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Sample records for cold trapped ions

  1. REVIEW: Quantum simulations with cold trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanning, Michael; Varón, Andrés F.; Wunderlich, Christof

    2009-08-01

    The control of internal and motional quantum degrees of freedom of laser-cooled trapped ions has been subject to intense theoretical and experimental research for about three decades. In the realm of quantum information science, the ability to deterministically prepare and measure quantum states of trapped ions is unprecedented. This expertise may be employed to investigate physical models conceived to describe systems that are not directly accessible for experimental investigations. Here, we give an overview of current theoretical proposals and experiments for such quantum simulations with trapped ions. This includes various spin models (e.g. the quantum transverse Ising model or a neural network), the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, the Frenkel-Kontorova model, and quantum fields and relativistic effects.

  2. Quantum simulations with cold trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    The quantum toolbox of the Innsbruck ion-trap quantum computer is applied to simulate the dynamics and to investigate the propagation of entanglement in a quantum many-body system represented by long chains of trapped-ion qubits. Quantum dynamics can be described by particle-like carriers of information that emerge in the collective behavior of the underlying system, the so-called quasiparticles. These elementary excitations are predicted to distribute quantum information in a fashion determined by the system's interactions. First, we observe the entanglement distributed by quasiparticles as they trace out light-cone-like wavefronts. Second, using the ability to tune the interaction range in our system, we observe information propagation in an experimental regime where the effective-lightcone picture does not apply. Moreover, a spectroscopic technique is presented to study artificial quantum matter and use it for characterizing quasiparticles in a many-body system of trapped atomic ions. Our approach is to excite combinations of the system's fundamental quasiparticle eigenmodes, given by delocalized spin waves. By observing the dynamical response to superpositions of such eigenmodes, we extract the system dispersion relation, magnetic order, and even detect signatures of quasiparticle interactions. In the second part of the talk, it will be shown how strings of trapped ions can be used for quantum simulations of a lattice gauge field theory. As an example, we map the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism to a string of trapped ions in a few-qubit quantum computer, simulating the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs.

  3. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  4. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  5. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  6. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  7. Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, B.; Offenberg, D.; Zhang, C. B.; Schiller, S.

    2008-10-01

    Using a laser-cooled ion trapping apparatus, we have investigated laser-induced chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and several neutral molecular gases at room temperature, O2 , CO2 , and N2O , leading to the production of cold trapped (≈20mK) BaO+ ions. The BaO+ ions were converted back to Ba+ ions via reaction with room-temperature CO. Reaction rates were determined by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The cold mixed-species ion ensembles produced were used for studying the efficiency of sympathetic cooling, by variation of the ratio of laser-cooled to sympathetically cooled ion numbers. In one extreme case, 20 laser-cooled Ba+138 ions were capable of maintaining the translational temperature of 120 sympathetically cooled barium isotopes (Ba+135-137) and 430 Ba16138O+ molecules at approximately 25mK .

  8. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  9. Superstatistical velocity distributions of cold trapped ions in molecular-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouse, I.; Willitsch, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a realistic molecular-dynamics treatment of laser-cooled ions in radio-frequency ion traps which avoids previously made simplifications such as modeling laser cooling as a friction force and combining individual heating mechanisms into a single effective heating force. Based on this implementation, we show that infrequent energetic collisions of single ions with background gas molecules lead to pronounced heating of the entire ion ensemble and a time-varying secular ensemble temperature, which manifests itself in a superstatistical time-averaged velocity distribution of the ions. The effect of this finding on the experimental determination of ion temperatures and rate constants for cold chemical reactions is discussed.

  10. Liquid metal cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Hundal, Rolv

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal being provided with a hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal which acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly.

  11. IR-induced conformational isomerization of a helical peptide in a cold ion trap.

    PubMed

    Seaiby, Caroline; Zabuga, Aleksandra V; Svendsen, Annette; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use laser-induced population transfer techniques to study the conformational isomerization of a helical peptide, Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH(+), in a cold ion trap. In one scheme, called IR-UV hole-filling spectroscopy, a single conformation is selectively excited with an IR pump laser via a distinct NH stretch vibration. After giving the vibrationally excited ions sufficient time to isomerize and re-cool in the trap, the new conformational redistribution is detected by UV photofragment spectroscopy. While we clearly observe a redistribution of the conformer populations due to isomerization, only those conformations that initially have population participate in this redistribution-we do not form conformers that were not initially present in the trap. In a second scheme, called IR-induced population transfer spectroscopy, we determine the fractional populations of the four stable conformations of Ac-Phe-(Ala)5-LysH(+) by scanning the IR laser while selectively detecting a specific conformation using UV photofragment spectroscopy. PMID:26747803

  12. Dynamics of a Cold Trapped Ion in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stefan; Haerter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2010-09-24

    We investigate the interaction of a laser-cooled trapped ion (Ba{sup +} or Rb{sup +}) with an optically confined {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The system features interesting dynamics of the ion and the atom cloud as determined by their collisions and their motion in their respective traps. Elastic as well as inelastic processes are observed and their respective cross sections are determined. We demonstrate that a single ion can be used to probe the density profile of an ultracold atom cloud.

  13. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  14. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  15. First principle simulations of phonons and thermal excitations of ultra-cold non-neutral ion plasmas in Penning traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, Dominic; Sawyer, Brian C.; Britton, Joesph W.; Bollinger, John J.

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-cold ions in Penning traps are a powerful platform for research in strongly correlated plasmas, quantum information, quantum metrology, and simulation of complex many-body problems of condensed matter theory. Thermal excitations of the ion crystals play a central role in these experiments. On the one hand, the motion associated with them is a limiting factor for the performance of current experiments. Better cooling of the ions could pave the way to new experiments. On the other hand, phonons are instrumental in some of the quantum simulation experiments because they allow one to engineer specific effective interactions between the spins of different ions. To better understand the phonons and thermal excitations in ultra-cold ion crystals we have carried out first principles molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations include a microscopic model for the laser cooling in addition to the cyclotron motion, trapping potentials, and Coulomb interactions between pairs of ions. We present results from these simulations on the stationary properties of planar ion crystals, phonon spectra and phonon mode structures, temperature of the phonon modes, and the dynamics of rearrangements of ions in the crystal.

  16. Trapping cold molecular hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Ch; Hogan, S D; Merkt, F

    2011-11-14

    Translationally cold H(2) molecules excited to non-penetrating |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states of principal quantum number in the range 21-37 have been decelerated and trapped using time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields. The |M(J)| = 3 Rydberg states were prepared from the X (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 0, J = 0) ground state using a resonant three-photon excitation sequence via the B (1)Σ(+)(u)(v = 3, J = 1) and I (1)Π(g) (v = 0, J = 2) intermediate states and circularly polarized laser radiation. The circular polarization of the vacuum ultraviolet radiation used for the B ← X transition was generated by resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing in xenon and the degree of circular polarization was determined to be 96%. To analyse the deceleration and trapping experiments, the Stark effect in Rydberg states of molecular hydrogen was calculated using a matrix diagonalization procedure similar to that presented by Yamakita et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2004, 121, 1419. Particular attention was given to the prediction of zero-field positions of low-l states and of avoided crossings between Rydberg-Stark states with different values of |M(J)|. The calculated Stark maps and probabilities for diabatic traversal of the avoided crossings were used as input to Monte-Carlo particle-trajectory simulations. These simulations provide a quantitatively satisfactory description of the experimental data and demonstrate that particle loss caused by adiabatic traversals of avoided crossings between adjacent |M(J)| = 3 Stark states of H(2) is small at principal quantum numbers beyond n = 25. The main source of trap losses was found to be from collisional processes. Predissociation following the absorption of blackbody radiation is estimated to be the second most important trap-loss mechanism at room temperature, and trap loss by spontaneous emission is negligible under our experimental conditions. PMID:21818497

  17. Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Greg C.

    2005-09-01

    This chapter describes research conducted in a few research groups in the 1990s in which RF quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers were coupled to a powerful atomic ion source, the inductively coupled plasma used in conventional ICP-MS instruments. Major section titles for this chapter are: RF Quadrupole Ion Traps Features of RF Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Selective Ion Trapping methods Inductively Coupled Plasma Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

  18. Effect of Coulomb interaction on time of flight of cold antiprotons launched from an ion trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, J. B.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1993-01-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for Maxwell-Boltzman (MB) distributions of antiprotons initially held in an ion trap and detected after being launched through a 50-cm-long shielding drift tube have been calculated. The distributions used are of temperature 0.4-40 K, cubic length 0.003-3.0 cm, and number 10-100 particles. The mutual Coulomb repulsion of the particles causes a reduction in the number of late arrival particles expected from the MB velocity distribution. The Coulomb energy is not equally divided among the particles during the expansion. The energy is transferred preferentially to the outer particles so that the reduction in the number of slow particles is not necessarily large. The reduction factor is found to be greater than unity when the potential energy of the trapped ions is greater than about 5 percent of the ions' kinetic energy and is about 2 for the launch parameters of the Los Alamos antiproton gravity experiment.

  19. Ion trap simulation tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  20. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  1. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  2. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  3. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  4. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  5. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  6. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  7. Computing rotational energy transfers of OD-/OH- in collisions with Rb: isotopic effects and inelastic rates at cold ion-trap conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sánchez, L.; Gianturco, F. A.; Carelli, F.; Wester, R.

    2015-12-01

    We report close-coupling (CC) quantum dynamics calculations for collisional excitation/de-excitation of the lowest four rotational levels of OD- and of OH- interacting with Rb atoms in a cold ion trap. The calculations are carried out over a range of energies capable of yielding the corresponding rates for state-changing events over a rather broad interval of temperatures which cover those reached in earlier cold trap experiments. They involved sympathetic cooling of the molecular anion through a cloud of laser-cooled Rb atoms, an experiment which is currently being run again through a Heidelberg-Innsbruck collaboration. The significance of isotopic effects is analysed by comparing both systems and the range of temperatures examined in the calculations is extended up to 400 K, starting from a few mK. Both cross sections and rates are found to be markedly larger than in the case of OD-/OH- interacting the He atoms under the same conditions, and the isotopic effects are also seen to be rather significant at the energies examined in the present study. Such findings are discussed in the light of the observed trap losses of molecular anions.

  8. Cold atoms in videotape micro-traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. D. J.; Retter, J. A.; Curtis, E. A.; Hall, B. V.; Llorente Garcia, I.; Eriksson, S.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2005-08-01

    We describe an array of microscopic atom traps formed by a pattern of magnetisation on a piece of videotape. We describe the way in which cold atoms are loaded into one of these micro-traps and how the trapped atom cloud is used to explore the properties of the trap. Evaporative cooling in the micro-trap down to a temperature of 1~μK allows us to probe the smoothness of the trapping potential and reveals some inhomogeneity produced by the magnetic film. We discuss future prospects for atom chips based on microscopic permanent-magnet structures.

  9. Modeling the Stability of Volatile Deposits in Lunar Cold Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crider, D. H.; Vondrak, R. R.

    2002-01-01

    There are several mechanisms acting at the cold traps that can alter the inventory of volatiles there. Primarily, the lunar surface is bombarded by meteoroids which impact, melt, process, and redistribute the regolith. Further, solar wind and magnetospheric ion fluxes are allowed limited access onto the regions in permanent shadow. Also, although cold traps are in the permanent shadow of the Sun, there is a small flux of radiation incident on the regions from interstellar sources. We investigate the effects of these space weathering processes on a deposit of volatiles in a lunar cold trap through simulations. We simulate the development of a column of material near the surface of the Moon resulting from space weathering. This simulation treats a column of material at a lunar cold trap and focuses on the hydrogen content of the column. We model space weathering processes on several time and spatial scales to simulate the constant rain of micrometeoroids as well as sporadic larger impactors occurring near the cold traps to determine the retention efficiency of the cold traps. We perform the Monte Carlo simulation over many columns of material to determine the expectation value for hydrogen content of the top few meters of soil for comparison with Lunar Prospector neutron data.

  10. Dynamics Of Ions In A Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Williams, Angelyn P.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Report describes computer-simulation study of motions of various numbers of ions in Paul trap. Study part of continuing effort to understand motions of trapped charged particles (atoms, ions, molecules, or dust particles). Motions characterized in terms of heating by radio-frequency fields, formation of crystallike structures in cold clouds of trapped particles, and other phenomena important in operation of radio-frequency traps in frequency standards.

  11. Space weathering on volatile deposits in lunar cold traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, D.; Vondrak, R.

    There are several mechanisms acting at the cold traps that can alter the inventory of volatiles there, including micrometeoroid bombardment, solar wind and magnetospheric ion sputtering, photon-stimulated desorption, and sublimation. We investigate the effects of these space weathering processes on a deposit of volatiles in a lunar cold trap by simulating the development of a column of material near the surface of the Moon. This simulation treats a column of material at a lunar cold trap and focuses on the hydrogen content of the column. We model space weathering processes on several time and spatial scales to simulate the constant rain of micrometeoroids as well as sporadic larger impactors occurring near the cold traps to determine the retention efficiency of the cold traps. We perform the Monte Carlo simulation over many columns of material to determine the expected hydrogen content of the top few meters of soil for comparison with Lunar Prospector neutron data. Each column is initialized with a random starting depth profile of hydrogen content assuming very immature soil. Time is allowed to run for 1 billion years and all changes to the column are calculated. An impactor flux from Gault [1972] is imposed to determine the timing and location of all nearby impacts. Nearby impacts excavate material from the column, exposing material from depth. More distant impacts cover the column with an ejecta blanket with a size and time dependent maturity value. In between impacts, the competing short term effects are simulated. Using the steady state delivery rate of water vapor to the lunar cold traps from Crider and Vondrak [2002], we find that the removal rate from space weathering processes does not exceed the rate at which volatiles are delivered to the cold traps on average. Together with the steady migration of hydrogen released from the soil elsewhere on the Moon, the predicted hydrogen content of the topmost meter of regolith in cold traps is within a factor of 2 of

  12. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  13. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  14. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  15. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  16. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  17. Lunar Cold Trap Contamination by Landing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, Scott T.; Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Tools have been developed to model and simulate the effects of lunar landing vehicles on the lunar environment (Metzger, 2011), mostly addressing the effects of regolith erosion by rocket plumes and the fate of the ejected lunar soil particles (Metzger, 2010). These tools are being applied at KSC to predict ejecta from the upcoming Google Lunar X-Prize Landers and how they may damage the historic Apollo landing sites. The emerging interest in lunar mining poses a threat of contamination to pristine craters at the lunar poles, which act as "cold traps" for water and may harbor other valuable minerals Crider and Vondrak (2002). The KSC Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab tools have been expanded to address the probability for contamination of these pristine "cold trap" craters.

  18. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  19. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  20. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  1. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C. E.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Bakr, W. S.; Mallard, W. J.; Brown, K. R.; Chuang, I. L.

    2006-03-15

    Chiaverini et al. [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion-trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many-zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of charged particles of 0.44 {mu}m diameter in a vacuum of 15 Pa (10{sup -1} torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion-trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four-rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through intersections. We further propose an additional dc-biased electrode above the trap which increases the trap depth dramatically, and a planar ion-trap geometry that generates a two-dimensional lattice of point Paul traps.

  2. EDITORIAL: Modern applications of trapped ions Modern applications of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Martina; Hilico, Laurent; Eschner, Jürgen

    2009-08-01

    investigation of cold molecular ions and clusters are among the fastest growing topics, leading to ultracold chemistry at the single-particle scale. The next edition of this meeting series will take the name of European Conference on Trapped Ions (ECTI) and will be held in the UK in 2010. We are looking forward to this event, which will offer the possibility to continue the fruitful interaction between research groups that employ ion traps in widely different contexts, and to take the next snapshot of this dynamic research area.

  3. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  4. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  5. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  6. Study of Cold Potassium Atom - Calcium Ion Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egodapitiya, Kisra; Gang, Shu; Clark, Robert; Brown, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    We report on our progress towards constructing a hybrid system for studying reactions between cold Potassium (K) atoms and cold Calcium (Ca+) ions. Ca+ ions will be trapped and Doppler-cooled inside a linear quadrupole ion trap. Cold K atoms will be created inside a magneto optical trap, such that the ion and the atoms are in an overlapping volume. Trapping and re-pumping beams for the Potassium MOT are derived from the same laser with wavelength 766 nm using two acousto optic modulators. The reaction products will be detected using a time-of- flight mass spectrometer that is designed to detect radially ejected ions. The main objective of this experiment is to study the rate coefficients, and identification of reaction channels between cold K atoms and Ca+ ions. Subsequently this setup will be used to study reactions between cold K atoms and sympathetically cooled molecular ions such as CaO+, and to study internal state quenching of molecular ions.

  7. Cryogenic ion trapping systems with surface-electrode traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antohi, P. B.; Schuster, D.; Akselrod, G. M.; Labaziewicz, J.; Ge, Y.; Lin, Z.; Bakr, W. S.; Chuang, I. L.

    2009-01-01

    We present two simple cryogenic rf ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 h. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with S88r+ ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 min.

  8. Improved Linear-Ion-Trap Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept for linear-ion-trap (LIT) frequency-standard apparatus proposed. Apparatus contains lengthened linear ion trap, and ions processed alternately in two regions: ions prepared in upper region of trap, then transported to lower region for exposure to microwave radiation, then returned to upper region for optical interrogation. Improved design intended to increase long-term frequency stability of apparatus while reducing size, mass, and cost.

  9. A single trapped ion in a finite range trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri Harouni, M.; Davoudi Darareh, M.

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > We present a method to describe dynamics of an ion confined in a finite size trap. > The trap is modeled with a potential in the context of an f-deformed oscillator. > The ion exhibits nonclassical properties such as squeezing and quantum interference. > . > Also this system can be used to generate highly excited motional Fock state. > The Hilbert space size effects and nano traps can be investigated by this model. - Abstract: This paper presents a method to describe dynamics of an ion confined in a realistic finite range trap. We model this realistic potential with a solvable one and we obtain dynamical variables (raising and lowering operators) of this potential. We consider coherent interaction of this confined ion in a finite range trap and we show that its center-of-mass motion steady state is a special kind of nonlinear coherent states. Physical properties of this state and their dependence on the finite range of potential are studied.

  10. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  11. Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1991-01-01

    Report describes principle of operation, design, and results of initial measurements on trapped-mercury-ion frequency-standard apparatus at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. New frequency standard being developed. Based on linear ion trap described in (NPO-17758). Expected to show much better short-term frequency stability because of increased ion-storage capacity.

  12. New ion trap for frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap was designed, which permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  13. Ultrafast entanglement of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyenhuis, Brian; Johnson, Kale; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Wong-Campos, David; Monroe, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated ultrafast spin-motion entanglement of a single atomic ion using a short train of intense laser pulses. This pulse train gives the ion a spin-dependent kick where each spin state receives a discrete momentum kick in opposite directions. Using a series of these spin-dependent kicks we can realize a two qubit gate. In contrast to gates using spectroscopically resolved motional sidebands, these gates may be performed faster than the trap oscillation period, making them potentially less sensitive to noise. Additionally this gate is temperature insensitive and does not require the ions to be cooled to the Lamb-Dicke limit. We show that multiple kicks can be strung together to create a ``Schrodinger cat'' like state, where the large separation between the two parts of the wavepacket allow us to accumulate the phase shift necessary for a gate in a shorter amount of time. We will present a realistic pulse scheme for a two ion gate, and our progress towards its realization. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  14. Cryogenic resonator design for trapped ion experiments in Paul traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, M. F.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Blatt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Trapping ions in Paul traps require high radio frequency voltages, which are generated using resonators. When operating traps in a cryogenic environment, an in-vacuum resonator showing low loss is crucial to limit the thermal load to the cryostat. In this study, we present a guide for the design and production of compact, shielded cryogenic resonators. We produced and characterized three different types of resonators and furthermore demonstrate efficient impedance matching of these resonators at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  16. Trapped Ion Optical Clocks at NPL

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H. S.; Barwood, G. P.; Hosaka, K.; Klein, H. A.; Lea, S. N.; Walton, B. R.; Webster, S. A.; Gill, P.; Huang, G.; Stannard, A.

    2006-11-07

    Forbidden transitions in single laser-cooled trapped ions provide highly stable and accurate references for optical frequency standards. This paper describes recent progress on strontium and ytterbium ion optical frequency standards under development at NPL.

  17. Dynamical Decoupling Using Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, Michael; Uys, Hermann; Vandevender, Aaron; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne; Bollinger, John

    2009-05-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the Uhrig Dynamical Decoupling (UDD) sequence in a variety of noise environments. Our qubit system consists of a crystalline array of ^9Be^+ ions confined in a Penning trap. We use an electron-spin-flip transition as our qubit manifold and drive qubit rotations using a quasi-optical 124 GHz microwave system. We study the effect of the UDD sequence in mitigating phase errors and compare against the well-known CPMG-style spin echo as a function of pulse number, rotation axis, noise spectrum, and noise strength. Our results show good agreement with theoretical predictions for qubit decoherence in the presence of classical phase noise, accounting for the effect of finite-duration π pulses. Finally, we demonstrate that the Uhrig sequence is more robust against systematic over/underrotation and detuning errors than is multipulse spin echo, despite the precise prescription for pulse-timing in UDD.

  18. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  19. Active stabilization of ion trap radiofrequency potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. G.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Restelli, A.; Landsman, K. A.; Neyenhuis, B.; Mizrahi, J.; Monroe, C.

    2016-05-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a radiofrequency (rf) Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to be better than 10 Hz or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  20. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  1. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  2. Micro-fabricated stylus ion trap.

    PubMed

    Arrington, Christian L; McKay, Kyle S; Baca, Ehren D; Coleman, Jonathan J; Colombe, Yves; Finnegan, Patrick; Hite, Dustin A; Hollowell, Andrew E; Jördens, Robert; Jost, John D; Leibfried, Dietrich; Rowen, Adam M; Warring, Ulrich; Weides, Martin; Wilson, Andrew C; Wineland, David J; Pappas, David P

    2013-08-01

    An electroformed, three-dimensional stylus Paul trap was designed to confine a single atomic ion for use as a sensor to probe the electric-field noise of proximate surfaces. The trap was microfabricated with the UV-LIGA technique to reduce the distance of the ion from the surface of interest. We detail the fabrication process used to produce a 150 μm tall stylus trap with feature sizes of 40 μm. We confined single, laser-cooled, (25)Mg(+) ions with lifetimes greater than 2 h above the stylus trap in an ultra-high-vacuum environment. After cooling a motional mode of the ion at 4 MHz close to its ground state ( = 0.34 ± 0.07), the heating rate of the trap was measured with Raman sideband spectroscopy to be 387 ± 15 quanta/s at an ion height of 62 μm above the stylus electrodes. PMID:24007096

  3. Cooling of highly charged ions in a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, L

    2000-03-31

    Highly charged ions are extracted from an electron beam ion trap and guided to Retrap, a cryogenic Penning trap, where they are merged with laser cooled Be{sup +} ions. The Be{sup +} ions act as a coolant for the hot highly charged ions and their temperature is dropped by about 8 orders of magnitude in a few seconds. Such cold highly charged ions form a strongly coupled nonneutral plasma exhibiting, under such conditions, the aggregation of clusters and crystals. Given the right mixture, these plasmas can be studied as analogues of high density plasmas like white dwarf interiors, and potentially can lead to the development of cold highly charged ion beams for applications in nanotechnology. Due to the virtually non existent Doppler broadening, spectroscopy on highly charged ions can be performed to an unprecedented precision. The density and the temperature of the Be{sup +} plasma were measured and highly charged ions were sympathetically cooled to similar temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the shape, temperature and density of the highly charged ions. Ordered structures were observed in the simulations.

  4. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  5. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  6. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  7. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  8. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  9. Improved trapping and transport of cold atoms for magnetic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadge, Amruta; James, T.; Li, X.; Lu, Bo; Garridogonzalez, N.; Finke, A.; Mellor, C.; Fromhold, M.; Koller, C.; Orucevic, F.; Kruger, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Using cold atoms, a very sensitive and high resolution magnetic and electric field sensor can be realised. Ultra-close trapping of atoms would improve the resolution of cold-atom based surface probes. The limitation on the trapping distance arises from strongly distance-dependent effects such as Casimir force, Johnson noise etc. We are constructing an experimental system to trap atoms at surface separations of less than a micron. We will demonstrate the possibility of using special surfaces such as silicon nitride membranes and graphene for sub-micron trapping. We have designed a 10-layer printed circuit board, which can magnetically trap the cold atom cloud and transport it precisely to a desired location. This gives us the ability to study multiple samples within the same vacuum environment. In order to achieve higher atom number in the initial trapping stages, we use a dual-color MOT technique for Rb-87 atoms. Using this technique we achieve a significant increase in atom number and decrease in temperature. In this talk, I will present the results of the dual color MOT. I will also report on results related to magnetic transport and sub-micron trapping of atoms.

  10. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  11. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  12. Experiments in Planar Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Rob; Burke, Timothy; Green, Dylan

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and demonstration of multipole ion traps based on concentric rings. We have developed both surface-electrode and layered planar trap designs which enable one to null the quadratic term in the electric potential to a high degree. Experiments demonstrating frequency upconversion of an applied signal demonstrate the nonlinear dynamics present in the trap. Applications include quantum chaos, ultracold chemistry, and, potentially, mass spectrometry. We acknowledge support from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and from The Citadel Foundation.

  13. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  14. A hybrid quantum system of ultracold atoms and trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sias, Carlo; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Zipkes, Christoph; Koehl, Michael; AMOP Team

    2011-05-01

    In the last decades, trapped ions and ultracold atoms have emerged as exceptionally controllable experimental systems to investigate fundamental physics, ranging from quantum information science to simulations of condensed matter models. Even though they share some common grounds in experimental techniques, such as laser cooling, ion trapping and atom trapping have developed very much independently, and only little cross-pollination has been seen. In our experiment we study how cold atoms can be combined with single trapped ions to create a new hybrid quantum system with tailored properties. We have deterministically placed a single ion into an atomic Bose Einstein condensate and demonstrated independent control over the two components within the hybrid system. We have studied the fundamental interaction processes and observed sympathetic cooling of the single ion by the condensate. Additionally, we have characterized elastic and inelastic atom- ion collisions and measured the energy-dependent reaction rate constants. Our experiment paves the way for coupling atomic quantum many-body states to an independently controllable single-particle, giving access to a wealth of novel physics and to completely new detection and manipulation techniques.

  15. Trapping cold atoms using surface-grown carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, P. G.; Machluf, S.; Younis, S.; Macaluso, R.; David, T.; Hadad, B.; Japha, Y.; Keil, M.; Joselevich, E.; Folman, R.

    2009-04-01

    We present a feasibility study for loading cold atomic clouds into magnetic traps created by single-wall carbon nanotubes grown directly onto dielectric surfaces. We show that atoms may be captured for experimentally sustainable nanotube currents, generating trapped clouds whose densities and lifetimes are sufficient to enable detection by simple imaging methods. This opens the way for a different type of conductor to be used in atomchips, enabling atom trapping at submicron distances, with implications for both fundamental studies and for technological applications.

  16. Cavity QED in a molecular ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D. I.; Bishop, Lev S.; Chuang, I. L.; DeMille, D.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2011-01-15

    We propose a class of experiments using rotational states of dipolar molecular ions trapped near an on-chip superconducting microwave cavity. Molecular ions have several advantages over neutral molecules for such cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. In particular, ions can be loaded easily into deep rf traps and are held independent of their internal state. An analysis of the detection efficiency for, and coherence properties of, the molecular ions is presented. We discuss approaches for manipulating quantum information and performing high-resolution rotational spectroscopy using this system.

  17. Trapping cold molecules and atoms: Simultaneous magnetic deceleration and trapping of cold molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelink, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-05-01

    Cooling molecules to the ultra-cold regime remains a major challenge in the growing field of cold molecules. The molecular internal degrees of freedom complicate the effort of direct application of laser cooling. An alternative and general path towards ultra-cold molecules relies on sympathetic cooling via collisions with laser-cooled atoms. Here, we demonstrate the first step towards application of sympathetic cooling by co-trapping of molecular Oxygen with Lithium atoms in a magnetic trap at a temperature of 300 mK. Our experiment begins with a pulsed supersonic beam which is a general source for cold high-flux atomic and molecular beams. Although the supersonic expansion efficiently cools the beam to temperatures below 1K, it also accelerates the beam to high mean velocities. We decelerate a beam of O2 in a moving magnetic trap decelerator from 375 m/s to a stop. We entrained the molecular beam with Li atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading the molecules and atoms into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 109 trapped molecules with background limited lifetime of 0.6 Sec. Our achievement enables application of laser cooling on the Li atoms in order to sympathetically cool the O2.

  18. A toroidal trap for cold {}^{87}{Rb} atoms using an rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold {}87{Rb} atoms in a toroidal geometry using a radio frequency (rf) dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong rf-field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has the minimum potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates trapping in toroidal geometry. In these experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in a quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in an rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for the rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in the realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  19. Synthesis of Cold Antihydrogen in a Cusp Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Kuroda, N.; Kim, C. H.; Torii, H. A.; Fujii, K.; Ohtsuka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Michishio, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Higaki, H.; Corradini, M.; Leali, M.; Lodi-Rizzini, E.; Mascagna, V.; Venturelli, L.; Zurlo, N.

    2010-12-10

    We report here the first successful synthesis of cold antihydrogen atoms employing a cusp trap, which consists of a superconducting anti-Helmholtz coil and a stack of multiple ring electrodes. This success opens a new path to make a stringent test of the CPT symmetry via high precision microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms.

  20. Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O.; Guerout, R.

    2011-08-14

    The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

  1. Small Scale Cold Traps on Airless Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, O.; Williams, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Bandfield, J.; Vasavada, A. R.; Paige, D. A.; Diviner Lunar Radiometer Science Team

    2013-10-01

    Lacking an atmosphere to transport heat, temperatures on airless bodies are primarily controlled by latitude and local time. However, local topography strongly affects temperatures at the surface and in the subsurface by changing the intensity and timing of insolation. In the case of low-obliquity bodies such as Mercury and the Earth’s moon, topography near the poles casts perennial shadows where volatiles such as water ice may be cold-trapped for billions of years. Prior studies have focused primarily on large contiguous cold traps > 1 km resolvable by instruments in lunar orbit. In this investigation, we used infrared measurements of the Moon, thermal models, and a statistical rough surface model to show that such cold traps may exist on a vast range of scales, from the largest impact craters, down to the skin depth of the diurnal temperature oscillation. The extremely insulating nature of planetary regolith leads to extreme temperature gradients and shallow diurnal skin depths. For example, the lunar 29-day diurnal temperature oscillation is damped to ~1% at a depth of 0.5 m. Therefore, at latitudes > 60° where perennial shadow exists, cold traps as small as a few tens of centimeters could exist. As two test cases, we calculated the fractional surface areas on the Moon (obliquity = 1.6°) and Ceres (3-5°) where temperatures remain < 110 K all year round, such that water ice is thermally stable at the surface for billions of years. We also calculated fractional areas where subsurface temperatures are < 145 K, such that subsurface ice deposits are stable on similar timescales. Finally, we will discuss the implications of these proposed small-scale cold traps for other airless bodies, including asteroids and giant planet satellites.

  2. Trapping and evolution dynamics of strongly magnetized cold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon

    Cold Rydberg atoms and ultracold plasmas have been studied in the strong-magnetization regime. In this new territory, novel atomic and plasma states---such as guiding-center drift Rydberg attains and strongly magnetized, quasi-neutral, ultracold plasmas---have been created and investigated. The evolution dynamics studies of these exotic diamagnetic forms of matter, made possible by implementing a superconducting magnetic atom trap, revealed rich dynamical features in the systems: The Landau-quantized energy structure has led to entirely different evolutions of the highly excited atoms in laser-excited or drift Rydberg states than in magnetic-field-free cases; and the presence of the strong magnetic field has drastically altered the collisional behavior and expansion dynamics of the plasmas. Furthermore, atom cooling and trapping methodology has been extended in multiple directions. Firstly, laser cooling and magnetic trapping of ground-state atoms has been demonstrated in magnetic; fields exceeding 3 Tesla, representing a 20-fold increase in the field-strength of cold-atom traps. Secondly, the trapping of Rydberg atoms with a lifetime of 80 ms has been achieved. This trapping technique exploits the quasi-free nature of Rydberg electrons, which can be adopted in other forms of Rydberg-atom trapping. Lastly; the trapping of two-component, ultracold plasmas has been demonstrated in a nested Penning-trap configuration. The confinement of quasi-neutral ultracold plasmas allowed us to observe novel effects such as the correlation between the ionic oscillation and the electron energy distribution.

  3. A trapped mercury 199 ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, L. S.; Giffard, R. P.; Mcguire, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mercury 199 ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap and optically pumped by mercury 202 ion resonance light are investigated as the basis for a high performance frequency standard with commercial possibilities. Results achieved and estimates of the potential performance of such a standard are given.

  4. Entanglement of trapped-ion clock states

    SciTech Connect

    Haljan, P. C.; Lee, P. J.; Brickman, K-A.; Acton, M.; Deslauriers, L.; Monroe, C.

    2005-12-15

    A Moelmer-Soerensen entangling gate is realized for pairs of trapped {sup 111}Cd{sup +} ions using magnetic-field insensitive 'clock' states and an implementation offering reduced sensitivity to optical phase drifts. The gate is used to generate the complete set of four entangled states, which are reconstructed and evaluated with quantum-state tomography. An average target-state fidelity of 0.79 is achieved, limited by available laser power and technical noise. The tomographic reconstruction of entangled states demonstrates universal quantum control of two ion qubits, which through multiplexing can provide a route to scalable architectures for trapped-ion quantum computing.

  5. An electrostatic autoresonant ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakov, A. V.; Hinch, B. J.

    2010-01-15

    A new method for ion extraction from an anharmonic electrostatic trap is introduced. Anharmonicity is a common feature of electrostatic traps which can be used for small scale spatial confinement of ions, and this feature is also necessary for autoresonant ion extraction. With the aid of ion trajectory simulations, novel autoresonant trap mass spectrometers (ART-MSs) have been designed based on these very simple principles. A mass resolution {approx}60 is demonstrated for the prototypes discussed here. We report also on the pressure dependencies, and the (mV) rf field strength dependencies of the ART-MS sensitivity. Importantly the new MS designs do not require heavy magnets, tight manufacturing tolerances, introduction of buffer gases, high power rf sources, nor complicated electronics. The designs described here are very inexpensive to implement relative to other instruments, and can be easily miniaturized. Possible applications are discussed.

  6. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  7. Extended linear ion trap frequency standard apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A linear ion trap for frequency standard applications is provided with a plurality of trapping rods equally spaced and applied quadruple rf voltages for radial confinement of atomic ions and biased level pins at each end for axial confinement of the ions. The trapping rods are divided into two linear ion trap regions by a gap in each rod in a common radial plane to provide dc discontinuity, thus dc isolating one region from the other. A first region for ion-loading and preparation fluorescence is biased with a dc voltage to transport ions into a second region for resonance frequency comparison with a local oscillator derived frequency while the second region is held at zero voltage. The dc bias voltage of the regions is reversed for transporting the ions back into the first region for fluorescence measurement. The dual mode cycle is repeated continuously for comparison and feedback control of the local oscillator derived frequency. Only the second region requires magnetic shielding for the resonance function which is sensitive to any ambient magnetic fields.

  8. Trapped-Ion Optical Frequency Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Piet O.; Leroux, Ian D.

    Optical frequency standards based on trapped atoms are the most accurate measurement devices we have available. They not only serve as superior time keepers but also lend themselves to a wide variety of applications ranging from tests of fundamental physics to the measurement of heights in relativistic geodesy. This chapter provides an introduction to the basics of optical frequency standards and clocks based on trapped ions and their applications.

  9. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  10. Sensitive detection of radiation trapping in cold-atom clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, Matthew; Stites, Ronald; Kim, Soo; Feeney, Laura; Bali, Samir

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we calculate the effect of radiation trapping on the photon statistics of the light scattered from optical molasses. We propose that an intensity correlation function measurement may be sensitive to the presence of radiation trapping at an on-resonance optical depth as low as 0.1, more than an order of magnitude less than where effects of multiple scattering in cold-atom clouds have been previously observed [T. Walker, D. Sesko, and C. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 408 (1990); D. Sesko, T. Walker, and C. Wieman, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B. 8, 946 (1991)].

  11. Motional-mode analysis of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalis, Henning; Hakelberg, Frederick; Wittemer, Matthias; Mielenz, Manuel; Warring, Ulrich; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    We present two methods for characterization of motional-mode configurations that are generally applicable to the weak- and strong-binding limit of single or multiple trapped atomic ions. Our methods are essential to realize control of the individual as well as the common motional degrees of freedom. In particular, when implementing scalable radio-frequency trap architectures with decreasing ion-electrode distances, local curvatures of electric potentials need to be measured and adjusted precisely, e.g., to tune phonon tunneling and control effective spin-spin interaction. We demonstrate both methods using single 25Mg+ ions that are individually confined 40 μ m above a surface-electrode trap array and prepared close to the ground state of motion in three dimensions.

  12. Ion trapping study in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.

    2011-03-28

    The ion trapping effect is an important beam dynamics issue in energy recovery linac (ERL). The ionized residue gas molecules can accumulate at the vicinity of the electron beam path and deteriorate the quality of the electron beam. In this paper, we present calculation results to address this issue in eRHIC and find best beam pattern to eliminate this effect. eRHIC is the future electron ion collider(EIC), which collides 5GeV to 30GeV electron beam from a new electron accelerator with the ion beam from existing RHIC ring. The electron accelerator adopts a multi-pass ERL, which contains 6 passes with 2 linacs per pass. The electron impacted ionization effect needs attention to ensure the quality of the electron beam. The high energy electrons ionize the residue gas in beam pipe. These ions may accumulate and are 'trapped' near the axis of the pipe where the electron beam passes, due to the interaction with the electron beam. The concentration of the ion may produce noticeable space charge field that affects the electron beam and neutralize the electron beam in the linacs. In the paper, we start with cross section of the ionization process and calculate the accumulation time, which are followed by the modeling to determine the criteria of the ion trapping. The ion trapping effect is determined by the longitudinal configuration of the electron bunches. The effect can be reduced or mitigate by some proper electron beam patterns. We will present these patterns with a linearized model. We present the linearized calculation on the ion motion in the cavity of multi-pass ERL and determine the stability of the ion motion from the results. We conclude that the ionized molecules won't accumulated in eRHIC linacs except both 40m ends. Electro-static clearing electrodes should be installed in those regions to remove the ions from accumulation.

  13. Hows and whys of ion trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.; Stepnowski, R.M.

    1987-09-15

    Why trap ions. The localization of a single atomic particle in a vacuum is one of the most fundamental problems of physics and one of enduring interest. Working in the gas phase at low pressures, the chemist has the opportunity to study a variety of phenomena, if such species of interest can be contained for a period of time. Ion traps provide a unique chemical system available for a variety of experiments. The authors describe the bases of the technology, its strengths and limitations, and examples of its use.

  14. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  15. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  16. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  17. Trapped Ion Magnetic Resonance: Concepts and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, Pedro Jose

    A novel spectroscopy of trapped ions is proposed which will bring single-ion detection sensitivity to the observation of magnetic resonance spectra and resolve the apparent incompatibility in existing techniques between high information content and high sensitivity. Methods for studying both electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are designed. They assume established techniques for trapping ions in high magnetic field and observing electrically the trapping frequencies with high resolution (<1 Hz) and sensitivity (single -ion). A magnetic bottle field gradient couples the spin and spatial motions together and leads to the small spin -dependent force on the ion exploited by Dehmelt to observe directly the perturbation of the ground-state electron's axial frequency by its spin magnetic moment. A series of fundamental innovations is described to extend magnetic resonance to molecular ions ( cong 100 amu) and nuclear magnetic moments. It is demonstrated how time-domain trapping frequency observations before and after magnetic resonance can be used to make cooling of the particle to its ground state unnecessary. Adiabatic cycling of the magnetic bottle off between detection periods is shown to be practical and to allow high-resolution magnetic resonance to be encoded pointwise as the presence or absence of trapping frequency shifts. Methods of inducing spin -dependent work on the ion orbits with magnetic field gradients and Larmor frequency irradiation are proposed which greatly amplify the attainable shifts in trapping frequency. The first proposal presented builds on Dehmelt's experiment to reveal ESR spectra. A more powerful technique for ESR is then designed where axially synchronized spin transitions perform spin-dependent work in the presence of a magnetic bottle, which also converts axial amplitude changes into cyclotron frequency shifts. The most general approach presented is a continuous Stern-Gerlach effect in which a magnetic field

  18. Ion trap simulation program, ITSIM: A powerful heuristic and predictive tool in ion trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Huy Anh

    The multi-particle simulation program, ITSIM version 4.0, takes advantage of the enhanced performance of the Windows 95 and NT operating systems in areas such as memory management, user friendliness, flexibility of graphics and speed, to investigate the motion of ions in the quadrupole ion trap. The objective of this program is to use computer simulations based on mathematical models to improve the performance of the ion trap mass spectrometer. The simulation program can provide assistance in understanding fundamental aspects of ion trap mass spectrometry, precede and help to direct the course of experiments, as well as having didactic value in elucidating and allowing visualization of ion behavior under different experimental conditions. The program uses the improved Euler method to calculate ion trajectories as numerical solutions to the Mathieu differential equation. This Windows version can simultaneously simulate the trajectories of ions with a virtually unlimited number of different mass-to-charge ratios and hence allows realistic mass spectra, ion kinetic energy distributions and other experimentally measurable properties to be simulated. The large number of simulated ions allows examination of (i) the offsetting effects of mutual ion repulsion and collisional cooling in an ion trap and (ii) the effects of higher order fields. Field inhomogeneities arising from exit holes, electrode misalignment, imperfect electrode surfaces or new trap geometries can be simulated with the program. The simulated data are used to obtain mass spectra from mass-selective instability scans as well as by Fourier transformation of image currents induced by coherently moving ion clouds. Complete instruments, from an ion source through the ion trap mass analyzer to a detector, can now be simulated. Applications of the simulation program are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the simulations and experimental data. Fourier transformed experiments and a novel six

  19. Linear ion trap based atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, Lute

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop a trapped ion-based fieldable frequency standard with stability 1 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau for averaging times tau greater than 10,000 s, a hybrid RF/DC linear ion trap was developed which permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. The authors have confined Hg-199(+) ions in this trap and have measured very high Q transitions with good SNRs. In preliminary measurements they obtained stabilities of 1.6 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau (tau between 50 and 800 s) with a 160-mHz wide atomic resonance linewidth and a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 for each measurement cycle. Atomic resonance lines as narrow as 30 mHz on the 40.5-GHz clock transition have been measured with no appreciable reduction in the ion signal. A stability of 7 x 10 to the -14th/sq rt tau is made possible by the signal-to-noise and line Q of this measured transition. Analysis of fundamental sources of frequency instability indicates that a long-term stability of 2 x 10 to the -16th is feasible for this device with existing technology for tau = 10 to the 6th s or more.

  20. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar(q+) (q = 5-7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar(q+) (q = 5-7) under a constant number density of H2 and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar(q+)(q = 5, 6)-H2 collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula. PMID:25362383

  1. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar{sup q+} (q = 5–7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar{sup q+} (q = 5–7) under a constant number density of H₂ and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar{sup q+}(q = 5, 6)-H₂ collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula.

  2. Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap Mass Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Li, Ailin; Tian, Yuan; Zare, Richard N; Austin, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    We report a linear ion trap (LIT) in which the electric field is formed by fine wires held under tension and accurately positioned using holes drilled in two end plates made of plastic. The coordinates of the hole positions were optimized in simulation. The stability diagram and mass spectra using boundary ejection were compared between simulation and experiment and good agreement was found. The mass spectra from experiments show peak widths (fwhm) in units of mass-to-charge of around 0.38 Th using a scan rate of 3830 Th/s. The limits of detection are 137 ppbv and 401 ppbv for benzene and toluene, respectively. Different sizes of the wire ion trap can be easily fabricated by drilling holes in scaled positions. Other distinguishing features, such as high ion and photon transmission, low capacitance, high tolerance to mechanical and assembly error, and low weight, are discussed. PMID:27373557

  3. The trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Singly ionized mercury atoms have a structure similar to neutral alkali atoms. They can be maintained as ions for very long times in an RF quadrupole ion trap. Thus, their ground state hyperfine structure can be used to make a frequency standard using optical pumping techniques similar to the well-known rubidium standard. The mass 199 isotope of mercury has an ionic hyperfine structure of 40.5 GHz. In a trap system a linewidth of 10 Hz has been measured. An expression is presented for the short-term stability of a proposed mercury standard as set by the achieved signal to noise ratio. There is prospect of further improvement. Long-term stability is affected by second order doppler effect, and by pressure, light, and Stark shifts. However, these appear either sufficiently small or sufficiently controlable that the proposed mercury ion standard would be competitive with existing standards.

  4. Proposed LLNL electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Egan, P.O.; Proctor, I.; Levine, M.A.; Hansen, L.; Kajiyama, Y.; Wolgast, R.

    1985-07-02

    The interaction of energetic electrons with highly charged ions is of great importance to several research fields such as astrophysics, laser fusion and magnetic fusion. In spite of this importance there are almost no measurements of electron interaction cross sections for ions more than a few times ionized. To address this problem an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is being developed at LLNL. The device is essentially an EBIS except that it is not intended as a source of extracted ions. Instead the (variable energy) electron beam interacting with the confined ions will be used to obtain measurements of ionization cross sections, dielectronic recombination cross sections, radiative recombination cross sections, energy levels and oscillator strengths. Charge-exchange recombinaion cross sections with neutral gasses could also be measured. The goal is to produce and study elements in many different charge states up to He-like xenon and Ne-like uranium. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The JPL trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide frequency standards for the Deep Space Network (DSN) which are more stable than present-day hydrogen masers, a research task was established under the Advanced Systems Program of the TDA to develop a Hg-199(+) trapped ion frequency standard. The first closed-loop operation of this kind is described. Mercury-199 ions are confined in an RF trap and are state-selected through the use of optical pumping with 194 nm UV light from a Hg-202 discharge lamp. Absorption of microwave radiation at the hyperfine frequency (40.5 GHz) is signaled by atomic fluorescence of the UV light. The frequency of a 40.5 GHz oscillator is locked to a 1.6 Hz wide atomic absorption line of the trapped ions. The measured Allan variance of this locked oscillator is currently gamma sub y (pi) = 4.4 x 10 to the minus 12th/square root of pi for 20 is less than pi is less than 320 seconds, which is better stability than the best commercial cesium standards by almost a factor of 2. This initial result was achieved without magnetic shielding and without regulation of ion number.

  6. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A.; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility ( K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance ( R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/ K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  7. Quantum information processing with trapped ion chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Timothy Andrew

    Trapped atomic ion systems are currently the most advanced platform for quantum information processing. Their long coherence times, pristine state initialization and detection, and precisely controllable and versatile interactions make them excellent quantum systems for experiments in quantum computation and quantum simulation. One of the more promising schemes for quantum computing consists of performing single and multi-qubit quantum gates on qubits in a linear ion crystal. Some of the key challenges of scaling such a system are the individual addressing of arbitrary subsets of ions and controlling the growing complexity of motional mode interactions as the number of qubits increases or when the gates are performed faster. Traditional entangling quantum gates between ion qubits use laser pulses to couple the qubit states to the collective motion of the crystal, thereby generating a spin-spin interaction that can produce entanglement between selected qubits. The intrinsic limitations on the performance of gates using this method can be alleviated by applying optimally shaped pulses instead of pulses with constant amplitude. This thesis explains the theory behind this pulse shaping scheme and how it is implemented on a chain of Yb ions held in a linear radiofrequency 'Paul' trap. Several experiments demonstrate the technique in chains of two, three, and five ions using various types of pulse shapes. A tightly focused individual addressing beam allows us to apply the entangling gates to a target pair of ions, and technical issues related to such tight focusing are discussed. Other advantages to the pulse shaping scheme include a robustness against detuning errors and the possibility of suppressing undesirable coupling due to optical spillover on neighboring ions. Combined with ion shuttling, we harness these features to perform sequential gates to different qubit pairs in order to create genuine tripartite entangled states and demonstrate the programmable quantum

  8. Single-trapped-ion vibronic Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Fidio, C.; Vogel, W.; de Matos Filho, R. L.; Davidovich, L.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a model for a single-trapped-ion vibronic Raman laser and study its dynamics by using quantum-trajectory methods. In our treatment, it is essential that both the cavity field of the high-finesse optical cavity and the center-of-mass vibrational motion of the trapped ion be quantized. A transition from a super-Poissonian light source to a Poissonian lasing regime is obtained by increasing the Raman coupling constant. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a nonclassical regime can be realized, where the photon statistics becomes sub-Poissonian and the photons leak out of the cavity in an antibunched manner. This is achieved by exploiting nonlinear Stark shifts inherent in the model, which depend on both the number of cavity photons and the number of vibrational quanta.

  9. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Pedernales, J. S.; Lizuain, I.; Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions. PMID:26482660

  10. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-01-01

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions. PMID:26482660

  11. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  12. Quantum error correction with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Philipp

    Quantum computers promise exponential speed-up compared to their classical counterparts for certain problems. Unfortunately, the states required for quantum computation are fragile and lose their quantum properties with growing system size. In a milestone work, it has been shown that quantum error correction can overcome this problem and enable arbitrary long and arbitrary high quality quantum algorithms. However, current experiments are not able to fulfill the requirements to employ useful quantum error correction procedures. In this talk, I will first review past proof-of-principle experiments in trapped ion quantum information processors. Building on that, I will sketch a way towards a medium-sized trapped ion system that will be capable of running an error correction procedure that outperforms it constituents.

  13. Ultrafast Interferometry and Gates with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kale; Wong-Campos, David; Neyenhuis, Brian; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We sense the motion of a trapped atomic ion using a sequence of state-dependent ultrafast momentum kicks. We use this atom interferometer to characterize a nearly-pure quantum state with n = 1 phonon and accurately measure thermal states ranging from near the zero-point energy to n ~104 , with the possibility of extending at least 100 times higher in energy. The complete energy range of this method spans from the ground state to far outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime, where atomic motion is greater than the optical wavelength. Apart from thermometry, these interferometric techniques are useful for quantum information purposes, and we discuss the outlook for ultrafast entangling gates between multiple trapped ions. This work is supported by the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  14. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.D.; Schaetz, T.; Chiaverini, J.; Leibfried, D.; Britton, J.; Itano, W.M.; Jost, J.D.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Wineland, D.J.; Knill, E.

    2005-05-05

    We summarize two experiments on the creation and manipulation of multi-particle entangled states of trapped atomic ions - quantum dense coding and quantum teleportation. The techniques used in these experiments constitute an important step toward performing large-scale quantum information processing. The techniques also have application in other areas of physics, providing improvement in quantum-limited measurement and fundamental tests of quantum mechanical principles, for example.

  15. An improved linear ion trap physics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes an improvement in the architecture of the physics package used in the Linear Ion Trap (LIT)-based frequency standard recently developed at JPL. This new design is based on the observation that ions can be moved along the axis of an LIT by applied dc voltages. The state selection and interrogation region can be separated from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator signal is compared with the stable atomic transition. This separation relaxes many of the design constraints of the present units. Improvements include increased frequency stability and a substantial reduction in size, mass, and cost of the final frequency standard.

  16. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  17. ION TRAPPING AND CATHODE BOMBARDMENT BY TRAPPED IONS IN DC PHOTOGUNS.

    SciTech Connect

    POZDEYEV,E.

    2007-06-25

    DC photoguns are used to produce high-quality, high-intensity electron beams for accelerator driven applications. Ion bombardment is believed to be the major cause of degradation of the photocathode efficiency. Additionally to ions produced in the accelerating cathode-anode gap, the electron beam can ionize the residual gas in the transport line. These ions are trapped transversely within the beam and can drift back to the accelerating gap and contribute to the bombardment rate of the cathode. This paper proposes a method to reduce the flow of ions produced in the beam transport line and drifting back to the cathode-anode gap by introducing a positive potential barrier that repels the trapped ions. The reduced ion bombardment rate and increased life time of photocathodes will reduce the downtime required to service photoinjectors and associated costs.

  18. Three-Dimensional Array for 40Ca+ Ion Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jin-Yin; Liu, Liang

    2009-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional scalable linear ion trap scheme for ion trapping and discuss its applications for the optical frequency standard and scalable quantum information processing with its parallel strings of trapped 40Ca+ ions. The geometry here contains nine equal-distance parallel rods driven by rf, which form trapping potentials for radial confinement and two end ring electrodes biased at a few volts for axial confinement. Its feasibility is calculated by using the finite element analysis method.

  19. Progress Toward a Cold Ion Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Christopher, Erickson; Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2012-06-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. The ions are generated by laser-cooling strontium and then photo-ionizing the atoms with a two-photon transition to an auto- ionizing state in the continuum. Each ion's quantum wave will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions between the hyperfine ground states of Sr^87+. The interferometer phase will be determined by measuring the fraction of ions exiting in each hyperfine state. We will discuss the theory of operation, experimental methods, and potential applications of the device.

  20. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  1. Ultrafast Manipulation of Trapped Ion Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Wes; Quraishi, Qudsia; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Monroe, Chris

    2009-05-01

    Ultrashort light pulses are an attractive tool for trapped ion quantum information processing. High pulse intensity permits far-detuned (>10 nm) operation, where decoherence from differential AC Stark shifts and spontaneous emission is suppressed. Short pulse duration allows interaction times shorter than a trap oscillation, circumventing the need for cooling to the Lamb-Dicke limit. We describe an experiment with trapped ^171Yb^+ using a vanadate laser (˜10 ps pulses at 355 nm). Since the single pulse bandwidth exceeds the S1/2 hyperfine splitting, coherent Raman transitions between qubit states should be possible. This is in contrast to our previous work [1] with near-resonant pulses that coherently transfer population to the P-state. It should also be possible to use a series of multiple pulses to impart spin-dependent forces. By controlling the pulse timing and phase we could then entangle multiple ions in a temperature insensitive manner [2,3]. [1] Madsen et al., PRL 97, 040505 (2006). [2] Garc'ia-Ripoll et al., PRL 91, 157901 (2003). [3] Duan, PRL 93, 100502 (2004).

  2. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  3. Electron beam ion sources and traps (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard

    2000-02-01

    The electron beam method of stepwise ionization to highest charge states has found applications in electron beam ion sources (EBISs) for accelerators and atomic physics collision experiments as well as in electron beam ion traps (EBITs) for x-ray and mass spectroscopy. A dense and almost monoenergetic electron beam provides a unique tool for ionization, because radiative recombination by slow electrons is negligible and charge exchange is almost avoided in ultrahigh vacua. These are essential differences to electron cyclotron resonance ion sources with inevitable low energy electrons and comparatively high gas pressure. The distinction between EBIS and EBIT as genuine devices has become meaningless, because EBISs may work as traps and almost all EBITs are feeding beamlines for external experiments. More interesting is to note the diversification of these devices, which demonstrates that a matured technology is finding dedicated answers for different applications. At present we may distinguish six major lines of development and application: high current EBISs for upcoming hadron colliders, super EBITs in the energy range above 300 keV for quantum electrondynamics tests, inexpensive and small EBISTs for atomic physics studies, a highly efficient EBIS with oscillating electrons, MEDEBIS for tumor therapy with C6+, and charge breeding in facilities for exotic radioactive beams.

  4. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  5. Ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer†

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Diana Rosa; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Park, Melvin A.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, theoretical simulations and experimental observations are used to describe the ion dynamics in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer. In particular, the ion motion, ion transmission and mobility separation are discussed as a function of the bath gas velocity, radial confinement, analysis time and speed. Mobility analysis and calibration procedure are reported for the case of sphere-like molecules for positive and negative ion modes. Results showed that a maximal mobility resolution can be achieved by optimizing the gas velocity, radial confinement (RF amplitude) and ramp speed (voltage range and ramp time). The mobility resolution scales with the electric field and gas velocity and R = 100–250 can be routinely obtained at room temperature. PMID:24571000

  6. Adjustable microchip ring trap for cold atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Paul M.; Stickney, James A.; Squires, Matthew B.; Scoville, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Miller, Steven M.

    2009-12-15

    We describe the design and function of a circular magnetic waveguide produced from wires on a microchip for atom interferometry using de Broglie waves. The guide is a two-dimensional magnetic minimum for trapping weak-field seeking states of atoms or molecules with a magnetic dipole moment. The design consists of seven circular wires sharing a common radius. We describe the design, the time-dependent currents of the wires and show that it is possible to form a circular waveguide with adjustable height and gradient while minimizing perturbation resulting from leads or wire crossings. This maximal area geometry is suited for rotation sensing with atom interferometry via the Sagnac effect using either cold atoms, molecules and Bose-condensed systems.

  7. Lunar Polar Cold Traps: Spatial Distribution and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, David A.; Siegler, M.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a ray-tracing and radiosity model that can accurately calculate lunar surface and subsurface temperatures for arbitrary topography. Using available digital elevation models for the lunar north and south polar regions derived from Clementine laser altimeter and image data, as well as ground-based radar data, we have calculated lunar surface and subsurface temperatures at 2 km resolution that include full effects of indirect solar and infrared radiation due to topography. We compare our thermal model results with maps of epithermal neutron flux measured by Lunar Prospector. When we use the ray tracing and thermal model to account for the effects of temperature and topography on the neutron measurements, our results show that the majority of the moon's polar cold traps are not filled with water ice.

  8. Progress Towards Quantum Simulation Using Micro-fabricated Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Ji, G.; Rickerd, C.; Collins, K.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-01

    We report on current experimental progress towards using a surface electrode trap for quantum simulation. We use a micro-fabricated trap developed collaboratively between the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and Honeywell International known as the Ball Grid Array (BGA) trap. This trap features 96 electrodes for fine control of the DC potential as well as a small footprint allowing for tight focusing of interaction lasers. We discuss the experimental system which utilizes the BGA trap, loading of Yb171 ions in this trap, and deterministic loading of chains of five or more ions. We hope to take advantage of the features of this new trap architecture in order to perform a small scale Boson Sampling experiment. This work is performed in collaboration with the GTRI Ion Trap Group and supported by ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, and the AFOSR STTR on Atom Trap Chips.

  9. Design Optimization for Anharmonic Linear Surface-Electrode Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Shu-Ming; Chen, Ping-Xing; Wu, Wei

    2014-11-01

    An accurate and rapid method is proposed to optimize anharmonic linear surface-electrode ion trap design. Based on the method, we analyze the impact of the architectural parameters, including the width, number, and applied voltage of prerequisite active electrodes, on the number and spacing of trapped ions. Sets of optimal anharmonic trap design are given. Then the optimal designs are verified by using an ant colony optimization algorithm. The results show that the maximum ion position errors and maximum ion spacing errors are less than 1 μm up to 80. The mean of the maximum errors is nearly linear with respect to the number of trapped ions.

  10. Ion beam analysis of defect trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. L.; Howe, L. M.

    1983-12-01

    Channeling measurements using medium energy ions (e.g. 1 MeV He +) have been used to determine the positions of solute atoms which are displaced from lattice sites by the trapping of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms. In this way, some simple defect trapping configurations have been identified in fcc metals. One of these is the mixed dumbbell (created when a self-interstitial is trapped by a small solute atom), consisting of a host atom and solute atom stradding a normal lattice site. Another is the tetravacancy-solute atom complex, consisting of four nearest neighbour vacancies surrounding a solute atom displaced into the tetrahedral interstitial site. In addition, from detailed analyses of displacements into different crystallographic channels as a function of irradiation fluence and annealing temperature, the evolution of a variety of defect complexes containing self-interstitials or vacancies has been studied in Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, and Mg crystals. Information from channeling analyses will be compared with data obtained from measurements of electrical resistivity, Mössbauer effect, perturbed angular correlation, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, muon precession, positron annihilation and internal friction. The advantages of the different methods will be discussed.

  11. Toward spin squeezing with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael; Britton, Joe; Bollinger, John J.

    2012-09-01

    Building robust instruments capable ofmaking interferometric measurements with precision beyond the standard quantum limit remains an important goal in many metrology laboratories. We describe here the basic concepts underlying spin squeezing experiments that allow one to surpass this limit. In principle it is possible to reach the so-called Heisenberg limit, which constitutes an improvement in precision by a factorv √N , where N is the number of particles on which the measurement is carried out. In particular, we focus on recent progress toward implementing spin squeezing with a cloud of beryllium ions in a Penning ion trap, via the geometric phase gate used more commonly for performing two-qubit entangling operations in quantum computing experiments.

  12. New ion trap for atomic frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the radio frequency (RF) confining fields has been designed and built. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions a conventional RF trap stores with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  13. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  14. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  15. Ultra-stable Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    A fieldable trapped ion frequency standard based on Hg-199(+) ions confined in a hybrid rf/dc linear ion trap is developed. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the rf confining fields. In preliminary measurements a stability of 2 to 3 x 10(exp -15) was obtained for 10000 second averaging times. These measurements were carried out with a 120 mHz wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5 GHz clock transition with a second order Doppler shift from the rf trapping field of 6 x 10(exp -13).

  16. Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. Cold Ion Escape from the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, Markus; Dubinin, Eduard; Andrews, David; Nilsson, Hans; Fedorov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express. The ion sensor IMA of this experiment has in principle a low-energy cut-off at 10eV but in negative spacecraft charging cold ions are lifted into the range of measurement but the field of view is restricted to about 4x360 deg. In a recent paper Nilsson et al. (Earth Planets Space, 64, 135, 2012) tried to use the method of long-time averaged distribution functions to overcome these constraints. In this paper we first use the same method to show that we get results consistent with this when using ASPERA-3 observations only. But then we can show that these results are inconsistent with observations of the local plasma density by the MARSIS radar instrument on board Mars Express. We demonstrate that the method of averaged distribution function can deliver the mean flow speed of the plasma but the low-energy cut-off does usually not allow to reconstruct the density. We then combine measurements of the cold ion flow speed with the plasma density observations of MARSIS to derive the cold ion flux. In an analysis of the combined nightside datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars. At a distance of about 0.5 Martian radii the flux settles at a constant value which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  18. Cold ion escape from the Martian ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the cold ionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007-2014 at 2.8 ± 0.4 ×1025 atoms / s which is in good agreement with model estimates. A possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside.

  19. Test of Lorentz symmetry with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of an experiment should not depend on the orientation of the apparatus in space. This important cornerstone of physics is deeply engrained into the Standard Model of Physics by requiring that all fields must be Lorentz invariant. However, it is well-known that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some theories conjecture that at the Planck scale Lorentz symmetry might be broken and measurable at experimentally accessible energy scales. Therefore, a search for violation of Lorentz symmetry directly probes physics beyond the Standard model. We present a novel experiment utilizing trapped calcium ions as a direct probe of Lorentz-violation in the electron-photon sector. We monitor the energy between atomic states with different orientations of the electronic wave-functions as they rotate together with the motion of the Earth. This is analogous to the famous Michelson-Morley experiment. To remove magnetic field noise, we perform the experiment with the ions prepared in the decoherence-free states. Our result improves on the most stringent bounds on Lorentz symmetry for electrons by 100 times. The experimental scheme is readily applicable to many ion species, hence opening up paths toward much improved test of Lorentz symmetry in the future. (Ph. D. Advisor: Hartmut Haeffner, University of California, Berkeley).

  20. Nonlinear theory of collisionless trapped ion modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahm, T.S.; Tang, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    A simplified two field nonlinear model for collisionless trapped-ion-mode turbulence has been derived from nonlinear bounce-averaged drift kinetic equations. The renormalized thermal diffusivity obtained from this analysis exhibits a Bohm-like scaling. A new nonlinearity associated with the neoclassical polarization density is found to introduce an isotope-dependent modification to this Bohm-like diffusivity. The asymptotic balance between the equilibrium variation and the finite banana width induced reduction of the fluctuation potential leads to the result that the radial correlation length decreases with increasing plasma current. Other important conclusions from the present analysis include the predictions that (i) the relative density fluctuation level {delta}n/n{sub 0} is lower than the conventional mixing length estimate, {Delta}r/L{sub n} (ii) the ion temperature fluctuation level {delta}T{sub i}/T{sub i} significantly exceeds the density fluctuation level {delta}n/n{sub 0}; and (iii) the parallel ion velocity fluctuation level {delta}v{sub i}{sub {parallel}}/v{sub Ti} is expected to be negligible.

  1. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  2. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions. PMID:26406306

  3. Doppler Sideband Spectra for Ions in a Linear Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a spectroscopic measurement of the temperature and linear density of HG+ ions held in a linear ion trap (LIT). The inferred temperature and number result from analysis of sidebands on the 40.5 GHz resonance line.

  4. Progress Towards Quantum Simulation Using Micro-fabricated Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Cao, C.; Ji, G.; Brennan, T.; Monroe, C.

    2014-05-01

    We report our current experimental progress towards using surface electrode traps for quantum simulation. Current progress is being made using a micro-fabricated Satellite trap from GTRI. This trap features two long storage arms which can be used to hold ions in reserve to mitigate the need to load ions via a heated oven in the event of ion loss. This should allow trapping of long ion chains with a substantial decrease in the time needed to recover an ion chain of a given length. The trap has 96 electrodes for fine control of the DC potential needed to create large anharmonic trapping wells. It also features two crossing linear regions for the ordering of mixed ion chains by selective shuttling between the arms of intersecting linear regions of the trap. This should allow us to trap multiple species and explore the advantages of having sympathetic coolant ions. Interspersing these ions through a chain of ions undergoing coherent operations potentially could increase the chain lifetime as well as mitigate certain heating effects. We hope to use these features as the next step in increasing the size of current quantum simulations being done at UMD, which are aimed at exploring quantum phenomena in spin systems. In collaboration with the GTRI QIS Group and supported by grants from the U.S. ARO with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  5. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  6. Experimental Uhrig dynamical decoupling using trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biercuk, Michael J.; Uys, Hermann; Vandevender, Aaron P.; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne M.; Bollinger, John J.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the Uhrig dynamical decoupling (UDD) sequence in a variety of noise environments. Our qubit system consists of a crystalline array of B9e+ ions confined in a Penning trap. We use an electron-spin-flip transition as our qubit manifold and drive qubit rotations using a 124 GHz microwave system. We study the effect of the UDD sequence in mitigating phase errors and compare against the well known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill-style multipulse spin echo as a function of pulse number, rotation axis, noise spectrum, and noise strength. Our results agree well with theoretical predictions for qubit decoherence in the presence of classical phase noise, accounting for the effect of finite-duration π pulses. Finally, we demonstrate that the Uhrig sequence is more robust against systematic over- or under-rotation and detuning errors than is multipulse spin echo, despite the precise prescription for pulse timing in UDD.

  7. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period. PMID:27249827

  8. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, F; Keitch, B; Kienzler, D; Bykov, D; Uebel, P; Schmidt, M A; Russell, P St J; Home, J P

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm. PMID:25832211

  9. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  10. Progress Report on the Improved Linear Ion Trap Physics Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the first operational results from the extended linear ion trap frequency standard now being developed at JPL. This new design separates the state selection/interrogation region from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator (LO) signal is compared to the stable atomic transition. Hg+ ions have been trapped, shuttled back and forth between the resonance and state selection traps. In addition, microwave transitions between the Hg+ clock levels have been driven in the resonance trap and detected in the state selection trap.

  11. Four-Sector Cylindrical Radio-Frequency Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, Ruthann K.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Proposed linear radio-frequency ion trap consists of closed metal cylinder partitioned into four equal cylindrical-sector electrodes and two circular end electrodes. Features include relatively large ion-storage capacity and shielding against external fields. Used in frequency-standard laboratories to confine 199Hg+ ions electrodynamically in isolation from external environment. Similar to device described in "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock" (NPO-17758).

  12. How far can ion trap miniaturization go? Parameter scaling and space-charge limits for very small cylindrical ion traps.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Higgs, Jessica; Li, Ailin; Barney, Brandon; Austin, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    A broad effort is underway to make radiofrequency (RF) ion trap mass spectrometers small enough for portable chemical analysis. A variety of trap geometries and fabrication approaches are under development from several research groups. A common issue is the reduced trapping capacity in smaller traps, with the associated reduction in sensitivity. This article explores the key variables that scale with trap size including RF voltage, frequency, electrical capacitance, power and pseudopotential well depth. High-field electric breakdown constrains the maximum RF voltages used in smaller ion traps. Simulations show the effects of space charge and the limits of trapping capacity as a function of trap dimensions for cylindrical ion traps down to the micrometer level. RF amplitudes that scale as the 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 power of trap radius, r0, were studied. At a fixed level of performance, the number of analyzable ions scales as r0(n), with n ranging from 1.55 to 1.75 depending on the choice of voltage scaling. The implications for miniaturized ion trap mass spectrometry are discussed. PMID:24619549

  13. Efficient photoionization loading of trapped ions with ultrafast pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Deslauriers, L.; Acton, M.; Blinov, B. B.; Brickman, K.-A.; Haljan, P. C.; Hensinger, W. K.; Hucul, D.; Katnik, S.; Kohn, R. N. Jr.; Lee, P. J.; Madsen, M. J.; Maunz, P.; Olmschenk, S.; Moehring, D. L.; Stick, D.; Sterk, J.; Yeo, M.; Younge, K. C.; Monroe, C.

    2006-12-15

    Atomic cadmium ions are loaded into radiofrequency ion traps by photoionization of atoms in a cadmium vapor with ultrafast laser pulses. The photoionization is driven through an intermediate atomic resonance with a frequency-quadrupled mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser that produces pulses of either 100-fs or 1-ps duration at a central wavelength of 229 nm. The large bandwidth of the pulses photoionizes all velocity classes of the Cd vapor, resulting in a high loading efficiency compared to previous ion trap loading techniques. Measured loading rates are compared with a simple theoretical model, and we conclude that this technique can potentially ionize every atom traversing the laser beam within the trapping volume. This may allow the operation of ion traps with lower levels of background pressures and less trap electrode surface contamination. The technique and laser system reported here should be applicable to loading most laser-cooled ion species.

  14. Efficient photoionization loading of trapped ions with ultrafast pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslauriers, L.; Acton, M.; Blinov, B. B.; Brickman, K.-A.; Haljan, P. C.; Hensinger, W. K.; Hucul, D.; Katnik, S.; Kohn, R. N., Jr.; Lee, P. J.; Madsen, M. J.; Maunz, P.; Olmschenk, S.; Moehring, D. L.; Stick, D.; Sterk, J.; Yeo, M.; Younge, K. C.; Monroe, C.

    2006-12-01

    Atomic cadmium ions are loaded into radiofrequency ion traps by photoionization of atoms in a cadmium vapor with ultrafast laser pulses. The photoionization is driven through an intermediate atomic resonance with a frequency-quadrupled mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser that produces pulses of either 100-fs or 1-ps duration at a central wavelength of 229nm . The large bandwidth of the pulses photoionizes all velocity classes of the Cd vapor, resulting in a high loading efficiency compared to previous ion trap loading techniques. Measured loading rates are compared with a simple theoretical model, and we conclude that this technique can potentially ionize every atom traversing the laser beam within the trapping volume. This may allow the operation of ion traps with lower levels of background pressures and less trap electrode surface contamination. The technique and laser system reported here should be applicable to loading most laser-cooled ion species.

  15. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-06-11

    Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This technique uses H₃Oþ as a chemical ionization (CI) reagent to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. Mass spectra acquired with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) are simple because proton transfer chemical ionization is ‘soft’ and results in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, peak identification can still be difficult due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). The use of an ITMS is appealing because of its ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates are possible that will allow for detection of multiple compounds. Here we present the first results from a proton transfer reaction ion trap mass spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype instrument in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second-generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low-ppbv to high-pptv range. Furthermore, the applicability of MS/MS in differentiating between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making differentiation possible, even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. However, MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular masses but with different intensity ratios

  16. Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeller, Peter; Palmer, Peter T.; Boscaini, Elena; Jobson, B Tom; Alexander, M. Lizabeth

    2003-07-07

    Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a relatively new field that has attracted a great deal of interest in the last several years. This technique uses H3O+ as a chemical ionization (CI) agent for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the parts per billion by volume (ppbv) - parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range. PTR-MS mass spectra are simple because the ionization method of proton transfer is “soft”, resulting in little or no fragmentation. Unfortunately, the simplicity of the mass spectra can cause problems in peak identification due to isobaric interferences. A possible solution to this problem is to couple the PTR drift tube to an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS). ITMS is appealing because of the ability to perform MS/MS and possibly distinguish between isomers and other isobars. Additionally, the ITMS duty cycle is much higher than that of a linear quadrupole so faster data acquisition rates can be realized for detection of multiple compounds. We present here the first results from a Proton Transfer Reaction Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ITMS). The aim of this study was to investigate ion injection and storage efficiency of a simple prototype interface in order to estimate possible detection limits of a second generation instrument. Using this prototype a detection limit of 100 ppbv was demonstrated for the PTR-ITMS. Modifications are suggested that will enable further reduction in detection limits to the low ppbv to pptv range. Furthermore the applicability of MS/MS to differentiate between isobaric species was determined. MS/MS spectra of the isobaric compounds methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) are presented and show fragments of different mass making a differentiation possible even when a mixture of both species is present in the same sample. MS/MS spectra of acetone and propanal produce fragments with the same molecular weight but different ratios, allowing quantitative distinction only if one species

  17. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  18. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Schowalter, Steven J; Dunning, Alexander J; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  19. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING IONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1962-04-17

    A method and apparatus are described for trapping ions within an evacuated container and within a magnetic field utilizing dissociation and/or ionization of molecular ions to form atomic ions and energetic neutral particles. The atomic ions are magnetically trapped as a result of a change of charge-to- mass ratio. The molecular ions are injected into the container and into the path of an energetic carbon arc discharge which dissociates and/or ionizes a portion of the molecular ions into atomic ions and energetic neutrals. The resulting atomic ions are trapped by the magnetic field to form a circulating beam of atomic ions, and the energetic neutrals pass out of the system and may be utilized in a particle accelerator. (AEC)

  20. Space-charge effects in Penning ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porobić, T.; Beck, M.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Couratin, C.; Finlay, P.; Knecht, A.; Fabian, X.; Friedag, P.; Fléchard, X.; Liénard, E.; Ban, G.; Zákoucký, D.; Soti, G.; Van Gorp, S.; Weinheimer, Ch.; Wursten, E.; Severijns, N.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of space-charge on ion cyclotron resonances and magnetron eigenfrequency in a gas-filled Penning ion trap has been investigated. Off-line measurements with K39+ using the cooling trap of the WITCH retardation spectrometer-based setup at ISOLDE/CERN were performed. Experimental ion cyclotron resonances were compared with ab initio Coulomb simulations and found to be in agreement. As an important systematic effect of the WITCH experiment, the magnetron eigenfrequency of the ion cloud was studied under increasing space-charge conditions. Finally, the helium buffer gas pressure in the Penning trap was determined by comparing experimental cooling rates with simulations.

  1. Ion-beam cleaning for cold welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    1000 eV beam bombarding metal surfaces to be joined removes oxides and contaminants at rate of several atomic layers per second for current density of 1 mA/squ. cm. Clean surfaces can then be joined by squeezing them together. With ion-beam cleaning, mating force for strong bond is low enough to cause only 1% deformation. Conventional cold-welding requires about 70% deformation for bonding. Technique was tested successfully on aluminum to aluminum welds, copper to copper, copper to aluminum, copper to nickel, and silver to iron. Base metals failed before welds in tear test.

  2. Cold Ion Escape from the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Nilsson, H.; Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-10-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the coldionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007 to 2014 at 2.9±0.2×10 25 atoms/s which is in good agreement with model estimates. In this talk we will also try to compare these results with more recent observations by the MAVEN spacecraft. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  3. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  4. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  5. Compact toroidal ion-trap design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M. J.; Gorman, C. H.

    2010-10-15

    We present the design of a type of compact toroidal, or 'halo', ion trap. Such traps may be useful for mass spectrometry, studying small Coulomb cluster rings, quantum-information applications, or other quantum simulations where a ring topology is of interest. We present results from a Monte Carlo optimization of the trap design parameters using finite-element analysis simulations that minimize higher-order anharmonic terms in the trapping pseudopotential, while maintaining complete control over ion placement at the pseudopotential node in three dimensions using static bias fields. These simulations are based on a practical electrode design using readily available parts, yet can be easily scaled to any size trap with similar electrode spacings. We also derive the conditions for a crystal structure transition for two ions in the compact halo trap, the first nontrivial transition for Coulomb crystals in this geometry.

  6. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  7. Ion collision crosssection measurements in quadrupole ion traps using a time-frequency analysis method.

    PubMed

    He, Muyi; Guo, Dan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a method for measuring ion collision crosssections (CCSs) was proposed through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories in quadrupole ion traps. A linear ion trap with added high-order electric fields was designed and simulated. With the presence of high-order electric fields and ion-neutral collisions, ion secular motion frequency within the quadrupole ion trap will be a function of ion motion amplitude, thus a function of time and ion CCS. A direct relationship was then established between ion CCS and ion motion frequency with respect to time, which could be obtained through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories (or ion motion induced image currents). To confirm the proposed theory, realistic ion trajectory simulations were performed, where the CCSs of bradykinin, angiotensin I and II, and ubiquitin ions were calculated from simulated ion trajectories. As an example, differentiation of isomeric ubiquitin ions was also demonstrated in the simulations. PMID:25319271

  8. Toward scalable ion traps for quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, J. M.; Uys, H.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Seidelin, S.; Britton, J.; Bollinger, J. J.; Leibfried, D.; Ospelkaus, C.; VanDevender, A. P.; Wineland, D. J.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we report the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a 150 zone ion trap array built in a 'surface-electrode' geometry microfabricated on a single substrate. We demonstrate the transport of atomic ions between the legs of a 'Y'-type junction and measure the in-situ heating rates for the ions. The trap design demonstrates the use of a basic component design library that can be quickly assembled to form structures optimized for a particular experiment.

  9. Design and operation of the electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, D.

    1990-05-30

    This report describes the basic features and operating principles of the Electron Beam Ion Trap. The differences between EBIT and other sources of highly charged ions are outlined. Its features and operating parameters are discussed. The report also explains why certain design choices were necessary and the constraints involved in building an electron beam ion trap. EBIT's evaporation cooling system is described in detail. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Ion Sponge: A 3-Dimentional Array of Quadrupole Ion Traps for Trapping and Mass-Selectively Processing Ions in Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations. PMID:24758328

  11. Cold ion heating at the dayside magnetopause during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Redondo, S.; André, M.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lavraud, B.; Graham, D. B.; Divin, A.; Aunai, N.

    2016-01-01

    Cold ions of ionospheric origin are known to be present in the magnetospheric side of the Earth's magnetopause. They can be very abundant, with densities up to 100 cm-3. These cold ions can mass load the magnetosphere, changing global parameters of magnetic reconnection, like the Alfvén speed or the reconnection rate. In addition they introduce a new length scale related to their gyroradius and kinetic effects which must be accounted for. We report in situ observations of cold ion heating in the separatrix owing to time and space fluctuations of the electric field. When this occurs, the cold ions are preheated before crossing the Hall electric field barrier. However, when this mechanism is not present cold ions can be observed well inside the reconnection exhaust. Our observations suggest that the perpendicular cold ion heating is stronger close to the X line owing to waves and electric field gradients linked to the reconnection process.

  12. Single Motional Quantum Exchange between Independently Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. R.; Ospelkaus, C.; Colombe, Y.; Wilson, A. C.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Coulomb coupling of ions in separate potential wells is a key feature of proposals to implement quantum simulation and could enable logic operations to be performed in a multi-zone quantum information processor without the requirement of bringing the ion qubits into the same trapping potential. It might also extend the capabilities of quantum logic spectroscopy to ions that cannot be trapped in the same potential well as the measurement ion, such as oppositely charged ions or even antimatter particles. We report recent results demonstrating tunable coupling of two 9Be+ ions held in trapping potentials separated by 40 μm. The ions are trapped 40 μm above the surface of a microfabricated planar trap with independently tunable axial frequencies of ~4 MHz. The trap is cooled to 4.2 K with a helium bath cryostat to suppress anomalous heating and to extend the lifetime of ions from minutes to days. By preparing approximate motional number states with n=0 and n=1 in the respective wells, and tuning the confining wells into resonance, a single quantum of motion is exchanged between the ions in ~200 μs. Work supported by IARPA, DARPA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  13. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. D. Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B.; Chen, S.-P.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  14. Charged-Particle Bean Transport for Ion Trapping Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichle, Brian W.; Wingfield, Love M.

    2001-11-01

    Electrostatic Einsel lenses are being developed for beam transport for use in two distinct metastable atomic lifetime experiments using two separate rf-ion traps. Each system has been modeled using Simion software, and the lenses have been designed from commercially available eV-parts. The first application is part of an electron gun source. Electrons are produced by a conventional dispenser cathode and are transported 25 cm to the trap. The design goal is to create a beam divergence to fully illuminate the active trap volume, and to provide tunable electron energies from 50 to 500 eV. The second application is to transport ions 1 m from a laser ablation ion source to an rf ion trap. Laser ablation involves essentially boiling ions from a solid target with intense laser pulses. Here, the design goal is to maximize flux by maximizing the solid angle of acceptance to the trap, minimize radial velocity, and minimize the spread in axial velocity. Development of a laser ablation ion source external to the trap volume will allow a very low base pressure in the trap region, which will make possible the study of species with lifetimes approaching 1 s. In addition, laser ablation will produce intermediately-charged ions from non-conductive solid targets.

  15. Rydberg excitation of trapped strontium ions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennrich, Markus; Higgins, Gerard; Pokorny, Fabian; Kress, Florian; Maier, Christine; Haag, Johannes; Colombe, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Trapped Rydberg ions are a novel approach for quantum information processing [1,2]. This idea joins the advanced quantum control of trapped ions with the strong dipolar interaction between Rydberg atoms. For trapped ions this method promises to speed up entangling interactions [3] and to enable such operations in larger ion crystals [4]. We report on the first experimental realization of trapped strontium Rydberg ions. A single ion was confined in a linear Paul trap and excited to Rydberg states (25S to 37S) using a two-photon excitation with 243nm and 308nm laser light. The transitions we observed are narrow and the excitation can be performed repeatedly which indicates that the Rydberg ions are stable in the ion trap. Similar results have been recently reported on a single photon Rydberg excitation of trapped calcium ions [5]. The tunability of the 304-309nm laser should enable us to excite our strontium ions to even higher Rydberg levels. Such highly excited levels are required to achieve a strong interaction between neighboring Rydberg ions in the trap as will be required for quantum gates using the Rydberg interaction. References [1] M. Müller, L. Liang, I. Lesanovsky, P. Zoller, New J. Phys. 10, 093009 (2008). [2] F. Schmidt-Kaler, et al., New J. Phys. 13, 075014 (2011). [3] W. Li, I. Lesanovsky, Appl. Phys. B 114, 37-44 (2014). [4] W. Li, A.W. Glaetzle, R. Nath, I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. A 87, 052304 (2013). [5] T. Feldker, et al., arXiv:1506.05958

  16. Ion trap array mass analyzer: structure and performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Gongyu; Luo, Chan; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2009-06-15

    An ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer--a novel ion trap mass analyzer with multiple ion trapping and analyzing channels--was designed and constructed. Its property and performance were investigated and reported in this paper. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes including two parallel printed circuit board (PCB) plates. Each PCB plate was fabricated to several identical rectangular electric strips based on normal PCB fabrication technology and was placed symmetrically to those on the opposite plate. There is no electrode between any two adjacent strips. Every strip was supplied with an rf voltage while the polarity of the voltage applied to the adjacent two strips was opposite. So the electric potential at the central plane between two adjacent strips is zero. Multiple identical electric field regions that contain the dominant quadrupole plus some other high-order fields were produced between the two PCB plates. The multiple identical electric field regions will have the property of ion trapping, ion storage, and mass analysis functions. So an ITA could work as multiple ion trap mass analyzers. It could perform multiple sample ion storage, mass-selected ion isolation, ion ejection, and mass analysis simultaneously. The ITA was operated at both "digital ion trap mode" and "conventional rf mode" experimentally. A preliminary mass spectrum has been carried out in one of the ion trap channels, and it shows a mass resolution of over 1000. Additional functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and mass-selected ion ejection have also been tested. Furthermore, the ITA has a small size and very low cost. An ITA with four channels is less than 30 cm(3) in total volume, and it shows a great promise for the miniaturization of the whole mass spectrometer instrument and high-throughput mass analysis. PMID:19441854

  17. Optimal surface-electrode trap lattices for quantum simulation with trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Roman; Wesenberg, Janus H; Leibfried, Dietrich

    2009-06-12

    Trapped ions offer long internal state (spin) coherence times and strong interparticle interactions mediated by the Coulomb force. This makes them interesting candidates for quantum simulation of coupled lattices. To this end, it is desirable to be able to trap ions in arbitrary conformations with precisely controlled local potentials. We provide a general method for optimizing periodic planar radio-frequency electrodes for generating ion trapping potentials with specified trap locations and curvatures above the electrode plane. A linear-programming algorithm guarantees globally optimal electrode shapes that require only a single radio-frequency voltage source for operation. The optimization method produces final electrode shapes that are smooth and exhibit low fragmentation. Such characteristics are desirable for practical fabrication of surface-electrode trap lattices. PMID:19658931

  18. Development of a low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy instrument using an electrospray ion source and a cryogenically controlled ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xuebin; Wang Laisheng

    2008-07-15

    The ability to control ion temperatures is critical for gas phase spectroscopy and has been a challenge in chemical physics. A low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy instrument has been developed for the investigation of complex anions in the gas phase, including multiply charged anions, solvated species, and biological molecules. The new apparatus consists of an electrospray ionization source, a three dimensional (3D) Paul trap for ion accumulation and cooling, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a magnetic-bottle photoelectron analyzer. A key feature of the new instrument is the capability to cool and tune ion temperatures from 10 to 350 K in the 3D Paul trap, which is attached to the cold head of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. Ion cooling is accomplished in the Paul trap via collisions with a background gas and has been demonstrated by observation of complete elimination of vibrational hot bands in photoelectron spectra of various anions ranging from small molecules to complex species. Further evidence of ion cooling is shown by the observation of H{sub 2}-physisorbed anions at low temperatures. Cold anions result in better resolved photoelectron spectra due to the elimination of vibrational hot bands and yield more accurate energetic and spectroscopic information. Temperature-dependent studies are made possible for weakly bonded molecular and solvated clusters, allowing thermodynamic information to be obtained.

  19. Development of a Low-Temperature Photoelectron Spectroscopy Instrument Using an Electrospray Ion Source and a Cryogenically Controlled Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2008-07-01

    The ability to control ion temperatures is critical for gas phase spectroscopy and has been a challenge in chemical physics. A low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy instrument has been developed for the investigation of complex anions in the gas phase, including multiply charged anions, solvated species, and biological molecules. The new apparatus consists of an electrospray ionization source, a 3D Paul trap for ion accumulation and cooling, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a magnetic-bottle photoelectron analyzer. A key feature of the new instrument is the capability to cool and tune ion temperatures from 10 to 350 K in the 3D Paul trap, which is attached to the cold head of a closed-cycle helium refrigerator. Ion cooling is accomplished in the Paul trap via collisions with a background gas and has been demonstrated by observation of complete elimination of vibrational hot bands in photoelectron spectra of various anions ranging from small molecules to complex species. Further evidence of ion cooling is shown by the observation of H2 physisorbed anions at low temperatures. Cold anions result in better resolved photoelectron spectra due to the elimination of vibrational hot bands and yield more accurate energetic and spectroscopic information. Temperature-dependent studies are made possible for weakly-bonded molecular and solvated clusters, allowing thermodynamic information to be obtained.

  20. Development of a low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy instrument using an electrospray ion source and a cryogenically controlled ion trap.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2008-07-01

    The ability to control ion temperatures is critical for gas phase spectroscopy and has been a challenge in chemical physics. A low-temperature photoelectron spectroscopy instrument has been developed for the investigation of complex anions in the gas phase, including multiply charged anions, solvated species, and biological molecules. The new apparatus consists of an electrospray ionization source, a three dimensional (3D) Paul trap for ion accumulation and cooling, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a magnetic-bottle photoelectron analyzer. A key feature of the new instrument is the capability to cool and tune ion temperatures from 10 to 350 K in the 3D Paul trap, which is attached to the cold head of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. Ion cooling is accomplished in the Paul trap via collisions with a background gas and has been demonstrated by observation of complete elimination of vibrational hot bands in photoelectron spectra of various anions ranging from small molecules to complex species. Further evidence of ion cooling is shown by the observation of H2-physisorbed anions at low temperatures. Cold anions result in better resolved photoelectron spectra due to the elimination of vibrational hot bands and yield more accurate energetic and spectroscopic information. Temperature-dependent studies are made possible for weakly bonded molecular and solvated clusters, allowing thermodynamic information to be obtained. PMID:18681692

  1. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R. J.; Seidelin, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Bollinger, J. J.; Amini, J. M.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Home, J. P.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Knill, E.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Shiga, N.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-09-15

    We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 {mu}m above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300{+-}30 s{sup -1} for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

  2. Multilayer Interconnects for Microfabricated Surface Electrode Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Jason; Seidelin, Signe; Wesenberg, Janus; Britton, Joe; Blakestad, Brad; Brown, Kenton; Epstein, Ryan; Home, Jonathan; Jost, John; Langer, Chris; Leibfried, Dietrich; Ozeri, Roee; Wineland, David

    2007-06-01

    Microfabricated surface electrode traps for ions are a promising technology for building scalable trapping geometries for quantum information processing. We have expanded upon our single layer gold-on-fused-silica surface electrode trap [1] to include a second patterned conducting layer under the trapping electrodes and have demonstrated the fabrication of this architecture using standard microfabrication techniques. The multilayer approach allows for a significant increase in multi-zone trapping complexity and permits improved trapping structures that are otherwise unattainable in single layer designs without vertical interconnects through the wafer. Using improved calculational methods [2], we are in the process of optimizing the planar designs to create modular elements that can be joined into larger multi-zone trapping structures. Work supported by DTO and NIST. 1. S. Seidelin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 253003 (2006). Also, see the abstract by S. Seidelin. 2. See the abstract by J. H. Wesenberg.

  3. Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Jr., John M.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

  4. Trapped Ion Quantum Gate Design in Presence of Micromotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Duan, Luming

    2014-05-01

    Linearly trapped atomic ions in a linear Paul trap has been the leading architecture of a scalable ion-based quantum computer. Although planar crystals can also be held in a Paul trap, the presense of non-negligible ion micromotion away from the trap axis makes quantum manipulations difficult. Here we propose for the first time a general framework for the design of high fidelity quantum gates with micromotion taken into account. This opens new possibilities for scalable quantum information processing with ion crystals of a general geometry. This work was supported by the NBRPC (973 Program) 2011CBA00300 (2011CBA00302), the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI programs, and the DARPA OLE program.

  5. Scaling and Suppression of Heating in an Adjustable Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmschenk, Steven; Deslauriers, Louis; Stick, Dan; Hensinger, Winfried; Sterk, Jon; Monroe, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    One of the major hurdles in the realization of large entangled states among trapped ions is anomalous heating of trapped ion motion [1]. We implement a novel rf ion trap featuring moveable electrodes that has enabled a controlled investigation of this motional decoherence. First, we characterize heating as a function of electrode proximity, related to the geometry of noisy potentials on the electrode surface. Second, we cool the electrodes via contact with a liquid nitrogen reservoir and observe that the decoherence rate is suppressed by an order of magnitude. The insight gained through these experiments may have relevance to scaling the ion trap quantum information processor. 1. Q. A. Turchette, et. al., Phys. Rev. A 61, 063418 (2000).

  6. Reducing Space Charge Effects in a Linear Ion Trap by Rhombic Ion Excitation and Ejection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yuzhuo; Hu, Lili; Guo, Dan; Fang, Xiang; Zhou, Mingfei; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in ion trap operations, which typically limit the ion trapping capacity, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of a quadrupole ion trap. In this study, a rhombic ion excitation and ejection method was proposed to minimize space charge effects in a linear ion trap. Instead of applying a single dipolar AC excitation signal, two dipolar AC excitation signals with the same frequency and amplitude but 90° phase difference were applied in the x- and y-directions of the linear ion trap, respectively. As a result, mass selective excited ions would circle around the ion cloud located at the center of the ion trap, rather than go through the ion cloud. In this work, excited ions were then axially ejected and detected, but this rhombic ion excitation method could also be applied to linear ion traps with ion radial ejection capabilities. Experiments show that space charge induced mass resolution degradation and mass shift could be alleviated with this method. For the experimental conditions in this work, space charge induced mass shift could be decreased by ~50%, and the mass resolving power could be improved by ~2 times at the same time. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27080008

  7. Reducing Space Charge Effects in a Linear Ion Trap by Rhombic Ion Excitation and Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yuzhuo; Hu, Lili; Guo, Dan; Fang, Xiang; Zhou, Mingfei; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in ion trap operations, which typically limit the ion trapping capacity, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of a quadrupole ion trap. In this study, a rhombic ion excitation and ejection method was proposed to minimize space charge effects in a linear ion trap. Instead of applying a single dipolar AC excitation signal, two dipolar AC excitation signals with the same frequency and amplitude but 90° phase difference were applied in the x- and y-directions of the linear ion trap, respectively. As a result, mass selective excited ions would circle around the ion cloud located at the center of the ion trap, rather than go through the ion cloud. In this work, excited ions were then axially ejected and detected, but this rhombic ion excitation method could also be applied to linear ion traps with ion radial ejection capabilities. Experiments show that space charge induced mass resolution degradation and mass shift could be alleviated with this method. For the experimental conditions in this work, space charge induced mass shift could be decreased by ~50%, and the mass resolving power could be improved by ~2 times at the same time.

  8. Implementation schemes for unsharp measurements with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sujit K.; Konrad, T.; Uys, H.

    2013-01-01

    Unsharp positive operator-valued measurements allow a variety of measurement applications which minimally disrupt the state of the quantum system. Experimental schemes are proposed for implementing unsharp measurements on the qubit levels of a trapped ion. The schemes rely on introducing weak entanglement between the state of a target ion and that of an auxiliary ion, using standard ion-trap quantum logic operations, and then realizing an unsharp measurement through projective measurement on the auxiliary atom. We analyze common sources of error and their effect on different applications of unsharp measurements.

  9. Recent developments and proposed schemes for trapped ion frequency standards. [trapped mercury ions for microwave and optical frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.

    1982-01-01

    Ion traps are exciting candidates as future precision frequency sources. Recent developments demonstrate that mercury ion frequency standards are capable of a stability performance comparable to commercial cesium standards. There is, however, considerable room for improvement with regard to the signal to noise problem. The 40 GHz microwave frequency implies that a careful design should be implemented to ensure the elimination of the unwanted side bands in the microwave pump signal. A long life, high performance light source to be used in a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be developed and the long term performance of a trapped mercury ion microwave standard must be investigated. While newly proposed two photon pumping schemes in conjuction with mercury ions promise exciting developments for both microwave and optical frequency standards, other ions that may be potential candidates should be evaluated for their usefulness.

  10. Experimental demonstration of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Mark; Allen, Curtis; Green, Dylan; Farr, Andrew; Burke, Timothy; Hilleke, Russell; Clark, Robert

    2015-08-01

    We report on the design and experimental characterization of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap. Individual microscopic sugar particles are confined in the trap. The trajectories of driven particle motion are compared with a theoretical model, both to verify qualitative predictions of the model and to measure the charge-to-mass ratio of the confined particle. The generation of harmonics of the driving frequency is observed as a key signature of the nonlinear nature of the trap. We remark on possible applications of our traps, including to mass spectrometry.

  11. Deep optical trap for cold alkaline-Earth atoms.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luciano S; Sereno, Milena; Cruz, Flavio C

    2008-03-01

    We describe a setup for a deep optical dipole trap or lattice designed for holding atoms at temperatures of a few mK, such as alkaline-Earth atoms which have undergone only regular Doppler cooling. We use an external optical cavity to amplify 3.2 W from a commercial single-frequency laser at 532 nm to 523 W. Powers of a few kW, attainable with low-loss optics or higher input powers, allow larger trap volumes for improved atom transfer from magneto-optical traps. We analyze possibilities for cooling inside the deep trap, the induced Stark shifts for calcium, and a cancellation scheme for the intercombination clock transition using an auxiliary laser. PMID:18542375

  12. Temperature and heating rate of ion crystals in Penning traps

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Marie J.; Hasegawa, Taro; Bollinger, John J.

    2004-09-01

    We have determined the temperature and heating rate of laser-cooled ions in a Penning trap using Doppler laser spectroscopy. Between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} {sup 9}Be{sup +} ions are trapped in a Penning trap and Doppler laser cooled to temperatures of a few millikelvin, where they form ion crystals. This system is an example of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. The ion temperature was measured as a function of time after turning off the laser-cooling. In the solid phase, we measured a heating rate of {approx}65 mK/s. Information about possible heating mechanisms was obtained directly from temperature measurements, and also from measurements of the rate of radial expansion of the ion plasma. We determined that the observed heating is due to collisions with the {approx}4x10{sup -9} Pa residual gas of our vacuum system.

  13. Is the Penning Ion Trap Suitable for Quantum Computation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, J. J.; Kriesel, J. M.; Itano, W. M.; Mitchell, T. B.

    2001-10-01

    There is a great deal of interest in finding a physical system which can perform computations through quantum unitary operations and be scaled to large numbers of qubits. rf ion traps have been used in pioneering experiments on a few qubits. The Penning ion trap has some potential advantages compared to the rf trap. In rf traps, heating and decoherence rates of ion motional states have been observed to scale inversely with the size of the electrodes. Penning traps can have large electrodes while still retaining the large (5-10 MHz) motional frequencies required for quantum logic operations. This is because large static fields are more easily generated than large amplitude rf fields. Addressing of individual ions in the Penning trap is complicated by the plasma rotation, but should be possible with crystallized, planar plasmas controlled by a combination of rotating fields (a ``hard disk" geometry). We will discuss the pros and cons as well as some initial experiments to investigate the suitability of the Penning trap for quantum computation.

  14. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  15. Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Leibrandt, David R.; Clark, Robert J.; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Antohi, Paul; Bakr, Waseem; Brown, Kenneth R.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2007-11-15

    We demonstrate loading of {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ions by laser ablation into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 4 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Additionally, laser ablation is used to load traps with a trap depth (40 meV) below where electron impact ionization loading is typically successful (> or approx. 500 meV)

  16. Towards Non-Equilibrium Dynamics with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbert, Ariel; Jubin, Sierra; Doret, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Atomic systems are superbly suited to the study of non-equilibrium dynamics. These systems' exquisite isolation from environmental perturbations leads to long relaxation times that enable exploration of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. One example of particular relevance to experiments in trapped ion quantum information processing, metrology, and precision spectroscopy is the approach to thermal equilibrium of sympathetically cooled linear ion chains. Suitable manipulation of experimental parameters permits exploration of the quantum-to-classical crossover between ballistic transport and diffusive, Fourier's Law conduction, a topic of interest not only to the trapped ion community but also for the development of microelectronic devices and other nanoscale structures. We present progress towards trapping chains of multiple co-trapped calcium isotopes geared towards measuring thermal equilibration and discuss plans for future experiments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This work is supported by Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and by Williams College.

  17. Photoelectron-photofragment coincidence spectroscopy in a cryogenically cooled linear electrostatic ion beam trap

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Shen, Ben B.; Poad, Berwyck L. J.; Continetti, Robert E.

    2011-10-15

    A cryogenically cooled linear electrostatic ion beam trap for use in photoelectron-photofragment coincidence (PPC) spectroscopy is described. Using this instrument, anions created in cold, low-duty-cycle sources can be stored for many seconds in a {approx}20 K environment to cool radiatively, removing energetic uncertainties due to vibrationally excited precursor anions. This apparatus maintains a well-collimated beam necessary for high-resolution fragment imaging and the high experimental duty cycle needed for coincidence experiments. Ion oscillation is bunched and phase-locked to a modelocked laser, ensuring temporal overlap between ion bunches and laser pulses and that ions are intersected by the laser only when travelling in one direction. An electron detector is housed in the field-free center of the trap, allowing PPC experiments to be carried out on ions while they are stored and permitting efficient detection of 3-dimensional electron and neutral recoil trajectories. The effects of trapping parameters on the center-of-mass trajectories in the laser-ion interaction region are explored to optimize neutral particle resolution, and the impact of bunching on ion oscillation is established. Finally, an initial demonstration of radiative cooling is presented.

  18. Mountain cold-trapping increases transfer of persistent organic pollutants from atmosphere to cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Wania, Frank; MacLeod, Matthew; Lei, Ying Duan; Quinn, Cristina L; Zhang, Xianming; Scheringer, Martin; Wegmann, Fabio; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Ivemeyer, Silvia; Heil, Fritz; Klocke, Peter; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Alaee, Mehran

    2013-08-20

    Concentrations of long-lived organic contaminants in snow, soil, lake water, and vegetation have been observed to increase with altitude along mountain slopes. Such enrichment, called "mountain cold-trapping", is attributed to a transition from the atmospheric gas phase to particles, rain droplets, snowflakes, and Earth's surface at the lower temperatures prevailing at higher elevations. Milk sampled repeatedly from cows that had grazed at three different altitudes in Switzerland during one summer was analyzed for a range of persistent organic pollutants. Mountain cold-trapping significantly increased air-to-milk transfer factors of most analytes. As a result, the milk of cows grazing at higher altitudes was more contaminated with substances that have regionally uniform air concentrations (hexachlorobenzene, α-hexachlorocyclohexane, endosulfan sulfate). For substances that have sources, and therefore higher air concentrations, at lower altitudes (polychlorinated biphenyls, γ-hexachlorocyclohexane), alpine milk has lower concentrations, but not as low as would be expected without mountain cold-trapping. Differences in the elevational gradients in soil concentrations and air-to-milk transfer factors highlight that cold-trapping of POPs in pastures is mostly due to increased gas-phase deposition as a result of lower temperatures causing higher uptake capacity of plant foliage, whereas cold-trapping in soils more strongly depends on wet and dry particle deposition. Climatic influences on air-to-milk transfer of POPs needs to be accounted for when using contamination of milk lipids to infer contamination of the atmosphere. PMID:23885857

  19. Magnetic levitation for effective loading of cold cesium atoms in a crossed dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuqing; Feng, Guosheng; Xu, Rundong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Jizhou; Chen, Gang; Dai, Xingcan; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2015-05-01

    We report a detailed study of effective magnetically levitated loading of cold atoms in a crossed dipole trap: an appropriate magnetic field gradient precisely compensates for the destructive gravitational force of the atoms and an additional bias field simultaneously eliminates the antitrapping potential induced by the magnetic field gradient. The magnetic levitation is required for a large-volume crossed dipole trap to form a shallow but very effective loading potential, making it a promising method for loading and trapping more cold atoms. For cold cesium atoms in the F =3 , m F =3 state prepared by three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling, a large number of atoms ˜3.2 ×106 have been loaded into a large-volume crossed dipole trap with the help of the magnetic levitation technique. The dependence of the number of atoms loaded and trapped in the dipole trap on the magnetic field gradient and bias field, respectively, is in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. The optimum magnetic field gradient of 31.13 G/cm matches the theoretical value of 31.3 G/cm well. This method can be used to obtain more cold atoms or a large number of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms for many atomic species in high-field seeking states.

  20. Toward Quantum Simulation with 9Be+ Ions in a Penning Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joe; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael; Bollinger, John

    2011-05-01

    Experimental progress in the fields of atomic and molecular physics has allowed exquisite control over ensembles of cold and ultracold ions, neutral atoms, and polar molecules. A number of theoretical proposals have been put forward concerning direct simulation of quantum Hamiltonians in these systems. We report progress toward simulation of the transverse Ising model in a two-dimensional Coulomb crystal of ~100 9Be+ ions confined within a Penning trap. Coupling between ions is controlled via optical dipole forces, thereby facilitating a wide range of interparticle interactions including infinite-range and nearest-neighbor coupling. Furthermore, the triangular lattice structure readily obtained within the planar Coulomb crystal allows for simulation of spin frustration in an antiferromagnetic system. Given our large ensembles of trapped 9Be+, it may be possible to perform quantum simulations that are currently intractable with classical computers. We acknowledge funding support from the DARPA OLE program.

  1. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  2. Trapped-ion antennae for the transmission of quantum information.

    PubMed

    Harlander, M; Lechner, R; Brownnutt, M; Blatt, R; Hänsel, W

    2011-03-10

    More than 100 years ago, Hertz succeeded in transmitting signals over a few metres to a receiving antenna using an electromagnetic oscillator, thus proving the electromagnetic theory developed by Maxwell. Since this seminal work, technology has developed, and various oscillators are now available at the quantum mechanical level. For quantized electromagnetic oscillations, atoms in cavities can be used to couple electric fields. However, a quantum mechanical link between two mechanical oscillators (such as cantilevers or the vibrational modes of trapped atoms or ions) has been rarely demonstrated and has been achieved only indirectly. Examples include the mechanical transport of atoms carrying quantum information or the use of spontaneously emitted photons. Here we achieve direct coupling between the motional dipoles of separately trapped ions over a distance of 54 micrometres, using the dipole-dipole interaction as a quantum mechanical transmission line. This interaction is small between single trapped ions, but the coupling is amplified by using additional trapped ions as antennae. With three ions in each well, the interaction is increased by a factor of seven compared to the single-ion case. This enhancement facilitates bridging of larger distances and relaxes the constraints on the miniaturization of trap electrodes. The system provides a building block for quantum computers and opportunities for coupling different types of quantum systems. PMID:21346764

  3. A Linear RFQ Ion Trap for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Flatt, B.; Green, M.; Wodin, J.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Gratta, G.; LePort, F.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Pocar, A.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank Jr., W.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Hauger, M.; Hodgson, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U.

    2008-01-14

    The design, construction, and performance of a linear radio-frequency ion trap (RFQ) intended for use in the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) are described. EXO aims to detect the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe to {sup 136}Ba. To suppress possible backgrounds EXO will complement the measurement of decay energy and, to some extent, topology of candidate events in a Xe filled detector with the identification of the daughter nucleus ({sup 136}Ba). The ion trap described here is capable of accepting, cooling, and confining individual Ba ions extracted from the site of the candidate double-beta decay event. A single trapped ion can then be identified, with a large signal-to-noise ratio, via laser spectroscopy.

  4. Tritium removal from NaK-cold traps; First results on hydride precipitation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, J.; Kirchner, R.; Pfeff, M.; Rackel, D. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses tritium removal from a self-cooled Pb-17Li blanket of a fusion reactor, permeation into an intermediate NaK loop and precipitation of the tritide in a cold trap. First experiments on the kinetics of hydride precipitation showed that low supersaturation concentrations are obtained at low concentration ranges, these values are obtained after a very short cold trap loading period. Both results meet essential requirements for fusion blanket cold traps. Theoretical work has shown that two-dimensional calculations (including buoyancy effects) of the temperature, velocity and concentration distributions result in precipitation distributions which differ significantly form these obtained with 1d-models currently used to develop mass transfer relationships.

  5. A model of optical trapping cold atoms using a metallic nano wire with surface plasmon effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Phuong Lan, Nguyen; Thi Nga, Do; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we construct a new model of optical trapping cold atoms with a metallic nano wire by using surface plasmon effect generated by strong field of laser beams. Using the skin effect, we send a strong oscillated electromagnetic filed through the surface of a metallic nano wire. The local field generated by evanescent effect creates an effective attractive potential near the surface of metallic nano wires. The consideration of some possible boundary and frequency conditions might lead to non-trivial bound state solution for a cold atom. We discus also the case of the laser reflection optical trap with shell-core design, and compare our model with another recent schemes of cold atom optical traps using optical fibers and carbon nanotubes.

  6. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    de Clercq, Ludwig E; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2016-02-26

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity. PMID:26967401

  7. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E.; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity.

  8. Global gyrokinetic simulations of trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Sarrat, M.; Collard, M.; Bertrand, P.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a reduced kinetic model, which describes simultaneously trapped-ion (TIM) and trapped-electron (TEM) driven modes. Interestingly, the model enables the study of a full f problem for ion and electron trapped particles at very low numerical cost. The linear growth rate obtained with the full f nonlinear code Trapped Element REduction in Semi Lagrangian Approach is successfully compared with analytical predictions. Moreover, nonlinear results show some basic properties of collisionless TEM and TIM turbulence in tokamaks. A competition between streamer-like structures and zonal flows is observed for TEM and TIM turbulence. Zonal flows are shown to play an important role in suppressing the nonlinear transport and strongly depend on the temperature ratio Te/Ti .

  9. Nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with trapped particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, O.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized four-component dusty plasma containing electrons and negative ions obeying vortex-like (trapped) velocity distribution, cold mobile positive ions and arbitrarily charged stationary dust has been theoretically investigated. The properties of small but finite amplitude DIASWs are studied by employing the reductive perturbation technique. It has been found that owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron and Maxwellian negative ion distribution to a vortex-like one, the dynamics of such DIASWs is governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation which admits SW solution under certain conditions. The basic properties (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of such DIASWs are found to be significantly modified by the presence of trapped electron and trapped negative ions. The implications of our results to space and laboratory dusty electronegative plasmas (DENPs) are briefly discussed.

  10. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  12. The magnetic trapping mode of an electron beam ion trap: New opportunities for highly charged ion research

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Schweikhard, L.; Lopez-Urrutia, J.C.; Widmann, K.

    1996-11-01

    Using x-ray spectroscopic techniques, we have investigated the properties of an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) after the electron beam is switched off. In the absence of the electron beam, bare, and hydrogenlike Kr{sup 35+} and Kr{sup 36+} ions remain trapped due to externally applied magnetic and electric fields for at least 5 s; xenon ions with an open {ital L} shell, i.e., Xe{sup 45+}{endash}Xe{sup 52+}, remain trapped at least as long as 20 s. The ion storage time in this {open_quote}{open_quote}magnetic trapping mode{close_quote}{close_quote} depends on the pressure of background atoms as well as on the value of the externally applied trapping potential, and even longer ion storage times appear possible. The magnetic trapping mode enables a variety of new opportunities for atomic physics research involving highly charged ions, which include the study of charge transfer reactions, Doppler-shift-free measurements of the Lamb shift, measurements of radiative lifetimes of long-lived metastable levels, or ion-ion collision studies, by x-ray or laser spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Because the trap is filled {ital in} {ital situ} during the electron trapping phase, transfer losses associated with filling the trap from an external source are avoided. We present spectra of the {ital K}-shell emission from heliumlike and hydrogenlike Kr{sup 34+} and Kr{sup 35+} as well as Xe{sup 52+} and Xe{sup 53+} that are produced by charge transfer reactions in collisions between ions and neutral atoms. Marked differences with {ital K}-shell spectra produced by electron-impact excitation are evident. We use the measurements to infer the Lamb shift contribution to the energy of the 1{ital s}{sub 1/2}{endash}2{ital p}{sub 3/2} transition in hydrogenlike Xe{sup 53+} and determine it to be 31276(12) eV. The measurement technique can be applied to any ion produced in an EBIT so that Doppler-shift-free Lamb shift measurements of hydrogenlike U{sup 91+} are within reach.

  13. T-junction ion trap array for two-dimensional ion shuttling, storage, and manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hensinger, W.K.; Olmschenk, S.; Stick, D.; Hucul, D.; Yeo, M.; Acton, M.; Deslauriers, L.; Monroe, C.; Rabchuk, J.

    2006-01-16

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional 11-zone ion trap array, where individual laser-cooled atomic ions are stored, separated, shuttled, and swapped. The trap geometry consists of two linear rf-ion trap sections that are joined at a 90 deg. angle to form a T-shaped structure. We shuttle a single ion around the corners of the T-junction and swap the positions of two crystallized ions using voltage sequences designed to accommodate the nontrivial electrical potential near the junction. Full two-dimensional control of multiple ions demonstrated in this system may be crucial for the realization of scalable ion trap quantum computation and the implementation of quantum networks.

  14. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations. PMID:25971536

  15. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  16. Investigation of nonextensivity trapped electrons effect on the solitary ion-acoustic wave using fractional Schamel equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari-Golshan, A.

    2016-08-01

    Ion-acoustic (IA) solitary wave propagation is investigated by solving the fractional Schamel equation (FSE) in a homogenous system of unmagnetized plasma. This plasma consists of the nonextensive trapped electrons and cold fluid ions. The effects of the nonextensive q-parameter, electron trapping, and fractional parameter have been studied. The FSE is derived by using the semi-inverse and Agrawal's methods. The analytical results show that an increase in the amount of electron trapping and nonextensive q-parameter increases the soliton ion-acoustic amplitude in agreement with the previously obtained results. However, it is vice-versa for the fractional parameter. This feature leads to the fact that the fractional parameter may be used to increase the IA soliton amplitude instead of increasing electron trapping and nonextensive parameters.

  17. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-05-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  18. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27150507

  19. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  20. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei-Feng; Ma, Song-She

    2008-02-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system. The scheme only requires a single laser beam. It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons, e.g. a thermal motion. Furthermore, it works in the regime, where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency. Thus, the teleportation speed is greatly increased, which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect. This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  1. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  2. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  3. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  4. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, K.; Okhapkin, M. V.; Herrera-Sancho, O. A.; Peik, E.

    2012-06-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 105 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10-7 to 10-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  5. Towards ultra-cold Bose-Fermi mixtures in a micro-magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.

    2005-05-01

    We present progress on producing quantum degenerate fermionic potassium (^40K) and bosonic rubidium (^87Rb) gases in a micro-magnetic chip trap. The two atomic species are cooled and trapped simultaneously in a vapor loaded magneto-optical trap (MOT). The cold two-species atomic cloud is transported in a quadrupole magnetic trap to the surface of a chip, where it is loaded into a micro-magnetic trap. In optimizing the loading process, we developed an optical probe with high signal-to-noise for mapping out the minima of the micro-magnetic field by creating a 1D MOT at the surface of the chip. We have seen evidence of RF evaporation and are working towards quantum degeneracy. This approach to degeneracy requires only a single chamber, because the rapid evaporative cooling due to the tight confinement of the chip trap relaxes the stringent vacuum requirements of a traditional magnetic trap. In describing our experimental approach, we address the experimental challenges related to microtrapping fermions and future studies of cold Fermi gases. Work supported by NSERC, CFI, PRO, and OIT.

  6. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  7. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  8. Laser-based studies with an ion-trap mass spectrometer: Ion tomography and analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. L.; Cisper, M. E.; Hemberger, P. H.; Nogar, N. S.; Williams, J. D.; Syka, J. E. P.

    The iron trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is an ion storage device which consists of two hyperbolic endcaps and a hyperbolic ring electrode. This forms a trapping cavity having a volume of several cm(sup 3). An RF potential applied to the ring electrode produces a time-varying potential which can be used to trap and/or manipulate ions under controlled conditions. This device has been used in ion trapping studies for a number of years. More recently, a commercial version has been produced and sold which allows for mass-selective ejection of trapped ions, with subsequent detection by an electron multiplier. In this mode, it operates as a compact, high efficiency, high resolution mass spectrometer. The instrument has found applications in GC/MS, in tandem mass spectroscopy and in portable mass spectral analysis. In this manuscript, we present a survey of recent results incorporating laser desorption, ionization, or photodissociation with ITMS. In one instance, we describe the use of laser photodissociation to map the spatial distribution of trapped ions in the ITMS. In this tomographic study, we have parameterized the effects of trapping potential, buffer gas pressure, supplementary RF-potential, and laser intensity. In separate studies, laser desorption was used to generate gas phase ions in the ITMS from a solid probe, by irradiation of both neat and matrix-dissolved samples. The latter experiment produced both high molecular weight ions and significant numbers of negative ions.

  9. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  10. Incomplete optical shielding in cold sodium atom traps

    SciTech Connect

    Yurovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1997-01-05

    A simple two-channel model, based on the semiclassical Landau-Zener (LZ) approximation, with averaging over angle-dependent exponents, is proposed as a fast means for accounting for the incomplete optical shielding of collisions, as observed in recent experiments conducted by Weiner and co-workers on ultracold sodium-atom traps, and its dependence on the laser polarization. The model yields a reasonably good agreement with the recent quantum close-coupling calculations of Julienne and co-workers. The remaining discrepancy between both theories and the data is qualitatively attributed to a partial overlap of the collision ranges at which loss processes and optical shielding occur.

  11. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    PubMed

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  12. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  13. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  14. Selection of Environmentally Friendly Solvents for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Secondary Oxygen Pack Cold Trap Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Chullen, Cinda; Morenz, Jesse; Stephenson, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Freon-113(TradeMark) has been used as a chemistry lab sampling solvent at NASA/JSC for EMU (extravehicular Mobility Unit) SOP (Secondary Oxygen Pack) oxygen testing Cold Traps utilized at the USA (United Space Alliance) Houston facility. Similar testing has occurred at the HSWL (Hamilton Sundstrand Windsor Locks) facility. A NASA Executive Order bans the procurement of all ODS (ozone depleting substances), including Freon-113 by the end of 2009. In order to comply with NASA direction, HSWL began evaluating viable solvents to replace Freon-113 . The study and testing effort to find Freon-113 replacements used for Cold Trap sampling is the subject of this paper. Test results have shown HFE-7100 (a 3M fluorinated ether) to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to remove and measure the non-volatile residue collected in a Cold Trap during oxygen testing. Furthermore, S-316 (a Horiba Instruments Inc. high molecular weight, non-ODS chlorofluorocarbon) was found to be an adequate replacement for Freon-113 as a solvent to reconstitute non-volatile residue removed from a Cold Trap during oxygen testing for subsequent HC (hydrocarbon) analysis via FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy).

  15. Development and Analysis of Cold Trap for Use in Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. M.; Dervan, C. A.; Pearson, J. B.; Godfroy, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    The design and analysis of a cold trap proposed for use in the purification of circulated eutectic sodium potassium (NaK-78) loops is presented. The cold trap is designed to be incorporated into the Fission Surface Power-Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC), which incorporates a pumped NaK loop to simulate in-space nuclear reactor-based technology using non-nuclear test methodology as developed by the Early Flight Fission-Test Facility. The FSP-PTC provides a test circuit for the development of fission surface power technology. This system operates at temperatures that would be similar to those found in a reactor (500-800 K). By dropping the operating temperature of a specified percentage of NaK flow through a bypass containing a forced circulation cold trap, the NaK purity level can be increased by precipitating oxides from the NaK and capturing them within the cold trap. This would prevent recirculation of these oxides back through the system, which may help prevent corrosion.

  16. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Zhang, Xing; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Karnesky, William E.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolationmore » and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.« less

  17. A System for Trapping Barium Ions in a Microfabricated Surface Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zichao; Wright, John; Graham, Richard; Sakrejda, Tomasz; Chen, Bing; Blinov, Boris; Musiqc Team

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing and development of microfabricated surface traps. Barium ions have been successfully cooled and trapped in this system. The dark lifetime of a single 138Ba + in this trap is up to 30s. And we can shuttle of ions at rate of 8 cm/s between different potential zones. Our system uses a modular design and is based on an in-vacuum PCB with integrated filters. Control of up to 96 DC electrodes is achieved with an update rate of 20 kHz using a custom FPGA based control system. Collection of fluorescence light over a numerical aperture of 0.28 has been achieved. This work is supported by IAPRA.

  18. Photoionizing Trapped Highly Charged Ions with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo, J R; Simon, M; Beilmann, C; Rudolph, J; Steinbruegge, R; Eberle, S; Schwarz, M; Baumann, T; Schmitt, B; Brunner, F; Ginzel, R; Klawitter, R; Kubicek, K; Epp, S; Mokler, P; Maeckel, V; Ullrich, J; Brown, G V; Graf, A; Leutenegger, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Behar, E; Follath, R; Reichardt, G; Schwarzkopf, O

    2011-09-12

    Photoabsorption by highly charged ions plays an essential role in astrophysical plasmas. Diagnostics of photoionized plasmas surrounding binary systems rely heavily on precise identification of absorption lines and on the knowledge of their cross sections and widths. Novel experiments using an electron beam ion trap, FLASH EBIT, in combination with monochromatic synchrotron radiation allow us to investigate ions in charge states hitherto out of reach. Trapped ions can be prepared in any charge state at target densities sufficient to measure absorption cross sections below 0.1 Mb. The results benchmark state-of-the-art predictions of the transitions wavelengths, widths, and absolute cross sections. Recent high resolution results on Fe{sup 14+}, Fe{sup 15+}, and Ar{sup 12+} at photon energies up to 1 keV are presented.

  19. Diviner lunar radiometer observations of cold traps in the moon's south polar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paige, D.A.; Siegler, M.A.; Zhang, J.A.; Hayne, P.O.; Foote, E.J.; Bennett, K.A.; Vasavada, A.R.; Greenhagen, B.T.; Schofield, J.T.; McCleese, D.J.; Foote, M.C.; DeJong, E.; Bills, B.G.; Hartford, W.; Murray, B.C.; Allen, C.C.; Snook, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Calcutt, S.; Taylor, F.W.; Bowles, N.E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Elphic, R.; Ghent, R.; Glotch, T.D.; Wyatt, M.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    2010-01-01

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies.

  20. Diviner Lunar Radiometer observations of cold traps in the Moon's south polar region.

    PubMed

    Paige, David A; Siegler, Matthew A; Zhang, Jo Ann; Hayne, Paul O; Foote, Emily J; Bennett, Kristen A; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Schofield, John T; McCleese, Daniel J; Foote, Marc C; DeJong, Eric; Bills, Bruce G; Hartford, Wayne; Murray, Bruce C; Allen, Carlton C; Snook, Kelly; Soderblom, Laurence A; Calcutt, Simon; Taylor, Fredric W; Bowles, Neil E; Bandfield, Joshua L; Elphic, Richard; Ghent, Rebecca; Glotch, Timothy D; Wyatt, Michael B; Lucey, Paul G

    2010-10-22

    Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment surface-temperature maps reveal the existence of widespread surface and near-surface cryogenic regions that extend beyond the boundaries of persistent shadow. The Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) struck one of the coldest of these regions, where subsurface temperatures are estimated to be 38 kelvin. Large areas of the lunar polar regions are currently cold enough to cold-trap water ice as well as a range of both more volatile and less volatile species. The diverse mixture of water and high-volatility compounds detected in the LCROSS ejecta plume is strong evidence for the impact delivery and cold-trapping of volatiles derived from primitive outer solar system bodies. PMID:20966246

  1. Characterization of protonated phospholipids as fragile ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Merves, Matthew; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Some ions exhibit “ion fragility” in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT-MS) during mass analysis with resonance ejection. In many cases, different ions generated from the same compound exhibit different degrees of ion fragility, with some ions (e.g., the [M+H]+ ion) stable and other ions (e.g., the [M+Na]+ ion) fragile. The ion fragility for quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry (MS) for protonated and sodiated ions of three phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PC (16:0/16:0), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophoethanolamine, PE (16:0/16:0), and N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine, SM (d18:1/16:0), was determined using three previously developed experiments: 1) the peak width using a slow scan speed, 2) the width of the isolation window for efficient isolation, and 3) the energy required for collision-induced dissociation. In addition, ion fragility studies were designed and performed to explore a correlation between ion fragility in QIT mass analysis and ion fragility during transport between the ion source and the ion trap. These experiments were: 1) evaluating the amount of thermal-induced dissociation as a function of heated capillary temperature, and 2) determining the extent of fragmentation occurring with increasing tube lens voltage. All phospholipid species studied exhibited greater ion fragility as protonated species in ion trap mass analysis than as sodiated species. In addition, the protonated species of both SM (d18:0/16:0) and PC (16:0/16:0) exhibited greater tendencies to fragment at higher heated capillary temperatures and high tube lens voltages, whereas the PE (16:0/16:0) ions did not appear to exhibit fragility during ion transport. PMID:22247650

  2. Field-free junctions for surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Robert; Schmied, R.; Blain, M. G.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D.

    2015-05-01

    Intersections between transport guides in a network of RF ion traps are a key ingredient to many implementations of scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Several junction architectures demonstrated so far are limited by varying radial secular frequencies, a reduced trap depth, or a non-vanishing RF field along the transport channel. We report on the design and progress in implementing a configurable microfabricated surface electrode Y-junction that employs switchable RF electrodes. An essentially RF-field-free pseudopotential guide between any two legs of the junction can be established by applying RF potential to a suitable pair of electrodes. The transport channel's height above the electrodes, its depth and radial curvature are constant to within 15%. Supported by IARPA, Sandia, NSA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  3. Dual-Ion-Trap Frequency Standards With Overlapping Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Prestage, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed scheme for enhancing performances of atomic frequency-standard apparatuses calls for two or more ion traps per apparatus interrogated in alternation by radio-frequency pulses. Provides nearly constant feedback gain, thereby providing nearly constant corrections for fluctuations in frequency of local oscillator. Degradation of performance by fluctuations in local oscillators reduced.

  4. Bidirectional Quantum Secure Direct Communication in Trapped Ion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yeqin; Gao, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    We propose a feasible scheme for implementing quantum secure direct communication in trapped ion systems. According to the results measured by the sender, the receiver can obtain different secret messages in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to both the initial vibrational state and heating. The probability of the success in our scheme is 1.0.

  5. Quantum Communication in the Ion-Trapped System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiong

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical scheme of quantum communication is proposed in the context of ion-trapped systems. According to the results, the receiver can obtain different secret messages in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to both the initial vibrational state and heating. The probability of the success in our scheme is 1.0.

  6. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  7. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theories in Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  8. Electron Cooling of Ions and Antiprotons in Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicknagel, Guenter

    2006-03-20

    For a theoretical description of electron cooling of ions or antiprotons in traps we have investigated the energy loss and cooling force in a strongly magnetized electron plasma employing both perturbation approaches and more complete numerical simulations. Some characteristic features for cooling under conditions prevailing in Penning traps are presented. One particular feature is, that the energy loss in strongly magnetized electrons, which tend to move along the field lines like beads on a wire, strongly depends on the sign of the interaction. The energy loss can be significantly larger for antiprotons than for protons. Special attention is paid to the cooling of highly charged ions, here bare Uranium, in HITRAP. The time evolution of the energy distribution of the trapped ions is studied within a simplified model which takes into account the related heating of the electrons. The feedback of this heating on the energy loss results in an intricate dependency of the cooling times on the density of the electrons and the ratio of the number of ions to the number of electrons in the trap. From this analysis we find that cooling times less than about a second are feasible for electron cooling of bare Uranium in HITRAP.

  9. Criteria for ultrastable operation of the trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    The leading systematic perturbations to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) mercury trapped ion frequency standard are characterized under present operating conditions. Sensitivity of the standard to environmental variations is measured, and the required regulation of key components to obtain a stability of 10(exp -16) is identified.

  10. Quantum energy teleportation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy-transfer channel without heat generation.