, the exterior surface of the nozzle nose and the surface of the simulated propellant grain in the aft motor port. A mathematical analysis and associated numerical procedure were developed to integrate the measured surface pressure distributions to determine the lateral and axial forces on the moveable section of the nozzle, the effective model thrust and the effective aerodynamic thrust vector (as opposed to the geometric nozzle gimbal angle). The nozzle lateral and axial aerodynamic loads and moments about the pivot point are required for design purposes and require complex, three dimensional flow analyses. The alignment of the thrust vector with the nozzle geometric centerline is also a design requirement requiring three dimensional analyses which were supported by this experimental program. The model was tested with all three gimbal angles at three pressure levels to determine Reynolds number effects and reproducibility. This program was successful in demonstrating that a measured surface pressure

  7. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Reaction Control System (ReCS) Cold Flow Development Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Melanie; Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Sivak, Amy; Morris, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Ares I launch vehicle, consisting of a five segment solid rocket booster first stage and a liquid bi-propellant J2-X engine Upper Stage, is the vehicle that s been chosen to launch the Orion Crew Module, which will return humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. After First Stage booster separation, the Reaction Control System (ReCS), a monopropellant hydrazine system, will provide the Upper Stage element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. This paper provides an overview of the system level development testing that has taken place on the Ares I launch vehicle Upper Stage ReCS. The ReCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) was built as a flight representative water flow test article whose primary test objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate the integrate system performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Water is the industry standard for cold flow testing of hydrazine systems, because the densities are very close and the speeds of sound are well characterized. The completion of this development level test program was considered necessary to support the ReCS Critical Design Review. This paper will address the design approach taken in building the test article, the objectives of the test program, types of testing completed, general results, the ability of the program to meet the test objectives, and lessons learned

  8. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27133605

  9. Elevated compartmentalization of Na+ into vacuoles improves salt and cold stress tolerance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Deng, Gaifang; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Salinity and low temperature are the main limiting factors for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and agricultural productivity. Various studies have shown that plant NHX-type antiporter plays a crucial role in regulating plant tolerance to salt stress by intracellular Na(+) compartmentalization. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtNHX1 gene that encodes a vacuolar Na(+) /H(+) antiporter was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Xushu-22 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to confer abiotic stress tolerance. Stable insertion of AtNHX1 into the sweet potato genome and its expression was confirmed by Southern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A remarkably higher Na(+) /H(+) exchange activity of tonoplast membrane from transgenic sweet potato lines (NOE) in comparison with wild-type (WT) plants confirmed the vacuolar antiporter function in mediating Na(+) /H(+) exchange. Under salt stress, NOE plants accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) levels in their tissues compared with WT plants, maintaining high K(+) /Na(+) ratios. Consequently, NOE plants showed enhanced protection against cell damage due to the increased proline accumulation, preserved cell membrane integrity, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging (e.g. increased superoxide dismutase activity), and reduced H2 O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Moreover, the transgenic plants showed improved cold tolerance through multiple mechanisms of action, revealing the first molecular evidence for NHX1 function in cold response. The transgenic plants showed better biomass production and root yield under stressful conditions. These findings demonstrate that overexpressing AtNHX1 in sweet potato renders the crop tolerant to both salt and cold stresses, providing a greater capacity for the use of AtNHX1 in improving crop performance under combined abiotic stress conditions. PMID:25307930

  10. Effects of Blending Alcohols with Poultry Fat Methyl Esters on Cold Flow Properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The low temperature operability, kinematic viscosity, and acid value of poultry fat methyl esters were improved with addition of ethanol, isopropanol, and butanol in a linear fashion with increasing alcohol content. The flash point decreased and moisture content increased upon addition of alcohols t...

  11. Towards an improved understanding of strength and anisotropy of cold compacted powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenhai

    The strength of powder compacts after cold compaction is known to be anisotropic, which comes from the directionality of microstructure resulting from initial particle morphology and/or from particle deformation during compaction. Current work focuses on multi-scale numerical analysis of powder compaction with emphasis on the role of interparticle cohesion on post-compaction mechanical properties. At macroscopic level, we applied phenomenological model to describe the mechanical behavior of powder, in which the material is considered to be continuum medium. A user subroutine (VUMAT) was successfully developed for ABAQUS/Explicit analysis, in which one of the popular phenomenological models for powder compaction---Drucker Prager/Cap model---is implemented. By studying of pharmaceutical powder die compaction and subsequent diametrical compression test via finite element analysis, the capabilities and limitations of current constitutive models are evaluated on predicting such as density, stress and tool force evolution, as well as the strength and fracture tendency. Our results illustrate that current model has good predictive capability of powder densification (e.g. density evolution) but can not predict post-compaction strength well. The following studies focus on evaluating the physics and mechanics occurring at particle level. The compaction of granular media was explored by using MPFEM approach. In the new model, individual particles discretized with a finite element mesh allow for a full description of contact mechanics and local and global particle kinematics. The introduction of a layer of degrading material on the surface of each particle provides the means of introducing variable cohesion and its effect on the final strength of compacts. The simulations show that the unloading creates tensile stresses at the root of the contact necks, which may cause partial or full separation of contact interface when the cohesion developed during loading is not strong

  12. Novel strategy to decrease reperfusion injuries and improve function of cold-preserved livers using normothermic ex vivo liver perfusion machine.

    PubMed

    Banan, Babak; Xiao, Zhenyu; Watson, Rao; Xu, Min; Jia, Jianluo; Upadhya, Gundumi A; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William

    2016-03-01

    Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) can decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury to the greatest degree when cold ischemia time is minimized. Warm perfusion of cold-stored livers results in hepatocellular damage, sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) dysfunction, and Kupffer cell activation. However, the logistics of organ procurement mandates a period of cold preservation before NELP. The aim of this study was to determine the beneficial effects of gradual rewarming of cold-stored livers by placement on NELP. Three female porcine livers were used for each group. In the immediate NELP group, procured livers were immediately placed on NELP for 8 hours. In the cold NELP group, livers were cold-stored for 4 hours followed by NELP for 4 hours. In rewarming groups, livers were cold-stored for 4 hours, then gradually rewarmed in different durations to 38°C and kept on NELP for an additional 4 hours. For comparison purposes, the last 4 hours of NELP runs were considered to be the evaluation phase. Immediate NELP livers had significantly lower concentrations of liver transaminases, hyaluronic acid, and β-galactosidase and had higher bile production compared to the other groups. Rewarming livers had significantly lower concentrations of hyaluronic acid and β-galactosidase compared to the cold NELP livers. In addition, there was a significant decline in international normalized ratio values, improved bile production, reduced biliary epithelial cell damage, and improved cholangiocyte function. Thus, if a NELP machine is not available at the procurement site and livers will need to undergo a period of cold preservation, a gradual rewarming protocol before NELP may greatly reduce damages that are associated with reperfusion. In conclusion, gradual rewarming of cold-preserved livers upon NELP can minimize the hepatocellular damage, Kupffer cell activation, and SEC dysfunction. PMID:26439190

  13. Waterhammer modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System cold flow development test article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides in-flight three-axis attitude control for the Ares I Upper Stage. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center in 2009 were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined the waterhammer pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  14. Lunar cold spots: Granular flow features and extensive insulating materials surrounding young craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Song, Eugenie; Hayne, Paul O.; Brand, Brittany D.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Paige, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Systematic temperature mapping and high resolution images reveal a previously unrecognized class of small, fresh lunar craters. These craters are distinguished by near-crater deposits with evidence for lateral, ground-hugging transport. More distal, highly insulating surfaces surround these craters and do not show evidence of either significant deposition of new material or erosion of the substrate. The near-crater deposits can be explained by a laterally propagating granular flow created by impact in the lunar vacuum environment. Further from the source crater, at distances of ∼10-100 crater radii, the upper few to 10s of centimeters of regolith appear to have been “fluffed-up” without the accumulation of significant ejecta material. These properties appear to be common to all impacts, but quickly degrade in the lunar space weathering environment. Cratering in the vacuum environment involves a previously unrecognized set of processes that leave prominent, but ephemeral, features on the lunar surface.

  15. Influence of Niobium on the Beginning of the Plastic Flow of Material during Cold Deformation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone. PMID:24453896

  16. Influence of niobium on the beginning of the plastic flow of material during cold deformation.

    PubMed

    Rešković, Stoja; Jandrlić, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on low-carbon steel and the steel with same chemical composition with addition of microalloying element niobium. While tensile testing was carried out, the thermographic measurement was tacking place simultaneously. A specific behavior of niobium microalloyed steel was noticed. Test results have shown that, in the elastic deformation region, thermoelastic effect occurs, which is more pronounced in niobium microalloyed steel. Start of plastic flow in steel which is not microalloyed with niobium begins later in comparison to the microalloyed steel, and it is conducted so that, at the point of maximum stress, deformation zone is formed within which stresses grow. In steel microalloyed with niobium after proportionality limit, comes the occurrence of the localized increase in temperature and the occurrence of Lüders band, which propagate along the sample forming a deformation zone. PMID:24453896

  17. Flow reduction in high-flow arteriovenous fistulas improve cardiovascular parameters and decreases need for hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Balamuthusamy, Saravanan; Jalandhara, Nishant; Subramanian, Anand; Mohanaselvan, Arvindselvan

    2016-07-01

    High output heart failure (HF) and pulmonary hypertension have been demonstrated in patients with prevalent arteriovenous (AV) fistulas. Fistulas with flow >2000 mL/minutes are more likely to induce changes in cardiac geometry and pulmonary artery pressure. The effects of reducing flow in AV access and its implications on HF decompensation and hospitalizations have not been studied. Retrospective analysis of 12 patients who needed hospitalization for acute Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) decompensation with AV access flow of 2 L/minutes (as defined by Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI)) or more were included in the study. All the patients underwent banding of their inflow at the anastomosis with perioperative access flow measurement. Follow-up period was 6 months. 2D echo was done at 6 months postbanding in addition to access flow and clinical evaluation. Complete data was available for all the 12 patients. Study data was collected on all the 12 patients. Mean age was 64.7 years. The mean access flow pre and postbanding were 3784 mL/minutes and 1178 mL/minutes, respectively (P < 0.001). Eighty percent of the patients had diabetes and 41% had coronary artery disease. There was a statistically significant decrease in cardiac output (pre = 7.06 L/minutes, post = 6.47 L/minutes P = 0.03), pulmonary systolic pressure (pre = 54 mmHg, post = 44 mmHg P = 0.02), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) (pre = 130 g/m(2) , post = 125 g/m(2) P = 0.006) and need for rehospitalization for CHF decompensation. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) staging improved by 1 stage postbanding (P = 0.002). The hospitalization rate was 3.75 ± 1.2 in the 6 months before banding and was decreased to 1.08 ± 1.2 (P = 0.002) postbanding. The hemoglobin level, predialysis systolic blood pressure, calcium phosphorous product and the use of Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) blockade agents and calcium channel blockers

  18. Cyanobacterial Alkanes Modulate Photosynthetic Cyclic Electron Flow to Assist Growth under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Berla, Bertram M.; Saha, Rajib; Maranas, Costas D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-01

    All cyanobacterial membranes contain diesel-range C15-C19 hydrocarbons at concentrations similar to chlorophyll. Recently, two universal but mutually exclusive hydrocarbon production pathways in cyanobacteria were discovered. We engineered a mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that produces no alkanes, which grew poorly at low temperatures. We analyzed this defect by assessing the redox kinetics of PSI. The mutant exhibited enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF), especially at low temperature. CEF raises the ATP:NADPH ratio from photosynthesis and balances reductant requirements of biosynthesis with maintaining the redox poise of the electron transport chain. We conducted in silico flux balance analysis and showed that growth rate reaches a distinct maximum for an intermediate value of CEF equivalent to recycling 1 electron in 4 from PSI to the plastoquinone pool. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the lack of membrane alkanes causes higher CEF, perhaps for maintenance of redox poise. In turn, increased CEF reduces growth by forcing the cell to use less energy-efficient pathways, lowering the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis. This study highlights the unique and universal role of medium-chain hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes: they regulate redox balance and reductant partitioning in these oxygenic photosynthetic cells under stress. PMID:26459862

  19. Waterhammer Modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System Cold Flow Development Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides three-axis attitude control for the Ares I launch vehicle during active Upper Stage flight. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain the proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted in the fall of 2009 at Marshall Space Flight Center were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid performance characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined waterhammer along with the subsequent pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  20. Cyanobacterial Alkanes Modulate Photosynthetic Cyclic Electron Flow to Assist Growth under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Berla, Bertram M; Saha, Rajib; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2015-01-01

    All cyanobacterial membranes contain diesel-range C15-C19 hydrocarbons at concentrations similar to chlorophyll. Recently, two universal but mutually exclusive hydrocarbon production pathways in cyanobacteria were discovered. We engineered a mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that produces no alkanes, which grew poorly at low temperatures. We analyzed this defect by assessing the redox kinetics of PSI. The mutant exhibited enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF), especially at low temperature. CEF raises the ATP:NADPH ratio from photosynthesis and balances reductant requirements of biosynthesis with maintaining the redox poise of the electron transport chain. We conducted in silico flux balance analysis and showed that growth rate reaches a distinct maximum for an intermediate value of CEF equivalent to recycling 1 electron in 4 from PSI to the plastoquinone pool. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the lack of membrane alkanes causes higher CEF, perhaps for maintenance of redox poise. In turn, increased CEF reduces growth by forcing the cell to use less energy-efficient pathways, lowering the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis. This study highlights the unique and universal role of medium-chain hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes: they regulate redox balance and reductant partitioning in these oxygenic photosynthetic cells under stress. PMID:26459862

  1. Role of conventional ultrasonography and color flow-doppler sonography in predicting malignancy in 'cold' thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Rago, T; Vitti, P; Chiovato, L; Mazzeo, S; De Liperi, A; Miccoli, P; Viacava, P; Bogazzi, F; Martino, E; Pinchera, A

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the usefulness of conventional thyroid ultrasonography (US) and color flow-doppler (CFD) sonography in the assessment of 'cold' thyroid nodules. One hundred and four consecutive patients with thyroid nodules who were to undergo surgery were examined by US and CFD before thyroidectomy. Conventional US evaluated the presence of a halo sign, hypoechogenicity and microcalcifications. The vascular pattern on CFD was classified as follows: Type I, absence of blood flow; Type II, perinodular blood flow; Type III, marked intranodular blood flow. On histology, 30 nodules were diagnosed as malignant (carcinoma, CA) and 74 as benign nodules (BN). On US, the echographic pattern most predictive for malignancy was absent halo sign, which was found in 20/30 CA and in 17/72 BN (P = 0.0001; specificity 77.0%; sensitivity 66.6%). The most specific combination on US, absent halo sign/microcalcifications, was found in 8/30 CA and in 5/74 BN (P < 0.005; specificity 93.2%, sensitivity 26.6%). The Type III pattern on CFD was found in 20/30 CA and 38/74 BN (not statistically significant). The combination of absent halo sign on US with Type III pattern on CFD was found in 15/30 CA and in 8/74 BN (P < 0.0001; specificity 89.0%, sensitivity 50.0%). The combination of absent halo sign/microcalcifications on US with Type III pattern on CFD was the most specific combination of the two techniques, being found in 5/30 CA and in only 2/74 BN (P < 0.01; specificity 97.2%, sensitivity 16.6%). In conclusion, findings on US and CFD become highly predictive for malignancy only when multiple signs are simultaneously present in a thyroid nodule. Thus the predictive value of these techniques increases at the expense of their sensitivity. Only in a small proportion of patients with thyroid carcinoma is US and CFD information highly predictive of malignancy. PMID:9461314

  2. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 3; Builders and Buyers Handbook for Improving New Home Efficiency, Comfort, and Durability in Cold and Very Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-08-01

    This best practices guide is part of a series produced by Building America. The guide book is a resource to help builders large and small build high-quality, energy-efficient homes that achieve 30% energy savings in space conditioning and water heating in the cold and very cold climates. The savings are in comparison with the 1993 Model Energy Code. The guide contains chapters for every member of the builder's team-from the manager to the site planner to the designers, site supervisors, the trades, and marketers. There is also a chapter for homeowners on how to use the book to provide help in selecting a new home or builder.

  3. Cold flow testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine alternate turbopump development high pressure fuel turbine model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.; Hudson, Susan T.; Johnson, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has established a cold airflow turbine test program to experimentally determine the performance of liquid rocket engine turbopump drive turbines. Testing of the SSME alternate turbopump development (ATD) fuel turbine was conducted for back-to-back comparisons with the baseline SSME fuel turbine results obtained in the first quarter of 1991. Turbine performance, Reynolds number effects, and turbine diagnostics, such as stage reactions and exit swirl angles, were investigated at the turbine design point and at off-design conditions. The test data showed that the ATD fuel turbine test article was approximately 1.4 percent higher in efficiency and flowed 5.3 percent more than the baseline fuel turbine test article. This paper describes the method and results used to validate the ATD fuel turbine aerodynamic design. The results are being used to determine the ATD high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine performance over its operating range, anchor the SSME ATD steady-state performance model, and validate various prediction and design analyses.

  4. Cold flow testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine alternate turbopump development high pressure fuel turbine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.; Hudson, Susan T.; Johnson, P. D.

    1992-06-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has established a cold airflow turbine test program to experimentally determine the performance of liquid rocket engine turbopump drive turbines. Testing of the SSME alternate turbopump development (ATD) fuel turbine was conducted for back-to-back comparisons with the baseline SSME fuel turbine results obtained in the first quarter of 1991. Turbine performance, Reynolds number effects, and turbine diagnostics, such as stage reactions and exit swirl angles, were investigated at the turbine design point and at off-design conditions. The test data showed that the ATD fuel turbine test article was approximately 1.4 percent higher in efficiency and flowed 5.3 percent more than the baseline fuel turbine test article. This paper describes the method and results used to validate the ATD fuel turbine aerodynamic design. The results are being used to determine the ATD high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) turbine performance over its operating range, anchor the SSME ATD steady-state performance model, and validate various prediction and design analyses.

  5. Cold spray deposition of Ti2AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Benjamin R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hauch, Benjamin; Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of Ti2AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ∼90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 HK and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding.

  6. Cold spray deposition of Ti2AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Benjamin R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.; Hauch, Benjamin; Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Sridharan, Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Coatings of Ti2AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ˜90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 HK and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding.

  7. Macrosegregation Improvement by Swirling Flow Nozzle for Bloom Continuous Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haibo; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2014-06-01

    Based on mathematical model coupling electromagnetism, fluid flow, heat transfer, and solute transport, the metallurgical performances of conventional straight nozzle, swirling flow nozzle (SFN), and M-EMS have been evaluated and compared. The soundness improvement of bloom castings has been investigated by casting tests of adopting the newly designed SFN. As compared to the normal nozzle, center porosity has been eliminated along with the popular center radial crack, and a better chemical homogeneity was obtained by employing the SFN accordingly, where the maximum segregation degree of C and S at the strand cross section is decreased from 1.28 to 1.02 and from 1.32 to 1.06, respectively. Combined with the results of numerical simulation, the positive effect obtained can be attributed to the remarkable superheat dissipation under the implementation of SFN, where, compared with the normal nozzle, the melt superheat degree at the mold exit is reduced by 15.5 K, 9.8 K, and 17.3 K (15.5 °C, 9.8 °C, and 17.3 °C) under the other three casting measures of SFN, normal nozzle with M-EMS, and SFN with M-EMS, respectively.

  8. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled. PMID:27313137

  9. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-06-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled.

  10. Maintaining semen quality by improving cold chain equipment used in cattle artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel; McClure, Elizabeth; Harston, Stephen; Madan, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Artificial insemination of dairy cattle is a common practice in the developing world that can improve farmer incomes and food security. Maintaining the fertilizing potential of frozen semen as it is manipulated, transported and stored is crucial to the success of this process. Here we describe simple technological improvements to protect semen from inadvertent thermal fluctuations that occur when users mishandle semen using standard equipment. We show that when frozen semen is mishandled, characteristics of semen biology associated with fertility are negatively affected. We describe several design modifications and results from thermal performance tests of several improved prototypes. Finally, we compare semen that has been mishandled in standard and improved equipment. The data suggest that our canister improvements can better maintain characteristics of semen biology that correlate with fertility when it is mishandled. PMID:27313137

  11. Methods to improve neural network performance in daily flows prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. L.; Chau, K. W.; Li, Y. S.

    2009-06-01

    SummaryIn this paper, three data-preprocessing techniques, moving average (MA), singular spectrum analysis (SSA), and wavelet multi-resolution analysis (WMRA), were coupled with artificial neural network (ANN) to improve the estimate of daily flows. Six models, including the original ANN model without data preprocessing, were set up and evaluated. Five new models were ANN-MA, ANN-SSA1, ANN-SSA2, ANN-WMRA1, and ANN-WMRA2. The ANN-MA was derived from the raw ANN model combined with the MA. The ANN-SSA1, ANN-SSA2, ANN-WMRA1 and ANN-WMRA2 were generated by using the original ANN model coupled with SSA and WMRA in terms of two different means. Two daily flow series from different watersheds in China (Lushui and Daning) were used in six models for three prediction horizons (i.e., 1-, 2-, and 3-day-ahead forecast). The poor performance on ANN forecast models was mainly due to the existence of the lagged prediction. The ANN-MA, among six models, performed best and eradicated the lag effect. The performances from the ANN-SSA1 and ANN-SSA2 were similar, and the performances from the ANN-WMRA1 and ANN-WMRA2 were also similar. However, the models based on the SSA presented better performance than the models based on the WMRA at all forecast horizons, which meant that the SSA is more effective than the WMRA in improving the ANN performance in the current study. Based on an overall consideration including the model performance and the complexity of modeling, the ANN-MA model was optimal, then the ANN model coupled with SSA, and finally the ANN model coupled with WMRA.

  12. Cold stress effects on PSI photochemistry in Zea mays: differential increase of FQR-dependent cyclic electron flow and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Savitch, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P A; Simmonds, John

    2011-06-01

    Cold-induced inhibition of CO(2) assimilation in maize (Zea mays L.) is associated with a persistent depression of the photochemical efficiency of PSII. However, very limited information is available on PSI photochemistry and PSI-dependent electron flow in cold-stressed maize. The extent of the absorbance change (ΔA(820)) used for in vivo quantitative estimation of photooxidizable P700(+) indicated a 32% lower steady-state oxidation level of the PSI reaction center P700 (P700(+)) in cold-stressed compared with control maize leaves. This was accompanied by a 2-fold faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark, indicating a higher capacity for cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in cold-stressed maize leaves. Furthermore, the increased PSI-dependent CEF(s) was associated with a much higher stromal electron pool size and 56% lower capacity for state transitions compared with control plants. To examine NADP(H) dehydrogenase (NDH)- and ferredoxin:plastoquinone oxidoreductase (FQR)-dependent CEF in vivo, the post-illumination transient increase of F(o)' was measured in the presence of electron transport inhibitors. The results indicate that under optimal growth conditions the relatively low CEF in the maize mesophyll cells is mostly due to the NDH-dependent pathway. However, the increased CEF in cold-stressed plants appears to originate from the up-regulated FQR pathway. The physiological role of PSI down-regulation, the increased capacity for CEF and the shift of preferred CEF mode in modulating the photosynthetic electron fluxes and distribution of excitation light energy in maize plants under cold stress conditions are discussed. PMID:21546369

  13. Branched-chain fatty acid methyl esters as cold flow improvers for biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel derived mainly from the transesterification of plant oils with methanol or ethanol. This fuel is generally made from commodity oils such as canola, palm, or soybean and has a number of properties that make it compatible in compression-ignition engines. Despite...

  14. Improvement of continuous solid circulation rate measurement in a cold flow circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.C.; Monazam, E.R.; Shadle, L.J.

    2008-03-10

    A method is described to independently estimate the solids velocity and voidage in the moving bed portion of the NETL circulating fluidized bed (CFB). These quantities are used by a device that continuously measures the solids circulation rate. The device is based on the use of a rotating Spiral vane installed in the standpipe of a circulating fluid bed (CFB). Correlations were developed from transient experiments and steady state mass balance data to correct the solids velocity and solids fraction in the standpipe as a function of standpipe aeration rate. A set of statisticallydesigned experiments was used to establish the need for these corrections and to verify the accuracy of solid circulation rate measurements after correction. The differences between the original and corrected measurements were quantitatively compared.

  15. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Are Cold Sores? Article Chapters What Are Cold Sores? Cold ... January 2012 Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores ...

  16. Salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate improve chilling tolerance in cold-stored lemon fruit (Citrus limon).

    PubMed

    Siboza, Xolani Irvin; Bertling, Isa; Odindo, Alfred Oduor

    2014-11-15

    Chilling injury (CI) is associated with the degradation of membrane integrity which can be aligned to phenolic oxidation activated by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD), enzymes responsible for tissue browning. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is a further enzyme prominent in the phenolic metabolism that is involved in acclimation against chilling stress. It was hypothesized that treatment with methyl jasmonate (MJ) and salicylic acid (SA) may enhance chilling tolerance in lemon fruit by increasing the synthesis of total phenolics and PAL by activating the key enzyme regulating the shikimic acid pathway whilst inhibiting the activity of POD and PPO. Lemon fruit were treated with 10μM MJ, 2mM SA or 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA, waxed, stored at -0.5, 2 or 4.5°C for up to 28 days plus 7 days at 23°C. Membrane integrity was studied by investigating membrane permeability and the degree of membrane lipid peroxidation in lemon flavedo following cold storage. The 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA treatment was most effective in enhancing chilling tolerance of lemon fruit, significantly reducing chilling-induced membrane permeability and membrane lipid peroxidation of lemon flavedo tissue. This treatment also increased total phenolics and PAL activity in such tissue while inhibiting POD activity, the latter possibly contributing to the delay of CI manifestation. PPO activity was found to be a poor biochemical marker of CI. Treatment with 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA resulted in an alteration of the phenolic metabolism, enhancing chilling tolerance, possibly through increased production of total phenolics and the activation of PAL and inhibition of POD. PMID:25216124

  17. Integrating Low Water Potential Seed Hydration with Other Treatments to Improve Cold Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Anwar A.; Ilyas, Satriyas; Ptasznik, Wlodzimierz

    1995-01-01

    Matriconditioning improved the performance of pepper, tomato, sweet corn, snap bean, table beet, sugar beet and watermelon seeds in early field plantings at suboptimal temperatures (averaged over 10 d after planting) ranging from 12 to 18 °C. Reduction in the time to 50% (T50) emergence in conditioned seeds ranged from 0·6 d in watermelon to 3·3 d in pepper and improvement in emergence from 10% in sugar beet to 30% in table beet. Further improvement in emergence occurred by inclusion of pesticides and/or gibberellin during conditioning. A 4 d conditioning of pepper at 25 °C was superior to 7 d conditioning at 15 °C in seeds germinated at 15 °C on filter paper, but 15 °C conditioning was superior in improving percentage emergence in early field plantings. Tomato seeds conditioned at 15 or 25 °C performed equally well in the field. A 2 d conditioning was superior to 1 d conditioning in improving the performance of supersweet sweet corn cultivars grown in a growth chamber at 10/20 °C. The water uptake rate in the presence of Micro-Cel E during matriconditioning of sweet corn seeds was slower than when the seeds were exposed to the same amount of water in absence of the carrier. Electrolyte leakage was greater in supersweet ‘Challenger’ sweet corn seeds carrying the sh2 gene compared to the sugary type sweet corn ‘More’, and in both cases matriconditioning reduced the leakage. Lettuce seeds matriconditioned for 24 h had higher 1-aminocyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid (ACC) content, developed greater ACC oxidase activity and performed better at 10 °C (germinated earlier and had higher percentage germination) than the untreated seeds. Matriconditioning appears to bring about beneficial physical, physiological and biochemical changes that seemingly improve embryo growth potential and tolerance to low temperatures. PMID:21247908

  18. Improving patient flow at a family health clinic.

    PubMed

    Bard, Jonathan F; Shu, Zhichao; Morrice, Douglas J; Wang, Dongyang Ester; Poursani, Ramin; Leykum, Luci

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a residency primary care clinic whose majority of patients are underserved. The clinic is operated by the health system for Bexar County and staffed primarily with physicians in a three-year Family Medicine residency program at The University of Texas School of Medicine in San Antonio. The objective of the study was to obtain a better understanding of patient flow through the clinic and to investigate changes to current scheduling rules and operating procedures. Discrete event simulation was used to establish a baseline and to evaluate a variety of scenarios associated with appointment scheduling and managing early and late arrivals. The first steps in developing the model were to map the administrative and diagnostic processes and to collect time-stamped data and fit probability distributions to each. In conjunction with the initialization and validation steps, various regressions were performed to determine if any relationships existed between individual providers and patient types, length of stay, and the difference between discharge time and appointment time. The latter two statistics along with resource utilization and closing time were the primary metrics used to evaluate system performance.The results showed that up to an 8.5 % reduction in patient length of stay is achievable without noticeably affecting the other metrics by carefully adjusting appointment times. Reducing the no-show rate from its current value of 21.8 % or overbooking, however, is likely to overwhelm the system's resources and lead to excessive congestion and overtime. Another major finding was that the providers are the limiting factor in improving patient flow. With an average utilization rate above 90 % there is little prospect in shortening the total patient time in the clinic without reducing the providers' average assessment time. Finally, several suggestions are offered to ensure fairness when dealing with out-of-order arrivals. PMID:25155098

  19. Design of a cold-flow test facility for the high pressure fuel turbopump turbine of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studevan, Colin C.

    1993-12-01

    The design and installation at the Naval Postgraduate School of a cold-flow test facility for the turbine of the high-pressure fuel turbopump of the Space Shuttle Main Engine, is reported. The specific article to be tested is the 'Alternate Development Model' designed and manufactured by Pratt & Whitney. The design of individual components is documented. The installation of the facility subsystem is described in detail. A preliminary estimation of turbine performance is made.

  20. Solution of plane cascade flow using improved surface singularity methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A solution method has been developed for calculating compressible inviscid flow through a linear cascade of arbitrary blade shapes. The method uses advanced surface singularity formulations which were adapted from those found in current external flow analyses. The resulting solution technique provides a fast flexible calculation for flows through turbomachinery blade rows. The solution method and some examples of the method's capabilities are presented.

  1. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  2. Improved macroscopic traffic flow model for aggressive drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A. R.; Velasco, R. M.

    2011-03-24

    As has been done for the treatment of diluted gases, kinetic methods are formulated for the study of unidirectional freeway traffic. Fluid dynamic models obtained from kinetic equations have inherent restrictions, the principal one is the restriction to the low density regime. Macroscopic models obtained from kinetic equations tends to selfrestrict to this regime and makes impossible to observe the medium density region. In this work, we present some results heading to improve this model and extend the observable region. Now, we are presenting a fluid dynamic model for aggressive drivers obtained from kinetic assumptions to extend the model to the medium density region in order to study synchronization phenomena which is a very interesting transition phase between free flow and traffic jams. We are changing the constant variance prefactor condition imposed before by a variance prefactor density dependent, the numerical solution of the model is presented, analyzed and contrasted with the previous one. We are also comparing our results with heuristic macroscopic models and real traffic observations.

  3. Cold temperature improves mobility and survival in Drosophila models of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP)

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Sally L.; Allard, Denise E.; Crowl, Christopher; Sherwood, Nina Tang

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) is a crippling neurodegenerative disease for which effective treatment or cure remains unknown. Victims experience progressive mobility loss due to degeneration of the longest axons in the spinal cord. Over half of AD-HSP cases arise from loss-of-function mutations in spastin, which encodes a microtubule-severing AAA ATPase. In Drosophila models of AD-HSP, larvae lacking Spastin exhibit abnormal motor neuron morphology and function, and most die as pupae. Adult survivors display impaired mobility, reminiscent of the human disease. Here, we show that rearing pupae or adults at reduced temperature (18°C), compared with the standard temperature of 24°C, improves the survival and mobility of adult spastin mutants but leaves wild-type flies unaffected. Flies expressing human spastin with pathogenic mutations are similarly rescued. Additionally, larval cooling partially rescues the larval synaptic phenotype. Cooling thus alleviates known spastin phenotypes for each developmental stage at which it is administered and, notably, is effective even in mature adults. We find further that cold treatment rescues larval synaptic defects in flies with mutations in Flower (a protein with no known relation to Spastin) and mobility defects in flies lacking Kat60-L1, another microtubule-severing protein enriched in the CNS. Together, these data support the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of cold extend beyond specific alleviation of Spastin dysfunction, to at least a subset of cellular and behavioral neuronal defects. Mild hypothermia, a common neuroprotective technique in clinical treatment of acute anoxia, might thus hold additional promise as a therapeutic approach for AD-HSP and, potentially, for other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24906373

  4. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  5. On improving cold region hydrological processes in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, Arman; Sushama, Laxmi; Verseghy, Diana; Harvey, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the treatment of frozen water in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-Interim) for the 1990-2001 period over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration and therefore soil moisture during the snowmelt season for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation are also in better agreement to those observed. This study thus demonstrates the importance of treatment of frozen water for realistic simulation of streamflows.

  6. Some like it hot, some like it cold: Temperature dependent biotechnological applications and improvements in extremophilic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-12-01

    The full biotechnological exploitation of enzymes is still hampered by their low activity, low stability and high cost. Temperature-dependent catalytic properties of enzymes are a key to efficient and cost-effective translation to commercial applications. Organisms adapted to temperature extremes are a rich source of enzymes with broad ranging thermal properties which, if isolated, characterized and their structure-function-stability relationship elucidated, could underpin a variety of technologies. Enzymes from thermally-adapted organisms such as psychrophiles (low-temperature) and thermophiles (high-temperature) are a vast natural resource that is already under scrutiny for their biotechnological potential. However, psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes show an activity-stability trade-off that necessitates the use of various genetic and chemical modifications to further improve their properties to suit various industrial applications. This review describes in detail the properties and biotechnological applications of both cold-adapted and thermophilic enzymes. Furthermore, the review critically examines ways to improve their value for biotechnology, concluding by proposing an integrated approach involving thermally-adapted, genetically and magnetically modified enzymes to make biocatalysis more efficient and cost-effective. PMID:26585268

  7. Cold Oxygen Plasma Treatments for the Improvement of the Physicochemical and Biodegradable Properties of Polylactic Acid Films for Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Song, Ah Young; Oh, Yoon Ah; Roh, Si Hyeon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Min, Sea C

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma (CP) treatment on the physicochemical and biodegradable properties of polylactic acid (PLA) films were studied. The PLA films were exposed to CP for 40 min at 900 W and 667 Pa using oxygen as the plasma-forming gas. The tensile, optical, and dynamic mechanical thermal properties, surface morphology, printability, water contact angle, chemical structure, weight change, and biodegradability properties of the films were evaluated during storage for up to 56 d. The tensile and optical properties of the PLA films were not significantly affected by CP treatment (CPT; P > 0.05). The surface roughness and water contact angle of PLA films increased by CPT and further increased during storage for 56 d. The printability of the PLA films increased following CPT and remained stable throughout the storage period. CP-induced hydrophilicity was also sustained during the storage period. The PLA films lost 1.9% of their weight after CPT, but recovered 99.5% of this loss after 14 d in storage. Photodegradation, thermal, and microbial biodegradable properties of the films were significantly improved by CPT (P < 0.05). Accelerated biodegradation of CP-treated PLA sachets with and without cheese was observed in compost. These results demonstrate the potential of CPT for modifying the stiffness, water contact angle, and chemical structure of PLA films and improving the printability and biodegradability of the films for food packaging. PMID:26646616

  8. Improving the environment for weaned piglets using polypropylene fabrics above the animals in cold periods.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Noé; Babot, Daniel; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Javier; Forcada, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the use of polypropylene fabrics in weaned pig facilities (5-10 weeks of age) during the winter period to improve thermal environment and energy saving for heating. Two experiments were conducted to validate the effects of fabrics (F) compared to control (C) in three 2-week periods using natural ventilation (assay 1, 2013) and forced ventilation (assay 2, 2014). Air temperature was greater in F than in C compartments in both years, particularly during the first 2-week periods (2 °C of mean difference). Natural ventilation was not enough to maintain relative humidity levels below 70 % at the end of the postweaning period (9-10 weeks of age) in both groups (F and C), whereas forced ventilation allowed controlling daily mean relative humidity levels <60 %. About 12-26 % of the radiant heat was transmitted through the fabrics cover, depending on the wavelength. There were no differences on growth performance of piglets in the two compartments in both years. The use of polypropylene fabrics was associated with a significant electric energy saving for heating during the first (data available only in 2014) and second 2-week period in both years. In conclusion, polypropylene fabrics may be an interesting tool to provide optimal environmental conditions for weaned piglets in winter, especially during the two first weeks after weaning. Their transmittance properties allow trapping infrared emission produced by the piglets and heating, avoiding heat losses through the roof, and therefore saving heating energy. PMID:25910465

  9. Improving the environment for weaned piglets using polypropylene fabrics above the animals in cold periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolz, Noé; Babot, Daniel; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Javier; Forcada, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the use of polypropylene fabrics in weaned pig facilities (5-10 weeks of age) during the winter period to improve thermal environment and energy saving for heating. Two experiments were conducted to validate the effects of fabrics (F) compared to control (C) in three 2-week periods using natural ventilation (assay 1, 2013) and forced ventilation (assay 2, 2014). Air temperature was greater in F than in C compartments in both years, particularly during the first 2-week periods (2 °C of mean difference). Natural ventilation was not enough to maintain relative humidity levels below 70 % at the end of the postweaning period (9-10 weeks of age) in both groups (F and C), whereas forced ventilation allowed controlling daily mean relative humidity levels <60 %. About 12-26 % of the radiant heat was transmitted through the fabrics cover, depending on the wavelength. There were no differences on growth performance of piglets in the two compartments in both years. The use of polypropylene fabrics was associated with a significant electric energy saving for heating during the first (data available only in 2014) and second 2-week period in both years. In conclusion, polypropylene fabrics may be an interesting tool to provide optimal environmental conditions for weaned piglets in winter, especially during the two first weeks after weaning. Their transmittance properties allow trapping infrared emission produced by the piglets and heating, avoiding heat losses through the roof, and therefore saving heating energy.

  10. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  11. Improving patient flow in pre-operative assessment.

    PubMed

    Stark, Cameron; Gent, Anne; Kirkland, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Annual patient attendances at a pre-operative assessment department increased by 24.8% from 5659 in 2009, to 7062 in 2012. The unit was staffed by administrative staff, nurses, and health care assistants (HCA). Medical review was accessed via on call medical staff, or notes were sent to anaesthetists for further review. With rising demand, patient waits increased. The average lead time for a patient (time from entering the department to leaving) was 79 minutes. 9.3% of patients attended within two weeks of their scheduled surgery date. 10% of patients were asked to return on a later day, as there was not sufficient capacity to undertake their assessment. There were nine routes of referral in to the department. Patients moved between different clinic rooms and the waiting area several times. Work patterns were uneven, as many attendances were from out-patient clinics which meant peak attendance times were linked to clinic times. There were substantial differences in the approaches of different nurses, making the HCA role difficult. Patients reported dissatisfaction with waits. Using a Lean quality improvement process with rapid PDSA cycles, the service changed to one in which patients were placed in a room, and remained there for the duration of their assessment. Standard work was developed for HCWs and nurses. Rooms were standardised using 5S processes, and set up improved to reduce time spent looking for supplies. A co-ordinator role was introduced using existing staff to monitor flow and to organise the required medical assessments and ECGs. Timing of booked appointments were altered to take account of clinic times. Routes in to the department were reduced from nine to one. Ten months after the work began, the average lead time had reduced to 59 minutes. The proportion of people attending within two weeks of their surgery decreased from 9.3% to 5.3%. Referrals for an anaesthetic opinion decreased from 30% to 20%, and in the month reviewed no one had to return to

  12. A deficiency in cold-inducible RNA-binding protein accelerates the inflammation phase and improves wound healing.

    PubMed

    Idrovo, Juan Pablo; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng Lang; Wang, Zhimin; Yen, Hao Ting; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Chronic or non-healing wounds are a major concern in clinical practice and these wounds are mostly associated with diabetes, and venous and pressure ulcers. Wound healing is a complex process involving overlapping phases and the primary phase in this complex cascade is the inflammatory state. While inflammation is necessary for wound healing, a prolonged inflammatory phase leads to impaired healing. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) belongs to a family of cold-shock proteins that are expressed in high levels under stress conditions. Recently, we demonstrated that a deficiency in CIRP led to decreased inflammation and mortality in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock. Thus, we hypothesized that a deficiency in CIRP would accelerate the inflammatory phase and lead to an improvement in cutaneous wound healing. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, a full-thickness wound was created on the dorsum of wild-type (WT) and CIRP-/- mice. The wound size was measured every other day for 14 days. The wound area was significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice by day 9 and continued to decrease until day 14 compared to the WT mice. In a separate cohort, mice were sacrificed on days 3 and 7 after wounding and the skin tissues were harvested for histological analysis and RNA measurements. On day 3, the mRNA expression of tumor necrossis factor (TNF)-α in the skin tissues was increased by 16-fold in the WT mice, whereas these levels were increased by 65-fold in the CIRP-/- mice. Of note on day 7, while the levels of TNF-α remained high in the WT mice, these levels were significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice. The histological analysis of the wounded skin tissue indicated an improvement as early as day 3 in the CIRP-/- mice, whereas in the WT mice, infiltrated immune cells were still present on day 7. On day 7 in the CIRP-/- mice, Gr-1 expression was low and CD31 expression was high, whereas in the WT mice, Gr-1 expression was high and CD31 expression was low

  13. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Marashdeh, Qussai

    2013-02-01

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi

  14. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  15. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerance is an abnormal sensitivity to a cold environment or cold temperatures. ... can be a symptom of a problem with metabolism. Some people (often very thin women) do not tolerate cold environments because they have very little body fat and ...

  16. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the most common reason that children miss school and parents miss work. Parents often get colds ... other children. A cold can spread quickly through schools or daycares. Colds can occur at any time ...

  17. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  18. Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, A.J.

    1994-01-11

    Apparatus is described for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas manifold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants. 15 figures.

  19. Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods

    DOEpatents

    Gadgil, Ashok J.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas mani-fold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants.

  20. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: one-dimensional soil thaw with conduction and advection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; McKenzie, Jeffrey M; MacQuarrie, Kerry T. B.; Voss, Clifford I.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have emerged in recent years. Dissimilarities often exist in their mathematical formulations and/or numerical solution techniques, but few analytical solutions exist for benchmarking flow and energy transport models that include pore water phase change. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the Lunardini solution, an approximate analytical solution for predicting soil thawing subject to conduction, advection, and phase change. Fifteen thawing scenarios are examined by considering differences in porosity, surface temperature, Darcy velocity, and initial temperature. The accuracy of the Lunardini solution is shown to be proportional to the Stefan number. The analytical solution results obtained for soil thawing scenarios with water flow and advection are compared to those obtained from the finite element model SUTRA. Three problems, two involving the Lunardini solution and one involving the classic Neumann solution, are recommended as standard benchmarks for future model development and testing.

  1. A cold, slow beam of TlF molecules for an improved probe for the nuclear Schiff moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, Daniel; Edwards, Eustace; Steinecker, Matthew; Peck, Stephen; Hunter, Larry; Demille, David

    2016-05-01

    We present a new experimental effort to search for the nuclear Schiff moment (SM) using thallium fluoride (TlF) molecules. Our approach capitalizes on the strong internal electric field present in a polarized molecule to amplify the effect of the SM. We project a 25-fold improvement over the current state of the art sensitivity to certain underlying mechanisms such as the CP-violating QCD θ-parameter. Our recent measurements indicate that optical cycling is possible on the X1Σ+ -->B3Π1 electronic transition of TlF. Here a single laser will enable 100 photons to be scattered before an excited vibrational level is populated. This is sufficient for unit-efficiency fluorescence detection, rotational cooling, and state preparation. With a single repump laser, ~ 104 photons could be scattered, sufficient for transverse laser cooling that could substantially increase the brightness of the molecular beam. We report on the production of a cold and slow beam of TlF molecules from a cryogenic buffer gas beam source and present flux measurements for a range of TlF vaporization techniques. We also present our progress towards understanding the hyperfine structure in the B3Π1 state and its role in optical cycling.

  2. Methods for improved resolution of flow electrophoresis cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.; Fogal, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    First method involves remote adjusting of zeta potential. Second approach sandwiches two conducting metal plates between opposite cell walls and thin insulating layer. Third method forces buffer to flow in direction opposite particle streams.

  3. A consortium of rhizobacterial strains and biochemical growth elicitors improve cold and drought stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kakar, K U; Ren, X-L; Nawaz, Z; Cui, Z-Q; Li, B; Xie, G-L; Hassan, M A; Ali, E; Sun, G-C

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, a consortium of two rhizobacteria Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Bk7 and Brevibacillus laterosporus B4, termed 'BB', biochemical elicitors salicylic acid and β-aminobutyric acid (SB) and their mixture (BBSB) were investigated for cold and drought stress tolerance in rice plants. After withholding water for 16 days, rice plants treated with BBSB showed 100% survival, improved seedling height (35.4 cm), shoot number (6.12), and showed minimum symptoms of chlorosis (19%), wilting (4%), necrosis (6%) and rolling of leaves. Similarly, BB inoculation enhanced plant growth and reduced overall symptoms in rice seedlings subjected to 0 ± 5 °C for 24 h. Our results imply several mechanisms underlying BB- and BBSB-elicited stress tolerance. In contrast to the control, both treatments significantly decreased leaf monodehydroascorbate (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage, and increased leaf proline and cholorophyll content. Moreover, activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased 3.0- and 3.6-fold, respectively. Moreover, expression of OsMYB3R-2, OsDIL, OsDREB1A and OsCDPK13 genes was significantly up-regulated, suggesting that these genes play important roles in abiotic stress tolerance of rice. In addition, bacterial strains Bk7 and B4 were able to produce high amounts of IAA and siderophores, and colonise the plant roots, while only strain Bk7 exhibited the capability to form biofilms and solubilise inorganic phosphate. This study indicates that the BB and BBSB bio-formulations can be used to confer induced systematic tolerance and improve the health of rice plants subject to chilling and drought stress. PMID:26681628

  4. Improvement of COBRA-TF for modeling of PWR cold- and hot-legs during reactor transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salko, Robert K.

    COBRA-TF is a two-phase, three-field (liquid, vapor, droplets) thermal-hydraulic modeling tool that has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under sponsorship of the NRC. The code was developed for Light Water Reactor analysis starting in the 1980s; however, its development has continued to this current time. COBRA-TF still finds wide-spread use throughout the nuclear engineering field, including nuclear-power vendors, academia, and research institutions. It has been proposed that extension of the COBRA-TF code-modeling region from vessel-only components to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant-line regions can lead to improved Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. Improved modeling is anticipated due to COBRA-TF's capability to independently model the entrained-droplet flow-field behavior, which has been observed to impact delivery to the core region[1]. Because COBRA-TF was originally developed for vertically-dominated, in-vessel, sub-channel flow, extension of the COBRA-TF modeling region to the horizontal-pipe geometries of the coolant-lines required several code modifications, including: • Inclusion of the stratified flow regime into the COBRA-TF flow regime map, along with associated interfacial drag, wall drag and interfacial heat transfer correlations, • Inclusion of a horizontal-stratification force between adjacent mesh cells having unequal levels of stratified flow, and • Generation of a new code-input interface for the modeling of coolant-lines. The sheer number of COBRA-TF modifications that were required to complete this work turned this project into a code-development project as much as it was a study of thermal-hydraulics in reactor coolant-lines. The means for achieving these tasks shifted along the way, ultimately leading the development of a separate, nearly completely independent one-dimensional, two-phase-flow modeling code geared toward reactor coolant-line analysis. This developed code has been named CLAP, for

  5. Toward an improved understanding of multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccino, Julia C.; Gray, William G.; Ferrand, Lin A.

    1998-08-01

    Physical description of multiphase flow in porous media ideally should be based on conservation principles. In practice, however, Darcy's law is employed as the foundation of multiphase flow studies. Darcy's law is an empirical surrogate for momentum conservation based on data obtained from experimental study of one-dimensional single-phase flow. In its original form [Darcy, 1856], Darcy's law contained a single, constant coefficient that depended on the properties of the medium. Since 1856, Darcy's relation has been heuristically and progressively altered by allowing this coefficient to be a spatially dependent, nonlinear function of fluid and solid phase properties, particularly of the quantities of these phases within the flow system. The shortcoming of this approach is that the governing flow equation is obtained by enhancing a simple empirical coefficient with complex functional dependencies rather than by simplifying general conservation principles. As a result, some of the important physical phenomena are not properly accounted for. Also, some assumptions intrinsic to the equations are overlooked, making accurate simulation more of an art than an entirely scientific exercise. A more general and more theoretically appealing approach to the derivation of conservation principles for multiphase flow has been evolving over the last 30 years. This approach employs a mathematical procedure for deriving conservation principles at the length scale of interest, followed by imposition of thermodynamic constraints to restrict the generality of these expressions. The product of this approach is a set of balance equations that provides a framework in which the assumptions inherent in a hypothesized model of multiphase flow are clearly stated. Requirements for more comprehensive and physically complete models can then be specified.

  6. Human responses to cold.

    PubMed

    Rintamäki, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    The thermoneutral ambient temperature for naked and resting humans is ca. 27 degrees C. Exposure to cold stimulates cold receptors of the skin which causes cold thermal sensations and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic stimulation causes vasoconstriction in skin, arms and legs. Diminished skin and extremity blood flow increases the thermal insulation of superficial tissues more than 300% corresponding to 0.9 clo (0.13 degrees C x m(-2) x W(-1)). With thermoregulatory vasoconstriction/ vasodilatation the body heat balance can be maintained within a range of ca. 4 degrees C, the middle of the range being at ca. 21 degrees C when light clothing is used. Below the thermoneutral zone metabolic heat production (shivering) is stimulated and above the zone starts heat loss by evaporation (sweating). Cold induced vasoconstriction increases blood pressure and viscosity and decreases plasma volume consequently increasing cardiac work. Cold induced hypertensive response can be counteracted by light exercise, while starting heavy work in cold markedly increases blood pressure. Under very cold conditions the sympathetic stimulation opens the anastomoses between arterioles and venules which increases skin temperatures markedly but temporarily, especially in finger tips. Adaptation to cold takes ca. 2 weeks, whereafter the physiological responses to cold are attenuated and cold exposure is subjectively considered less stressful. PMID:17929604

  7. Dynamic adaptation of the peripheral circulation to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephen S; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-01-01

    Humans residing or working in cold environments exhibit a stronger cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction in the peripheral microvasculature than those living in warm regions of the world, leading to a general assumption that thermal responses to local cold exposure can be systematically improved by natural acclimatization or specific acclimation. However, it remains unclear whether this improved tolerance is actually due to systematic acclimatization, or alternately due to the genetic pre-disposition or self-selection for such occupations. Longitudinal studies of repeated extremity exposure to cold demonstrate only ambiguous adaptive responses. In field studies, general cold acclimation may lead to increased sympathetic activity that results in reduced finger blood flow. Laboratory studies offer more control over confounding parameters, but in most studies, no consistent changes in peripheral blood flow occur even after repeated exposure for several weeks. Most studies are performed on a limited amount of subjects only, and the variability of the CIVD response demands more subjects to obtain significant results. This review systematically surveys the trainability of CIVD, concluding that repeated local cold exposure does not alter circulatory dynamics in the peripheries, and that humans remain at risk of cold injuries even after extended stays in cold environments. PMID:21851473

  8. Evidence for viscous flow nature in Zr{sub 60}Al{sub 15}Ni{sub 25} metallic glass subjected to cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhijie; Hao Weixin; Hu Yong; Song Kaikai; Eckert, Juergen; Stoica, Mihai; Scudino, Sergio

    2013-07-08

    The microstructure changes of Zr{sub 60}Al{sub 15}Ni{sub 25} metallic glass upon cold rolling and their influences on the thermally induced crystallization kinetics are investigated. The results show that atomic redistribution occurs within the localized zones in the glassy matrix, resulting from the softening of the shear modulus, which retards the crystallization behaviors during the subsequent heating. The present work provides direct evidence for the viscous flow nature in a metallic glass subjected to plastic deformation, during which the softened zones act as potential shear transformation zones.

  9. Improvement of COBRA-TF for modeling of PWR cold- and hot-legs during reactor transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salko, Robert K.

    COBRA-TF is a two-phase, three-field (liquid, vapor, droplets) thermal-hydraulic modeling tool that has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under sponsorship of the NRC. The code was developed for Light Water Reactor analysis starting in the 1980s; however, its development has continued to this current time. COBRA-TF still finds wide-spread use throughout the nuclear engineering field, including nuclear-power vendors, academia, and research institutions. It has been proposed that extension of the COBRA-TF code-modeling region from vessel-only components to Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant-line regions can lead to improved Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis. Improved modeling is anticipated due to COBRA-TF's capability to independently model the entrained-droplet flow-field behavior, which has been observed to impact delivery to the core region[1]. Because COBRA-TF was originally developed for vertically-dominated, in-vessel, sub-channel flow, extension of the COBRA-TF modeling region to the horizontal-pipe geometries of the coolant-lines required several code modifications, including: • Inclusion of the stratified flow regime into the COBRA-TF flow regime map, along with associated interfacial drag, wall drag and interfacial heat transfer correlations, • Inclusion of a horizontal-stratification force between adjacent mesh cells having unequal levels of stratified flow, and • Generation of a new code-input interface for the modeling of coolant-lines. The sheer number of COBRA-TF modifications that were required to complete this work turned this project into a code-development project as much as it was a study of thermal-hydraulics in reactor coolant-lines. The means for achieving these tasks shifted along the way, ultimately leading the development of a separate, nearly completely independent one-dimensional, two-phase-flow modeling code geared toward reactor coolant-line analysis. This developed code has been named CLAP, for

  10. Nanoparticle embedded enzymes for improved lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Özalp, Veli C; Zeydanlı, Uğur S; Lunding, Anita; Kavruk, Murat; Öz, M Tufan; Eyidoğan, Füsun; Olsen, Lars F; Öktem, Hüseyin A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, combining the nanoparticle embedded sensors with lateral flow assays, a novel strategy for ensuring the quality of signalling in lateral flow assays (LFAs) was developed. A LFA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) is reported that is based on horse radish peroxidase (HRP) which is co-entrapped with Texas Red dextran inside porous polyacrylamide nanoparticles. In this system, enzymes are protected in the porous matrix of polyacrylamide which freely allows the diffusion of the analyte. The sensor is rapid and sensitive for quantification of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. A test solution of hydrogen peroxides was quantified with this novel LFA-ROS sensor to obtain a linear range between 1 and 25 μM. Nanoparticle embedding of enzymes is proposed here as a general strategy for developing enzyme-based lateral flow assays, eliminating adverse effects associated with biological samples. PMID:23730687

  11. Elements of an improved model of debris‐flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth‐averaged model of debris‐flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore‐fluid pressure. Non‐hydrostatic pore‐fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state‐dependent property that links the depth‐averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore‐pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate‐dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate‐independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore‐pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states.

  12. U.S. Stream Flow Measurement and Data Dissemination Improve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Robert M.; Costa, John E.

    2004-05-01

    Stream flow information is essential for many important uses across a broad range of scales, including global water balances, engineering design, flood forecasting, reservoir operations, navigation, water supply, recreation, and environmental management. Growing populations and competing priorities for water, including preservation and restoration of aquatic habitat, are spurring demand for more accurate, timely, and accessible water data. To be most useful, stream flow information must be collected in a standardized manner, with a known accuracy, and for a long and continuous time period. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates over 7000 stream gauges nationwide, which constitute over 90% of the nation's stream gauges that provide daily stream flow records, and that are accessible to the public. Most stream flow records are not based on direct measurement of river discharge, but are derived from continuous measurements of river elevations or stage. These stage data, recorded to 3-mm accuracy, are then converted into discharge by use of a stage/discharge relation (rating) that is unique for each stream gauging location. Because stream beds and banks are not static, neither is the stage discharge rating. Much of the effort and cost associated with stream gauging lies in establishing and updating this relation. Ten years ago, USGS personnel would visit stream gauging stations 8 to 10 times a year to make direct measurements of river depth, width, and velocity using mechanical instruments: a sounding rod or cable, a tagline, and a current meter. From these data, flow rates were computed. The range of measured flow and concurrent river stages were then used to build the rating curve for each site and to track changes to the rating curve.

  13. Effect of cold-work on self-welding susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel (alloy D9) in high temperature flowing sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikandamurthy, C.; Kumar, Hemant; Chakraborty, Gopa; Albert, S. K.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rajan, K. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Self-welding susceptibility of alloy D9 (15Cr-15Ni-2Mo titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel), used as wrapper in the fuel subassemblies of sodium cooled fast reactor, was studied in flowing sodium. Specimens were tested at 823 K in annealed and in 20% cold-worked condition up to a maximum contact stress of 24.5 MPa and maximum duration of 9 months. The results showed that the annealed alloy D9 showed good resistance to self-welding in all the tests. But 20% cold-worked alloy D9 got self-welded in all the tests except in the test carried out for 3 months duration indicating that tests conducted at high contact stresses and long duration reduce the resistance of the steel to self-weld. Microstructural changes observed in the cold-worked alloy D9 at the location of contact between the mating surfaces indicate dynamic recovery resulting from high contact stress and temperature facilitating self-weld.

  14. Improved Flow Modeling in Transient Reactor Safety Analysis Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Holowach, M.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Cheung, F.B.

    2002-07-01

    A method of accounting for fluid-to-fluid shear in between calculational cells over a wide range of flow conditions envisioned in reactor safety studies has been developed such that it may be easily implemented into a computer code such as COBRA-TF for more detailed subchannel analysis. At a given nodal height in the calculational model, equivalent hydraulic diameters are determined for each specific calculational cell using either laminar or turbulent velocity profiles. The velocity profile may be determined from a separate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis, experimental data, or existing semi-empirical relationships. The equivalent hydraulic diameter is then applied to the wall drag force calculation so as to determine the appropriate equivalent fluid-to-fluid shear caused by the wall for each cell based on the input velocity profile. This means of assigning the shear to a specific cell is independent of the actual wetted perimeter and flow area for the calculational cell. The use of this equivalent hydraulic diameter for each cell within a calculational subchannel results in a representative velocity profile which can further increase the accuracy and detail of heat transfer and fluid flow modeling within the subchannel when utilizing a thermal hydraulics systems analysis computer code such as COBRA-TF. Utilizing COBRA-TF with the flow modeling enhancement results in increased accuracy for a coarse-mesh model without the significantly greater computational and time requirements of a full-scale 3D (three-dimensional) transient CFD calculation. (authors)

  15. Comparison of effect of a turbojet engine and three cold-flow configurations on the stability of a full-scale supersonicle inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musial, Norman T

    1957-01-01

    Increasing the volume and length of the duct behind the inlet affected the inlet stability at Mach 2.0 and zero angle of attack. Close approximation of the inlet stability limit of the J34 engine-inlet configuration was obtained by a cold-pipe configuration having a length and volume approaching that measured to the engine turbine. Variation of these parameters had a small effect on the minimum subcritical stable mass flow below a cowl-lip-position parameter of 44 degrees and appeared to have a negligible effect on the inlet pressure-recovery - mass-flow curve. Initial buzz frequency and minimum cowl-lip-position parameter for complete buzz-free operation varied with configuration.

  16. Improved vortex methods for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G.; Leonard, A.

    1989-01-01

    Robust numerical methods are developed for three-dimensional incompressible vortical flows, using Lagrangian vortex elements. A successful scheme must be able to handle regions of intense vortex stretching and vortex reconnection with reasonable accuracy (without diverging). Here, consideration is given to vortex particles, also commonly called vortons or vortex sticks. The following issues are discussed: (1) use of delta-function elements and weak solutions of the vorticity equation; (2) use of smoothed elements and the choice of the smoothing function; (3) representation of viscous effects and the redistribution of element strength; and (4) conservation laws (are they satisfied?). The various proposed schemes have been tested on flows involving a strong interaction between two vortex rings.

  17. Elements of an improved model of debris-flow motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new depth-averaged model of debris-flow motion describes simultaneous evolution of flow velocity and depth, solid and fluid volume fractions, and pore-fluid pressure. Non-hydrostatic pore-fluid pressure is produced by dilatancy, a state-dependent property that links the depth-averaged shear rate and volumetric strain rate of the granular phase. Pore-pressure changes caused by shearing allow the model to exhibit rate-dependent flow resistance, despite the fact that the basal shear traction involves only rate-independent Coulomb friction. An analytical solution of simplified model equations shows that the onset of downslope motion can be accelerated or retarded by pore-pressure change, contingent on whether dilatancy is positive or negative. A different analytical solution shows that such effects will likely be muted if downslope motion continues long enough, because dilatancy then evolves toward zero, and volume fractions and pore pressure concurrently evolve toward steady states. ?? 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  19. Improvement of Flow Characteristics for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Inutake, M.; Hosokawa, Y.; Sato, R.; Ando, A.; Tobari, H.; Hattori, K

    2005-01-15

    A higher specific impulse and a larger thrust are required for a manned interplanetary space thruster. Until the realization of a fusion-plasma thruster, a magneto-plasma-dynamic arcjet (MPDA) powered by a fission reactor is one of the promising candidates for a manned Mars space thruster. The MPDA plasma is accelerated axially by a self-induced j x B force. Thrust performance of the MPDA is expected to increase by applying a magnetic nozzle instead of a solid nozzle. In order to get a much higher thruster performance, two methods have been investigated in the HITOP device, Tohoku University. One is to use a magnetic Laval nozzle in the vicinity of the MPDA muzzle for converting the high ion thermal energy to the axial flow energy. The other is to heat ions by use of an ICRF antenna in the divergent magnetic nozzle. It is found that by use of a small-sized Laval-type magnetic nozzle, the subsonic flow near the muzzle is converted to be supersonic through the magnetic Laval nozzle. A fast-flowing plasma is successfully heated by use of an ICRF antenna in the magnetic beach configuration.

  20. Study of flow distribution and its improvement on the header of plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jian; Li, Yanzhong

    2004-11-01

    In order to enhance the uniformity of flow distribution, an improved header configuration of plate-fin heat exchanger is put forward in this paper. Based on the analysis of the fluid flow maldistribution for the conventional header used in industry, a baffle with small holes of three different kinds of diameters is recommended to install in the header. The flow maldistribution parameter S is obtained under different header configuration. When the baffle is properly installed with an optimum length, with stagger arranged and suitably distributed holes from axial line to baffle boundary, the ratio of the maximum flow velocity to the minimum flow velocity drops from 3.44-3.04 to 1.57-1.68 for various Reynolds numbers. The numerical results indicate that the improved header configuration can effectively improve the performance. The conclusion of this paper is of great significance in the improvement of plate-fin heat exchanger.

  1. Cold flow scaleup facility experimental results and comparison of performance at different bed configurations, Volume 1: Topical report, January--December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, D.K.; Yang, W.C.; Ettehadieh, B.; Anestis, T.C.; Haldipur, G.B.; Kettering, E.; O'Rourke, R.E.; Weigle, D.

    1988-12-01

    KRW Energy Systems Inc. is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally acceptable production of low- and medium-BTU fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks for electric power generation, synthetic natural gas, chemical feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents analysis of the Cold Flow Scaleup Facility (CFSF) operations. Included is work performed on the 3-meter CFSF model using four different bed configurations to check correlations and scale-up criteria developed from studies conducted in small-scale cold flow units and those available in open literature. The 3-meter model permits full front-face viewing of the fluidized bed through a transparent plastic window and with its instrumentation allows detailed studies of jet behavior, bubble dynamics, solid circulation, gas mixing, and related phenomena important to the design of a large-scale gasifier. 87 refs., 95 figs., 56 tabs.

  2. An improved lambda-scheme for one-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.; Dipiano, M. T.

    1983-01-01

    A code for the calculation of one-dimensional flows is presented, which combines a simple and efficient version of the lambda-scheme with tracking of discontinuities. The latter is needed to identify points where minor departures from the basic integration scheme are applied to prevent infiltration of numerical errors. Such a tracking is obtained via a systematic application of Boolean algebra. It is, therefore, very efficient. Fifteen examples are presented and discussed in detail. The results are exceptionally good. All discontinuites are captured within one mesh interval.

  3. Aerosil for the improvement of the flow behavior of powdered substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The tendency of powdered substances to agglomerate and stick together is studied. The highly dispersed silicic acid Aerosil (tradename) is studied as an agent to improve the free flowing characteristics of powdered materials. It was concluded that the use of Aerosil 200, Aerosil R 972, aluminum oxide C and sylicic acid D 17 as flow agents caused broad improvements in the flow properties of powders. Additionally, the sifting, dispersion, and spray behavior, as well as the grinding and air separation characteristics of powders were improved.

  4. Improving the health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heat-waves in England: a case-study approach using temperature-mortality relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masato, Giacomo; Cavany, Sean; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Dacre, Helen; Bone, Angie; Carmicheal, Katie; Murray, Virginia; Danker, Rutger; Neal, Rob; Sarran, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The health forecasting alert system for cold weather and heatwaves currently in use in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans for England is based on 5 alert levels, with levels 2 and 3 dependent on a forecast or actual single temperature action trigger. Epidemiological evidence indicates that for both heat and cold, the impact on human health is gradual, with worsening impact for more extreme temperatures. The 60% risk of heat and cold forecasts used by the alerts is a rather crude probabilistic measure, which could be substantially improved thanks to the state-of-the-art forecast techniques. In this study a prototype of a new health forecasting alert system is developed, which is aligned to the approach used in the Met Office's (MO) National Severe Weather Warning Service (NSWWS). This is in order to improve information available to responders in the health and social care system by linking temperatures more directly to risks of mortality, and developing a system more coherent with other weather alerts. The prototype is compared to the current system in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans via a case-study approach to verify its potential advantages and shortcomings. The prototype health forecasting alert system introduces an "impact vs likelihood matrix" for the health impacts of hot and cold temperatures which is similar to those used operationally for other weather hazards as part of the NSWWS. The impact axis of this matrix is based on existing epidemiological evidence, which shows an increasing relative risk of death at extremes of outdoor temperature beyond a threshold which can be identified epidemiologically. The likelihood axis is based on a probability measure associated with the temperature forecast. The new method is tested for two case studies (one during summer 2013, one during winter 2013), and compared to the performance of the current alert system. The prototype shows some clear improvements over the current alert system. It allows for a much greater

  5. Overpressure and fluid flow in the new jersey continental slope: implications for slope failure and cold seeps

    PubMed

    Dugan; Flemings

    2000-07-14

    Miocene through Pleistocene sediments on the New Jersey continental slope (Ocean Drilling Program Site 1073) are undercompacted (porosity between 40 and 65%) to 640 meters below the sea floor, and this is interpreted to record fluid pressures that reach 95% of the lithostatic stress. A two-dimensional model, where rapid Pleistocene sedimentation loads permeable sandy silt of Miocene age, successfully predicts the observed pressures. The model describes how lateral pressure equilibration in permeable beds produces fluid pressures that approach the lithostatic stress where overburden is thin. This transfer of pressure may cause slope failure and drive cold seeps on passive margins around the world. PMID:10894774

  6. Ultraviolet-B radiation induced crosslinking improves physical properties of cold- and warm-water fish gelatin gels and films

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold- and warm-water fish gelatin granules were exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation for doses up to 29.7 J/cm2. Solutions and films were prepared from the granules. Gel electrophoresis and refractive index were used to examine changes in molecular weight of the samples. Also, the gel strength and rhe...

  7. Integration of selective breeding and vaccination to improve disease resistance in aquaculture: Application to control bacterial cold water disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial cold water disease (BCWD) is a frequent cause of elevated mortality in rainbow trout and the development of effective control strategies is a priority within the U.S. A goal of the NCCCWA breeding program is to produce germplasm with superior growth and survival following exposure to infe...

  8. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Common Cold Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page ... Help people who are suffering from the common cold by volunteering for NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials. ...

  9. Improvement of flavor and viscosity in hot and cold break tomato juice and sauce by peel removal.

    PubMed

    Mirondo, Rita; Barringer, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes are typically not peeled before being made into juice but the peels contain enzymes that affect the odor, flavor, and viscosity of the juice. The peels are removed in the finisher, but their presence during the break process may affect quality. Juice was processed from peeled and unpeeled tomatoes using hot or cold break. The juices were pasteurized by high temperature short time (HTST), low temperature long time (LTLT), or with a retort. The control samples were treated with 10% calcium chloride to stop enzymatic activity in the juice. Sauce was made from juice and the tomato products were analyzed for volatiles, color, viscosity, and by sensory. Cold break juice made with peel contained higher levels of some lipoxygenase-, carotenoid-, and amino acid-derived volatiles, than the juice made without peel. Because of the lack of enzyme activity, hot break juices had lower levels of these volatiles and there was no significant difference between hot break juices made with and without peel. CaCl2 -treated and HTST juice had higher levels of most of the volatiles than LTLT, including the lipoxygenase-derived volatiles. The presence of peel produced a significant decrease in the viscosity of the cold break juice and sauce. There was no significant difference in the hue angle, total soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity, and vitamin C for most of the treatments. The texture, flavor, and overall liking of cold break juice made without peel were preferred over cold break juice made with peel whereas the color was less preferred. Between the sauces no significant differences in preference were obtained. PMID:25603846

  10. MoFlow: visualizing conformational changes in molecules as molecular flow improves understanding

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Current visualizations of molecular motion use a Timeline-analogous representation that conveys "first the molecule was shaped like this, then like this...". This scheme is orthogonal to the Pathline-like human understanding of motion "this part of the molecule moved from here to here along this path". We present MoFlow, a system for visualizing molecular motion using a Pathline-analogous representation. Results The MoFlow system produces high-quality renderings of molecular motion as atom pathlines, as well as interactive WebGL visualizations, and 3D printable models. In a preliminary user study, MoFlow representations are shown to be superior to canonical representations for conveying molecular motion. Conclusions Pathline-based representations of molecular motion are more easily understood than timeline representations. Pathline representations provide other advantages because they represent motion directly, rather than representing structure with inferred motion. PMID:26361501

  11. Using LEAN to improve a segment of emergency department flow.

    PubMed

    Vose, Courtney; Reichard, Christine; Pool, Susan; Snyder, Megan; Burmeister, David

    2014-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is an organizational concern. This article describes how Toyota LEAN methods were used as a performance improvement framework to address ED overcrowding. This initiative also impacted "bolus of patients" or "batching" concerns, which occur when inpatient units receive an influx of patients from EDs and other areas at the same time. In addition to decreased incidence of overcrowding, the organization realized increased interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25340919

  12. Determination of Mercury in Aqueous and Geologic Materials by Continuous Flow-Cold Vapor-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (CVAFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hageman, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    New methods for the determination of total mercury in geologic materials and dissolved mercury in aqueous samples have been developed that will replace the methods currently (2006) in use. The new methods eliminate the use of sodium dichromate (Na2Cr2O7 ?2H2O) as an oxidizer and preservative and significantly lower the detection limit for geologic and aqueous samples. The new methods also update instrumentation from the traditional use of cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry to cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. At the same time, the new digestion procedures for geologic materials use the same size test tubes, and the same aluminum heating block and hot plate as required by the current methods. New procedures for collecting and processing of aqueous samples use the same procedures that are currently (2006) in use except that the samples are now preserved with concentrated hydrochloric acid/bromine monochloride instead of sodium dichromate/nitric acid. Both the 'old' and new methods have the same analyst productivity rates. These similarities should permit easy migration to the new methods. Analysis of geologic and aqueous reference standards using the new methods show that these procedures provide mercury recoveries that are as good as or better than the previously used methods.

  13. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Using Sap Flow Monitoring for Improved Process-based Ecohydrologic Understanding 2022

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sap flow measurements can be an important tool for unraveling the complex web of ecosystem fluxes, especially when it is combined with other measurements like eddy covariance, isotopes, remote sensing, etc. In this talk, we will demonstrate how sap flow measurements have improved our process-level u...

  15. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit – a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  16. Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate and the peripheral thermal responses in normal and cold-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Hope, Katrina; Eglin, Clare; Golden, Frank; Tipton, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) is a prevalent, but largely undiagnosed and poorly understood syndrome afflicting many who, as part of their work or leisure, expose their extremities to cold temperatures. The long term sequelae of NFCI are hyperhidrosis, cold-sensitivity and pain; these can last a lifetime. We tested the hypothesis that, in comparison with a placebo, sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) would increase the peripheral microcirculation during and after a mild cold challenge of individuals who had not been diagnosed with NFCI, but were cold-sensitive. Naive participants were categorised into two cohort groups: control (n=7) or cold-sensitive (n=6). All participants undertook a standardised two minute cold exposure of their right foot while toe skin temperature (Tsk; infra-red thermograms) and blood flow (toe pad laser Doppler) were measured. GTN increased the rate of rewarming and absolute Tsk of the coldest toe after the cold challenge in cold-sensitive individuals. GTN also increased the blood flow in the great toe during rewarming in some cold-sensitive individuals. We accept our hypothesis and suggest that the impairment in the vasodilatory response seen in individuals with cold-sensitivity can be overcome by the use of GTN, an endothelial-independent NO donor, and thereby improve the rewarming of cooled peripheral tissues. PMID:24280630

  17. Flow improvements in the circuit of the Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.

    1983-01-01

    The mean velocity profiles in both the horizontal and vertical planes of symmetry at specific locations throughout the tunnel circuit to identify the most promising means for improving the flow in the 4 by 7 meter wind tunnel were measured. In the base line tunnel flow surveys, the flow patterns near the end of the test section indicate a uniform mean velocity distribution. Downstream of the test section, unsymmetrical flow patterns result in low velocities along the inner walls and in flow separation along the inner wall of the diffuser upstream of the drive fan and along the outer wall of the large diffuser downstream of the drive fan. A set of trailing-edge flaps attached to the five flow-control vanes located just downstream of the first corner were installed. These flaps are successful in making the tunnel flow more symmetrical and in eliminating the regions of separation in the diffusers upstream and downstream of the drive fan.

  18. Performance of Improved High-Order Filter Schemes for Turbulent Flows with Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotov, Dmitry Vladimirovich; Yee, Helen M C.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the filter scheme with improved dissipation control ? has been demonstrated for different flow types. The scheme with local ? is shown to obtain more accurate results than its counterparts with global or constant ?. At the same time no additional tuning is needed to achieve high accuracy of the method when using the local ? technique. However, further improvement of the method might be needed for even more complex and/or extreme flows.

  19. Improving the signal analysis for in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhenyu; Yang, Ping; Wei, Dan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    At early stage of cancer, a small number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) appear in the blood circulation. Thus, early detection of malignant circulating tumor cells has great significance for timely treatment to reduce the cancer death rate. We have developed an in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC) to monitor the metastatic process of CTCs and record the signals from target cells. Information of target cells which is helpful to the early therapy would be obtained through analyzing and processing the signals. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The PAFC technique can detect signals from circulating tumor cells or other particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly.

  20. LES and experimental studies of cold and reacting flow in a swirled partially premixed burner with and without fuel modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengissen, A.X.; Van Kampen, J.F.; Huls, R.A.; Stoffels, G.G.M.; Kok, J.B.W.; Poinsot, T.J.

    2007-07-15

    In devices where air and fuel are injected separately, combustion processes are influenced by oscillations of the air flow rate but may also be sensitive to fluctuations of the fuel flow rate entering the chamber. This paper describes a joint experimental and numerical study of the mechanisms controlling the response of a swirled complex-geometry combustor burning natural gas and air. The flow is first characterized without combustion and LDV results are compared to large eddy simulation (LES) data. The nonpulsated reacting regime is then studied and characterized in terms of the heat release field. Finally the fuel flow rate is pulsated at several amplitudes and the response of the chamber is analyzed using phase-locked averaging and acoustic analysis. Results show that LES and acoustic analysis predict the flame dynamics in this complex configuration with accuracy when heat losses (radiation and convection) are accounted for. (author)

  1. Water pipe flow simulation using improved virtual particles on smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, E. S.; Yeak, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is a meshless method used widely to solve problems such as fluid flows. Due to its meshless property, it is ideal to solve problems on complex geometry. In this paper, boundary treatment were implied for the rectangular pipe flow simulations using SPH. The repulsive force is applied to the boundary particles along with the improved virtual particles on different geometry alignment. The water flow is solved using incompressible SPH and will be examined throughout the simulation. Results from this simulation will be compared with single layered virtual particles. Based on the result of the study, it is found that the improved virtual particles is more accurate and stable.

  2. Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous flows aerothermal modeling program, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K. C.; Patankar, S. V.; Runchal, A. K.; Mongia, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The details of a study to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes to predict complex flows are described. In this program, several discretization schemes were evaluated using simple test cases. This assessment led to the selection of three schemes for an in-depth evaluation based on two-dimensional flows. The scheme with the superior overall performance was incorporated in a computer program for three-dimensional flows. To improve the computational efficiency, the selected discretization scheme was combined with a direct solution approach in which the fluid flow equations are solved simultaneously rather than sequentially.

  3. Hot versus Cold: the Dichotomy in Spherical Accretion of Cooling Flows onto Supermassive Black Holes in Elliptical Galaxies, Galaxy Groups, and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ~100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z ⊙, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R e ~ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  4. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  5. Prediction of cavitation performance and choking flow limit of inducers for cold water and for fluids with thermodynamic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage-Boutar, E.; Desclaux, J.

    1990-07-01

    Two methods of prediction of partial cavitation in inducers of rocket engine turbopumps have been developed. The first one is an analytical method previously developed to predict minimum NPSH (inlet total head minus vapor pressure) and the choking flow limit which was modified to include the computation of blade and boundary layer blockage. The second one is a method based on the work of Moore and Ruggeri (1969). This method takes into account thermodynamic effect for the prediction of the cavitation parameter Ki. For the choking flow limit, the first method can be extended to cryogenic fluids. Comparisons with available experimental data obtained with VULCAIN inducer pumping water and liquid hydrogen are presented.

  6. Improving Flow Response of a Variable-rate Aerial Application System by Interactive Refinement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate response of a variable-rate aerial application controller to changing flow rates and to improve its response at correspondingly varying system pressures. System improvements have been made by refinement of the control algorithms over time in collaboration with ...

  7. Experimental study on improvement effect of guide wall to water flow in bend of spillway chute.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Diao, Yanfang; Zhai, Xingtao; Li, Shuning

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve water flow in a bend of a spillway chute using a guide wall, modeling experiments with or without a guide wall under conditions of three different bend axial radii, three chute bottom slopes and three flow rates were carried out in this study. Two indexes were calculated, which are the improved water surface uniformity and the reduced rate of water surface difference in concave and convex banks of the cross-section. The results show that: (1) setting a guide wall in a bend can improve water flow in the bend because it increased the water surface uniformity of the cross-section and reduced the water surface difference in the concave and convex banks; (2) the smaller the bend axial radius, the better the water surface improvement effect will be using a guide wall; (3) the steeper the bottom slope, the more cross-sections with less water surface difference; and (4) flow rates have a great influence on water surface improvement in the bend, and the guide wall can improve water flow obviously when the water depth in the starting section of the bend is lower than the height of the guide wall. This study has important implications in engineering design of guide walls. PMID:26877052

  8. Measurement of Gas Velocities in the Presence of Solids in the Riser of a Cold Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Spenik, J.; Ludlow, J.C.; Compston, R.; Breault, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The local gas velocity and the intensity of the gas turbulence in a gas/solid flow are a required measurement in validating the gas and solids flow structure predicted by computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models in fluid bed and transport reactors. The high concentration and velocities of solids, however, make the use of traditional gas velocity measurement devices such as pitot tubes, hot wire anemometers and other such devices difficult. A method of determining these velocities has been devised at the National Energy Technology Laboratory employing tracer gas. The technique developed measures the time average local axial velocity gas component of a gas/solid flow using an injected tracer gas which induces changes in the heat transfer characteristics of the gas mixture. A small amount of helium is injected upstream a known distance from a self-heated thermistor. The thermistor, protected from the solids by means of a filter, is exposed to gases that are continuously extracted from the flow. Changes in the convective heat transfer characteristics of the gas are indicated by voltage variations across a Wheatstone bridge. When pulsed injections of helium are introduced to the riser flow the change in convective heat transfer coefficient of the gas can be rapidly and accurately determined with this instrument. By knowing the separation distance between the helium injection point and the thermistor extraction location as well as the time delay between injection and detection, the gas velocity can easily be calculated. Variations in the measured gas velocities also allow the turbulence intensity of the gas to be estimated.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Studies of the Natural Convection Flow Within a Horizontal Cylinder Subjected to a Uniformly Cold Wall Boundary Condition. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Poly. Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numberical solutions are obtained for the quasi-compressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the time dependent natural convection flow within a horizontal cylinder. The early time flow development and wall heat transfer is obtained after imposing a uniformly cold wall boundary condition on the cylinder. Solutions are also obtained for the case of a time varying cold wall boundary condition. Windware explicit differ-encing is used for the numerical solutions. The viscous truncation error associated with this scheme is controlled so that first order accuracy is maintained in time and space. The results encompass a range of Grashof numbers from 8.34 times 10,000 to 7 times 10 to the 7th power which is within the laminar flow regime for gravitationally driven fluid flows. Experiments within a small scale instrumented horizontal cylinder revealed the time development of the temperature distribution across the boundary layer and also the decay of wall heat transfer with time.

  10. Shear flow control of cold and heated rectangular jets by mechanical tabs. Volume 1: Results and discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of mechanical protrusions on the jet mixing characteristics of rectangular nozzles for heated and unheated subsonic and supersonic jet plumes were studied. The characteristics of a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4 without the mechanical protrusions were first investigated. Intrusive probes were used to make the flow measurements. Possible errors introduced by intrusive probes in making shear flow measurements were also examined. Several scaled sizes of mechanical tabs were then tested, configured around the perimeter of the rectangular jet. Both the number and the location of the tabs were varied. From this, the best configuration was selected. The conclusions derived were: (1) intrusive probes can produce significant errors in the measurements of the velocity of jets if they are large in diameter and penetrate beyond the jet center; (2) rectangular jets without tabs, compared to circular jets of the same exit area, provide faster jet mixing; and (3) further mixing enhancement is possible by using mechanical tabs.

  11. On-line separation for the speciation of mercury in natural waters by flow injection-cold vapour-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Jon; Raposo, Juan Carlos; Larreta, Joana; Martinez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic mercury and methylmercury are determined in natural waters by injecting the filtered samples onto a low cost commercial flow injection system in which an anion exchange microcolumn is inserted after the injection loop (FIA-IE). If hydrochloric acid is used as the carrier solution, the HgCl4(2-) species (inorganic mercury) will be retained by the anion exchanger while the CH3HgCI species (methylmercury) will flow through the resin with negligible retention. Four anion exchangers and seven elution agents were checked, in a batch mode, to search for the best conditions for optimal separation and elution of both species. Dowex M-41 and L-cysteine were finally selected. Mercury detection was performed by cold vapour-electrothermal atomic adsorption spectrometry (HG-ETAAS). Both systems were coupled to perform the continuous on-line separation/detection of both inorganic mercury and methylmercury species. Separation and detection conditions were optimized by two chemometric approaches: full factorial design and central composite design. A limit of detection of 0.4 microg L(-1) was obtained for both mercury species (RSD < 3.0% for 20 microg L(-1) inorganic and methylmercury solutions). The method was applied to mercury speciation in natural waters of the Nerbioi-lbaizabal estuary (Bilbao, North of Spain) and recoveries of more than 95% were obtained. PMID:15537077

  12. Improvements in sparse matrix/vector technique applications for on-line load flow calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ristanovic, P.; Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S.

    1989-02-01

    Sparsity technique is applied to a wide range of problems in power systems analysis. In this paper the authors propose several analytical and computational improvements in sparsity applications. The new partial matrix refactorization method and ordering algorithm are presented. The proposed method is very efficient when applied to various kinds of programs, such as: on-line load flow, optimal power flow and steady-state security analysis. The proposed methodology is applied in a fast decoupled load flow program which include the treatment of tap violations on under-load tap changing (ULTC) transformers and reactive power generation on PV buses. Effects of proposed improvements are well tested and documented on the three networks: 118 bus IEEE test network and two utility networks with 209 and 519 buses, respectively. Keywords: sparsity technique, load flow analysis, security analysis.

  13. Improved Simulation of Peak Flows Under Climate Change: Post-Processing or Multi-Objective Calibration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Booij, M. J.; Xu, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have large impacts on peak flows. There are, however, large uncertainties in the simulation of peak flows by hydrological models. This study aims to improve the simulation of peak flows under climate change in Lanjiang catchment, East China by comparing two approaches: post-processing of peak flows and multi-objective calibration. Two hydrological models (SWAT and GR4J) are employed to simulate the daily flows and the peaks-over-threshold method is used to extract peak flows from the simulated daily flows. Three post-processing methods, namely the quantile mapping method and two generalized linear models, are set up to correct the biases in the simulated raw peak flows. Besides, a multi-objective calibration of the GR4J model by taking the peak flows into account in the calibration process is carried out. The regional climate model PRECIS with boundary forcing from two GCMs (HadCM3 and ECHAM5) under greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B is applied to produce the climate data for the baseline period and the future period 2011-2040. The results show that the post-processing methods, particularly quantile mapping method, can correct the biases in the raw peak flows effectively. The multi-objective calibration also resulted in a good simulation performance of peak flows. The final estimated peak flows in the future period show an obvious increase compared with those in the baseline period, indicating there are probably more frequent floods in Lanjiang catchment in the future.

  14. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.W.; King, E.L.; Schneider, K.C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points. 8 figures.

  15. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, Donald W.; King, Edward L.; Schneider, Ken C.

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  16. Polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction for trace inorganic and organic mercury determination in water samples by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Leticia B; Olsina, Roberto A; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2013-11-15

    A simple and green technique named polymer-supported ionic liquid solid phase extraction (PSIL-SPE) was developed for mercury (Hg) species determination. Inorganic Hg (InHg) species was complexed with chloride ions followed by its introduction into a flow injection on-line system to quantitatively retain the anionic chlorocomplex (HgCl4(2-)) in a column packed with CYPHOS(®) IL 101-impregnated resin. The trapped InHg was then reduced with stannous chloride (SnCl2) and eluted with the same flow of reducing agent followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) detection. Organic mercury species (OrgHg) did not interact with the impregnated resin and were not retained into the column. Total concentration of OrgHg was evaluated by difference between total Hg and InHg concentration. A 95% extraction efficiency was achieved for InHg when the procedure was developed under optimal experimental conditions. The limit of detection obtained for preconcentration of 40 mL of sample was 2.4 ng L(-1) InHg. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 2.7% (at 1 µg L(-1) InHg and n=10) calculated from the peak height of absorbance signals (Gaussian-shape and reproducible peaks). This work reports the first polymer-supported IL solid phase extraction approach implemented in a flow injection on-line system for determination of Hg species in mineral, tap and river water samples. PMID:24148384

  17. An improved weakly compressible SPH method for simulating free surface flows of viscous and viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Deng, Xiao-Long

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an improved weakly compressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is proposed to simulate transient free surface flows of viscous and viscoelastic fluids. The improved SPH algorithm includes the implementation of (i) the mixed symmetric correction of kernel gradient to improve the accuracy and stability of traditional SPH method and (ii) the Rusanov flux in the continuity equation for improving the computation of pressure distributions in the dynamics of liquids. To assess the effectiveness of the improved SPH algorithm, a number of numerical examples including the stretching of an initially circular water drop, dam breaking flow against a vertical wall, the impact of viscous and viscoelastic fluid drop with a rigid wall, and the extrudate swell of viscoelastic fluid have been presented and compared with available numerical and experimental data in literature. The convergent behavior of the improved SPH algorithm has also been studied by using different number of particles. All numerical results demonstrate that the improved SPH algorithm proposed here is capable of modeling free surface flows of viscous and viscoelastic fluids accurately and stably, and even more important, also computing an accurate and little oscillatory pressure field.

  18. Cold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    This chapter and the following one address collective effects of quantum particles, that is, the effects which are observed when we put together a large number of identical particles, for example, electrons, helium-4 or rubidium-85 atoms. We shall see that quantum particles can be classified into two categories, bosons and fermions, whose collective behavior is radically different. Bosons have a tendency to pile up in the same quantum state, while fermions have a tendency to avoid each other. We say that bosons and fermions obey two different quantum statistics, the Bose-Einstein and the Fermi-Dirac statistics, respectively. Temperature is a collective effect, and in Section 5.1 we shall explain the concept of absolute temperature and its relation to the average kinetic energy of molecules. We shall describe in Section 5.2 how we can cool atoms down thanks to the Doppler effect, and explain how cold atoms can be used to improve the accuracy of atomic clocks by a factor of about 100. The effects of quantum statistics are prominent at low temperatures, and atom cooling will be used to obtain Bose-Einstein condensates at low enough temperatures, when the atoms are bosons.

  19. Improved resolution of ambient flow through fractured rock with temperature logs.

    PubMed

    Pehme, P E; Parker, B L; Cherry, J A; Greenhouse, J P

    2010-01-01

    In contaminant hydrogeology, investigations at fractured rock sites are typically undertaken to improve understanding of the fracture networks and associated groundwater flow that govern past and/or future contaminant transport. Conventional hydrogeologic, geophysical, and hydrophysical techniques used to develop a conceptual model are often implemented in open boreholes under conditions of cross-connected flow. A new approach using high-resolution temperature (+/-0.001 degrees C) profiles measured within static water columns of boreholes sealed using continuous, water-inflated, flexible liners (FLUTe) identifies hydraulically active fractures under ambient (natural) groundwater flow conditions. The value of this approach is assessed by comparisons of temperature profiles from holes (100 to 200 m deep) with and without liners at four contaminated sites with distinctly different hydrogeologic conditions. The results from the lined holes consistently show many more hydraulically active fractures than the open-hole profiles, in which the influence of vertical flow through the borehole between a few fractures masks important intermediary flow zones. Temperature measurements in temporarily sealed boreholes not only improve the sensitivity and accuracy of identifying hydraulically active fractures under ambient conditions but also offer new insights regarding previously unresolvable flow distributions in fractured rock systems, while leaving the borehole available for other forms of testing and monitoring device installation. PMID:19840124

  20. Improved CFD Model to Predict Flow and Temperature Distributions in a Blast Furnace Hearth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiyama, Keisuke M.; Guo, Bao-Yu; Zughbi, Habib; Zulli, Paul; Yu, Ai-Bing

    2014-10-01

    The campaign life of a blast furnace is limited by the erosion of hearth refractories. Flow and temperature distributions of the liquid iron have a significant influence on the erosion mechanism. In this work, an improved three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model is developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer phenomena in the hearth of BlueScope's Port Kembla No. 5 Blast Furnace. Model improvements feature more justified input parameters in turbulence modeling, buoyancy modeling, wall boundary conditions, material properties, and modeling of the solidification of iron. The model is validated by comparing the calculated temperatures with the thermocouple data available, where agreements are established within ±3 pct. The flow distribution in the hearth is discussed for intact and eroded hearth profiles, for sitting and floating coke bed states. It is shown that natural convection affects the flow in several ways: for example, the formation of (a) stagnant zones preventing hearth bottom from eroding or (b) the downward jetting of molten liquid promoting side wall erosion, or (c) at times, a vortex-like peripheral flow, promoting the "elephant foot" type erosion. A significant influence of coke bed permeability on the macroscopic flow pattern and the refractory temperature is observed.

  1. Improvement of the hillslope-storage Boussinesq model by considering lateral flow in the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jun; Shen, Chengji; Luo, Zhaoyang; Hua, Guofen; Zhao, Hongjun

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated flow is an important factor that affects groundwater motion. Among various drainage models, the nonlinear Hillslope-storage Boussinesq (HSB) model has been commonly used to predict water flux along a slope. In this study, we improved this model by considering lateral flow in the unsaturated zone. Using modified van Genuchten functions, we analytically expressed the concept of equivalent propagation thickness in the vadose zone. This analytical expression was then incorporated into the HSB model to reflect two different stages of the drainage process and to simulate the hillslope drainage process more accurately. The model results indicated that lateral flow has significant effects in the unsaturated zone during the hillslope drainage process. Even in sandy aquifers, the amount of water contributed by the unsaturated zone is a key factor that enables a decrease in the water table during the middle and late stages of the process. A comparison between the measured and simulated results based on both convergent-type and divergent-type hillslope drainage processes revealed that the thickness of the saturated zone decreases as the unsaturated flow increases. This study emphasizes the necessity of considering unsaturated flow in the HSB model to improve the accuracy of predicting groundwater outflow rates and develop more accurate hydrographs. The concept of equivalent propagation thickness also provides a criterion for assessing the importance of unsaturated lateral flow for future drainage research.

  2. Reducing transport delay through improvements in real-time program flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the process of measuring and reducing software-transport delays through careful analysis, and modifications of real-time programs. A 737 program is analyzed and modified to improve the simulation overall transport delay by approximately 30 percent. The transport delay was improved through modification to the real-time program flow and the implementation of quaternions in the calculation of the math model.

  3. Full-scale cold-flow modelling of the SRC-I slurry fired heater at Creare, Inc. : gas density and liquid rheology studies and overall data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, D.C.; Weimer, R.F.; Crowley, C.J.; Patel, B.R.; Sam, R.G.; Wallis, G.B.

    1984-05-01

    The major conclusions are: (1) The flow regime in the heater pipe will be slug flow at the design conditions of 6- and 12-ft/sec liquid and gas superficial velocities, respectively. The pipe configuration for the design is a 1/sup 0/ upward slope. (2) Slug flow will also exist in the heater pipes at mass loadings as low as one-third the design gas and liquid velocities. (3) The expected pressure drop across the fired heater will be 25 to 50% lower than the design value. This will provide flexibility for any design modifications and still stay below the design pressure drop. (4) The expected heat transfer coefficient will be higher than the design value, thereby improving the overall heat transfer performance. (5) Based on the heat transfer data developed at Creare and the computer simulation program at ICRC, the inside wall temperature of the fired heater pipe could be controlled below 850/sup 0/F. The thick pipe walls serve as huge heat sink and are not influenced by the cyclic nature of the slug flow. (6) The presence of slug flow and a higher heat transfer coefficient maintaining the inside wall temperature below 850/sup 0/F should eliminate the possibility of coking in the fired heater pipe. (7) The results confirm the presence of slug flow at the full range of operating conditions. The expected lower pressure drop and higher heat transfer coefficient compared with the design values would improve the overall performance of the fired heater. Therefore, the results from the test program at Creare confirm the SRC-I Demonstration Plant fired heater design. Appendix 1 has been entered individually into EDB and ERA. 5 references, 1 table.

  4. The electronic image stabilization technology research based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Ji, Ming; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Wentao; Lu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jiaoying; Yang, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The electronic image stabilization technology based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation technique can effectively improve the non normal shift, such as jitter, rotation and so on. Firstly, the ORB features are extracted from the image, a set of regions are built on these features; Secondly, the optical-flow vector is computed in the feature regions, in order to reduce the computational complexity, the multi resolution strategy of Pyramid is used to calculate the motion vector of the frame; Finally, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the effect of the algorithm is carried out. The results show that the proposed algorithm has better stability compared with image stabilization based on the traditional optical-flow motion vector estimation method.

  5. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  6. An improved version of NCOREL: A computer program for 3-D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code called NCOREL (for Nonconical Relaxation) has been developed to solve for supersonic full potential flows over complex geometries. The method first solves for the conical at the apex and then marches downstream in a spherical coordinate system. Implicit relaxation techniques are used to numerically solve the full potential equation at each subsequent crossflow plane. Many improvements have been made to the original code including more reliable numerics for computing wing-body flows with multiple embedded shocks, inlet flow through simulation, wake model and entropy corrections. Line relaxation or approximate factorization schemes are optionally available. Improved internal grid generation using analytic conformal mappings, supported by a simple geometric Harris wave drag input that was originally developed for panel methods and internal geometry package are some of the new features.

  7. Juncture flow improvement for wing/pylon configurations by using CFD methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gea, Lie-Mine; Chyu, Wei J.; Stortz, Michael W.; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    Transonic flow field around a fighter wing/pylon configuration was simulated by using an implicit upwinding Navier-Stokes flow solver (F3D) and overset grid technology (Chimera). Flow separation and local shocks near the wing/pylon junction were observed in flight and predicted by numerical calculations. A new pylon/fairing shape was proposed to improve the flow quality. Based on numerical results, the size of separation area is significantly reduced and the onset of separation is delayed farther downstream. A smoother pressure gradient is also obtained near the junction area. This paper demonstrates that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology can be used as a practical tool for aircraft design.

  8. ON-FARM IMPROVEMENTS TO REDUCE SEDIMENT AND NUTRIENTS IN IRRIGATION RETURN FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on an 800-hectare irrigated tract in central Washington's Columbia Basin Project studied the effects of on-farm improvements on reduction of the discharge of sediment and nutrients via irrigation return flow. Technical assistance and financial cost-sharing were provided ...

  9. IMPROVED FLOW CYTOMETRIC ASSAY FOR SOMATIC MUTATIONS AT THE GLYCOPHORIN A LOCUS IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved method has been developed for the glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans. he new assay, named the "BR6" assay, can be performed on a commercially available, single-beam flow cytometer, in contrast to the previously described 1W1 assay that required a...

  10. Assessing the potential for improved scramjet performance through application of electromagnetic flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Martin Forrester

    Sustained hypersonic flight using scramjet propulsion is the key technology bridging the gap between turbojets and the exoatmospheric environment where a rocket is required. Recent efforts have focused on electromagnetic (EM) flow control to mitigate the problems of high thermomechanical loads and low propulsion efficiencies associated with scramjet propulsion. This research effort is the first flight-scale, three-dimensional computational analysis of a realistic scramjet to determine how EM flow control can improve scramjet performance. Development of a quasi-one dimensional design tool culminated in the first open source geometry of an entire scramjet flowpath. This geometry was then tested extensively with the Air Force Research Laboratory's three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and EM coupled computational code. As part of improving the model fidelity, a loosely coupled algorithm was developed to incorporate thermochemistry. This resulted in the only open-source model of fuel injection, mixing and combustion in a magnetogasdynamic (MGD) flow controlled engine. In addition, a control volume analysis tool with an electron beam ionization model was presented for the first time in the context of the established computational method used. Local EM flow control within the internal inlet greatly impacted drag forces and wall heat transfer but was only marginally successful in raising the average pressure entering the combustor. The use of an MGD accelerator to locally increase flow momentum was an effective approach to improve flow into the scramjet's isolator. Combustor-based MGD generators proved superior to the inlet generator with respect to power density and overall engine efficiency. MGD acceleration was shown to be ineffective in improving overall performance, with all of the bypass engines having approximately 33% more drag than baseline and none of them achieving a self-powered state.

  11. Rapid isolation, reliable characterization, and water solubility improvement of polymethoxyflavones from cold-pressed mandarin essential oil.

    PubMed

    Russo, Marina; Rigano, Francesca; Arigò, Adriana; Sciarrone, Danilo; Calabrò, Maria Luisa; Farnetti, Sara; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Polymethoxyflavones possess many biological properties, as lipid-lowering, hypoglycaemic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer activities, therefore, they may be employed as nutraceuticals or therapeutic agents. The scarcity of pure polymethoxyflavones on the market as well as their low water solubility limited in vivo studies and the use of polymethoxyflavones as food or pharmaceutical supplements. Since mandarin peels are a rich source of polymethoxyflavones, tangeretin, nobiletin, sinensetin, tetra-O-methyl scutellarein, and heptamethoxyflavone were purified from a nonvolatile residue of a cold-pressed mandarin essential oil using a multidimensional preparative liquid chromatographic system coupled with a photodiode array detector and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. A new prototype, consisting of a nano-liquid chromatography system coupled with an electron ionization mass spectrometer, was used for the characterization of the pure isolated molecules. Finally, due to the collection of highly pure nobiletin and tangeretin, the ability of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin to enhance the water solubility of both polymethoxyflavones was evaluated by phase solubility studies and Job's plot method. PMID:27060470

  12. Quantifying fluid flow, solute mixing, and biogeochemical turnover at cold vents of the eastern Aleutian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmann, Klaus; Linke, Peter; Suess, Erwin; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Sahling, Heiko; Schlüter, Michael; Dählmann, Anke; Lammers, Stephan; Greinert, Jens; von Mirbach, Nikolaus

    1997-12-01

    In situ oxygen fluxes were measured at vent sites in the Aleutian trench at a water depth of almost 5000 m using a TV-guided benthic flux chamber. The flux was 2 orders of magnitude greater than benthic oxygen fluxes in areas unaffected by venting on the continental margin off Alaska. Porewater profiles taken from the surface sediment below a vent site showed high concentrations of sulfide, methane, and ammonia. The reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds are transported to the vent site by fluids expelled from deeper anoxic sediment layers by the forces of plate convergence. The tectonically driven fluid flow was determined from the biochemical turnover in vent communities and was found to be 3.4 ± 0.5 m yr -1. A model was used to quantify the transport of silica, Ca 2+, and sulfate via diffusion, advection, and bioirrigation through the surface sediments of a vent site. A nonlocal mixing coefficient of 20-30 yr -1 was determined by fitting the model curves to the measured porewater profiles showing that the transport of solutes within the near-surface sediments and across the sediment-water interface is dominated by the activity of the vent fauna. Sulfate-containing oceanic bottom water and methane-rich vent fluids were mixed below the clam colony to produce sulfide and a CaCO 3 precipitate. The vent biota shape their immediate environment and control the sediment-water exchange and the benthic fluxes at vent sites. The oxygen consumption at vent sites is a major sink for oxygen at the study area.

  13. Cholesterol-Loaded Cyclodextrin Increases the Cholesterol Content of Goat Sperm to Improve Cold and Osmotic Resistance and Maintain Sperm Function after Cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Vianney M; Leclerc, Pierre; Bailey, Janice L

    2016-04-01

    The success of semen cryopreservation depends on sperm membrane integrity and function after thawing. Cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC) is used for in vitro incorporation of cholesterol to protect cells against cold temperatures. We hypothesized that CLC treatment also enhances sperm cholesterol content to increase tolerance to osmotic shock and cryoresistance, thereby improving fertility. We confirmed the fact that treatment of goat semen with 3 mg/ml CLC increases sperm cholesterol content using both the Liebermann-Burchard approach and filipin III labeling of membrane cholesterol. Sperm were then treated with or without CLC and cryopreserved. After thawing, sperm cholesterol dramatically fell, even in the presence of CLC, which explains the mechanism of cryocapacitation. CLC treatment, however, maintained a normal prefreeze cholesterol level in sperm after cryopreservation. Furthermore, fresh sperm treated with CLC and subjected to either cold shock or incubated in hypo-, iso-, and hyperosmotic media, designed to mimic stresses associated with freezing/thawing, displayed increased temperature and osmotic tolerance. CLC treatment also improved sperm viability, motility, and acrosome integrity after thawing. Furthermore, CLC treatment did not affect the sperm's ability to undergo in vitro capacitation according to chlortetracycline fluorescence and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. A pilot field trial demonstrated that artificial insemination with sperm that underwent increased cholesterol levels following CLC treatment yielded higher fertility ( ITALIC! P< 0.1) and proliferation ( ITALIC! P< 0.05) rates in vivo than untreated semen from the same ejaculate samples. These observations suggest that CLC treatment could be used to improve cryoprotection during the freezing and thawing of goat sperm. PMID:26888968

  14. Cold-Flow Testing of a Proposed Integrated Center-Body Diffuser/Steam Blocker Concept for Plum Brook Station's B-2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Daryl A.; Weaver, Harold F; Kastner, Carl E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The center-body diffuser (CBD) steam blocker (SB) system is a concept that incorporates a set of secondary drive nozzles into the envelope of a CBD, such that both nozzle systems (i.e., the rocket engine and the steam blocking nozzles) utilize the same supersonic diffuser, and will operate either singularly or concurrently. In this manner, the SB performs as an exhaust system stage when the rocket engine is not operating, and virtually eliminates discharge flow on rocket engine shutdown. A 2.25-percent scale model of a proposed SB integrated into a diffuser for the Plum Brook B-2 facility was constructed and cold-flow tested for the purpose of evaluating performance characteristics of various design options. These specific design options addressed secondary drive nozzle design (method of steam injection), secondary drive nozzle location relative to CBD throat, and center-body throat length to diameter (L/D) ratios. The objective of the test program is to identify the desired configuration to carry forward should the next phase of design proceed. The tested scale model can provide data for various pressure ratios; however, its design is based on a proposed B-2 spray chamber (SC) operating pressure of 4.0 psia and a steam supply pressure of 165 psia. Evaluation of the test data acquired during these tests indicate that either the discrete axial or annular nozzle configuration integrated into a CBD, with an annular throat length of 1.5 L/D at the nominal injection position, would be suitable to carry forward from the SB's perspective. Selection between these two then becomes more a function of constructability and implementation than performance. L/D also has some flexibility, and final L/D selection can be a function of constructability issues within a limited range.

  15. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. You may also have a sore throat, cough, ... symptoms are: Nasal congestion Runny nose Scratchy throat Sneezing Adults and older children with colds generally have ...

  16. Cold Intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Cold Intolerance Many polio ... index of Handbook on the Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Back to top Contact ...

  17. Improvements to a Flow Sensor for Liquid Bismuth-Fed Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Kevin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in using bismuth metal as a propellant in Hall Thrusters [1, 2]. Bismuth offers some considerable cost, weight, and space savings over the traditional propellant--xenon. Quantifying the performance of liquid metal-fed Hall thrusters requires a very precise measure of the low propellant flow rates [1, 2]. The low flow rates (10 mg/sec) and the temperature at which free flowing liquid bismuth exists (above 300 C) preclude the use of off-the-shelf flow sensing equipment [3]. Therefore a new type of sensor is required. The hotspot bismuth flow sensor, described in Refs. [1-5] is designed to perform a flow rate measurement by measuring the velocity at which a thermal feature moves through a flow chamber. The mass flow rate can be determined from the time of flight of the thermal peak, [4, 5]. Previous research and testing has been concerned mainly with the generation of the thermal peak and it's subsequent detection. In this paper, we present design improvements to the sensor concept; and the results of testing conducted to verify the functionality of these improvements. A ceramic material is required for the sensor body (see Fig. 1), which must allow for active heating of the bismuth flow channel to keep the propellant in a liquid state. The material must be compatible with bismuth and must be bonded to conductive elements to allow for conduction of current into the liquid metal and measurement of the temperature in the flow. The new sensor requires fabrication techniques that will allow for a very small diameter flow chamber, which is required to produce useful measurements. Testing of various materials has revealed several that are potentially compatible with liquid bismuth. Of primary concern in the fabrication and testing of a robust, working prototype, is the compatibility of the selected materials with one another. Specifically, the thermal expansion rates of the materials relative to the ceramic body cannot expand so

  18. Improvement in Myocardial Function and Coronary Blood Flow in Ischemic Myocardium after Mannitol

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, James T.; Powell, Wm. John; Guiney, Timothy E.; Stark, James J.; Sanders, Charles A.; Leaf, Alexander

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperosmolality on the performance of, and the collateral blood flow to, ischemic myocardium. The myocardial response to mannitol, a hyperosmolar agent which remains extracellular, was evaluated in anesthetized dogs. Mannitol was infused into the aortic roots of 31 isovolumic hearts and of 15 dogs on right heart bypass, before and during ischemia. Myocardial ischemia was produced by temporary ligation of either the proximal or mid-left anterior descending coronary artery. Mannitol significantly improved the depressed ventricular function curves which occurred with left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. Mannitol also significantly lessened the S-T segment elevation (epicardial electrocardiogram) occurring during myocardial ischemia in the isovolumic hearts and this reduction was associated with significant increases in total coronary blood flow (P < 0.005) and with increased collateral coronary blood flow to the ischemia area (P < 0.005). Thus, increases in serum osmolality produced by mannitol result in the following beneficial changes during myocardial ischemia: (a) improved myocardial function, (b) reduced S-T segment elevation, (c) increased total coronary blood flow, and (d) increased collateral coronary blood flow. PMID:4640943

  19. Cold plasma ashing improves the trace element detection of single Daphnia specimens by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelfl, Stefan; Mages, Margarete; Encina, Francisco

    2003-12-01

    The recently developed dry method for the element determination of single freshwater microcrustacean specimens ( Daphnia) using total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry showed that inhomogeneities of the biological material on the glass carriers resulted in some cases in high background and hampered the detection of certain trace elements (e.g. Cr, Ni). The aim of this study was to test how inhomogeneities of the biological material can be reduced using cold plasma ashing (CPA) techniques. For that, single specimens of the microcrustacean Daphnia pulex prepared according to the dry method were measured by TXRF before and after CPA. To determine the efficiency of the removal of organic matrix, the background and signal-to-background relationship of 28 samples were analyzed. The results showed (1) a highly significant reduction of the background by CPA fluctuating between 26 and 46% (all elements) and (2) a significant increase of the signal-to-background relationship by the factor 1.5-2.5 (all elements) and a much better detection of Cr, Pb, As and Se. The element concentrations (with exception of Cr, Ni and Pb) after ashing were in the same range or slightly higher than that before ashing. No significant differences between the two treatments were observed for Mn, As, Pb, Se (November), Sr (November), Cr (March) and Pb (March). The element concentration of P, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, Cr (November), Fe and Rb were significantly higher after ashing. In general, they increased by 1.5-13.6% and were highest for Rb (March) and P (November). In contrast, the element concentration of Ni and Cr (only March) decreased significantly after ashing (Ni: 91.6-92.1%, Cr: 91.3%). We recommend the use of CPA for biological material in the microgram-range as a routine method for TXRF analysis, especially when trace elements in minute concentrations are of interest.

  20. Hyaluronic Acid (800 kDa) Supplementation of University of Wisconsin Solution Improves Viability of Osteochondral Grafts and Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression during Cold Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takuya; Uchida, Kentaro; Onuma, Kenji; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Takano, Shotaro; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Fujimaki, Hisako; Miyagi, Masayuki; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting is a promising option for the treatment of large cartilage defects. However, because the cell viability of osteochondral tissues (OCTs) gradually reduces during storage at 4°C, methods for maintaining the cell viability of fresh OCTs are needed to improve transplantation outcomes. Here, we evaluated whether the supplementation of preservation solution with one of three different molecular weight forms of hyaluronic acid (HA) improved the viability of rat OCTs during long-term cold storage. The supplementation of University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with 800 kDa significantly improved the cell viability of OCT after 14 days at 4°C compared to nonsupplemented UW solution. In contrast, UW solution supplemented with either 1900 or 6000 kDa HA did not markedly improve the cell viability of the OCT. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the levels of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 9 were significantly decreased in OCT stored in UW solution supplemented with 800 kDa HA. Although further studies in human OCT are warranted, these findings demonstrate that the use of 800 kDa HA in place of serum may be a suitable approach for the long-term preservation of osteochondral allografts designated for the repair of large cartilage defects in the clinical setting. PMID:26199955

  1. Sequential approach to joint flow-seismic inversion for improved characterization of fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peter K.; Zheng, Yingcai; Fang, Xinding; Wojcik, Rafal; McLaughlin, Dennis; Brown, Stephen; Fehler, Michael C.; Burns, Daniel R.; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-02-01

    Seismic interpretation of subsurface structures is traditionally performed without any account of flow behavior. Here we present a methodology for characterizing fractured geologic reservoirs by integrating flow and seismic data. The key element of the proposed approach is the identification—within the inversion—of the intimate relation between fracture compliance and fracture transmissivity, which determine the acoustic and flow responses of a fractured reservoir, respectively. Owing to the strong (but highly uncertain) dependence of fracture transmissivity on fracture compliance, the modeled flow response in a fractured reservoir is highly sensitive to the geophysical interpretation. By means of synthetic models, we show that by incorporating flow data (well pressures and tracer breakthrough curves) into the inversion workflow, we can simultaneously reduce the error in the seismic interpretation and improve predictions of the reservoir flow dynamics. While the inversion results are robust with respect to noise in the data for this synthetic example, the applicability of the methodology remains to be tested for more complex synthetic models and field cases.

  2. Do internal flow measurements improve the calibration of rainfall-runoff models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerat, J.; AndréAssian, V.; Perrin, C.; Vaze, J.; Perraud, J. M.; Ribstein, P.; Loumagne, C.

    2012-02-01

    This paper compares four calibration strategies for a daily semidistributed rainfall-runoff model. The model is applied over 187 French catchments where streamflow data are available at the catchment outlet and at internal gauging stations. In the benchmark calibration strategy, the model parameters were optimized against the outlet flow only, with internal points considered as ungauged. In the three multisite alternative strategies, the parameters were optimized against the flow at the outlet and at one internal gauge. On 53 catchments, a second interior gauge was used as an independent validation point. The four methods were compared for their ability to estimate flow at the two internal points and at the catchment outlet, in calibration and validation modes, and considering three performance metrics. The results in validation indicate that interior flow data provided limited improvement in model performance. When the performance was evaluated at the outlet point, multisite calibrations led to nearly identical performance as the single-site calibrations, regardless of the number of calibrated parameters. Unexpectedly, similar results were obtained for most performance statistics when the model was evaluated at interior points. A sensitivity analysis performed on streamflow data confirmed that this conclusion still holds in presence of errors in flow data. Last, the comparison between lumped and semidistributed parameterizations clearly favored the lumped schemes, which show more stable parameters and equivalent performance for the simulation at independent interior points. The finding from this study provides confidence in lumped parameterization schemes, even for predicting the flow at interior gauges in a catchment.

  3. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  4. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  5. Improving the Health Forecasting Alert System for Cold Weather and Heat-Waves In England: A Proof-of-Concept Using Temperature-Mortality Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Masato, Giacomo; Bone, Angie; Charlton-Perez, Andrew; Cavany, Sean; Neal, Robert; Dankers, Rutger; Dacre, Helen; Carmichael, Katie; Murray, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this study a prototype of a new health forecasting alert system is developed, which is aligned to the approach used in the Met Office’s (MO) National Severe Weather Warning Service (NSWWS). This is in order to improve information available to responders in the health and social care system by linking temperatures more directly to risks of mortality, and developing a system more coherent with other weather alerts. The prototype is compared to the current system in the Cold Weather and Heatwave plans via a case-study approach to verify its potential advantages and shortcomings. Method The prototype health forecasting alert system introduces an “impact vs likelihood matrix” for the health impacts of hot and cold temperatures which is similar to those used operationally for other weather hazards as part of the NSWWS. The impact axis of this matrix is based on existing epidemiological evidence, which shows an increasing relative risk of death at extremes of outdoor temperature beyond a threshold which can be identified epidemiologically. The likelihood axis is based on a probability measure associated with the temperature forecast. The new method is tested for two case studies (one during summer 2013, one during winter 2013), and compared to the performance of the current alert system. Conclusions The prototype shows some clear improvements over the current alert system. It allows for a much greater degree of flexibility, provides more detailed regional information about the health risks associated with periods of extreme temperatures, and is more coherent with other weather alerts which may make it easier for front line responders to use. It will require validation and engagement with stakeholders before it can be considered for use. PMID:26431427

  6. Production of anteiso-branched fatty acids in Escherichia coli; next generation biofuels with improved cold-flow properties.

    PubMed

    Haushalter, Robert W; Kim, Woncheol; Chavkin, Ted A; The, Lionadi; Garber, Megan E; Nhan, Melissa; Adams, Paul D; Petzold, Christopher J; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-11-01

    Microbial fermentation is emerging as an increasingly important resource for the production of fatty acids to serve as precursors for renewable diesel as well as detergents, lubricants and other industrial chemicals, as an alternative to traditional sources of reduced carbon such as petroleum. A major disadvantage of fuels derived from biological sources is their undesirable physical properties such as high cloud and pour points, and high viscosity. Here we report the development of an Escherichia coli strain that efficiently produces anteiso-branched fatty acids, which can be converted into downstream products with lower cloud and pour points than the mixtures of compounds produced via the native metabolism of the cell. This work addresses a serious limitation that must be overcome in order to produce renewable biodiesel and oleochemicals that perform as well as their petroleum-based counterparts. PMID:25250846

  7. Improvement of flow and bulk density of pharmaceutical powders using surface modification.

    PubMed

    Jallo, Laila J; Ghoroi, Chinmay; Gurumurthy, Lakxmi; Patel, Utsav; Davé, Rajesh N

    2012-02-28

    Improvement in flow and bulk density, the two most important properties that determine the ease with which pharmaceutical powders can be handled, stored and processed, is done through surface modification. A limited design of experiment was conducted to establish a standardized dry coating procedure that limits the extent of powder attrition, while providing the most consistent improvement in angle of repose (AOR). The magnetically assisted impaction coating (MAIC) was considered as a model dry-coater for pharmaceutical powders; ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and ascorbic acid. Dry coated drug powders were characterized by AOR, particle size as a function of dispersion pressure, particle size distribution, conditioned bulk density (CBD), Carr index (CI), flow function coefficient (FFC), cohesion coefficient using different instruments, including a shear cell in the Freeman FT4 powder rheometer, and Hansen flowability index. Substantial improvement was observed in all the measured properties after dry coating relative to the uncoated powders, such that each powder moved from a poorer to a better flow classification and showed improved dispersion. The material intrinsic property such as cohesion, plotted as a function of particle size, gave a trend similar to those of bulk flow properties, AOR and CI. Property improvement is also illustrated in a phase map of inverse cohesion (or FFC) as a function of bulk density, which also indicated a significant positive shift due to dry coating. It is hoped that such phase maps are useful in manufacturing decisions regarding the need for dry coating, which will allow moving from wet granulation to roller compaction or to direct compression based formulations. PMID:22197769

  8. Experimental study on heat transfer and flow resistance in improved latticework cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongwu; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jianqin; Pan, Wenyan

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of heat transfer and flow resistance of the latticework (vortex) cooling channel with ribs truncated at their two ends were theoretically and experimentally studied compared with regular and smooth channels of the same configuration. The results showed: the heat transfer efficiency of the latticework channel with two slots was better than those of regular and smooth channels of the same configuration, its flow resistance situation in the slotted channel becomes quite complex; The flow resistances of 2 mm- and 4 mm-slotted channels were obviously lower than that of the regular channel, but they are still much higher than that of the smooth channel; Compared with the regular channel, the total heat transfer efficiencies of the slotted channels were pretty improved, among them the 4-mm slotted channel has the biggest enhancement. From the experimental results, it is obvious that the latticework channel with proper slots has a great prospect in the design of the inner cooling channels of turbine blades.

  9. Human Factors Operability Timeline Analysis to Improve the Processing Flow of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Schlierf, Roland; Miller, Darcy; Posada, Juan; Haddock, Mike; Haddad, Mike; Tran, Donald; Henderon, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Human factors and timeline analysis to have a more efficient and effective processing flow. The solution involved developing a written timeline of events that included each activity within each functional flow block. Each activity had computer animation videos and pictures of the people involved and the hardware. The Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool (HFEAT) was improved by modifying it to include the timeline of events. The HFEAT was used to define the human factors requirements and design solutions were developed for these requirements. An example of a functional flow block diagram is shown, and a view from one of the animations (i.e., short stack pallet) is shown and explained.

  10. Improving the performance of a compression ignition engine by directing flow of inlet air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemper, Carlton

    1946-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption. The results indicate the possibility of improving the performance of a given type of combustion chamber without changing its shape and with no change in valve timing. They would also seem to prove that directional turbulence, set up before the inlet valve of a four-stroke cycle engine, continues in the engine cylinder throughout the compression stroke.

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  12. Finite element analysis of transonic flows in cascades: Importance of computational grids in improving accuracy and convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecer, A.; Akay, H. U.

    1981-01-01

    The finite element method is applied for the solution of transonic potential flows through a cascade of airfoils. Convergence characteristics of the solution scheme are discussed. Accuracy of the numerical solutions is investigated for various flow regions in the transonic flow configuration. The design of an efficient finite element computational grid is discussed for improving accuracy and convergence.

  13. Improvement of trout streams in Wisconsin by augmenting low flows with ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novitzki, R.P.

    1973-01-01

    Approximately 2 cubic feet per second of ground water were introduced into the Little Plover River in 1968 when natural streamflow ranged from 3 to 4 cubic feet per second. These augmentation flows were retained undiminished through the 2-mile reach of stream monitored. Maximum stream temperatures were reduced as much as 5?F (3?C) at the augmentation site during the test period, although changes became insignificant more than 1 mile downstream. Maximum temperatures might be reduced as much as 10?F (6?C) during critical periods, based on estimates using a stream temperature model developed as part of the study. During critical periods significant temperature improvement may extend 2 miles or more downstream. Changes in minimum DO (dissolved oxygen) levels were slight, primarily because of the high natural DO levels occurring during the test period. Criteria for considering other streams for flow augmentation are developed on the basis of the observed hydrologic responses in the Little Plover River. Augmentation flows of nearly 2? cubic feet per second of ground water were introduced into the headwater reach of Black Earth Creek from the end of June through mid-October 1969. Streamflow ranged from 1 to 2 cubic feet per second at the augmentation site, and the average flow at the gaging station at Black Earth, approximately 8 miles downstream, ranged from 25 to 50 cubic feet per second. Augmentation flows were retained through the 8-mile reach of stream. Temperature of the augmentation flow as it entered the stream ranged from 60? to 70?F (about 16? to 21?C) during the test period, and minimum stream temperatures were raised 5?F (3?C) or more at the augmentation site, with changes extending from 2 to 3 miles downstream. Augmentation during critical periods could maintain stream temperatures between 40? and 70?F (4? and 21?C) through most of the study reach. DO levels were increased by as much as 2 milligrams per liter or more below the augmentation site, although the

  14. Emergency department overcrowding and long wait times: taking a corporate approach to improving patient flow.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Glen; Gaunt, Karen; Sinclair, Douglas; Trafford, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding and long wait times are major concerns in health systems the world over. Many ED-focused innovations--such as revising staff mix, improving internal processes and exploiting decision-support software--have been implemented to address these complex problems, often with limited success. Beginning in 2008, St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, which had some of the most challenging ED overcrowding and longest wait times in Ontario, has charted a different course. By taking an organization-wide corporate approach to the challenge of patient flow throughout the hospital, St. Michael's has significantly improved key ED flow metrics for both its admitted and non-admitted patients. PMID:25906463

  15. Improvements to the measurement of electrically controlled hydraulic pumps' flow/pressure characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jian-Feng; Liu, Cheng-Liang; Gu, Jian-Jiang; Shen, Liang-Chong

    2011-12-01

    To increase the measurement accuracy, and also to automate the measurement operation, we modify the electrically controlled hydraulic pumps' (ECHPs') flow/pressure performance characteristic description and improve the test method in existent standards. According to ECHPs' working principle, we divide ECHPs' operation into two models: constant flow operating mode (CFOM) and constant pressure operating mode (CPOM). A direct drive servo-proportional control valve (DDV) is used to load the test pump. In the CFOM, we change the pressure load at a constant rate by driving the DDV's displacement with nonlinear feedback and a proportional-integral (PI) controller. In the CPOM, we take advantage of the DDV's inherent linearity between its input signal and output flow, and change the flow load at a constant rate by using open-loop spool displacement control. A mathematic model is built for the derivation of a stable condition and the analysis of steady-state pressure tracking error. The theoretical analysis shows that the feedback linearization and PI controller with negative proportional and integral gains are able to track a slope pressure load command with a desired rate. The test results also show that the mathematical model is valid and the proposed method can improve the measurement accuracy remarkably.

  16. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  17. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  18. Web-Based Predictive Analytics to Improve Patient Flow in the Emergency Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckler, David L.

    2012-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) simulation project was established to demonstrate how requirements-driven analysis and process simulation can help improve the quality of patient care for the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA) Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMC). This project developed a web-based simulation prototype of patient flow in EDs, validated the performance of the simulation against operational data, and documented IT requirements for the ED simulation.

  19. Improved Measurement of B(sub 22) of Macromolecules in a Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Wilbur; Fanguy, Joseph; Holman, Steven; Guo, Bin

    2008-01-01

    An improved apparatus has been invented for use in determining the osmotic second virial coefficient of macromolecules in solution. In a typical intended application, the macromolecules would be, more specifically, protein molecules, and the protein solution would be pumped through a flow cell to investigate the physical and chemical conditions that affect crystallization of the protein in question. Some background information is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the novel aspects of this apparatus. A method of determining B22 from simultaneous measurements of the static transmittance (taken as an indication of concentration) and static scattering of light from the same location in a flowing protein solution was published in 2004. The apparatus used to implement the method at that time included a dual-detector flow cell, which had two drawbacks: a) The amount of protein required for analysis of each solution condition was of the order of a milligram - far too large a quantity for a high-throughput analysis system, for which microgram or even nanogram quantities of protein per analysis are desirable. b) The design of flow cell was such that two light sources were used to probe different regions of the flowing solution. Consequently, the apparatus did not afford simultaneous measurements at the same location in the solution and, hence, did not guarantee an accurate determination of B22.

  20. Performance improvement of a cross-flow hydro turbine by air layer effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. D.; Yoon, H. Y.; Inagaki, M.; Ooike, S.; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, Y. H.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is not only to investigate the effects of air layer in the turbine chamber on the performance and internal flow of the cross-flow turbine, but also to suggest a newly developed air supply method. Field test is performed in order to measure the output power of the turbine by a new air supply method. CFD analysis on the performance and internal flow of the turbine is conducted by an unsteady state calculation using a two-phase flow model in order to embody the air layer effect on the turbine performance effectively.The result shows that air layer effect on the performance of the turbine is considerable. The air layer located in the turbine runner passage plays the role of preventing a shock loss at the runner axis and suppressing a recirculation flow in the runner. The location of air suction hole on the chamber wall is very important factor for the performance improvement. Moreover, the ratio between air from suction pipe and water from turbine inlet is also significant factor of the turbine performance.

  1. DSMC simulation of hypersonic flows using an improved SBT-TAS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshayeshi, Bijan; Roohi, Ehsan; Stefanov, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    The current paper examines a new DSMC approach to hypersonic flow simulation consisting of a combination between the Simplified Bernoulli Trials (SBT) collision algorithm and the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) selection procedure. The SBT collision algorithm has already been introduced as a scheme that provides accurate results with a quite small number of particles per cells and its combination with the transient adaptive subcell (TAS) technique will enable SBT to have coarser grid sizes as well. In the current research, the no-time-counter (NTC) collision algorithm and nearest neighbor (NN) pair selection procedure of Bird DS2V code are substituted by the SBT-TAS and comparisons between the new algorithm and NTC-NN are made considering appropriate test cases including hypersonic cylinder flow and axisymmetric biconic flow. Hypersonic cylinder flow is a well-known benchmark problem with a wide collision frequency range while the biconic flow exhibits laminar shock/shock and shock/boundary-layer interactions. Improvements implemented in the SBT-TAS technique, including subcell volume estimation, surface properties filter, and time controller, are discussed in detail. The simulations of these hypersonic test cases demonstrated that from the viewpoint of consumed sample-size, SBT-TAS is an efficient collision technique.

  2. Combining Electrical Techniques to map a Till Aquitard for Quantifying Lateral Flows and Improved Recharge Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, K. E.; Mackay, R.

    2007-12-01

    Where low permeability layers are present in the unsaturated zone, groundwater recharge can be significantly modified by lateral flows. To improve estimates of the magnitude and spatial distribution of lateral flows, a well defined model of the unsaturated zone hydraulic properties is required. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys, using Geonics EM31 and EM34, along with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) have been used in the Tern Catchment, Shropshire, UK to determine the distribution of Quaternary glacial deposits above the Triassic sandstone aquifer. The deposits are generally less than 10m thick and comprise low permeability lodgement till and high permeability outwash. Modelling studies have shown the depth and slope of the till surface to be key parameters controlling the magnitude of lateral flows with recharge focussed at the till edge. The distribution of permeability within the till is of secondary importance. The spatial extent of the till is well constrained by EM data and is shown to be continuous. ERT profiles provide data on the depth to the till surface in detailed 2D sections. Combining the two data sets has enabled the depth estimates from the ERT surveys to be extrapolated across a 2D map area. Recharge estimates based on the depth maps take into account lateral flows across the top of the till and show that these flows can contribute significantly to catchment recharge.

  3. Improving flow patterns and spillage characteristics of a box-type commercial kitchen hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Han, Meng-Ji; Priyambodo, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    A conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood and its improved version (termed the "IQV commercial kitchen hood") were studied using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique and tracer-gas (sulfur hexafluoride) detection methods. The laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique qualitatively revealed the flow field of the hood and the areas apt for leakages of hood containment. The tracer-gas concentration detection method measured the quantitative leakage levels of the hood containment. The oil mists that were generated in the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood leaked significantly into the environment from the areas near the front edges of ceiling and side walls. Around these areas, the boundary-layer separation occurred, inducing highly unsteady and turbulent recirculating flow, and leading to spillages of hood containment due to inappropriate aerodynamic design at the front edges of the ceiling and side walls. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the conventional box-type commercial kitchen hood showed that the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face attained very large values on an order of magnitude about 10(3)-10(4) ppb. By combining the backward-offset narrow suction slot, deflection plates, and quarter-circular arcs at the hood entrance, the IQV commercial kitchen hood presented a flow field containing four backward-inclined cyclone flow structures. The oil mists generated by cooking were coherently confined in these upward-rising cyclone flow structures and finally exhausted through the narrow suction slot. The tracer-gas concentration measurements on the IQV commercial kitchen hood showed that the order of magnitude of the sulfur hexafluoride concentrations detected at the hood face is negligibly small--only about 10(0) ppb across the whole hood face. PMID:24579753

  4. Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) Changes Gene Expression of Key Molecules of the Wound Healing Machinery and Improves Wound Healing In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Stephanie; Unger, Petra; Wacker, Eva; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Heinlin, Julia; Li, Yang-Fang; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2013-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time) in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated. PMID:24265766

  5. An improved parallel SPH approach to solve 3D transient generalized Newtonian free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jinlian; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Weigang; Li, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a corrected parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (C-SPH) method is proposed to simulate the 3D generalized Newtonian free surface flows with low Reynolds number, especially the 3D viscous jets buckling problems are investigated. The proposed C-SPH method is achieved by coupling an improved SPH method based on the incompressible condition with the traditional SPH (TSPH), that is, the improved SPH with diffusive term and first-order Kernel gradient correction scheme is used in the interior of the fluid domain, and the TSPH is used near the free surface. Thus the C-SPH method possesses the advantages of two methods. Meanwhile, an effective and convenient boundary treatment is presented to deal with 3D multiple-boundary problem, and the MPI parallelization technique with a dynamic cells neighbor particle searching method is considered to improve the computational efficiency. The validity and the merits of the C-SPH are first verified by solving several benchmarks and compared with other results. Then the viscous jet folding/coiling based on the Cross model is simulated by the C-SPH method and compared with other experimental or numerical results. Specially, the influences of macroscopic parameters on the flow are discussed. All the numerical results agree well with available data, and show that the C-SPH method has higher accuracy and better stability for solving 3D moving free surface flows over other particle methods.

  6. The Changing Cold Regions Network: Improving the Understanding and Prediction of Changing Land, Water, and Climate in the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.; Chun, K. P.; Shook, K.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Within the cold interior of western and northern Canada, rapid and widespread environmental changes are taking place, which are of serious concern for society and have a range of implications from local to regional and global scales. From a scientific standpoint there is an urgent need to understand the changes and develop improved diagnostic and predictive modelling tools to deal with the uncertainty faced in the future. The Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) is a research consortium of over 50 Canadian university and government scientists and international researchers aimed at addressing these issues within the geographic domain of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan River Basins. CCRN's primary focus is to integrate existing and new experimental data with modelling and remote sensing products to understand, diagnose and predict changing land, water and climate, and their interactions and feedbacks. To support these activities, the network utilizes a suite of 14 world-class water, ecosystem, cryosphere and climate (WECC) observatories across this region that provide exceptional opportunities to observe change, investigate processes and their dynamics, and develop and test environmental models. This talk will briefly describe the CCRN thematic components and WECC observatories, and will then describe some of the observed environmental changes and their linkages across the northern and mountainous parts of the network study domain. In particular, this will include changes in permafrost, terrestrial vegetation, snowcover, glaciers, and river discharge in relation to observed climatic changes across the region. The observations draw on a wide range of literature sources and statistical analyses of federal and provincial regional monitoring network data, while more detailed observations at some of the WECC observatories help to show how these regional changes are manifested at local scales and vice versa. A coordinated special observation and analysis period across all

  7. Scale Model Experiments on Sound Propagation From a Mach 2.5 Cold Nitrogen Jet Flowing Through a Rigid-Walled Duct With a J-Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    The Launch Systems Testbed (LST) represents the evolution of vibroacoustics research and development work performed at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) over the last 15 years. The LST is located at the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) in the KSC industrial complex. The LETF is operated by Sierra Lobo, Inc., as a member of University-Affiliated Technology Development Contract (USTDC) to KSC Spaceport and Engineering and Technology Directorate (YA), with ASRC Aerospace Corporation as a the prime contractor. Trajectory Simulation Mechanism (TSM) is a major component of the LST, developed specifically to simulate nonstationary acoustic loads on launch pad structures, vehicles, and payloads. TSM enhances the capabilities within LST for simulating launch environments of future vehicles. The scaled launch environments will be used to predict the full-scale launch environment via an appropriate scaling procedure. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has tasked NASA KSC to perform a basic technology test program in support of developing a low-cost clean pad (incorporating passive mitigation techniques) for future launch vehicles. The overall goal of the program is to develop innovative launch exhaust management systems, which effectively reduce launch acoustic environment with innovative duct designs, while eliminating traditional sound suppression water systems. Passive techniques, such as nontraditional duct geometries, resonators, and diffusers, etc., will be investigated. The overall goals are to advance innovative concepts for a clean pad while developing ideas to reduce transmitted sound via investigation and modeling of jet exhaust acoustic and flow field characteristics. The series of tests outlined in this report represent baseline tests and are geared towards defining the acoustic load environment on the TSM pad for open and closed duct configurations. This report summarizes the cold jet acoustic testing for Mach 2.5 supersonic nitrogen jet issuing

  8. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed

  9. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  10. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  11. Improving the reliability of venous Doppler flow measurements: relevance of combined ECG, training and repeated measures.

    PubMed

    Staelens, Anneleen S E; Tomsin, Kathleen; Oben, Jolien; Mesens, Tinne; Grieten, Lars; Gyselaers, Wilfried

    2014-07-01

    The nature of venous Doppler waves is highly variable. An additional electrocardiogram (ECG) improves the interpretation of venous Doppler wave characteristics and allows measurement of venous pulse transit time. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of ECG-guided repeated measurements of venous Doppler flow characteristics before and after sonographer training and the inter- and intra-observer variability. In four groups of 25 healthy women, venous Doppler flow measurements were performed at the level of the kidneys and liver according to a standardized protocol. Intra-observer Pearson correlation coefficients of the renal interlobar vein Doppler indices were ≥ 0.80 with the addition of the ECG, which are higher than the results of a former study. The inter-observer correlation between an experienced ultrasonographer and an inexperienced ultrasonographer improved from ≥ 0.71 to ≥ 0.91 after training. The correlation range of all parameters between two independent observers improved when values were based on repeated measures. The addition of an ECG to the Doppler image, training and repeated measurements are helpful in improving venous Doppler wave interpretation. PMID:24631376

  12. Massive cold cloud clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gabor; Zahorecz, Sarolta

    2015-08-01

    The all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015) allows an almost unbiased study of the early phases of star-formation in our Galaxy. Several thousand of the clumps have also distance estimates allowing a mass, and density determination. The nature of Planck clumps varies from IRDCs to tiny nearby cold clouds with masses ranging from one to several tens of thousands solar masses. Some of the clumps are embedded in GMCs, others are isolated. Some are close or even very close to OB associations, while others lay far from any UV luminous objects.The small scale clustering of these objects was studied with the improved Minimum Spanning Tree method of Cartwright & Whitworth identifying groups in 3D space. As a result also massive cold cloud clusters were identified. We analyse the MST structures, and discuss their relation to ongoing and future massive star formation.

  13. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  14. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-04-01

    The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073 kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs. PMID:23500582

  15. An improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sheng; Qu, Xiaobo; Xu, Cheng; Ma, Dongfang; Wang, Dianhai

    2015-10-01

    This letter develops an improved multi-value cellular automata model for heterogeneous bicycle traffic flow taking the higher maximum speed of electric bicycles into consideration. The update rules of both regular and electric bicycles are improved, with maximum speeds of two and three cells per second respectively. Numerical simulation results for deterministic and stochastic cases are obtained. The fundamental diagrams and multiple states effects under different model parameters are analyzed and discussed. Field observations were made to calibrate the slowdown probabilities. The results imply that the improved extended Burgers cellular automata (IEBCA) model is more consistent with the field observations than previous models and greatly enhances the realism of the bicycle traffic model.

  16. Multiplexed lateral flow biosensors: Technological advances for radically improving point-of-care diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Macdonald, Joanne

    2016-09-15

    Lateral flow biosensors are a leading technology in point-of-care diagnostics due to their simplicity, rapidness and low cost. Their primacy in this arena continues through technological breakthroughs such as multiplexing: the detection of more than one biomarker in a single assay. Multiplexing capacity is critical for improving diagnostic efficiency, enhancing the diagnostic precision for specific diseases and reducing diagnostic cost. Here we review, for the first time, the various types and strategies employed for creating multiplexed lateral flow biosensors. These are classified into four main categories in terms of specific application or multiplexing level, namely linear, parameter, spatial and conceptual. We describe the practical applications and implications for each approach and compare their advantages and disadvantages. Importantly, multiplexing is still subject to limitations of the traditional lateral flow biosensor, such as sensitivity and specificity. However, by pushing the limitations of the traditional medium into the multiplex arena, several technological breakthroughs are emerging with novel solutions that further expand the utility of lateral flow biosensing for point-of-care applications. PMID:27125840

  17. Chronic Mild Cold Conditioning Modulates the Expression of Hypothalamic Neuropeptide and Intermediary Metabolic-related Genes and Improves Growth Performances in Young Chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Low environmental temperatures are among the most challenging stressors in poultry industries. Although landmark studies using acute severe cold exposure have been conducted, still the molecular mechanisms underlying cold-stress responses in birds are not completely defined. In the pre...

  18. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  19. Improved numerical modeling of groundwater flow and transport at the MADE-2 site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.D.; Rucker, D.F.

    1995-02-01

    Public domain computer programs were used to attempt an improved model of the tritium plume observed during Macrodispersion Experiment 2 (MADE-2), a field scale natural gradient experiment conducted at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi. The finite difference program MODFLOW was used to simulate the flow of groundwater through a 330 m x 105 m computational domain. Solutions for the 468 day experiment were obtained using a Sun Sparcstation 2 for several choices of convergence and storage parameters. The simulations had small mass balance errors and were consistent with continuous head observations. Tritium plume simulations used the mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian finite difference program MT3D to solve the contaminant transport equation using the MODFLOW-predicted flow field. Thirteen runs were made using various advection algorithms and dispersivities, but none was successful.

  20. Availability Improvement of Layer 2 Seamless Networks Using OpenFlow

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elias; Jacob, Eduardo; Matias, Jon; Moreira, Naiara; Astarloa, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The network robustness and reliability are strongly influenced by the implementation of redundancy and its ability of reacting to changes. In situations where packet loss or maximum latency requirements are critical, replication of resources and information may become the optimal technique. To this end, the IEC 62439-3 Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) provides seamless recovery in layer 2 networks by delegating the redundancy management to the end-nodes. In this paper, we present a combination of the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) approach and PRP topologies to establish a higher level of redundancy and thereby, through several active paths provisioned via the OpenFlow protocol, the global reliability is increased, as well as data flows are managed efficiently. Hence, the experiments with multiple failure scenarios, which have been run over the Mininet network emulator, show the improvement in the availability and responsiveness over other traditional technologies based on a single active path. PMID:25759861

  1. An improved supersonic, three-dimensional, external, inviscid flow field code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, F.; Koch, F.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to compute the inviscid super/hypersonic flow fields about complex vehicle geometries accurately and efficiently. A second-order accurate finite difference scheme is used to integrate the three-dimensional Euler equations in regions of continuous flow, while all shock waves are computed as discontinuities via the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. Conformal mappings are used to develop a computational grid. The effects for equilibrium air are included using curve fits of Mollier charts. This report deals only with modifications to these procedures in four specific areas: inlet mass ingestion, subsonic axial Mach number, improved conformal mappings, and vehicles flying at yaw. In each area both the modifications to the computational procedures and computer code are discussed.

  2. Availability improvement of layer 2 seamless networks using OpenFlow.

    PubMed

    Molina, Elias; Jacob, Eduardo; Matias, Jon; Moreira, Naiara; Astarloa, Armando

    2015-01-01

    The network robustness and reliability are strongly influenced by the implementation of redundancy and its ability of reacting to changes. In situations where packet loss or maximum latency requirements are critical, replication of resources and information may become the optimal technique. To this end, the IEC 62439-3 Parallel Redundancy Protocol (PRP) provides seamless recovery in layer 2 networks by delegating the redundancy management to the end-nodes. In this paper, we present a combination of the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) approach and PRP topologies to establish a higher level of redundancy and thereby, through several active paths provisioned via the OpenFlow protocol, the global reliability is increased, as well as data flows are managed efficiently. Hence, the experiments with multiple failure scenarios, which have been run over the Mininet network emulator, show the improvement in the availability and responsiveness over other traditional technologies based on a single active path. PMID:25759861

  3. An Improved Treatment of External Boundary for Three-Dimensional Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon V.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative numerical approach for setting highly accurate nonlocal boundary conditions at the external computational boundaries when calculating three-dimensional compressible viscous flows over finite bodies. The approach is based on application of the difference potentials method by V. S. Ryaben'kii and extends our previous technique developed for the two-dimensional case. The new boundary conditions methodology has been successfully combined with the NASA-developed code TLNS3D and used for the analysis of wing-shaped configurations in subsonic and transonic flow regimes. As demonstrated by the computational experiments, the improved external boundary conditions allow one to greatly reduce the size of the computational domain while still maintaining high accuracy of the numerical solution. Moreover, they may provide for a noticeable speedup of convergence of the multigrid iterations.

  4. On the variability of cold region flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matti, Bettina; Dahlke, Helen E.; Lyon, Steve W.

    2016-03-01

    Cold region hydrological systems exhibit complex interactions with both climate and the cryosphere. Improving knowledge on that complexity is essential to determine drivers of extreme events and to predict changes under altered climate conditions. This is particularly true for cold region flooding where independent shifts in both precipitation and temperature can have significant influence on high flows. This study explores changes in the magnitude and the timing of streamflow in 18 Swedish Sub-Arctic catchments over their full record periods available and a common period (1990-2013). The Mann-Kendall trend test was used to estimate changes in several hydrological signatures (e.g. annual maximum daily flow, mean summer flow, snowmelt onset). Further, trends in the flood frequency were determined by fitting an extreme value type I (Gumbel) distribution to test selected flood percentiles for stationarity using a generalized least squares regression approach. Results highlight shifts from snowmelt-dominated to rainfall-dominated flow regimes with all significant trends (at the 5% significance level) pointing toward (1) lower magnitudes in the spring flood; (2) earlier flood occurrence; (3) earlier snowmelt onset; and (4) decreasing mean summer flows. Decreasing trends in flood magnitude and mean summer flows suggest widespread permafrost thawing and are supported by increasing trends in annual minimum daily flows. Trends in selected flood percentiles showed an increase in extreme events over the full periods of record (significant for only four catchments), while trends were variable over the common period of data among the catchments. An uncertainty analysis emphasizes that the observed trends are highly sensitive to the period of record considered. As such, no clear overall regional hydrological response pattern could be determined suggesting that catchment response to regionally consistent changes in climatic drivers is strongly influenced by their physical

  5. Improved stop-flow apparatus to measure permeability of human red cells and ghosts.

    PubMed

    Levin, S W; Levin, R L; Solomon, A K; Pandiscio, A; Kirkwood, D H

    1980-11-01

    An improved stop-flow apparatus has been designed and constructed to measure the permeability characteristics of human red cells, which can be inferred from the time course of red cell volume changes following a sudden change in cellular environment produced by a raped mixing device. The improved apparatus is directly coupled to a computer which automates the subtraction and averaging procedures that have been developed to minimize the noise generated in the system by the cessation of red cell forward motion when the flow is suddenly stopped. Real time data acquisition also makes it possible to increase the number of data points by an order of magnitude, thus improving accuracy significantly. The apparatus has been tested by measurements of the human red cell hydraulic permeability coefficient. Data are presented to validate the subtraction procedure. Experiments have also been carried out on red cell ghosts which indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of the ghost is similar to that of the undisturbed red cell. PMID:7002984

  6. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  7. Possible Signatures of a Cold-flow Disk from MUSE Using a z ˜ 1 Galaxy-Quasar Pair toward SDSS J1422-0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Finley, H.; Schroetter, I.; Murphy, M. T.; Richter, P.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Wendt, M.; Kamann, S.; Epinat, B.; Cantalupo, S.; Straka, L. A.; Schaye, J.; Martin, C. L.; Péroux, C.; Wisotzki, L.; Soto, K.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Brinchmann, J.; Kollatschny, W.

    2016-04-01

    We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circumgalactic gas around a z=0.91 low-mass star-forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope show that the galaxy has a dust-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 4.7 ± 2.0 M⊙ yr-1, with no companion down to 0.22 M⊙ yr-1 (5σ) within 240 {h}-1 kpc (“30”). Using a high-resolution spectrum of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle α of only 15°), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a “cold-flow disk” extending at least 12 kpc (3× {R}1/2). We estimate the mass accretion rate {\\dot{M}}{{in}} to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the H i column density of log {N}{{H}{{I}}}/{{cm}}-2 ≃ 20.4 obtained from a Hubble Space Telescope/COS near-UV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g., Zn ii, Cr ii, Ti ii, Mn ii, Si ii), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 {Z}⊙ (albeit with large uncertainties: {log} Z/{Z}⊙ =-0.4\\quad +/- \\quad 0.4), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity (12 + log O/H = 8.7 ± 0.2), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blueshifted Mg ii and Fe ii absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The Mg ii and Fe ii absorption line ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent Fe ii* emission. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under program 080.A-0364 (SINFONI), 079.A-0600 (UVES), and as part of MUSE commissioning (ESO program 060.A-9100). Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  8. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  9. What maintains the waters flowing in our rivers? - Rethinking hydrogeology to improve public policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcelos, Vitor Vieira

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses how new contributions from hydrogeological science in the 20th and 21st centuries have allowed for a better understanding of the processes that affect the maintenance of river flows. Moreover, the way in which this knowledge has been conveyed beyond academia and has been gradually incorporated into public policy for natural resource management is also discussed. This article explains the development of several approaches used to understand the relationships among the management of aquifers, vegetation and river flows, including water balance, aquifer recharge, the piston effect, seasonal effects, and safe and sustainable yields. Additionally, the current challenges regarding the modeling of hydrological processes that integrate groundwater and surface waters are discussed. Examples of studies applied in Brazil that demonstrate these processes and stimulate thought regarding water management strategies are presented. In light of the case studies, it is possible to propose different strategies, each adapted for specific hydrogeological context to maximize aquifer recharge or base flow maintenance. Based on these strategies, the role of infiltration ponds and other artificial recharge techniques is re-evaluated in the context of the mitigation of environmental impacts on the maintenance of river flows. Proposals for the improvement of public policies regarding the payment of related environmental services to stimulate investment in aquifer recharge and the maintenance of base flow, for which the goal is to attain win-win-win situations for the environment, farmers and water users, while preventing land speculation, are discussed. Lastly, a conceptual model for the dissemination of hydrogeological knowledge in public policies is provided, and its challenges and possibilities are discussed.

  10. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  11. Effects of terlipressin on patients with sepsis via improving tissue blood flow.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xudong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yaoli; Zhou, Jian; Zhu, Yu; Jiang, Dongpo; Liu, Liangming; Li, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin (TP), an analog of arginine vasopressin, was reported beneficial in sepsis patients when combined use with norepinephrine (NE), but the undetermined action, mechanism, and safety limited it to become the first-line vasopressor for sepsis patients. With 32 septic shock patients, we investigated the effects of a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) on hemodynamic, tissue blood flow, vital organ function, acid-base balance, and coagulation function to systemically know the beneficial effect and side effects of TP on septic shock. The results showed that as compared with the single use of NE group (17 patients), a small dose of TP (1.3 μg/kg/h) in combination with NE continuous infusion, except for decreasing the mortality and NE requirement, could better improve and stabilize the hemodynamics, improve the tissue blood flow, increase the blood oxygen saturation and urine volume, and decrease the lactate level and complication rate (47% versus 82.3% in NE group). Meanwhile, TP + NE did not induce blood bilirubin increase and platelet count decrease and hyponatremia that vasopressin has. The results show that low dose of TP continuous infusion can help NE achieve the good resuscitation effect by improving tissue blood flow, stabilizing hemodynamics, and protecting organ function in septic shock patients while did not induce the side effects that high dose or bonus of TP or vasopressin induced. Low dose of TP may be recommended as the first-line vasopressor for refractory hypotension after severe sepsis or septic shock. PMID:26253455

  12. Chilling Out with Colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common cold virus, but more than 200 viruses can cause colds. Because there are so many, ... to help you feel better. Take that, cold viruses! continue How Kids Catch Colds Mucus (say: MYOO- ...

  13. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  14. Cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Paul L; Hegerova, Livia T; Gertz, Morie A

    2013-08-15

    Cold agglutinin disease is a rare and poorly understood disorder affecting 15% of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. We reviewed the clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, and management in the literature and describe our institutional experience to improve strategies for accurate diagnosis and treatment. Retrospective analysis identified 89 patients from our institution with cold agglutinin disease from 1970 through 2012. Median age at symptom onset was 65 years (range, 41 to 83 years), whereas the median age at diagnosis was 72 years (range, 43 to 91 years). Median survival of all patients was 10.6 years, and 68 patients (76%) were alive 5 years after the diagnosis. The most common symptom was acrocyanosis (n = 39 [44%]), and many had symptoms triggered by cold (n = 35 [39%]) or other factors (n = 20 [22%]). An underlying hematologic disorder was detected in 69 patients (78%). Thirty-six patients (40%) received transfusions during their disease course, and 82% received drug therapy. Rituximab was associated with the longest response duration (median, 24 months) and the lowest proportion of patients needing further treatment (55%). Our institution's experience and review of the literature confirms that early diagnostic evaluation and treatment improves outcomes in cold agglutinin disease. PMID:23757733

  15. Triamine-Modified Polyimides Having Improved Processability and Low Melt Flow Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A. (Inventor); Nguyen, Baochan N. (Inventor); Eby, Ronald K. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Addition-cured polyimides that contain the reaction product of an aromatic triamine or trianhydride analogue thereof, a reactive end group such as 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, ester derivatives of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, anhydride derivatives of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid, or 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride, an aromatic diamine, and a dialkyl ester of an aromatic tetracarboxylic acid. The resultant starlike polyimides; exhibit lower melt flow viscosity than its linear counterparts, providing for improved processability of the polyimide. Also disclosed are methods for the synthesis of these polyimides as well as composite structures formed using these polyimides.

  16. Improved Apparatus for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr; Dryden, H L

    1934-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in the design of the equipment associated with the hot-wire anemometer for the measurement of fluctuating air speeds in turbulent air flow, and presents the results of some experimental investigations dealing with the response of the hot wire to speed fluctuations of various frequencies. Attempts at measuring the frequency of the fluctuations encountered in the Bureau of Standards' 54-inch wind tunnel are also reported. In addition, the difficulties encountered in the use of such apparatus and the precautions found helpful in avoiding them are discussed.

  17. Improved Gradient Vector Flow for robust shape estimation in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S

    2010-01-01

    We propose a improved Gradient Vector Flow (iGVF) for active contour detection. The algorithm herein proposed allows to surpass the problems of the GVF, which occur in noisy images with cluttered background. We experimentally illustrate that the proposed modified version of the GVF algorithm has a better performance in noisy images. The main difference concerns the use of more robust and informative features (edge segments) which significantly reduce the influence of noise. Experiments with real data from several image modalities are presented to illustrate the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:21097295

  18. Human Factors Operability Timeline Analysis to Improve the Processing Flow of the Orion Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlierf, Roland; Stambolian, Damon B.; Miller, Darcy; Posanda, Juan; Haddock, Mike; Haddad, Mike; Tran, Donald; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The Constellation Program (CxP) Orion vehicle goes through several areas and stages of processing before its launched at the Kennedy Space Center. In order to have efficient and effective processing, all of the activities need to be analyzed. This was accomplished by first developing a timeline of events that included each activity, and then each activity was analyzed by operability experts and human factors experts with spacecraft processing experience. This papers focus is to explain the results and the process for developing this human factors operability timeline analysis to improve the processing flow of Orion.

  19. Improving Landslide Inventories by Limiting Land Classification to Drainage Areas of Debris Flow-Dominated Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, N. J.; Mitasova, H.; Wegmann, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Landslide inventories, frequently created by aerial photograph interpretation (API), are often used in the production of hillslope hazard maps to characterize past landslides or to evaluate a hazard model. In the former application of inventories, potential landslides in hazard maps are delineated as areas that have similar morphometrics as past landslides at locations of modeled hillslope instability. Therefore, the accuracy of the inventory has a strong influence upon hazard extent. In the latter application, the partial inventories that sometimes result from API, due to the subjectivity of interpretation and revegetation of landslides, likely results in incorrect evaluations. A more complete, less subjective technique is needed to not only better characterize past landslides and improve evaluation of hazard models, but also to assess the extent of areas prone to significant mass wasting in mountainous regions due to the evolution of landscapes. Inventory accuracy continues to improve with new technology and automated techniques, though rarely is the form of a channel's topography incorporated into the inventory process despite the growing evidence of a topographic signature of debris flows. This signature demarcates the transition between the dominant channel erosional process: fluvial or debris flow. These process transitions are often observed at scaling breaks in log-log plots of a channel's drainage area versus slope (DS plot). The scaling breaks, above which the effects of fluvial power laws upon channel topography are not observed and below which debris flow scars are not found, may signify the lowest point in the watershed where debris flows occur. We present an inventory technique that limits a land classification algorithm to areas that are upstream from this scaling break determined from DS plots of five streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) region of the southern Appalachians. Topographic data for the DS plots and the

  20. Improving placental blood flow in pre-eclampsia with prostaglandin A1.

    PubMed

    Toppozada, M; Medhat, I; Sallam, H; Ismail, A A; el-Badawy, E S; Abd Rabbo, S

    1992-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 is a potent hypotensive, peripheral vasodilator, a weak oxytocic, antiplatelet aggregator. It improves the renal hemodynamics. Its effect on placental circulation was evaluated (expressed as systolic/diastolic ratio and umbilical artery resistance index) in 20 women with severe pre-eclampsia and 10 normotensive pregnant women, by using the Doppler technique. Moreover, another 10 women with severe pre-eclampsia received dextrose 5% as a placebo for comparative purposes. Significant improvements in both parameters studied were observed in the women with severe pre-eclampsia. The beneficial changes differed significantly from the recorded values when using dextrose in pre-eclampsia or prostaglandin A1 in normotensive subjects. Such promising data add another important perspective to prostaglandin A1 in severe pre-eclampsia and may open up new avenues for its use in other situations with compromised placental flow. PMID:1315092

  1. Improvement of operational flood forecasting through the assimilation of satellite observations and multiple river flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Fabio; Ercolani, Giulia

    2016-05-01

    Data assimilation has the potential to improve flood forecasting. However, it is rarely employed in distributed hydrologic models for operational predictions. In this study, we present variational assimilation of river flow data at multiple locations and of land surface temperature (LST) from satellite in a distributed hydrologic model that is part of the operational forecasting chain for the Arno river, in central Italy. LST is used to estimate initial condition of soil moisture through a coupled surface energy/water balance scheme. We present here several hindcast experiments to assess the performances of the assimilation system. The results show that assimilation can significantly improve flood forecasting, although in the limit of data error and model structure.

  2. Perilla oil improves blood flow through inhibition of platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang-Sei; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of perilla oil on the platelet aggregation in vitro and thrombosis in vivo were investigated in comparison with aspirin, a well-known blood flow enhancer. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with perilla oil and aggregation inducers collagen or thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Perilla oil significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations, in which the thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets were reduced in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were administered once daily by gavage with perilla oil for 1 week, carotid arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Perilla oil delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 0.5 mL/kg. In addition, a high dose (2 mL/kg) of perilla oil greatly prevented the occlusion, comparable to the effect of aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that perilla oil inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is proposed that perilla oil could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24707301

  3. CD4+ LYMPHOCYTES IMPROVE VENOUS BLOOD FLOW IN EXPERIMENTAL ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULAE

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Juan C.; Martinez, Laisel; Mesa, Annia; Wei, Yuntao; Tabbara, Marwan; Salman, Loay H.; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of immune cells in arteriovenous fistulae (AVF) maturation is poorly understood and has received, until quite recently, little attention. This study examines the role of T lymphocytes in AVF vascular remodeling. Methods Experimental fistulae were created in athymic rnu nude rats lacking mature T lymphocytes and euthymic control animals by anastomosing the left superior epigastric vein to the nearby femoral artery. Blood flow rates, wall morphology and histological changes were assessed in AVF 21 days after creation. The effect of CD4+ lymphocytes on AVF maturation in athymic animals was analyzed by adoptive transfer of cells after fistula creation. Results The absence of T lymphocytes compromised blood flow in experimental fistulae. Histopathological inspection of AVF from athymic rats revealed that T cell immunodeficiency negatively affected venous vascular remodeling, as evidenced by a reduced lumen, a thick muscular layer and a low number of inflammatory cells compared to control animals. Adoptive transfer of CD4+ lymphocytes from euthymic rats into athymic animals before and after fistula creation improved blood flow and reduced intima-media thickness. Conclusion These results point at the protective role of CD4+ lymphocytes in the remodeling of the AVF vascular wall. PMID:25999254

  4. Enhanced Efficacy of Doxorubicin by microRNA-499-Mediated Improvement of Tumor Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ayaka; Asai, Tomohiro; Ryu, Sho; Ando, Hidenori; Maeda, Noriyuki; Dewa, Takehisa; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Genetic therapy using microRNA-499 (miR-499) was combined with chemotherapy for the advanced treatment of cancer. Our previous study showed that miR-499 suppressed tumor growth through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and subsequent angiogenesis. In the present study, we focused on blood flow in tumors treated with miR499, since some angiogenic vessels are known to lack blood flow. Tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) were prepared and modified with Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly peptide (APRPG) for targeted delivery of miR-499 (APRPG-miR-499) to angiogenic vessels and tumor cells. The tumor blood flow was significantly improved, so-called normalized, after systemic administration of APRPG-miR-499 to Colon 26 NL-17 carcinoma–bearing mice. In addition, the accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) in the tumors was increased by pre-treatment with APRPG-miR-499. Moreover, the combination therapy of APRPG-miR-499 and DOX resulted in significant suppression of the tumors. Taken together, our present data indicate that miR-499 delivered with APRPG-modified-TEPA-PCL normalized tumor vessels, resulting in enhancement of intratumoral accumulation of DOX. Our findings suggest that APRPG-miR-499 may be a therapeutic, or a combination therapeutic, candidate for cancer treatment. PMID:26797645

  5. Depth of field and improved resolution of slit-scan flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Michael; Crone, Martin; Cremer, Christoph G.

    1996-12-01

    In a slit-scan flow cytometer particles specifically labelled by fluorochromes (e.g., cells, chromosomes) are aligned coaxially in a flow stream. One by another they pass a ribbon-like shaped laser beam with a diameter smaller than the particle length. Although several slit-scan flow systems have been developed during the last two decades, a complete description of the theory of optical resolution under the real experimental conditions used as well as a description how to overcome experimental limitations are missing. Often, resolution values are estimated under the assumption of ideal Gaussian beam propagation. These estimates suffer from a discrepancy to practical implementation, Here, some of these effects in slit-scan optics are discussed from a more theoretical point of view. In order to obtain an acceptable depth of field, a focal width around 2 micrometer appears to be an optimum under the regime of Gaussian beam propagation. However, in practice, effects due to thick lenses, finite apertures, chromatic aberrations, or the ellipticity of the laser beam overshadow this result and influence the laser beam shape. To further improve the resolution with a high depth of field, new concepts are required. Therefore, a combination of an interference fringe pattern of two coherent laser beams for excitation (fringe-scanning) with a slit-scan detection of the incoherent fluorescence light is introduced. Preliminary experiences of the first experimental realization are discussed.

  6. Enhanced Efficacy of Doxorubicin by microRNA-499-Mediated Improvement of Tumor Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ayaka; Asai, Tomohiro; Ryu, Sho; Ando, Hidenori; Maeda, Noriyuki; Dewa, Takehisa; Oku, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Genetic therapy using microRNA-499 (miR-499) was combined with chemotherapy for the advanced treatment of cancer. Our previous study showed that miR-499 suppressed tumor growth through the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and subsequent angiogenesis. In the present study, we focused on blood flow in tumors treated with miR499, since some angiogenic vessels are known to lack blood flow. Tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) were prepared and modified with Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly peptide (APRPG) for targeted delivery of miR-499 (APRPG-miR-499) to angiogenic vessels and tumor cells. The tumor blood flow was significantly improved, so-called normalized, after systemic administration of APRPG-miR-499 to Colon 26 NL-17 carcinoma-bearing mice. In addition, the accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) in the tumors was increased by pre-treatment with APRPG-miR-499. Moreover, the combination therapy of APRPG-miR-499 and DOX resulted in significant suppression of the tumors. Taken together, our present data indicate that miR-499 delivered with APRPG-modified-TEPA-PCL normalized tumor vessels, resulting in enhancement of intratumoral accumulation of DOX. Our findings suggest that APRPG-miR-499 may be a therapeutic, or a combination therapeutic, candidate for cancer treatment. PMID:26797645

  7. Improving post-wildfire hydrologic simulations with ParFlow in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Sonya; Kinoshita, Alicia; Atchley, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires alter the natural hydrologic processes within a watershed and may impact hydrologic characteristics including surface runoff and subsurface water storage. Generally, post-fire hydrologic models are either one-dimensional, empirically-based models, or two-dimensional, conceptually-based models with lumped parameter distributions. These models are useful in providing runoff measurements at the watershed outlet; however, do not provide distributed hydrologic simulation at each point within the watershed. This work uses ParFlow, a three-dimensional, distributed hydrologic model to represent soil burn severity and evaluate vegetation recovery rate impacts on water components. This model is developed for Devil Canyon, a watershed burned in 2003 by the Old Fire in southern California. The domain uses a 30m-cell size resolution over a 6.7 km by 6.4 km lateral extent. The subsurface reaches 30 m and is assigned a variable cell thickness, allowing an explicit consideration of the soil burn severity throughout the stages of recovery and vegetation regrowth. Vegetation regrowth is monitored using satellite-based Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) products. Pre- and post-fire hydrologic responses are evaluated using runoff measurements at the watershed outlet, and using water component (overland flow, lateral flow, baseflow) measurements. The long-term continuous simulations will improve our understanding of post-fire hydrological partitioning between water balance components and the spatial variability of watershed processes.

  8. Recalibration of the Shear Stress Transport Model to Improve Calculation of Shock Separated Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    The Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST) k . turbulence model is one of the most widely used two-equation Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models for aerodynamic analyses. The model extends Menter s baseline (BSL) model to include a limiter that prevents the calculated turbulent shear stress from exceeding a prescribed fraction of the turbulent kinetic energy via a proportionality constant, a1, set to 0.31. Compared to other turbulence models, the SST model yields superior predictions of mild adverse pressure gradient flows including those with small separations. In shock - boundary layer interaction regions, the SST model produces separations that are too large while the BSL model is on the other extreme, predicting separations that are too small. In this paper, changing a1 to a value near 0.355 is shown to significantly improve predictions of shock separated flows. Several cases are examined computationally and experimental data is also considered to justify raising the value of a1 used for shock separated flows.

  9. Exploring a Method for Improving Turbulent Separated-Flow Predictions with kappa-omega Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    A particular failing of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes separated turbulent flow computations is addressed within the context of a kappa-omega two-equation turbulence model. The failing is the tendency for turbulence models to under-predict turbulent shear stress in the shear layers of some separation bubbles, yielding late boundary layer reattachment and recovery. Inspired by unpublished work of Volker, Langtry, and Menter, the author undertook an independent investigation in an attempt to improve the ability of the Menter shear stress transport (SST) model to predict flowfield characteristics in and downstream of separation bubbles. The fix is an ad hoc term that is a function of the local ratio of turbulent production to dissipation; it is used to multiply the omega-destruction term, increasing eddy viscosity in separated regions. With this fix, several flowfields are investigated. Results show that, although the "separation fix" can provide dramatic improvement in some cases, it is not consistently good for all flows. Thus, although it may prove helpful in many situations in its current form, this model may benefit from further refinements, including better sensitization to the energetics of turbulence in the separated region.

  10. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mesquita, Jayme Alves; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2007-02-01

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100μm of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  11. An Improved Experimental Method for Simulating Erosion Processes by Concentrated Channel Flow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Yu; Mo, Bin; Mi, Hong-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Rill erosion is an important process that occurs on hill slopes, including sloped farmland. Laboratory simulations have been vital to understanding rill erosion. Previous experiments obtained sediment yields using rills of various lengths to get the sedimentation process, which disrupted the continuity of the rill erosion process and was time-consuming. In this study, an improved experimental method was used to measure the rill erosion processes by concentrated channel flow. By using this method, a laboratory platform, 12 m long and 3 m wide, was used to construct rills of 0.1 m wide and 12 m long for experiments under five slope gradients (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 degrees) and three flow rates (2, 4, and 8 L min−1). Sediment laden water was simultaneously sampled along the rill at locations 0.5 m, 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, 4 m, 5 m, 6 m, 7 m, 8 m, 10 m, and 12 m from the water inlet to determine the sediment concentration distribution. The rill erosion process measured by the method used in this study and that by previous experimental methods are approximately the same. The experimental data indicated that sediment concentrations increase with slope gradient and flow rate, which highlights the hydraulic impact on rill erosion. Sediment concentration increased rapidly at the initial section of the rill, and the rate of increase in sediment concentration reduced with the rill length. Overall, both experimental methods are feasible and applicable. However, the method proposed in this study is more efficient and easier to operate. This improved method will be useful in related research. PMID:24949621

  12. Does Coronary Stenting Following Balloon Angioplasty Improve Myocardial Fractional Flow Reserve?

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Himeno, Etsuro

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: Suboptimal distal coronary flow reserve after successful balloon angioplasty has been attributed to angiographically unrecognized inadequate lumen expansion, and adjunct coronary stenting has been shown to improve coronary flow reserve. The aim of this study was to investigate whether myocardial fractional flow reserve (FFRmyo) would increase further after coronary stenting compared with balloon angioplasty alone in the same patient group. Methods: FFRmyo and quantitative coronary angiography were obtained before and after pre-stent balloon dilation, and again after stent placement in 11 patients (7 left anterior descending artery, 3 right coronary artery and 1 left circumflex artery). FFRmyo was calculated as the ratio of Pd/Pa during intracoronary adenosine 5'-triphosphate (50 {mu}g and 20 {mu}g in the left and right coronary arteries, respectively)-induced maximum hyperemia, where Pd represents mean distal coronary pressure measured by a 2.1 Fr infusion catheter and Pa represents mean aortic pressure measured by the guiding catheter. Results: Percent diameter stenosis significantly decreased after balloon angioplasty (74% {+-} 15% vs 37% {+-} 17%, p < 0.001), and decreased further after stent placement (18% {+-} 10%, p < 0.001 vs baseline and balloon angioplasty). FFRmyo after coronary stenting (0.85 {+-} 0.09) was significantly higher than that at baseline (0.51 {+-} 0.16, p < 0.001) and after balloon angioplasty (0.77 {+-} 0.11, p < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between angiographic variables and FFRmyo. The increase in lumen dimensions after coronary stenting was followed by a further significant improvement of FFRmyo. Conclusion: These results suggest that coronary stenting may provide a more favorable functional status and lumen geometry of residual coronary stenosis compared with balloon angioplasty alone.

  13. Improving Control of Microbially-Induced Mineral Precipitation in Flow Systems - Experiments and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Phillips, A. J.; Lauchnor, E.; Ebigbo, A.; Connolly, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Helmig, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures in our laboratories have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms and biofilm produced calcium carbonate precipitates to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media as well as improve the stability of unconsolidated porous media. Two overarching challenges in effectively implementing microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) are controlling (1) the spatial and temporal distribution of the formed precipitates and (2) the inactivation of microbes during the calcium carbonate precipitation process. Failure to control either one of those could result in injection well plugging or the necessity to implement costly cell-reinjection or -resuscitation strategies. Our recent work has focused on optimizing strategies for MICP in small (capillaries and micromodels), small columns (1 to 2.5 cm diameter, up to 5 cm in length), meso- (2 ft columns and 4 cm x 8 cm 2-d reactors) and large-scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone radial flow) systems. Results of these experiments have been modelled using two different approaches. (1) a microscale phase-field approach and (2) a large scale volume averaging approach. Close interaction between experimenters and modellers have resulted in improved injection strategies and the models are currently being used as experimental design tools. This presentation will focus on our recent efforts that combined 2 ft column experimentation with Darcy-scale modelling to calibrate and validate a model before utilizing the model for the optimization of biomineralization strategies in radial flow demonstrations in meso-scale sand stone cores at ambient and high pressures. Schematic pore-scale representation of MICP model

  14. Improved instrumentation for blood flow velocity measurements in the microcirculation of small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Jayme Alves Jr. de; Bouskela, Eliete; Wajnberg, Eliane; Lopes de Melo, Pedro

    2007-02-15

    Microcirculation is the generic name of vessels with internal diameter less than 100 {mu}m of the circulatory system, whose main functions are tissue nutrition and oxygen supply. In microcirculatory studies, it is important to know the amount of oxyhemoglobin present in the blood and how fast it is moving. The present work describes improvements introduced in a classical hardware-based instrument that has usually been used to monitor blood flow velocity in the microcirculation of small animals. It consists of a virtual instrument that can be easily incorporated into existing hardware-based systems, contributing to reduce operator related biases and allowing digital processing and storage. The design and calibration of the modified instrument are described as well as in vitro and in vivo results obtained with electrical models and small animals, respectively. Results obtained in in vivo studies showed that this new system is able to detect a small reduction in blood flow velocity comparing arteries and arterioles (p<0.002) and a further reduction in capillaries (p<0.0001). A significant increase in velocity comparing capillaries and venules (p<0.001) and venules and veins (p<0.001) was also observed. These results are in close agreement with biophysical principles. Moreover, the improvements introduced in the device allowed us to clearly observe changes in blood flow introduced by a pharmacological intervention, suggesting that the system has enough temporal resolution to track these microcirculatory events. These results were also in close conformity to physiology, confirming the high scientific potential of the modified system and indicating that this instrument can also be useful for pharmacological evaluations.

  15. Improving Long-term Post-wildfire hydrologic simulations using ParFlow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, S. R.; Kinoshita, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires alter the natural hydrologic processes within a watershed. After vegetation is burned, the combustion of organic material and debris settles into the soil creating a hydrophobic layer beneath the soil surface with varying degree of thickness and depth. Vegetation regrowth rates vary as a function of radiative exposure, burn severity, and precipitation patterns. Hydrologic models used by the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams use input data and model calibration constraints that are generally either one-dimensional, empirically-based models, or two-dimensional, conceptually-based models with lumped parameter distributions. These models estimate runoff measurements at the watershed outlet; however, do not provide a distributed hydrologic simulation at each point within the watershed. This work uses ParFlow, a three-dimensional, distributed hydrologic model to (1) correlate burn severity with hydrophobicity, (2) evaluate vegetation recovery rate on water components, and (3) improve flood prediction for managers to help with resource allocation and management operations in burned watersheds. ParFlow is applied to Devil Canyon (43 km2) in San Bernardino, California, which was 97% burned in the 2003 Old Fire. The model set-up uses a 30m-cell size resolution over a 6.7 km by 6.4 km lateral extent. The subsurface reaches 30 m and is assigned a variable cell thickness. Variable subsurface thickness allows users to explicitly consider the degree of recovery throughout the stages of regrowth. Burn severity maps from remotely sensed imagery are used to assign initial hydrophobic layer parameters and thickness. Vegetation regrowth is represented with satellite an Enhanced Vegetation Index. Pre and post-fire hydrologic response is evaluated using runoff measurements at the watershed outlet, and using water component (overland flow, lateral flow, baseflow) measurements.

  16. Improving the Dupuit-Forchheimer Approximation for Free Surface Flow in an Unconfined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. H.

    2003-12-01

    The classical Dupuit-Forchheimer (DF) approximation for groundwater free surface flow in an unconfined aquifer assumes that the vertical component of the seepage velocity is zero. This assumption is expected to be least accurate when there is non-zero accretion at the free surface. The DF approximation leads to a nonlinear diffusion equation satisfied by the height of the free surface. The general principles of integral methods used by Yves Parlange are to assume some simple approximate shape for some unknown function, and then to choose the parameters of this function to satisfy some known integral relation of the flow system. The DF approximation is improved by assuming that the vertical velocity component is zero at the impermeable horizontal base, and increases linearly to its unknown value at the free surface. The well known Guirinsky potential which depends only on the free surface height corresponds to the DF assumptions. Youngs used an integral relation to define a new potential which depends on the free surface height and also on the vertical velocity component, and which for steady flow satisfies a Poisson equation in the horizontal coordinates. We use the assumption of linear variation of vertical velocity to calculate an approximation to the Youngs potential. In some simple flow systems such as the classical dam problem this leads to a simple differential equation for the free surface height, which can be solved numerically. ln some cases simple explicit approximations can be found for quantities of interest, such as the maximum free surface height between drainage ditches.

  17. Ducted fan inlet/exit and rotor tip flow improvements for vertical lift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akturk, Ali

    The current research utilized experimental and computational techniques in 5" and 22" diameter ducted fan test systems that have been custom designed and manufactured. Qualitative investigation of flow around the ducted fan was also performed using smoke flow visualizations. Quantitative measurements consisted of 2D and 3D velocity measurements using planar and Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV and SPIV), high resolution total pressure measurements using Kiel total pressure probes and real time six-component force and torque measurements. The computational techniques used in this thesis included a recently developed radial equilibrium based rotor model(REBRM) and a three dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) based CFD model. A radial equilibrium based rotor model (REBRM) developed by the author was effectively integrated into a three-dimensional RANS based computational system. The PIV measurements and computational flow predictions using (REBRM) near the fan inlet plane were in a good agreement at hover and forward flight conditions. The aerodynamic modifications resulting from the fan inlet flow distortions in forward flight regime were clearly captured in 2D PIV results. High resolution total pressure measurements at the downstream of the fan rotor showed that tip leakage, rotor hub separation, and passage flow related total pressure losses were dominant in hover condition. However, the losses were dramatically increased in forward flight because of inlet lip separation and distortion. A novel ducted fan inlet flow conditioning concept named "Double Ducted Fan" (DDF) was developed. The (DDF) concept has a potential to significantly improve the performance and controllability of VTOL UAVs and many other ducted fan based vertical lift systems. The new concept that will significantly reduce the inlet lip separation related performance penalties used a secondary stationary duct system to control "inlet lip separation" occurring especially at

  18. Building block style recipes for productivity improvement in OPC, RET and ILT flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linghui; Kwa, Denny; Wan, Jinyin; Wang, Tom; St. John, Matt; Deeth, Steven; Chen, Xiaohui; Cecil, Tom; Meng, Xiaodong; Lucas, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Traditional model-based Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and rule-based Resolution Enhancement Technology (RET) methods have been the workhorse mask synthesis methods in volume production for logic and memory devices for more than 15 years. Rule-based OPC methods have been in standard use for over 20 years now. With continuous technical enhancements, these methods have proven themselves robust, flexible and fast enough to meet many of the technical needs of even the most advanced nodes. Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) methods are well known to have strong benefits in finding flexible mask pattern solutions to improve process window for the most advanced design locations where traditional methods are not sufficient. However, OPC/RET requirements at each node have changed radically in the last 20 years beyond just technical requirements. The volume of engineering work to be done has also skyrocketed. The number of device layers which need OPC/RET can be 10X higher than in earlier nodes. Additionally, the number of mask layers per device layer is often 2X or more times higher with multiple patterning. Finally, the number of features to correct per mask increases ~2X with each node. These factors led to a large increase in the number of OPC engineers needed to develop the complex new OPC/RET recipes for advanced nodes. In this paper, we describe new developments which significantly improve the productivity of OPC engineers to deploy Rule Based OPC (RBOPC), Model Based OPC (MBOPC), AF, and ILT recipes in modern manufacturing flows. In addition to technical improvements such as novel multiple segment hotspot fixing solvers and ILT hot-spot fixing necessary to support correction needs, we have re-architected the entire flow based on how OPC engineers now develop and maintain OPC/RET recipes. The re-architecture of the flow takes advantages of more recent developments in modular and structured programming methods which are known to benefit ease engineering software

  19. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  20. LJUBLJANICA CONNECTS - Restoration of the Ljubljanica River corridor and improvement of the river's flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabret, Katarina; Sapač, Klaudija; Šraj, Mojca; Bezak, Nejc; Sečnik, Matej; Vidmar, Andrej; Brilly, Mitja

    2016-04-01

    The project Ljubljanica connects is focused on improving connectivity and living conditions in Ljubljanica River which flows through capital city of Slovenia, Ljubljana. It represents living environment for endangered and Natura 2000 targeted fish species Danube Salmon (Hucho hucho), Danube Roach (Rutilus pigus) and Striped Chub (Leuciscus souffia). The project consists of four sets of activities: concrete restoration actions including improvement of two fish passes, monitoring of fish migration, monitoring of eco-hydrological parameters, and raising of public awareness. To improve living conditions the concrete restoration measures were performed. The reconstructions of sill and two fish passes on the Ljubljanica River have been implemented and barrier's lifting system on the weir was modernized. Above the sill in Zalog there is an oxbow which was disconnected with main river channel during the low flows. Interrupted inflow of fresh water caused very poor living conditions for animals in the oxbow. The raise of the sill helped to improve this situation. One of the fish passes included in the project is more than 100 years old whereas both are protected as cultural and technical heritage. None was working properly and due to the protection no visible nor drastic measures were allowed. With smaller improvements we managed to re-establish their operation. A lifting system of the barrier at the Ambrožev trg gate was outdated and did not allow precise regulation of the water level. Too fast raising of the barrier instantly caused deterioration of eco-hydrological conditions downstream. With modernization of the electromechanical equipment the situation is improved. The fish monitoring helps us to evaluate success of concrete restoration actions. The fish population status is monitored with marking the fish with Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags. Regarding the location of catch we implant tags beneath transparent or translucent tissue combining different tag

  1. INEL cold test pit demonstration of improvements in information derived from non-intrusive geophysical methods over buried waste sites. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-29

    Under Contract between US DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Blackhawk Geosciences Division of Coleman Research Corporation (BGD-CRC), geophysical investigations were conducted to improve the detection of buried wastes. Site characterization is a costly and time consuming process with the most costly components being drilling, sampling, and chemical analysis of samples. There is a focused effort at US DOE and other agencies to investigate methodologies that reduce costs and shorten the time between characterization and clean-up. These methodologies take the form of employing non-invasive (geophysical) and minimal invasive (e.g., cone penetrometer driving) techniques of characterization, and implementing a near real-time, rational decision-making process (Expedited Site Characterization). Over the Cold Test Pit (CTP) at INEL, data were acquired with multiple sensors on a dense grid. Over the CTP the interpretations inferred from geophysical data are compared with the known placement of various waste forms in the pit. The geophysical sensors employed were magnetics, frequency and time domain electromagnetics, and ground penetrating radar. Also, because of the high data density acquired, filtering and other data processing and imaging techniques were tested. The conclusions derived from the geophysical surveys were that pit boundaries, berms between cells within the pit, and individual objects placed in the pit were best mapped by the new Geonics EM61 time domain EM metal detector. Part of the reason for the effectiveness of the time domain metal detector is that objects buried in the pit are dominantly metallic. Also, the utility of geophysical data is significantly enhanced by dimensional and 3-dimensional imaging formats. These images will particularly assist remediation engineers in visualizing buried wastes.

  2. Improving the flow representation in a stochastic programming model for hydropower operations in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Y.; Olivares, M. A.; Vargas, X.

    2015-12-01

    This research aims to improve the representation of stochastic water inflows to hydropower plants used in a grid-wide, power production scheduling model in central Chile. The model prescribes the operation of every plant in the system, including hydropower plants located in several basins, and uses stochastic dual dynamic programming (SDDP) with possible inflow scenarios defined from historical records. Each year of record is treated as a sample of weekly inflows to power plants, assuming this intrinsically incorporates spatial and temporal correlations, without any further autocorrelation analysis of the hydrological time series. However, standard good practice suggests the use of synthetic flows instead of raw historical records.The proposed approach generates synthetic inflow scenarios based on hydrological modeling of a few basins in the system and transposition of flows with other basins within so-called homogeneous zones. Hydrologic models use precipitation and temperature as inputs, and therefore this approach requires producing samples of those variables. Development and calibration of these models imply a greater demand of time compared to the purely statistical approach to synthetic flows. This approach requires consideration of the main uses in the basins: agriculture and hydroelectricity. Moreover a geostatistical analysis of the area is analyzed to generate a map that identifies the relationship between the points where the hydrological information is generated and other points of interest within the power system. Consideration of homogeneous zones involves a decrease in the effort required for generation of information compared with hydrological modeling of every point of interest. It is important to emphasize that future scenarios are derived through a probabilistic approach that incorporates the features of the hydrological year type (dry, normal or wet), covering the different possibilities in terms of availability of water resources. We present

  3. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  4. Improving Godunov-type reconstructions for simulation of vortex-dominated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei; Baeder, James D.

    2006-04-01

    A systematic Fourier accuracy analysis is performed to examine the numerical diffusion inherent in a Godunov-type reconstruction, including both the reconstruction of the solution within each cell and the computation of the derivative terms of the reconstruction. It is found that compared with the more popular fifth-order polynomial fit of the interface values, a piecewise quadratic reconstruction of the solution with more accurate slope and curvature, especially those computed by compact difference schemes, is much less dissipative. Therefore, further given in the paper is a general framework to make a piecewise quadratic reconstruction free of numerical oscillations around the shocks. The improved accuracy and robustness of the resulting Godunov-type schemes for simulation of vortex-dominated flows are demonstrated with the numerical results of several carefully selected cases, including vortex convection and shock-vortex interaction.

  5. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Rhee, Man Hee; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2013-12-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24396387

  6. Nattokinase improves blood flow by inhibiting platelet aggregation and thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja-Young; Kim, Tae-Su; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Kwang Sei; Park, Sung Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nattokinase on the in vitro platelet aggregation and in vivo thrombosis were investigated in comparison with aspirin. Rabbit platelet-rich plasma was incubated with nattokinase and aggregation inducers collagen and thrombin, and the platelet aggregation rate was analyzed. Nattokinase significantly inhibited both the collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregations. Nattokinase also reduced thromboxane B2 formation from collagen-activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. Rats were orally administered with nattokinase for 1 week, and their carotid arteries were exposed. Arterial thrombosis was induced by applying 35% FeCl3-soaked filter paper for 10 min, and the blood flow was monitored with a laser Doppler probe. Nattokinase delayed the FeCl3-induced arterial occlusion in a dose-dependent manner, doubling the occlusion time at 160 mg/kg. In addition, a high dose (500 mg/kg) of nattokinase fully prevented the occlusion, as achieved with aspirin (30 mg/kg). The results indicate that nattokinase extracted from fermented soybean inhibit platelet aggregation by blocking thromboxane formation, and thereby delay thrombosis following oxidative arterial wall injury. Therefore, it is suggested that nattokinase could be a good candidate without adverse effects for the improvement of blood flow. PMID:24396387

  7. Time Domain Transformations to Improve Hydrologic Model Consistency: Parameterization in Flow-Corrected Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. J.; Marshall, L. A.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Streamflow modeling is highly complex. Beyond the identification and mapping of dominant runoff processes to mathematical models, additional challenges are posed by the switching of dominant streamflow generation mechanisms temporally and dynamic catchment responses to precipitation inputs based on antecedent conditions. As a result, model calibration is required to obtain parameter values that produce acceptable simulations of the streamflow hydrograph. Typical calibration approaches assign equal weight to all observations to determine the best fit over the simulation period. However, the objective function can be biased toward (i.e., implicitly weight) certain parts of the hydrograph (e.g., high streamflows). Data transformations (e.g., logarithmic or square root) scale the magnitude of the observations and are commonly used in the calibration process to reduce implicit weighting or better represent assumptions about the model residuals. Here, we consider a time domain data transformation rather than the more common data domain approaches. Flow-corrected time was previously employed in the transit time modeling literature. Conceptually, it stretches time during high streamflow and compresses time during low streamflow periods. Therefore, streamflow is dynamically weighted in the time domain, with greater weight assigned to periods with larger hydrologic flux. Here, we explore the utility of the flow-corrected time transformation in improving model performance of the Catchment Connectivity Model. Model process fidelity was assessed directly using shallow groundwater connectivity data collected at Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest. Our analysis highlights the impact of data transformations on model consistency and parameter sensitivity.

  8. An Improved Discrete-Time Model for Heterogeneous High-Speed Train Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Bin; Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Xin-Gang

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to present a simulation model for heterogeneous high-speed train traffic flow based on an improved discrete-time model (IDTM). In the proposed simulation model, four train control strategies, including departing strategy, traveling strategy, braking strategy, overtaking strategy, are well defined to optimize train movements. Based on the proposed simulation model, some characteristics of train traffic flow are investigated. Numerical results indicate that the departure time intervals, the station dwell time, the section length, and the ratio of fast trains have different influence on traffic capacity and train average velocity. The results can provide some theoretical support for the strategy making of railway departments. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2012CB725400, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 71222101, the Research Foundation of State Key Laboratory of Rail Traffic Control and Safety under Grant No. RCS2014ZT16, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities No. 2015YJS088, Beijing Jiaotong University

  9. Dual targeting improves microbubble contrast agent adhesion to VCAM-1 and P-selectin under flow

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, E. A.; Pickard, J. E.; Rychak, J.; Klibanov, A.; Ley, K.

    2009-01-01

    To improve ultrasound contrast agents targeted to the adhesion molecules P-selectin and VCAM-1 for the purpose of molecular imaging of atherosclerotic plaques, perfluorocarbon-filled phospholipid microbubble contrast agents were coupled by a polyethylene glycol-biotin-streptavidin bridge with mAb MVCAM.A(429), a sialyl Lewisx polymer (PAA-sLex), or both (dual). Approximately three hundred thousand antibody molecules were coupled to the surface of each microbubble. Recombinant mouse P-selectin and/or VCAM-1 coated on flow chambers showed saturation of binding at approximately 15 ng/μl, resulting in 800 and 1200 molecules/μm2 for P-selectin and VCAM-1, respectively. Dual substrates coated with equal concentrations of P-selectin and VCAM-1 had site densities between 50 and 60% of single substrates. When microbubbles were perfused through flow chambers at 5×106 microbubbles/ml (wall shear stress from 1.5 to 6 dyn/cm2) dual targeted microbubbles adhered almost twice as efficiently as single targeted microbubbles at 6 dyn/cm2. The present study suggests that dual targeted contrast agents may be useful for atherosclerotic plaque detection at physiologically relevant shear stresses. PMID:19666063

  10. An improved equilibrium-kinetics speciation algorithm for redox reactions in variably saturated subsurface flow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Brimhall, George

    1999-07-01

    Reactive chemical transport occurs in a variety of geochemical environments, and over a broad range of space and time scales. Efficiency of the chemical speciation and water-rock-gas interaction calculations is important for modeling field-scale multidimensional reactive transport problems. An improved efficient model, REACT, for simulating water-rock-gas interaction under equilibrium and kinetic conditions, has been developed. In this model, equilibrium and kinetic reactions are solved simultaneously by Newton-Raphson iteration. The REACT speciation model was coupled with the multidimensional nonisothermal multiphase flow and mass transport code TOUGH2, resulting in the general purpose reactive chemical transport simulator TOUGHREACT. An application to supergene copper enrichment of a typical copper protore that includes the sulfide minerals pyrite (FeS 2) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) is presented. The efficiency and convergence of the present model is demonstrated from this numerically difficult application that involves very large variations in the concentrations of oxygen, and sulfide and sulfate species. TOUGHREACT provides a detailed description of water-rock-gas interactions during fully transient, multiphase, nonisothermal flow and transport in hydrologically and geochemically heterogeneous media. The code is helpful for assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, geothermal convection, waste disposal, contaminant transport and water quality.

  11. Lean techniques for the improvement of patients’ flow in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chan, HY; Lo, SM; Lee, LLY; Lo, WYL; Yu, WC; Wu, YF; Ho, ST; Yeung, RSD; Chan, JTS

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency departments (EDs) face problems with overcrowding, access block, cost containment, and increasing demand from patients. In order to resolve these problems, there is rising interest to an approach called “lean” management. This study aims to (1) evaluate the current patient flow in ED, (2) to identify and eliminate the non-valued added process, and (3) to modify the existing process. METHODS: It was a quantitative, pre- and post-lean design study with a series of lean management work implemented to improve the admission and blood result waiting time. These included structured re-design process, priority admission triage (PAT) program, enhanced communication with medical department, and use of new high sensitivity troponin-T (hsTnT) blood test. Triage waiting time, consultation waiting time, blood result time, admission waiting time, total processing time and ED length of stay were compared. RESULTS: Among all the processes carried out in ED, the most time consuming processes were to wait for an admission bed (38.24 minutes; SD 66.35) and blood testing result (mean 52.73 minutes, SD 24.03). The triage waiting time and end waiting time for consultation were significantly decreased. The admission waiting time of emergency medical ward (EMW) was significantly decreased from 54.76 minutes to 24.45 minutes after implementation of PAT program (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The application of lean management can improve the patient flow in ED. Acquiescence to the principle of lean is crucial to enhance high quality emergency care and patient satisfaction. PMID:25215143

  12. Cold-air performance of a 15.41-cm-tip-diameter axial-flow power turbine with variable-area stator designed for a 75-kW automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Kofskey, M. G.; Wong, R. Y.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of the axial flow, variable area stator power turbine stage for the Department of Energy upgraded automotive gas turbine engine was conducted in cold air. The interstage transition duct, the variable area stator, the rotor, and the exit diffuser were included in the evaluation of the turbine stage. The measured total blading efficiency was 0.096 less than the design value of 0.85. Large radial gradients in flow conditions were found at the exit of the interstage duct that adversely affected power turbine performance. Although power turbine efficiency was less than design, the turbine operating line corresponding to the steady state road load power curve was within 0.02 of the maximum available stage efficiency at any given speed.

  13. Interfacial coupling between immiscible polymers: Flow accelerates reaction and improves adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jie

    As the workhorses of the plastics industry, polyolefins are consumed in the largest volume of all types of polymers. Despite their wide use, polyolefins suffer from poor adhesion and compatibility with other polar polymers due to their intrinsic low polarity and lack of functional groups. The first goal of this study is to enhance interfacial adhesion between polyolefins with other polymers through coupling reaction of functional polymers. We have used functional polyethylenes with maleic anhydride, hydroxyl, primary and secondary amino groups grafted through reactive extrusion. Functional polyolefins dramatically improved the performance of polyolefins, including adhesion, compatibility, hardness and scratch resistance, and greatly expand their applications. The second goal is to understand the factors affecting adhesion. We systematically investigated two categories of parameters. One is molecular: the type and incorporation level of functional groups. The other is processing condition: die design in extruders, reaction time and temperature. The interfacial adhesion was measured with the asymmetric dual cantilever beam test and T-peel test. The extent of reaction was quantified through measuring anchored copolymers via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A quantitative correlation between adhesion and coupling reaction was developed. A coextruded bilayer system with coupling reaction at interfaces was created to clarify processing effects on the kinetics of coupling reactions. For the reaction between maleic anhydride modified polyethylene and nylon 6, the reaction rate during coextrusion through a fishtail die with compressive/extensional flow was strikingly almost two orders of magnitude larger than that through a constant thickness die without compressive flow. The latter reaction rate was close to that of quiescent lamination. We attribute the reaction acceleration through the fishtail die to the large deformation rate under the compressive/extensional flow

  14. Single Limb Exercise Induces Femoral Artery Remodeling and Improves Blood Flow in the Hemiparetic Leg Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Sandra A.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Guo, Lisa X.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose After stroke, individuals have decreased mobility of the hemiparetic leg, which demands less muscle oxygen consumption; thus, blood flow decreases. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of single limb exercise (SLE) on femoral artery blood flow, diameter and peak flow velocity in the hemiparetic leg after stroke. Methods Twelve individuals (60.6 ± 14.5 years of age; 5 male) with chronic stroke (69.1 ± 82.2 months; 5 with right-side hemiparesis) participated in the study. The intervention consisted of a SLE knee extension/flexion protocol three times per week for 4 weeks. Using Doppler ultrasound, bilateral femoral artery blood flow, diameter and peak flow velocity was assessed at baseline, after 2 weeks and after 4 weeks of SLE. Results Using repeated measures ANOVA, femoral artery blood flow, arterial diameter, and blood flow velocity in the hemiparetic limb were significantly improved (p < 0.0001) after the SLE. No significant changes occurred in the non-trained limb for any outcome measures. Conclusions These data suggest that a 4-week SLE training program that increases muscular activity in the hemiparetic limb improves femoral artery blood flow, diameter, and peak velocity. SLE may be an important training strategy in stroke rehabilitation to minimize the vascular changes that occur post-stroke due to decreased activity of the hemiparetic limb. PMID:19520990

  15. Constitutive expression of DaCBF7, an Antarctic vascular plant Deschampsia antarctica CBF homolog, resulted in improved cold tolerance in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Lee, Jungeun; Cui, Li Hua; Kang, Yoonjee; Oh, Tae Kyung; Park, Hyun; Lee, Hyoungseok; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-07-01

    Deschampsia antarctica is an Antarctic hairgrass that grows on the west coast of the Antarctic peninsula. In this report, we have identified and characterized a transcription factor, D. antarctica C-repeat binding factor 7 (DaCBF7), that is a member of the monocot group V CBF homologs. The protein contains a single AP2 domain, a putative nuclear localization signal, and the typical CBF signature. DaCBF7, like other monocot group V homologs, contains a distinct polypeptide stretch composed of 43 amino acids in front of the AP2 motif. DaCBF7 was predominantly localized to nuclei and interacted with the C-repeat/dehydration responsive element (CRT/DRE) core sequence (ACCGAC) in vitro. DaCBF7 was induced by abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, and salinity. To investigate its possible cellular role in cold tolerance, a transgenic rice system was employed. DaCBF7-overexpressing transgenic rice plants (Ubi:DaCBF7) exhibited markedly increased tolerance to cold stress compared to wild-type plants without growth defects; however, overexpression of DaCBF7 exerted little effect on tolerance to drought or salt stress. Transcriptome analysis of a Ubi:DaCBF7 transgenic line revealed 13 genes that were up-regulated in DaCBF7-overexpressing plants compared to wild-type plants in the absence of cold stress and in short- or long-term cold stress. Five of these genes, dehydrin, remorin, Os03g63870, Os11g34790, and Os10g22630, contained putative CRT/DRE or low-temperature responsive elements in their promoter regions. These results suggest that overexpression of DaCBF7 directly and indirectly induces diverse genes in transgenic rice plants and confers enhanced tolerance to cold stress. PMID:26025521

  16. From a project to transformation: how "going against the flow" led to improved access and patient flow in an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Alikhan, L Miin; Howard, Robert J; Bowry, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A results-driven approach to optimizing patient flow, grounded on quality improvement, change management and organizational learning principles, is described. Tactics included collaborative governance, performance management, rapid process improvements and implementation toolkits. Results included an 83.1% decrease in emergent volumes waiting for greater than 24 hours and a 49.1% improvement in emergency department length of stay for admitted patients. There were no adverse outcomes on other key indicators. Sustainability remains the challenge but early results are encouraging. PMID:19999372

  17. Cold sensitivity test for individuals with non-freezing cold injury: the effect of prior exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the chronic symptoms of non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) is cold sensitivity. This study examined the effects of prior exercise on the response to a cold sensitivity test (CST) in NFCI patients with the aim of improving diagnostic accuracy. Methods Twenty three participants, previously diagnosed with NFCI by a Cold Injuries Clinic, undertook two CSTs. Participants either rested (air temperature 31°C) for approximately 80 min (prior rest condition (REST)) or rested for 30 min before exercising gently for 12 min (prior exercise condition (EX)). Following REST and EX, the participants placed their injured foot, covered in a plastic bag, into 15°C water for 2 min; this was followed by spontaneous rewarming in 31°C air for 10 min. Results The great toe skin temperature (Tsk) before immersion averaged 32.5 (3.4)°C in both conditions. Following immersion, the rate of rewarming of the great toe Tsk was faster in EX compared to REST and was higher 5 min (31.7 (3.4)°C vs. 29.8 (3.4)°C) and 10 min (33.8 (4.0)°C vs. 32.0 (4.0)°C) post-immersion. Over the first 5 min of rewarming, changes in the great toe Tsk correlated with the changes in skin blood flow (SkBF) in EX but not the REST condition. No relationship was observed between Tsk in either CST and the severity of NFCI as independently clinically assessed. Conclusions Exercise prior to the CST increased the rate of the toe Tsk rewarming, and this correlated with the changes in SkBF. However, the CST cannot be used in isolation in the diagnosis of NFCI, although the EX CST may prove useful in assessing the severity of post-injury cold sensitivity for prognostic and medico-legal purposes. PMID:23849038

  18. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  19. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  20. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics - colds and flu ... treat infections that are caused by a virus. Colds and flu are caused by viruses. If you ... Hamilton A. Treatments for symptoms of the common cold. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(12):Online. PMID: ...

  1. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    Colds and vitamin C ... belief that vitamin C can cure the common cold , research about this claim is conflicting. Large doses ... vitamin C may help reduce how long a cold lasts, but they do not appear to protect ...

  2. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  3. Cold-batter mincing of hot-boned and crust-freezing air-chilled turkey breast improved meat turnover time and product quality.

    PubMed

    Medellin-Lopez, M; Sansawat, T; Strasburg, G; Marks, B P; Kang, I

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the combined effects of turkey hot-boning and cold-batter mincing technology on acceleration of meat turnover and meat quality improvement. For each of 3 replications, 15 turkeys were slaughtered and eviscerated. Three of the eviscerated carcasses were randomly assigned to water-immersion chilling for chill-boning (CB) and the remaining were immediately hot-boned (HB), half of which were used without chilling whereas the remaining were subjected to crust-freezing air chilling (CFAC) in an air-freezing room (1.0 m/s, -12°C) with/without 1/4; sectioning (HB-1/4;CFAC, HB-CFAC). As a result, CB and HB breasts were minced using 1 of 5 treatments: (1) CB and traditional mincing (CB-T), (2) HB and mincing with no chilling (HB-NC), (3) HB and mincing with CO2 (HB-CO2), (4) HB and mincing after CFAC (HB-CFAC), and (5) HB and mincing after quarter sectioning and CFAC (HB-1/4;CFAC). Traditional water-immersion chilling took an average of 5.5 h to reduce the breast temperature to 4°C, whereas HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC took 1.5 and 1 h, respectively. The breast of HB-CFAC and HB-1/4;CFAC showed significantly higher pH (6.0-6.1), higher fragmentation index (196-198), and lower R-value (1.0-1.1; P < 0.05) than those of the CB controls. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in sarcomere length were seen between CB-T and HB-CFAC filets regardless of quarter sectioning. When muscle was minced, the batter pH (5.9) of CB-T was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those (6.1-6.3) of HB-NC, HB-CO2, and HB-1/4;CFAC, with the intermediate pH (6.0) seen for the HB-CFAC. When meat batters were cooked, higher cooking yield (90 - 91%; P < 0.05) was found in HB-CFAC, HB-1/4;CFAC, and HB-CO2, followed by HB-NC (90%) and finally CB-T (86%). Stress values (47-51 kPa) of HB-CFAC gels were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of CB-T (30 kPa) and HB-NC (36 kPa). A similar trend was found in strain values. PMID:24604866

  4. Stability Improvement of High-Pressure-Ratio Turbocharger Centrifugal Compressor by Asymmetric Flow Control-Part I: Non-Axisymmetrical Flow in Centrifugal Compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyang; Zheng, Xinqian; Zhang, Yangjun; Bamba, Takahiro; Tamaki, Hideaki; Huenteler, Joern; Li, Zhigang

    2013-03-01

    This is Part I of a two-part paper documenting the development of a novel asymmetric flow control method to improve the stability of a high-pressure-ratio turbocharger centrifugal compressor. Part I focuses on the nonaxisymmetrical flow in a centrifugal compressor induced by the nonaxisymmetrical geometry of the volute while Part II describes the development of an asymmetric flow control method to avoid the stall on the basis of the characteristic of nonaxisymmetrical flow. To understand the asymmetries, experimental measurements and corresponding numerical simulation were carried out. The static pressure was measured by probes at different circumferential and stream-wise positions to gain insights about the asymmetries. The experimental results show that there is an evident nonaxisymmetrical flow pattern throughout the compressor due to the asymmetric geometry of the overhung volute. The static pressure field in the diffuser is distorted at approximately 90 deg in the rotational direction of the volute tongue throughout the diffuser. The magnitude of this distortion slightly varies with the rotational speed. The magnitude of the static pressure distortion in the impeller is a function of the rotational speed. There is a significant phase shift between the static pressure distributions at the leading edge of the splitter blades and the impeller outlet. The numerical steady state simulation neglects the aforementioned unsteady effects found in the experiments and cannot predict the phase shift, however, a detailed asymmetric flow field structure is obviously obtained. PMID:24891757

  5. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 2: A model for supersonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. The second part of the present report focuses on the extension of a well-known correlation for cascade losses at supersonic inlet flows. It was originally established for DCA bladings and is now modified to reflect the flow situation in blade rows having low-cambered, arbitrarily designed blades including precompression blades. Finally, the steady loss increase from subsonic to supersonic inlet-flow velocities demonstrates the matched performance of the different correlations of the new model.

  6. A simple flow cytometry method improves the detection of phosphatidylserine-exposing extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Arraud, N; Gounou, C; Linares, R; Brisson, A R

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasma contains cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), which participate in physiopathological processes and have potential applications as disease biomarker. However, the enumeration of EVs faces major problems, due to their sub-micrometer size and to intrinsic limitations in methods of characterization, mainly flow cytometry (FCM). Objectives Our objective is to enumerate EVs in plasma, by taking as the prototype the population of phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing EVs, which constitute one of the major EV populations and are responsible for thrombotic disorders. Methods The concentration of PS-exposing EVs in platelet-free plasma (PFP) of healthy subjects was measured by FCM using either light scattering or fluorescence as the trigger and fluorescent Annexin-5 (Anx5) as the specific label. In addition, PS-exposing EVs were enumerated by electron microscopy (EM) after labeling with Anx5 gold nanoparticles and sedimentation on EM grids. Results We show that about 50× more Anx5-positive EVs are detected by FCM when detection is triggered on fluorescence as compared with light scattering. By fluorescence triggering, concentrations of 22 000–30 000 Anx5-positive EVs per μL PFP were determined, using two different flow cytometers. The limit of detection of the fluorescence triggering method was estimated at about 1000–2500 Anx5 molecules. Results from EM suggest that EVs down to 100–150 nm diameter are detected by fluorescence triggering. Conclusion This study presents a simple method for enumerating EVs. We believe that this method is applicable in a general context and will improve our understanding of the roles of EVs in pathophysiological situations, which will open avenues for the development of EV-based diagnosis assays. PMID:25348269

  7. Oral antioxidants improve leg blood flow during exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Matthew J; Trinity, Joel D; Garten, Ryan S; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Witman, Melissa A H; Bledsoe, Amber D; Morgan, David E; Runnels, Sean; Reese, Van R; Zhao, Jia; Amann, Markus; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-09-01

    The consequence of elevated oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle blood flow as well as the transport and utilization of O2 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well understood. The present study examined the impact of an oral antioxidant cocktail (AOC) on leg blood flow (LBF) and O2 consumption during dynamic exercise in 16 patients with COPD and 16 healthy subjects. Subjects performed submaximal (3, 6, and 9 W) single-leg knee extensor exercise while LBF (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure, leg vascular conductance, arterial O2 saturation, leg arterial-venous O2 difference, and leg O2 consumption (direct Fick) were evaluated under control conditions and after AOC administration. AOC administration increased LBF (3 W: 1,604 ± 100 vs. 1,798 ± 128 ml/min, 6 W: 1,832 ± 109 vs. 1,992 ± 120 ml/min, and 9W: 2,035 ± 114 vs. 2,187 ± 136 ml/min, P < 0.05, control vs. AOC, respectively), leg vascular conductance, and leg O2 consumption (3 W: 173 ± 12 vs. 210 ± 15 ml O2/min, 6 W: 217 ± 14 vs. 237 ± 15 ml O2/min, and 9 W: 244 ± 16 vs 260 ± 18 ml O2/min, P < 0.05, control vs. AOC, respectively) during exercise in COPD, whereas no effect was observed in healthy subjects. In addition, the AOC afforded a small, but significant, improvement in arterial O2 saturation only in patients with COPD. Thus, these data demonstrate a novel beneficial role of AOC administration on exercising LBF, O2 consumption, and arterial O2 saturation in patients with COPD, implicating oxidative stress as a potential therapeutic target for impaired exercise capacity in this population. PMID:26188020

  8. Using flow cytometry to estimate pollen DNA content: improved methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Paul; Husband, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Flow cytometry has been used to measure nuclear DNA content in pollen, mostly to understand pollen development and detect unreduced gametes. Published data have not always met the high-quality standards required for some applications, in part due to difficulties inherent in the extraction of nuclei. Here we describe a simple and relatively novel method for extracting pollen nuclei, involving the bursting of pollen through a nylon mesh, compare it with other methods and demonstrate its broad applicability and utility. Methods The method was tested across 80 species, 64 genera and 33 families, and the data were evaluated using established criteria for estimating genome size and analysing cell cycle. Filter bursting was directly compared with chopping in five species, yields were compared with published values for sonicated samples, and the method was applied by comparing genome size estimates for leaf and pollen nuclei in six species. Key Results Data quality met generally applied standards for estimating genome size in 81 % of species and the higher best practice standards for cell cycle analysis in 51 %. In 41 % of species we met the most stringent criterion of screening 10 000 pollen grains per sample. In direct comparison with two chopping techniques, our method produced better quality histograms with consistently higher nuclei yields, and yields were higher than previously published results for sonication. In three binucleate and three trinucleate species we found that pollen-based genome size estimates differed from leaf tissue estimates by 1·5 % or less when 1C pollen nuclei were used, while estimates from 2C generative nuclei differed from leaf estimates by up to 2·5 %. Conclusions The high success rate, ease of use and wide applicability of the filter bursting method show that this method can facilitate the use of pollen for estimating genome size and dramatically improve unreduced pollen production estimation with flow cytometry. PMID

  9. An Improved Flow Cytometry Method For Precise Quantitation Of Natural-Killer Cell Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Nehlsen-Cannarella, Sandra; Sams, Clarence

    2006-01-01

    The ability to assess NK cell cytotoxicity using flow cytometry has been previously described and can serve as a powerful tool to evaluate effector immune function in the clinical setting. Previous methods used membrane permeable dyes to identify target cells. The use of these dyes requires great care to achieve optimal staining and results in a broad spectral emission that can make multicolor cytometry difficult. Previous methods have also used negative staining (the elimination of target cells) to identify effector cells. This makes a precise quantitation of effector NK cells impossible due to the interfering presence of T and B lymphocytes, and the data highly subjective to the variable levels of NK cells normally found in human peripheral blood. In this study an improved version of the standard flow cytometry assay for NK activity is described that has several advantages of previous methods. Fluorescent antibody staining (CD45FITC) is used to positively identify target cells in place of membranepermeable dyes. Fluorescent antibody staining of target cells is less labor intensive and more easily reproducible than membrane dyes. NK cells (true effector lymphocytes) are also positively identified by fluorescent antibody staining (CD56PE) allowing a simultaneous absolute count assessment of both NK cells and target cells. Dead cells are identified by membrane disruption using the DNA intercalating dye PI. Using this method, an exact NK:target ratio may be determined for each assessment, including quantitation of NK target complexes. Backimmunoscatter gating may be used to track live vs. dead Target cells via scatter properties. If desired, NK activity may then be normalized to standardized ratios for clinical comparisons between patients, making the determination of PBMC counts or NK cell percentages prior to testing unnecessary. This method provides an exact cytometric determination of NK activity that highly reproducible and may be suitable for routine use in the

  10. The Incidence of Low-metallicity Lyman-limit Systems at z ~ 3.5: Implications for the Cold-flow Hypothesis of Baryonic Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Thomas J.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Cooksey, Kathy L.; O'Meara, John M.; Torrey, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Cold accretion is a primary growth mechanism of simulated galaxies, yet observational evidence of “cold flows” at redshifts where they should be most efficient (z = 2-4) is scarce. In simulations, cold streams manifest as Lyman-limit absorption systems (LLSs) with low heavy-element abundances similar to those of the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM). Here we report on an abundance survey of 17 H i-selected LLSs at z = 3.2-4.4 which exhibits no metal absorption in Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra. Using medium-resolution spectra obtained at Magellan, we derive ionization-corrected metallicities (or limits) with a Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampling that accounts for the large uncertainty in NH i measurements typical of LLSs. The metal-poor LLS sample overlaps with the IGM in metallicity and can be described by a model where {71}-11+13% are drawn from the IGM chemical abundance distribution. These represent roughly half of all LLSs at these redshifts, suggesting that 28%-40% of the general LLS population at z ˜ 3.7 could trace accreting gas. An ancillary sample of ten LLSs without any a priori metal-line selection is fit by a model having {48}-12+14% of metallicities drawn from the IGM. We compare these results with regions of a moving-mesh simulation. The observed and simulated LLS metallicity distributions are in good agreement, after accounting for known uncertainties in both, with the fraction of simulated baryons in IGM-metallicity LLSs within a factor of two of the observed value. A statistically significant fraction of all LLSs have low metallicity and therefore represent candidates for accreting gas; large-volume simulations can establish what fraction of these candidates actually lie near galaxies and the observational prospects for detecting the presumed hosts in emission. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. TOPAZ: The transient one-dimensional pipe flow analyzer: An update on code improvements and increased capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1987-09-01

    TOPAZ is a ''user-friendly'' computer code for modeling the one-dimensional, transient physics of multi-species gas transfer in arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, vessels, and flow branches. This report, the fourth in a series of reports documenting TOPAZ, discusses coding improvements and the addition of new capabilities. These improvements make the current version of TOPAZ considerably more versatile than the original version which was distributed last year. For example, the new version does not restrict the user to modeling only hydrogen and helium isotope flows. Users now have the capability of modeling arbitrary gas mixture flows. In addition users may define time-dependent functions for mass generation, energy deposition, flow area, and maximum integration time step. Parallel flow paths and flows through channels having noncircular cross-sections may now be simulated. Improvements in TOPAZ mesh generation have been made which permit users to add additional ''plumbing'' to existing models without renumbering the mesh. 7 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Improved design and optimization of subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovelli, A.; Carranza-Díaz, O.; Rossi, L.; Barry, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands and sand filters are engineered systems capable of eliminating a wide range of pollutants from wastewater. These devices are easy to operate, flexible and have low maintenance costs. For these reasons, they are particularly suitable for small settlements and isolated farms and their use has substantially increased in the last 15 years. Furthermore, they are also becoming used as a tertiary - polishing - step in traditional treatment plants. Recent work observed that research is however still necessary to understand better the biogeochemical processes occurring in the porous substrate, their mutual interactions and feedbacks, and ultimately to identify the optimal conditions to degrade or remove from the wastewater both traditional and anthropogenic recalcitrant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons, pharmaceuticals, personal care products. Optimal pollutant elimination is achieved if the contact time between microbial biomass and the contaminated water is sufficiently long. The contact time depends on the hydraulic residence time distribution (HRTD) and is controlled by the hydrodynamic properties of the system. Previous reports noted that poor hydrodynamic behaviour is frequent, with water flowing mainly through preferential paths resulting in a broad HRTD. In such systems the flow rate must be decreased to allow a sufficient proportion of the wastewater to experience the minimum residence time. The pollutant removal efficiency can therefore be significantly reduced, potentially leading to the failure of the system. The aim of this work was to analyse the effect of the heterogeneous distribution of the hydraulic properties of the porous substrate on the HRTD and treatment efficiency, and to develop an improved design methodology to reduce the risk of system failure and to optimize existing systems showing poor hydrodynamics. Numerical modelling was used to evaluate the effect of substrate heterogeneity on the breakthrough curves of

  13. Respiratory changes due to extreme cold in the Arctic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, P.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1993-03-01

    Effects of acute exposure and acclimatisation to cold stress on respiratory functions were investigated in healthy tropical Indian men ( n=10). Initial baseline recordings were carried out at Delhi and thereafter serially thrice at the arctic region and once on return to Delhi. For comparison the respiratory functions were also evaluated on Russian migrants (RM; n=7) and Russian natives (RN; n=6). The respiratory functions were evaluated using standard methodology on a Vitalograph: In Indians, there was an initial decrease in lung vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume 1st s (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) on acute exposure to cold stress, followed by gradual recovery during acclimatisation for 4 weeks and a further significant improvement after 9 weeks of stay at the arctic region. On return to India all the parameters reached near baseline values except for MVV which remained slightly elevated. RM and RN showed similar respiratory functions at the beginning of acute cold exposure at the arctic zone. RN showed an improvement after 10 weeks of stay whereas RM did not show much change. The respiratory responses during acute cold exposure are similar to those of initial altitude responses.

  14. Improving lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA) diagnostics via biomarker enrichment for mHealth.

    PubMed

    Lai, James J; Stayton, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    Optical detection technologies based on mobile devices can be utilized to enable many mHealth applications, including a reader for lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA). However, an intrinsic challenge associated with LFIA for clinical diagnostics is the limitation in sensitivity. Therefore, rapid and simple specimen processing strategies can directly enable more sensitive LFIA by purifying and concentrating biomarkers. Here, a binary reagent system is presented for concentrating analytes from a larger volume specimen to improve the malaria LFIA's limit of detection (LOD). The biomarker enrichment process utilizes temperature-responsive gold-streptavidin conjugates, biotinylated antibodies, and temperature-responsive magnetic nanoparticles. The temperature-responsive gold colloids were synthesized by modifying the citrate-stabilized gold colloids with a diblock copolymer, containing a thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) segment and a gold-binding block composed of NIPAAm-co-N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide. The gold-streptavidin conjugates were synthesized by conjugating temperature-responsive gold colloids with streptavidin via covalent linkages using carbodiimide chemistry chemistry. The gold conjugates formed half-sandwiches, gold labeled biomarker, by complexing with biotinylated antibodies that were bound to Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), a malaria antigen. When a thermal stimulus was applied in conjunction with a magnetic field, the half-sandwiches and temperature-responsive magnetic nanoparticles that were both decorated with pNIPAAm formed large aggregates that were efficiently magnetically separated from human plasma. The binary reagent system was applied to a large volume (500 μL) specimen for concentrating biomarker 50-fold into a small volume and applied directly to an off-the-shelf malaria LFIA to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25626532

  15. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery. PMID:23852404

  16. Analysing the information flow between financial time series . An improved estimator for transfer entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschinski, R.; Kantz, H.

    2002-11-01

    Following the recently introduced concept of transfer entropy, we attempt to measure the information flow between two financial time series, the Dow Jones and DAX stock index. Being based on Shannon entropies, this model-free approach in principle allows us to detect statistical dependencies of all types, i.e. linear and nonlinear temporal correlations. However, when available data is limited and the expected effect is rather small, a straightforward implementation suffers badly from misestimation due to finite sample effects, making it basically impossible to assess the significance of the obtained values. We therefore introduce a modified estimator, called effective transfer entropy, which leads to improved results in such conditions. In the application, we then manage to confirm an information transfer on a time scale of one minute between the two financial time series. The different economic impact of the two indices is also recovered from the data. Numerical results are then interpreted on one hand as capability of one index to explain future observations of the other, and on the other hand within terms of coupling strengths in the framework of a bivariate autoregressive stochastic model. Evidence is given for a nonlinear character of the coupling between Dow Jones and DAX.

  17. Improving variational mass-consistent models of hydrodynamic flows via boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Variational mass-consistent models for the velocity field v have been used by mesoscale meteorological community to modeling the wind field from an observed field v 0 in a bounded region Ω with boundary Γ. Variational calculus reduces the problem to the solution of an elliptic equation for a Lagrange multiplier λ subject to Dirichlet Boundary Condition (DBC) on flow-through boundaries. In this work, it is shown that DBC decreases the regularity of λ and this in turn decreases the accuracy with which the velocity field satisfies the mass-balance. The boundary condition (BC) v · n = v T · ngiven by the true field v T on the whole boundary Γ, leads only to a Neumann boundary condition (NBC) for λ. Approximations of this BC are studied. Analytic and numerical results show that the velocity field U 0 obtained from v 0 by direct integration of the continuity equation, yields a NBC that improves significantly the fields obtained with DBC's.

  18. Sirolimus formulation with improved pharmacokinetic properties produced by a continuous flow method.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Tamás; Angi, Réka; Basa-Dénes, Orsolya; Ránky, Soma; Ötvös, Zsolt; Glavinas, Hristos; Filipcsei, Genovéva; Heltovics, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    The oral bioavailability of Sirolimus is limited by poor dissolution of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a low bioavailability and large inter-individual differences in blood levels. Several different formulation approaches were applied to overcome these disadvantageous pharmacokinetic properties including the marketed oral solution and a tablet form containing wet milled nanocrystals. These approaches deliver improved pharmacokinetics, yet, they share the characteristics of complex production method and composition. We have developed a nanostructured Sirolimus formulation prepared by the controlled continuous flow precipitation of the compound from its solution in the presence of stabilizers. We have shown that contrary to the batch production the process could be easily intensified and scaled up; apparently the uniformity of the precipitation is heavily dependent on the production parameters, most likely the mixing of the solvent and antisolvent. We compared the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the nanostructured formula with the marketed nanoformula. We found that our method produces particles in the size range of less than 100nm. The solid form redispersed instantaneously in water and in biorelevant media. Both the solid form and the redispersed colloid solution showed excellent stability even in accelerated test conditions. The oral administration of the nanostructured formula resulted in faster absorption, higher exposure and higher trough concentrations when compared to the marked form. These advantageous properties could allow the development of solid oral Sirolimus formulae with lower strength and gel based topical delivery systems. PMID:26003815

  19. An Improved Method for High-throughput Discrimination and Enumeration of Sedimentary Cells Using Flow Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morono, Y.; Kallmeyer, J.; Terada, T.; Inagaki, F.; IODP Expedition 329 Shipboard Science Party

    2011-12-01

    Detection and enumeration of microbial life in marine subsurface environments provides primary information on the extent and habitability of the Earth's biosphere. Flow cytometry (FCM) is a powerful tool for identifying and enumerating fluorescence-stained cells with high throughput, using fluorescent intensity, range of wavelength, and cell size. FCM is widely used in medical sciences and aquatic microbial ecology. However, mineral grains and difficulties in distinguishing between life cells and non-specific background fluorescence prevented FCM to be applied for counting microbial cells in sediment or rock samples. SYBR Green I-stained cells can be distinguished from non-biological background signals based on differences in their fluorescence spectra. Here we extended this technique to FCM analysis by modifying the cell detachment protocol using a density gradient method, and then standardized an FCM cell counting method for various types of marine subsurface sediments. Microbial cells in sediment samples could effectively be detached and analyzed discriminatively with FCM. The high capacity of FCM to count particles (up to 10,000 cells/sec) and its high sensitivity will provide information about microbial cell abundance at high spatial resolution and with unprecedented accuracy. This improved cell count method will be useful to evaluate samples with high depth resolution, including narrow geochemical and geological interfaces as potential specific microbial niches, and may even help to asses very low population densities at the fringe of the biosphere.

  20. Methods to improve traffic flow and noise exposure estimation on minor roads.

    PubMed

    Morley, David W; Gulliver, John

    2016-09-01

    Address-level estimates of exposure to road traffic noise for epidemiological studies are dependent on obtaining data on annual average daily traffic (AADT) flows that is both accurate and with good geographical coverage. National agencies often have reliable traffic count data for major roads, but for residential areas served by minor roads, especially at national scale, such information is often not available or incomplete. Here we present a method to predict AADT at the national scale for minor roads, using a routing algorithm within a geographical information system (GIS) to rank roads by importance based on simulated journeys through the road network. From a training set of known minor road AADT, routing importance is used to predict AADT on all UK minor roads in a regression model along with the road class, urban or rural location and AADT on the nearest major road. Validation with both independent traffic counts and noise measurements show that this method gives a considerable improvement in noise prediction capability when compared to models that do not give adequate consideration to minor road variability (Spearman's rho. increases from 0.46 to 0.72). This has significance for epidemiological cohort studies attempting to link noise exposure to adverse health outcomes. PMID:27350039

  1. Improving low-temperature performance of surface flow constructed wetlands using Potamogeton crispus L. plant.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinlin; Zhang, Jian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Yin, Xiaole

    2016-10-01

    In this study, enhanced organics and nitrogen removal efficiency in SFCWs by different submerged plants for polluted river water treatment under cold temperature was evaluated. High average removal efficiencies of COD (92.45%), NH4(+)-N (93.70%) and TN (55.62%) were achieved in experimental SFCWs with Potamogeton crispus compared with SFCWs with other plants. SFCWs with underground Phragmites australis root also presented better performance than the unplanted systems, indicating its positive role of contamination removal in winter. The results of this study indicated SFCWs with hardy submerged plant P. crispus could be a more effective and sustainable strategy for removing organics and nitrogen in shallow nutrient enriched river water ecosystems under cold climate. PMID:27381001

  2. Physiological characteristics of cold acclimatization in man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Nayar, H. S.

    1981-09-01

    Studies were conducted on 15 healthy young soldiers to evaluate the effect of a cold acclimatization schedule on the thermoregulatory and metabolic activity on exposure to acute cold stress. These men were exposed to cold (10‡C) for 4 h daily wearing only shorts for 21 days, in a cold chamber. They were subjected to a standard cold test at 10 ± 1‡C the day 1, 6, 11 and 21. The subjects were made to relax in a thermoneutral room (26 28‡C) for 1 h and their heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, mean body temperature, peripheral temperatures, and shivering activity were recorded. Then they were exposed to 10‡C and measurements were repeated at 30 min intervals, for 2 h. The cold induced vasodilatation (CIVD), cold pressor response and thermoregulatory efficiency tests were measured initially and at the end of acclimatization schedule. The data show that the procedure resulted in elevated resting metabolism, less fall in body temperature during acute cold stress, reduction in shivering, improvement in CIVD and thermoregulatory efficiency and less rise in BP and HR during cold pressor response. The data suggest the possibility of cold acclimatization in man by repeated exposure to moderately severe cold stress.

  3. Cold air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 2: Effect of air ejection on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An air cooled version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine aerodynamic performance with and without air ejection from the stator and rotor blades surfaces to simulate the effect of cooling air discharge. Air ejection rate was varied from 0 to 10 percent of turbine mass flow for both the stator and the rotor. A primary-to-air ejection temperature ratio of about 1 was maintained.

  4. Effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the Sauk River Valley Aquifer and on streamflow in the Cold Spring area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The simulated contributing areas for selected watersupply wells in the Cold Spring area generally extend to and possibly beyond the model boundaries to the north and to the southeast. The contributing areas for the Gold'n Plump Poultry Processing Plant supply wells extend: (1) to the Sauk River, (2) to the north to and possibly beyond to the northern model boundary, and (3) to the southeast to and possibly beyond the southeastern model boundary. The primary effects of projected increased ground-water withdrawals of 0.23 cubic feet per second (7.5 percent increase) were to: (1) decrease outflow from the Sauk River Valley aquifer through constant-head boundaries and (2) decrease leakage from the valley unit of the Sauk River Valley aquifer to the streams. No appreciable differences were discernible between the simulated steady-state contributing areas to wells with 1998 pumpage and those with the projected pumpage.

  5. Improved blade profile loss and deviation angle models for advanced transonic compressor bladings. Part 1: A model for subsonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, W.M.; Hennecke, D.K.; Fottner, L.

    1996-01-01

    New blading concepts as used in modern transonic axial-flow compressors require improved loss and deviation angle correlations. The new model presented in this paper incorporates several elements and treats blade-row flows having subsonic and supersonic inlet conditions separately. In the first part of this paper two proved and well-established profile loss correlations for subsonic flows are extended to quasi-two-dimensional conditions and to custom-tailored blade designs. Instead of a deviation angle correlation, a simple method based on singularities is utilized. The comparison between the new model and a recently published model demonstrates the improved accuracy in prediction of cascade performance achieved by the new model.

  6. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E.; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed. PMID:27399702

  7. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed. PMID:27399702

  8. Improved Modeling of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs by Quantitatively Handling Flow Convergence into the Wellbore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelman, M.; Crandall, D.; Sams, W. N.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Complex fractured networks in the subsurface control the flow of fluids in many applications, and accurately modeling their interaction with wells is critical to understanding their behavior. For tight sand and shale formations, fluid flow is primarily restricted to fractures within each rock layer. NFFLOW was designed by the Department of Energy to model gas well production from naturally fractured reservoirs. NFFLOW is a discrete fracture simulator, with every fracture and rock matrix in the domain handled individually. One-dimensional models are used calculate the flow through connected fractures and flow from the surrounding rocks into fractures. Flow into wellbores are determined from the combined flux from connecting fractures and adjacent rock matrices. One-dimensional fluid flow equations are used because they are extremely fast to solve and represent a reasonable approximation of the physical behavior of fluids in most of the reservoir. However, near the wellbore those models become inaccurate due to gas flow convergence, which is a multidimensional situation. We present a method to correct the one-dimensional models, using data from two-dimensional fluid flow models, while maintaining the original simulator speed. By applying corrections from the two-dimensional model, the one-dimensional models can better account for gas flow convergence into the wellbore as well as the location of the wellbore within the rock strata. Corrections were successful in scaling the one-dimensional flow rates to match the two dimensional values over a wide range of parameters for both fracture flow and porous media flow into the wellbore. This is shown to increase the accuracy of history matching to production data for a wide range of wells, allowing for better modeling and prediction of future productivity. With an accurate history match established, NFFLOW can then be used to investigate issues such as the ability of the formation to sequester carbon dioxide or the effects

  9. Profoundly improving flow properties of a cohesive cellulose powder by surface coating with nano-silica through comilling.

    PubMed

    Chattoraj, Sayantan; Shi, Limin; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2011-11-01

    Poor flow properties hinder the easy handling of powders during industrial-scale processing. In this work, we show that powder flow can be substantially improved by reducing the cohesion of powders by coating them with nanosized guest particles. We further show that comilling is an efficient process for nanocoating. We have systematically investigated the effects of total number of comilling cycles (10-70 cycles) and silica loading (0-1.0 wt %) on the flow behavior of a highly cohesive and poorly flowing grade of microcrystalline cellulose powder (Avicel PH105). Optimum flow enhancement has been achieved with 1.0 wt % silica loading at 40 comilling cycles. The flow properties of nanocoated Avicel PH105 are comparable to those of Avicel PH102, which exhibits adequate flowability for processing on a high-speed tablet press. Comilling is fast and suitable for continuous processing. It shows potential for addressing industrial powder handling problems caused by poor powder flow properties. PMID:21698602

  10. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied

  11. Improving Viability of Stem Cells During Syringe Needle Flow Through the Design of Hydrogel Cell Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Mulyasasmita, Widya; Su, James; Lampe, Kyle J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases; however, current delivery protocols using direct injection result in poor cell viability. We demonstrate that during the actual cell injection process, mechanical membrane disruption results in significant acute loss of viability at clinically relevant injection rates. As a strategy to protect cells from these damaging forces, we hypothesize that cell encapsulation within hydrogels of specific mechanical properties will significantly improve viability. We use a controlled in vitro model of cell injection to demonstrate success of this acute protection strategy for a wide range of cell types including human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), human adipose stem cells, rat mesenchymal stem cells, and mouse neural progenitor cells. Specifically, alginate hydrogels with plateau storage moduli (G′) ranging from 0.33 to 58.1 Pa were studied. A compliant crosslinked alginate hydrogel (G′=29.6 Pa) yielded the highest HUVEC viability, 88.9%±5.0%, while Newtonian solutions (i.e., buffer only) resulted in 58.7%±8.1% viability. Either increasing or decreasing the hydrogel storage modulus reduced this protective effect. Further, cells within noncrosslinked alginate solutions had viabilities lower than media alone, demonstrating that the protective effects are specifically a result of mechanical gelation and not the biochemistry of alginate. Experimental and theoretical data suggest that extensional flow at the entrance of the syringe needle is the main cause of acute cell death. These results provide mechanistic insight into the role of mechanical forces during cell delivery and support the use of protective hydrogels in future clinical stem cell injection studies. PMID:22011213

  12. Standardizing admission and discharge processes to improve patient flow: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate how hospital capacity was managed focusing on standardizing the admission and discharge processes. Methods This study was set in a 900-bed university affiliated hospital of the National Health Service, near Barcelona (Spain). This is a cross-sectional study of a set of interventions which were gradually implemented between April and December 2008. Mainly, they were focused on standardizing the admission and discharge processes to improve patient flow. Primary administrative data was obtained from the 2007 and 2009 Hospital Database. Main outcome measures were median length of stay, percentage of planned discharges, number of surgery cancellations and median number of delayed emergency admissions at 8:00 am. For statistical bivariate analysis, we used a Chi-squared for linear trend for qualitative variables and a Wilcoxon signed ranks test and a Mann–Whitney test for non-normal continuous variables. Results The median patients’ global length of stay was 8.56 days in 2007 and 7.93 days in 2009 (p < 0.051). The percentage of patients admitted the same day as surgery increased from 64.87% in 2007 to 86.01% in 2009 (p < 0.05). The number of cancelled interventions due to lack of beds was 216 patients in 2007 and 42 patients in 2009. The median number of planned discharges went from 43.05% in 2007 to 86.01% in 2009 (p < 0.01). The median number of emergency patients waiting for an in-hospital bed at 8:00 am was 5 patients in 2007 and 3 patients in 2009 (p < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, standardization of admission and discharge processes are largely in our control. There is a significant opportunity to create important benefits for increasing bed capacity and hospital throughput. PMID:22741542

  13. Cold air systems: Sleeping giant

    SciTech Connect

    MacCracken, C.D. )

    1994-04-01

    This article describes how cold air systems help owners increase the profits from their buildings by reducing electric costs and improving indoor air quality through lower relative humidity levels. Cold air distribution involves energy savings, cost savings, space savings, greater comfort, cleaner air, thermal storage, tighter ducting, coil redesign, lower relative humidities, retrofitting, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). It opens a door for architects, engineers, owners, builders, environmentalists, retrofitters, designers, occupants, and manufacturers. Three things have held up cold air's usage: multiple fan-powered boxes that ate up the energy savings of primary fans. Cold air room diffusers that provided inadequate comfort. Condensation from ducts, boxes, and diffusers. Such problems have been largely eliminated through research and development by utilities and manufacturers. New cold air diffusers no longer need fan powered boxes. It has also been found that condensation is not a concern so long as the ducts are located in air conditioned space, such as drop ceilings or central risers, where relative humidity falls quickly during morning startup.

  14. Design, fabrication, commissioning, and testing of a 250 g/s, 2-K helium cold compressor system

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ganni; D. M. Arenius; B. S. Bevins; W. C. Chronis; J. D. Creel; J. D. Wilson Jr.

    2002-05-10

    In June 1999 the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Cryogenic Systems Group had completed the design, fabrication, and commissioning of a cold compressor system capable of pumping 250 g/s of 2-K helium vapor to a pressure above 1 bar. The 2-K cold box consists of five stages of centrifugal variable speed compressors with LN2 cooled drive motors and magnetic bearings, a plate fin heat exchanger, and an LN2 shield system. The new 2-K cold box (referred to as the SCN) was built as a redundant system to an existing four stage cold compressor SCM cold box that was commissioned in May 1994. The SCN has been in continuous service supporting the facility experiments since commissioning. This system has achieved a significant improvement in the total 2-K refrigeration system capacity and stability and has substantially increased the operating envelope both in cold compressor flow and operating pressure range. This paper describes the cold box configuration and the experience s in the design, fabrication, commissioning and performance evaluation. The capacity of the system for various operating pressures (0.040 to 0.025 bar at the load corresponding to a total compressor pressure ratio of 28 to 54) is presented. An effort is made to characterize the components and their operating data over the tested range. This includes the return side pressure drop in the distribution system, the heat exchanger, and the cold compressor characteristics. The system design parameters and their effects on performance are outlined.

  15. Design, fabrication, commissioning, and testing of a 250 g/s, 2-K helium cold compressor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganni, V.; Arenius, D. M.; Bevins, B. S.; Chronis, W. C.; Creel, J. D.; Wilson, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    In June 1999 the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) Cryogenic Systems Group had completed the design, fabrication, and commissioning of a cold compressor system capable of pumping 250 g/s of 2-K helium vapor to a pressure above 1 bar. The 2-K cold box consists of five stages of centrifugal variable speed compressors with LN2 cooled drive motors and magnetic bearings, a plate fin heat exchanger, and an LN2 shield system. The new 2-K cold box (referred to as the SCN) was built as a redundant system to an existing four stage cold compressor SCM cold box that was commissioned in May 1994. The SCN has been in continuous service supporting the facility experiments since commissioning. This system has achieved a significant improvement in the total 2-K refrigeration system capacity and stability and has substantially increased the operating envelope both in cold compressor flow and operating pressure range. This paper describes the cold box configuration and the experiences in the design, fabrication, commissioning and performance evaluation. The capacity of the system for various operating pressures (0.040 to 0.025 bar at the load corresponding to a total compressor pressure ratio of 28 to 54) is presented. An effort is made to characterize the components and their operating data over the tested range. This includes the return side pressure drop in the distribution system, the heat exchanger, and the cold compressor characteristics. The system design parameters and their effects on performance are outlined.

  16. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  17. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  18. Development of a combinatorial atmospheric pressure cold plasma processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terajima, Takeshi; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2004-02-01

    Low-temperature plasma can be generated under atmospheric pressure by applying an RF (13.56 MHz) voltage between parallel electrodes, the surfaces of which are preferably covered with an insulator. Applications of this atmospheric pressure cold plasma include thin film deposition, chemical synthesis, etching, resist-ashing, surface treatment, and sterilization. For seeking further improvement of the system and more applications, we have developed a combinatorial atmospheric pressure cold plasma generator to fabricate composition spread thin films by synchronizing the variation of feeding gas ratio with the substrate stage motion. This system can be extended to fabricating a variety of combinatorial libraries by controlling other parameters in the operation such as the gas flow rate, the RF power, substrate temperature, and the treatment time. The utility of this combinatorial plasma process has been demonstrated with the plasma copolymerization of CO 2 with ethylene to fix CO 2 into the plasma polymerized film in the form of ester linkage.

  19. Development of the highly loaded axial flow turbine airfoils, making use of the improved inverse channel flow design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.

    1985-11-01

    To reduce the number of the turbine airfoils or the solidity as far as possible without increasing energy loss, a study of highly loaded turbine airfoils was conducted. These airfoils were designed for the typical velocity diagrams of the first and second stages of a jet engine low pressure turbine. With regard to the design procedures, an improved inverse method, and also a boundary layer analysis technique were employed to optimize the airfoil shapes. These airfoils, and state-of-the-art aft loaded conventional airfoils designed for almost equivalent velocity diagrams were tested in the high speed cascade wind tunnel. The airfoils showed lower kinetic energy loss coefficient characteristics and wider useful incidence ranges over the wider range extended to the high subsonic regime compared with the aft loaded ones, in spite of their higher loading. In addition to some main parts of the design procedures, theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  20. A comprehensive approach to improving patient flow in our hospitals--the 'left to right, over and under' concept.

    PubMed

    Ardagh, Michael

    2015-08-21

    It is essential we manage the capacity of our hospitals so that acute demand can be accommodated without developing queues for care and backlogs of work. This paper presents a comprehensive model for improving patient flow in our hospitals by attending carefully to both the demand and capacity states of the hospital and maximising efficient flow of our acute patient journeys. The model includes attention to the patient journey as the central focus, with an overarching governance structure and an underpinning sophisticated operations structure. PMID:26367513

  1. Dataset of protein changes induced by cold acclimation in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) populations recurrently selected for improved freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bipfubusa, Marie; Rocher, Solen; Bertrand, Annick; Castonguay, Yves; Renaut, Jenny

    2016-09-01

    The data provide an overview of proteomic changes in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) in response to cold acclimation and recurrent selection for superior freezing tolerance. Proteins were extracted from crowns of two red clover cultivars grown under non-acclimated or cold-acclimated conditions, and plants obtained from the initial genetic background (TF0) and from populations obtained after three (TF3) and four cycles (TF4) of recurrent selection for superior freezing tolerance. Proteins were analyzed using a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled to mass spectroscopy (MS and MS/MS). Differentially regulated proteins were subsequently identified using MALDI TOF/TOF analysis. The data are related to a recently published research article describing proteome composition changes associated with freezing tolerance in red clover, "A proteome analysis of freezing tolerance in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)" (Bertrand et al., 2016 [1]). They are available in the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository under the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD003689. PMID:27408927

  2. Accuracy improvement of the ice flow rate measurements on Antarctic ice sheet by DInSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiramizu, Kaoru; Doi, Koichiro; Aoyama, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    to be apparent ones, the average could be a measure of flow rate estimation accuracy by DInSAR. Therefore, it is concluded that the accuracy of the ice flow rate measurement can be improved by using PRISM-DEM. In this presentation, we will show the results of the estimated flow rate of ice streams in the region of interest, and discuss the additional accuracy improvement of this method.

  3. Comparison of Noise Source Localization Data with Flow Field Data Obtained in Cold Supersonic Jets and Implications Regarding Broadband Shock Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Wernet, Mark; Clem, Michelle; Fagan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Phased array noise source localization have been compared with 2 types of flow field data (BOS and PIV). The data show that: 1) the higher frequency noise in a BBSN hump is generated further downstream than the lower frequency noise. This is due to a) the shock spacing decreasing and b) the turbulent structure size increasing with distance downstream. 2) BBSN can be created by very weak shocks. 3) BBSN is not created by the strong shocks just downstream of the nozzle because the turbulent structures have not grown large enough to match the shock spacing. 4) The point in the flow where the shock spacing equals the average size of the turbulent structures is a hot spot for shock noise. 5) Some of the shocks responsible for producing the first hump also produce the second hump.

  4. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Simon S.; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y.; Choi, Manfi M.; Cheng, Juno C.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P < 0.05). However, cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration. PMID:26735552

  5. Chronic Mild Cold Conditioning Modulates the Expression of Hypothalamic Neuropeptide and Intermediary Metabolic-Related Genes and Improves Growth Performances in Young Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong; Greene, Elizabeth; Ishola, Peter; Huff, Geraldine; Donoghue, Annie; Bottje, Walter; Dridi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Background Low environmental temperatures are among the most challenging stressors in poultry industries. Although landmark studies using acute severe cold exposure have been conducted, still the molecular mechanisms underlying cold-stress responses in birds are not completely defined. In the present study we determine the effect of chronic mild cold conditioning (CMCC) on growth performances and on the expression of key metabolic-related genes in three metabolically important tissues: brain (main site for feed intake control), liver (main site for lipogenesis) and muscle (main site for thermogenesis). Methods 80 one-day old male broiler chicks were divided into two weight-matched groups and maintained in two different temperature floor pen rooms (40 birds/room). The temperature of control room was 32°C, while the cold room temperature started at 26.7°C and gradually reduced every day (1°C/day) to reach 19.7°C at the seventh day of the experiment. At day 7, growth performances were recorded (from all birds) and blood samples and tissues were collected (n = 10). The rest of birds were maintained at the same standard environmental condition for two more weeks and growth performances were measured. Results Although feed intake remained unchanged, body weight gain was significantly increased in CMCC compared to the control chicks resulting in a significant low feed conversion ratio (FCR). Circulating cholesterol and creatine kinase levels were higher in CMCC chicks compared to the control group (P<0.05). CMCC significantly decreased the expression of both the hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and anorexigenic cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) in chick brain which may explain the similar feed intake between the two groups. Compared to the control condition, CMCC increased the mRNA abundance of AMPKα1/α2 and decreased mTOR gene expression (P<0.05), the master energy and nutrient sensors, respectively. It also significantly decreased the

  6. Improving a complex finite-difference ground water flow model through the use of an analytic element screening model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, R.J.; Anderson, M.P.; Kelson, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.This paper demonstrates that analytic element models have potential as powerful screening tools that can facilitate or improve calibration of more complicated finite-difference and finite-element models. We demonstrate how a two-dimensional analytic element model was used to identify errors in a complex three-dimensional finite-difference model caused by incorrect specification of boundary conditions. An improved finite-difference model was developed using boundary conditions developed from a far-field analytic element model. Calibration of a revised finite-difference model was achieved using fewer zones of hydraulic conductivity and lake bed conductance than the original finite-difference model. Calibration statistics were also improved in that simulated base-flows were much closer to measured values. The improved calibration is due mainly to improved specification of the boundary conditions made possible by first solving the far-field problem with an analytic element model.

  7. Cold-air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 1: Design and performance of a solid blade configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    A solid blade version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine its performance over a range of speeds from 0 to 105 percent of equivalent design speed and over a range of total to static pressure ratios from 1.62 to 5.07. The results of this investigation will be used as a baseline for comparison with those obtained from a cooled version of this turbine.

  8. Accuracy of Numerical Simulations of Tip Clearance Flow in Transonic Compressor Rotors Improved Dramatically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. Although numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated, they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because, in high-speed machines, measurements acquired in sufficient detail to be useful are rare. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field compared measured tip clearance flow details (e.g., trajectory and radial extent) of the NASA Rotor 35 with results obtained from a numerical simulation. Previous investigations had focused on capturing the detailed development of the jetlike flow leaking through the clearance gap between the rotating blade tip and the stationary compressor shroud. However, we discovered that the simulation accuracy depends primarily on capturing the detailed development of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the leakage jet and the shroud.

  9. Computation of three-dimensional, rotational flow through turbomachinery blade rows for improved aerodynamic design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, S. V.; Bozzola, R.; Povinelli, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a three dimensional computer code developed for predicting the flowfield in stationary and rotating turbomachinery blade rows is described in this study. The four stage Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme is used for solving the governing flow equations and yields solution to the full, three dimensional, unsteady Euler equations in cylindrical coordinates. This method is fully explicit and uses the finite volume, time marching procedure. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the code, steady solutions were obtained for several cascade geometries under widely varying flow conditions. Computed flowfield results are presented for a fully subsonic turbine stator and a low aspect ratio, transonic compressor rotor blade under maximum flow and peak efficiency design conditions. Comparisons with Laser Anemometer measurements and other numerical predictions are also provided to illustrate that the present method predicts important flow features with good accuracy and can be used for cost effective aerodynamic design studies.

  10. Investigation on a three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingjun; Chen, Houlei; Cai, Jinghui

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces a new type of pulse tube cryocooler, three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler (TCFPTC), which consists of one linear compressor and three cold fingers, i.e., CFA, CFB and CFC. Those three cold fingers are driven by the linear compressor simultaneously. This paper investigates two aspects. First, it studies the mass flow distribution among the three cold fingers by varying the input electrical power. The cooling powers of the three cold fingers at constant cooling temperatures and the cooling temperatures of the three cold fingers at constant cooling powers with various input electrical powers are investigated. Secondly, the interaction among the three cold fingers is investigated by varying the heating power of any one cold finger. Generally, if the heating power applied on one cold finger increases, with its cold head temperature rising up, the cold head temperatures of the others will decrease. But, when the cooling power of CFC has been 4 W, the cold head temperature of whichever cold finger increases, the cold head temperature of CFA or CFB will seldom change if its heating power keeps constant.

  11. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  12. Methane-Carbon Flow into the Benthic Food Web at Cold Seeps – A Case Study from the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as −53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other 13C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus. PMID:24116017

  13. Methane-carbon flow into the benthic food web at cold seeps--a case study from the Costa Rica subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as -53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other (13)C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus. PMID:24116017

  14. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using PET to improve the management of patients with stable ischemic coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Hiroshi; Dowsley, Taylor; Dwivedi, Girish; deKemp, Robert A; Chow, Benjamin J; Ruddy, Terrence D; Davies, Ross A; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S B; Hessian, Renee

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac PET has been evolving over the past 30 years. Today, it is accepted as a valuable imaging modality for the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease. PET has demonstrated superior diagnostic accuracy for the detection of coronary artery disease compared with single-photon emission computed tomography, and also has a well-established prognostic value. The routine addition of absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow increases the diagnostic accuracy for three-vessel disease and provides incremental functional and prognostic information. Moreover, the characterization of the vasodilator capacity of the coronary circulation may guide proper decision-making and monitor the effects of lifestyle changes, exercise training, risk factor modification or medical therapy for improving regional and global myocardial blood flow. This type of image-guided approach to individualized patient therapy is now attainable with the routine use of cardiac PET flow reserve imaging. PMID:25354033

  15. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle flows based on the equilibration of energy concept

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying

    2005-05-01

    Many particle-laden flows in engineering applications involve turbulent gas flows. Modeling multiphase turbulent flows is an important research topic with applications in fluidized beds and particle conveying. A predictive multiphase turbulence model can help CFD codes to be more useful for engineering applications, such as the scale-up in the design of circulating fluidized combustor and coal gasifications. In engineering applications, the particle volume fraction can vary from dilute (<10{sup -4}) to dense ({approx} 50%). It is reasonable to expect that multiphase turbulence models should at least satisfy some basic modeling and performance criteria and give reasonable predictions for the canonical problems in dilute particle-laden turbulent flows. In this research, a comparative assessment of predictions from Simonin and Ahmadi's turbulence models is performed with direct numerical simulation (DNS) for two canonical problems in particle-laden turbulent flows. Based on the comparative assessment, some criteria and the areas for model improvement are identified: (1) model for interphase TKE transfer, especially the time scale of interphase TKE transfer, and (2) correct prediction of TKE evolution with variation of particle Stokes number. Some deficiencies that are identified in the Simonin and Ahmadi models, limit the applicability. A new multiphase turbulence model, the Equilibration of Energy Model (EEM), is proposed in this work. In EEM, a multiscale interaction time scale is proposed to account for the interaction of a particle with a range of eddy sizes. EEM shows good agreement with the DNS results for particle-laden isotropic turbulence. For particle-laden homogeneous shear flows, model predictions from EEM can be further improved if the dissipation rate in fluid phase is modeled with more accuracy.

  16. Caffeine and the common cold.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Thomas, M; Perry, K; Whitney, H

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine whether caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee removed the malaise (reduced alertness, slower psychomotor performance) associated with having a common cold. One hundred volunteers were tested when healthy and 46 returned to the laboratory when they developed colds. Those subjects who remained healthy were then recalled as a control group. On the second visit subjects carried out two sessions, one pre-drink and another an hour after the drink. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions, caffeinated coffee (1.5 mg/kg caffeine/body weight), decaffeinated coffee or fruit juice. Subjects with colds reported decreased alertness and were slower at performing psychomotor tasks. Caffeine increased the alertness and performance of the colds subjects to the same level as the healthy group and decaffeinated coffee also led to an improvement. These results suggest that drugs which increase alertness can remove the malaise associated with the common cold, and that increased stimulation of the sensory afferent nerves may also be beneficial. PMID:9443519

  17. Finger cold-induced vasodilation: a review.

    PubMed

    Daanen, H A M

    2003-06-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes precedence over the survival of peripheral tissue. Subjects that are often exposed to local cold (e.g. fish filleters) develop an enhanced CIVD response. Also, differences between ethnic groups are obvious, with black people having the weakest CIVD response. Many other factors affect CIVD, such as diet, alcohol consumption, altitude, age and stress. CIVD is probably caused by a sudden decrease in the release of neurotransmitters from the sympathetic nerves to the muscular coat of the arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs) due to local cold. AVAs are specific thermoregulatory organs that regulate blood flow in the cold and heat. Their relatively large diameter enables large amounts of blood to pass and convey heat to the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, information on the quantity of AVAs is lacking, which makes it difficult to estimate the full impact on peripheral blood flow. This review illustrates the thermospecificity of the AVAs and the close link to CIVD. CIVD is influenced by many parameters, but controlled experiments yield information on how CIVD protects the extremities against cold injuries. PMID:12712346

  18. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  19. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  20. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...